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Sample records for coal liquefaction model

  1. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. (ed.)

    1991-01-01

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  2. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    Research continues on coal liquefaction in the following areas: (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  3. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. (ed.)

    1991-01-01

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  4. Coal liquefaction processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, N.R.; Blazek, C.F.; Tison, R.R.

    1979-07-01

    Coal liquefaction is an emerging technology receiving great attention as a possible liquid fuel source. Currently, four general methods of converting coal to liquid fuel are under active development: direct hydrogenation; pyrolysis/hydrocarbonization; solvent extraction; and indirect liquefaction. This work is being conducted at the pilot plant stage, usually with a coal feed rate of several tons per day. Several conceptual design studies have been published recently for large (measured in tens of thousands of tons per day coal feed rate) commercial liquefaction plants, and these reports form the data base for this evaluation. Products from a liquefaction facility depend on the particular method and plant design selected, and these products range from synthetic crude oils up through the lighter hydrocarbon gases, and, in some cases, electricity. Various processes are evaluated with respect to product compositions, thermal efficiency, environmental effects, operating and maintenance requirements, and cost. Because of the large plant capacities of current conceptual designs, it is not clear as to how, and on what scale, coal liquefaction may be considered appropriate as an energy source for Integrated Community Energy Systems (CES). Development work, both currently under way and planned for the future, should help to clarify and quantify the question of applicability.

  5. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P.; Sendlein, L.V.A. (eds.)

    1991-05-28

    Significant progress was made in the May 1990--May 1991 contract period in three primary coal liquefaction research areas: catalysis, structure-reactivity studies, and novel liquefaction processes. A brief summary of the accomplishments in the past year in each of these areas is given.

  6. Steam pretreatment for coal liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanenko, Olga

    The objectives of this work are to test the application of steam pretreatment to direct coal liquefaction, to investigate the reaction of model compounds with water, and to explore the use of zeolites in these processes. Previous work demonstrated the effectiveness of steam pretreatment in a subsequent flash pyrolysis. Apparently, subcritical steam ruptures nearly all of the ether cross links, leaving a partially depolymerized structure. It was postulated that very rapid heating of the pretreated coal to liquefaction conditions would be required to preserve the effects of such treatment. Accordingly, a method was adopted in which coal slurry is injected into a hot autoclave containing solvent. Since oxygen is capable of destroying the pretreatment effect, precautions were taken for its rigorous exclusion. Tests were conducted with Illinois No. 6 coal steam treated at 340sp°C, 750 psia for 15 minutes. Both raw and pretreated samples were liquified in deoxygenated tetralin at high severity (400sp°C, 30 min.) and low severity (a: 350sp°C, 30 min., and b: 385sp°C, 15 min.) conditions under 1500 psia hydrogen. Substantial improvement in liquid product quality was obtained and the need for rapid heating and oxygen exclusion demonstrated. Under low severity conditions, the oil yield was more than doubled, going from 12.5 to 29 wt%. Also chemistry of the pretreatment process was studied using aromatic ethers as model compounds. alpha-Benzylnaphthyl ether (alpha-BNE), alpha-naphthylmethyl phenyl (alpha-NMPE), and 9-phenoxyphenanthrene were exposed to steam and inert gas at pretreatment conditions and in some cases to liquid water at 315sp°C. alpha-BNE and alpha-NMPE showed little difference in conversion in inert gas and in steam. Hence, these compounds are poor models for coal in steam pretreatment. Thermally stable 9-phenoxyphenanthrene, however, was completely converted in one hour by liquid water at 315sp°C. At pretreatment conditions mostly rearranged starting

  7. Surfactant-Assisted Coal Liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    Obtaining liquid fuels from coal which are economically competitive with those obtained from petroleum based sources is a significant challenge for the researcher as well as the chemical industry. Presently, the economics of coal liquefaction are not favorable because of relatively intense processing conditions (temperatures of 430 degrees C and pressures of 2200 psig), use of a costly catalyst, and a low quality product slate of relatively high boiling fractions. The economics could be made more favorable by achieving adequate coal conversions at less intense processing conditions and improving the product slate. A study has been carried out to examine the effect of a surfactant in reducing particle agglomeration and improving hydrodynamics in the coal liquefaction reactor to increase coal conversions...

  8. Chemical aspects of coal liquefaction by oxygen in alkaline slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreozzi, R.; Caprio, V.; Insola, A.

    1988-03-01

    Coal liquefaction by oxygen in alkaline slurries is reviewed from the chemical point of view. Available information is considered in the light of questions relating to coal liquefaction. A lack of chemical knowledge in this area is noted, especially on model compounds. 72 refs.

  9. Separation of solids from coal liquefaction products using sonic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slomka, B.J.

    1994-10-01

    Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. This project seeks to improve the effectiveness of coal liquefaction by novel application of sonic and ultrasonic energy to separation of solids from coal liquefaction streams.

  10. Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Robert F.; Miller, Robert N.

    1986-01-01

    A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

  11. Progress in Coal Liquefaction Technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Worldwide primary energy consumption is entering an era of pluralism and high quality under the influence of rapid economic development, increasing energy shortage and strict environmental policies. Although renewable energy technology is developing rapidly, fossil fuels (coal, oil and gas) are still the dominant energy sources in the world. As a country rich in coal but short ofoil and gas, China's oil imports have soared in the past few years. Government, research organizations and enterprises in China are paying more and more attention to the processes of converting coal into clean liquid fuels. Direct and indirect coal liquefaction technologies are compared in this paper based on China's current energy status and technological progress not only in China itself but also in the world.

  12. Cooperative Research Program in coal liquefaction. Technical report, May 1, 1994--October 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: coliquefaction of coal with waste materials; catalysts for coal liquefaction to clean transportation fuels; fundamental research in coal liquefaction; and in situ analytical techniques for coal liquefaction and coal liquefaction catalysts.

  13. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, August 1, 1991--October 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1991-12-31

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  14. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, November 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1992-06-01

    Research continues on coal liquefaction in the following areas: (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  15. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, August 1, 1991--October 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1991-12-31

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  16. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-03-01

    CONSOL R D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  17. Catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, S W

    1981-01-01

    Monolith catalysts of MoO/sub 3/-CoO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were prepared and tested for coal liquefaction in a stirred autoclave. In general, the monolith catalysts were not as good as particulate catalysts prepared on Corning alumina supports. Measurement of O/sub 2/ chemisorption and BET surface area has been made on a series of Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts obtained from PETC. The catalysts were derived from Cyanamid 1442A and had been tested for coal liquefaction in batch autoclaves and continuous flow units. MoO/sub 3/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts over the loading range 3.9 to 14.9 wt % MoO/sub 3/ have been studied with respect to BET surface (before and after reduction), O/sub 2/ chemisorption at -78/sup 0/C, redox behavior at 500/sup 0/C, and activity for cyclohexane dehydrogenation at 500/sup 0/C. In connection with the fate of tin catalysts during coal liquefaction, calculations have been made of the relative thermodynamic stability of SnCl/sub 2/, Sn, SnO/sub 2/, and SnS in the presence of H/sub 2/, HCl, H/sub 2/S and H/sub 2/O. Ferrous sulfate dispersed in methylnaphthalene has been shown to be reduced to ferrous sulfide under typical coal hydroliquefaction conditions (1 hour, 450/sup 0/C, 1000 psi initial p/sub H/sub 2//). This suggests that ferrous sulfide may be the common catalytic ingredient when either (a) ferrous sulfate impregnated on powdered coal, or (b) finely divided iron pyrite is used as the catalyst. Old research on impregnated ferrous sulfate, impregnated ferrous halides, and pyrite is consistent with this assumption. Eight Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts from commercial suppliers, along with SnCl/sub 2/, have been studied for the hydrotreating of 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) in a stirred autoclave at 450 and 500/sup 0/C.

  18. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, May 1, 1993--October 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, G.P. [ed.

    1994-07-01

    This report summarizes progress in four areas of research under the general heading of Coal Liquefaction. Results of studies concerning the coliquefaction of coal with waste organic polymers or chemical products of these polymers were reported. Secondly, studies of catalytic systems for the production of clean transportation fuels from coal were discussed. Thirdly, investigations of the chemical composition of coals and their dehydrogenated counterparts were presented. These studies were directed toward elucidation of coal liquefaction processes on the chemical level. Finally, analytical methodologies developed for in situ monitoring of coal liquefaction were reported. Techniques utilizing model reactions and methods based on XAFS, ESR, and GC/MS are discussed.

  19. The Dual Role of Oxygen Functions in Coal Pretreatment and Liquefaction: Crosslinking and Cleavage Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Serio; Erik Kroo; Sylvie Charpenay; Peter Solomon

    1993-09-30

    The overall objective of this project was to elucidate and model the dual role of oxygen functions in thermal pretreatment and liquefaction of low rank coals through the application of analytical techniques and theoretical models. The project was an integrated study of model polymers representative of coal structures, raw coals of primarily low rank, and selectively modified coals in order to provide specific information relevant to the reactions of real coals. The investigations included liquefaction experiments in microautoclave reactors, along with extensive analysis of intermediate solid, liquid and gaseous products. Attempts were made to incorporate the results of experiments on the different systems into a liquefaction model.

  20. Potential environmental regulations for coal liquefaction facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauzvardis, P.; Gasper, J.; Surles, T.

    1979-12-01

    Although this report deals with potential regulatory constraints only on development of coal liquids, it should be noted that every basic industry in the national economy is constrained by a myriad of state, local, and federal laws, and many of these existing laws may eventually affect coal liquids development. The American Petroleum Institute has prepared a list of the 12 most generally applicable environmental laws; these are summarized. For the present study, the most comprehensive constraining regulations likely to apply to coal liquefaction were chosen from this list. The choices depended in part upon which laws could be complied with by appropriate facility design. Therefore, for this study, the regulations examined were those covering solid and hazardous wastes and emissions of air and water pollutants. It should be noted that there are at present no emission regulations pertaining specifically to coal liquefaction. A survey of such analogous industries was conducted to identify regulations on air and water pollutants and solid waste disposal that might pertain to coal synfuel plants. The Federal New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for air and water pollutants were specified where applicable. Wherever federal standards for a particular emission source or pollutant did not exist but appeared necessary, appropriate standards were specified on the basis of state regulations.Estimates of emission and effluent standards that may be applicable to coal liquefaction facilities are presented. Emission standards are defined for coal driers, boilers, process, and combustion equipment and for Claus sulfur plants. Effluent standards are provided for process, boiler, and miscellaneous waste streams. Sources of solid wastes from coal liquefaction and proposed disposal regulations for hazardous wastes are also described.

  1. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Volume I contains papers presented at the following sessions: AR-Coal Liquefaction; Gas to Liquids; and Direct Liquefaction. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. Mongolian coal liquefaction test; Mongorutan no ekika tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H.; Kubo, H. [Mitsui SRC Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Tsedevsuren, T. [National Research Center of Chemistry and Technology of Coal in Mongoria (Mongolia)

    1996-10-28

    This paper describes the results of liquefaction tests of Mongolian coals using an autoclave and a flow micro reactor. Uvdughudag coal, Hootiinhonhor coal, and Shivee-Ovoo coal were used for liquefaction tests with an autoclave. Oil yields of Uvdughudag and Hootiinhonhor coals were 55.56 wt% and 55.29 wt%, respectively, which were similar to that of Wyoming coal. Similar results were obtained, as to produced gas and water yields. These coals were found to be suitable for coal liquefaction. Lower oil yield, 42.55 wt% was obtained for Shivee-Ovoo coal, which was not suitable for liquefaction. Liquefaction tests were conducted for Uvdughudag coal with a flow micro reactor. The oil yield was 55.7 wt%, which was also similar to that of Wyoming coal, 56.1 wt%. Hydrogen consumption of Uvdughudag coal was also similar to that of Wyoming coal. From these, Uvdughudag coal can be a prospective coal for liquefaction. From the distillation distribution of oil, distillate fraction yield below 350{degree}C of Uvdughudag coal was 50.7 wt%, which was much higher than that of Wyoming coal, 35.6 wt%. Uvdughudag coal is a coal with high light oil fraction yield. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malhotra, R.; McMillen, D.F. (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Burke, F.P.; Winschel, R.A.; Brandes, S.D. (Consolidation Coal Co., Library, PA (United States). Research and Development Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    SRI International evaluated two analytical methods for application to coal liquefaction. These included field ionization mass spectrometry and a technique employing iodotrimethylsilane for the derivatization of oxygen bound to alkyl carbon (alkyl ethers). The full report authored by the SRI researchers is presented here. The following assessment briefly highlights the major findings of the project, and evaluates the potential of the methods for application to coal-derived materials. These results will be incorporated by Consol into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of this contract. (VC)

  4. Characteristics estimation of coal liquefaction residue; Sekitan ekika zansa seijo no suisan ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itonaga, M.; Imada, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Okada, Y.; Inokuchi, K. [Mitsui SRC Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    The paper studied a possibility of estimating characteristics of coal liquefaction residue from liquefaction conditions in the case of fixing coal kind in the NEDOL process coal liquefaction PSU. Wyoming coal was used for the study, and the already proposed simplified liquefaction reaction models were used. Among material balances explained by the models, those of asphaltene, preasphaltene, THF insoluble matters are concerned with residue composition. Ash content is separately calculated from ash balance. Reaction velocity constants of simplified liquefaction reaction models which influence the residue composition were obtained by the multiple regression method from experimental results in the past. The estimation expression of residue viscosity was introduced from residue ash/composition. When the residue composition is estimated by the model from liquefaction conditions, and the residue viscosity is obtained using it, the higher the liquefaction temperature is, the higher the residue viscosity is. The result obtained well agreed the measuring result. The simplified liquefaction model of a certain coal kind has been established, and characteristics of residue can be estimated even at liquefaction conditions which have never been experienced before if there is a certain amount of the accumulated data on residue composition/characteristics. 4 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Robins, W.H. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-07-01

    Under contract from the DOE , and in association with CONSOL Inc., Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated four principal and several complementary techniques for the analysis of non-distillable direct coal liquefaction materials in support of process development. Field desorption mass spectrometry (FDMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods were examined for potential usefulness as techniques to elucidate the chemical structure of residual (nondistillable) direct coal liquefaction derived materials. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry (SFC/MS) were evaluated for effectiveness in compound-class separation and identification of residual materials. Liquid chromatography (including microcolumn) separation techniques, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and GC/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods were applied to supercritical fluid extracts. The full report authored by the PNL researchers is presented here. The following assessment briefly highlights the major findings of the project, and evaluates the potential of the methods for application to coal liquefaction materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of CONSOL's contract.

  6. Proximate and ultimate analysis of coal and products from coal liquefaction and pyrolysis processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, C.; Iacchelli, A.; Selucky, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Procedures are given for analysis of coal, coal liquefaction products, and coal pyrolysis products. Proximate analysis (determination of moisture, ash, volatile matter and fixed carbon) using the Fisher Coal Analyzer Model 490, and ultimate analysis (determination of C, H, N, S, O, and occasionally Cl) using the Perkin-Elmer Elemental Analyzer are described. Determination of calorific value of coal using the oxygen bomb calorimeter is also detailed, as well as procedures for trace element analysis and for removal of halogenated solvents from gravity separation fractions of coal. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chunshan Song; Schobert, H.H.; Parfitt, D.P. [and others

    1997-11-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that dispersed catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on exploring novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction and the effectiveness of temperature-programmed liquefaction using dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research was to explore novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular precursors, that could be used in low concentrations but exhibit relatively high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. We have synthesized and tested various catalyst precursors in liquefaction of subbituminous and bituminous coals and in model compound studies to examine how do the composition and structure of the catalytic precursors affect their effectiveness for coal liquefaction under different reaction conditions, and how do these factors affect their catalytic functions for hydrogenation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, for cleavage of C-C bonds in polycyclic systems such as 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, for hydrogenolysis of C-O bond such as that in dinaphthylether, for hydrodeoxygenation of phenolic compounds and other oxygen-containing compounds such as xanthene, and for hydrodesulfurization of polycyclic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene. The novel bimetallic and monometallic precursors synthesized and tested in this project include various Mo- and Fe-based compounds.

  8. Supercritical Water Liquefaction of Coal and Waste Tires

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prapan KUCHONTHARA; Yukihiko MATSUMURA

    2001-01-01

      Supercritical water liquefaction of scrap tire rubber and Ishikari coal, separately and in mixtures was investigated to study the possible synergetic effects of coliquefaction between the feedstocks...

  9. Japan's Sunshine Project 1988 annual summary of coal liquefaction and gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    Describes work carried out during the year on coal liquefaction and gasification technologies, bituminous and brown coal liquefaction, development of machinery and materials for coal liquefaction plant, coal type selection studies, data collection and processing, utilization and upgrading technology of coal derived products, toxicological and environmental effects of liquefied coal, coal-based hydrogen production technology and technology for entrained flow coal gasification.

  10. Rationale for continuing R&D in indirect coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G. [MITRE Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this analysis is to use the world energy demand/supply model developed at MITRE to examine future liquid fuels supply scenarios both for the world and for the United States. This analysis has determined the probable extent of future oil resource shortages and the likely time frame in which the shortages will occur. The role that coal liquefaction could play in helping to alleviate this liquid fuels shortfall is also examined. The importance of continuing R&D to improve process performance and reduce the costs of coal-derived transportation fuel is quantified in terms of reducing the time when coal liquids will become competitive with petroleum.

  11. EXPLORATORY RESEARCH ON NOVEL COAL LIQUEFACTION CONCEPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.

    1998-11-30

    The report presents a summary the work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-95PC95050. Investigations performed under Task 4--Integrated Flow Sheet Testing are detailed. In this program, a novel direct coal liquefaction technology was investigated by CONSOL Inc. with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and LDP Associates. The process concept explored consists of a first-stage coal dissolution step in which the coal is solubilized by hydride ion donation. In the second stage, the products are catalytically upgraded to refinery feedstocks. Integrated first-stage and solids-separation steps were used to prepare feedstocks for second-stage catalytic upgrading. An engineering and economic evaluation was conducted concurrently with experimental work throughout the program. Approaches to reduce costs for a conceptual commercial plant were recommended at the conclusion of Task 3. These approaches were investigated in Task 4. The economic analysis of the process as it was defined at the conclusion of Task 4, indicates that the production of refined product (gasoline) via this novel direct liquefaction technology is higher than the cost associated with conventional two-stage liquefaction technologies.

  12. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion contractors review conference: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This volume contains 55 papers presented at the conference. They are divided into the following topical sections: Direct liquefaction; Indirect liquefaction; Gas conversion (methane conversion); and Advanced research liquefaction. Papers in this last section deal mostly with coprocessing of coal with petroleum, plastics, and waste tires, and catalyst studies. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, October--December 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-05-01

    Progress on seventeen projects related to coal liquefaction or the upgrading of coal liquids and supported by US DOE is reported with emphasis on funding, brief process description history and current progress. (LTN)

  14. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. FIMS analysis of direct coal liquefaction process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malhotra, R.; McMillen, D.F. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This study was designed to apply the method of field ionization mass spectrometry (FIMS) for the analysis of direct coal liquefaction process-stream samples. The FIMS method was shown to have a high potential for application to direct coal liquefaction-derived samples in a Phase 1 project in this program. In this Phase 3 project, the FIMS method was applied to a set of samples produced in HRI bench-scale liquefaction Runs CC-15 and CC-16. FIMS was used to obtain the molecular weight profile of the samples and to identify specific prominent peaks in the low end (160--420 Da) region of the molecular weight profile. In the samples examined in this study, species were identified which previously were recognized as precursors to the formation of high molecular weight structures associated with the formation of coke in petroleum vacuum gas oils.

  15. Coal liquefaction technology: studies of coal liquefaction, and of product upgrading and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Experimental liquefaction is reported of subbituminous Taiheiyo coal with tetralin solvent and a red mud-sulfur catalyst, at 440 C and 85 kg/cm/sup 2/ initial hydrogen pressure. A study was made of the dependence of production composition and liquids yield on residence time. The results obtained were compared with corresponding results for Miike coal and Yallourn brown coal. Studies were also made of the influence of hydrotreating conditions on the properties of the hydrotreated oil, and of the hydrotreating of Taiheiyo coal SRC liquids. Possible uses for the hydrotreated product are diesel fuel, gas oil, hydrotreated oil with cetane number 45-60, and kerosene. 22 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-08-01

    This is the tenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Process oils from Wilsonville Run 262 were analyzed to provide information on process performance. Run 262 was operated from July 10 through September 30, 1991, in the thermal/catalytic Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) configuration with ash recycle. The feed coal was Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal. The high/low temperature sequence was used. Each reactor was operated at 50% of the available reactor volume. The interstage separator was in use throughout the run. The second-stage reactor was charged with aged Criterion 324 catalyst (Ni/Mo on 1/16 inch alumina extrudate support). Slurry catalysts and sulfiding agent were fed to the first-stage reactor. Molyvan L is an organometallic compound which contains 8.1% Mo, and is commercially available as an oil-soluble lubricant additive. It was used in Run 262 as a dispersed hydrogenation catalyst precursor, primarily to alleviate deposition problems which plagued past runs with Black Thunder coal. One test was made with little supported catalyst in the second stage. The role of phenolic groups in donor solvent properties was examined. In this study, four samples from direct liquefaction process oils were subjected to O-methylation of the phenolic groups, followed by chemical analysis and solvent quality testing.

  17. Health and environmental effects document for direct coal liquefaction - 1981.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Wilson, B.W.; Mahlum, D.D.; Sever, L.E.; Olsen, A.R.

    1982-09-01

    This document presents initial estimates of potential human health effects from inhalation of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) that may be released from a future hypothetical industry producing about 600,000 bb1/day of synthetic fuel by direct liquefaction of coal. The assessment approach starts wth general assumptions that are then refined in a tiered sequence that considers available epidemiological, environmental and chemical data. The uncertainties involved in such an evaluation have been quantified where possible at this early stage of health risk analysis. Many surrogate data bases were considered for application to coal liquefaction including coke oven, British gas retort, roofing tar and asphalts, and cigarette smoke. The coke oven data base was selected for this assessment because the chemical and physical nature of coke oven emissions are judged to more closely approximate potential coal liquefaction emissions. Utilizing the extensive epidemiological data base for coke oven workers as a surrogate model, health effects from release of coal liquefaction NMHC may be quantified. This method results in estimates of about 1 x 10/sup -3/ excess cancer deaths/yr to an industrial work force of 7800 persons and 5 x 10/sup -2/ excess cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole from NMHC that boil above 600/sup 0/F. Sources of uncertainty in the estimates are listed. Using these uncertainties, it is estimated that from 2 x 10/sup -4/ to 5 x 10/sup -3/ lung cancer deaths/yr may occur in the industrial work force and from 1 x 10/sup -2/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -1/ lung cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole. On an individual basis, the excess lifetime risk to occupationally exposed workers is estimated to be 500 times greater than to members of the U.S. public.

  18. Coal liquefaction process with increased naphtha yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Daniel F.

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein the solid carbonaceous material is slurried with a suitable solvent and then subjected to liquefaction at elevated temperature and pressure to produce a normally gaseous product, a normally liquid product and a normally solid product. The normally liquid product is further separated into a naphtha boiling range product, a solvent boiling range product and a vacuum gas-oil boiling range product. At least a portion of the solvent boiling-range product and the vacuum gas-oil boiling range product are then combined and passed to a hydrotreater where the mixture is hydrotreated at relatively severe hydrotreating conditions and the liquid product from the hydrotreater then passed to a catalytic cracker. In the catalytic cracker, the hydrotreater effluent is converted partially to a naphtha boiling range product and to a solvent boiling range product. The naphtha boiling range product is added to the naphtha boiling range product from coal liquefaction to thereby significantly increase the production of naphtha boiling range materials. At least a portion of the solvent boiling range product, on the other hand, is separately hydrogenated and used as solvent for the liquefaction. Use of this material as at least a portion of the solvent significantly reduces the amount of saturated materials in said solvent.

  19. Liquefaction/solubilization processes of Spanish coals by microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laborda, F.; Monistrol, I.F.; Luna, N.; Fernandez, M. [Madrid Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Microbiologia y Parasitologia

    1997-12-31

    Several fundamental aspects of microbial coal liquefaction/solubilization have been studied in this work. The first one is the mechanisms implicated on coal transformation. During coal solubilization, fungal cells produced extracellular peroxidase, esterase and some times phenol oxidase enzymes which appear to be involved in solubilization. Moreover, the analysis of liquefaction/solubilization products was done. In this regard, a reduction on the average size of humic acids derived from lignite was observed, probably due to depolymerization caused by microorganisms. Finally, microorganisms showed a specific adherence to the coal surface, that seems to promote the microbial attack to coal. (orig.)

  20. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, July-September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    The status of coal liquefaction pilot plants supported by US DOE is reviewed under the following headings: company involved, location, contract, funding, process name, process description, flowsheet, history and progress during the July-September 1979 quarter. Supporting projects such as test facilities, refining and upgrading coal liquids, catalyst development, and gasification of residues from coal gasification plants are discussed similarly. (LTN)

  1. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, January--March 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    Current ERDA work in coal liquefaction is aimed at improved process configurations for both catalytic and non-catalytic processes to provide more attractive processing economics and lower capital investment. Coal liquefaction can now be achieved under more moderate processing conditions and more rapidly than was the case in the 1930's. The advantage of coal liquefaction is that the entire range of liquid products, including heavy boiler fuel, distillate fuel oil, gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel oil, can be produced from coal by varying the type of process and operating conditions used in the process. Furthermore, coal-derived liquid fuels also have the potential for use as chemical feedstocks. To determine the most efficient means of utilizing coal resources, ERDA is sponsoring the development of several conversion processes that are currently in the pilot plant stage. Nineteen projects under development are described and progress for each in the quarter is detailed briefly. (LTN)

  2. A CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF COAL LIQUEFACTION PROCESS STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.A. Robbins; S.D. Brandes; D.J. Pazuchanics; D.G. Nichols; R.A. Winschel

    1999-02-01

    This is the Technical Progress Report for the sixteenth quarter of activities under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC93054. It covers the period April 1 through June 30, 1998. Described in this report are the following activities: (1) CONSOL characterized nine process stream samples received from Exxon Recycle Coal Liquefaction Unit (RCLU) operations conducted in 1994 with Rawhide Mine Wyoming subbituminous coal and all-dispersed Fe and Mo catalysts. (2) The University of Delaware subcontract related to resid reactivity was completed with issuance of the Topical Report covering work performed by Delaware. (3) Computational studies of the coal liquefaction resid models developed at the University of Delaware were continued at CONSOL R and D. The two reaction models, consisting of the reaction optimization and reaction once-through programs, were the focus of these studies. The updated resid structure data and results were used in the reaction models to predict percent conversion values that were compared with the experimentally-measured values from the University of Delaware. (4) Small samples of high-sulfur Hondo resid and anthracene oil were shipped to John Verkade of Iowa State University at his request. Verkade is testing a desulfurization method.

  3. U.S. DOE indirect coal liquefaction program: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, J.; Schmetz, E.; Winslow, J.; Tischer, R. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States); Srivastava, R.

    1997-12-31

    Coal is the most abundant domestic energy resource in the United States. The Fossil Energy Organization within the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been supporting a coal liquefaction program to develop improved technologies to convert coal to clean and cost-effective liquid fuels to complement the dwindling supply of domestic petroleum crude. The goal of this program is to produce coal liquids that are competitive with crude at $20 to $25 per barrel. Indirect and direct liquefaction routes are the two technologies being pursued under the DOE coal liquefaction program. This paper will give an overview of the DOE indirect liquefaction program. More detailed discussions will be given to the F-T diesel and DME fuels which have shown great promises as clean burning alternative diesel fuels. The authors also will briefly discuss the economics of indirect liquefaction and the hurdles and opportunities for the early commercial deployment of these technologies. Discussions will be preceded by two brief reviews on the liquid versus gas phase reactors and the natural gas versus coal based indirect liquefaction.

  4. A study on the hydrotreating of coal hydro liquefaction residue and its kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J.; Lu, X.; Zhang, D.; Gao, J. [Department of Chemical Engineering for Energy Resources, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2010-09-15

    Hydro-conversion of coal hydro liquefaction residue obtained from a 6 t/day pilot plant of Shenhua Group in Shanghai was carried out under the hydrotreating condition. The coal hydro liquefaction residue and its product were extracted in sequence with n-hexane, toluene and tetrahydrofuran in a Soxhlet apparatus. The n-hexane soluble fractions increased with the increase of reaction temperature and time. Its amount increased from 14.14% to a maximum of 40.86% under the conditions of 470 {sup o}C and 30 min, which meant that moderate extension of coal residence time in the coal hydro liquefaction reactor is beneficial to the increase of oil yield. A 4-lumped kinetic model of coal hydro liquefaction residue hydro-conversion was performed using solubility-based lumped fractions. In the model, the tetrahydrofuran insoluble fractions were classified into two parts: easily reactive part and unreactive part. The kinetic parameters were estimated by a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method and a nonlinear least squares method, and the apparent activation energies were calculated according to the Arrhenius Equation. A large quantity of total catalyst consisting of remained liquefaction catalyst, part of the mineral from raw coal and additive Fe-based catalyst could considerably reduce the apparent activation energy of hydro-conversion for the toluene insoluble/tetrahydrofuran insoluble fractions to 36.79 kJ-mol{sup -1}. The calculated values of the model coincided well with the experimental values. (authors)

  5. Case studies on direct liquefaction of low rank Wyoming coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, P.; Kramer, S.J.; Poddar, S.K. [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Previous Studies have developed process designs, costs, and economics for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 and Wyoming Black Thunder coals at mine-mouth plants. This investigation concerns two case studies related to the liquefaction of Wyoming Black Thunder coal. The first study showed that reducing the coal liquefaction reactor design pressure from 3300 to 1000 psig could reduce the crude oil equivalent price by 2.1 $/bbl provided equivalent performing catalysts can be developed. The second one showed that incentives may exist for locating a facility that liquifies Wyoming coal on the Gulf Coast because of lower construction costs and higher labor productivity. These incentives are dependent upon the relative values of the cost of shipping the coal to the Gulf Coast and the increased product revenues that may be obtained by distributing the liquid products among several nearby refineries.

  6. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandes, S.D.; Lancet, M.S.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-11-01

    This is the eleventh Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Major topics reported are: (1) The results of a study designed to determine the effects of the conditions employed at the Wilsonville slurry preheater vessel on coal conversion is described. (2) Stable carbon isotope ratios were determined and used to source the carbon of three product samples from Period 49 of UOP bench-scale coprocessing Run 37. The results from this coprocessing run agree with the general trends observed in other coprocessing runs that we have studied. (3) Microautoclave tests and chemical analyses were performed to calibrate'' the reactivity of the standard coal used for determining donor solvent quality of process oils in this contract. (4) Several aspects of Wilsonville Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) resid conversion kinetics were investigated; results are presented. Error limits associated with calculations of deactivation rate constants previously reported for Runs 258 and 261 are revised and discussed. A new procedure is described that relates the conversions of 850[degrees]F[sup +] , 1050[degrees]F[sup +], and 850 [times] 1050[degrees]F material. Resid conversions and kinetic constants previously reported for Run 260 were incorrect; corrected data and discussion are found in Appendix I of this report.

  7. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States)); Gutterman, C. (Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)); Chander, S. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States))

    1992-08-26

    Research in this project centers upon developing a new approach to the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates all aspects of the coal liquefaction process including coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, coal liquefaction experimentation, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. On May 28, 1992, the Department of Energy authorized starting the experimental aspects of this projects; therefore, experimentation at Amoco started late in this quarterly report period. Research contracts with Auburn University, Pennsylvania State University, and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation were signed during June, 1992, so their work was just getting underway. Their work will be summarized in future quarterly reports. A set of coal samples were sent to Hazen Research for beneficiation. The samples were received and have been analyzed. The literature search covering coal swelling has been up-dated, and preliminary coal swelling experiments were carried out. Further swelling experimentation is underway. An up-date of the literature on the liquefaction of coal using dispersed catalysts is nearing completion; it will be included in the next quarterly report.

  8. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, April--June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, S.R.; Martin, S.C.; Song, Chunshan; Schobert, H.H.

    1996-08-01

    This quarterly report describes our recent work on two related subjects: effect of using organometallic catalyst precursor on hydrodeoxygenation under coal liquefaction conditions, and the effect of mineral matters in liquefaction reactions of coals. Oxygen functionalities, especially phenols, are undesirable components of coal derived liquids. Removal of these compounds from the products of coal liquefaction is required. A beneficial alternative would be the removal of these functionalities, or the prevention of their formation, during the liquefaction process. Organometallic precursors of Co, Ni and Mo have been studied as catalysts. To ascertain the hydrodeoxygenation properties of these catalysts under liquefaction conditions, model compounds were investigated. Anthrone, Dibutylmethyl phenol, dinaphthyl ether and xanthene were studied to provide a comparison of conversions to deoxygenated products. Studies of the deoxygenating abilities of these catalyst precursors in coal liquefaction systems have also been performed. Improvements in conversion and product quality are observed. Both these factors are dependent on the coal used. It is also considered that some mineral matters in coal may have catalytic actions. Demineralization by successive HCl/HF treatments of a low rank coal has demonstrated that removal of the inherent mineral matter imparts no serious detrimental effect upon low temperature liquefaction. It appears that elimination of such species allows for better access for gaseous H{sub 2}, as suggested by previous studies.

  9. STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael T. Klein

    2000-01-01

    Using a reactor in which the coal is physically separated from the solid catalyst by a porous wall permeable to the hydrogen donor solvent, it was shown that direct contact between the catalyst and the coal is not required for catalyzed coal liquefaction. This occurs however only when there is a hydrogen atmosphere, as liquefaction with catalyst participation does not occur in a nitrogen atmosphere. Liquefaction by hydrogen transfer from the donor solvent itself does occur. This suggests that there is transfer of hydrogen from the catalyst to the coal via the solvent. The character of the solvent makes a significant difference, the better solvents being good hydrogen donors. These results indicate that the role of the catalyst may be to regenerate the spent hydrogen donor solvent during the liquefaction process. The peak temperature for volatiles evolution has been shown to be a reproducible measure of the coal rank. This was shown by an excellent correlation (R2 = 0.998) between peak volatiles temperatures (by TGA) and vitrinite reflectance. Using TG/MS, the volatiles contents of coals of a wide range of ranks was determined. The low rank coals emit largely phenols and some other oxygen compounds and olefins. The higher rank coals emit largely aromatic hydrocarbons and some olefins.

  10. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. The kinetics of coal liquefaction distillation resid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.; Huang, H.; Wang, S.; Campbell, D.

    1998-03-01

    Under subcontract from CONSOL Inc., the University of Delaware studied the mechanism and kinetics of coal liquefaction resid conversion. The program at Delaware was conducted between August 15, 1994, and April 30, 1997. It consisted of two primary tasks. The first task was to develop an empirical test to measure the reactivity toward hydrocracking of coal-derived distillation resids. The second task was to formulate a computer model to represent the structure of the resids and a kinetic and mechanistic model of resid reactivity based on the structural representations. An introduction and Summary of the project authored by CONSOL and a report of the program findings authored by the University of Delaware researchers are presented here.

  11. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chunshan, Song; Kirby, S.; Schmidt, E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this project is to explore bimetallic dispersed catalysts for more efficient coal liquefaction. Coal liquefaction involves cleavage of methylene, dimethylene and ether bridges connecting various aromatic units and the reactions of various oxygen functional groups. This paper describes recent results on (1) hydrodeoxygenation of O-containing polycyclic model compounds using novel organometallic catalyst precursors; and (2) activity and selectivity of dispersed Fe catalysts from organometallic and inorganic precursors for hydrocracking of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl) bibenzyl. The results showed that some iron containing catalysts have higher activity in the sulfur-free form, contrary to conventional wisdom. Adding sulfur to Fe precursors with Cp-ligands decreased the activity of the resulting catalyst. This is in distinct contrast to the cases with iron pentacarbonyl and superfine Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, where S addition increased their catalytic activity substantially. A positive correlation between sulfur addition and increased activity can be seen, but a reversed trend between Fe cluster size and hydrocracking conversion could be observed, for carbonyl-type Fe precursors. It is apparent that the activity and selectivity of Fe catalysts for NMBB conversion depends strongly on both the type of ligand environment, the oxidation state and the number of intermetal bonds in the molecular precursor.

  12. Processes of liquefaction/solubilization of Spanish coals by microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laborda, F.; Monistrol, I.F.; Luna, N.; Fernandez, M. [Universidad de Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Microbiologia y Parasitologia

    1999-07-01

    Several fundamental aspects of microbial coal liquefaction/solubilization were studied. The liquefied/solubilized products from coal by microorganisms were analysed. The liquid products analysed by IR titration and UV/visible spectrometry showed some alterations with regard to the original coal. Humic acids extracted from the liquefied lignite showed a reduction in the average molecular weight and a increase in the condensation index, probably due to depolymerization caused by microorganisms. The mechanisms implicated in coal biosolubilization by two fungal strains, M2 (Trichoderma sp.) and M4 (Penicillium sp.) were also studied. Extracellular peroxidase, esterase and phenoloxidase enzymes appear to be involved in coal solubilization. (orig.)

  13. The dual role of oxygen functions in coal pretreatment and liquefaction: Crosslinking and cleavage reactions. First annual report, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serio, M.A.; Kroo, E.; Teng, H.; Charpenay, S.; Solomon, P.R.

    1992-08-01

    The overall objective of this project is elucidate and model the dual role of oxygen functions in thermal pretreatment and liquefaction of low rank coals through the application of analytical techniques and theoretical models. The project will be an integrated study of model polymers representative of coal structures, raw coals of primarily low rank, and selectivity modified coals in order to provide specific information relevant to the reactions of real coals. The investigations will include liquefaction experiments in microautoclave reactors along with extensive analysis of intermediate solid, liquid and gaseous products. Attempts will be made to incorporate the results of experiments on the different systems into a liquefaction model.

  14. SURFACE-MODIFIED COALS FOR ENHANCED CATALYST DISPERSION AND LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah

    1999-09-01

    This is the final report of the Department of Energy Sponsored project DE-FGF22-95PC95229 entitled, surface modified coals for enhanced catalyst dispersion and liquefaction. The aims of the study were to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants and catalysts on the coal and to train and educate minority scientists in catalysts and separation science. Illinois No. 6 Coal (DEC-24) was selected for the study. The surfactants investigated included dodecyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB), a cationic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, an anionic surfactant, and Triton x-100, a neutral surfactant. Ammonium molybdate tetrahydrate was used as the molybdenum catalyst precursor. Zeta potential, BET, FTIR, AFM, UV-Vis and luminescence intensity measurements were undertaken to assess the surface properties and the liquefaction activities of the coal. The parent coal had a net negative surface charge over the pH range 2-12. However, in the presence of DDAB the negativity of the surface charge decreased. At higher concentrations of DDAB, a positive surface charge resulted. In contrast to the effect of DDAB, the zeta potential of the coal became more negative than the parent coal in the presence of SDS. Adsorption of Triton reduced the net negative charge density of the coal samples. The measured surface area of the coal surface was about 30 m{sup 2}/g compared to 77m{sup 2}/g after being washed with deionized water. Addition of the surfactants decreased the surface area of the samples. Adsorption of the molybdenum catalyst increased the surface area of the coal sample. The adsorption of molybdenum on the coal was significantly promoted by preadsorption of DDAB and SDS. Molybdenum adsorption showed that, over a wide range of concentrations and pH values, the DDAB treated coal adsorbed a higher amount of molybdenum than the samples treated with SDS. The infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the atomic force

  15. SURFACE-MODIFIED COALS FOR ENHANCED CATALYST DISPERSION AND LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah

    1999-09-01

    This is the final report of the Department of Energy Sponsored project DE-FGF22-95PC95229 entitled, surface modified coals for enhanced catalyst dispersion and liquefaction. The aims of the study were to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants and catalysts on the coal and to train and educate minority scientists in catalysts and separation science. Illinois No. 6 Coal (DEC-24) was selected for the study. The surfactants investigated included dodecyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB), a cationic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, an anionic surfactant, and Triton x-100, a neutral surfactant. Ammonium molybdate tetrahydrate was used as the molybdenum catalyst precursor. Zeta potential, BET, FTIR, AFM, UV-Vis and luminescence intensity measurements were undertaken to assess the surface properties and the liquefaction activities of the coal. The parent coal had a net negative surface charge over the pH range 2-12. However, in the presence of DDAB the negativity of the surface charge decreased. At higher concentrations of DDAB, a positive surface charge resulted. In contrast to the effect of DDAB, the zeta potential of the coal became more negative than the parent coal in the presence of SDS. Adsorption of Triton reduced the net negative charge density of the coal samples. The measured surface area of the coal surface was about 30 m{sup 2}/g compared to 77m{sup 2}/g after being washed with deionized water. Addition of the surfactants decreased the surface area of the samples. Adsorption of the molybdenum catalyst increased the surface area of the coal sample. The adsorption of molybdenum on the coal was significantly promoted by preadsorption of DDAB and SDS. Molybdenum adsorption showed that, over a wide range of concentrations and pH values, the DDAB treated coal adsorbed a higher amount of molybdenum than the samples treated with SDS. The infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the atomic force

  16. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  17. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  18. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1990-- April 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1992-02-15

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science (CFFLS) is currently engaged in a three year contract with the US Department of Energy investigating a range of research topics dealing with direct coal liquefaction. This report summarizes the results of this program in its second year, from May 1, 1990 to April 30, 1991. Accomplishments for this period are presented for the following tasks: Iron-based catalysts for coal liquefaction, exploratory research on coal conversion, novel coal liquefaction concepts, and novel catalysts for coal liquefaction.

  19. Direct liquefaction of low-rank coals under mild conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, N.; Rinaldi, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Due to decreasing of petroleum reserves, direct coal liquefaction is attracting renewed interest as an alternative process to produce liquid fuels. The combination of hydrogen peroxide and coal is not a new one. In the early 1980, Vasilakos and Clinton described a procedure for desulfurization by leaching coal with solutions of sulphuric acid/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. But so far, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} has never been ascribed a major role in coal liquefaction. Herein, we describe a novel approach for liquefying low-rank coals using a solution of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in presence of a soluble non-transition metal catalyst. (orig.)

  20. Catalyst system and process for benzyl ether fragmentation and coal liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoeller, Joseph Robert

    1998-04-28

    Dibenzyl ether can be readily cleaved to form primarily benzaldehyde and toluene as products, along with minor amounts of bibenzyl and benzyl benzoate, in the presence of a catalyst system comprising a Group 6 metal, preferably molybdenum, a salt, and an organic halide. Although useful synthetically for the cleavage of benzyl ethers, this cleavage also represents a key model reaction for the liquefaction of coal; thus this catalyst system and process should be useful in coal liquefaction with the advantage of operating at significantly lower temperatures and pressures.

  1. Studies in coal liquefaction with application to the SRC and related processes. Quarterly report, August 1981-October 1981. [Using model compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarrer, A. R.; Guin, J. A.; Curtis, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    Model compound reactions were studied to evaluate the effects of mass transfer, solvent type, solvent blending, hydrogen partial pressure, temperature, reactant concentration, additive loading and its preparation, etc. Naphthalene hydrogenation and benzothiophene hydrodesulfurization were investigated under the conditions comparable to commercial coal liquefaction and related processes. Both of these reaction systems were observed to be surface reaction controlled under the reaction conditions used in this work. Certain aromatic compounds were observed to cause a reduction in the reaction rates of naphthalene and benzothiophene. Single stage coal dissolution was investigated using tetralin as a hydrogen donor solvent and a commercial cobalt-molybdate catalyst. A spinning basket system was developed to allow injection of the catalyst at a desired time in the reaction cycle. This catalyst injection technique proved to be reliable for the exploratory work done here. The degree of catalyst deactivation was rated by comparing the activities of the spent catalyst for model compound (naphthalene and cumene) reactivities relative to those of the fresh catalyst. No substantial reduction in deactivation was observed to result with delayed contacting of the catalyst with the coal-tetralin reaction mixture. The effect of reaction temperature on the initial rate of catalyst deactivation was also studied.

  2. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, April--June 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    The United States has more energy available in coal than in petroleum, natural gas, oil shale, and tar sands combined. Nationwide energy shortages, together with the availability of abundant coal reserves, make commercial production of synthetic fuels from coal vital to the Nation's total supply of clean energy. In response to this need, the Office of Fossil Energy of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) is conducting a research and development program to provide technology that will permit rapid commercialization of processes for converting coal to synthetic liquid and gaseous fuels and for improved direct combustion of coal. These fuels must be storable and suitable for power generation, transportation, and residential and industrial uses. ERDA's program for the conversion of coal to liquid fuels was begun by two of ERDA's predecessor agencies: Office of Coal Research (OCR) in 1962, and Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, in the 1930's. Current work in coal liquefaction is aimed at improved process configurations for both catalytic and non-catalytic processes to provide more attractive processing economics and lower capital investment. Coal liquefaction can now be achieved under more moderate processing conditions and more rapidly than was the case in the 1930's. The advantage of coal liquefaction is that the entire range of liquid products, including heavy boiler fuel, distillate fuel oil, gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel oil, can be produced from coal by varying the type of process and operating conditions used in the process. Furthermore, coal-derived liquid fuels also have the potential for use as chemical feedstocks. To determine the most efficient means of utilizing coal resources, ERDA is sponsoring the development of several conversion processes that are currently in the pilot plant stage. Nineteen projects under development are described and progress for each in the quarter is detailed briefly

  3. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1994-10-01

    Accomplishments for the past year are presented for the following tasks: coliquefaction of coal with waste materials; catalysts for coal liquefaction to clean transportation fuels; fundamental research in coal liquefaction; and in situ analytical techniques for coal liquefaction and coal liquefaction catalysts some of the highlights are: very promising results have been obtained from the liquefaction of plastics, rubber tires, paper and other wastes, and the coliquefaction of wastes with coal; a number of water soluble coal liquefaction catalysts, iron, cobalt, nickel and molybdenum, have been comparatively tested; mossbauer spectroscopy, XAFS spectroscopy, TEM and XPS have been used to characterize a variety of catalysts and other samples from numerous consortium and DOE liquefaction projects and in situ ESR measurements of the free radical density have been conducted at temperatures from 100 to 600{degrees}C and H{sub 2} pressures up to 600 psi.

  4. Japan`s sunshine project. 17.. 1992 annual summary of coal liquefaction and gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the achievement of coal liquefaction and gasification technology development in the Sunshine Project for FY 1992. It presents the research and development of coal liquefaction which includes studies on reaction mechanism of coal liquefaction and catalysts for coal liquefaction, the research and development of coal gasification technologies which includes studies on gasification characteristics of various coals and improvement of coal gasification efficiency, the development of bituminous coal liquefaction which includes engineering, construction and operation of a bituminous coal liquefaction pilot plant and research by a process supporting unit (PSU), the development of brown coal liquefaction which includes research on brown coal liquefaction with a pilot plant and development of techniques for upgrading coal oil from brown coal, the development of common base technologies which includes development of slurry letdown valves and study on upgrading technology of coal-derived distillates, the development of coal-based hydrogen production technology with a pilot plant, the development of technology for entrained flow coal gasification, the assessment of coal hydrogasification, and the international co-operation. 4 refs., 125 figs., 39 tabs.

  5. Coal Liquefaction by Using Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuying; Wu, Peng; Gu, Fan

    2013-07-01

    An innovative method for coal liquefaction by using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in a short reaction time was developed. Using tetralin as the reaction medium, DBD plasma as the energy source, and a reaction time of 10 min at 140°C, up to 10% of coal was converted to liquid material. The results showed the feasibility of coal's liquefaction by DBD plasma under relatively moderate conditions. Simultaneously, it was clarified that the effect of DBD plasma treatment was opposed to the thermal effect of heating. An acid plasma sheath could be formed on the coal powder surface in DBD conditions, liquefied reactions could be carried out in the absence of inorganic acid, and the products were nearly neutral and with low causticity.

  6. SLURRY PHASE IRON CATALYSTS FOR INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhaya K. Datye

    1998-11-19

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, they have studied the attrition behavior of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for converting coal based syngas into liquid fuels.

  7. Direct liquefaction of plastics and coprocessing of coal with plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P.; Feng, Z.; Mahajan, V. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this work were to optimize reaction conditions for the direct liquefaction of waste plastics and the coprocessing of coal with waste plastics. In previous work, the direct liquefaction of medium and high density polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PPE), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and a mixed plastic waste, and the coliquefaction of these plastics with coals of three different ranks was studied. The results established that a solid acid catalyst (HZSM-5 zeolite) was highly active for the liquefaction of the plastics alone, typically giving oil yields of 80-95% and total conversions of 90-100% at temperatures of 430-450 {degrees}C. In the coliquefaction experiments, 50:50 mixtures of plastic and coal were used with a tetralin solvent (tetralin:solid = 3:2). Using approximately 1% of the HZSM-5 catalyst and a nanoscale iron catalyst, oil yields of 50-70% and total conversion of 80-90% were typical. In the current year, further investigations were conducted of the liquefaction of PE, PPE, and a commingled waste plastic obtained from the American Plastics Council (APC), and the coprocessing of PE, PPE and the APC plastic with Black Thunder subbituminous coal. Several different catalysts were used in these studies.

  8. Technology for advanced liquefaction processes: Coal/waste coprocessing studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugini, A.V.; Rothenberger, K.S.; Ciocco, M.V. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The efforts in this project are directed toward three areas: (1) novel catalyst (supported and unsupported) research and development, (2) study and optimization of major operating parameters (specifically pressure), and (3) coal/waste coprocessing. The novel catalyst research and development activity has involved testing supported catalysts, dispersed catalysts, and use of catalyst testing units to investigate the effects of operating parameters (the second area) with both supported and unsupported catalysts. Several supported catalysts were tested in a simulated first stage coal liquefaction application at 404{degrees}C during this performance period. A Ni-Mo hydrous titanate catalyst on an Amocat support prepared by Sandia National laboratories was tested. Other baseline experiments using AO-60 and Amocat, both Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported catalysts, were also made. These experiments were short duration (approximately 12 days) and monitored the initial activity of the catalysts. The results of these tests indicate that the Sandia catalyst performed as well as the commercially prepared catalysts. Future tests are planned with other Sandia preparations. The dispersed catalysts tested include sulfated iron oxide, Bayferrox iron oxide (iron oxide from Miles, Inc.), and Bailey iron oxide (micronized iron oxide from Bailey, Inc.). The effects of space velocity, temperature, and solvent-to-coal ratio on coal liquefaction activity with the dispersed catalysts were investigated. A comparison of the coal liquefaction activity of these catalysts relative to iron catalysts tested earlier, including FeOOH-impregnated coal, was made. These studies are discussed.

  9. Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity. Final technical report, September 1990--February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.; Shams, K.G.

    1994-07-01

    Recent research efforts in direct coal liquefaction are focused on lowering the level of reaction severity, identification and determination of the causes of retrogressive reactions, and improving the economics of the process. Ambient pretreatment of coals using methanol and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid was extensively studied in connection with low severity coal liquefaction. Ambient pretreatment of eight Argonne coals using methanol/HCl improved THF-soluble conversions 24.5 wt % (maf basis) for Wyodak subbituminous coal and 28.4 wt % for Beulah-Zap lignite with an average increase of 14.9 wt % for the eight Argonne coals at 623 K (350{degrees}C) reaction temperature and 30 minutes reaction time. Optimal pretreatment conditions were determined using Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coals. Acid concentration was the most important pretreatment variable studied; liquefaction reactivity increased with increasing acid concentration up to 2 vol %. The FTIR spectra of treated and untreated Wyodak coal samples demonstrated formation of carboxylic functional groups during pretreatment, a result of divalent (Ca, Mg) cationic bridge destruction. The extent of liquefaction reactivity directly correlated with the amount of calcium removed during pretreatment, and results from calcium ``addback`` experiments supported the observation that calcium adversely affected coal reactivity at low severity reaction conditions. Model compound studies using benzyl phenyl ether demonstrated that calcium cations catalyzed retrogressive reactions, inhibited hydrogenation reactions at low severity reaction conditions, and were more active at higher reaction temperatures. Based on kinetic data, mechanisms for hydrogenation-based inhibition and base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are proposed. The base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are shown to occur via a hydrogen abstraction mechanism where hydrogenation inhibition reactions are shown to take place via a surface quenching mechanism.

  10. Technical, Energetics, and Economic Comparison of NRL Oxidative Coal Liquefaction Process with some Developed Coal Liquefaction Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-05

    the synthesis step becomes two processes. synthesis CO + H2 catalyst ) methanol conversion methanol catalyst > gasoline + water Wiser states that...structure illustrates the main types of linkage between ring clusters and also some of the heteroatom forms that are found in coal. 20 APPENDIX II...used more widely as petroleum and natural gas resources are depleted and hydrogen for coal liquefaction processes will be produced predominantly from

  11. Kinetics assisted design of catalysts for coal liquefaction. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, M.T.; Foley, H.C.; Calkins, W.H.; Scouten, C.

    1998-02-01

    The thermal and catalytic reactions of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (NBBM), a resid and coal model compound, were examined. Catalytic reaction of NBBM was carried out at 400 C under hydrogen with a series of transition metal-based catalytic materials including Fe(CO){sub 4}PPh{sub 3}, Fe(CO){sub 3}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}, Fe(CO){sub 2}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}CS{sub 2}, Fe(CO){sub 5}, Mo(CO){sub 6}, Mn{sub 2}(CO){sub 10}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MoS{sub 2}. Experimental findings and derived mechanistic insights were organized into molecular-level reaction models for NBBM pyrolysis and catalysis. Hydropyrolysis and catalysis reaction families occurring during NBBM hydropyrolysis at 420 C were summarized in the form of reaction matrices which, upon exhaustive application to the components of the reacting system, yielded the mechanistic reaction model. Each reaction family also had an associated linear free energy relationship (LFER) which provided an estimate of the rate constant k{sub i} given a structural property of species i or its reaction. Including the catalytic reaction matrices with those for the pyrolysis model provided a comprehensive NBBM catalytic reaction model and allowed regression of fundamental LFER parameters for the catalytic reaction families. The model also allowed specification of the property of an optimal catalyst. Iron, molybdenum and palladium were predicted to be most effective for model compound consumption. Due to the low costs associated with iron and its disposal, it is a good choice for coal liquefaction catalysis and the challenge remains to synthesize small particles able to access the full surface area of the coal macromolecule.

  12. Efficient direct coal liquefaction of a premium brown coal catalyzed by cobalt-promoted fumed oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautmann, M.; Loewe, A.; Traa, Y. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Chemical Technology

    2013-11-01

    The search for alternatives in the fuel sector is an important technological challenge. An interim solution could be provided by direct coal liquefaction. Hydrogen economy and the lack of an efficient catalyst are the main obstacles for this process. We used a premium German brown coal with a high H/C molar ratio of 1.25 and nanostructured cobalt catalysts to improve the efficiency of direct coal liquefaction. We were able to recover and recycle the catalyst efficiently and reached good brown coal conversions and oil yields with single-stage coal liquefaction. The oil quality observed almost reached that of a conventional crude oil considering higher heating value (HHV), H/C molar ratio and aliphatic content. (orig.)

  13. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1995-09-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. The paper describes activities carried out this quarter. 11 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

  14. Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, Oleg

    2013-12-31

    Under the cooperative agreement program of DOE and funding from Wyoming State’s Clean Coal Task Force, Western Research Institute and Thermosolv LLC studied the direct conversion of Wyoming coals and coal-lignin mixed feeds into liquid fuels in conditions highly relevant to practice. During the Phase I, catalytic direct liquefaction of sub-bituminous Wyoming coals was investigated. The process conditions and catalysts were identified that lead to a significant increase of desirable oil fraction in the products. The Phase II work focused on systematic study of solvothermal depolymerization (STD) and direct liquefaction (DCL) of carbonaceous feedstocks. The effect of the reaction conditions (the nature of solvent, solvent/lignin ratio, temperature, pressure, heating rate, and residence time) on STD was investigated. The effect of a number of various additives (including lignin, model lignin compounds, lignin-derivable chemicals, and inorganic radical initiators), solvents, and catalysts on DCL has been studied. Although a significant progress has been achieved in developing solvothermal depolymerization, the side reactions – formation of considerable amounts of char and gaseous products – as well as other drawbacks do not render aqueous media as the most appropriate choice for commercial implementation of STD for processing coals and lignins. The trends and effects discovered in DCL point at the specific features of liquefaction mechanism that are currently underutilized yet could be exploited to intensify the process. A judicious choice of catalysts, solvents, and additives might enable practical and economically efficient direct conversion of Wyoming coals into liquid fuels.

  15. A Characterization and Evaluation of Coal Liquefaction Process Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.

    1997-03-31

    This is the Technical Progress Report for the tenth quarter of activities under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC93054. It covers the period October 1 through December 31, 1996. Described in this report are the following activities: (1) CONSOL characterized two HTI coal/petroleum coprocessing samples for Ni and V concentrations, as requested by DOE. The results are reported in Appendix 1. (2) CONSOL began work to evaluate the potential for producing alkylphenyl ethers, and specifically ethylphenyl ethers, from coal liquefaction phenols. The work includes a literature review and experimentation. The status of this ongoing work is described in this report. (3) A set of samples was requested from HTI Run ALC-2 (Appendix 2). (4) The University of Delaware is conducting resid reactivity tests and is developing a kinetic mechanistic model of resid reactivity. A summary of Delaware`s progress is appended to this report (Appendix 3). (5) A paper was submitted for presentation at the 213th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 13-17, 1997, in San Francisco, CA, (Appendix 4).

  16. Effects of coal rank on the chemical composition and toxicological activity of coal liquefaction materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.W.; Dauble, D.D.

    1986-05-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and toxicological testing of coal liquefaction materials from the EDS and H-Coal processes operated using different ranks of coal. Samples of recycle solvent from the bottoms recycle mode of the EDS direct coal liquefaction process derived from bituminous, sub-bituminous, and lignite coals were analyzed. In addition, the H-Coal heavy fuel oils derived from bituminous and sub-bituminous coals were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsoprtion column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry. The toxicological activity of selected samples was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay, an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity, and a static bioassy with Daphnia magna for aquatic toxicity of the water-soluble fractions. 22 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs.

  17. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, July--September 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-02-01

    ERDA's program for the conversion of coal to liquid fuels is aimed at improved process configurations for both catalytic and noncatalytic processes to provide more attractive processing economics and lower capital investment. The advantage of coal liquefaction is that the entire range of liquid products, including heavy boiler fuel, distillate fuel oil, gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel oil, can be produced from coal by varying the type of process and operating conditions used in the process. Furthermore, coal-derived liquids also have the potential for use as chemical feedstocks. To provide efficient and practical means of utilizing coal resources, ERDA is sponsoring the development of several conversion processes that are currently in the pilot plant stage. Responsibility for the design, construction, and operation of these facilities is given and progress in the quarter is summarized. Several supporting or complementary projects are described similarly. (LTN)

  18. Colombian coal liquefaction and its coprocessing with Venezuelan crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, R.; Nagaishi, H. [Hokkaido National Industrial Research Institute, Sapporo (Japan); Ishiguro, H. [Nippon Kokan K.K. Kawasaki (JP)] (and others)

    1999-09-01

    Titiribi coal from Colombia shows an excellent reactivity to liquefaction and coprocessing. Anthracene oil was excellent as a vehicle oil to facilitate the liquefaction reaction during the initial stage at 400{sup o}C. In the case of coprocessing with Morichal crude oil and red-mud/sulfur catalyst, the maximum conversion of Titiribi coal was ca. 79 wt% daf at 400{sup o}C and ca. 93 wt% daf at 450{sup o}C. The hydrogen consumption in the presence of Morichal crude oil is lower than that in the presence of anthracene oil. It is considered to be the effect of hydrogen sulfide and the hydrogen donor ability of Morichal crude oil. (author)

  19. Hydrorefining distillates from coal liquefaction using intermetallic compound hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadiev, Kh.M.; Pivovarova, N.A.; Askhabova, Kh.N.; Taramov, Kh.K.

    1986-07-01

    Investigations are discussed into hydrorefining of coal liquefaction distillate using ZrNi intermetallic compound hydride as catalyst. The paper shows that 70-75% reduction in content of unsaturated and sulfur-containing compounds takes place in the presence of this catalyst at low temperature (200-250 C) and pressure (0.1 MPa), and establishes that preliminary preparation of starting material (removal of phenols and nitrous bases) produces significant effect on hydrorefining results and product stability. Tests have also shown that although intermetallic compound hydride catalyst has fairly low stability, it is capable of recovering its catalytic properties on reduction-oxidation treatment. Description of the tests and characteristics of hydrorefining products of coal liquefaction distillate are given. 8 references.

  20. Development of computer simulator for coal liquefaction reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yawata, T.; Kobayashi, M.; Ohi, S.; Itho, H.; Hiraide, M. [Nippon Oil Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    The computer simulator for a coal liquefaction reactor is a useful engineering tool to analyse the data of such reactors. The authors applied this technique to a reactor in the NEDOL process to predict the performance of the reactor, and to assist in the design of a reactor for demonstration plant. The development program of the simulator and its utilization plan are discussed. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal at HTI: Bench-scale studies in coal/waste plastics coprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, L.K.; Stalzer, R.H. [Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc., Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The development of Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction (CMSL) at HTI has focused on both bituminous and sub-bituminous coals using laboratory, bench and PDU scale operations. The crude oil equivalent cost of liquid fuels from coal has been curtailed to about $30 per barrel, thus achieving over 30% reduction in the price that was evaluated for the liquefaction technologies demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties. Contrary to the common belief, the new generation of catalytic multistage coal liquefaction process is environmentally very benign and can produce clean, premium distillates with a very low (<10ppm) heteroatoms content. The HTI Staff has been involved over the years in process development and has made significant improvements in the CMSL processing of coals. A 24 month program (extended to September 30, 1995) to study novel concepts, using a continuous bench scale Catalytic Multi-Stage unit (30kg coal/day), has been initiated since December, 1992. This program consists of ten bench-scale operations supported by Laboratory Studies, Modelling, Process Simulation and Economic Assessments. The Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction is a continuation of the second generation yields using a low/high temperature approach. This paper covers work performed between October 1994- August 1995, especially results obtained from the microautoclave support activities and the bench-scale operations for runs CMSL-08 and CMSL-09, during which, coal and the plastic components for municipal solid wastes (MSW) such as high density polyethylene (HDPE)m, polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), and polythylene terphthlate (PET) were coprocessed.

  2. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins offers a means of liquefying coal at low severity conditions. Lower temperature, 350[degrees]C, and lower hydrogen pressure, 500 psi, have been used to perform liquefaction reactions. The presence of the cyclic olefin, hexahydroanthracene, made a substantial difference in the conversion of Illinois No. 6 coal at these low severity conditions. The Researchperformed this quarter was a parametric evaluation of the effect of different parameters on the coal conversion and product distribution from coal. The effect of the parameters on product distribution from hexahydroanthracene was also determined. The work planned for next quarter includes combining the most effective parametric conditions for the low severity reactions and determining their effect. The second part ofthe research performed this quarter involved performing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy using cyclic olefins. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using FTIR and a heated cell to determine the reaction pathway that occurs in the hydrogen donation reactions from cyclic olefins. The progress made to date includes evaluating the FTIR spectra of cyclic olefins and their expected reaction products. This work is included in this progress report.

  3. Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing direct coal liquefaction rawhide sub-bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, R.F.; Coless, L.A.; Davis, S.M. [and others

    1995-12-31

    In 1992, the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research to demonstrate a dispersed catalyst system using a combination of molybdenum and iron precursors for direct coal liquefaction. This dispersed catalyst system was successfully demonstrated using Black Thunder sub-bituminous coal at Wilsonville, Alabama by Southern Electric International, Inc. The DOE sponsored research continues at Exxon Research and Development Laboratories (ERDL). A six month continuous bench-scale program using ERDL`s Recycle Coal Liquefaction Unit (RCLU) is planned, three months in 1994 and three months in 1995. The initial conditions in RCLU reflect experience gained from the Wilsonville facility in their Test Run 263. Rawhide sub-bituminous coal which is similar to the Black Thunder coal tested at Wilsonville was used as the feed coal. A slate of five dispersed catalysts for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal has been tested. Throughout the experiments, the molybdenum addition rate was held constant at 100 wppm while the iron oxide addition rate was varied from 0.25 to 1.0 weight percent (dry coal basis). This report covers the 1994 operations and accomplishments.

  4. Coal liquefaction technology. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technologies and processes for converting coal to liquid chemicals and fuels. Topics include materials characterization of liquefaction processes, catalysis, pyrolysis, depolymerization, coprocessing, and integrated liquefaction. Also discussed are liquid fuel use in automobiles and power generation, low-temperature carbonization technology, multi-stage liquefaction, cost benefit analysis, and commercialization of liquefaction technology. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  5. Simulation of coal liquefaction process by developing user models on Aspen Plus platform%Aspen Plus用户模型技术的煤直接液化全流程模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单贤根; 常小瑞; 任琼; 江洪波; 翁惠新

    2014-01-01

    Based on six lumped kinetic model, this paper used the BFGS optimization algorithm to obtain kinetic constant of heating-up and isothermal stage of direct coal liquefaction process, and through regression of experimental data to get specific product composition for separation unit of direct coal liquefaction. Then the Aspen Plus user model of direct coal liquefaction was developed and integrated with the Aspen Plus software to achieve an entire process simulation of direct coal liquefaction process in Aspen Plus platform which can make the best use of its powerful databases and simulation calculation ability of separation processes. The calculation value of gas liquid equilibrium in high temperature and low temperature separators for reaction products agreed well with the experiment data. The entire process simulation in Aspen Plus platform can provide technical support for the optimization of direct coal liquefaction reaction and separation conditions.%基于六集总动力学模型,采用BFGS优化算法获得煤直接液化升温阶段和恒温阶段的反应动力学常数,同时通过试验数据回归得到用于煤直接液化分离单元的具体产品组成,并以此为基础开发了煤直接液化反应的Aspen Plus用户模型。在此基础上,将上述煤直接液化用户模型与Aspen Plus流程模拟软件集成在一起,充分利用Aspen Plus软件强大的性质数据库和分离过程模拟计算能力,最终实现了基于Aspen Plus平台的煤直接液化全流程模拟,模拟计算得到的煤直接液化反应产物在高温和低温分离器的气液相平衡数据与实验值较吻合。基于Aspen Plus的全流程模拟可以为煤直接液化反应和分离条件的优化选择提供技术参考。

  6. Properties of Direct Coal Liquefaction Residue Modified Asphalt Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this paper are to use Direct Coal Liquefaction Residue (DLCR to modify the asphalt binders and mixtures and to evaluate the performance of modified asphalt mixtures. The dynamic modulus and phase angle of DCLR and DCLR-composite modified asphalt mixture were analyzed, and the viscoelastic properties of these modified asphalt mixtures were compared to the base asphalt binder SK-90 and Styrene-Butadiene-Styrene (SBS modified asphalt mixtures. The master curves of the asphalt mixtures were shown, and dynamic and viscoelastic behaviors of asphalt mixtures were described using the Christensen-Anderson-Marasteanu (CAM model. The test results show that the dynamic moduli of DCLR and DCLR-composite asphalt mixtures are higher than those of the SK-90 and SBS modified asphalt mixtures. Based on the viscoelastic parameters of CAM models of the asphalt mixtures, the high- and low-temperature performance of DLCR and DCLR-composite modified asphalt mixtures are obviously better than the SK-90 and SBS modified asphalt mixtures. In addition, the DCLR and DCLR-composite modified asphalt mixtures are more insensitive to the frequency compared to SK-90 and SBS modified asphalt mixtures.

  7. STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael T. Klein

    2000-01-01

    There are several aspects of the Direct Coal Liquefaction process which are not fully understood and which if better understood might lead to improved yields and conversions. Among these questions are the roles of the catalyst and the solvent. While the solvent is known to act by transfer of hydrogen atoms to the free radicals formed by thermal breakdown of the coal in an uncatalyzed system, in the presence of a solid catalyst as is now currently practiced, the yields and conversions are higher than in an uncatalyzed system. The role of the catalyst in this case is not completely understood. DOE has funded many projects to produce ultrafine and more active catalysts in the expectation that better contact between catalyst and coal might result. This approach has met with limited success probably because mass transfer between two solids in a fluid medium i.e. the catalyst and the coal, is very poor. It is to develop an understanding of the role of the catalyst and solvent in Direct Liquefaction that this project was initiated. Specifically it was of interest to know whether direct contact between the coal and the catalyst was important. By separating the solid catalyst in a stainless steel basket permeable to the solvent but not the coal in the liquefaction reactor, it was shown that the catalyst still maintains a catalytic effect on the liquefaction process. There is apparently transfer of hydrogen atoms from the catalyst through the basket wall to the coal via the solvent. Strong hydrogen donor solvents appear to be more effective in this respect than weak hydrogen donors. It therefore appears that intimate contact between catalyst and coal is not a requirement, and that the role of the catalyst may be to restore the hydrogen donor strength to the solvent as the reaction proceeds. A range of solvents of varying hydrogen donor strength was investigated. Because of the extensive use of thermogravimetric analysis in this laboratory in was noted that the peak

  8. A CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF COAL LIQUEFACTION PROCESS STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.A. Robbins; G.W. Heunisch; R.A. Winschel; S.D. Brandes

    1998-04-01

    This is the Technical Progress Report for the eleventh quarter of activities under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC93054. It covers the period January 1 through March 31, 1997. Described in this report are the following activities: (1) CONSOL characterized process stream samples from HTI Run ALC-2, in which Black Thunder Mine coal was liquefied using four combinations of dispersed catalyst precursors. These results are described in the Results and Discussion section of this report. (2) Oil assays were completed on the HT I Run PB-05 product blend. Background information is presented in the Results and Discussion section of this report. The results are presented in Appendix 1. (3) Fractional distillation of the net product oil of HTI Run POC-1 was completed. Background information is presented in the Results and Discussion section of this report. The results are presented in Appendix 2. (4) CONSOL completed an evaluation of the potential for producing alkylphenyl ethers from coal liquefaction phenols. Those results are described briefly in the Results and Discussion section of this report. The full report is presented in Appendix 3. (5) At the request of DOE, various coal liquid samples and relevant characterization data were supplied to the University of West Virginia and the Federal Energy Technology Center. These activities are described in Appendix 4. (6) The University of Delaware is conducting resid reactivity tests and is completing the resid reaction computer model. A summary of Delaware's progress is provided in the Results and Discussion section. (7) The University of Delaware was instructed on the form in which the computer model is to be delivered to CONSOL (Appendix 5). (8) The University of Delaware submitted a paper on the resid reactivity work for presentation at the 213th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 13-17, 1997 in San Francisco, California. The paper, ''Kinetics of Hydroprocessing of Coal-Derived Vacuum

  9. Subtask 3.9 - Direct Coal Liquefaction Process Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aulich, Ted; Sharma, Ramesh

    2012-07-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Accelergy Corporation, an advanced fuels developer with technologies exclusively licensed from ExxonMobil, undertook Subtask 3.9 to design, build, and preliminarily operate a bench-scale direct coal liquefaction (DCL) system capable of converting 45 pounds/hour of pulverized, dried coal to a liquid suitable for upgrading to fuels and/or chemicals. Fabrication and installation of the DCL system and an accompanying distillation system for off-line fractionation of raw coal liquids into 1) a naphtha middle distillate stream for upgrading and 2) a recycle stream was completed in May 2012. Shakedown of the system was initiated in July 2012. In addition to completing fabrication of the DCL system, the project also produced a 500-milliliter sample of jet fuel derived in part from direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal, and submitted the sample to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio, for evaluation. The sample was confirmed by AFRL to be in compliance with all U.S. Air Force-prescribed alternative aviation fuel initial screening criteria.

  10. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction infratechnology and generic technology development: Final report, October 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sendlein, L.V.A.

    1987-06-29

    During the first year of its research program, the Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science has made significant progress in many areas of coal liquefaction and coal structure research. Research topics for which substantial progress has been made include integrated coal structure and liquefaction studies, investigation of differential liquefaction processes, development and application of sophisticated techniques for structural analysis, computer analysis of multivariate data, biodesulfurization of coal, catalysis studies, co-processing of coal and crude oil, coal dissolution and extraction processes, coal depolymerization, determination of the liquefaction characteristics of many US coals for use in a liquefaction database, and completion of a retrospective technology assessment for direct coal liquefaction. These and related topics are discussed in considerably more detail in the remainder of this report. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base.

  11. SHORT CONTACT TIME DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION USING A NOVEL BATCH REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael T. Klein; William H. Calkins

    1997-10-29

    The overall goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the Direct Coal Liquefaction process at the molecular level. Many approaches have been used to study this process including kinetic studies, study of the liquefaction products, study of the effect of reaction variables, such as temperature, solvent type and composition, the changing nature and composition of the coal during liquefaction, and the distribution in the liquefaction products of the hydrogen consumed. While all these studies have contributed to our growing knowledge of the liquefaction process, an adequate understanding of direct liquefaction still eludes us. This is due to many reasons including: the complexity and variable nature of coal itself and the many different chemical reactions which are occurring simultaneously during direct coal liquefaction. We believe that a study of the liquefaction process at the very early stages will avoid the complexities of secondary reactions associated with free radical high temperature processes that are clearly involved in direct coal liquefaction. This prompted us to devise a reactor system which avoids long heat up and cool-down times associated with previous kinetic studies, and allows kinetic measurements even at as short as the first few seconds of the liquefaction reaction.

  12. Colombian (Titiribi) coal liquefaction and its co-processing with Venezuelan (Morichal) crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, R.; Ishiguro, H.; Maekawa, Y.; Mondragon, F. (Government Industrial Development Laboratory, Hokkaido (Japan))

    1989-10-01

    The reactivity in the liquefaction of Titiribi coal from Colombia was studied without a vehicle oil and with Morichal crude oil from Venezuela and anthracene oil derived from coal as a vehicle oil in a batch autoclave in order to obtain fundamental data on the liquefaction and co-processing characteristics. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, April-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    DOE's program for the conversion of coal to liquid fuels was begun by two of DOE's predecessor agencies: Office of Coal Research (OCR) in 1962, and Bureau of Mines, US Department of the Interior, in the 1930's. Current work is aimed at improved process configurations for both catalytic and non-catalytic processes to provide more attractive processing economics and lower capital investment. The advantage of coal liquefaction is that the entire range of liquid products, especially boiler fuel, distillate fuel oil, and gasoline, can be produced from coal by varying the type of process and operating conditions used in the process. Furthermore, coal-derived liquids have the potential for use as chemical feedstocks. To provide efficient and practical means of utilizing coal resources, DOE is supporting the development of several conversion processes that are currently in the pilot plant stage. DOE, together with the Electric Power Research Institue, has contracted with fourteen projects are described brieflly: funding, description, status, history, and progress in the current quarter. (LTN)

  14. Highly Dispersed Pseudo-Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysts Synthesized via Inverse Micelle Solutions for the Liquefaction of Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampden-Smith, M.; Kawola, J.S.; Martino, A.; Sault, A.G.; Yamanaka, S.A.

    1999-01-05

    The mission of this project was to use inverse micelle solutions to synthesize nanometer sized metal particles and test the particles as catalysts in the liquefaction of coal and other related reactions. The initial focus of the project was the synthesis of iron based materials in pseudo-homogeneous form. The frost three chapters discuss the synthesis, characterization, and catalyst testing in coal liquefaction and model coal liquefaction reactions of iron based pseudo-homogeneous materials. Later, we became interested in highly dispersed catalysts for coprocessing of coal and plastic waste. Bifunctional catalysts . to hydrogenate the coal and depolymerize the plastic waste are ideal. We began studying, based on our previously devised synthesis strategies, the synthesis of heterogeneous catalysts with a bifunctional nature. In chapter 4, we discuss the fundamental principles in heterogeneous catalysis synthesis with inverse micelle solutions. In chapter 5, we extend the synthesis of chapter 4 to practical systems and use the materials in catalyst testing. Finally in chapter 6, we return to iron and coal liquefaction now studied with the heterogeneous catalysts.

  15. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-03-01

    CONSOL R&D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  16. Japan`s New Sunshine Project. 20. 1995 annual summary of coal liquefaction and gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The paper described a summary of the 1995 study on coal liquefaction and gasification under the New Sunshine Project. As for coal liquefaction, a study was made of liquefaction characteristics and catalysts of various coals. Also studied were liquefaction conditions for quality improvement of liquefaction products, an evaluation method of quality of coal liquid, and a utilization method of coal liquid. In order to prevent carbonization and realize effective liquefaction, a study was conducted for elucidation of the reaction mechanism of high pressure hydrogenation. In a 150t/d pilot plant using hydrogen transfer hydrogenation solvents, the NEDOL method was studied using various catalysts and kinds of coals. This is a step prior to data acquisition for engineering, actual construction of equipment and operation. A 1t/d process supporting unit is a unit to support it. The unit conducts studies on slurry letdown valves and synthetic iron sulfide catalysts, screening of Chinese coals, etc. As to coal gasification, the paper added to the basic research the combined cycle power generation using entrained flow coal gasification for improvement of thermal efficiency and environmental acceptability and the HYCOL method for hydrogen production. 68 refs., 40 figs.

  17. Subtask 3.3 - Feasibility of Direct Coal Liquefaction in the Modern Economic Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin Oster; Joshua Strege; Marc Kurz; Anthony Snyder; Melanie Jensen

    2009-06-15

    Coal liquefaction provides an alternative to petroleum for the production of liquid hydrocarbon-based fuels. There are two main processes to liquefy coal: direct coal liquefaction (DCL) and indirect coal liquefaction (ICL). Because ICL has been demonstrated to a greater extent than DCL, ICL may be viewed as the lower-risk option when it comes to building a coal liquefaction facility. However, a closer look, based on conversion efficiencies and economics, is necessary to determine the optimal technology. This report summarizes historical DCL efforts in the United States, describes the technical challenges facing DCL, overviews Shenhua's current DCL project in China, provides a DCL conceptual cost estimate based on a literature review, and compares the carbon dioxide emissions from a DCL facility to those from an ICL facility.

  18. Biomedical implications of altered product composition in advanced coal liquefaction processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B.W.; Mahlum, D.D.; Pelroy, R.A.

    1986-04-01

    Chemical and toxicologic characteristics of direct coal liquefaction materials are highly dependent upon the specific process operations by which the coal liquids were produced, including, in particular, those that affect boiling point range and degree of hydrogen incorporation. Recent advances in direct coal liquefaction technology, such as the use of catalytic hydrogenation, reduced liquefaction severity and lowering the upper temperature cut point for the distillation of fuels, have resulted in products with higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratios and lower heteroatom content. These higher-quality fuels tend to be less mutagenic and carcinogenic in laboratory assays than earlier coal liquefaction products. It is likely that application of postproduction hydrotreatment, as well as restriction of upper distillation temperature, for coal-based fuel products could result in materials that exhibit mutagenic or carcinogenic activity which is no greater than that of their petroleum-derived counterparts. 2 figs., 3 tabs., 46 refs.

  19. Coal liquefaction process solvent characterization and evaluation: Second annual report, January 1--December 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winschel, R. A.; Robbins, G. A.; Burke, F. P.

    1987-06-01

    In 1986, work under this contract concentrated on support of the liquefaction process development activities of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Test Facility at Wilsonville, AL, and at the Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., (HRI) process development unit (PDU) in Lawrenceville, NJ, on two potential process improvements for coal liquefaction, and on a stable carbon isotope method for quantifying the separate contributions of coal and petroleum to coprocessing products. The several most-significant results and conclusions obtained under this contract in 1986 are highlighted below. 32 refs., 12 figs., 24 tabs.

  20. Effect of Recycle Solvent Hydrotreatment on Oil Yield of Direct Coal Liquefaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shansong Gao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of the recycle solvent hydrotreatment on oil yield of direct coal liquefaction were carried out in the 0.18 t/day direct coal liquefaction bench support unit of National Engineering Laboratory for Direct Coal Liquefaction (China. Results showed that the hydrogen-donating ability of the hydrogenated recycle solvent improved and the hydrogen consumption of solvent hydrotreatment was increased by decreasing liquid hourly space velocity (LHSV from 1.5 to 1.0 h−1 and increasing reaction pressure from 13.7 to 19.0 MPa. The hydrogen-donating ability of the hydrogenated recycle solvent was enhanced, thus promoting the oil yield and coal conversion of the liquefaction reaction. The coal conversion and distillates yield of coal liquefaction were increased from 88.74% to 88.82% and from 47.41% to 49.10%, respectively, with the increase in the solvent hydrotreatment pressure from 13.7 to 19.0 MPa. The coal conversion and distillates of coal liquefaction were increased from 88.82% to 89.27% and from 49.10% to 54.49%, respectively, when the LHSV decreased from 1.5 to 1.0 h−1 under the solvent hydrotreatment pressure of 19.0 MPa.

  1. Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

    1989-03-01

    The DOE Coal Liquefaction Research Needs (COLIRN) Panel reviewed, developed, and assessed R and D needs for the development of coal liquefaction for the production of transportation fuels. Technical, economics, and environmental considerations were important components of the panel's deliberations. The panel examined in some depth each of the following technologies: direct liquefaction of coal, indirect liquefaction via conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas, pyrolysis, coprocessing of combined coal/oil feedstocks, and bioconversion of coal and coal-derived materials. In this assessment particular attention was given to highlighting the fundamental and applied research which has revealed new and improved liquefaction mechanisms, the potentially promising innovative processes currently emerging, and the technological and engineering improvements necessary for significant cost reductions. As the result of this assessment, the COLIRN panel developed a list of prioritized research recommendations needed to bring coal liquefaction to technical and economic readiness in the next 5--20 years. The findings and the research recommendations generated by the COLIRN panel are summarized in this publication. 107 figs., 63 tabs.

  2. Characteristics of process oils from HTI coal/plastics co-liquefaction runs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A. [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this project is to provide timely analytical support to DOE`s liquefaction development effort. Specific objectives of the work reported here are presented. During a few operating periods of Run POC-2, HTI co-liquefied mixed plastics with coal, and tire rubber with coal. Although steady-state operation was not achieved during these brief tests periods, the results indicated that a liquefaction plant could operate with these waste materials as feedstocks. CONSOL analyzed 65 process stream samples from coal-only and coal/waste portions of the run. Some results obtained from characterization of samples from Run POC-2 coal/plastics operation are presented.

  3. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Heunisch, G.W.; Winschel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    Described in this report are the following activities: CONSOL characterized process stream samples from HTI Run ALC-2, in which Black Thunder Mine coal was liquefied using four combinations of dispersed catalyst precursors. Oil assays were completed on the HTI Run PB-05 product blend. Fractional distillation of the net product oil of HTI Run POC-1 was completed. CONSOL completed an evaluation of the potential for producing alkylphenyl ethers from coal liquefaction phenols. At the request of DOE, various coal liquid samples and relevant characterization data were supplied to the University of West Virginia and the Federal Energy Technology Center. The University of Delaware is conducting resid reactivity tests and is completing the resid reaction computer model. The University of Delaware was instructed on the form in which the computer model is to be delivered to CONSOL.

  4. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Status assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandes, S.D.

    1995-07-01

    A review of the literature dealing with the modeling of fossil-fuel resid conversion to product oils and an updated assessment of the physico-chemical analytical methodology applicable to coal-liquefaction product streams is presented in this document. Analytical methodologies included here are either those which are different than those previously surveyed or are improvements on, or significantly different applications of methods previously surveyed. The literature cited spans the time period from 1991 to the present. The literature was examined from the 1960s through the present. When possible, for each model described, the methodology for deriving the model and the relative quality of the kinetic parameters derived is discussed. Proposed reaction schemes used for constructing coal-conversion models, in many cases, include the conversion of a resid intermediate to light products. These models are, therefore, also of interest, and are included here. Analytical techniques were identified that were shown to be useful for providing physico-chemical information of coal-liquefaction resids. These techniques are nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, mass spectrometry (especially the technique of field ionization mass spectrometry), electron spin resonance spectroscopy coupled to thermogravimetric analysis, and a suite of petroleum inspection tests. It is recommended that these techniques be used in the present contract. 76 refs.

  5. Research on co-liquefaction of highly volatile coal and waste polymer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋书宇; 赵鸣

    2002-01-01

    In the paper, the reaction pattern and technological requirement of the co-processing of coal with waste polymer are studied in a 50 ml reactor. The results showed that adding waste polymers during the liquefaction of coal could effectively improve coal conversion, increase oil yield, reduce the cost of hydrogen, and require less strict reaction conditions.

  6. Applied research and evaluation of process concepts for liquefaction and gasification of western coals. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, W. H.

    1980-09-01

    Fourteen sections, including five subsections, of the final report covering work done between June 1, 1975 to July 31, 1980 on research programs in coal gasification and liquefaction have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  7. Low Severity Coal Liquefaction Promoted by Cyclic Olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christine W. Curtis

    1998-04-09

    The development of the donor solvent technology for coal liquefaction has drawn a good deal of attention over the last three decades. The search for better hydrogen donors led investigators to a class of compounds known as cyclic olefins. Cyclic olefins are analogues of the conventional hydroaromatic donor species but do not contain aromatic rings. The cyclic olefins are highly reactive compounds which readily release their hydrogen at temperatures of 200 C or higher. Considerable effort has been o expended toward understanding the process of hydrogen donation. Most of this work was conducted in bomb reactors, with product analysis being carried out after the reaction was complete. Efforts directed towards fundamental studies of these reactions in situ are rare. The current work employs a high temperature and high pressure infrared cell to monitor in situ the concentrations of reactants and products during hydrogen release from hydrogen donor compounds.

  8. Effects of pretreatment by organic reduction on coal liquefaction (3). [Partial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuzu, Satoshi; Fujimoto, Tatsuya; Miyake, Mikio; Nomura, Masakatsu

    1986-10-23

    In this experiment, Akabira coal pretreated by the reductive hydrogenation was liquefied using the red mud-sulfur (ratio by weight: 9/1) catalyst to determine the effect of the partial reductive hydrogenation as the pretreatment on the coal liquefaction. The reduced coal was prepared by the reductive hydrogenation using sodium in liquid ammonia or by the pretreatment using molten potassium under reflux of tetra-hydrofuran. A 50 ml-autoclave was used for the liquefaction. The result indicates that hydrogen is introduced into the aromatic nucleus in the molecule of coal by the partial hydrogenation and the partial cleavages of C-C and C-O bonds in the structure of coal take place. Since the liquefaction of partially hydrogenated coal is accelerated by introducing hydrogen, the consumption of hydrogen is reduced and the efficiency of reaction is enhanced. (4 figs, 2 tabs, 3 refs)

  9. Assessment of Long-Term Research Needs for Coal-Liquefaction Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, S.S.

    1980-03-01

    The Fossil Energy Research Working Group (FERWG), at the request of J.M. Deutch (Under Secretary of DOE), E. Frieman (Director, Office of Energy Research) and G. Fumich, Jr. (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Fuels), has studied and reviewed currently funded coal-liquefaction technologies. These studies were performed in order to provide an independent assessment of critical research areas that affect the long-term development of coal-liquefaction technologies. This report summarizes the findings and research recommendations of FERWG.

  10. Study on the mechanism of coal liquefaction reaction and a new process concept

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Shi-dong; LI Wen-bo; WANG Yong; GUO Zhi; LI Ke-jian

    2008-01-01

    The coal hydrogenation reaction process is simply considered as three steps. In the first step, the smaller molecules associated with coal structure units are released as some gases and water in the condition of solvent and heating. In this step, some weaker bonds of the coal structure units are ruptured to form free radicals. The radicals are stabi-lized by hydrogen atoms from donor solvent and/or H2. In the second step, chain reaction occurs quickly. In the process of chain reaction, the covalent bonds of coal structure units are attacked by the radicals to form some asphaltenes. In the third step, asphaltenes are hydrogenated form more liquids and some gases. In coal liquefaction, the second step of coal hydrogenation reaction should be controlled to avoid integration of radicals, and the third step of coal hydrogenation should be accelerated to increase the coal conversion and the oil yield. A new concept of coal liquefaction process named as China direct coal lique-faction (CDCL) process is presented based on the mechanism study of coal liquefaction.

  11. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: Indirect Liquefaction (oxygenated fuels); and Indirect Liquefaction (Fischer-Tropsch technology). Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. The role of recycle oil in direct coal liquefaction process development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, F.P.

    1995-08-01

    It has long been recognized that use of a recycle oil is a convenient and perhaps necessary feature of a practical direct coal liquefaction process. The recycle oil performs a number of important functions. It serves as a vehicle to convey coal into the liquefaction reactor and products from the reactor. It is a medium for mass and heat transfer among the solid, liquid, and gaseous components of the reactor inventory. It can act as a reactant or intermediate in the liquefaction process. Therefore, the nature of the recycle oil can have a determining effect on process configuration and performance, and the characterization of recycle oil composition and chemistry has been the subject of considerable interest. This paper discusses recycle oil characterization and its influence on the industrial development of coal liquefaction technology,

  13. Using gas chromatography to characterize a direct coal liquefaction naphtha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omais, Badaoui; Courtiade, Marion; Charon, Nadège; Roullet, Christophe; Ponthus, Jérémie; Thiébaut, Didier

    2012-02-24

    Speciation of oxygenated compounds in direct coal liquefaction naphthas is essential considering their important roles in coal conversion reactions. This study attempts to characterize them as fully as possible using gas chromatographic systems. Firstly, GC-MS was deployed allowing the identification of a few ketones, alcohols, and phenols. This conventional analysis was complemented by the application of GC-GC-FID aiming to overcome the coelutions highlighted when using one-dimensional gas chromatography. Heart-cutting and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography were used and the comprehensive system led to better performances as expected considering the complexity of the matrix. In fact, it allowed the identification of more than a hundred of oxygenated compounds belonging to five chemical families: alcohols, ketones, furans, acids and phenols. Average response factors of each of these families were determined by GC×GC-FID using calibration curves and vary from 1 (hydrocarbons) to 2.50 (carboxylic acids). Thanks to a breakthrough columns set involving a trifluoropropyl stationary phase, alcohols and phenols which represent around 14% of the sample were fully identified. A detailed quantification of these species was carried out for the first time in such matrices using the determined response factors. It was concluded that 90% (w/w) of the alcohols are aromatic (phenols), 5% (w/w) are cyclic and 5% (w/w) are linear. A quantification of hydrocarbon families was also achieved and shows that the matrix is mostly naphthenic (56%, w/w), but also contains aromatics (22%, w/w) and paraffins (8%, w/w). This detailed characterization leads to a better understanding of coal conversion processes and is essential to convert them into synthetic fuels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cooperative Research Program in Coal-Waste Liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Huffman

    2000-03-31

    The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste plastic and tires and the coprocessing of these waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was conducted by a committee that included nine representatives from the CFFS, six from the U.S. Department of Energy - Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), and four from Burns and Roe, Inc. The study included: (1) An assessment of current recycling practices, particularly feedstock recycling in Germany; (2) A review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability for various types of waste polymers; and (3) A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and an economic analysis for various feedstock mixes. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 100 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case with oil priced at $20 per barrel, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 9% to 20%, using tipping fees for waste plastic and tires typical of those existing in the U.S. The most profitable feedstock appeared to waste plastic alone, with a plant processing 300 t/d of plastic yielding ROI's from 13 to 27 %, depending on the tipping fees for waste plastic. Feedstock recycling of tires was highly dependent on the price that could be obtained for recovered carbon. Addition of even relatively small amounts (20 t/d) of coal to waste plastic and/or coal feeds lowered the ROI's substantially. It should also be noted that increasing the size of the plant significantly improved all ROI's. For example, increasing plant size from 300 t/d to1200 t/d approximately doubles the estimated ROI's for a waste plastic feedstock.

  15. Co-liquefaction of micro algae with coal. 2; Bisai sorui to sekitan no kyoekika hanno. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, C.; Matsui, T.; Otsuki, M.; Ikenaga, N.; Suzuki, T. [Kansai University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-28

    For the removal and recycle of CO2, a global warming gas, utilization of photosynthesis by micro algae is investigated. Formed micro algae are decomposed into CO2, H2O and CH4 again, which does not result in the permanent fixation. For the effective utilization of these micro algae, creation of petroleum alternate energy was tried through the co-liquefaction of micro algae with coal. Were investigated influences of the reaction temperature during the co-liquefaction and influences of catalysts, such as Fe(CO)5-S, Ru(CO)12, and Mo(CO)6-S, which are effective for the coal liquefaction. Micro algae, such as chlorella, spirulina, and littorale, and Yallourn brown coal were tested. It was found that co-liquefaction of micro algae with coal can be successfully proceeded under the same conditions as the liquefaction of coal. The oil yield obtained from the co-liquefaction in the presence of Fe(CO)5-S, an effective catalyst for coal liquefaction, agreed appropriately with the arithmetical mean value from separate liquefaction of coal and micro algae. It was suggested that pyrrhotite, an active species for coal liquefaction, was sufficiently formed by increasing the addition of sulfur. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Biological liquefaction characteristics of Jurassic weak & non-stick coal in Hengshan, North Shaanxi Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Mei-li; CHEN Hong-gui; JIANG Su-rong

    2008-01-01

    Jurassic weak & non-stick coal in Hengshan of North Shaanxi Province waspretreated by the nitric acid. Then, it was biodegraded by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.The biodegradation role of the white-rot fungus for coal is extremely significant. Orthogo-nal test demonstrate that liquefied time, liquefaction temperature and the amount of fun-gus liquids etc. are the main factors affecting the coal biodegradation rate. The best tech-nical condition of the coal biological liquefaction was got. Comparing the coal sample be-fore biodegradation with that after biodegradation, it is found that the ash of the coal resi-due after biodegradation reduces significantly, H and O contents increase, C and N con-tents decrease. The biodegradation change the coal macromolecular structure.

  17. Liquefaction behavior of finely pulverized coal. Chobifunsaitan no ekika hanno kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Y.; Kamo, T.; Miki, K.; Yamamoto, Y. (National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1992-11-05

    The reaction process of coal liquefaction which uses ultrafine pulverized coal having a particle diameter of several micrometers was investigated in order to improve the catalytic efficiency between coal and catalyst. Two kinds of samples were prepared by crushing Taiheiyo-coal into less than 100-mesh by usual technique and further pulverizing the crushed coal to several [mu]m. When iron oxide catalyst, sulfur and tetralin solvent were used, pulverizing does not bring a significant improvement in conversion rate and the yield of liquefaction oil capable of being distillated. This is considered to be due to the coagulation between fine particles before or during reaction, suggesting the importance of selecting reaction conditions etc. In the case of pulverized coal, hydrogen consumption is high and hydrogenation of heavy fractions such as SRC proceeds. When liquefaction-oil circulating solvent and red mud-sulfur-based catalyst were used, gas yield was low in pulverized coal, but no significant improvement was not shown in oil yield of liquefaction oil. The conversion rate and SRC yield were somewhat high in the case of pulverized coal. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. 3rd international conference on coal gasification and liquefaction, University of Pittsburgh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-01-01

    The third annual international conference on ''Coal Gasification and Liquefaction: What Needs to be Done Now'' was held at the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA on August 3-5, 1976. The majority of the papers dealt with coal gasification and liquefaction (often on the basis of process pilot plant experience) and on flue gas desulfurization by a variety of processes; fewer papers involved fluidized bed combustion, combined cycle power plants, coal desulfurization, government policy on environmental effects and on synthetic fuels, etc. Twenty-eight papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  19. Thermodynamic characterisation and modelling of coal liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, A.M.H. van der

    1997-01-01

    For the description of the temperature-pressure relationship of coal oils, a model is required that requires as input only data from analytical chemical techniques. Coal oils are obtained during liquefaction and differ in properties from crude oils in their contents of aromatic hydrocarbons. As

  20. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. [Effect of preconversion heat soak with coal liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    A study of the high-temperature soaking started in this quarter, following the installation of reactors in the previous quarter. Two high-volatile bituminous coals and three coal liquids, which were identified in the previous report, were used. A cross-linked, three-dimensional macromolecular model has been widely accepted f or the structure of coal, but there is no direct evidence to prove this model. The conventional coal structure model has been recently re-examined by this investigator because of the importance of relatively strong intra- and intermolecular interactions in bituminous coals. It was reasonable to deduce that significant portions were physically associated after a study of multistep extractions, associative equilibria, the irreversibility and the dependence of coal concentration on solvent swelling, and consideration of the monophase concept. Physical dissociation which may be significant above 300{degree}C should be utilized for the treatment before liquefaction. The high-temperature soaking in a recycle oil was proposed to dissociate coal complexes.

  1. Exploratory Research on Novel Coal Liquefaction Concept - Task 2: Evaluation of Process Steps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.

    1997-05-01

    A novel direct coal liquefaction technology is being investigated in a program being conducted by CONSOL Inc. with the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research and LDP Associates under DOE Contract DE-AC22-95PC95050. The novel concept consists of a new approach to coal liquefaction chemistry which avoids some of the inherent limitations of current high-temperature thermal liquefaction processes. The chemistry employed is based on hydride ion donation to solubilize coal at temperatures (350-400{degrees}C) significantly lower than those typically used in conventional coal liquefaction. The process concept being explored consists of two reaction stages. In the first stage, the coal is solubilized by hydride ion donation. In the second, the products are catalytically upgraded to acceptable refinery feedstocks. The program explores not only the initial solubilization step, but integration of the subsequent processing steps, including an interstage solids-separation step, to produce distillate products. A unique feature of the process concept is that many of the individual reaction steps can be decoupled, because little recycle around the liquefaction system is expected. This allows for considerable latitude in the process design. Furthermore, this has allowed for each key element in the process to be explored independently in laboratory work conducted under Task 2 of the program.

  2. Improving performance of direct coal liquefaction through swelling with solvent under the radiation of ultrasonic wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Xian-zhi; LI Ke-jian; WANG Li

    2004-01-01

    Three kinds of lower rank bituminous coals from Yanzhou mine and Tengxian mine from Shandong Province were treated and hydrogenated in the study. The test results show that the performance of hydrogenation liquefaction of the pretreated coals is improved markedly. Under the test condition of H2 initial pressure 8.2 MPa, addition of the oil yield of pretreated YZ1 coal is 69.76% compared with 62.53% of oil yield of untreated YZ1. Seminally the oil yield of pretreated YZ2 coal is 55.43% compared with20.88% of untreated YZ2 coal. The results of tests also prove that the improving degree of hydrogenation liquefaction of the pretreated coals is related with radiation duration when the radiation frequency and radiation power of ultrasonic wave are fixed.

  3. Characterization of the impregnated iron based catalyst for direct coal liquefaction by EXAFS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianliYang; JishengZhun; 等

    2001-01-01

    Catalyst plays an important role in direct cola liquefaction(DCL)[1],Due to relatively high activity,low cost and environmentally benign for disposal,iron catalysts are regarded as the most attractive catalysts for DCL.To maximize catalytic effect and minimize catalyst usage,ultra-fine size catalysts are preferred.The most effective catalysts are found to be those impregnated onto coal because of their high dispersion on coal surface and intimate contact with coal particles.

  4. Production and Optimization of Direct Coal Liquefaction derived Low Carbon-Footprint Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Markovich

    2010-06-30

    This report summarizes works conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42448. The work scope was divided into two categories - (a) experimental program to pretreat and refine a coal derived syncrude sample to meet transportation fuels requirements; (b) system analysis of a commercial scale direct coal liquefaction facility. The coal syncrude was derived from a bituminous coal by Headwaters CTL, while the refining study was carried out under a subcontract to Axens North America. The system analysis included H{sub 2} production cost via six different options, conceptual process design, utilities requirements, CO{sub 2} emission and overall plant economy. As part of the system analysis, impact of various H{sub 2} production options was evaluated. For consistence the comparison was carried out using the DOE H2A model. However, assumptions in the model were updated using Headwaters database. Results of Tier 2 jet fuel specifications evaluation by the Fuels & Energy Branch, US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RZPF) located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) are also discussed in this report.

  5. Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Topical report No. 14. Catalyst activity trends in two-stage coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-02-01

    The Two Stage Coal Liquefaction process became operational at Wilsonville in May 1981, with the inclusion of an H-OIL ebullated-bed catalytic reactor. The two stage process was initially operated in a nonintegrated mode and has recently been reconfigurated to fully integrate the thermal and the catalytic stages. This report focuses on catalyst activity trends observed in both modes of operation. A literature review of relevant catalyst screening studies in bench-scale and PDU units is presented. Existing kinetic and deactivation models were used to analyze process data over an extensive data base. Based on the analysis, three separate, application studies have been conducted. The first study seeks to elucidate the dependence of catalyst deactivation rate on type of coal feedstock used. A second study focuses on the significance of catalyst type and integration mode on SRC hydrotreatment. The third study presents characteristic deactivation trends observed in integrated operation with different first-stage thermal severities. In-depth analytical work was conducted at different research laboratories on aged catalyst samples from Run 242. Model hydrogenation and denitrogenation activity trends are compared with process activity trends and with changes observed in catalyst porosimetric properties. The accumulation of metals and coke deposits with increasing catalyst age, as well as their distribution across a pellet cross-section, are discussed. The effect of catalyst age and reactor temperature on the chemical composition of flashed bottoms product is addressed. Results from regenerating spent catalysts are also presented. 35 references, 31 figures, 18 tables.

  6. Status of health and environmental research relative to direct coal liquefaction: 1976 to the present

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, R.H.; Cowser, K.E. (eds.)

    1982-06-01

    This document describes the status of health and environmental research efforts, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to assist in the development of environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction processes. Four major direct coal liquefaction processes are currently in (or have been investigated at) the pilot plant stage of development. Two solvent refined coal processes (SRC-I and -II), H-coal (a catalytic liquefaction process) and Exxon donor solvent (EDS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was assigned responsibility for evaluating SRC process materials and prepared comprehensive health and environmental effects research program plans for SRC-I and -II. A similar program plan was prepared for H-coal process materials by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A program has been developed for EDS process materials by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. The program includes short-term screening of coal-derived materials for potential health and ecological effects. Longer-term assays are used to evaluate materials considered most representative of potential commercial practice and with greatest potential for human exposure or release to the environment. Effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential health and ecological effects are also being evaluated. These assessments are being conducted to assist in formulating cost-effective environmental research programs and to estimate health and environmental risks associated with a large-scale coal liquefaction industry. Significant results of DOE's health and environmental research efforts relative to coal liquefaction include the following: chemical characterization, health effects, ecological fate and effects, amelioration and risk assessment.

  7. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis. Quarterly report, January--March 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  8. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis. Quarterly report, May--August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  9. Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

    1989-03-01

    Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

  10. Catalytic activity of pyrite for coal liquefaction reaction; Tennen pyrite no shokubai seino ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, K.; Kozu, M.; Okada, T.; Kobayashi, M. [Nippon Coal Oil Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Since natural pyrite is easy to obtain and cheap as coal liquefaction catalyst, it is to be used for the 150 t/d scale NEDOL process bituminous coal liquefaction pilot plant. NEDO and NCOL have investigated the improvement of catalytic activity of pulverized natural pyrite for enhancing performance and economy of the NEDOL process. In this study, coal liquefaction tests were conducted using natural pyrite catalyst pulverized by dry-type bowl mill under nitrogen atmosphere. Mechanism of catalytic reaction of the natural pyrite was discussed from relations between properties of the catalyst and liquefaction product. The natural pyrite provided an activity to transfer gaseous hydrogen into the liquefaction product. It was considered that pulverized pyrite promotes the hydrogenation reaction of asphaltene because pulverization increases its contact rate with reactant and the amount of active points on its surface. It was inferred that catalytic activity of pyrite is affected greatly by the chemical state of Fe and S on its surface. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Liquefaction and/or solubilization of Spanish coals by newly isolated microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monistrol, I.F.; Laborda, F. (Universidad de Alcala de Henares, Alcala de Henares (Spain). Dept. de Microbiologia Parasitologia)

    1994-11-01

    A screening procedure has been set up for isolating microorganisms capable of liquefying coal. Spanish coals were used in the tests, namely a brown lignite from Galicia, sub-bituminous coal from Teruel and hard coal from Minas Figaredo S.A. (Asturias). Among the isolated strains several microorganisms proved capable of liquefying untreated lignite. When lignites were pretreated a more intense and rapid liquefaction was achieved, chelating agents being among the best pretreatment. None of the isolated microorganisms could satisfactorily liquefy sub-bituminous and hard coals in solid media. On the other hand, some fungi grew specifically on the untreated coals, engulfing them and in many cases a soft slurry was obtained. Several of the isolated microorganisms were able to solubilize all three untreated Spanish coals in liquid media. Coal solubilization was measured spectrophotometrically at 300, 400 and 450 nm. 5 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Japan`s New Sunshine Project. 1996 Annual Summary of Coal Liquefaction and Gasification; 1996 nendo new sunshine keikaku seika hokokusho gaiyoshu. Sekitan no ekika gasuka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    In reference to the results of the research and development under the fiscal 1996 New Sunshine Project, a report was summed up on coal liquefaction and coal gasification. As to the R and D of coal liquefaction technology, researches were conducted on liquefaction characteristics and engineering properties by coal kind, catalysts for coal liquefaction, liquefaction reaction of coal and reformation utilization of the liquefied products, liquefaction reaction mechanism and coking mechanism, solubility of coal in solvent and catalytic reaction mechanism, solvent reaction mechanism by hydrogen donor solvent, etc. Concerning the R and D of coal gasification technology, made were the basic study of eco-technology adaptable gasification technology and the study of coal gasification enhancing technology. Further, as to the development of bituminous coal liquefaction technology, carried out were the study in pilot plants and the support study of pilot plants. Additionally, R and D were done of the basic technology of coal liquefaction such as upgrading technology and environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction technology, and of coal hydrogasification technology. 3 refs., 81 figs., 25 tabs.

  13. Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Indirect coal liquefaction, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    A comprehensive review of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology, including fixed, fluidized, and bubble column reactors, was undertaken in order to develop an information base before initiating the design of the Fischer-Tropsch indirect liquefaction PDU as a part of the Generic Coal Conversion Facilities to be built at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The pilot plant will include a fixed bed and slurry bubble column reactor for the F-T mode of operation. The review encompasses current status of both these technologies, their key variables, catalyst development, future directions, and potential improvement areas. However, more emphasis has been placed on the slurry bubble column reactor since this route is likely to be the preferred technology for commercialization, offering process advantages and, therefore, better economics than fixed and fluidized bed approaches.

  14. 煤炭间接液化制油能源效率和环境可行性分析%Analysis on Energy Efficiency and Environment Feasibility of Coal Indirect Liquefaction to Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊诚; 康有贵; 金嘉璐; 刘万洲

    2012-01-01

    Based on a coal indirect liquefaction(coal to oil) plant with four million ton of coal per year as a model,taking the coal-fired power generation of the most wide applied coal utilization accesses as the references,from the coal comprehensive energy efficiency,solid waste treatment and recovery utilization,water consumption,waste water treatment and drainage,SO2 treatment and emission,CO2 collection and sealing,and others,the energy efficiency and environment feasibility of the coal indirect liquefaction were analyzed.The analysis showed that the coal indirect liquefaction would be a new access with higher energy efficiency and more clean coal utilization and could provide the references to the CO2 collection,sealing and utilization in the future.

  15. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, January--March 1978. [Brief summary of 15 pilot plant projects supported by US DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-09-01

    The advantage of coal liquefaction is that the entire range of liquid products, including heavy boiler fuel, distillate fuel oil, gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel oil, can be produced from coal by varying the type of process and operating conditions used in the process. Furthermore, coal-derived liquids have the potential for use as chemical feedstocks. To provide efficient and practical means of utilizing coal resources, DOE is sponsoring the development of several conversion processes currently in the pilot plant stage. Fifteen coal liquefaction projects supported by US DOE are described briefly, with flowsheets, funding, history and progress during the quarter. (LTN)

  16. Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Technical progress report, Run 243 with Illinois 6 coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-02-01

    This report presents the operating results for Run 243 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R and D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run was made in an Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) mode using Illinois 6 coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary objective was to demonstrate the effect of a dissolver on the ITSL product slate, especially on the net C/sub 1/-C/sub 5/ gas production and hydrogen consumption. Run 243 began on 3 February 1983 and continued through 28 June 1983. During this period, 349.8 tons of coal was fed in 2947 hours of operation. Thirteen special product workup material balances were defined, and the results are presented herein. 29 figures, 19 tables.

  17. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation:. Characterization of coal liquids by field ionization mass spectrometry and iodotrimethylsilane derivatization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malhotra, R.; McMillen, D.F. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Burke, F.P.; Winschel, R.A.; Brandes, S.D. [Consolidation Coal Co., Library, PA (United States). Research and Development Dept.

    1992-01-01

    SRI International evaluated two analytical methods for application to coal liquefaction. These included field ionization mass spectrometry and a technique employing iodotrimethylsilane for the derivatization of oxygen bound to alkyl carbon (alkyl ethers). The full report authored by the SRI researchers is presented here. The following assessment briefly highlights the major findings of the project, and evaluates the potential of the methods for application to coal-derived materials. These results will be incorporated by Consol into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of this contract. (VC)

  18. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, April 1993--June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Gutterman, C.

    1994-09-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and carrying out a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. All three coals used in this study (Black Thunder, Burning Star bituminous, and Martin Lake lignite) are effectively swelled by a number of solvents. The most effective solvents are those having hetero-functionality. In addition, a synergistic effect has been demonstrated, in which solvent blends are more effective for coal swelling than the pure solvents alone. Therefore, it will be necessary to use only low levels of swelling agents and yet promote the impregnation of catalyst precursors. The rate of the impregnation of catalyst precursors into swollen coal increases greatly as the effectiveness of the solvent to swell the coal increases. This effect is also demonstrated by improved catalyst precursor impregnation with increased contact temperature. Laboratory- and bench-scale liquefaction experimentation is underway using swelled and catalyst impregnated coal samples. Higher coal conversions were observed for the SO{sub 2}-treated coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Conversions of swelled coal were highest when Molyvan-L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively, were added to the liquefaction solvent.

  19. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) process bench studies with bituminous coal. Final report, [October 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-03-01

    Reported herein are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using bituminous coal concluded at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE contract during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with the application of coal cleaning methods and solids separation methods to the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) Process. Additionally a predispersed catalyst was evaluated in a thermal/catalytic configuration, and an alternative nickel molybdenum catalyst was evaluated for the CTSL process. Three coals were evaluated in this program: Bituminous Illinois No. 6 Burning Star and Sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The tests involving the Illinois coal are reported herein, and the tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico coals are described in Topical Report No. 1. On the laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects are reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests, such as tests on rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids, and cleaned coals, are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL process are described in the CTSL Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

  20. Biological production of alcohols from coal through indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, S.; Prieto, S.; Harrison, S.B.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of producing liquid fuels from the components of synthesis gas through biological indirect liquefaction. The results of pure culture and natural source screening studies aimed at finding organisms capable of carrying out the conversions are presented and discussed. 17 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Coal liquefaction in an inorganic-organic medium. [DOE patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, T.; Grens, E.A. II; Holten, R.R.

    Improved process for liquefaction of coal by contacting pulverized coal in an inorganic-organic medium solvent system containing a ZnCl/sub 2/ catalyst, a polar solvent with the structure RX where X is one of the elements O, N, S, or P, and R is hydrogen or a lower hydrocarbon radical; the solvent system can contain a hydrogen donor solvent (and must when RX is water) which is immiscible in the ZnCl/sub 2/ and is a hydroaromatic hydrocarbon selected from tetralin, dihydrophenanthrene, dihydroanthracene or a hydrogenated coal derived hydroaromatic hydrocarbon distillate fraction.

  2. Development of liquefaction process of coal and biomass in supercritical water; Chorinkaisui wo mochiita sekitan biomass doji ekika process no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonaka, H.; Matsumura, Y.; Tsutsumi, A.; Yoshida, K. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Masuno, Y.; Inaba, A. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Liquefaction of coal and biomass in supercritical water has been investigated, in which strong solubilization force of supercritical water against hydrocarbons is utilized. Free radicals are formed through the cleavage of covalent bonds in coal under the heating condition at around 400{degree}C during coal liquefaction. It is important to stabilize these unstable intermediate products by hydrogen transfer. On the other hand, hydrogen is not required for the liquefaction of biomass having higher H/C atomic ratio and oxygen content than those of coal. Co-liquefaction of coal and biomass was conducted using supercritical water, in which excess hydrogen from the liquefaction of biomass would be transferred to coal, resulting in the effective liquefaction of coal. Mixture of coal and cellulose was liquefied in supercritical water at 390{degree}C under the pressure of 25 MPa using a semi-continuous reactor, and the results were compared with those from the separate liquefaction of them. The co-liquefaction of coal and cellulose did not show any difference in the residue yield from the separate liquefaction of these, but led to the increased production of compounds with lower molecular weight. The liquefaction was completed in 15 minutes. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    A study of the high-temperature soaking started in this quarter, following the installation of reactors in the previous quarter. Two high-volatile bituminous coals and three coal liquids, which were identified in the previous report, were used. A cross-linked, three-dimensional macromolecular model has been widely accepted f or the structure of coal, but there is no direct evidence to prove this model. The conventional coal structure model has been recently re-examined by this investigator because of the importance of relatively strong intra- and intermolecular interactions in bituminous coals. It was reasonable to deduce that significant portions were physically associated after a study of multistep extractions, associative equilibria, the irreversibility and the dependence of coal concentration on solvent swelling, and consideration of the monophase concept. Physical dissociation which may be significant above 300{degree}C should be utilized for the treatment before liquefaction. The high-temperature soaking in a recycle oil was proposed to dissociate coal complexes.

  4. Geological occurrence response to trace elemental migration in coal liquefaction based on SPSS: take no. 11 coalbed in Antaibao mine for example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaohong; Qin, Yong; Yang, Weifeng

    2013-03-01

    Coal liquefaction is an adoptable method to transfer the solid fossil energy into liquid oil in large scale, but the dirty material in which will migrate to different step of liquefaction. The migration rule of some trace elements is response to the react activity of macerals in coal and the geological occurrence of the element nature of itself. In this paper, from the SPSS data correlation analysis and hierarchical clustering dendrogram about the trace elements with macerals respond to coal liquefaction yield, it shows the trace elements in No.11 Antaibao coal seam originated from some of lithophile and sulphophle elements. Correlation coefficient between liquefaction yield of three organic macerals and migration of the elements in liquefaction residue indicated that the lithophile are easy to transfer to residue, while sulphophle are apt to in the liquid products. The activated macerals are response to sulphophle trace elements. The conclusion is useful to the coal blending and environmental effects on coal direct liquefaction.

  5. Non-catalytic transfer hydrogenation in supercritical CO2 for coal liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhussien, Hussien

    This thesis presents the results of the investigation on developing and evaluating a low temperature (coal dissolution in supercritical CO2. The main idea behind the thesis was that one hydrogen atom from water and one hydrogen atom from the hydrogen transfer agent (HTA) were used to hydrogenate the coal. The products of coal dissolution were non-polar and polar while the supercritical CO2, which enhanced the rates of hydrogenation and dissolution of the non-polar molecules and removal from the reaction site, was non-polar. The polar modifier (PM) for CO2 was added to the freed to aid in the dissolution and removal of the polar components. The addition of a phase transfer agent (PTA) allowed a seamless transport of the ions and by-product between the aqueous and organic phases. DDAB, used as the PTA, is an effective phase transfer catalyst and showed enhancement to the coal dissolution process. COAL + DH- +H 2O → COAL.H2 + DHO-- This process has a great feature due to the fact that the chemicals were obtained without requir-ing to first convert coal to CO and H2 units as in indirect coal liquefaction. The experiments were conducted in a unique reactor set up that can be connected through two lines. one line to feed the reactor with supercritical CO 2 and the other connected to gas chromatograph. The use of the supercritical CO2 enhanced the solvent option due to the chemical extraction, in addition to the low environmental impact and energy cost. In this thesis the experiment were conducted at five different temperatures from atmos-pheric to 140°C, 3000 - 6000 psi with five component of feed mixture, namely water, HTA, PTA, coal, and PM in semi batch vessels reactor system with a volume of 100 mL. The results show that the chemicals were obtained without requiring to first convert coal to CO and H2 units as in indirect coal liquefaction. The results show that the conversion was found to be 91.8% at opti-mum feed mixtures values of 3, 1.0 and 5.4 for water: PM

  6. Assessing the economic impact of indirect liquefaction process improvements: Volume 1, Development of the integrated indirect liquefaction model and baseline case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G.C. (Mitre Corp., McLean, VA (USA). Civil Systems Div.)

    1990-10-01

    This report documents the development of an integrated indirect liquefaction system model, which processes input coal to refined liquid products, and the model's application in the analysis of a baseline case. The baseline case uses Shell gasification of coal followed by gas cleaning to produce a clean synthesis gas for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The raw liquid products are refined to produce gasoline and diesel. Costs of liquid products have been estimated for the baseline plant. The model also alloys many sensitivity studies to be performed so that the economic impacts of research and development advances can be quantified. When used in this manner, the model can provide research guidance for future indirect liquefaction studies. 18 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. Studies on characteristics of fluid dynamics in the coal liquefaction reactor; Sekitan ekika hanno tonai no ryudo tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakawaki, K.; Nogami, Y.; Inokuchi, K. [Mitsui SRC Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Mochizuki, M.; Imada, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Tachikawa, N.; Moki, T.; Ishikawa, I. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    To design the coal liquefaction reactor of large scale plant in future, it is important to understand characteristics of fluid dynamics within the coal liquefaction reactor. In this study, to measure the fluid dynamics of liquid phase within the coal liquefaction reactor operated under high temperature and high pressure coal liquefaction condition, neutron attenuating tracer (NAT) technique, one of the tracer test methods, was applied using 1 t/d coal treating PSU. The residence time of liquid phase within the reactor can be measured by utilizing property of neutron of being absorbed by materials. The tracer was injected at the inlets of first and third reactors, and the neutron was counted at each outlet. The concentration of tracer was derived from the discrete value, to determine the residence time distribution of liquid phase. The mean residence time of liquid phase in the single first reactor and in the total three reactors were prolonged under the severe operation conditions of liquefaction. The more severe the liquefaction operation condition was, the more active the mixing of liquid phase was in the first reactor. It was found that the progress of reaction was accelerated. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Trace component analysis of process hydrogen streams at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronfenbrenner, J.C.

    1983-09-01

    This report summarizes subcontracted work done by the Radian Corporation to analyze trace components in process hydrogen streams at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The data will be used to help define whether the gas streams to be treated in the hydrogen processing unit in the SRC-I Demonstration Plant will require further treatment to remove trace contaminants that could be explosive under certain conditions. 2 references.

  9. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1992-08-26

    Research in this project centers upon developing a new approach to the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates all aspects of the coal liquefaction process including coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, coal liquefaction experimentation, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. On May 28, 1992, the Department of Energy authorized starting the experimental aspects of this projects; therefore, experimentation at Amoco started late in this quarterly report period. Research contracts with Auburn University, Pennsylvania State University, and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation were signed during June, 1992, so their work was just getting underway. Their work will be summarized in future quarterly reports. A set of coal samples were sent to Hazen Research for beneficiation. The samples were received and have been analyzed. The literature search covering coal swelling has been up-dated, and preliminary coal swelling experiments were carried out. Further swelling experimentation is underway. An up-date of the literature on the liquefaction of coal using dispersed catalysts is nearing completion; it will be included in the next quarterly report.

  10. Evaluation of coal minerals and metal residues as coal-liquefaction catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-02-01

    Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-79ET14806, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., subcontracted Auburn University Coal Conversion Laboratory to perform exploratory studies on the use of minerals and by-product metallic wastes in coal liquefaction. Under this program Auburn University conducted an extensive screening program on numerous materials from which the more active or interesting ones were further investigated in the continuous process development units (PDU) at Air Products. In Volume 1 of the final report a number of the results from those tests are summarized for comparison with the PDU results. Because of the very extensive and detailed work performed at Auburn University, a portion of that work is not included in Volume 1. Therefore, in order to fulfill the requirements of the contract with DOE, a compilation of the work performed by Auburn University is submitted in Volume 2. The information from the Auburn University work was compiled from a sequence of monthly reports submitted to air Products and Chemicals, Inc., during the course of the program. Because of the very large numbers of screening runs conducted at Auburn, the overlap between these reports is minimal. This work presents in some detail the various stages of development of screening procedures and analytical methods that were developed. The reader should also find them extremely informative as to the generation of ideas that developed during this program. The work reported in this volume went beyond simple screening runs. Extensive exploratory studies as well as basic studies on the behavior of reactants and catalysts were performed. These results from the basic and exploratory studies impacted on the overall direction of this program.

  11. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Application of liquid chromatographic separation methods to THF-soluble portions of integrated two-stage coal liquefaction resids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, J.B.; Pearson, C.D.; Young, L.L.; Green, J.A. (National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States))

    1992-05-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using non-aqueous ion exchange liquid chromatography (NIELC) for the examination of the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble distillation resids and THF-soluble whole oils derived from direct coal liquefaction. The technique can be used to separate the material into a number of acid, base, and neutral fractions. Each of the fractions obtained by NIELC was analyzed and then further fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The separation and analysis schemes are given in the accompanying report. With this approach, differences can be distinguished among samples obtained from different process streams in the liquefaction plant and among samples obtained at the same sampling location, but produced from different feed coals. HPLC was directly applied to one THF-soluble whole process oil without the NIELC preparation, with limited success. The direct HPLC technique used was directed toward the elution of the acid species into defined classes. The non-retained neutral and basic components of the oil were not analyzable by the direct HPLC method because of solubility limitations. Sample solubility is a major concern in the application of these techniques.

  12. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly report, October--December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W.

    1992-12-31

    Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins offers a means of liquefying coal at low severity conditions. Lower temperature, 350{degrees}C, and lower hydrogen pressure, 500 psi, have been used to perform liquefaction reactions. The presence of the cyclic olefin, hexahydroanthracene, made a substantial difference in the conversion of Illinois No. 6 coal at these low severity conditions. The Researchperformed this quarter was a parametric evaluation of the effect of different parameters on the coal conversion and product distribution from coal. The effect of the parameters on product distribution from hexahydroanthracene was also determined. The work planned for next quarter includes combining the most effective parametric conditions for the low severity reactions and determining their effect. The second part ofthe research performed this quarter involved performing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy using cyclic olefins. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using FTIR and a heated cell to determine the reaction pathway that occurs in the hydrogen donation reactions from cyclic olefins. The progress made to date includes evaluating the FTIR spectra of cyclic olefins and their expected reaction products. This work is included in this progress report.

  13. Mutagenicity of products from coal gasification and liquefaction in the Salmonella/microsome assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeny, R; Warshawsky, D; Hollingsworth, L; Hund, M; Moore, G

    1981-01-01

    As a first step in the assessment of their possible bio-effects, coal-related materials were tested for mutagenicity in the Salmonella/microsome assay. Of three coal gasification by-products tested, only a tar was mutagenic for any of four Salmonella strains. The following liquefaction materials were mutagenic for strains TA1538, TA98, and/or TA100: A liquefaction vehicle oil and coal hydrogenation filtered liquid, separated bottoms, vacuum overhead, and vacuum bottoms. Neither powdered coal nor water produced as a by-product of the hydrogenation process was positive in the Salmonella test. No coal-related material was mutagenic for the missense mutant TA1535 or for any strain in the absence of metabolic activation provided by rat hepatic homogenates (S9). In all but one instance Aroclor 1254-induced S9 provided the maximum activation for mutagenesis. Fractionation of all samples was undertaken by serial extraction with organic solvents of increasing polarity (hexane, toluene, methylene chloride, acetonitrile). Highly mutagenic materials were found in fractions of the hydrogenation filtered liquid, vacuum overhead, and vacuum bottoms. Thus far non-mutagenic samples have not yielded mutagenic components upon fractionation.

  14. Studies of the effect of selected nondonor solvents on coal liquefaction yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolley, R. L.; Rodgers, B. R.; Benjamin, B. M.; Poutsma, M. L.; Douglas, E. C.; McWhirter, D. A.

    1983-09-01

    The objective of this research program was to evaluate the effectiveness of selected nondonor solvents (i.e., solvents that are not generally considered to have hydrogen available for hydrogenolysis reactions) for the solubilization of coals. Principal criteria for selection of candidate solvents were that the compound should be representative of a major chemical class, should be present in reasonable concentration in coal liquid products, and should have the potential to participate in hydrogen redistribution reactions. Naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, carbazole, phenanthridine, quinoline, 1-naphthol, and diphenyl ether were evaluated to determine their effect on coal liquefaction yields and were compared with phenol and two high-quality process solvents, Wilsonville SRC-I recycle solvent and Lummus ITSL heavy oil solvent. The high conversion efficacy of 1-naphthol may be attributed to its condensation to binaphthol and the consequent availability of hydrogen. The effectiveness of both the nitrogen heterocycles and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds may be due to their polycyclic aromatic nature (i.e., possible hydrogen shuttling or transfer agents) and their physical solvent properties. The relative effectiveness for coal conversion of the Lummus ITSL heavy oil solvent as compared with the Wilsonville SRC-I process solvent may be attributed to the much higher concentration of 3-, 4-, and 5-ring PAH and hydroaromatic constituents in Lummus solvent. The chemistry of coal liquefaction and the development of recycle, hydrogen donor, and nondonor solvents are reviewed. The experimental methodology for tubing-bomb tests is outlined, and experimental problem areas are discussed.

  15. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1996-03-01

    Research on sulfate and metal (Mo, Sn) promoted Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts in the current year focused on optimization of conditions. Parameters varied included temperature, solvent, solvent-to-coal ratio, and the effect of presulfiding versus in situ sulfiding. Oil yields were found to increase approximately proportionately with both temperature and solvent-to-coal ratio. The donor solvent, tetralin, proved to give better total conversion and oil yields than either 1-methylnaphthalene or Wilsonville recycle oil. A significant enhancement of both total liquefaction yields and oil yields from lignites and subbituminous coals has been achieved by incorporating iron into the coal matrix by cation exchange. A study has been conducted on the synthesis of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten catalysts using a laser pyrolysis technique.

  16. Novel nanodispersed coal liquefaction catalysts: Molecular design via microemulsion-based synthesis. Final technical report, October 1990--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Boakye, E.; Vittal, M. [and others

    1995-04-01

    This report described the synthesis of Molybdenum Sulfides in microemulsions by acidification of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate. Molybdenum Sulfides have been shown to be potential coal liquefaction catalysts. The importance of particle size, temperature effects, and coal surface chemistry to impregnation are discussed.

  17. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1991--April 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1996-03-01

    Extensive research continued on catalysts based on novel anion-treated (mainly sulfated) oxides and oxyhydroxides of iron [Fe{sub x}O{sub y}/SO{sub 4}]. In addition, sulfated oxides of tin as well as molybdenum promoted iron oxides were used. Incorporation of small amounts of sulfate, molybdate, or tungstate anions by wet precipitation/impregnation methods was found to increase the surface acidic character of iron oxides; more importantly, it reduced the grain sizes significantly with corresponding increases in specific surface areas. These anion-treated iron and tin oxides were more active for direct coal liquefaction and coal-heavy oil coprocessing than their untreated counterparts. With these catalyst systems, higher conversion levels are obtained as compared to the soluble precursors of iron and molybdenum at the same catalyst metalloading (3500 ppm iron and 50 ppm molybdenum with respect to coal). Sulfated iron oxides and oxyhydroxides were equally active as coal liquefaction catalysts. The sulfate, molybdate, and tungstate anions were found to have similar promotional effects on the properties and activities of iron oxides. One step in the synthesis of anion-treated iron and tin oxides is precipitation as hydroxides using either urea or ammonium hydroxide. The catalysts prepared using urea as a precipitation agent were more reproducible than those using ammonium, hydroxide in terms of activities and properties. These catalysts/catalyst precursors were characterized by several techniques to determine their physical (size and structure related) and chemical (acidity) properties. Sulfated and molybdated iron oxides were found to have grain sizes as small as 10-20 nm. An attempt was made to correlate the physicochemical properties of these catalysts with their activity for coal liquefaction.

  18. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Volume 1, Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The overall objective of this project was to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrated coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. Heterofunctional solvents were the most effective in swelling coals. Also solvent blends such as isopropanol/water were more effective than pure solvents alone. Impregnating slurry catalysts simultaneously during coal swelling showed that better uptake was achieved with nonswelling solvent and higher impregnation temperature. Some enhancement in initial coal conversion was seen liquefying SO{sub 2}-treated Black Thunder coal with slurry catalysts, and also when hydrogen donor liquefaction solvents were used. Noncatalytic reactions showed no benefit from SO{sub 2} treatment. Coupling coal swelling and SO{sub 2} treatment with slurry catalysts was also not beneficial, although high conversion was seen with continuous operation and long residence time, however, similar high conversion was observed with untreated coal. SO{sub 2} treatment is not economically attractive unless it provides about 17% increase in coal reactivity. In most cases, the best results were obtained when the coal was untreated and the slurry catalyst was added directly into the reactor. Foster Wheeler`s ASCOT process had better average liquid yields than either Wilsonville`s vacuum tower/ROSE combination or delayed coking process. This liquid product also had good quality.

  19. Behavior of catalyst and mineral matter in coal liquefaction; Sekitan ekika hannochu no kobusshitsu to shokubai no kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, K.; Wang, J.; Tomita, A. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Institute for Chemical Reaction Science

    1996-10-28

    Mineral matter in coals is important in various senses for coal liquefaction. It is possible that the catalytic activity is affected by the interaction between catalyst and mineral matter. Iron-based catalyst forms pyrrhotite in the process of liquefaction, but the interaction between it and mineral matter is not known in detail. In this study, the interaction between mineral matter and catalyst and the selective reaction between them were investigated. Tanito Harum coal was used for this study. This coal contains a slight amount of siderite and jarosite besides pyrite as iron compounds. Liquefaction samples were obtained from the 1 t/d NEDOL process PSU. The solid deposits in the reactor mainly contained pyrrhotite and quartz. A slight amount of kaolinite was observed, and pyrite was little remained. It was found that the catalyst (pyrrhotite) often coexisted with quartz, clay and calcite. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Modeling and simulation of an entrained flow coal gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govind, R.; Shah, J.

    1984-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to simulate the Texaco downflow entrained-bed pilot-plant gasifier using coal liquefaction residues and coal-water slurries as feedstocks. This model describes the physical and chemical processes occurring in an entrained coal gasifier. Parameter studies were made in order to provide a better understanding of the reactor performance for various inlet feed conditions utilising the model.

  1. Hydrogeologic investigation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, F.G.; Kearl, P.M.; Mumby, M.E.; Rogers, S.

    1996-09-01

    This document describes the geology and hydrogeology at the former Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development (ACLR&D) facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The work was conducted by personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Grand Junction office (ORNL/GJ) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Characterization information was requested by PETC to provide baseline environmental information for use in evaluating needs and in subsequent decision-making for further actions associated with the closeout of facility operations. The hydrogeologic conceptual model presented in this report provides significant insight regarding the potential for contaminant migration from the ACLR&D facility and may be useful during other characterization work in the region. The ACLR&D facility is no longer operational and has been dismantled. The site was characterized in three phases: the first two phases were an environmental assessment study and a sod sampling study (APCO 1991) and the third phase the hydraulic assessment. Currently, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation (RI) to address the presence of contaminants on the site is underway and will be documented in an RI report. This technical memorandum addresses the hydrogeologic model only.

  2. Hydrogeologic investigation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, F.G.; Kearl, P.M.; Mumby, M.E.; Rogers, S.

    1996-09-01

    This document describes the geology and hydrogeology at the former Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development (ACLR&D) facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The work was conducted by personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Grand Junction office (ORNL/GJ) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Characterization information was requested by PETC to provide baseline environmental information for use in evaluating needs and in subsequent decision-making for further actions associated with the closeout of facility operations. The hydrogeologic conceptual model presented in this report provides significant insight regarding the potential for contaminant migration from the ACLR&D facility and may be useful during other characterization work in the region. The ACLR&D facility is no longer operational and has been dismantled. The site was characterized in three phases: the first two phases were an environmental assessment study and a sod sampling study (APCO 1991) and the third phase the hydraulic assessment. Currently, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation (RI) to address the presence of contaminants on the site is underway and will be documented in an RI report. This technical memorandum addresses the hydrogeologic model only.

  3. Dispersed catalysts for co-processing and coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockrath, B.; Parfitt, D.; Miller, R. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The basic goal is to improve dispersed catalysts employed in the production of clean fuels from low value hydrocarbons. The immediate objective is to determine how the properties of the catalysts may be altered to match the demands placed on them by the properties of the feedstock, the qualities of the desired end products, and the economic constraints put upon the process. Several interrelated areas of the application of dispersed catalysts to co-processing and coal conversion are under investigation. The first involves control of the selectivity of MoS{sub 2} catalysts for HDN, HDS, and hydrogenation of aromatics. A second area of research is the development and use of methods to evaluate dispersed catalysts by means of activity and selectivity tests. A micro-flow reactor has been developed for determining intrinsic reactivities using model compounds, and will be used to compare catalysts prepared in different ways. Micro-autoclaves will also be used to develop data in batch experiments at higher partial pressures of hydrogen. The third area under investigation concerns hydrogen spillover reactions between MoS{sub 2} catalysts and carbonaceous supports. Preliminary results obtained by monitoring H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} exchange reactions with a pulse-flow microreactor indicate the presence of spillover between MoS{sub 2} and a graphitic carbon. A more complete study will be made at a later stage of the project. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  4. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Volume 2, appendices. Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., College Park, PA (United States); Gutterman, C.

    1995-04-01

    Liquefaction experiments were undertaken using subbituminous Black Thunder mine coal to observe the effects of aqueous SO{sub 2} coal beneficiation and the introduction of various coal swelling solvents and catalyst precursors. Aqueous SO{sub 2} beneficiation of Black Thunder coal removed alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, increased the sulfur content and increased the catalytic liquefaction conversion to THF solubles compared to untreated Black Thunder coal. The liquefaction solvent had varying effects on coal conversion, depending upon the type of solvent added. The hydrogen donor solvent, dihydroanthracene, was most effective, while a coal-derived Wilsonville solvent promoted more coal conversion than did relatively inert 1-methylnaphthalene. Swelling of coal with hydrogen bonding solvents tetrahydrofuran (THF), isopropanol, and methanol, prior to reaction resulted in increased noncatalytic conversion of both untreated and SO{sub 2} treated Black Thunder coals, while dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), which was absorbed more into the coal than any other swelling solvent, was detrimental to coal conversion. Swelling of SO{sub 2} treated coal before liquefaction resulted in the highest coal conversions; however, the untreated coal showed the most improvements in catalytic reactions when swelled in either THF, isopropanol, or methanol prior to liquefaction. The aprotic solvent DMSO was detrimental to coal conversion.

  5. Benefit-cost analysis of selected DOE/OHER investments in coal liquefaction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callaway, J.M.; Fillo, J.P.; Gray, R.H.; Felix, W.D.; Mahlum, D.D.

    1982-09-01

    Based in large part of the lack of specific information about the nature and magnitude of health impacts that could occur from commercialization of a coal liquefaction industry, DOE initiated a broad-based program to study the potential health and environmental fate and effects of process streams from several coal liquefaction process options. Responsibility for this research was assigned to OHER. Specific results of this research program that are important for the purpose of this analysis include findings that: the toxicity and teratogenic potential of coal liquids boiling below 450/sup 0/F is small; mutagenic and carcinogenic activity is typically expressed in coal liquids boiling above 750/sup 0/F; and mutagenic and carcinogenic activity increases markedly in coal liquids boiling above 800/sup 0/F. Based on the above findings, OHER funded research to evaluate the effect of various hydrotreatment levels on the biological activity of coal-derived liquids. Studies using the Ames assay or mammalian cell transformation assays indicated that hydrotreatment was effective in reducing biological activity of coal-derived liquids. Skin-painting studies demonstrated that carcinogenicity was also reduced by hydrotreatment. Studies in progress are evaluating the effects of hydrotreatment severity on biological activity. However, it appears reasonably clear that health risks can be reduced by hydrotreating only materials that boil above 750/sup 0/F. Materials boiling below 750/sup 0/ could be marketed directly without significant risk to individuals exposed to these products. The benefit-cost analysis presented is based on the premise that the cost differential between full and partial hydrotreatment provides the basis for approximating the potential benefits associated with the relevant OHER research investments.

  6. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report, September 20, 1991--September 19, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    One of the main goals for competitive coal liquefaction is to decrease gas yields to reduce hydrogen consumption. Complexing this element as methane and ethane decreases process efficiently and is less cost effective. To decrease the gas yield and increase the liquid yield, an effective preconversion process has been explored on the basis of the physically associated molecular nature of coal. Activities have been focused on two issues: (1) maximizing the dissolution of associated coal and (2) defining the different reactivity associated with a wide molecular weight distribution. Two-step soaking at 350{degrees}C and 400{degrees}C in a recycle oil was found to be very effective for coal solubilization. No additional chemicals, catalysts, and hydrogen are required for this preconversion process. High-volatile bituminous coals tested before liquefaction showed 80--90% conversion with 50--55% oil yields. New preconversion steps suggested are as follows: (1) dissolution of coal with two-step high-temperature soaking, (2) separation into oil and heavy fractions of dissolved coal with vacuum distillation, and (3) selective liquefaction of the separated heavy fractions under relatively mild conditions. Laboratory scale tests of the proposed procedure mode using a small autoclave showed a 30% increase in the oil yield with a 15--20% decrease in the gas yield. This batch operation projects a substantial reduction in the ultimate cost of coal liquefaction.

  7. Fractionally distilled SRC-I, SRC-II, EDS, H-Coal and ITSL direct coal liquefaction process materials: a comparative summary of chemical analysis and biological testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.; Dauble, D.D.; Wilson, B.W.

    1985-07-01

    This document reports and compares the results compiled from chemical analyses and biological testing of coal liquefaction process materials which were fractionally distilled, after production, into various comparable boiling-point range cuts. Comparative analyses were performed on solvent refined coal (SRC)-I, SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS an integrated two-stage liquefaction (ITSL) distillate materials. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative, chemical and biological assessments. Where possible, results obtained from the distillate cuts are compared to those from coal liquefaction materials with limited boiling ranges. Work reported here was conducted by investigators in the Biology and Chemistry Department at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, WA. 38 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  8. Analysis of the relationship between the coal properties and their liquefaction characteristics by using the coal data base; Tanshu data base ni yoru tanshitsu to ekika tokusei no kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbayashi, Y.; Okada, K. [Coal Mining Research Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    The relationship between coal properties and liquefaction or gasification characteristics was analyzed by using the analysis and test results and liquefaction characteristics in the coal data base. On liquefaction reaction, the close relation between an oil yield and coal constituent composition or a coal rank is well-known. Various multivariable regression analyses were conducted by using 6 factors as variables such as calorific value, volatile component, O/C and H/C atomic ratios, exinite+vitrinite content and vitrinite reflectance, and liquefaction characteristics as variate. On liquefaction characteristics, the oil yield of dehydrated and deashed coals, asphaltene yield, hydrogen consumption, produced water and gas quantities, and oil+asphaltene yield were predicted. The theoretical gasification efficiency of each specimen was calculated to evaluate the liquefaction reaction obtained. As a result, the oil yield increased with H/C atomic ratio, while the theoretical gasification efficiency increased with O/C atomic ratio. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-08-01

    This is the tenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Process oils from Wilsonville Run 262 were analyzed to provide information on process performance. Run 262 was operated from July 10 through September 30, 1991, in the thermal/catalytic Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) configuration with ash recycle. The feed coal was Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal. The high/low temperature sequence was used. Each reactor was operated at 50% of the available reactor volume. The interstage separator was in use throughout the run. The second-stage reactor was charged with aged Criterion 324 catalyst (Ni/Mo on 1/16 inch alumina extrudate support). Slurry catalysts and sulfiding agent were fed to the first-stage reactor. Molyvan L is an organometallic compound which contains 8.1% Mo, and is commercially available as an oil-soluble lubricant additive. It was used in Run 262 as a dispersed hydrogenation catalyst precursor, primarily to alleviate deposition problems which plagued past runs with Black Thunder coal. One test was made with little supported catalyst in the second stage. The role of phenolic groups in donor solvent properties was examined. In this study, four samples from direct liquefaction process oils were subjected to O-methylation of the phenolic groups, followed by chemical analysis and solvent quality testing.

  10. Studies of initial stage in coal liquefaction. Effect of decomposition of oxygen-functional groups on coal liquefaction; Ekika hanno no shoki katei ni kansuru kenkyu. 3. Gansanso kannoki no bunkai kyodo to ekika hanno eno eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komeiji, A.; Kaneko, T.; Shimazaki, K. [Nippon Brown Coal Liquefaction Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Pretreatment of brown coal in oil was conducted using 1-methyl naphthalene or mixture of tetralin and 1-methyl naphthalene as solvent at temperatures ranging from 300 to 430{degree}C under nitrogen atmosphere. Effects of the solvent properties on the structural change of oxygen-functional groups (OFG) and coal liquefaction were investigated by means of quantitative analysis of OFG and solid state {sup 13}C-NMR measurement. When hydrogen transfer from solvent was insufficient, it was suggested that brown coal molecules loose their hydrogen to be aromatized. While, at lower temperatures ranging from 300 to 350{degree}C, hydrogen contained in brown coal molecules was consumed for the stabilization of pyrolytic radicals, and the deterioration of liquefaction was not observed. When hydrogen transfer from solvent was insufficient at higher temperatures above 400{degree}C in nitrogen atmosphere during pretreatment in oil, crosslinking like benzofuran type was formed by dehydration condensation of hydroxyl group in brown coal, to deteriorate the liquefaction, remarkably. The addition of donor solvent like tetralin decreased the formation of crosslinking like benzofuran type, which suppressed the deterioration of liquefaction. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, July--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, E.; Song, C.; Schobert, H.H.

    1994-01-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that dispersed catalysts can be superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. The primary objective of this research is to explore novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from heterometallic molecular precursors, that can be used in low concentrations but exhibit high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. This quarterly report describes the preparation of two precursors. The first is a heterometallic complex consisting of two transition metals, Mo and Ni, and sulfur in a single molecule synthesized. The second is a thiocubane type cluster consisting of iron and sulfur.

  12. The use of mixed pyrrhotite/pyrite catalysts for co-liquefaction of coal and waste rubber tires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadyburjor, D.B.; Zondlo, J.W.; Sharma, R.K. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The overall objective of this research program is to determine the optimum processing conditions for tire/coal co-liquefaction. The catalysts used will be a ferric-sulfide-based materials, as well as promising catalysts from other consortium laboratories. The intent here is to achieve the maximum coal+tire conversion at the mildest conditions of temperature and pressure. Specific objectives include an investigation of the effects of time, temperature, pressure, catalyst and co-solvent on the conversion and product slate of the co-liquefaction. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  13. Coal liquefaction studies using phosphoric acid at moderate temperatures and pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, J.B.; Vermeulen, T.

    1977-12-01

    Concentrated phosphoric acid solutions (65-100% H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/) were studied as a potential homogenous catalytic medium for coal liquefaction at temperatures of up 250/sup 0/C and hydrogen pressures up to 600 psig. Possible catalytic additives, both organic and inorganic, were investigated. Sulfuric acid and molten phosphate and sulfate salt systems were also briefly studied. Sodium pyrophosphate was found to be a beneficial additive to phosphoric acid, in that it reduces the tendency toward foaming upon contacting coal with hot acid, and was used in all subsequent experiments. The materials were relatively ineffective in liquefying coals, except with certain organic additives. Approximately 30% of the sulfur in coal is removed by phosphoric acid treatment, while no effect on nitrogen content is evidenced. Some deashing occurs, with AlCa components most affected. Phosphorus is chemically incorporated into the product coal at levels of 2% or less with most of the incorporated P ending up in the pyridine extract. B.E.T. surface area and scanning electron microscope studies indicate that increased extraction yields of product coals are due more to chemical effects than simply to exposure of more surface area to the extraction solvent used.

  14. The current status of coal liquefaction technologies - Panorama 2008; La liquefaction du charbon: ou en est-on aujourd'hui? - Panorama 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    In 2008, a first coal liquefaction unit to produce motor fuel (20,000 BPSD) will come on-stream in Shenhua, China (in the Ercos region of Inner Mongolia). Other, more ambitious projects have been announced in China for between now and 2020. Since oil production is expected to peak in the medium term, this technology may develop regionally in the next 20 years to cover ever-increasing demand for motor fuel.

  15. Biogeneration of iron-based catalyst precursors by Acidianus brierleyi on high- and low-pyrite coals for direct liquefaction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty, M.V.S.; Huggins, F.E.; Aleem, M.I.H.; Kermode, R.I.; Bhattacharyya, D. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-03-01

    Treatment of high-pyrite, high-sulphur Illinois (IBS) coals and pyrite-free Blind Canyon (DECS) coal with added pyrite in the presence of {ital Acidianus brierleyi} showed formation of iron oxyhydroxide (FeOOH) particles and subsequent sulphiding caused enhancement in liquefaction and oil yield. IBC No. 101 and 105, and DECS No. 17 containing different amounts of pyrite were treated with {ital A. brierleyi} to evaluate its effect on FeOOH formation. Chemical analysis of the liquid phase and Moessbauer analysis of the coals revealed that all the biotreated coals showed significant reduction in pyrite after 21 days (or less with pH alteration in the middle of IBC No. 105 coal run) of incubation. Further data on bioprocessed coals obtained from Moessbauer spectroscopy verified the formation of an FeOOH phase, which acts as a catalyst precursor for direct coal liquefaction (DCL). The direct liquefaction conversion and oil yield of the biotreated DECS No. 17 coal with added pyrite increased by 14 and 5% respectively, over the control which did not contain {ital A. brierleyi}. 40 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Microbial recovery of metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperl, P.L.; Sperl, G.T.

    1995-07-01

    This project was initiated on October 1, 1989, for the purpose of recovering metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Two catalyst types were the subject of the contract. The first was a Ni-No catalyst support on alumina (Shell 324), the catalyst used in a pilot scale coal liquefaction facility at Wilsonville, Alabama. The second material was an unsupported ammonium molybdate catalyst used in a pilot process by the Department of Energy at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This material was obtained in late February 1990 but has not been pursued since the Mo content of this particular sample was too low for the current studies and the studies at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center have been discontinued. The object of the contract was to treat these spent catalysts with microorganisms, especially Thiobacillus ferrooxidans , but also other Thiobacillus spp. and possibly Sulfolobus and other potential microorganisms, to leach and remove the metals (Ni and Mo) from the spent catalysts into a form which could be readily recovered by conventional techniques.

  17. Energy-based numerical models for assessment of soil liquefaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Alavi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents promising variants of genetic programming (GP, namely linear genetic programming (LGP and multi expression programming (MEP to evaluate the liquefaction resistance of sandy soils. Generalized LGP and MEP-based relationships were developed between the strain energy density required to trigger liquefaction (capacity energy and the factors affecting the liquefaction characteristics of sands. The correlations were established based on well established and widely dispersed experimental results obtained from the literature. To verify the applicability of the derived models, they were employed to estimate the capacity energy values of parts of the test results that were not included in the analysis. The external validation of the models was verified using statistical criteria recommended by researchers. Sensitivity and parametric analyses were performed for further verification of the correlations. The results indicate that the proposed correlations are effectively capable of capturing the liquefaction resistance of a number of sandy soils. The developed correlations provide a significantly better prediction performance than the models found in the literature. Furthermore, the best LGP and MEP models perform superior than the optimal traditional GP model. The verification phases confirm the efficiency of the derived correlations for their general application to the assessment of the strain energy at the onset of liquefaction.

  18. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The experimental study of coal swelling ratios have been determined with a wide variety of solvents. Only marginal levels of coal swelling were observed for the hydrocarbon solvents, but high levels were found with solvents having heteroatom functionality. Blends were superior to pure solvents. The activity of various catalyst precursors for pyrene hydrogenation and coal conversion was measured. Higher coal conversions were observed for the S0{sub 2}-treated coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Coal conversions were highest for Molyvan-L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively. Bottoms processing consists of a combination of the ASCOT process coupling solvent deasphalting with delayed coking. Initial results indicate that a blend of butane and pentane used near the critical temperature of butane is the best solvent blend for producing a yield/temperature relationship of proper sensitivity and yet retaining an asphalt phase of reasonable viscosity. The literature concerning coal swelling, both alone and in combination with coal liquefaction, and the use of dispersed or unsupported catalysts in coal liquefaction has been updated.

  19. An updated geospatial liquefaction model for global application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Baise, Laurie G.; Thompson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    We present an updated geospatial approach to estimation of earthquake-induced liquefaction from globally available geospatial proxies. Our previous iteration of the geospatial liquefaction model was based on mapped liquefaction surface effects from four earthquakes in Christchurch, New Zealand, and Kobe, Japan, paired with geospatial explanatory variables including slope-derived VS30, compound topographic index, and magnitude-adjusted peak ground acceleration from ShakeMap. The updated geospatial liquefaction model presented herein improves the performance and the generality of the model. The updates include (1) expanding the liquefaction database to 27 earthquake events across 6 countries, (2) addressing the sampling of nonliquefaction for incomplete liquefaction inventories, (3) testing interaction effects between explanatory variables, and (4) overall improving model performance. While we test 14 geospatial proxies for soil density and soil saturation, the most promising geospatial parameters are slope-derived VS30, modeled water table depth, distance to coast, distance to river, distance to closest water body, and precipitation. We found that peak ground velocity (PGV) performs better than peak ground acceleration (PGA) as the shaking intensity parameter. We present two models which offer improved performance over prior models. We evaluate model performance using the area under the curve under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) and the Brier score. The best-performing model in a coastal setting uses distance to coast but is problematic for regions away from the coast. The second best model, using PGV, VS30, water table depth, distance to closest water body, and precipitation, performs better in noncoastal regions and thus is the model we recommend for global implementation.

  20. Chemical analysis and mutational assay of distilled oils from the H-coal direct liquefaction process: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B.W.; Later, D.W.; Wright, C.W.; Stewart, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Samples from the H-Coal process, a catalytic, single-stage, coal liquefaction technology, were chemically characterized and screened for microbial mutagenicity. For these investigations, a blend of light and heavy H-Coal process oils was fractionally distilled into 50/sup 0/F boiling point cuts. The chemical analyses and biological testing results presented in this status report deal primarily with the blended material and the distillate fractions boiling above 650/sup 0/F. Results from the microbial mutagenicity assays indicated that onset of biological activity in the crude materials occurred above 700/sup 0/F. Similar trends have been observed for Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) I, SRC II, Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) and Exxon EDS process materials. After chemical class fractionation, the primary source of microbial mutagenicity of the crude boiling point cuts was the nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compound (N-PAC) fractions. Amino polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (amino-PAH) were present at sufficient concentration levels in the N-PAC fractions to account for the observed mutagenic responses. In general, the chemical composition of the H-Coal materials studied was similar to that of other single-stage liquefaction materials. The degree of alkylation in these materials was determined to be greater than in the SRC and less than in the EDS process distillate cuts. 13 references, 8 figures, 11 tables.

  1. Chemical analysis and mutational assay of distilled oils from the H-coal direct liquefaction process: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B.W.; Later, D.W.; Wright, C.W.; Stewart, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Samples from the H-Coal process, a catalytic, single-stage, coal liquefaction technology, were chemically characterized and screened for microbial mutagenicity. For these investigations, a blend of light and heavy H-Coal process oils was fractionally distilled into 50/sup 0/F boiling point cuts. The chemical analyses and biological testing results presented in this status report deal primarily with the blended material and the distillate fractions boiling above 650/sup 0/F. Results from the microbial mutagenicity assays indicated that onset of biological activity in the crude materials occurred above 700/sup 0/F. Similar trends have been observed for Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) I, SRC II, Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) and Exxon EDS process materials. After chemical class fractionation, the primary source of microbial mutagenicity of the crude boiling point cuts was the nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compound (N-PAC) fractions. Amino polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (amino-PAH) were present at sufficient concentration levels in the N-PAC fractions to account for the observed mutagenic responses. In general, the chemical composition of the H-Coal materials studied was similar to that of other single-stage liquefaction materials. The degree of alkylation in these materials was determined to be greater than in the SRC and less than in the EDS process distillate cuts. 13 references, 8 figures, 11 tables.

  2. Chemical Compositional Analysis of Catalytic Hydroconversion Products of Heishan Coal Liquefaction Residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Yue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquefaction residue of Heishan bituminous coal (HLR was subject to two hydroconversion reactions under 5 MPa initial pressure of hydrogen at 300°C for 3 h, without catalyst and with acid supported catalyst (ASC, respectively. The reaction products were analyzed with gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS. The results show that 222 organic compounds were detected totally in the products and they can be divided into alkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons (AHCs, phenols, ketones, ethers, and other species (OSs. The yield of hydroconversion over the ASC is much higher than that without catalyst. The most abundant products are aromatic hydrocarbons in the reaction products from both catalytic and noncatalytic reactions of HLR. The yield of aromatic hydrocarbons in the reaction product from hydroconversion with the ACS is considerably higher than that from hydroconversion without a catalyst.

  3. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1993-12-01

    Process oil samples from HRI Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) Bench Unit Run CC-16 (227-76) were analyzed to provide information on process performance. Run CC-16 was operated in December 1992 with Burning Star 2 Mine (Illinois 6 seam) coal to test and validate Akzo EXP-AO-60 Ni/Mo catalyst (1/16 in. extrudate). Results were compared with those of four previous HRI CTSL bench unit runs made with Ni/Mo catalysts. Major conclusions from this work are summarized. (1) Akzo EXP-AO-60 gave process oil characteristics in Run CC-16 similar to those of other Ni/Mo catalysts tested in Runs I-13, I-16, I-17, and I-18 (by our analytical and empirical test methods). No distinct performance advantage for any of the catalysts emerges from the process oil characteristics and plant performance. Thus, for commercial coal liquefaction, a number of equivalent catalysts are available from competitive commercial sources. The similarity of run performance and process oil characteristics indicates consistent performance of HRI`s bench unit operations over a period of several years; (2) Dominant effects on process oil properties in Run CC-16 were catalyst age and higher temperature operation in Periods 10--13 (Condition 2). Properties affected were the aromaticities and phenolic -OH concentrations of most streams and the asphaltene and preasphaltene concentrations of the pressure-filter liquid (PFL) 850{degrees}F{sup +} resid. The trends reflect decreasing hydrogenation and defunctionalization of the process streams with increasing catalyst age. Operation at higher temperature conditions seems to have partially offset the effects of catalyst age.

  4. Coal Liquefaction characteristics and chemical structure of product oil; Sekitan ekika hanno tokusei to seiseibutsu no kagaku kozo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, H.; Sato, M.; Chiba, T.; Hattori, H. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan). Center for Advanced Research of Energy Technology; Sasaki, M. [Hokkaido National Industrial Research Institute, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Through the hydrogenolysis of Wandoan coal and Tanito Harum coal which are used for the NEDOL process, differences of liquefaction characteristics between them were found. The purpose of this study is to grasp these differences as differences of chemical structures of oil fractions. The compound type analysis was conducted for oil fractions obtained at varied reaction temperature for varied reaction time. Coal liquefaction characteristics of these coals were discussed by relating oil yields and chemical structures. For Tanito Harum coal, yields of gas and oil were considered to be lower than those for Wandoan coal, which reflected that the contents of partially hydrogenated hydroaromatics in oil fraction from the former were lower than those from the latter, and that the remarkable change of composition did not occur with the progress of the reaction. For both the coals, the remarkable changes in the average molecular weight of oil fraction were not observed with the progress of the reaction. While, the content of methane gradually increased with the progress of the reaction, which suggested that oil was gradually dealkylated. 5 figs.

  5. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: The application of {sup 252}Cf-plasma desorption mass spectrometry to analysis of direct coal liquefaction heavy products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, J.W.; Lapucha, A.R.

    1992-10-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using {sup 252}Cf PDMS, GPC, and MPLC for the examination of the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble portion of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. The {sup 252}Cf-PDMS technique was used to determine molecular weight distributions of twenty-five THF-soluble resids. In order to detemine if {sup 252}Cf-PDMS responds differently to different chemical classes of compounds, Lehigh separated five of the samples into chemically distinct fractions by MPLC, then analyzed the parent samples, their fractions, and the re-mixed fractions by {sup 252}Cf-PDMS and GPC. Irreversible alteration of the samples upon separation was noted by Lehigh. This was confirmed by use of gas chromatographic (GC) analyses. The noted irreversible alterations prevented a direct comparison of the remixed materials and the original samples. Thus, the selective response of {sup 252}Cf-PDMS to different chemical classes of compounds could not be confirmed or ruled out. The number average molecular weights (M{sub n}) obtained by {sup 252}Cf-PDMS and GPC agreed well. However, the weight average molecular weights (M{sub w}) obtained by GPC are always higher than the corresponding {sup 252}Cf-PDMS results. Number average molecular weights and weight average molecular weights obtained with {sup 252}Cf-PDMS and GPC were compared with those obtained by field ionization mass spectrometry (FIMS), previously reported by SRI International for the parent resid samples from which the Lehigh THF-soluble samples were derived.

  6. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: The application of [sup 252]Cf-plasma desorption mass spectrometry to analysis of direct coal liquefaction heavy products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, J.W.; Lapucha, A.R.

    1992-10-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using [sup 252]Cf PDMS, GPC, and MPLC for the examination of the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble portion of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. The [sup 252]Cf-PDMS technique was used to determine molecular weight distributions of twenty-five THF-soluble resids. In order to detemine if [sup 252]Cf-PDMS responds differently to different chemical classes of compounds, Lehigh separated five of the samples into chemically distinct fractions by MPLC, then analyzed the parent samples, their fractions, and the re-mixed fractions by [sup 252]Cf-PDMS and GPC. Irreversible alteration of the samples upon separation was noted by Lehigh. This was confirmed by use of gas chromatographic (GC) analyses. The noted irreversible alterations prevented a direct comparison of the remixed materials and the original samples. Thus, the selective response of [sup 252]Cf-PDMS to different chemical classes of compounds could not be confirmed or ruled out. The number average molecular weights (M[sub n]) obtained by [sup 252]Cf-PDMS and GPC agreed well. However, the weight average molecular weights (M[sub w]) obtained by GPC are always higher than the corresponding [sup 252]Cf-PDMS results. Number average molecular weights and weight average molecular weights obtained with [sup 252]Cf-PDMS and GPC were compared with those obtained by field ionization mass spectrometry (FIMS), previously reported by SRI International for the parent resid samples from which the Lehigh THF-soluble samples were derived.

  7. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandes, S.D.; Lancet, M.S.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-11-01

    This is the eleventh Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Major topics reported are: (1) The results of a study designed to determine the effects of the conditions employed at the Wilsonville slurry preheater vessel on coal conversion is described. (2) Stable carbon isotope ratios were determined and used to source the carbon of three product samples from Period 49 of UOP bench-scale coprocessing Run 37. The results from this coprocessing run agree with the general trends observed in other coprocessing runs that we have studied. (3) Microautoclave tests and chemical analyses were performed to ``calibrate`` the reactivity of the standard coal used for determining donor solvent quality of process oils in this contract. (4) Several aspects of Wilsonville Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) resid conversion kinetics were investigated; results are presented. Error limits associated with calculations of deactivation rate constants previously reported for Runs 258 and 261 are revised and discussed. A new procedure is described that relates the conversions of 850{degrees}F{sup +} , 1050{degrees}F{sup +}, and 850 {times} 1050{degrees}F material. Resid conversions and kinetic constants previously reported for Run 260 were incorrect; corrected data and discussion are found in Appendix I of this report.

  8. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, October 1995--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C.; Cooke, W.S.; Schmidt, E.; Schobert, H.H.

    1996-02-01

    Coal liquefaction involves cleavage of methylene, dimethylene and ether bridges connecting polycyclic aromatic units and the reactions of various oxygen functional groups. Here in this quarterly, we report on the catalytic effects of several molybdenum-, cobalt-, and iron-containing compounds in the reactions of dibenzothiophene (DBT) with hydrogen under conditions related to coal liquefaction. The catalytic effects of several molybdenum-, cobalt-, and iron-containing compounds have been examined in the hydrogenation and hydrodesulfurization reactions of dibenzothiophene (DBT) under conditions related to coal liquefaction. The metal compounds are candidate catalyst precursors for direct coal liquefaction. The reactions were carried out in batch microautoclave reactors at 400{degrees}C for 30 minutes with 6.9 MPa (cold) hydrogen pressure, and tridecane solvent. A metal loading of 0.5 mol% resulted in low conversion and only hydrogenation. Addition of sulfur in 4:1 molar ratio led only to a minor increase in conversion and hydrodesulfurization. The use of a higher boiling solvent (octadecane vs. tridecane) was beneficial in providing increased conversion, hydrodesulfurization, and hydrogenation. An increase in metal compound loading to 36.2 mol% led to a dramatic increase in conversion, hydrodesulfurization, and hydrocracking. Molybdenum hexacarbonyl at 36 mol% loading, with added sulfur at 6:1 ratio and octadecane solvent, gave 100% conversion of dibenzothiophene to other products with 100% hydrodesulfurization. Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate and molybdenum(III) chloride are less active under similar conditions. A cobalt-molybdenum thiocubane complex gave unexpectedly low conversions. Iron and cobalt carbonyls also provided very low conversions, even with added sulfur.

  9. Modeling and simulation of an entrained flow coal gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govind, R.; Shah, J.

    1984-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to stimulate the Texaco downflow entrained-bed pilot-plant gasifier using coal liquefaction residues and coal-water slurries as feedstocks. This model describes the physical and chemical processes occurring in an entrained coal gasifier. The gasification kinetics describes different complex reactions occurring in the gasifier and the hydrodynamics describes mass, momentum and energy balances for solid and gas phases. Temperature, concentration and velocity profiles along the reactor height were obtained by solving the mass, momentum and energy balances. Parameter studies were made to provide a better understanding of the reactor performance for various inlet feed conditions utilizing the model.

  10. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, July--September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneyama, Yoshiharu; Wei, B.; Reddy, K.M.; Song, C.; Schobert, H.H.

    1997-01-01

    This quarterly report describes recent work on two related subjects: (1) effect of dispersed molybdenum catalyst precursor and the influence of water addition on C-O bond cleavage, aromatic hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation under coal liquefaction conditions, and (2) the effect of dispersed molybdenum catalyst precursor on the molecular weight reduction and desulfurization of petroleum resids related to coal/petroleum resids coprocessing. Technical progress on the C-O bond cleavage of 2,2{prime}-dinaphthyl ether and high temperature simulated distillation GC and HDS study on catalytic upgrading of atmospheric and vacuum resids.

  11. Study of initial stage in coal liquefaction. Increase in oil yield with suppression of retrogressive reaction during initial stage; Ekika hanno no shoki katei ni kansuru kenkyu. 1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesugi, K.; Kanaji, M.; Kaneko, T.; Shimasaki, K. [Nippon Brown Coal Liquefaction Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    For the coal liquefaction, improvement of liquefaction conditions and increase of liquefied oil yield are expected by suppressing the recombination through rapid stabilization of pyrolytic radicals which are formed at the initial stage of liquefaction. Two-stage liquefaction combining prethermal treatment and liquefaction was performed under various conditions, to investigate the effects of reaction conditions on the yields and properties of products as well as to increase liquefied oil yield. Consequently, it was found that the catalyst contributes greatly to the hydrogen transfer to coal at the prethermal treatment. High yield of n-hexane soluble fraction with products having low condensation degree could be obtained by combining the prethermal treatment in the presence of hydrogen and catalyst with the concentration of slurry after the treatment. This was considered to be caused by the synergetic effect between the improvement of liquefaction by suppressing polymerization/condensation at the initial stage of reaction through the prethermal treatment and the effective hydrogen transfer accompanied with the improvement of contact efficiency of coal/catalyst by the concentration of slurry at the stage of liquefaction. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Reaction mechanism of coal liquefaction: hydrogenolysis of model compound using synthetic pyrite as catalysts. 7. Property change of synthetic pyrite catalyst with the time after production; Sekitan ekika hanno kiko (model kagobutsu no hanno). 7. Gosei ryukatetsu shokubai no keiji henka ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, H.; Meno, H.; Uemaki, O.; Shibata, T.; Tsuji, T. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Reactions of various model compounds were investigated using synthetic pyrites for coal liquefaction. In this study, successive changes of the catalysts were investigated from the reactions of model compounds by using three different synthetic pyrites with the lapse of time after production. Benzyl phenyl ether, dibenzyl, and n-octylbenzene were used as model compounds. Reactions were conducted in an autoclave, into which sample, catalyst, decalin as solvent, and initial hydrogen pressure 10 MPa were charged. The autoclave was held at 450 or 475{degree}C of reaction temperature for 1 hour. The catalyst with a shorter lapse of time after production acted to hydrogen transfer, and inhibited the formation of condensation products due to the stabilization of decomposed fragment. It also acted to isomerization of materials by cutting alkyl side chains. When adding sulfur to the catalyst with longer lapse of time after production under these reaction conditions, it inhibited the formation of condensation products for the reaction of benzyl phenyl ether. However, it did not provide the effect for the reaction of n-octylbenzene. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Effect of sulfur or hydrogen sulfide on initial stage of coal liquefaction in tetralin; Sekitan ekika shoki katei ni okeru io to ryuka suiso no hatasu yakuwari

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakada, M. [Government Industrial Research Institute, Kyushu, Saga (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    It is well known that the solubilization of coal can be accelerated by adding sulfur or hydrogen sulfide during direct liquefaction of difficult coals. From the studies of authors on the coal liquefaction under the conditions at rather low temperatures between 300 and 400{degree}C, liquefaction products with high quality can be obtained by suppressing the aromatization of naphthene rings, but it was a problem that the reaction rate is slow. For improving this point, results obtained by changing solvents have been reported. In this study, to accelerate the liquefaction reaction, Illinois No.6 coal was liquefied in tetralin at temperature range from 300 to 400{degree}C by adding a given amount of sulfur or hydrogen sulfide at the initial stage of liquefaction. The addition of sulfur or hydrogen sulfide provided an acceleration effect of liquefaction reaction at temperature range between 300 and 400{degree}C. The addition of sulfur or hydrogen sulfide at 400{degree}C increased the oil products. At 370 and 400{degree}C, the liquid yield by adding sulfur was slightly higher than that by adding hydrogen sulfide, unexpectedly. The effects of sulfur and hydrogen sulfide were reversed when increasing the hydrogen pressure. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Coal liquefaction in early stage of NEDOL process 1t/d PSU; 1t/d PSU ni okeru ekika shoki hanno ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, K.; Kawabata, M.; Mochizuki, M.; Imada, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nogami, Y.; Inokuchi, K. [Mitsui SRC Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    To investigate the behavior of coal liquefaction reaction in early stage as a part of studies on the coal liquefaction characteristics using NEDOL process 1 t/d process supporting unit (PSU), coal slurry sample was taken from the outlet of slurry preheater located in the upflow of liquefaction reactors, and was tested. Tanito Harum coal was used for liquefaction. Preheater was operated under the condition of pressure of 170 kg/cm{sup 2}, gas flow rate of 64 Nm{sup 3}/hr, and at temperature up to 410{degree}C at the outlet, in response to the standard test condition. The slurry sample was discharged into a high temperature separator with temperature of 250{degree}C. Liquefaction was not proceeded at the outlet of preheater. Solid residue yielded around 80%, and liquid yielded around 15%. Gases, CO and CO2, and water yielded also small amount around 3%. The solid sample contained much IOM fraction (tetrahydrofuran-insoluble and ash), and the liquid contained much heavy oil fraction. Hydrogenation was not proceeded, and the hydrogen consumption was very low showing below one-tenth of that at the usual operation. Hydrogen sulfide gas was formed at early stage, which suggested that the change of iron sulfide catalyst occur at early stage of liquefaction. 1 ref., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Reconfigured, close-coupled reconfigured, and Wyodak coal integrated two-stage coal liquefaction process materials from the Wilsonville facility: Chemical and toxicological evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.W.

    1987-03-01

    This document reports the results of the chemical analysis and toxicological testing of process materials sampled during the operation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility (Wilsonville, AL) in the reconfigured, integrated (RITSL run No. 247), the close-coupled, reconfigured, integrated (CCRITSL run No. 249), and the Wyodak coal integrated (ITSL run No. 246) two-stage liquefaction operating modes. Chemical methods of analysis included proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, adsorption column chromatography, high resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry. Toxicological evaluation of the process materials included a histidine reversion assay for microbial mutagenicity, an initiation/promotion assay for tumorigenicity in mouse skin, and an aquatic toxicity assay using Daphnia magna. The results of these analyses and tests are compared to the previously reported results derived from the Illinois No. 6 coal ITSL and nonintegrated two-stage liquefaction (NTSL) process materials from the Wilsonville facility. 21 refs., 13 figs., 21 tabs.

  16. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies and PDU scale-up with sub-bituminous coal. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.T.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-03-01

    Reported are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using sub-bituminous coal conducted at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-88PC88818 during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with testing of the baseline Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process with comparisons with other two stage process configurations, catalyst evaluations and unit operations such as solid separation, pretreatments, on-line hydrotreating, and an examination of new concepts. In the overall program, three coals were evaluated, bituminous Illinois No. 6, Burning Star and sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The runs (experiments) concern process variables, variable reactor volumes, catalysts (both supported, dispersed and rejuvenated), coal cleaned by agglomeration, hot slurry treatments, reactor sequence, on-line hydrotreating, dispersed catalyst with pretreatment reactors and CO{sub 2}/coal effects. The tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico Coals are reported herein, and the tests involving the Illinois coal are described in Topical Report No. 2. On a laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects were conducted and reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer such as: rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids and cleaned coals. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL{trademark} process are described in the CTSL{trademark} Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

  17. Thermolysis of phenethyl phenyl ether: A model of ether linkages in low rank coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III; Malcolm, E.A.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, an area of interest and frustration for coal chemists has been the direct liquefaction of low rank coal. Although low rank coals are more reactive than bituminous coals, they are more difficult to liquefy and offer lower liquefaction yields under conditions optimized for bituminous coals. Solomon, Serio, and co-workers have shown that: in the pyrolysis and liquefaction of low rank coals, a low temperature cross-linking reaction associated with oxygen functional groups occurs before tar evolution. A variety of pretreatments (demineralization, alkylation, and ion-exchange) have been shown to reduce these retrogressive reactions and increase tar yields, but the actual chemical reactions responsible for these processes have not been defined. In order to gain insight into the thermochemical reactions leading to cross-linking in low rank coal, we have undertaken a study of the pyrolysis of oxygen containing coal model compounds. Solid state NMR studies suggest that the alkyl aryl ether linkage may be present in modest amounts in low rank coal. Therefore, in this paper, we will investigate the thermolysis of phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE) as a model of 0-aryl ether linkages found in low rank coal, lignites, and lignin, an evolutionary precursor of coal. Our results have uncovered a new reaction channel that can account for 25% of the products formed. The impact of reaction conditions, including restricted mass transport, on this new reaction pathway and the role of oxygen functional groups in cross-linking reactions will be investigated.

  18. Coal conversion rate in 1t/d PSU liquefaction reactor; 1t/d PSU ekika hannoto ni okeru sekitan tenka sokudo no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, K.; Imada, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nogami, Y.; Inokuchi, K. [Mitsui SRC Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    To investigate the coal liquefaction characteristics, coal slurry samples were taken from the outlets of the reactors and slurry preheater of NEDOL process 1 t/d process supporting unit (PSU), and were analyzed. Tanito Harum coal was used for liquefaction, and the slurry was prepared with recycle solvent. Liquefaction was performed using synthetic iron sulfide catalyst at reaction temperatures, 450 and 465{degree}C. Solubility of various solid samples was examined against n-hexane, toluene, and tetrahydrofuran (THF). When considering the decrease of IMO (THF-insoluble and ash) as a characteristic of coal conversion reaction, around 20% at the outlet of the slurry preheater, around 70% within the first reactor, and several percents within the successive second and third reactors were converted against supplied coal. Increase of reaction temperature led to the increase of evaporation of oil fraction, which resulted in the decrease of actual slurry flow rate and in the increase of residence time. Thus, the conversion of coal was accelerated by the synergetic effect of temperature and time. Reaction rate constant of the coal liquefaction was around 2{times}10{sup -1} [min{sup -1}], which increased slightly with increasing the reaction temperature from 450 to 465{degree}C. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Japan`s Sunshine Project. 1991 annual summary of coal liquefaction and gasification; 1991 nendo sunshine keikaku seika hokokusho gaiyoshu. Sekitan no ekika gas ka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    Out of the research and development on the 1991 Sunshine Project, the results of coal liquefaction/gasification are reported. The basic research of coal liquefaction/gasification is conducted. The research plan for a 150 ton/day scale pilot plant (PP) is worked out for the development of bituminous coal liquefaction technology by NEDOL process. Data of PSU (Process Support Units) operation, especially, are studied. Concerning the data obtained through dismantling of the 50 ton/day PP in Australia which uses Australian Victoria coal due to completion of its operation and also obtained from its support research, they are reflected in the design of a demonstration plant, and the results are arranged for study. Research and development on refining technology of coal-derived liquid such as Illinois coal liquid and on application technology of its products are made. For the development of coal-use hydrogen production technology, conducted is the research of a high temperature gasification PP by entrained flow bed process which is the core of the coal gasification technology. Elementary study with a 2 ton/day furnace is made for the development of the entrained flow bed coal gasification combined cycle power generation system. Also conducted are PP construction, adjusting operation and the overall research operation.

  20. Characterization of selected Ohio coals to predict their conversion behavior relative to 104 North American Coals. [Factors correlating with liquefaction behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitacre, T. P.; Hunt, T. J.; Kneller, W. A.

    1982-02-01

    Twenty-six coal samples from Ohio were collected as washed and seam samples, and lithobodies within the seams. Characterization of these samples included determination of % maceral, % anti R/sub max/, LTA, chlorine content and proximate/ultimate and qualitative mineral analyses. These data were compared to data from a similar project by Yarzab, R.F., et al., 1980 completed at Pennsylvania State University using tetralin as the hydrogen donor solvent. The characteristics of these coals were correlated with liquefaction conversion and other data accrued on 104 North American coals by statistical analyses. Utilizing percent carbon, sulfur, volatile matter, reflectance, vitrinite and total reactive macerals, Q-mode cluster analysis demonstrated that Ohio coals are more similar to the coals of the Interior province than to those of the Appalachian province. Linear multiple regression analysis for the 104 North American coals provided a prediction equation for conversion (R = .96). The predicted conversion values for the samples range from 58.8 to 79.6%, with the Lower Kittanning (No. 5) and the Middle Kittanning (No. 6) coal seams showing the highest predicted percent conversion (respectively, 73.4 and 72.2%). The moderately low FSI values for the No. 5 and No. 6 coals (respectively, 2.5 and 3) and their moderately high alkaline earth content (respectively, 0.69 and 0.74%) suggest that these coals possess the best overall properties for conversion. Stepwise regression has indicated that the most important coal characteristics affecting conversion are, in decreasing order of importance: % volatile matter, % vitrinite and % total sulfur. Conversion processes can be expected to produce higher yields with Ohio coals due to the presence of such mineral catalysts as pyrite and kaolinite. It is believed that the presence of these disposable catalysts increases the marketability of Ohio coals.

  1. Parallel finite element modeling of earthquake ground response and liquefaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinchi Lu(陆金池); Jun Peng(彭军); Ahmed Elgamal; Zhaohui Yang(杨朝晖); Kincho H. Law

    2004-01-01

    Parallel computing is a promising approach to alleviate the computational demand in conducting large-scale finite element analyses. This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for earthquake ground response and liquefaction using the parallel nonlinear finite element program, ParCYCLIC, designed for distributed-memory message-passing parallel computer systems. In ParCYCLIC, finite elements are employed within an incremental plasticity, coupled solid-fluid formulation. A constitutive model calibrated by physical tests represents the salient characteristics of sand liquefaction and associated accumulation of shear deformations. Key elements of the computational strategy employed in ParCYCLIC include the development of a parallel sparse direct solver, the deployment of an automatic domain decomposer, and the use of the Multilevel Nested Dissection algorithm for ordering of the finite element nodes. Simulation results of centrifuge test models using ParCYCLIC are presented. Performance results from grid models and geotechnical simulations show that ParCYCLIC is efficiently scalable to a large number of processors.

  2. Effect of intermolecular cohesion on coal liquefaction. 3. Reactivity of oxygen methylated coal; Sekitan teibunshika hanno ni okeru bunshikan gyoshuryoku no koka. 3. O-methyl ka tan no hanno tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, M.; Nagaishi, H.; Yoshida, T. [Hokkaido National Industrial Research Institute, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    The reactivity of oxygen methylated coal was studied to control hydrogen bond in bituminous coal liquefaction and intermolecular cohesion such as van der Waals force. In experiment, crushed and dried Illinois coal of 100mesh or less was used as specimen, and oxygen methylated coal was prepared by Liotta`s method using tetrabutylammonium halide. Coal liquefaction was conducted in an electromagnetic agitation autoclave using tetralin solvent under initial hydrogen pressure of 100kg/cm{sup 2} while heating. The molecular weight distribution of the products obtained was measured by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) analysis. The experimental results are as follows. The effect of intermolecular cohesion in bituminous coal on the reactivity is mainly derived from decomposing reaction from preasphaltene to oil. Yields of oil fraction by methylation increase corresponding to release of intermolecular cohesion. Since the thermal release is promoted with temperature rise, the difference in yield due to different treatments decreases. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Two-stage coal liquefaction process materials from the Wilsonville Facility operated in the nonintegrated and integrated modes: chemical analyses and biological testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Later, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    This document reports the results from chemical analyses and biological testing of process materials sampled during operation of the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility (Wilsonville, Alabama) in both the noncoupled or nonintegrated (NTSL Run 241) and coupled or integrated (ITSL Run 242) two-stage liquefaction operating modes. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative chemical and biological assessments of several NTSL and ITSL process materials. In general, the NTSL process materials were biologically more active and chemically more refractory than analogous ITSL process materials. To provide perspective, the NTSL and ITSL results are compared with those from similar testing and analyses of other direct coal liquefaction materials from the solvent refined coal (SRC) I, SRC II and EDS processes. Comparisons are also made between two-stage coal liquefaction materials from the Wilsonville pilot plant and the C.E. Lummus PDU-ITSL Facility in an effort to assess scale-up effects in these two similar processes. 36 references, 26 figures, 37 tables.

  4. Modeling of Liquefaction of Cryogenic Propellant in a Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A.; Bolshinskiy, L. G.; Majumdar, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades NASA has been focusing to develop technology that would to allow for production of cryogenic propellants on the surface of Mars. The in-situ propellant production reduces the amount of propellants needed to be taken to Mars and ultimately to reduce mission cost. Utilizing Martian resources, the produced gaseous propellants (i.e., oxygen and methane) are liquefied and stored prior to use on the Mars ascent vehicle. In this paper, a model for the liquefaction process of gaseous propellants in a cryogenically refrigerated tank is presented. The tank is considered to be cylindrical with elliptical top and bottom domes. A multi-node transient model is developed based on the mass and energy conservation equations and wall-gas and liquid-gas interface mass and heat transfer correlations. Description of the model and predicted results will be presented in the final paper.

  5. 煤制油化工基地式一体化建设模式思考%On the Base-integration Construction Mode of Coal Liquefaction Chemical Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万国杰

    2011-01-01

    Considering the industrial properties of coal liquefaction chemical industry, referring to the other country's exploration of the construction model on coal liquefaction chemical industry, together with the successful experience of domestic constructing demonstration projects on coal liquefaction chemical industry and national reality of diverse energy resources, various techniques and products are synthetically integrated from the systemic view, focus on the coal liquefaction chemical industry to build a circulating eco-industrial park of the base-integration with step conversion of coal to various of products and step utilization of the energy, in the end, to achieve the optimum of integrated ener- gy system. Through the overall planning of the coal mine, processing of coal, coal gasification (including paralysis), syngas processing, IGCC, coal chemical industry, fuels production from coal, byproducts processing and products deep processing, system of public works, system of public logistics and public service systems, with the form of co-production as well as mutual supply on variety of products, taking the advan- tage of the base-integration, while producing dimensions beneficial result, diversify and fine the products are pursued, and economic benefit, products competition, environmental benefit, social benefit are organically combined with the country's industrial policies. An integrated coal liquefaction chemical industry base is to be built with the highest energy efficiency, the best system benefits, refining division, the professional management, large-scale operation, harmonious relationship between local government and coal mining enterprise, and the environment friendly nature.%鉴于煤制油化工的产业特点,借鉴国际上对煤制油化工建设模式的探索,结合我国煤制油化工示范工程建设的成功经验和我国能源结构及分布的国情,从系统的角度综合集成各种技术和产品组合,围绕煤制

  6. A unified classification model for modeling of seismic liquefaction potential of soil based on CPT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samui, Pijush; Hariharan, R

    2015-07-01

    The evaluation of liquefaction potential of soil due to an earthquake is an important step in geosciences. This article examines the capability of Minimax Probability Machine (MPM) for the prediction of seismic liquefaction potential of soil based on the Cone Penetration Test (CPT) data. The dataset has been taken from Chi-Chi earthquake. MPM is developed based on the use of hyperplanes. It has been adopted as a classification tool. This article uses two models (MODEL I and MODEL II). MODEL I employs Cone Resistance (q c) and Cyclic Stress Ratio (CSR) as input variables. q c and Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) have been taken as inputs for MODEL II. The developed MPM gives 100% accuracy. The results show that the developed MPM can predict liquefaction potential of soil based on q c and PGA.

  7. Development of continuous bench scale unit for direct liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Wang Lai [Korea Inst. of Energy and Resources, Daeduk (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-31

    Batch coal liquefaction experiments using tubing bombs and continuous experiments by cell liquefaction test facility were carried out. The main purpose was to maximize the coal liquefaction yields by improving the activity of coal dissolution catalysts which are oil soluble transition metal naphthenate and to supplement the incomplete research results. In the meantime, the study on the reaction characteristics of coal liquefaction and coal liquid upgrading catalyst upon sulfiding conditions and phosphorous addition have been conducted (author). 102 refs., 35 figs.

  8. Experimental Validation of a Mathematical Model for Seabed Liquefaction Under Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Kirca, Özgür; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study directed towards the validation of a mathematical model for the buildup of pore water pressure and resulting liquefaction of marine soils under progressive waves. Experiments were conducted under controlled conditions with silt (d(50) = 0.......070 mm) in a wave flume with a soil pit. Waves with wave heights in the range of 7.7-18 cm, 55-cm water depth and 1.6-s wave period enabled us to study both the liquefaction and no-liquefaction regime pore water pressure buildup. The experimental data were used to validate the model. A numerical example...

  9. Experimental validation of a mathematical model for seabed liquefaction in waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Kirca, Özgür; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study directed towards the validation of a mathematical model for the buildup of pore water pressure and resulting liquefaction of marine soils under progressive waves. Experiments were conducted under controlled conditions with silt ( d50 = 0.......070 mm) in a wave flume with a soil pit. Waves with wave heights in the range 7.7-18 cm with the water depth 55 cm and the wave period 1.6 s enabled us to study both the liquefaction and no-liquefaction regime pore water pressure buildup. The experimental data was used to validate the model. A numerical...

  10. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 1 - effects of solvents, catalysts and temperature conditions on conversion and structural changes of low-rank coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lili [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Schobert, Harold H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Song, Chunshan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The main objectives of this project were to study the effects of low-temperature pretreatments on coal structure and their impacts on subsequent liquefaction. The effects of pretreatment temperatures, catalyst type, coal rank, and influence of solvent were examined. Specific objectives were to identify the basic changes in coal structure induced by catalytic and thermal pretreatments, and to determine the reactivity of the catalytically and thermally treated coals for liquefaction. In the original project management plan it was indicated that six coals would be used for the study. These were to include two each of bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite rank. For convenience in executing the experimental work, two parallel efforts were conducted. The first involved the two lignites and one subbituminous coal; and the second, the two bituminous coals and the remaining subbituminous coal. This Volume presents the results of the first portion of the work, studies on two lignites and one subbituminous coal. The remaining work accomplished under this project will be described and discussed in Volume 2 of this report. The objective of this portion of the project was to determine and compare the effects of solvents, catalysts and reaction conditions on coal liquefaction. Specifically, the improvements of reaction conversion, product distribution, as well as the structural changes in the coals and coal-derived products were examined. This study targeted at promoting hydrogenation of the coal-derived radicals, generated during thermal cleavage of chemical bonds, by using a good hydrogen donor-solvent and an effective catalyst. Attempts were also made in efforts to match the formation and hydrogenation of the free radicals and thus to prevent retrogressive reaction.

  11. Studies of initial stage in coal liquefaction. 4. Radical formation and structural change with thermal decomposition of coal; Ekika hanno no shoki katei ni kansuru kenkyu. 4. Netsubunkai ni tomonau radical seisei kyodo to kozo henka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanaji, M.; Kaneko, T.; Shimasaki, K. [Nippon Brown Coal Liquefaction Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kumagai, H.; Chiba, T. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan). Center for Advanced Research of Energy Technology

    1996-10-28

    In relation to coal liquefaction reaction, the effect of the coexistence of transferable hydrogen (TH) from process solvent on reduction of radical concentration and the effect of pre-heat treatment on average structure of coals were studied. In experiment, change in radical concentration with temperature rise was measured using the system composed of Yallourn coal and process solvent. The results are as follows. Process solvent with a wide boiling point range of 180-420{degree}C is effective in suppressing an increase in radical concentration even at higher temperature. The effect of hydrogen-donating solvent increases with TH. It was also suggested that high-boiling point constituents in solvent stabilize radicals even over 400{degree}C by vapor phase hydrogenation. The experimental results of pre-heat treatment are as follows. Although the conversion improvement effect of TH is equivalent to that of the model solvent, TH tends to produce soluble products with smaller ring numbers. It was thus suggested that pre-heat treatment in process solvent is effective to inhibit retrogressive reactions. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Liquefaction of Tangier soils by using physically based reliability analysis modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubujet P.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Approaches that are widely used to characterize propensity of soils to liquefaction are mainly of empirical type. The potential of liquefaction is assessed by using correlation formulas that are based on field tests such as the standard and the cone penetration tests. These correlations depend however on the site where they were derived. In order to adapt them to other sites where seismic case histories are not available, further investigation is required. In this work, a rigorous one-dimensional modelling of the soil dynamics yielding liquefaction phenomenon is considered. Field tests consisting of core sampling and cone penetration testing were performed. They provided the necessary data for numerical simulations performed by using DeepSoil software package. Using reliability analysis, the probability of liquefaction was estimated and the obtained results were used to adapt Juang method to the particular case of sandy soils located in Tangier.

  13. Investigation on characterization and liquefaction of coals from Tavan tolgoi deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Purevsuren

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of proximate, ultimate, petrographic and IR analysis results have been confirmed that the Tavan tolgoi coal is a high-rank G mark stone coal. The results of X-ray fluorescence analysis of coal ash show that the Tavan tolgoi coal is a subbituminous coal. The ash of Tavan tolgoi coal has an acidic character. The results of pyrolysis of Tavan tolgoi coal at different heating temperatures show that a maximum yield - 5.0% of liquid product can be obtained at 700°C. The results of thermal dissolution of Tavan tolgoi coal in tetralin with constant mass ratio between coal and tetralin (1:1.8 at 450°C show that 50.0% of liquid product can be obtained after thermal decomposition of the COM (coal organic matter. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5564/mjc.v14i0.191 Mongolian Journal of Chemistry 14 (40, 2013, p12-19

  14. Major elements distribution during liquefaction of beneficated coal fractions from hydrocyclone and flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barraza, J. [Universitaria Melendez (Colombia). Dept. de Procesos Quimicos; Cloke, M.; Belghazi, A. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Beneficiated coal fractions obtained by hydrocyclone and column flotation separation were liquefied in order to determine their effect on the reduction of the major element content in the coal extract liquid prior to hydroprocessing. Results showed that some major elements, mainly Ca, Mn and Ti, were reduced using these beneficiated coal fractions. In general, all the elements exhibit higher reduction using overflow from the cyclone separation compared to the concentrate from the column flotation. (orig.)

  15. Integrated system for coal-methanol liquefaction and slurry pipeline transportation. Final report. [In slurry transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, W.F.; Davidson, J.K.; Horton, J.H.; Summers, C.W.

    1980-03-31

    The engineering economics of an integrated coal-to-methanol conversion system and coal-in-methanol transportation system are examined, under the circumstances of the western coalfields, i.e., long distances from major markets and scarcity of water in the vicinity of the mines. The transportation economics are attractive, indicating tariffs of approximately 40 cents per million Btu per thousand miles for the coal-methanol pipeline vs 60 cents via coal-water pipelines and upwards of a dollar via rail. Energy consumption is also less in the coal-methanol pipeline than in the coal-water pipeline, and about equal to rail. It is also concluded that, by a proper marriage of the synthetic fuel (methanolization) plant to the slurrification plant, most, and in some cases all, of the water required by the synthetic fuel process can be supplied by the natural moisture of the coal itself. Thus, the only technology which presently exists and by which synthetic fuel from western coal can displace petroleum in the automotive fuel market is the integrated methanol conversion and tranportation system. The key element is the ability of the methanol slurry pipeline to accept and to deliver dry (1 to 5% moisture) coal, allowing the natural coal moisture to be used as synthesis feedstock in satisfaction of the large water requirement of any synthetic fuel plant. By virtue of these unique properties, this integrated system is seen as the only means in the foreseeable future whereby western coal can be converted to synthetic fuel and moved to distant markets.

  16. Liquefaction chemistry and kinetics: Hydrogen utilization studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the chemistry and kinetics that occur in the initial stages of coal liquefaction and to determine the effects of hydrogen pressure, catalyst activity, and solvent type on the quantity and quality of the products produced. The project comprises three tasks: (1) preconversion chemistry and kinetics, (2) hydrogen utilization studies, and (3) assessment of kinetic models for liquefaction. The hydrogen utilization studies work will be the main topic of this report. However, the other tasks are briefly described.

  17. Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Quarterly report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L. [Canadian Energy Development, Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1994-07-01

    A detailed evaluation of the bench unit data on Black Thunder feedstocks was completed. The results show that in a once-through operation using counterflow, reactor technology coal conversions in excess of 90% could be obtained, giving distillable oil yields in the range 60--65 wt % on MAF coal. The remaining non-distillable oil fraction which represents 20--25 wt % on MAF coal is a source of additional distillable oil in further processing, for example, bottoms recycle operation. C{sub 1}-C{sub 3} gas yields were generally in the order of 6--8 wt %. In autoclave studies, Illinois No. 6 coal was found to be much less reactive than Black Thunder coal, and did not respond well to solubilization with carbon monoxide/steam. Process severity was, therefore, increased for bench unit operations on Illinois No. 6 coal, and work has concentrated on the use of hydrogen rather than carbon monoxide for solubilization. Preliminary coking studies on the resid from bench unit runs on Black Thunder coal were also carried out. Distillable liquid yields of 55--60 wt % were obtained. The technical and economic study to be carried out by Kilborn Engineering Company has been initiated.

  18. Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, Jerald [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2014-03-31

    The project currently is composed of six specific tasks – three research tasks, two outreach and training tasks, and one project management and communications task. Task 1 addresses project management and communication. Research activities focused on Task 2 (Describe and Quantify the Economic Impacts and Implications of the Development and Deployment of Coal-to-Liquid Facilities in China), Task 3 (Development of Alternative Coal Gasification Database), and Task 4 (Geologic Carbon Management Options). There also were significant activities related to Task 5 (US-China Communication, Collaboration, and Training on Clean Coal Technologies) as well as planning activity performed in support of Task 6 (Training Programs).

  19. Finite Element Modelling of Seismic Liquefaction in Soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galavi, V.; Petalas, A.; Brinkgreve, R.B.J.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical aspects of seismic liquefaction in soils as implemented in the finite element code, PLAXIS, is described in this paper. After description of finite element equations of dynamic problems, three practical dynamic boundary conditions, namely viscous boundary tractions, tied degrees of freedom

  20. Novel Bimettallic Dispersed Catalysts for Temperature-Programmed Coal Liquefaction: Technical progress report January--March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C.; Schmidt, E.; Schobert, H.H.

    1996-06-01

    Coal liquefaction may involve cleavage of methylene, dimethylene and ether bridges connecting polycyclic aromatic units and the reactions of various oxygen functional groups. Here in this quarterly, we report on the effects of dispersed Mo catalysts and H{sub 2}O addition on hydrogenation and C-C bond hydrocracking of 4-(1- naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, abbreviated as NMBB. Recent research in this laboratory has demonstrated a strong synergistic effect between a dispersed Mo sulfide catalyst and water in low-severity coal liquefaction reaction. This finding prompted us to examine the effects of dispersed Mo catalysts and H{sub 2}O addition on hydrogenation and C-C bond hydrocracking of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, NMBB. Batch studied in microautoclave reactors at 350 and 400{degrees}C for 30 min revealed that active catalysts can be generated in situ from either ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (ATTM) or Mo(CO){sub 6} under the reaction conditions (350 or 400{degrees}C, 30 min), with the main catalysis of the latter for NMBB hydrogenation, but the former for C-C bond cleavage. Water may have strong promoting effect on NMBB conversion in catalytic runs, depending on the conditions. At 350{degrees}C a 50% increase in NMBB conversion was observed upon H{sub 2}O addition to the run using ATTM (1 wt % Mo) as catalyst. However, at 400{degrees}C no major difference in conversion or product distribution was found. Runs of NMBB at 350{degrees}C using Mo(CO){sub 6} lead to tetrahydro-NMBB-derivatives and few cleavage products. Water added to Mo(CO){sub 6} suppressed hydrogenation. The combination of Mo(CO){sub 6} and S lead to almost complete conversion of NMBB. A run with Mo(CO){sub 6}/S/H{sub 2}O gave similar results. It appears that water can increase NMBB conversion with ATTM at 350{degrees}C but decreased conversion for runs at 400{degrees}C. Also contained in this report is mechanistic discussion for hydrocracking and hydrogenation of NMBB.

  1. Modelling the coal chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gertenbach, J.-D.; Varendorff, R. von [Knowledge Based Engineering, Sandton (South Africa)

    1999-03-01

    Managing the supply chain in an integrated coal operation involves many operation and control options often too complex for the human mind to comprehend and react to. By integrating all the knowledge of a supply chain into an expert system, both off-line and on-line real time decisions are possible. Knowledge Based Engineering based in South Africa, has gained valuable experience in modelling such mining operations. The article discusses the methodologies that the company has implemented. KBE uses Gensym`s G2 Real Time Expert System as the foundation of the system and the knowledge base is developed modularly.

  2. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C.; Huang, L.; Wenzel, K.A.; Hatcher, P.G.; Schobert, H.H.

    1994-02-01

    In this quarter, progress has been made in the following two aspects: The influences of temperature, dispersed Mo catalyst, and solvent on the liquefaction conversion and composition of products from low-rank coals; and the hydrous pyrolysis of a lignite and spectroscopic characterization of its structural transformation during the hydrous pyrolysis. The analytical work described in this quarter also represents molecular-level characterization of products. The purpose of the first part of the work described in this quarter is to study the influences of temperature, solvent and dispersed Mo catalyst on the liquefaction conversion and chemical composition of the products. Many specialty chemicals, including one- to four-ring aromatics, could potentially be produced by liquefying coal. To achieve this goal, not only a high coal conversion but also a desirable product distribution is necessary. Therefore, it is of great importance to understand the structural changes of the coal during reaction and to investigate the conditions under which the aliphatics or aromatics can be removed from the macromolecular structure of coal. This quarterly report also describes the hydrous pyrolysis of Potapsco lignite and spectroscopic characterization of its structural transformation during the hydrous pyrolysis. This work has some implications both on the structural changes of low-rank coals during pretreatment and on the geochemical reactions during coalification stage. Vitrinite, a major component of most coals, is derived from degraded wood in ancient peat swamps. Organic geochemical studies conducted on a series of coalified wood samples derived mostly from gymnosperms have allowed the development of a chemical reaction series to characterize the major coalification reactions which lignin, the major coal-producing component of wood, undergoes.

  3. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Characterization of coal-derived materials by field desorption mass spectrometry, two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, supercritical fluid extraction, and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Robins, W.H. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Under contract from the DOE , and in association with CONSOL Inc., Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated four principal and several complementary techniques for the analysis of non-distillable direct coal liquefaction materials in support of process development. Field desorption mass spectrometry (FDMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods were examined for potential usefulness as techniques to elucidate the chemical structure of residual (nondistillable) direct coal liquefaction derived materials. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry (SFC/MS) were evaluated for effectiveness in compound-class separation and identification of residual materials. Liquid chromatography (including microcolumn) separation techniques, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and GC/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods were applied to supercritical fluid extracts. The full report authored by the PNL researchers is presented here. The following assessment briefly highlights the major findings of the project, and evaluates the potential of the methods for application to coal liquefaction materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of CONSOL`s contract.

  4. Dependence of liquefaction behavior on coal characteristics. Part VI. Relationship of liquefaction behavior of a set of high sulfur coals to chemical structural characteristics. Final technical report, March 1981 to February 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neill, P. H.; Given, P. H.

    1984-09-01

    The initial aim of this research was to use empirical mathematical relationships to formulate a better understanding of the processes involved in the liquefaction of a set of medium rank high sulfur coals. In all, just over 50 structural parameters and yields of product classes were determined. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the empirical relationships between the various properties, a number of relatively complex statistical procedures and tests were applied to the data, mostly selected from the field of multivariate analysis. These can be broken down into two groups. The first group included grouping techniques such as non-linear mapping, hierarchical and tree clustering, and linear discriminant analyses. These techniques were utilized in determining if more than one statistical population was present in the data set; it was concluded that there was not. The second group of techniques included factor analysis and stepwise multivariate linear regressions. Linear discriminant analyses were able to show that five distinct groups of coals were represented in the data set. However only seven of the properties seemed to follow this trend. The chemical property that appeared to follow the trend most closely was the aromaticity, where a series of five parallel straight lines was observed for a plot of f/sub a/ versus carbon content. The factor patterns for each of the product classes indicated that although each of the individual product classes tended to load on factors defined by specific chemical properties, the yields of the broader product classes, such as total conversion to liquids + gases and conversion to asphaltenes, tended to load largely on factors defined by rank. The variance explained and the communalities tended to be relatively low. Evidently important sources of variance have still to be found.

  5. Exploratory research on novel coal liquefaction concept. [Quarterly report], January 1--March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, F.P.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A. [CONSOL, Inc., Library, PA (United States). Research and Development Dept.; Derbyshire, F.J.; Kimber, G.; Anderson, R.K.; Carter, S.D. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Peluso, M. [LDP Associates, Hamilton Square, NJ (United States)

    1996-05-09

    Work this quarter concentrated on evaluating the effects of low- severity, first stage reaction conditions on coal conversions, exploring the effect of solvent-to-coal ratio on filtration performance, exploring the effects of pretreatment on dispersed catalysts for hydrotreating tests, and the installation and calibration of a simulated distillation instrument. Additional work included continued review of the technical and patent literature and expansion of the annotated bibliography.

  6. Effect of properties of iron compounds on the catalytic activity in direct coal liquefaction; Tetsu kagobutsu no keitai to sekitan ekika kassei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, T.; Tazawa, K. [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Shimasaki, K. [Kobe Steel Ltd. (Japan)

    1998-08-20

    When considering merchandising scale of the coal liquefaction process, it is a preliminary condition that metal used for its catalyst is rich in resource volume, cheap in production cost, without pollution, and so forth, and application of cheap iron ore and ferrous compounds to disposable catalyst is desired. As liquefaction activity of the iron ore was hitherto improved by its micro crushing, its mechanical crush had a limit of about 2 {mu}m in mean particle diameter. However, together with recent crushing technique, crushers with high performance were developed, and then micro crushing by sub-micron became possible industri8ally even for iron ore. In this study, three kinds of Australian iron ores such as limonite of ferric hydroxide type iron ore, pyrite of ferrous sulfide type, and hematite of ferric oxide type were micro crushed to examine coal liquefaction activity and hydrogenation reaction activity of 1-methyl naphthalene (1-MN) and also relationship between properties and activity of catalyst for the latter before and after reaction. 11 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Physical modeling and visualization of soil liquefaction under high confining stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lenart González; Tarek Abdoun; Mourad Zeghal; Vivian Kallou; Michael K. Sharp

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms of seismically-induced liquefaction of granular soils under high confining stresses are still not fully understood. Evaluation of these mechanisms is generally based on extrapolation of observed behavior at shallow depths.Three centrifuge model tests were conducted at RPI's experimental facility to investigate the effects of confining stresses on the dynamic response ora deep horizontal deposit of saturated sand. Liquefaction was observed at high confining stresses in each of the tests. A system identification procedure was used to estimate the associated shear strain and stress time histories.These histories revealed a response marked by shear strength degradation and dilative patterns. The recorded accelerations and pore pressures were employed to generate visual animations of the models. These visualizations revealed a liquefaction front traveling downward and leading to large shear strains and isolation of upper soil layers.

  8. EROI Analysis for Direct Coal Liquefaction without and with CCS: The Case of the Shenhua DCL Project in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyang Kong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there are considerable discrepancies between China’s central government and some local governments in attitudes towards coal to liquids (CTL technology. Energy return on investment (EROI analysis of CTL could provide new insights that may help solve this dilemma. Unfortunately, there has been little research on this topic; this paper therefore analyses the EROI of China’s Shenhua Group Direct Coal Liquefaction (DCL project, currently the only DCL commercial project in the world. The inclusion or omission of internal energy and by-products is controversial. The results show that the EROIstnd without by-product and with internal energy is 0.68–0.81; the EROIstnd (the standard EROI without by-product and without internal energy is 3.70–5.53; the EROIstnd with by-product and with internal energy is 0.76–0.90; the EROIstnd with by-product and without internal energy is 4.13–6.14. Furthermore, it is necessary to consider carbon capture and storage (CCS as a means to control the CO2 emissions. Considering the added energy inputs of CCS at the plant level, the EROIs decrease to 0.65–0.77, 2.87–3.97, 0.72–0.85, and 3.20–4.40, respectively. The extremely low, even negative, net energy, which may be due to high investments in infrastructure and low conversion efficiency, suggests CTL is not a good choice to replace conventional energy sources, and thus, Chinese government should be prudent when developing it.

  9. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chunshan; Schmidt, E.; Schobert, H.H.

    1996-01-01

    Coal liquefaction involves cleavage of methylene, dimethylene and ether bridges connecting polycyclic aromatic units and the reactions of various oxygen functional groups. Here in this quarterly, we report on the hydrocracking of 4-(l-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl in the presence of iron (Fe) catalysts and sulfur and residual wall catalytic effect. Catalytic hydrocracking of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (NMBB) predominantly yielded naphthalene and 4-methylbibenzyl. Various iron compounds were examined as catalyst precursors. Sulfur addition to most catalyst precursors led to substantially higher catalyst activity and higher conversion. NMBB was also treated with sulfur in the absence of iron compounds, in concentrations of 1.2-3.4 wt%, corresponding to the conditions present in reactions with added iron compounds. Increasing sulfur concentrations led to higher NMBB conversions. Furthermore, sulfur had a permanent effect on the reactor walls. A black sulfide layer formed on the surface which could not be removed mechanically. The supposed non-catalytic reactions done in the same reactor but after experiments with added sulfur showed higher conversions than comparable experiments done in new reactors. This wall catalytic effect can be reduced by treating the sulfided reactors with hydrochloric acid. The results of this work demonstrate the significant effect of sulfur addition and sulfur-induced residual wall effects on carbon-carbon bond cleavage and hydrogenation of aromatics.

  10. A Spotlight on Liquefaction: Evidence from Clinical Settings and Experimental Models in Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere-Joan Cardona

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquefaction is one of the most intriguing aspects of human tuberculosis. It is a major cause of the transition from the infection to active disease (tuberculosis, TB as well as the transmission of M. tuberculosis to other persons. This paper reviews the natural history of liquefaction in humans from a pathological and radiological point of view and discusses how the experimental models available can be used to address the topic of liquefaction and cavity formation. Different concepts that have been related to liquefaction, from the influence of immune response to mechanical factors, are reviewed. Synchronic necrosis or apoptosis of infected macrophages in a close area, together with an ineffective fibrosis, appears to be clue in this process, in which macrophages, the immune response, and bacillary load interact usually in a particular scenario: the upper lobes of the lung. The summary would be that even if being a stochastic effect, liquefaction would result if the organization of the intragranulomatous necrosis (by means of fibrosis would be disturbed.

  11. MAGNETO-CHEMICAL CHARACTER STUDIES OF NOVEL Fe CATALYSTS FOR COAL LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty A. Akundi; Jian H. Zhang; A.N. Murty; S.V. Naidu

    2002-04-01

    The objectives of the present study are: (1) To synthesize iron catalysts: Fe/MoO{sub 3}, and Fe/Co/MoO{sub 3} employing two distinct techniques: Pyrolysis with organic precursors and Co-precipitation of metal nitrates; (2) To investigate the magnetic character of the catalysts before and after exposure to CO and CO+H{sub 2} by (a) Mossbauer study of Iron (b) Zerofield Nuclear Magnetic Resonance study of Cobalt, and (c) Magnetic character of the catalyst composite; (3) To study the IR active surface species of the catalyst while stimulating (CO--Metal, (CO+H{sub 2})--Metal) interactions, by FTIR Spectroscopy; and (4) To analyze the catalytic character (conversion efficiency and product distribution) in both direct and indirect liquefaction Process and (5) To examine the correlations between the magnetic and chemical characteristics. This report presents the results of our investigation on (a) the effect of metal loading (b) the effect of intermetallic ratio and (c) the effect of catalyst preparation procedure on (i) the magnetic character of the catalyst composite (ii) the IR active surface species of the catalyst and (iii) the catalytic yields for three different metal loadings: 5%, 15%, and 25% (nominal) for three distinct intermetallic ratios (Fe/Co = 0.3, 1.5, 3.0).

  12. National coal utilization assessment: modeling long-term coal production with the Argonne coal market model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dux, C.D.; Kroh, G.C.; VanKuiken, J.C.

    1977-08-01

    The Argonne Coal Market Model was developed as part of the National Coal Utilization Assessment, a comprehensive study of coal-related environmental, health, and safety impacts. The model was used to generate long-term coal market scenarios that became the basis for comparing the impacts of coal-development options. The model has a relatively high degree of regional detail concerning both supply and demand. Coal demands are forecast by a combination of trend and econometric analysis and then input exogenously into the model. Coal supply in each region is characterized by a linearly increasing function relating increments of new mine capacity to the marginal cost of extraction. Rail-transportation costs are econometrically estimated for each supply-demand link. A quadratic programming algorithm is used to calculate flow patterns that minimize consumer costs for the system.

  13. EDS coal liquefaction process development. Phase V. EDS commercial plant study design update. Illinois coal. Volume 1. Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epperly, W. R.

    1981-03-01

    The objectives of the Study Design Update (SDU) were to identify the technical issues facing a potential commercial-size EDS plant design; to provide a reliable basis for estimating the cost of EDS products; and to furnish research guidance to the EDS Project. The SDU consists of two distinct studies in which different processing schemes are used to produce the hydrogen and fuel gas required by the plant. These studies are referred to as the Base Case and the Market Flexibility Sensitivity Case. In the Base Case, hydrogen is generated by steam reforming of the light hydrocarbon gases produced in the plant. Fuel gas is generated by feeding the bottoms stream from the liquefaction section vacuum pipestill to a FLEXICOKING unit. In the FLEXICOKING unit reactor, the bottoms stream is converted to coke; additional liquid product is also recovered. The coke is converted to low-Btu fuel gas in the FLEXICOKING unit gasifier. In the Market Flexibility Sensitivity (MFS) Case, the bottoms stream from the vacuum pipestill is split, and about half is sent to the FLEXICOKING unit for recovery of additional liquid product and production of fuel gas. The remainder of the bottoms stream is converted to hydrogen in a Partial Oxidation Unit. Hence the MFS Case does not consume light hydrocarbon gases produced and they are available for sale. The study of these two cases has demonstrated the importance of bottoms process selection to the economics and thermal efficiency of an EDS plant. Volume 1 - Main Report has been developed to be a stand-alone document. Both the Base Case and Market Flexibility Sensitivity (MFS) Case are covered. This volume includes an overview and detailed case summaries. It also covers economics, product recovery factors, material and energy balances, cost estimates and enviromental considerations.

  14. Indirect coal liquefaction technology and its research progress%煤间接液化技术及其研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙启文; 吴建民; 张宗森; 庞利峰

    2013-01-01

    The principles and typical process of synthesis of liquid fuels from indirect coal liquefaction are discussed. The development history and recent advances in indirect coal liquefaction technology are reviewed. The process routes and critical issues, including gasifier, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis reactor and catalyst are also discussed. The technical economics of the process is analyzed and its commercialization development prospect is presented. The analysis shows that constructing commercial scale indirect coal liquefaction plant is not only technically and economically feasible, but also promoting commercialization of indirect coal liquefaction technology and accelerating the formation of China's technology and industry of energy source conversion.%介绍了煤经合成气间接液化合成液体燃料的原理及典型工艺.综述了煤间接液化技术的发展历程及其最新进展,讨论了国内外煤间接液化技术的工艺流程,重点介绍了煤间接液化过程中的核心问题,主要包括气化炉、费托合成反应器和费托合成催化剂,分析了煤间接液化的技术经济性以及对煤间接液化的工业应用前景进行了展望.分析表明:具有我国自主知识产权的煤间接液化技术建设100万吨级以上工业化装置在技术上可靠、经济上可行,且100万吨级工业化项目的成功实施将带动我国煤间接液化技术的产业化进程,加快形成具有中国特色的能源转化技术和产业.

  15. Effect of hydrogen pressure on free radicals in direct coal liquefaction/coprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seehra, M.S.; Ibrahim, M.M. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study was to investigate the coprocessing of coal with waste tires and commingled plastics and to characterize the relevant catalysts, using high pressure/high temperature in-situ ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) spectroscopy. The recent results from high pressure ESR spectroscopy are emphasized. During this period, considerable progress was made in developing the high pressure capabilities in in-situ ESR spectroscopy and new results carried out in 1000 psi of H{sub 2}gas are presented. In these experiments, sapphire tubes were used to contain the high pressures at temperatures up to 500{degrees}C. Results of the experiments carried out under 1000 psi of H{sub 2} are compared with those under 1000 psi of non-interacting argon and with the earlier experiments in flowing H{sub 2} gas where the volatiles are removed by the flowing gas. In these experiments, the free radical density N of the Blind Canyon coal was measured at each temperature and pressure by double integration of the ESR signal and calibrating it against a standard. The details of the experimental apparatus and procedures have been described in earlier publications.

  16. Filtration in coal liquefaction - Influence of filtration conditions in non-hydrogenated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, J. W.; Rantell, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    A series of experiments has been carried out to study the effects of filtration conditions upon the rate of filtration of non-hydrogenated coal digests. The results show the dependence of cake resistivity on both the filtration temperature and pressure. Filter cakes were found to be compressible, resulting in smaller increases in rate with increasing pressure than with incompressible cakes. The filtration temperature determines the packing of residual solids in the cake which in turn affects the cake resistivity. An empirical relation has been derived between filtration temperature and resistivity. With increasing temperature there is an increase in filtration rate due to the reduced viscosity, but a reduction owing to a higher packing density of solids in the filter cake.

  17. Aspen Process Flowsheet Simulation Model of a Battelle Biomass-Based Gasification, Fischer-Tropsch Liquefaction and Combined-Cycle Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-10-30

    This study was done to support the research and development program of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in the thermochemical conversion of biomass to liquid transportation fuels using current state-of-the-art technology. The Mitretek study investigated the use of two biomass gasifiers; the RENUGAS gasifier being developed by the Institute of Gas Technology, and the indirectly heated gasifier being developed by Battelle Columbus. The Battelle Memorial Institute of Columbus, Ohio indirectly heated biomass gasifier was selected for this model development because the syngas produced by it is better suited for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with an iron-based catalyst for which a large amount of experimental data are available. Bechtel with Amoco as a subcontractor developed a conceptual baseline design and several alternative designs for indirect coal liquefaction facilities. In addition, ASPEN Plus process flowsheet simulation models were developed for each of designs. These models were used to perform several parametric studies to investigate various alternatives for improving the economics of indirect coal liquefaction.

  18. Advances in Seabed Liquefaction and its Implications for Marine Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    A review is presented of recent advances in seabed liquefaction and its implications for marine structures. The review is organized in seven sections: Residual liquefaction, including the sequence of liquefaction, mathematical modelling, centrifuge modelling and comparison with standard wave-flum......-flume results; Momentary liquefaction; Floatation of buried pipelines; Sinking of pipelines and marine objects; Liquefaction at gravity structures; Stability of rock berms in liquefied soils; and Impact of seismic-induced liquefaction.......A review is presented of recent advances in seabed liquefaction and its implications for marine structures. The review is organized in seven sections: Residual liquefaction, including the sequence of liquefaction, mathematical modelling, centrifuge modelling and comparison with standard wave...

  19. Effect of molybdenum catalysts on direct Shendong coal liquefaction%钼系催化剂对神东煤直接液化的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾军; 黄澎; 谷小会; 赵渊

    2011-01-01

    利用间歇式高压釜,采用钼系催化剂钼酸铵、三氧化钼和二硫化钼对神东煤进行煤直接液化性能的研究.研究表明,钼的添加量为0.1%时,钼酸铵的效果最好,转化率和油产率最高,分别为82.14%,39.47%.%Study on direct Shendong coal liquefaction reaction with molybdenum catalysts containing annnonium molybdate, molybdenum trioxide, molybdenum disulfide in batch high-pressure reactor.The results show that molybdenum addition account for 0.1% of dry coal, ammonium molybdate plays well, conversion and oil yield is highest,which is 82.14% and 39.47% ,respectively.

  20. Influence of catalytic activity and reaction conditions on the product distribution in coal liquefaction; Sekitan ekikayu no seiseibutsu bunpu ni taisuru shokubai kassei oyobi hanno joken no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasuo, H.; Sakanishi, K.; Mochida, I. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Institute of Advanced Material Study

    1996-10-28

    The NiMo sulfide supported on Ketjen Black (KB) was more effective and yielded lighter oil products containing light fractions with their boiling point below 300{degree}C during the two stage liquefaction combining low temperature and high temperature hydrogenation the conventional NiMo/alumina catalyst and FeS2 catalyst. Although the NiMo/alumina yielded increased oil products during the two stage liquefaction, the lighter oil fractions did not increase and the heavier fractions increased mainly. This suggests that the hydrogenation of aromatic rings and successive cleavage of the rings are necessary for producing the light oil, which is derived from the sufficient hydrogenation of aromatic rings using catalysts. For the two stage reaction with NiMo/KB catalyst, it was considered that sufficient hydrogen was directly transferred to coal molecules at the first stage of the low temperature reaction, which promoted the solubilization of coal and the successive hydrogenation at the high temperature reaction. Thus, high activity of the catalyst must be obtained. It is expected that further high quality distillates can be produced through the optimization of catalysts and solvents at the two stage reaction. 1 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Evaluation of liquefaction potential of soil based on standard penetration test using multi-gene genetic programming model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muduli, Pradyut; Das, Sarat

    2014-06-01

    This paper discusses the evaluation of liquefaction potential of soil based on standard penetration test (SPT) dataset using evolutionary artificial intelligence technique, multi-gene genetic programming (MGGP). The liquefaction classification accuracy (94.19%) of the developed liquefaction index (LI) model is found to be better than that of available artificial neural network (ANN) model (88.37%) and at par with the available support vector machine (SVM) model (94.19%) on the basis of the testing data. Further, an empirical equation is presented using MGGP to approximate the unknown limit state function representing the cyclic resistance ratio (CRR) of soil based on developed LI model. Using an independent database of 227 cases, the overall rates of successful prediction of occurrence of liquefaction and non-liquefaction are found to be 87, 86, and 84% by the developed MGGP based model, available ANN and the statistical models, respectively, on the basis of calculated factor of safety (F s) against the liquefaction occurrence.

  2. Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coal liquefaction workers: impact of a workwear policy on excretion of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, R; Kowalczyk, G; Gardiner, K; Calvert, I

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--This study was undertaken to assess whether contaminated personal clothing worn beneath a coverall (normal workwear) is a source of potentially significant dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coal liquefaction workers. METHODS--An intervention study was conducted over a two week period involving 10 workers that reflected the range of activities performed at the factory. A cross over design was used to examine the influence of normal workwear (personal clothing worn beneath a coverall) and intervention workwear (new coverall, shirt, trousers, underwear, socks, and boots) upon excretion of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) and skin pad deposition of pyrene. RESULTS--The impact of intervention was noted in three ways: (1) A notable reduction (55%) in the mass of 1-OHP excreted on the first day of the intervention phase was found. The median reduction in mass excreted (22.7 nmol) was significant from zero at the 5% level; (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 9.5-40.8 nmol). (2) A notable reduction (82%) in skin pad deposition of pyrene on the first day of the intervention phase was found. The median reduction of 13.20 ng.cm-2 was significant from zero at the 5% level; (95% CI 7.3-26.4 ng.cm-2). (3) About a 50% reduction in 1-OHP concentration over the working week occurred during the intervention phase; an increase of 2.07 mumol/mol creatinine was found from the start to the end of the work period during the intervention phase compared with an increase of 4.06 mumol/mol creatinine during the normal phase. This reduction was not significant at the 5% level. CONCLUSION--The results indicate that on the first day of the working week investigated, significant reductions in absorbtion (as measured by excretion of urinary 1-OHP) and deposition of PAHs (as measured by skin pad deposition of pyrene) can be effected by improvements in workwear policy. The impact of the improved workwear regimen was also detected by reduction in spot urinary 1-OHP

  3. Liquefaction of crop residues for polyol production

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, C.; Wang, T.; Zhang, L.; Zang, L.; Li, Y; Mao, Z.; Liang, L.

    2006-01-01

    The liquefaction of crop residues in the presence of ethylene glycol, ethylene carbonate, or polyethylene glycol using sulfuric acid as a catalyst was studied. For all experiments, the liquefaction was conducted at 160C and atmospheric pressure. The mass ratio of feedstock to liquefaction solvents used in all the experiments was 30:100. The results show that the acid catalyzed liquefaction process fit a pseudo-first-order kinetics model. Liquefaction yields of 80, 74, and 60% were obtained i...

  4. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 2 - hydrogenative and hydrothermal pretreatments and spectroscopic characterization using pyrolysis-GC-MS, CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR and FT-IR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chunshan Song; Hatcher, P.G.; Saini, A.K.; Wenzel, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    It has been indicated by DOE COLIRN panel that low-temperature catalytic pretreatment is a promising approach to the development of an improved liquefaction process. This work is a fundamental study on effects of pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. The main objectives of this project are to study the coal structural changes induced by low-temperature catalytic and thermal pretreatments by using spectroscopic techniques; and to clarify the pretreatment-induced changes in reactivity or convertibility of coals. As the second volume of the final report, here we summarize our work on spectroscopic characterization of four raw coals including two subbituminous coals and two bituminous coals, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-extracted but unreacted coals, the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been thermally pretreated. in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent, and the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been catalytically pretreated in the presence of a dispersed Mo sulfide catalyst in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent.

  5. Heteroatom speciation in coal liquefaction via FTIR coupled with liquid chromatography. Quarterly progress report, October 1-December 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, L.T.

    1984-05-01

    The objectives of the research are (1) evaluate the potential of FT-IR for qualitative functional group detection in chromatographic fractions of highly polar materials, (2) develop separation techniques with the aid of FT-IR detection for concentration of oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur functionalities in synfuels, (3) describe and quantify the various heteroatom functionalities in selected solvent refined coal fractions, (4) place speciation techniques on-line with chromatographic separations, (5) compare quantitative speciation information obtained from LC-FTIR with established fluorine tagging techniques regarding model compounds and synfuels. 23 figures, 5 tables.

  6. Studies of initial stage in coal liquefaction. Effect of prethermal treatment condition with process solvent to increase oil yields; Ekika hanno no shoki katei ni kansuru kenkyu. Sekitan no maeshori joken to yozai koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindo, T.; Komatsu, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Okui, T.; Kaneko, T.; Shimasaki, K. [Nippon Brown Coal Liquefaction Co. ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Process solvent was hydrogenated in the brown coal liquefaction, to investigate the influence of it on the prethermal treatment and liquefaction. Consequently, it was found that the n-hexane soluble (HS) yield was improved. In this study, capacity of hydrogen transfer from solvent during prethermal treatment and effects of catalyst were investigated. Since prethermal treatment in oil was effective for improving the oil yield in the presence of hydrogen/catalyst or high hydrogen-donor solvent, influence of hydrogen-donor performance of solvent or addition of catalyst on the hydrogenation behavior of coal and the characteristics of products during prethermal treatment were investigated in relation to successive liquefaction results. As a result, it was found that the increase of HS yield was due to the acceleration of conversion of THF-insoluble using high hydrogen-donor solvent and/or by adding catalyst. It was also found that the use of high hydrogen-donor solvent and highly active catalyst at the stage of prethermal treatment before the successive liquefaction was effective for improving the HS yield, i.e., liquefied oil yield. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Modeling liquefaction of water saturated granular material under undrained cyclic shearing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juhua Zhang

    2005-01-01

    The tendency of particles in a water-saturated granular mass to re-arrange into a denser state during cyclic shearing under pressure results in an increase in pore water pressure. The increase in the pore water pressure causes a reduction in the inner particle contact forces, and in turn easier re-arrangement of the particles. Eventually, the material loses its shear strength, partially or almost completely. In this paper, a general three-dimensional continuum mechanics model is presented for the deformation of granular materials.A physically based model is also presented for characterization of liquefaction of the water saturated granular material under undrained cyclic shearing. The model incorporates the fabric of the granular mass, which develops as the frictional granular mass is deformed in shear. It includes the coupling between shearing and excess pore water pressure. The model parameters are estimated, based on the results of cyclic shearing experiments on large hollow cylindrical samples of silica sand. Basically, the calculation results utilizing this model can embody liquefaction phenomena of the water saturated granular material under undrained cyclic shearing.

  8. Basic properties of Japanese and foreign coals selected for liquefaction. 1. A consideration of the method for proximate analysis of coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, R.

    1984-10-01

    The use of thermogravimetry for the proximate analysis of coals is compared with the Japanese Standard method (JIS M8812). The thermogravimetric method was found to be applicable to a wide range of brown coals, lignites and bituminous coals providing a rapid and simple method requiring only a small sample and giving a direct determination of fixed carbon.

  9. Modelling landslide liquefaction, mobility bifurcation and the dynamics of the 2014 Oso disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.; George, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Some landslides move slowly or intermittently downslope, but others liquefy during the early stages of motion, leading to runaway acceleration and high-speed runout across low-relief terrain. Mechanisms responsible for this disparate behaviour are represented in a two-phase, depth-integrated, landslide dynamics model that melds principles from soil mechanics, granular mechanics and fluid mechanics. The model assumes that gradually increasing pore-water pressure causes slope failure to nucleate at the weakest point on a basal slip surface in a statically balanced mass. Failure then spreads to adjacent regions as a result of momentum exchange. Liquefaction is contingent on pore-pressure feedback that depends on the initial soil state. The importance of this feedback is illustrated by using the model to study the dynamics of a disastrous landslide that occurred near Oso, Washington, USA, on 22 March 2014. Alternative simulations of the event reveal the pronounced effects of a landslide mobility bifurcation that occurs if the initial void ratio of water-saturated soil equals the lithostatic, critical-state void ratio. They also show that the tendency for bifurcation increases as the soil permeability decreases. The bifurcation implies that it can be difficult to discriminate conditions that favour slow landsliding from those that favour liquefaction and long runout.

  10. 含氧煤层气流量变化对液化工艺影响的模拟研究%Simulation Study on Influence of Flow Change of Oxygen-contained Coal-bed Methane upon Liquefaction Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱菁; 王长元; 张武; 任小坤

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, simulation calculation wad carried out on the liquefaction process of coal-bed methane by using HYSYS software and analysis was made on influence of the flow change of coal-bed methane upon the energy consumption of liquefaction and the recovery rate of methane. The results showed that the change range of the total liquefaction energy consumption was identical with that of coal-bed methane flow, of which the change range of the nitrogen compression energy consumption was greater than that of coal-bed methane flow and that of the MRC compression energy consumption was smaller than that of coal-bed methane;the flow change increased the liquefaction energy consumption of unit LNG product, but the flow decrease did not affect the recovery rate of coal-bed methane, and only the flow increase may reduce its recovery rate. In actual operation, it’ s better to make the cooling system having 5% margin so as to ensure the security and stability of the liquefaction process.%利用HYSYS软件对煤层气液化工艺进行模拟计算,分析了煤层气流量变化对液化能耗和CH4回收率的影响,结果表明:总液化能耗变化幅度与煤层气流量变化幅度一致,其中氮气压缩功耗变化幅度大于流量变化幅度,混合冷剂压缩功耗变化幅度小于流量变化幅度;煤层气流量变化会使LNG单位产品液化能耗增加,但流量减小不影响CH4回收率,只有流量增加会降低CH4回收率。在实际运行时,应使制冷系统提供的冷量留有5%的余量,以确保工艺过程的安全与稳定。

  11. Chemistry and catalysis of coal liquefaction catalytic and thermal upgrading of coal liquid and hydrogenation of CO to produce fuels. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, W.H.

    1981-02-01

    Studies on the basic properties of supported sulfide catalysts showed that different supports have a profound influence on catalytic activities of CoMo catalysts. The three functions of hydrodesulfurization, hydrogenation and cracking were differently affected depending on the support used and the manner of preparation of the catalyst. Also, incorporation of additives to the support showed that the different catalytic functions can be selectively affected. A systematic study concerned with catalytic cracking of coal-derived liquids, viz., an SRC-II middle-heavy distillate and four hydrotreated SRC-II products was carried out in the range of 375 to 500/sup 0/C (LHSV, 0.2 to 3.9 h/sup -1/). Hydrotreatment, even to a limited extent, results in a remarkable improvement in the yield of gasoline-range products from the SRC-II distillate. This improvement is ascribed to: (a) hydrogenolysis reactions leading to lower molecular weight feedstock components and (b) limited hydrogenation of aromatic rings leading to polycyclic feed components with sufficient concentration of hydroaromatic rings needed for effective cracking. The results with model compounds and the data on hydrogen consumption during hydrotreatment of SRC-II liquids indicate that for tricyclic, tetracyclic, and pentacyclic coal-liquid components the optimal concentration of hydroaromatic rings for effective subsequent cracking is at least two rings per molecule.

  12. Development of coal liquefaction technologies (Part 3); Development of common base techniques (Part 4). Development and employment of evaluating approach to liquefied process. Development of data collecting and processing system for coal liquefaction process and etc. Sekitan ekika gijutsu kaihatsu (3); Kyotsu kiban gijutsu no kaihatsu nado (4). Ekika process no hyoka shuho no kaihatsu, unyo. Sekitan ekika process nado no data no shushu, Shori system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-09-01

    This research aims to develop the management system of informations concerning coal liquefaction process and etc., to develop data collecting and processing system on pilot plant and supporting researches and to effectively use data to advance to following step such as conceptural design for the demonstration plant. In addition, this research aims to collect many kinds of techniques obtained by the research and development and to arrange and promote the licensing system to practically use this system. Practical results in 1988 were as follows: Conceptural design on basic data base and retrieval or look up system on general technical informations were carried out to develop the data base system for coal liquefaction and to develop the data collecting and processing system for the coal liquefaction process and etc. Data locative leveling was carried out as the conceptural design for basic data base and the basic structures of hardware and software were made up as the basic design for the retrieval system of general technical informations. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. A thermodynamic model for coal gas outbursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth, J.; Lakatos, J. (Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary). Research Lab. for Mining Chemistry)

    1994-06-01

    A thermodynamic model-scheme has been formulated based on the laboratory modelling results of gas/coal outbursts and sorption properties of the gas/coal systems. The sorption properties include the inversion of sorption isotherms, the maximum characters of isobar functions, the activated sorption of gases in coal (methane, carbon-dioxide, nitrogen, ethane) and two equilibria (a metastable and a stable one) in the coal/gas systems. The basic idea of the model is that between the two equilibria exists a potential barrier. When this barrier is crossed by the gas sorbed in the bulk phase of coal a considerable amount of energy is released. This energy may be stored in a definite volume of the rock and if it becomes greater than the compressive strength of the coal the outburst takes place. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Utilisation potential of products of microbial coal liquefaction. Final report; Verwertungspotential der Produkte der mikrobiellen Kohleverfluessigung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepsel, R.; Schmiers, H.; Grosse, S.; Weber, A.

    2002-07-01

    Ever since the discovery in the 1980s that microorganisms are capable of converting coal into soluble products research groups all over the world have been exploring the bioconversion of coal. It was at an advance stage of the present integrated project, which initially only involved microbiology research groups, that the need for a chemical working group with knowledge and experience in the area of coal chemistry and structural analysis of coal was recognised. The task of the chemical working group was to provide knowledge on the chemical nature of bioconversion products and the chemical processes of coal bioconversion. This involved identifying structural changes occurring in the feed coal as well as in its constituent humic acids and macromolecular matrix as a result of the activity of coal degrading microorganisms. [German] Nachdem Anfang der achtziger Jahre entdeckt wurde, dass sich Kohlen durch Mikroorganismen in loesliche Produkte ueberfuehren lassen, agieren weltweit Forschergruppen auf dem Gebiet der Biokonversion von Kohle. In einem fortgeschrittenen Bearbeitungsstadium des Verbundprojektes, an dem zunaechst nur mikrobiologische Arbeitsgruppen beteiligt waren, wurde die Notwendigkeit erkannt, eine chemische Arbeitsgruppe mit Kenntnissen und Erfahrungen auf den Gebieten der Kohlechemie und der Strukturanalytik von Kohlen zu integrieren. Aufgabenstellung der chemischen Arbeitsgruppe war und ist es, Erkenntnisse ueber die chemische Natur der Biokonversionsprodukte und die chemischen Ablaeufe der mikrobiellen Kohlekonversion bereitstellen. Die Aufgabenstellung umfasst die Aufklaerung der strukturellen Veraenderung der Einsatzkohle sowie ihrer Komponenten Huminsaeuren und makromolekulare Matrix durch die Einwirkung kohleabbauender Mikroorganismen. (orig.)

  15. Assessment of thermodynamic models for the design, analysis and optimisation of gas liquefaction systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Elmegaard, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas liquefaction systems are based on refrigeration cycles – they consist of the same operations such as heat exchange, compression and expansion, but they have different layouts, components and working fluids. The design of these systems requires a preliminary simulation and evaluation...... of their performance. However, the thermodynamic models used for this purpose are characterised by different mathematical formulations, ranges of application and levels of accuracy. This may lead to inconsistent results when estimating hydrocarbon properties and assessing the efficiency of a given process. This paper...... presents a thorough comparison of six equations of state widely used in the academia and industry, including the GERG-2008 model, which has recently been adopted as an ISO standard for natural gases. These models are used to (i) estimate the thermophysical properties of a Danish natural gas, (ii) simulate...

  16. Proceedings of the 1978 coal chemistry workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radding, S. B.; Peters, H. M. [eds.

    1978-11-01

    Ten papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. They deal with the structural chemical analysis of coal and the chemistry of coal gasification and coal liquefaction. DOE's Fossil Energy Program is discussed in detail and recommendations for further research in coal gasification and coal liquefaction are made. (LTN)

  17. Development, modelling and evaluation of a small-scale gas liquefaction plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Markussen, Wiebke Brix

    2017-01-01

    plant uses a multi-component refrigerant together with a propane precooling cycle and plate heat exchangers, to achieve a higher performance. This LNG production concept was modelled based on the Danish natural gas composition. Firstly, the total power consumption and heat transfer conductance were......A small-scale gas liquefaction plant was developed and analysed based on process simulation tools and pilot tests. It will be installed in harbours, easing the penetration of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a maritime fuel, in a sector facing more stringent environmental regulations. The proposed...... minimised by optimising the operating conditions and the refrigerant composition. The effects of varying feed and refrigerant compositions were analysed. Secondly, the system layouts were evaluated by conducting an exergetic assessment. Finally, the most promising layouts were validated by pilot plant...

  18. Molecular model and ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulation of coal vitrinite pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wu; Zhu, Yan-ming; Wang, Geoff; Wang, Yang; Liu, Yu

    2015-08-01

    Vitrinite in coal, the mainly generating methane maceral, plays an important role in hydrocarbon generation of coal. This study aims at obtaining products formation mechanism of vitrinite pyrolysis, and hence determining the chemical bond, molecular liquefaction activity, and reactions mechanism of methane and C2-4 during pyrolysis. The ReaxFF molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was carried out at temperature of 1500 K in order to investigate the mechanism of vitrinite pyrolysis. Initially, a minimum energy conformational structure model was constrained by a combination of elemental and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) literature data. The model analysis shows the chemical and physical parameters of vitrinite pyrolysis are broadly consistent with the experimental data. Based on the molecular model, ReaxFF MD simulations further provide information of unimolecule such as bond length, and chemical shift, and hence the total population and energy of main products. Molecules bond and pyrolysis fragments, based on active bond analyzed, revealed pyrolysis products of single vitrinite molecule with aliphatic C-C bond, especially ring and chain aliphatic as liquefaction activity. The molecular cell whose density is 0.9 g/cm(3) with lowest energy accords with the experimental density 1.33 g/cm(3). The content of main products after pyrolysis, classifying as CH4, H2O, and H2, was changed along with the increasing temperature. The gas molecule, fragments and generation pathways of CO2, H2, CH4, and C2H6 were also elucidated. These results show agreement with experimental observations, implying that MD simulation can provide reasonable explanation for the reaction processes involved in coal vitrinite pyrolysis. Thus the mechanism of coal hydrocarbon generation was revealed at the molecular level.

  19. Studies in coal liquefaction with application to the SRC and related processes. Quarterly report, May-July 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarrer, A. R.; Guin, J. A.; Curtis, C. W.

    1984-03-01

    This report examines liquid-phase adsorption as a possible method of studying the interactions between coal liquids and hydrotreating catalysts. The duel purposes of this work are to develop a method to determine specific surface areas of porous catalysts and to examine how compounds commonly found in coal liquids are adsorbed on hydrotreating catalysts. The liquid-phase adsorption studies were performed at room temperature in tubing bomb reactors. Adsorption isotherms obtained from these experiments were assumed to follow Langmuir-type behavior. Compounds used in these studies included PNA compounds, a basic nitrogen containing compound, and an acidic oxygen containing compound. Various commercial grade catalysts as well as presulfided CoMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and presulfided iron oxide were used as adsorbents. Experiments have shown that quinoline, a basic nitrogen containing compound, appears to be an excellent compound for surface area determination via liquid-phase adsorption. Adsorption of compounds such as pyrene, a PNA compound, and phenol, an acidic oxygen containing compound, may be used to determine the relative areas of different types of sites on catalyst surfaces. The sensitivity of this liquid-phase adsorption technique was evaluated by adsorbing different solutes on various catalyst surfaces. This technique shows that the adsorptivity of different coal liquids is a distinct function of the individual properties of the adsorbate as well as the properties of adsorbent used. Comparison of the adsorption properties of these coal liquids on various adsorbents may give insights as to how they adsorb on hydrotreating catalysts, how they compete for the active catalyst sites, and what types of sites the adsorbed molecules occupy. 29 references, 37 figures, 41 tables.

  20. Study on mathematical model of steam coal blending

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高洪阁; 李白英; 刘泽常; 尹增德

    2002-01-01

    It is necessary to set up a new mathematical model of steam coal blending instead of the old model. Indexes such as moisture content, ash content, volatile matter, sulfur content and heating value in the new mathematical model have linear relation. The new mathematical model can also predict ash-fusion temperature precisely by considering coal ash ratio in steam coal blending, therefore it is possible to obtain linear relation of ash-fusion temperature between single coal and steam coal blending. The new mathematical model can improve precision of steam coal blending and perfect the old mathematical model of steam coal blending.

  1. Biotreatment of coals and coal related compounds by hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty, M.V.S.; Aleem, M.I.H.; Kermode, R.I.; Bhattacharyya, D. (University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Acidianus brierleyi were used to study hydrogenation of coal, pretreated coal, asphaltenes and model compounds (diphenyl methane (DPM) and fumarate) under anaerobic conditions. This study involved three primary aspects: (1) determination of net hydrogen-uptake, (2) identification of the biohydrogenated product of fumarate, and (3) testing the influence of hydrogen uptake/biohydrogenation of coal in terms of direct liquefaction yield. The net hydrogen uptake values (from Warburg and GC assays) by the coals or the model compounds (controls) were less than that of the biotreated samples. The greatest hydrogen uptake occurred in untreated coal KCER No. 4677 in the presence of D. desulfuricans. The net hydrogen uptake by coals varied depending upon the coal type and the microorganism. Model compound DPM showed its highest hydrogen uptake rate when catalysed by D. desulfuricans. D. desulfuricans also hydrogenated 36% of the fumarate to succinate in the presence of hydrogen. Biotreated coal KCER No. 4677 was subsequently subjected to direct liquefaction. It showed a net increase in liquefaction yield of 5-4% as a result of biotreatment.

  2. Modelling and analysis of global coal markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueby, Johannes

    2013-01-17

    The thesis comprises four interrelated essays featuring modelling and analysis of coal markets. Each of the four essays has a dedicated chapter in this thesis. Chapters 2 to 4 have, from a topical perspective, a backward-looking focus and deal with explaining recent market outcomes in the international coal trade. The findings of those essays may serve as guidance for assessing current coal market outcomes as well as expected market outcomes in the near to medium-term future. Chapter 5 has a forward-looking focus and builds a bridge between explaining recent market outcomes and projecting long-term market equilibria. Chapter 2, Strategic Behaviour in International Metallurgical Coal Markets, deals with market conduct of large exporters in the market of coals used in steel-making in the period 2008 to 2010. In this essay I analyse whether prices and trade-flows in the international market for metallurgical coals were subject to non-competitive conduct in the period 2008 to 2010. To do so, I develop mathematical programming models - a Stackelberg model, two varieties of a Cournot model, and a perfect competition model - for computing spatial equilibria in international resource markets. Results are analysed with various statistical measures to assess the prediction accuracy of the models. The results show that real market equilibria cannot be reproduced with a competitive model. However, real market outcomes can be accurately simulated with the non-competitive models, suggesting that market equilibria in the international metallurgical coal trade were subject to the strategic behaviour of coal exporters. Chapter 3 and chapter 4 deal with market power issues in the steam coal trade in the period 2006 to 2008. Steam coals are typically used to produce steam either for electricity generation or for heating purposes. In Chapter 3 we analyse market behaviour of key exporting countries in the steam coal trade. This chapter features the essay Market Structure Scenarios in

  3. Analysis of Catalyst Vulcanization of Coal Direct Liquefaction to Oil Hydrogenation Modification Combination%煤直接液化油加氢改质组合催化剂硫化过程分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭贵贵

    2013-01-01

    神华煤直接液化先期工程1.0Mt/a煤直接液化油加氢改质装置在首次工业应用中,采用了中国石化石油化工科学研究院开发的煤直接液化油加氢改质技术(RCHU),以及配套的RGC-1/RNC-2/RCC-1催化剂组合,该技术通过对煤直接液化轻馏分油进行加氢改质,以达到改善产品品质、提高柴油产品十六烷值。本文对煤直接液化油加氢改质装置,首次工业应用开工过程中的催化剂预硫化进行了总结,通过对比催化剂实际上硫量与理论上硫量、实际生成水量与理论生成水量,可知此次开工过程中催化剂的上硫率较高、硫化效果较好。%Shenhua coal direct liquefaction front engineering of the 1.0Mt/a coal direct liquefaction to oil hydrogenation modification unit in the first industrial application was using the coal direct liquefaction oil hydrogenation modified techonlogy (RCHU) and the supporting RGC-1/RNC-2/RCC-1 composition catalyst empoldered by Research Institute of the Petroleum Processing. The technology upgrades the coal direct liquefaction light distillate oil and improves product quality increasing the cetane number of diesel products. This article sum-marizes the catalyst pre-sulfuration process in first commercial application found that the rate of sulfur consumption on the catalyst finally is higher in the process and the sulfuration is successful by comparing sulfur consumed by the catalyst and generated water in fact and theory.

  4. Studies in coal liquefaction with application to the SRC and related processes. Quarterly report, May-July 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guin, J. A.; Curtis, C. W.; Tarrer, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    This report discusses a kinetic investigation of the Fe-S-H/sub 2/ system conducted as an outgrowth of current research in the SRC-I (solvent refined coal) process to better understand the effects of naturally occurring iron sulfides in coal hydrogenation and hydrodesulfurization. A total of twelve closed system reactions were carried out in which 48 to 60 mesh pyrite, in the presence of hydrogen gas, underwent transformation to 1C hexagonal pyrrhotite. Reaction temperatures were 350/sup 0/C and 400/sup 0/C with four sample runs at temperature. Initial pressure of hydrogen gas was 1250 psig (8617 KPa). A comparison of the results for each reaction series was evaluated with time and temperature as variables. The transformation rate of pyrite to pyrrhotite was found to increase over the range of reaction temperatures with the 400/sup 0/C samples showing the greatest amount of transformation per unit time. For the 375/sup 0/C and 400/sup 0/C runs pyrrhotite formation decreased after approximately 15 minutes of reaction time due to (1) reduced availability of pyrite, and (2) resistance to diffusion in the topochemical product layer.

  5. 12th international conference on coal science. Coal - contributing to sustainable world development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The theme of the conference was: coal - contributing to sustainable world. Papers dealt with combustion, coal cleaning, surface analysis, coal sustainability and research, metallurgical coke, structural studies, ash utilization, SEM analysis, liquefaction, pulverized coal injection, power plant emissions, analytical techniques, gasification, thermal analysis, weathering, self-heating and dust explosion, low rank coal gasification, geochemistry and trace elements, petrographic studies, CO{sub 2} mitigation, low rank coal pyrolysis, gas sorption, pyrolysis, synthesis gas, low rank coal drying, biomass pyrolysis, gas cleaning, underground gasification, activated carbon, pyrolysis and char reactivity, gasification model studies, agglomerated and slurry fuels, co-pyrolysis, and tar products and effluents. The poster papers are also included. The papers have been abstracted separately on the IEA Clean Coal Centre Coal Abstracts database.

  6. A semi-empirical model for the estimation of maximum horizontal displacement due to liquefaction-induced lateral spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Allison T.; Seed, Raymond B.; Kayen, Robert E.; Wu, Jiaer

    2006-01-01

    During the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake, liquefaction-induced lateral spreading and resultant ground displacements damaged bridges, buried utilities, and lifelines, conventional structures, and other developed works. This paper presents an improved engineering tool for the prediction of maximum displacement due to liquefaction-induced lateral spreading. A semi-empirical approach is employed, combining mechanistic understanding and data from laboratory testing with data and lessons from full-scale earthquake field case histories. The principle of strain potential index, based primary on correlation of cyclic simple shear laboratory testing results with in-situ Standard Penetration Test (SPT) results, is used as an index to characterized the deformation potential of soils after they liquefy. A Bayesian probabilistic approach is adopted for development of the final predictive model, in order to take fullest advantage of the data available and to deal with the inherent uncertainties intrinstiic to the back-analyses of field case histories. A case history from the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake is utilized to demonstrate the ability of the resultant semi-empirical model to estimate maximum horizontal displacement due to liquefaction-induced lateral spreading.

  7. Development of Predictive Thermodynamic Model for Liquefaction of Natural Gas Using the C3-Mr Refrigeration Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagde, Kenneth, K.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a propane precooled mixed refrigerant (C3-MR liquefaction plant with 4 pressure levels of propane cooling operational in Nigeria and demonstrates the procedure for developing a thermodynamic model that predicts the liquefied natural gas (LNG production rate. The model prediction was validated with plant data with a maximum deviation of 3%. The thermodynamic efficiency of the natural gas liquefaction plant was estimated to be 45.1%. Simulations reveals that LNG production rate for the C3-MR plant depends on cooling water supply temperature (1 ͦC rise results to 92 tonnes per day of LNG loss, thermodynamic efficiency of the overall liquefaction process (1% drop results to 215 tonnes per day of LNG loss, LNG outlet temperature (1 ͦC decrease results to 108 tonnes per day of LNG loss, LNG production to feed gas supply ratio (1% rise results to 37 tonnes per day rise in LNG, thermal efficiency of gas turbine drivers (1% drop results to 277 tonnes per day of LNG loss, ambient air temperature (1 ͦC drop results to 67 tonnes per day of LNG increase and feed gas supply pressure.

  8. Mathematical Modelling of Coal Gasification Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, T.; Raghavan, V.; Ajilkumar, A.; Vijay Kumar, K.

    2017-07-01

    experimental and modelling work has been undertaken to investigate the gasification characteristics of high ash Indian coals and compare the yield with those of high grade Australian and Japanese coals. A 20 kW capacity entrained flow gasifier has been constructed and the gasification characteristics have been studied for Indian coals for different particle sizes, system pressures and air flow rates. The theoretical model incorporates the effects of Knudsen diffusion, devolatilization and various heterogenous and homogenous kinetic steps as well as two-phase flow interactions involving the gaseous and particle phases. Output parameters such as carbon conversion, cold gas efficiency and syngas composition have been compared for different grades of coals under a wide range of operating conditions. The model developed for the entrained flow gasifier predicts the gasification characteristics of both Indian and foreign coals well. Apart from the entrained flow gasifier, a bubbling bed gasifier of 100 kW capacity has also been studied. A pilot plant for the gasification of Indian coals has been set up for this capacity and its performance has been investigated experimentally as well as theoretically at different air and steam flow rates. Carbon conversion efficiency of more than 80% has been achieved.

  9. Biological testing and chemical analysis of process materials from an integrated two stage coal liquefaction: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B.W.; Buhl, P.; Moroni, E.C.

    1983-07-01

    Samples for chemical characterization and biological testing were obtained from ITSL runs 3LCF7, 3LCF8 and 3LCF9. Chemical analysis of these materials showed that SCT products were composed of fewer compounds than analogous materials from Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) processes. Major components in the SCT materials were three-, four-, five- and six-ring neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Methyl(C/sub 1/) and C/sub 2/ homologs of these compounds were present in relatively low concentrations, compared to their non-alkylated homologs. Organic nitrogen was primarily in the form of tertiary polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles and carbazoles. Little or no amino PAH (APAH) or cyano PAH were detected in samples taken during normal PDU operations, however, mutagenic APAH were produced during off-normal operation. Microbial mutagenicity appeared to be due mainly to the presence of APAH which were probably formed in the LC finer due to failure of the catalyst to promote deamination following carbon-nitrogen bond scission of nitrogen-containing hydroaromatics. This failure was observed for the off-normal runs where it was likely that the catalyst had been deactivated. Carcinogenic activity of ITSL materials as assessed by (tumors per animal) in the initiation/promotion mouse skin painting assay was slightly reduced for materials produced with good catalyst under normal operation compared to those collected during recycle of the LC Finer feed. Initiation activity of the latter samples did not appear to be significantly different from that of other coal derived materials with comparable boiling ranges. The observed initiation activity was not unexpected, considering analytical data which showed the presence of four-, five- and six-ring PAH in ITSL materials.

  10. Capacity modelling of the coal value chain at Sasol Coal Supply

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Harmse, M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available plants. The plants must be supplied with adequate coal to sustain production. A simulation model was built to test the feasibility of blending the coal from the mines according to a weekly blend plan....

  11. 紫外光谱法分析煤直接液化油族组成%A Quick Quantitative Analysis for Group Composition of Coal Liquefaction Oil by Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊文俊; 吴美香; 郝建树; 冯杰; 李文英

    2015-01-01

    煤液化油组成的测定方法以色谱法为主,但由于样品沸程长,组分性质不均一,色谱法无法实现简便快速地对液化油族组分进行定性/定量。为建立一种快速准确定量煤液化油中的酚类化合物、芳烃、脂肪烃的分析方法,本文选取具有代表性组成的煤液化油180~200℃馏分为研究对象,筛选了环己烷、乙醇、氢氧化钠‐乙醇(50 W t%,简称碱醇溶剂)三种分离溶剂。通过对煤液化油样品在200~400 nm波长间的特征吸收峰分析,发现碱醇溶剂可使芳烃化合物对酚类化合物的干扰减少到最小,可以有效避免吸收峰重叠问题。在此基础上,进一步对比分析了苯酚,间甲酚,邻甲酚,对甲酚等标准化合物与液化油酚类混合物在碱醇溶液中紫外吸收的标准曲线,以定量样品组成。选择间甲酚为标准化合物,根据其在290 nm处的标准曲线,得到煤液化油中酚类化合物的总量为32.14%,测定结果与宏量样品分离、称重、物料平衡后结果基本一致。在得到酚类化合物含量之后,以四氢萘为标准物,获得液化油中芳烃的总量为44.91%,脂肪烃的含量为22.95%。为确定方法的准确性,油样分别加入不同量的间甲酚和四氢萘标准物,酚的加标回收率为104.3~110.75%,芳香烃的加标回收率在84.3~91.75%。综上表明:利用紫外光谱法,以碱醇溶剂排除芳烃对酚吸收的影响,能够快速测定煤液化油中酚类和芳香烃的含量,脂肪烃的含量可差减得到。%Gas chromatography is now the primary analysis method for the coal liquefaction oil .However ,a simple and rapid quantification/qualification of the coal liquefaction oil can hardly be realized ,because the coal liquefaction oil is in a heterogeneous state with a long boiling range .The aim of this study was to establish a rapid and accurate method for the quantification of

  12. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    In the Advance Coal Liquefaction Concept Proposal (ACLCP) carbon monoxide (CO) and water have been proposed as the primary reagents in the pretreatment process. The main objective of this project is to develop a methodology for pretreating coal under mild conditions based on a combination of existing processes which have shown great promise in liquefaction, extraction and pyrolysis studies. The aim of this pretreatment process is to partially depolymerise the coal, eliminate oxygen and diminish the propensity for retograde reactions during subsequent liquefaction. The desirable outcome of the CO pretreatment step should be: (1) enhanced liquefaction activity and/or selectivity toward products of higher quality due to chemical modification of the coal structure; (2) cleaner downstream products; (3) overall improvement in operability and process economics.

  13. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-12-17

    The overall objective of the program was to improve the understanding of retrograde reactions and their dependencies on coal rank and structure, and/or coal modifications and reaction conditions. Because retrograde reactions are competitive with bond breaking reactions, an understanding of both is required to shift the competition in favor of the latter. Related objectives were to clarify the conflicting observations reported in literature on such major topics as the role of oxygen groups in retrograde reactions and to provide a bridge from very fundamental studies on pure compounds to phenomenological studies on actual coal. This information was integrated into the FG-DVC model, which was improved and extended to the liquefaction context.

  14. Elucidation of hydrogen mobility in tetralin under coal liquefaction conditions using a tritium tracer method. Effects of the addition of H2S and H2O; Tritium tracer ho wo mochiita sekitan ekika hanno jokenka deno tetralin no suiso idosei hyoka. Ryuka suiso oyobi mizu no tenka koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbe, M.; Saito, M.; Ishihara, A.; Kabe, T. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    It was previously reported that the tritium tracer method is useful for the quantitative consideration of hydrogen behavior in coal during coal liquefaction reaction. Tetralin is excellent hydrogen donating solvent, and is considered as one of the model compounds of coal. In this study, effects of H2S and H2O on the hydrogen exchange reaction between tetralin and gaseous hydrogen labeled by tritium were investigated. It was suggested that the conversion of tetralin and the hydrogen exchange reaction between gaseous hydrogen and tetralin proceed through the radical reaction mechanism with a tetralyl radical as an intermediate product. When H2S existed in this reaction, the hydrogen exchange yield increased drastically without changing the conversion yield. This suggested that the hydrogen exchange reaction proceeds even in the reaction where radical does not give any effect. In the case of H2O addition, the conversion yield and hydrogen exchange rate decreased into a half or one-third. It was suggested that H2O inhibited the formation process of tetralyl radical. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Bioechnology of indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, R.; Jain, M.K.; Worden, R.M.; Grethlein, A.J.; Soni, B.; Zeikus, J.G.; Grethlein, H.

    1990-05-07

    The project on biotechnology of indirect liquefaction was focused on conversion of coal derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels using a two-stage, acidogenic and solventogenic, anaerobic bioconversion process. The acidogenic fermentation used a novel and versatile organism, Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, which was fully capable of using CO as the sole carbon and energy source for organic acid production. In extended batch CO fermentations the organism was induced to produce butyrate at the expense of acetate at low pH values. Long-term, steady-state operation was achieved during continuous CO fermentations with this organism, and at low pH values (a pH of 6.0 or less) minor amounts of butanol and ethanol were produced. During continuous, steady-state fermentations of CO with cell recycle, concentrations of mixed acids and alcohols were achieved (approximately 12 g/l and 2 g/l, respectively) which are high enough for efficient conversion in stage two of the indirect liquefaction process. The metabolic pathway to produce 4-carbon alcohols from CO was a novel discovery and is believed to be unique to our CO strain of B. methylotrophicum. In the solventogenic phase, the parent strain ATCC 4259 of Clostridium acetobutylicum was mutagenized using nitrosoguanidine and ethyl methane sulfonate. The E-604 mutant strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum showed improved characteristics as compared to parent strain ATCC 4259 in batch fermentation of carbohydrates.

  16. (Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center): Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1987. [Advanced Coal Research and Technology Development Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-02-01

    Research programs on coal and coal liquefaction are presented. Topics discussed are: coal science, combustion, kinetics, surface science; advanced technology projects in liquefaction; two stage liquefaction and direct liquefaction; catalysts of liquefaction; Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and thermodynamics; alternative fuels utilization; coal preparation; biodegradation; advanced combustion technology; flue gas cleanup; environmental coordination, and technology transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base. (CBS)

  17. Application of the SELECS methodology to evaluate socioeconomic and environmental impacts of commercial-scale coal liquefaction plants at six potential sites in Kentucky. Final report from the study on development of environmental guidelines for the selection of sites for fossil energy conversion facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Northrop, G. M.; D' Ambra, C. A.

    1980-11-01

    Environmental and socioeconomic impacts likely to occur during the operational phase of two coal liquefaction processes have been evaluated with SELECS (Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems) for each of six potential sites in Kentucky for commercial scale facilities capable of processing about 26,000 tons of coal per stream day. The processes considered in this evaluation are SRC-I, a direct liquefaction route with solid boiler fuel as the principal product, and Coal-to-Methanol-to-Gasoline, an indirect liquefaction route with transportation fuel as the primary product. For comparative purposes, the impacts of a 2-gigawatt coal-fired steam-electric power plant (with coal requirements comparable to the liquefaction facilities) and an automobile parts manufacturing plant (with employment requirements of 849, comparable to the liquefaction facilities) have also been evaluated at each site. At each site, impacts have been evaluated for one or two nearby cities or towns and four to six counties where significant impacts might be expected. The SELECS methodology affords a well-organized and efficient approach to collecting and assessing a large volume of data needed to comprehensively determine the potential socioeconomic and environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commercial scale synfuel and other energy conversion facilities. This study has also shown that SELECS is equally applicable to determine the impacts of other facilities, such as automobile parts manufacturing. In brief, the SELECS methodology serves the purpose of objectively screening sites in order to choose one at which adverse impacts will be least, and/or to determine what aspect of a proposed facility might be modified to lessen impacts at a specific site.

  18. 30 CFR 206.463 - In-situ and surface gasification and liquefaction operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In-situ and surface gasification and... gasification and liquefaction operations. If an ad valorem Federal coal lease is developed by in-situ or surface gasification or liquefaction technology, the lessee shall propose the value of coal for royalty...

  19. 30 CFR 206.264 - In-situ and surface gasification and liquefaction operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In-situ and surface gasification and... gasification and liquefaction operations. If an ad valorem Federal coal lease is developed by in-situ or surface gasification or liquefaction technology, the lessee shall propose the value of coal for royalty...

  20. Estimation of sand liquefaction based on support vector machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏永华; 马宁; 胡检; 杨小礼

    2008-01-01

    The origin and influence factors of sand liquefaction were analyzed, and the relation between liquefaction and its influence factors was founded. A model based on support vector machines (SVM) was established whose input parameters were selected as following influence factors of sand liquefaction: magnitude (M), the value of SPT, effective pressure of superstratum, the content of clay and the average of grain diameter. Sand was divided into two classes: liquefaction and non-liquefaction, and the class label was treated as output parameter of the model. Then the model was used to estimate sand samples, 20 support vectors and 17 borderline support vectors were gotten, then the parameters were optimized, 14 support vectors and 6 borderline support vectors were gotten, and the prediction precision reaches 100%. In order to verify the generalization of the SVM method, two other practical samples’ data from two cities, Tangshan of Hebei province and Sanshui of Guangdong province, were dealt with by another more intricate model for polytomies, which also considered some influence factors of sand liquefaction as the input parameters and divided sand into four liquefaction grades: serious liquefaction, medium liquefaction, slight liquefaction and non-liquefaction as the output parameters. The simulation results show that the latter model has a very high precision, and using SVM model to estimate sand liquefaction is completely feasible.

  1. Study on sand particles creep model and open pit mine landslide mechanism caused by sand fatigue liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dong-Ning; Wang, Lai-Gui; Zhang, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Shu-Kun

    2017-06-01

    The sand particles in the sand - rock composite slope of the open pit mine occurs creep deformation and fatigue liquefaction under the action of vehicle load vibration and hydraulic gradient, which causes landslide geological disasters and it destroys the surface environment. To reveal the mechanism, a mechanics model based on the model considering the soil structural change with a new “plastic hinge” element is developed, to improve its constitutive and creep curve equations. Data from sand creep experiments are used to identify the parameters in the model and to validate the model. The results show that the mechanical model can describe the rotation progress between the sand particles, disclose the negative acceleration creep deformation stage during the third phase, and require fewer parameters while maintaining accuracy. It provides a new creep model considering rotation to analyze sand creep mechanism, which provides a theoretical basis for revealing the open pit mine landslide mechanism induced by creep deformation and fatigue liquefaction of sandy soil.

  2. Liquefaction technology assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-05-01

    A survey of coal liquefaction technology and analysis of projected relative performance of high potential candidates has been completed and the results are reported here. The key objectives of the study included preparation of a broad survey of the status of liquefaction processes under development, selection of a limited number of high potential process candidates for further study, and an analysis of the relative commercial potential of these candidates. Procedures which contributed to the achievement of the above key goals included definition of the characteristics and development status of known major liquefaction process candidates, development of standardized procedures for assessing technical, environmental, economic and product characteristics for the separate candidates, and development of procedures for selecting and comparing high potential processes. The comparisons were made for three production areas and four marketing areas of the US. In view of the broad scope of the objectives the survey was a limited effort. It used the experience gained during preparation of seven comprehensive conceptual designs/economic evaluations plus comprehensive reviews of the designs, construction and operation of several pilot plants. Results and conclusions must be viewed in the perspective of the information available, how this information was treated, and the full context of the economic comparison results. Comparative economics are presented as ratios; they are not intended to be predictors of absolute values. Because the true cost of constructing and operating large coal conversion facilities will be known only after commercialization, relative values are considered more appropriate. (LTN)

  3. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Direct Coal Liquefaction Residue Basing on Hansen Solubility Parameters%基于Hansen溶度参数的煤直接液化残渣超临界萃取

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜广策; 林雄超; 张生娟; 王中奇; 王永刚; 陈强; 朱豫飞

    2015-01-01

    以丙酮、异丙醇和苯为溶剂在超临界状态下对煤直接液化残渣进行萃取,应用溶度参数分析了超临界萃取环境中溶剂和萃取原料的变化;基于Hansen拓展方法建立了关联Hansen溶度参数和萃取收率的理论方程。结果表明,临界温度较高。以色散力溶度参数为主的苯的萃取收率明显高于其它2种溶剂;液化残渣中可萃出组分的理想溶解度随温度的升高而增大,该效应也是超临界溶剂萃取重质组分时萃取收率提高的重要原因;萃取收率与Hansen溶度参数之间的回归模型与实验结果具有较好的一致性,证明Hansen溶度参数理论和Hansen拓展方法适用于描述煤直接液化残渣的超临界萃取过程。%The supercritical fluid extraction( SFE) of direct coal liquefaction residue using acetone, isopro-panol and benzene as solvents was investigated. The Hansen solubility parameters were used to clarify the variations of both solvent and the solute in SFE process. An empirical equation in terms of the extended Hansen approach was proposed to correlate the extraction capacity with the Hansen solubility parameters of solvents. The results show that the extraction yield using supercritical benzene, of which the dispersive compo-nent is the major in total solubility parameters, obtained the highest extraction yield. The ideal solubility on organic components in direct coal liquefaction residue improved with the extraction temperature increasing. The empirical equation shows high consistency with experimental results. As a consequence, the theory of Hansen solubility parameter and extended Hansen approach are applicable to the study on supercritical fluid extraction of direct coal liquefaction residue.

  4. Selective solvent absorption in coal conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, J.W.; Lapucha, A.; Lazarov, L.; Amui, J.

    1992-04-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to determine the importance of the presence of added hydrogen donor compounds within the coal in the first stage of direct liquefaction processes; and (2) to determine the composition of the solvent absorbed by and present within the coal in the first stage of direct coal liquefaction.

  5. Coupling hydrothermal liquefaction and anaerobic digestion for energy valorization from model biomass feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posmanik, Roy; Labatut, Rodrigo A; Kim, Andrew H; Usack, Joseph G; Tester, Jefferson W; Angenent, Largus T

    2017-06-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction converts food waste into oil and a carbon-rich hydrothermal aqueous phase. The hydrothermal aqueous phase may be converted to biomethane via anaerobic digestion. Here, the feasibility of coupling hydrothermal liquefaction and anaerobic digestion for the conversion of food waste into energy products was examined. A mixture of polysaccharides, proteins, and lipids, representing food waste, underwent hydrothermal processing at temperatures ranging from 200 to 350°C. The anaerobic biodegradability of the hydrothermal aqueous phase was examined through conducting biochemical methane potential assays. The results demonstrate that the anaerobic biodegradability of the hydrothermal aqueous phase was lower when the temperature of hydrothermal processing increased. The chemical composition of the hydrothermal aqueous phase affected the anaerobic biodegradability. However, no inhibition of biodegradation was observed for most samples. Combining hydrothermal and anaerobic digestion may, therefore, yield a higher energetic return by converting the feedstock into oil and biomethane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Applied coal petrology: the role of petrology in coal utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isabel Suarez-Ruiz; John Crelling [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR-CSIC), Oviedo (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    This book is an integrated approach towards the applications of coal (organic) petrology and discusses the role of this science in the field of coal and coal-related topics. Contents are: Introduction 2. Basic factors controlling coal quality and technological behaviour of coal 3. Mining and benefication 4. Coal combustion 5. Coal gasification 6. Coal liquefaction 7. Coal carbonisation 8. Coal-derived carbons 9. Coal as a Petroleum source rock and reservoir rock 10. Environmental and health aspects 11. Other applications of coal petrology.

  7. Effects of MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) on liquefaction and ulceration in rabbit skin model of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinfang; Luo, Yanping; Gao, Qi; Lu, Xiaoling; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Xun; Zhang, Lifeng; Wang, Jingqiu; Ma, Xingming; Zhu, Bingdong

    2016-10-01

    Tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease, which caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It typically affects the functions of the lung and causes high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. The lectin pathway, one of the complement cascade systems, provides the primary line of defense against invading pathogens. However, what is the specific effection between tuberculosis and complement is unknown. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a recognition subunit, binds to arrays of carbohydrates on the surfaces of pathogens, which results in the activation of MBL-associated serine protease-2 to trigger a downstream reaction cascade of complement system. The effects of human MBL-associated serine protease-2 (hMASP-2) were assessed in a rabbit-skin model by intradermal injection of 5 × 10(6) viable BCG bacilli. The rAd-hMASP-2 accelerated the formation of liquefaction and healing of the granuloma lesions, reduced the bacteria loads of the skin nodules. The serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ were significantly increasing during the granuloma and liquefaction phases in the rAd-hMASP-2 group. This study suggests that hMASP-2 can induce a protective efficacy in BCG-infected rabbit skin models, which affects both the progress of lesions and the survival of the mycobacteria within them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 褐煤与煤直接液化残渣共热解产物半焦性能研究%Properties of semi-coke from co-pyrolysis of lignite and direct liquefaction residue of Shendong coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓红; 马江山; 薛艳利; 李文英

    2015-01-01

    为使煤直接液化残渣得到清洁高效再利用,采用常压固定床反应器,对神东煤直接液化残渣与呼伦贝尔褐煤共热解制取的半焦进行了研究。结合扫描电镜、N2-吸附、X射线衍射、拉曼光谱以及热重分析发现,共热解过程中存在的软化熔融现象导致液化残渣与褐煤相互黏结,共热解半焦比表面积与孔体积减小,半焦结构有序化程度增加。与褐煤单独热解半焦相比,共热解半焦CO2气化反应性能低。%In order to make use of coal direct liquefaction residue efficiently, co-pyrolysis of Hulunbuir lignite and direct liquefaction residue ( DLR) of Shendong coal were conducted in a fixed bed reactor under atmospheric pressure. The physicochemical properties of co-pyrolysis semi-coke were analyzed by scanning electron microscope, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analyzer. The results show that DLR semi-coke and lignite semi-coke are cohered each other, because the DLR is softened and melted during co-pyrolysis. The specific surface area and pore volume of co-pyrolysis semi-coke decrease. Characterization of both XRD and Raman spectroscopy indicate that the order degree of co-pyrolysis semi-coke increases with the addition of DLR. Compared with the lignite semi-coke, the CO2 gasification reactivity of co-pyrolysis semi-coke decreases.

  9. The estimation of coal thickness based on Kriging technique and 3D coal seam modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.; Hu, J.; Zhu, H.; Ding, X. [Tongji University, Shanghai (China)

    2008-07-15

    Based on borehole data, the spatial variation of coal seam thickness was studied. Using contour data, a Triangulated Irregular Network (TIN) model was constructed with a strip algorithm. By using the Kriging method, the thickness at each point of the TIN was calculated. The thickness of coal has the characteristic of uncertainties. The top TIN of the coal seam can be acquired through mapping the bottom TIN with the calculated thickness. A 3D model of the coal seam was constructed by building the corresponding relationship between the top and bottom TIN. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Numerical Simulation on Flow Field of Diameter-reduced Valve in Low-concentration Coal-bed Methane Liquefaction%低浓度煤层气液化中缩径阀门流场的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘令; 刘利亚; 付耀国; 甘海龙

    2015-01-01

    In this paper,the method of computational fluid dynamics was adopted,the two-equation model with k-εwas used to close the N-S equation,the structure of the diameter-reduced valve was reasonably simplified,and numerical simulation was made on the flow field,the flow stability of fluid and the local resistance coefficient of the diameter-reduced valves with different taper angle and size which were installed in the pipeline of the cryogenic liquefaction equipment of low-concentration coal-bed methane . The simulated results showed that when the angle of the diameter-reduced valve was equal to or larger than 50 o ,the fluid was seriously divorced from the boundary layer,the fluid flow produced vortex,and the diameter-reduced valve had a poor fluid-passing characteristic;under the same conditions,the local resistance coefficient increased with the increase of the taper angle of the diameter-reduced valve. The simulated results can provide reference for the selection of the valves used in the engineering pipeline.%采用计算流体力学的方法,用k—ε两方程模型封闭N—S方程,对缩径阀门结构进行合理简化,对低浓度煤层气深冷液化装备的管线中,不同变径角度和不同通径缩径阀门的流场、流体流动稳定性及局部阻力系数进行了数值模拟。模拟结果表明:缩径阀门的缩径角度在大于等于50°时,流体脱离边界层现象严重,流体流动出现漩涡,缩径阀门具有较差的过流特性;在相同流动条件下,局部阻力系数随着变径角度的增大而增大。模拟计算结果可为项目建设时管线阀的选型提供参考。

  11. Modelling Underground Coal Gasification—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md M. Khan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The technical feasibility of underground coal gasification (UCG has been established through many field trials and laboratory-scale experiments over the past decades. However, the UCG is site specific and the commercialization of UCG is being hindered due to the lack of complete information for a specific site of operation. Since conducting UCG trials and data extraction are costly and difficult, modeling has been an important part of UCG study to predict the effect of various physical and operating parameters on the performance of the process. Over the years, various models have been developed in order to improve the understanding of the UCG process. This article reviews the approaches, key concepts, assumptions, and limitations of various forward gasification UCG models for cavity growth and product gas recovery. However, emphasis is given to the most important models, such as packed bed models, the channel model, and the coal slab model. In addition, because of the integral part of the main models, various sub-models such as drying and pyrolysis are also included in this review. The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the various simulation methodologies and sub-models in order to enhance the understanding of the critical aspects of the UCG process.

  12. Study of coal and gas outbursts by numerical modeling approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Sheng; ZHANG Hong-wei

    2007-01-01

    During mining or road-way development, the distribution of stress and coal pore pressure in the coal face and rib around the new opening will change, under certain conditions, dynamic failure of coal in the form of an outburst can occur. In the modeling studies presented in this paper, an outburst was considered to consist of three distinct stages:preinitiation, initiation and post-initiation, which takes into account the major processes and mechanisms that can influence both outburst-proneness and post-initiation outburst behavior. The model has been applied to simulate the effects of mechanisms in the coal matrix, coal strength, coal damage, geological structures on outbursts. The model constructed using the FLAC software, which were undertaken to research the effects on outbursts of coal strength pressure gradient, and other factors.

  13. The direct liquefaction proof of concept program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H. [New York & Puritan Avenues, Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The goal of the Proof of Concept (POC) Program is to develop Direct Coal Liquefaction and associated transitional technologies towards commercial readiness for economically producing premium liquid fuels from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. The program focuses on developing the two-stage liquefaction (TSL) process by utilizing geographically strategic feedstocks, commercially feasible catalysts, new prototype equipment, and testing co-processing or alternate feedstocks and improved process configurations. Other high priority objectives include dispersed catalyst studies, demonstrating low rank coal liquefaction without solids deposition, improving distillate yields on a unit reactor volume basis, demonstrating ebullated bed operations while obtaining scale-up data, demonstrating optimum catalyst consumption using new concepts (e.g. regeneration, cascading), producing premium products through on-line hydrotreating, demonstrating improved hydrogen utilization for low rank coals using novel heteroatom removal methods, defining and demonstrating two-stage product properties for upgrading; demonstrating efficient and economic solid separation methods, examining the merits of integrated coal cleaning, demonstrating co-processing, studying interactions between the preheater and first and second-stage reactors, improving process operability by testing and incorporating advanced equipment and instrumentation, and demonstrating operation with alternate coal feedstocks. During the past two years major PDU Proof of Concept runs were completed. POC-1 with Illinois No. 6 coal and POC-2 with Black Thunder sub-bituminous coal. Results from these operations are continuing under review and the products are being further refined and upgraded. This paper will update the results from these operations and discuss future plans for the POC program.

  14. Low-rank coal research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, G. F.; Laudal, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  15. Liquefaction of crop residues for polyol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan, C.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The liquefaction of crop residues in the presence of ethylene glycol, ethylene carbonate, or polyethylene glycol using sulfuric acid as a catalyst was studied. For all experiments, the liquefaction was conducted at 160C and atmospheric pressure. The mass ratio of feedstock to liquefaction solvents used in all the experiments was 30:100. The results show that the acid catalyzed liquefaction process fit a pseudo-first-order kinetics model. Liquefaction yields of 80, 74, and 60% were obtained in 60 minutes of reaction when corn stover was liquefied with ethylene glycol, a mixture of polyethylene glycol and glycerol (9:1, w/w, and ethylene carbonate, respectively. When ethylene carbonate was used as solvent, the liquefaction yields of rice straw and wheat straw were 67% and 73%, respectively, which is lower than that of corn stover (80%. When a mixture of ethylene carbonate and ethylene glycol (8:2, w/w was used as solvent, the liquefaction yields for corn stover, rice straw and wheat straw were 78, 68, and 70%, respectively.

  16. Deashing of coal liquids by sonically assisted filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slomka, B.J.

    1994-10-01

    This project seeks to improve the effectiveness and reduce the cost of coal liquefaction by novel applications of sonic and ultrasonic energy. The specific purpose of this project is to develop and improve means for the economical removal of dispersed solid particles of ash, unreacted coal, and spent catalyst from direct and indirect coal liquefaction resids by using sonic or ultrasonic waves. Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. Direct coal liquefaction processes generate liquid products which contain solids including coal-originated mineral matter, unreacted coal, and spent dispersed catalyst. The removal of these solids from a product stream is one of the most difficult problems in direct coal liquefaction processes. On this report, results are discussed for sonically assisted crossflow filtration of V-1067 resid, diluted with No. 2 fuel oil, and sonically assisted batch filtrations of solids concentrates from continuous cross-flow filtration experiments.

  17. Coal liquefaction model compounds. Final report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajewski, J.J.; Gilbert, K.E.

    1994-12-31

    This final report is divided into sections dealing with tetralin pyrolysis, chroman pyrolysis, molecular mechanics of organometallic systems, and pi conjugated biradicals. Experiments performed and results are discussed for each area of study.

  18. Model documentation Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-30

    This report documents objectives and conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Coal Market Module (CMM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 (AEO96). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of CMM`s three submodules: Coal Production Submodule, Coal Export Submodule, and Coal Distribution Submodule.

  19. Numerical Modelling by FLAC on Coal Fires in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusat, D.; Drebenstedt, C.

    2009-04-01

    Coal fires occur in many countries all over the world (e.g. Australia, China, India, Indonesia, USA and Russia) in underground and on surface. In China the most coal fires occur especially in the North. Economical and environmental damages are the negative effects of the coal fires: coal fires induce open fractures and fissures within the seam and neighbouring rocks. So that these are the predominant pathways for oxygen flow and exhaust gases from a coal fire. All over northern China there are a large number of coal fires, which cause and estimated yearly coal loss of between 100 and 200 million tons ([1], [2], [3]). Spontaneous combustion is a very complicated process and is influenced by number of factors. The process is an exothermic reaction in which the heat generated is dissipated by conduction to the surrounding environment, by radiation, by convection to the ventilation flow, and in some cases by evaporation of moisture from the coal [4]. The coal fires are very serious in China, and the dangerous extent of spontaneous combustion is bad which occupies about 72.9% in mining coal seams. During coal mining in China, the coal fires of spontaneous combustion are quite severity. The dangerous of coal spontaneous combustion has been in 56% of state major coalmines [5]. The 2D and 3D-simulation models describing coal fire damages are strong tools to predict fractures and fissures, to estimate the risk of coal fire propagation into neighbouring seams, to test and evaluate coal fire fighting and prevention methods. The numerical simulations of the rock mechanical model were made with the software for geomechanical and geotechnical calculations, the programs FLAC and FLAC3D [6]. To fight again the coal fires, exist several fire fighting techniques. Water, slurries or liquefied nitrogen can be injected to cool down the coal or cut of air supply with the backfill and thereby extinct the fire. Air supply also can be cut of by covering the coal by soil or sealing of the

  20. 含氧煤层气液化流程爆炸极限分析%Analysis of flammability limits for liquefaction process of oxygen-bearing coal-bed methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秋英; 王莉; 巨永林

    2011-01-01

    大部分含氧煤层气由于技术限制没有被合理利用,而是直接放空,不仅浪费资源.而且污染大气环境.针对某一典型煤层气气源条件和组分特点,设计了一种新型的液化精馏工艺流程,结合HYSYS软件模拟计算结果以及爆炸极限理论,对该液化精馏工艺流程的爆炸极限进行了分析计算,结果表明煤层气中甲烷浓度在压缩、液化以及节流过程中都高于爆炸上限,操作过程安全性比较高.但在精馏塔顶部甲烷浓度开始低于爆炸上限而导致精馏过程存在安全隐患.首先对原料气进行初步脱氧,然后再通过调整精馏塔塔底采出量来控制塔顶杂质气体中甲烷含量,使得其在整个液化及精馏流程中始终高于爆炸上限.分析结果表明,采取安全措施后整个流程都不存在爆炸危险性,甲烷回收率和产品纯度都较高,而且整个流程能耗也比较低.模拟结果显示,所设计的液化及精馏流程对不同气源具有较好的适用性,分析计算结果为含氧煤层气的杂质分离、操作过程的爆炸极限分析以及安全措施的采取提供了一定的参考.%Most of oxygen-bearing coal-bed methane (CBM) has not been utilized due to the limit in technique for production. The discharged gas leads to not only the waste of resources but also environmental pollution. In this study, a liquefaction process is proposed and designed for the typical CBM. HYSYS software is adopted to simulate the process. The flammability limits are analyzed and calculated based on the flammability limit theory and the simulated results of HYSYS. The results indicate that no flammable hazards exist in the processes of compression, liquefaction and throttling but they may appear at the top of the distillation tower. A method, in which oxygen is first removed from the feed gas with the control of the bottom flowrate (flowrate of the liquid product at column bottom), is adopted to ensure that the methane

  1. HOZOP在400万t/a煤炭间接液化中的应用研究%Application Research of HOZOP Software Method to the Air Separation Unit in 4 Million t/a Coal Indirect Liquefaction Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马磊; 杨阳

    2014-01-01

    神华宁煤400万t/a煤炭间接液化项目上游10万空分装置初步设计HAZOP分析的目的是,针对杭州杭氧股份有限公司的设计,通过人工HAZOP分析(危险与可操作性分析)的方式,识别初设中存在的不足及风险隐患,帮助设计承包方及时改进和优化设计,以提升整个工艺系统的安全性,为设计承包方的详细设计及后期业主方的生产运营,提供坚实的保障。%According to the related standard requirements of the state and group company, this project should be carried out the HAZOP analysis for the further improvement of the project security level, to identi⁃fy the security issues exist in the design and to ensure the success of the 4 million t/a coal indirect liquefac⁃tion project (hereinafter referred to as the“project”) of Shenhua Ningxia Coal Industry Group, and lay the foundation to realize“secure with optimal”device. The purpose of the ten thousand upstream air separation unit preliminary design of HAZOP analysis of the 4 million t/a coal indirect liquefaction project of Shenhua Ningxia Coal Industry Group is direct at the preliminary design of Hangzhou Hangyang Co., Ltd.. To identify the shortage and potential risks exist in the preliminary design and help design contractors to improve and optimize their design through artificial HAZOP analysis (analysis of risk and operability) method. In order to enhance the security of the entire process system, and it provides solid guarantee for the design contractors detailed design and for the owners later period production and operation.

  2. Mating model on production capacity for the system of cutting coal and drawing top-coal in FMMSC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Xin-xian

    2007-01-01

    Being a safe and highly-efficient mining method, fully mechanized mining with sublevel caving (FMMSC) was extensively employed in Chinese coal mines with thick seam. In order to make drawing top-coal furthest to parallel work with shearer cutting coal,decrease failure ratio of rear scraper conveyor and increase safe production capacity of equipments, based on production technology, set up the mating model of safe production capacity of equipments for the system of drawing top-coal and shearer cutting coal in coal face with sublevel caving. It is mean capability of drawing top-coal adapted to the capability of shearer cutting coal in a working circle in the coal face that was deduced. The type selection of equipment of rear scraper conveyor can be tackled with this mating model.The model was applied in FMMSC in Yangcun Coal Mine, Yima Coal Group of China. With the mating light-equipments, the coal output in coal face attained 1.05 Mt in 2004. It gained better technical-economic benefit.

  3. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    In the Advance Coal Liquefaction Concept Proposal (ACLCP) carbon monoxide (CO) and water have been proposed as the primary reagents in the pretreatment process. The main objective of this project is to develop a methodology for pretreating coal under mild conditions based on a combination of existing processes which have shown great promise in liquefaction, extraction and pyrolysis studies. The aim of this pretreatment process is to partially depolymerise the coal, eliminate oxygen and diminish the propensity for retograde reactions during subsequent liquefaction. The desirable outcome of the CO pretreatment step should be: (1) enhanced liquefaction activity and/or selectivity toward products of higher quality due to chemical modification of the coal structure; (2) cleaner downstream products; (3) overall improvement in operability and process economics.

  4. HYSYS在含氧煤层气液化分离中的应用研究%Application Research of HYSYS in Liquefaction Separation of Oxygen-contained Coal-bed Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖娅; 诸林; 靳亮; 邓骥

    2014-01-01

    在煤矿开采过程中采出的煤层气因含有空气难以加工利用,直接放空,不仅污染大气环境,而且浪费燃气资源。针对某典型含氧煤层气气源,设计了一种氮-甲烷膨胀制冷的液化精馏工艺,并利用HYSYS进行了模拟计算,结果显示,该工艺可较彻底除去氮气、氧气等杂质,获得较高浓度的甲烷产品,甲烷回收率达到99.99%。同时分析了回流比、塔板数以及入塔温度对塔底产品含氧量和甲烷含量的影响。%The coal-bed methane ( CBM) extracted during coal mining contains oxygen and is difficult to be processed and utilized, if it is directly vented, it not only pollutes the environment but also causes the resources waste. Based on a typical oxygen-contained CBM source, a liquefaction rectification process by nitrogen-methane expansion refrigeration was designed and simulation computation was made with HYSYS. The results showed that the nitrogen and oxygen in CBM can be completely removed by this process, the methane product with relatively high concentration can be got, and the methane recovery rate can reach 99. 99%. In addition, analysis was made on the influence of the reflux ratio, plate number and feed temperature on the oxygen and methane content in the bottom products.

  5. 煤直接液化减压塔进料球阀失效分析及修复%Failure Analysis and Repair of Feedstock Ball Valve in Direct Coal Liquefaction Vacuum Tower

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙云飞; 龚宝龙

    2016-01-01

    介绍了煤直接液化工艺流程及其特点。根据减压塔进料球阀的工作参数和功能作用,比照其失效形貌,分析了该球阀发生磨损失效的原因,制定了相应的拆解和修复方案。对修复后的球阀进行检查和试验,以满足标准规范的要求。最后对该球阀的优化运行给出了建议。%The technological process and characteristics of the direct coal liquefaction are introduced. In consideration of the working parameters and functions as well as the failure morphology of the feedstock ball valve in the vacuum tower, the reason of the wear failure is analyzed and the corresponding disassembly and repair scheme are proposed. Then the examinations and tests are performed to meet the requirements of the standards. At last, the advices on the optimal operation are given.

  6. LIQUEFACTION AND DISPLACEMENT OF SATURATED SAND UNDER VERTICAL VIBRATION LOADING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiaobing; TAN Qingming; CHENG C.M.; YU Shanbing; CUI Peng

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of the vertical vibration loading on the liquefaction of saturated sand, one dimensional model for the saturated sand with a vertical vibration is presented based on the two phase continuous media theory. The development of the liquefaction and the liquefaction region are analyzed. It is shown that the vertical vibration loading could induce liquefaction.The rate of the liquefaction increases with the increase of the initial limit strain or initial porosity or amplitude and frequency of loading, and increases with the decrease of the permeability or initial modulus. It is shown also that there is a phase lag in the sand column. When the sand permeability distribution is non-uniform, the pore pressure and the strain will rise sharply where the permeability is the smallest, and fracture might be induced. With the development of liquefaction, the strength of the soil foundation becomes smaller and smaller. In the limiting case, landslides or debris flows could occur.

  7. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction. Final report, September 20, 1988--November 20, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-12-17

    The overall objective of the program was to improve the understanding of retrograde reactions and their dependencies on coal rank and structure, and/or coal modifications and reaction conditions. Because retrograde reactions are competitive with bond breaking reactions, an understanding of both is required to shift the competition in favor of the latter. Related objectives were to clarify the conflicting observations reported in literature on such major topics as the role of oxygen groups in retrograde reactions and to provide a bridge from very fundamental studies on pure compounds to phenomenological studies on actual coal. This information was integrated into the FG-DVC model, which was improved and extended to the liquefaction context.

  8. Knowledge modeling of coal mining equipments based on ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baolong; Wang, Xiangqian; Li, Huizong; Jiang, Miaomiao

    2017-06-01

    The problems of information redundancy and sharing are universe in coal mining equipment management. In order to improve the using efficiency of knowledge of coal mining equipments, this paper proposed a new method of knowledge modeling based on ontology. On the basis of analyzing the structures and internal relations of coal mining equipment knowledge, taking OWL as ontology construct language, the ontology model of coal mining equipment knowledge is built with the help of Protégé 4.3 software tools. The knowledge description method will lay the foundation for the high effective knowledge management and sharing, which is very significant for improving the production management level of coal mining enterprises.

  9. Model of environmental life cycle assessment for coal mining operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchart-Korol, Dorota, E-mail: dburchart@gig.eu; Fugiel, Agata, E-mail: afugiel@gig.eu; Czaplicka-Kolarz, Krystyna, E-mail: kczaplicka@gig.eu; Turek, Marian, E-mail: mturek@gig.eu

    2016-08-15

    This paper presents a novel approach to environmental assessment of coal mining operations, which enables assessment of the factors that are both directly and indirectly affecting the environment and are associated with the production of raw materials and energy used in processes. The primary novelty of the paper is the development of a computational environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) model for coal mining operations and the application of the model for coal mining operations in Poland. The LCA model enables the assessment of environmental indicators for all identified unit processes in hard coal mines with the life cycle approach. The proposed model enables the assessment of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) based on the IPCC method and the assessment of damage categories, such as human health, ecosystems and resources based on the ReCiPe method. The model enables the assessment of GHGs for hard coal mining operations in three time frames: 20, 100 and 500 years. The model was used to evaluate the coal mines in Poland. It was demonstrated that the largest environmental impacts in damage categories were associated with the use of fossil fuels, methane emissions and the use of electricity, processing of wastes, heat, and steel supports. It was concluded that an environmental assessment of coal mining operations, apart from direct influence from processing waste, methane emissions and drainage water, should include the use of electricity, heat and steel, particularly for steel supports. Because the model allows the comparison of environmental impact assessment for various unit processes, it can be used for all hard coal mines, not only in Poland but also in the world. This development is an important step forward in the study of the impacts of fossil fuels on the environment with the potential to mitigate the impact of the coal industry on the environment. - Highlights: • A computational LCA model for assessment of coal mining operations • Identification of

  10. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1993-06-01

    A two dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and nonreactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. The model, referred to as 93-PCGC-2 is applicable to cylindrical, axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using a discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. A new coal-general devolatilization submodel (FG-DVC) with coal swelling and char reactivity submodels has been added.

  11. Coal conversion. 1977 technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    The status and progress in US DOE's projects in coal gasification, liquefaction, and fluidized-bed combustion are reviewed with financing, flowsheets, history, progress and status of each (57 projects). (LTN)

  12. Industrial role of coal chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierk, E.A.; Stadelhofer, J.W.

    1983-02-07

    The paper is concerned with the production of coal-based chemicals either from the by-products of coal carbonization, or from synthesis gas manufactured from coal. The potential of coal tar as a raw material for chemicals synthesis forms the basis of the paper. Koppers-Totzek and Lurgi gasification processes and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are considered, and, finally, coal liquefaction processes are briefly mentioned.

  13. Model of environmental life cycle assessment for coal mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchart-Korol, Dorota; Fugiel, Agata; Czaplicka-Kolarz, Krystyna; Turek, Marian

    2016-08-15

    This paper presents a novel approach to environmental assessment of coal mining operations, which enables assessment of the factors that are both directly and indirectly affecting the environment and are associated with the production of raw materials and energy used in processes. The primary novelty of the paper is the development of a computational environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) model for coal mining operations and the application of the model for coal mining operations in Poland. The LCA model enables the assessment of environmental indicators for all identified unit processes in hard coal mines with the life cycle approach. The proposed model enables the assessment of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) based on the IPCC method and the assessment of damage categories, such as human health, ecosystems and resources based on the ReCiPe method. The model enables the assessment of GHGs for hard coal mining operations in three time frames: 20, 100 and 500years. The model was used to evaluate the coal mines in Poland. It was demonstrated that the largest environmental impacts in damage categories were associated with the use of fossil fuels, methane emissions and the use of electricity, processing of wastes, heat, and steel supports. It was concluded that an environmental assessment of coal mining operations, apart from direct influence from processing waste, methane emissions and drainage water, should include the use of electricity, heat and steel, particularly for steel supports. Because the model allows the comparison of environmental impact assessment for various unit processes, it can be used for all hard coal mines, not only in Poland but also in the world. This development is an important step forward in the study of the impacts of fossil fuels on the environment with the potential to mitigate the impact of the coal industry on the environment.

  14. Simulation modeling of rock strata kinematics during coal seam extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleishman, A.Sh. (Leningradskii Institut Inzhenerov Zheleznodorozhnogo Transporta (Russian Federation))

    1992-01-01

    Analyzes coal seam extraction on the basis of generalized quasi-real coal bearing rock strata from the point of view of simulation modeling of strata movement and deformation. A mathematical model of rock strata kinematics which considers rock layer separation parallel to seam bedding under complicated mining and geologic conditions in zones of geologic disturbances is analyzed. The model is used for calculating rates of strata movement and deformation. 2 refs.

  15. Supercritical solvent extraction of direct liquefaction residue from Shenhua coal%神华煤直接液化残渣超临界溶剂萃取研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘朋飞; 张永奇; 房倚天; 赵建涛

    2012-01-01

    利用甲苯、苯和乙醇三种溶剂在反应釜中对神华煤直接液化残渣进行了超临界溶剂萃取,考察了压力、温度、萃取时间、溶剂/残渣比等对萃取产物收率和重质液体萃取组成的影响.结果表明,以甲苯为溶剂进行萃取时,萃取时间对重质液体产率及HS和A收率的影响不大,而温度、压力以及溶剂/残渣质量比都会影响萃取产物的产率及组成.溶剂超临界萃取过程中,有其他组分向HS组分转化,提高了HS的收率.三种溶剂中,苯显示了和甲苯相似的萃取性能,而乙醇的萃取性能相比苯和甲苯则较差,但乙醇萃取得到的重质液体中轻质组分含量高于苯和甲苯.萃取过程中,残渣中的灰分和硫分主要富集至萃取残渣中.%Extraction of direct liquefaction residue from Shenhua coal with three solvents was investigated in a batch autoclave at supercritical conditions to clarify the impacts of pressure, temperature, and extraction time on the yields of heavy liquid and its compositions. It is found that when toluene is used as a solvent, extract time has no obvious effect on yield of heavy liquid, hexane soluble(HS) and asphaltene( A). Extract temperature, extract pressure and mass ratio of solvent to residue have significant effect on yield and composition of residue extract. During the supercritical solvent extraction of liquefaction residue, some other components are transformed into HS and this results in increasing yield of HS. Benzene shows similar extraction ability to toluene while ethanol is poor in dissolving heavy liquid. There are more light components in heavy liquid extracted by ethanol than those by benzene and toluene. Sulfur and ash are mainly enriched in extract residue during extraction process.

  16. The creep experiment and theoretical model analysis of gascontaining coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Guang-zhi; ZHANG Dong-ming; WANG Wei-zhong

    2007-01-01

    A creep experiment of preformed molding coal under different confining pressures were carried out using self-developed 3-triaxial creep loading device for gas-containing coal, which loaded by Shimadzu AGI-250 kN electrical servo-controlled stiffness testing machine. Based on the experimental results, the variation trend of axial deformation under different stress states was studied, and creep failure characteristics of gascontaining coal under different confining pressures were analyzed. The experimental results were identified with seven-component nonlinear viscoelasto-plastic creep model (Hohai model), and the creep material parameters were obtained. The experimental result complies well with the theoretical value of this model. It indicates that creep constitutive relation of gas-containing coal can be expressed by nonlinear viscoelasto-plastic creep model correctly.

  17. Developing a model of strategic management of coal mining enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komissarova Maria Anatolievna

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In article problems of strategic management of the companies of ugledo-happening branch reveal, and the model of strategic management of the coal-mining enterprise taking into account their branch specificity is offered to consideration.

  18. Non-linear models: coal combustion efficiency and emissions control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulsari, A.; Wemberg, A.; Anttila, A.; Multas, A. [Nonlinear Solutions Oy, Turku (Finland)

    2009-04-15

    Today's power plants feel the pressure to limit their NOx emissions and improve their production economics. The article describes how nonlinear models are effective for process guidance of various kinds of processes, including coal fired boilers. These models were developed for the Naantati 2 boiler at the electricity and heat generating coal-fired plant in Naantali, near Turku, Finland. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Model of coupled gas flow and deformation process in heterogeneous coal seams and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chun-hui; ZHAO Quan-sheng; YU Yong-jiang

    2011-01-01

    The heterogeneity of coal was studied by mechanical tests. Probability plots of experimental data show that the mechanical parameters of heterogeneous coal follow a Weibull distribution. Based on elasto-plastic mechanics and gas dynamics, the model of coupled gas flow and deformation process of heterogeneous coal was presented and the effects of heterogeneity of coal on gas flow and failure of coal were investigated. Major findings include: The effect of the heterogeneity of coal on gas flow and mechanical failure of coal can be considered by the model in this paper. Failure of coal has a great effect on gas flow.

  20. Hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse; Rudolf, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass with the aim of describing the current status of the technology. Hydrothermal liquefaction is a medium-temperature, high-pressure thermochemical process, which produces a liquid product, often called bio-oil or bi-crude. During...... the hydrothermal liquefaction process, the macromolecules of the biomass are first hydrolyzed and/or degraded into smaller molecules. Many of the produced molecules are unstable and reactive and can recombine into larger ones. During this process, a substantial part of the oxygen in the biomass is removed...... by dehydration or decarboxylation. The chemical properties of bio-oil are highly dependent of the biomass substrate composition. Biomass constitutes of various components such as protein; carbohydrates, lignin and fat, and each of them produce distinct spectra of compounds during hydrothermal liquefaction...

  1. Surfactant-assisted liquefaction of particulate carbonaceous substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, G. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A slurry of carbonaceous particles such as coal containing an oil soluble polar substituted oleophilic surfactant, suitably an amine substituted long chain hydrocarbon, is liquefied at high temperature and high hydrogen presence. The pressure of surfactant results in an increase in yield and the conversion product contains a higher proportion of light and heavy oils and less asphaltene than products from other liquefaction processes.

  2. Model documentation coal market module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    This report documents the objectives and the conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the Coal Production Submodule (CPS). It provides a description of the CPS for model analysts and the public. The Coal Market Module provides annual forecasts of prices, production, and consumption of coal.

  3. Gas/slurry flow in coal-liquefaction processes (fluid dynamics in a three-phase-flow column). Final technical progress report, 1 October 1979-31 March 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, D.H.S.; Sivasubramanian, R.; Moujaes, S.F.; Givens, E.N.

    1982-04-01

    A commercial coal liquefaction plant will employ vertical tubular reactors feeding slurry and gas concurrently upward through these vessels. In the SRC-I plant design the reactor is essentially an empty vessel with only a distributor plate located near the inlet. Because the commercial plant represents a considerable scale-up over Wilsonville or any pilot plant, this program addressed the need for additional data on behavior of three phase systems in large vessels. Parameters that were investigated in this program were studied at conditions that relate directly to projected plant operating conditions. The fluid dynamic behavior of the three-phase upflow system was studied by measuring gas and slurry holdup, liquid dispersion, solids suspension and solids accumulation. The dependent parameters are gas and liquid velocities, solid particle size, solids concentration, liquid viscosity, liquid surface tension and inlet distributor. Within the range of liquid superficial velocity from 0.0 to 0.5 ft/sec, gas holdup is found to be independent of liquid flow which agrees with other investigators. The results also confirm our previous finding that gas holdup is independent of column diameter when the column diameter is 5 inches or larger. The gas holdup depends strongly on gas flow rate; gas holdup increases with increasing gas velocity. The effect of solids particles on gas holdup depends on the gas flow rate. Increasing liquid viscosity and surface tension reduce gas holdup which agrees with other investigators. Because of the complexity of the system, we could not find a single correlation to best fit all the data. The degree of liquid backmixing markedly affects chemical changes occurring in the dissolver, such as sulfur removal, and oil and distillate formation.

  4. Basic equations of channel model for underground coal gasification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The underground coal gasification has advantages of zero rubbish, nonpollution, low cost and high safety. According to the characteristics of the gasification, the channel model of chemical fluid mechanics is used to set up the fluid equations and chemical equations by some reasonable suppositions in this paper, which lays a theoretical foundation on requirements of fluid movement rules in the process of underground coal gasification.

  5. Experiments and Modelling of Coal Pyrolysis under Fluidized Bed Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangYongzhe; XuXiangdong; 等

    1999-01-01

    The pyrolysis behavior of two Chinese coals has been investigated in a laboratory-scale bubbling fluidized bed system in Siegen University,Germany,Experimental equipment and procedure are introduced.The amounts of pyrolysis species of each coal were measured,calcuated and compared.A new method was presented to determine the needed parameters in FG-DVC model with the experimental results instead of other much more complicated experiments.

  6. Some Challenges Posed by Coal Bed Methane Regional Assessment Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Catherine R; Doherty, John; Howell, Stephen; Erriah, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Coal measures (coal bearing rock strata) can contain large reserves of methane. These reserves are being exploited at a rapidly increasing rate in many parts of the world. To extract coal seam gas, thousands of wells are drilled at relatively small spacing to depressurize coal seams to induce desorption and allow subsequent capture of the gas. To manage this process effectively, the effect of coal bed methane (CBM) extraction on regional aquifer systems must be properly understood and managed. Groundwater modeling is an integral part of this management process. However, modeling of CBM impacts presents some unique challenges, as processes that are operative at two very different scales must be adequately represented in the models. The impacts of large-scale gas extraction may be felt over a large area, yet despite the significant upscaling that accompanies construction of a regional model, near-well conditions and processes cannot be ignored. These include the highly heterogeneous nature of many coal measures, and the dual-phase flow of water and gas that is induced by coal seam depressurization. To understand these challenges, a fine-scale model was constructed incorporating a detailed representation of lithological heterogeneity to ensure that near-well processes and conditions could be examined. The detail of this heterogeneity was at a level not previously employed in models built to assess groundwater impacts arising from CBM extraction. A dual-phase reservoir simulator was used to examine depressurization and water desaturation processes in the vicinity of an extractive wellfield within this fine-scale model. A single-phase simulator was then employed so that depressurization errors incurred by neglecting near-well, dual-phase flow could be explored. Two models with fewer lithological details were then constructed in order to examine the nature of depressurization errors incurred by upscaling and to assess the interaction of the upscaling process with the

  7. Decision tree approach for soil liquefaction assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandomi, Amir H; Fridline, Mark M; Roke, David A

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, the performances of some decision tree (DT) techniques are evaluated for postearthquake soil liquefaction assessment. A database containing 620 records of seismic parameters and soil properties is used in this study. Three decision tree techniques are used here in two different ways, considering statistical and engineering points of view, to develop decision rules. The DT results are compared to the logistic regression (LR) model. The results of this study indicate that the DTs not only successfully predict liquefaction but they can also outperform the LR model. The best DT models are interpreted and evaluated based on an engineering point of view.

  8. Evaluating simplified methods for liquefaction assessment for loss estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongar, Indranil; Rossetto, Tiziana; Giovinazzi, Sonia

    2017-06-01

    Currently, some catastrophe models used by the insurance industry account for liquefaction by applying a simple factor to shaking-induced losses. The factor is based only on local liquefaction susceptibility and this highlights the need for a more sophisticated approach to incorporating the effects of liquefaction in loss models. This study compares 11 unique models, each based on one of three principal simplified liquefaction assessment methods: liquefaction potential index (LPI) calculated from shear-wave velocity, the HAZUS software method and a method created specifically to make use of USGS remote sensing data. Data from the September 2010 Darfield and February 2011 Christchurch earthquakes in New Zealand are used to compare observed liquefaction occurrences to forecasts from these models using binary classification performance measures. The analysis shows that the best-performing model is the LPI calculated using known shear-wave velocity profiles, which correctly forecasts 78 % of sites where liquefaction occurred and 80 % of sites where liquefaction did not occur, when the threshold is set at 7. However, these data may not always be available to insurers. The next best model is also based on LPI but uses shear-wave velocity profiles simulated from the combination of USGS VS30 data and empirical functions that relate VS30 to average shear-wave velocities at shallower depths. This model correctly forecasts 58 % of sites where liquefaction occurred and 84 % of sites where liquefaction did not occur, when the threshold is set at 4. These scores increase to 78 and 86 %, respectively, when forecasts are based on liquefaction probabilities that are empirically related to the same values of LPI. This model is potentially more useful for insurance since the input data are publicly available. HAZUS models, which are commonly used in studies where no local model is available, perform poorly and incorrectly forecast 87 % of sites where liquefaction occurred, even at

  9. Selective solvent absorption in coal conversion. Quarterly report, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, J.W.; Lapucha, A.; Lazarov, L.; Amui, J.

    1992-04-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to determine the importance of the presence of added hydrogen donor compounds within the coal in the first stage of direct liquefaction processes; and (2) to determine the composition of the solvent absorbed by and present within the coal in the first stage of direct coal liquefaction.

  10. Coal pyrolysis in plasma and thermodynamic analysis for model compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Y.; Pang, X.; Bao, W.; Xie, K. [Shanxi Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology, Taiyuan (China)

    2001-02-01

    On the basis of study on coal and graphite pyrolysis in hydrogen-enriched argon plasma jet reactor, thermodynamic analysis for reactions producing acetylene was carried out by the means of selecting model compounds including various gaseous aliphatic and liquid aromatic hydrocarbons, which were regarded as similar to the primary volatile of coal, and by calculating the changes of Gibbs functions under deferent temperatures. The fact that the reactions of the volatiles releasing from coal play an essential part in acetylene formation from coal in H{sub 2}-Ar plasma was verified. The result that acetylene can be produced easily in high temperature can be deduced from entropy effects by theoretical analysis and experiment. These results are of significance for mechanism investigation of acetylene formation in plasma reactor. 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. Liquefaction mechanism induced by dynamic excitation modeled in Plaxis AE with the use of UBC and MOHR–coulomb constitutive relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borowiec Anna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Computer Aided Engineering (CAE is commonly used in modern design of the various types of structures. There are two main issues/aspects that should be consider while using CAE in Geotechnics: the basic theory and material model. The paper deals with a problem of choosing the proper constitutive relationships which according to the authors are equally important in obtaining correct and reasonable results. This problem is illustrated by an example of dynamic calculations of fully saturated non-cohesive soils where liquefaction phenomenon is most likely to occur.

  12. Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfred G. Comolli; Peizheng Zhou; HTI Staff

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of the U.S. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, is to ensure the US a secure energy supply at an affordable price. An integral part of this program was the demonstration of fully developed coal liquefaction processes that could be implemented if market and supply considerations so required, Demonstration of the technology, even if not commercialized, provides a security factor for the country if it is known that the coal to liquid processes are proven and readily available. Direct liquefaction breaks down and rearranges complex hydrocarbon molecules from coal, adds hydrogen, and cracks the large molecules to those in the fuel range, removes hetero-atoms and gives the liquids characteristics comparable to petroleum derived fuels. The current processes being scaled and demonstrated are based on two reactor stages that increase conversion efficiency and improve quality by providing the flexibility to adjust process conditions to accommodate favorable reactions. The first stage conditions promote hydrogenation and some oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen removal. The second stage hydrocracks and speeds the conversion to liquids while removing the remaining sulfur and nitrogen. A third hydrotreatment stage can be used to upgrade the liquids to clean specification fuels.

  13. 铁基催化剂对将军庙煤低压直接液化性能影响%Effect of Iron-based Catalysts on Direct Liquefaction Performance of Coal From Jiangjunmiao, Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海龙; 廖玲

    2015-01-01

    以将军庙煤为研究对象,催化剂用量按活性金属元素计为3%(wtCoaldaf)、反应温度T=420℃、反应时间τ=75 min、溶煤比S/C=2/1和氢初压PH2=6.5 MPa条件下,首先,以油产率为目标,Fe2O3为主催化剂,S为助催化剂,通过考察S/Fe对煤样直接液化性能的影响,确定了最佳S/Fe=1/1。其次,在S/Fe为1/1和上述反应条件下,考察了一系列铁基催化剂对煤样液化性能的影响。结果表明,以油产率为目标,其活性由高到低为:Fe2O3/S>油溶性Fe3O4/S >油溶性Fe3O4(中试)/S >飞灰/S >纳米Fe3O4/S>黄铁矿/Fe2O3>油酸铁/S > FeSO4/S> Fe(NO3)3/S>β-FeOOH/S >FeCl3/S >还原铁粉/S >FeS。最后,将Fe2O3/S与MoO3/S、FeSO4/S与NiSO4/S和CoSO4/S分别进行了比较。结果表明:Fe2O3/S比MoO3/S更能促进沥青质向油的转化;FeSO4/S与NiSO4/S和CoSO4/S三者油产率相差甚小,均约67%。故此,Fe2O3/S的催化活性最好。%The research objectwasthe coal from Jiangjunmiao. First of all,takingoil yield as the target and Fe2O3as the maincatalyst and S as the sub-catalyst, the best S/Fe=1∶1wasconfirmedby investigating the effect of S/Fe on direct liquefaction performanceof coal sample under the reaction conditions of catalysts 3%( wt), 420℃,reaction time 75 min, solvent/coal=2/1 and H2initial pressure 6.5 MPa. Theneffect of a series of iron-based catalysts on liquefaction performanceof coal sample under S/Fe=1/1andotheraboveconditionswas investigated. The results showthat:the rank ordering of the activity of catalysts according to the oil yield is Fe2O3/S>oil-soluble Fe3O4/S > oil-soluble(pilot plant) Fe3O4/S >fly ash/S >nanometer Fe3O4/S>pyrite/Fe2O3>oleic acid iron/S > FeSO4/S> Fe(NO3)3/S > β-FeOOH/S>FeCl3/S >iron powder/S >FeS. At last,Fe2O3/S and MoO3/S, FeSO4/S and NiSO4/S and CoSO4/Swererespectively compared. Theresults show that:Fe2O3/S can more promote theconversionof asphaltene to oil than MoO3/S;thegap of the oil yieldsamong FeSO4/S

  14. Solvent recyclability in a multistep direct liquefaction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetland, M.D.; Rindt, J.R. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Direct liquefaction research at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has, for a number of years, concentrated on developing a direct liquefaction process specifically for low-rank coals (LRCs) through the use of hydrogen-donating solvents and solvents similar to coal-derived liquids, the water/gas shift reaction, and lower-severity reaction conditions. The underlying assumption of all of the research was that advantage could be taken of the reactivity and specific qualities of LRCs to produce a tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble material that might be easier to upgrade than the soluble residuum produced during direct liquefaction of high-rank coals. A multistep approach was taken to produce the THF-soluble material, consisting of (1) preconversion treatment to prepare the coal for solubilization, (2) solubilization of the coal in the solvent, and (3) polishing to complete solubilization of the remaining material. The product of these three steps can then be upgraded during a traditional hydrotreatment step. The results of the EERC`s research indicated that additional studies to develop this process more fully were justified. Two areas were targeted for further research: (1) determination of the recyclability of the solvent used during solubilization and (2) determination of the minimum severity required for hydrotreatment of the liquid product. The current project was funded to investigate these two areas.

  15. Modelling adaptation of the coal industry to sustainability conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwala, W. [Polish Academy of Science, Krakow (Poland). Mineral & Energy Economics Research Institute

    2008-07-15

    Fossil fuels still constitute an important source of energy in the world, but they need to comply with more strict environmental requirements. The coal industry, the basic primary energy supplier to the Polish economy, not only faces new environmental regulations but also restructuring and changes in the industry's organisational structure. The issues of primary importance are the medium and long-term prospects of achieving a suitable quantity and quality of coal supplied, as well as suitable costs. The structure of power generation needs to adjust to emissions limits with given fuel supplies. The paper discusses the construction of a coal supply balancing system which has been developed and applied as a decision support for rational planning of the development of the Polish coal industry. It consists of two linked groups of models: coal supply and coal balancing. Such a structure allows it to respond to the problems emerging, for the most part from new environmental regulations, and to select policies that will lead to sustainability in the industry.

  16. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, M.U.; Hobbs, M.L.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1993-08-01

    A generalized one-dimensional, heterogeneous, steady-state, fixed-bed model for coal gasification and combustion is presented. The model, FBED-1, is a design and analysis tool that can be used to simulate a variety of gasification, devolatilization, and combustion processes. The model considers separate gas and solid temperatures, axially variable solid and gas flow rates, variable bed void fraction, coal drying, devolatilization based on chemical functional group composition, depolymerization, vaporization and crosslinking, oxidation, and gasification of char, and partial equilibrium in the gas phase.

  17. Hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse; Hoffmann, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Biomass is one of the most abundant sources of renewable energy, and will be an important part of a more sustainable future energy system. In addition to direct combustion, there is growing attention on conversion of biomass into liquid en-ergy carriers. These conversion methods are divided...... into liquid biofuels, with the aim of describing the current status and development challenges of the technology. During the hydrothermal liquefaction process, the biomass macromolecules are first hydrolyzed and/or degraded into smaller molecules. Many of the produced molecules are unstable and reactive...... into biochemical/biotechnical methods and thermochemical methods; such as direct combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, liquefaction etc. This chapter will focus on hydrothermal liquefaction, where high pressures and intermediate temperatures together with the presence of water are used to convert biomass...

  18. Hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse; Hoffmann, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Biomass is one of the most abundant sources of renewable energy, and will be an important part of a more sustainable future energy system. In addition to direct combustion, there is growing attention on conversion of biomass into liquid en-ergy carriers. These conversion methods are divided...... into biochemical/biotechnical methods and thermochemical methods; such as direct combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, liquefaction etc. This chapter will focus on hydrothermal liquefaction, where high pressures and intermediate temperatures together with the presence of water are used to convert biomass...... into liquid biofuels, with the aim of describing the current status and development challenges of the technology. During the hydrothermal liquefaction process, the biomass macromolecules are first hydrolyzed and/or degraded into smaller molecules. Many of the produced molecules are unstable and reactive...

  19. Production of fuel range oxygenates by supercritical hydrothermal liquefaction of lignocellulosic model systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Helmer; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulosic model compounds and aspen wood are processed at supercritical hydrothermal conditions to study and understand feedstock impact on biocrude formation and characteristics. Glucose and xylose demonstrate similar yield of biocrude and biochar, similar biocrude characteristics, and it ......Lignocellulosic model compounds and aspen wood are processed at supercritical hydrothermal conditions to study and understand feedstock impact on biocrude formation and characteristics. Glucose and xylose demonstrate similar yield of biocrude and biochar, similar biocrude characteristics...

  20. Coliquefaction of coal, tar sand bitumen and plastic (interaction among coal, bitumen and plastic); Sekitan/tar sand bitumen/plastic no kyoekika ni okeru kyozon busshitsu no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Okuyama, Y.; Matsubara, K. [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Kamo, T.; Sato, Y. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    For the improvement of economy, coliquefaction of coal, tar sand bitumen and plastic was performed under low hydrogen pressure, to investigate the influence of interaction among these on the liquefaction characteristics. For comparison, coliquefaction was also performed under the hydrogen pressure same as the NEDOL process. In addition, for clarifying its reaction mechanism, coliquefaction of dibenzyl and plastic was performed as a model experiment, to illustrate the distribution of products and composition of oil, and to discuss the interaction between dibenzyl and various plastics, and between various plastics. Under direct coal liquefaction conditions, coprocessing of Tanito Harum coal, Athabasca tar sand and plastic was carried out under low hydrogen pressure with an autoclave. The observed value of oil yield was higher than the calculated value based on the values from separate liquefaction of coal and plastic, which suggested the interaction between coal and the mixed plastic. The results of coliquefaction of coal, tar sand bitumen and plastic could be explained from the obtained oil yield and its composition by the coliquefaction of dibenzyl and plastic. 2 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. Mice housed on coal dust-contaminated sand: A model to evaluate the impacts of coal mining on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Gallardo, Karina; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2016-03-01

    Coal dust is the most important air pollutant in coal mining in regards to producing deleterious health effects. It permeates the surrounding environment threatening public health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxic effects associated with exposure to sand contaminated with coal dust particles below 38 μm in diameter, obtained from a mineral sample collected in the largest coal mine in South America, La Loma, Cesar, Colombia. Sterilized sand was spiked with coal dust to obtain concentrations ranging from zero to 4% coal dust. To model natural exposure, mice were housed for eight weeks in boxes containing this mixture as bedding after which, they were euthanized and blood and tissue samples were collected. Real time PCR analysis revealed an increase in Cyp1A1 mRNA for living on sand with coal dust concentrations greater than 2% compared to mice living on sand without coal dust. Unexpectedly, for mice on coal dust-polluted sand, Sod1, Scd1 and Nqo1 hepatic mRNA were downregulated. The Comet assay in peripheral blood cells and the micronucleus test in blood smears, showed a significant potential genotoxic effect only at the highest coal dust concentration. Histopathological analysis revealed vascular congestion and peribronchial inflammation in the lungs. A dose-response relationship for the presence of hepatic steatosis, vacuolization and nuclei enlargements was observed in the exposed animals. The data suggest living on a soil polluted with coal dust induces molecular, cellular and histopathological changes in mice. Accordingly, the proposed model can be used to identify deleterious effects of exposure to coal dust deposited in soils that may pose health risks for surrounding wildlife populations.

  2. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (USA)); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology is important to reduce the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal, a feedstock whose variable and often unexpected behavior presents a significant challenge. This program will merge significant advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors. The foundation to describe coal-specific conversion behavior is AFR's Functional Group (FG) and Devolatilization, Vaporization, and Crosslinking (DVC) models, developed under previous and on-going METC sponsored programs. These models have demonstrated the capability to describe the time dependent evolution of individual gas species, and the amount and characteristics of tar and char. The combined FG-DVC model will be integrated with BYU's comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model, PCGC-2, which is currently the most widely used reactor simulation for combustion or gasification. Success in this program will be a major step in improving in predictive capabilities for coal conversion processes including: demonstrated accuracy and reliability and a generalized first principles'' treatment of coals based on readily obtained composition data. The progress during the fifteenth quarterly of the program is presented. 56 refs., 41 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Scale-Bridging Model Development for Coal Particle Devolatilization

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, Benjamin B; Smith, Philip J; Fletcher, Thomas H; Packard, Andrew; Frenklach, Michael; Hegde, Arun; Li, Wenyu; Oreluk, James

    2016-01-01

    When performing large-scale, high-performance computations of multi-physics applications, it is common to limit the complexity of physics sub-models comprising the simulation. For a hierarchical system of coal boiler simulations a scale-bridging model is constructed to capture characteristics appropriate for the application-scale from a detailed coal devolatilization model. Such scale-bridging allows full descriptions of scale-applicable physics, while functioning at reasonable computational costs. This study presents a variation on multi-fidelity modeling with a detailed physics model, the chemical percolation devolatilization model, being used to calibrate a scale-briding model for the application of interest. The application space provides essential context for designing the scale-bridging model by defining scales, determining requirements and weighting desired characteristics. A single kinetic reaction equation with functional yield model and distributed activation energy is implemented to act as the scal...

  4. Security analysis and measures for the liquefaction process of oxygen-bearing coal-bed methane%含氧煤层气液化流程安全性分析与措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓骥; 诸林; 肖娅; 赵启龙

    2014-01-01

    There is a risk of explosion during purifying the coal-bed methane coming from un-derground drainage ,for the reason that the gas contains oxygen .In this paper ,the results of simulation with HYSYS and the flammability limit theory were combined together to analyze the security of whole process .The results showed that the explosion hazard concentrated at the end of the condensation and on the top of rectification tower .The measure to reduce the compressor outlet pressure or raise the final condensation temperature was proposed .What′s more ,the secu-rity measure was proposed to control the methane content of rectification tower gas above the up-per limit of the explosion strictly ,and then the inerting gas with nitrogen contacts with liquid ni-trogen upstream for further recovery of CH4 .The results indicate that when the value of nitrogen injection ratio is greater than 0 .6 (mole ratio ) ,there is no danger of explosion in liquefaction process ,and both methane yield and process safety are improved greatly in this way .%矿下抽采的煤层气由于混有空气而在液化中存在爆炸危险。通过将HYSYS对常规液化分离流程的模拟结果与爆炸极限理论相结合进行分析计算得出:爆炸危险主要集中在冷凝终了处和精馏塔顶部。进而提出降低压缩机出口压力或提高最终冷凝温度;严格控制精馏塔塔顶气相C H4含量在爆炸上限之上,塔顶气用N2惰化后再与液氮逆流接触以进一步回收C H4。计算表明,当N2注入比达0.6(摩尔比),气相CH4含量曲线将绕过临界点进入安全区。采取措施后CH4有较高收率且液化流程安全性得以提高。

  5. Close-coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies. Final report, [October 1, 1988--July 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Popper, G.A.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-06-01

    This is the final report of a four year and ten month contract starting on October 1, 1988 to July 31, 1993 with the US Department of Energy to study and improve Close-Coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Direct Liquefaction of coal by producing high yields of distillate with improved quality at lower capital and production costs in comparison to existing technologies. Laboratory, Bench and PDU scale studies on sub-bituminous and bituminous coals are summarized and referenced in this volume. Details are presented in the three topical reports of this contract; CTSL Process Bench Studies and PDU Scale-Up with Sub-Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-1, CTSL Process Bench Studies with Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-2, and CTSL Process Laboratory Scale Studies, Modelling and Technical Assessment-DE-88818-TOP-3. Results are summarized on experiments and studies covering several process configurations, cleaned coals, solid separation methods, additives and catalysts both dispersed and supported. Laboratory microautoclave scale experiments, economic analysis and modelling studies are also included along with the PDU-Scale-Up of the CTSL processing of sub-bituminous Black Thunder Mine Wyoming coal. During this DOE/HRI effort, high distillate yields were maintained at higher throughput rates while quality was markedly improved using on-line hydrotreating and cleaned coals. Solid separations options of filtration and delayed coking were evaluated on a Bench-Scale with filtration successfully scaled to a PDU demonstration. Directions for future direct coal liquefaction related work are outlined herein based on the results from this and previous programs.

  6. Critical Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification Models. Part II: Kinetic and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Żogała

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: This paper presents state of art in the field of coal gasification modeling using kinetic and computational fluid dynamics approach. The paper also presents own comparative analysis (concerned with mathematical formulation, input data and parameters, basic assumptions, obtained results etc. of the most important models of underground coal gasification.

  7. Combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, and liquefaction of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, T.B.

    1980-09-01

    All the products now obtained from oil can be provided by thermal conversion of the solid fuels biomass and coal. As a feedstock, biomass has many advantages over coal and has the potential to supply up to 20% of US energy by the year 2000 and significant amounts of energy for other countries. However, it is imperative that in producing biomass for energy we practice careful land use. Combustion is the simplest method of producing heat from biomass, using either the traditional fixed-bed combustion on a grate or the fluidized-bed and suspended combustion techniques now being developed. Pyrolysis of biomass is a particularly attractive process if all three products - gas, wood tars, and charcoal - can be used. Gasification of biomass with air is perhaps the most flexible and best-developed process for conversion of biomass to fuel today, yielding a low energy gas that can be burned in existing gas/oil boilers or in engines. Oxygen gasification yields a gas with higher energy content that can be used in pipelines or to fire turbines. In addition, this gas can be used for producing methanol, ammonia, or gasoline by indirect liquefaction. Fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a gas rich in ethylene that can be used to make alcohols or gasoline. Finally, treatment of biomass with high pressure hydrogen can yield liquid fuels through direct liquefaction.

  8. SUMMARY REPORT OF THE DOE DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT CAMPAIGN OF THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.P. Burke; S.D. Brandes; D.C. McCoy; R.A. Winschel; D. Gray; G. Tomlinson

    2001-07-01

    Following the petroleum price and supply disruptions of 1973, the U.S. government began a substantial program to fund the development of alternative fuels. Direct coal liquefaction was one of the potential routes to alternative fuels. The direct coal liquefaction program was funded at substantial levels through 1982, and at much lower levels thereafter. Those processes that were of most interest during this period were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels. By 1999, U.S. government funding for the development of direct coal liquefaction ended. Now that the end of this campaign has arrived, it is appropriate to summarize the process learnings derived from it. This report is a summary of the process learnings derived from the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development campaign of the late twentieth century. The report concentrates on those process development programs that were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels and were largely funded by DOE and its predecessors in response to the petroleum supply and price disruptions of the 1970s. The report is structured as chapters written by different authors on most of the major individual DOE-funded process development programs. The focus of the report is process learnings, as opposed to, say, fundamental coal liquefaction science or equipment design. As detailed in the overview (Chapter 2), DOE's direct coal liquefaction campaign made substantial progress in improving the process yields and the quality of the distillate product. Much of the progress was made after termination by 1983 of the major demonstration programs of the ''first generation'' (SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS) processes.

  9. Coal Consumption Reduction in Shandong Province: A Dynamic Vector Autoregression Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Deng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Coal consumption and carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion in China are attracting increasing attention worldwide. Between 1990 and 2013, the coal consumption in Shandong Province increased by approximately 5.29 times. Meanwhile, the proportion of coal consumption of Shandong Province to China rose from 7.6% to 10.8%, and to the world, it rose from 1.8% to 5.5%. Identifying the drivers of coal consumption in Shandong Province is vital for developing effective environmental policies. This paper uses the Vector Autoregression model to analyze the influencing factors of coal consumption in Shandong Province. The results show that industrialization plays a dominant role in increasing coal consumption. Conversely, coal efficiency is the key factor to curtailing coal consumption. Although there is a rebound effect of coal efficiency in the short term, from a long-term perspective, coal efficiency will reduce coal consumption gradually. Both economic growth and urbanization have a significant effect on coal consumption in Shandong Province. In addition, the substitution effect of oil to coal has not yet met expectations. These findings are important for relevant authorities in Shandong in developing appropriate policies to halt the growth of coal consumption.

  10. Refining and end use study of coal liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, G.

    1998-05-01

    A conceptual design and ASPEN Plus process flowsheet simulation model was developed for a Battelle biomass-based gasification, Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquefaction and combined-cycle power plant. This model was developed in a similar manner to those coal liquefaction models that were developed under DOE contract DE-AC22-91PC90027. As such, this process flowsheet simulation model was designed to be a research guidance tool and not a detailed process design tool. However, it does contain some process design features, such as sizing the F-T synthesis reactors. This model was designed only to predict the effects of various process and operating changes on the overall plant heat and material balances, utilities, capital and operating costs.

  11. Some thoughts on the organic structure of bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Our current operating hypothesis is that coal consists of a cross linked macromolecular network of high aromatic clusters held together by linkages which include ethers and methylene groups. These clusters are arranged like beads on a string with 3 to 5 beads between branch points. Coal can be liqufied most readily by cleaving the links between the clusters. Doing chemistry on the clusters in the whole coal is very difficult because of the problems of getting to the clusters by reagents. It is fortunate that the linkages between clusters are quite reactive. But even with this, it is clear that coal liquefaction is a formidable chemical problem. There is much wisdom is Sternberg's suggestion that the chemistry of the freed clusters (pre-asphaltenes) be developed. Our model indicates that the chemistry which results in freeing the clusters from the network also should be explored and broadened.

  12. Preliminary evaluation of PETC-coal conversion solid and hazardous wastes. Progress report, September 15, 1977--September 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufeld, R.D.; Shapiro, M.; Chen, C.; Wallach, S.; Sain, S.

    1978-09-30

    This progress report reviews issues and local area practice relative to the disposal of small quantity laboratory solid and chemical wastes from the PETC site. Research efforts to date have been in two major directions, a) solid and hazardous waste problems relative to PETC, and b) solid and hazardous waste problems relative to coal gasification and liquefaction conversion processes. It is intended that bench scale coal conversion processes located at PETC be considered as small but typical models for residuals sample generation. A literature search activity has begun in order to develop a data bank of coal conversion residual characterizations, and identify other centers of hazardous waste handling research expertise.

  13. Modeling of Pulverized Coal Combustion in Cement Rotary Kiln

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, based on analysis of the chemical and physical processes of clinker formation, a heat flux function was introduced to take account of the thermal effect of clinker formation. Combining the models of gas-solid flow, heat and mass transfer, and pulverized coal combustion, a set of mathematical models for a full-scale cement rotary kiln were established. In terms of commercial CFD code (FLUENT), the distributions of gas velocity, gas temperature, and gas components in a cement rot...

  14. A coupled soil-pore fluid formulation for modeling soil liquefaction and cyclic mobility in seabed using the finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Tian; Roenby, Johan; Hededal, Ole

    by formulating the strong interactions between soil skeleton and the pore fluid via a coupled set of partial differential equations. A single bounding surface soil model capable of simulating the accumulations of pore pressures, strains, dilatancy, and strain „softening‟, is then adopted for quantifying...... the cyclic soil constitutive relations. To deal with the high non-linearity in the equations, the finite volume (FV) method is proposed for the numerical simulation. The corresponding discretization strategies and solution algorithms, including the conventional segregated method and the more recent block...... matrix solver, are discussed as well. Overall, investigations in this paper provide a methodology for developing a numerical code simulating liquefaction and cyclic mobility. In future work this will be implemented in practice with the aid of the open source CFD toolbox, OpenFOAM....

  15. Using Mathematica software for coal gasification simulations – Selected kinetic model application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Iwaszenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal gasification is recognized as a one of promising Clean Coal Technologies. As the process itself is complicated and technologically demanding, it is subject of many research. In the paper a problem of using volumetric, non-reactive core and Johnson model for coal gasification and underground coal gasification is considered. The usage of Mathematica software for models' equations solving and analysis is presented. Coal parameters were estimated for five Polish mines: Piast, Ziemowit, Janina, Szczygłowice and Bobrek. For each coal the models' parameters were determined. The determination of parameters was based on reactivity assessment for 50% char conversion. The calculations show relatively small differences between conversion predicted by volumetric and non reactive core model. More significant differences were observed for Johnson model, but they do not exceeded 10% for final char conversion. The conceptual model for underground coal gasification was presented.

  16. Comprehensive model for predicting elemental composition of coal pyrolysis products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricahrds, Andrew P. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Shutt, Tim [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Fletcher, Thomas H. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    2017-04-23

    Large-scale coal combustion simulations depend highly on the accuracy and utility of the physical submodels used to describe the various physical behaviors of the system. Coal combustion simulations depend on the particle physics to predict product compositions, temperatures, energy outputs, and other useful information. The focus of this paper is to improve the accuracy of devolatilization submodels, to be used in conjunction with other particle physics models. Many large simulations today rely on inaccurate assumptions about particle compositions, including that the volatiles that are released during pyrolysis are of the same elemental composition as the char particle. Another common assumption is that the char particle can be approximated by pure carbon. These assumptions will lead to inaccuracies in the overall simulation. There are many factors that influence pyrolysis product composition, including parent coal composition, pyrolysis conditions (including particle temperature history and heating rate), and others. All of these factors are incorporated into the correlations to predict the elemental composition of the major pyrolysis products, including coal tar, char, and light gases.

  17. Coal; Le charbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teissie, J.; Bourgogne, D. de; Bautin, F. [TotalFinaElf, La Defense, 92 - Courbevoie (France)

    2001-12-15

    Coal world production represents 3.5 billions of tons, plus 900 millions of tons of lignite. 50% of coal is used for power generation, 16% by steel making industry, 5% by cement plants, and 29% for space heating and by other industries like carbo-chemistry. Coal reserves are enormous, about 1000 billions of tons (i.e. 250 years of consumption with the present day rate) but their exploitation will be in competition with less costly and less polluting energy sources. This documents treats of all aspects of coal: origin, composition, calorific value, classification, resources, reserves, production, international trade, sectoral consumption, cost, retail price, safety aspects of coal mining, environmental impacts (solid and gaseous effluents), different technologies of coal-fired power plants and their relative efficiency, alternative solutions for the recovery of coal energy (fuel cells, liquefaction). (J.S.)

  18. Fiscal 1997 report on the survey for a data book on new energy technology development. Waste power generation, solar energy utilization. geothermal power generation, clean energy vehicles, coal liquefaction/gasification, and traverse themes; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho. Shin energy gijutsu kaihatsu kankei data shu sakusei chosa (haikibutsu hatsuden, taiyonetsu riyo, chinetsu hatsuden, clean energy jidosha, sekitan ekika gas ka oyobi odanteki theme)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The paper collected and arranged data on new energy technology. As to the waste power generation, in terms of general waste, 161 places have power generation facilities, 657,000 kW in output, as of the end of FY 1996. Out of them, 100 facilities (scale of output: 555,000 kW) are selling power. In terms of industrial waste, 53 places (209,000 kW) have power generation facilities. The output will be 2 million kW in FY 2000. In relation to the solar energy utilization, the number of solar systems introduced in FY 1996 is 25,000, that of water heating appliances produced in FY 1996 is 170,000. Geothermal power of 494,000 kW and 37,000 kW was introduced for electric power industry use and private use, respectively. Clean energy vehicles have not been so much spread, but the hybrid car was put on sale in 1997. Concerning the coal liquefaction, the R and D were made at a pilot plant of NEDOL process, and operation started in 1997. As to the coal gasification, investigational study and element study on the demonstration plant are being conducted in FY 1997 and 1998, making use of the research results obtained from the existing pilot plant of coal gasification combined power generation

  19. Stochastic reservoir simulation for the modeling of uncertainty in coal seam degasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacan, C. Özgen; Olea, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Coal seam degasification improves coal mine safety by reducing the gas content of coal seams and also by generating added value as an energy source. Coal seam reservoir simulation is one of the most effective ways to help with these two main objectives. As in all modeling and simulation studies, how the reservoir is defined and whether observed productions can be predicted are important considerations.

  20. DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROOF-OF-CONCEPT PROGRAM - BENCH RUN PB-10 (HTI 227-109)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1999-12-30

    This report presents the results of the bench-scale test, PB-10, performed at HTI's facilities under DOE contract (HTI Run No. 227-109). This bench test continues the work that was started in PDU testing 260-007. Previous bench test (PB-09, HTI 227-106) was performed on different seams of Chinese coal (Shenhua Ningtiaota Coal No.2 and No.3). Since another coal, Shangwan coal was selected for the liquefaction plant, PB-10 was made as approved by DOE/COR. The objective of this test was to evaluate the liquefaction performance of Shangwan coal utilizing various backend processing and recycle schemes. Additionally, this test was to collect available process data to allow for the best scale-up process design possible from this particular unit.

  1. Experimental Research and Mathematical Modelling for Coal Reburning in Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Jun; SU Sheng; SUN Lu-shi; SUN Xue-xin; ZHANG Zhong-xiao; ZHU Ji-mu

    2006-01-01

    Reburning technology is one of the most cost-effective NOx reduction strategies for coal combustion systems. In this paper, a nitric oxide submodel incorporated into a comprehensive coal combustion model was developed for predicting NOx reduction in a 93 kW laboratory-scale coal combustion furnace by reburning. This NO submodel, including reburning mechanism, requires the solution of only two transport equations to model the behavior of NO reduction in the reburning process. A number of experiments have been performed in the same furnace, and the experimental data obtained from the optimized reburn configuration was used to validate the model. Measurements and predictions both show above 50% reduction of NO emissions for the optimized reburning process. Profile comparisons show that the predicted temperature and oxygen concentration match well with the measurements, and the general trend of predicted NO concentration is very similar to that measured. The results of this study show that the present nitric oxide submodel depicts quite well the observed behaviour of NO annihilation in the reburning process. It is expected that this usable and computationally economic model represents a useful tool to simulate the gaseous fuel reburning process for the researchers concerned with practical combustors.

  2. Model documentation, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives and the conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the National Energy Modeling System`s (NEMS) Coal Market Module (CMM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of CMM`s two submodules. These are the Coal Production Submodule (CPS) and the Coal Distribution Submodule (CDS). CMM provides annual forecasts of prices, production, and consumption of coal for NEMS. In general, the CDS integrates the supply inputs from the CPS to satisfy demands for coal from exogenous demand models. The international area of the CDS forecasts annual world coal trade flows from major supply to major demand regions and provides annual forecasts of US coal exports for input to NEMS. Specifically, the CDS receives minemouth prices produced by the CPS, demand and other exogenous inputs from other NEMS components, and provides delivered coal prices and quantities to the NEMS economic sectors and regions.

  3. Structure-Based Predictive Model for Coal Char Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Hadad; Joseph Calo; Robert Essenhigh; Robert Hurt

    1998-04-08

    Progress was made this period on a number of separate experimental and modelling activities. At Brown, the models of carbon nanostructure evolution were expanded to consider high-rank materials with initial anisotropy. The report presents detailed results of Monte Carlo simulations with non-zero initial layer length and with statistically oriented initial states. The expanded simulations are now capable of describing the development of nanostructure during carbonization of most coals. Work next quarter will address the remaining challenge of isotropic coke-forming coals. Experiments at Brown yielded important data on the "memory loss" phenomenon in carbon annealing, and on the effect of mineral matter on high-temperature reactivity. The experimental aspects of the Brown work will be discussed in detail in the next report.

  4. A kinetic model of carbon burnout in pulverized coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurt, R.; Jian-Kuan Sun; Lunden, M. [Brown University, Providence, RI (United States). Division of Engineering

    1998-04-01

    The degree of carbon burnout is an important operating characteristic of full-scale suspension-fired coal combustion systems affecting boiler efficiency, electrostatic precipitator operation and the value of fly ash as a saleable product. Prediction of carbon loss requires special char combustion kinetics valid through the very high conversions targeted in industry (typically {gt} 99.5%), and valid for a wide-range of particle temperature histories occurring in full-scale furnaces. The paper presents high-temperature kinetic data for five coal chars in the form of time-resolved burning profiles that include the late stages of combustion. It then describes the development and validation of the Carbon Burnout Kinetic Model (CBK), a coal-general kinetics package that is specifically designed to predict the total extent of carbon burnout and ultimate fly ash carbon content for prescribed temperature/oxygen histories typical of pulverized coal combustion systems. The model combines the single-film treatment of cha oxidation with quantitative descriptions of thermal annealing, statistical kinetics, statistical densities, and ash inhibition in the late stages of combustion. In agreement with experimental observations, the CBK model predicts (1) low reactivities for unburned carbon residues extracted from commercial ash samples, (2) reactivity loss in the late stages of laboratory combustion, (3) the observed sensitivity of char reactivity to high-temperature heat treatment on second and subsecond time scales, and (4) the global reaction inhibition by mineral matter in the late stages of combustion observed in single-particle imaging studies. The model ascribes these various char deactivation phenomena to the combined effects of thermal annealing, ash inhibition, and the preferential consumption of more reactive particles (statistical kinetics), the relative contributions of which vary greatly with combustion conditions. 39 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs., 1 app.

  5. Evaluation of ADAM/1 model for advanced coal extraction concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, G. K.; Gangal, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    Several existing computer programs for estimating life cycle cost of mining systems were evaluated. A commercially available program, ADAM/1 was found to be satisfactory in relation to the needs of the advanced coal extraction project. Two test cases were run to confirm the ability of the program to handle nonconventional mining equipment and procedures. The results were satisfactory. The model, therefore, is recommended to the project team for evaluation of their conceptual designs.

  6. 3D Geological Modeling of CoalBed Methane (CBM) Resources in the Taldykuduk Block Karaganda Coal Basin, Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Raman; Kiponievich Ogay, Evgeniy; Royer, Jean-Jacques; Zhapbasbayev, Uzak; Panfilova, Irina

    2015-04-01

    Coal Bed Methane (CBM) is gas stored in coal layers. It can be extracted from wells after hydraulic fracturing and/or solvent injection, and secondary recovery techniques such as CO2 injection. Karaganda Basin is a very favorable candidate region to develop CBM production for the following reasons: (i) Huge gas potential; (ii) Available technologies for extracting and commercializing the gas produced by CBM methods; (iii) Experience in degassing during underground mining operations for safety reasons; (iv) Local needs in energy for producing electricity for the industrial and domestic market. The objectives of this work are to model the Taldykuduk block coal layers and their properties focusing on Coal Bed Methane production. It is motivated by the availability of large coal bed methane resources in Karaganda coal basin which includes 4 300 Bm3 equivalent 2 billion tons of coal (B = billion = 109) with gas content 15-25 m3/t of coal (for comparison San Juan basin (USA) has Methane (CH4) can be considered as an environmentally-friendly fuel compared to coal. Actually, the methane extracted during mining is released in the atmosphere, collecting it for recovering energy will reduce CO2 equivalent emissions by 36 Mt, good news regarding climate warming issues. The exploitation method will be based on a EOR technology consisting in injecting CO2 which replaces methane in pores because it has a higher adsorption capacity than CH4; exploiting CBM by CO2 injection provides thus a safe way to sequestrate CO2 in adsorbed form. The 3D geological model was built on Gocad/Skua using the following available data set: 926 wells and large area (7 x 12 km). No seismic data; coal type and chemical components (S, ash, …); unreliable available cross-section & maps due to old acquisition; quality mature coal; complex heterogeneous fractures network reported on geological cross sections; and utilization issues of the water extracted in the early stages of exploitation. The resulting

  7. Improved ultrasonic differentiation model for structural coal types based on neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Zi-jian; WANG Fu-zhong; LI Tao; BAI Shan-shan

    2009-01-01

    In order to solve the difficulty of detailed recognition of subdivisions of structural coal types, a differentiation model that combines BP neural network with an ultrasonic reflection method is proposed. Structural coal types are recognized based on a suit-able consideration of ultrasonic speed, an ultrasonic attenuation coefficient, characteristics of ultrasonic transmission and other parameters relating to structural coal types. We have focused on a computational model of ultrasonic speed, attenuation coefficient in coal and differentiation algorithm of structural coal types based on a BP neural network. Experiments demonstrate that the model can distinguish structural coal types effectively. It is important for the improved ultrasonic differentiation model to predict coal and gas outbursts.

  8. A genetic-algorithm approach for assessing the liquefaction potential of sandy soils

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, G.; Akyol, E.

    2010-01-01

    The determination of liquefaction potential is required to take into account a large number of parameters, which creates a complex nonlinear structure of the liquefaction phenomenon. The conventional methods rely on simple statistical and empirical relations or charts. However, they cannot characterise these complexities. Genetic algorithms are suited to solve these types of problems. A genetic algorithm-based model has been developed to determine the liquefaction potential by confirming Cone...

  9. Residual Liquefaction under Standing Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V.S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study which deals with the residual liquefaction of seabed under standing waves. It is shown that the seabed liquefaction under standing waves, although qualitatively similar, exhibits features different from that caused by progressive waves....... The experimental results show that the buildup of pore-water pressure and the resulting liquefaction first starts at the nodal section and spreads towards the antinodal section. The number of waves to cause liquefaction at the nodal section appears to be equal to that experienced in progressive waves for the same...... wave height. Recommendations are made as to how to assess liquefaction potential in standing waves. Copyright © 2012 by the International Society of Offshore and Polar Engineers (ISOPE)....

  10. The manufacture of hydrogen from coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaros, C. L.; Arora, J. L.; Burnham, K. B.

    1975-01-01

    The conversion of coal to hydrogen is studied from the viewpoint of overall plant efficiency for three different processes: suspension gasification, fluidized-bed gasification, and fluidized steam-iron process. The basic principles of these processes are reviewed, and total energy requirements are estimated and complete energy balances are made for each process, on the assumption that each model plant is self-contained, with no power imported. Overall plant efficiencies for conversion of coal to major gaseous products plus by-products were determined to be: suspension gasification - 57.0%, fluidized-bed gasification - 66.4%, fluidized steam-iron process - 62.6%. Similar results are presented for methane liquefaction from coal using a process design based on hydrogasification, and it is found that conversion of coal to pipeline methane is much more efficient and less expensive than hydrogen conversion if a portion of the coal is converted to synthesis gas and this gas is used to hydrogenate more coal to methane.

  11. Efficiency of jet grout columns and sand-recycled material mixtures for mitigating liquefaction damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerem Ertek, M.; Demir, Gökhan; Köktan, Utku

    2017-04-01

    Liquefaction is an important seismic phenomena that has to be assessed and consequently makes it essential to take measures in order to reduce related hazards. There are several ways to assess liquefaction potential analytically and some constitutive models implemented in FEM softwares presenting cyclic behaviour of sand making it possible to observe shear strain or excess pore pressure ratio which are measures to hold a view about liquefaction occurrence. According to various studies in the literature, post-earthquake inspections show that the measures in terms of grouting, piled rafts and sand mixtures with different non-liquefiable materials reduce liquefaction related damage. This paper aims to provide a brief information about effectiveness of jet-grout columns and recycled material-sand mixtures against liquefaction by the help of numerical analyses performed with MIDAS GTS NX software with regard to generation of shear strains. Key words: liquefaction, numerical analyses, jet-grout, sand mixtures

  12. Use of numerical simulation modeling for perfecting coal industry projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Y.; Abramovich, B.N. (Kitaiskii Gornyi Universitet (China))

    1992-02-01

    Evaluates digital computerized simulation of operation of control systems for a hydraulic haulage system of the MLS-170 coal cutter loader used in China. A structural scheme of a mathematical model of the hydraulic haulage system is discussed. The BGLS program package for haulage system modeling is described. Modeling haulage system start-up and oil pressure fluctuations and their causes is evaluated. Practical aspects of use of the digital computerized simulation by manufacturers of the MLS-170 haulage system for its modifications are discussed. 3 refs

  13. Development of a phenomenological model for coal slurry atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooher, J.P. [Adelphi Univ., Garden City, NY (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Highly concentrated suspensions of coal particles in water or alternate fluids appear to have a wide range of applications for energy production. For enhanced implementation of coal slurry fuel technology, an understanding of coal slurry atomization as a function coal and slurry properties for specific mechanical configurations of nozzle atomizers should be developed.

  14. Development of coal energy utilization technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Coal liquefaction produces new and clean energy by performing hydrogenation, decomposition and liquefaction on coal under high temperatures and pressures. NEDO has been developing bituminous coal liquefaction technologies by using a 150-t/d pilot plant. It has also developed quality improving and utilization technologies for liquefied coal, whose practical use is expected. For developing coal gasification technologies, construction is in progress for a 200-t/d pilot plant for spouted bed gasification power generation. NEDO intends to develop coal gasification composite cycle power generation with high efficiency and of environment harmonious type. This paper summarizes the results obtained during fiscal 1994. It also dwells on technologies to manufacture hydrogen from coal. It further describes development of technologies to manufacture methane and substituting natural gas (SNG) by hydrogenating and gasifying coal. The ARCH process can select three operation modes depending on which of SNG yield, thermal efficiency or BTX yield is targeted. With respect to promotion of coal utilization technologies, description is given on surveys on development of next generation technologies for coal utilization, and clean coal technology promotion projects. International coal utilization and application projects are also described. 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Intensity measures for seismic liquefaction hazard evaluation of sloping site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志雄; 程印; 肖杨; 卢谅; 阳洋

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the correlation between a large number of widely used ground motion intensity measures (IMs) and the corresponding liquefaction potential of a soil deposit during earthquake loading. In order to accomplish this purpose the seismic responses of 32 sloping liquefiable site models consisting of layered cohesionless soil were subjected to 139 earthquake ground motions. Two sets of ground motions, consisting of 80 ordinary records and 59 pulse-like near-fault records are used in the dynamic analyses. The liquefaction potential of the site is expressed in terms of the the mean pore pressure ratio, the maximum ground settlement, the maximum ground horizontal displacement and the maximum ground horizontal acceleration. For each individual accelerogram, the values of the aforementioned liquefaction potential measures are determined. Then, the correlation between the liquefaction potential measures and the IMs is evaluated. The results reveal that the velocity spectrum intensity (VSI) shows the strongest correlation with the liquefaction potential of sloping site. VSI is also proven to be a sufficient intensity measure with respect to earthquake magnitude and source-to-site distance, and has a good predictability, thus making it a prime candidate for the seismic liquefaction hazard evaluation.

  16. Development and validation of THM coupling model of methane-containing coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao; Yunqi; Xu; Jiang; Liu; Dong; Liang; Yongqing

    2012-01-01

    Based on nine necessary basic assumptions for THM coupling model,this research comprehensively applied the theories of elastic mechanics,seepage mechanics and heat transfer,and established a real three-field and two-way coupled mathematical model to reveal the connections among seepage field,deformation field and temperature field within the system of methane-containing coal.In comparison between numerical and analytical solutions,the coupling modeling for THM of methane-containing coal was proved to be correct by model application in the physical simulation experiment of coal and gas outburst.The model established in this paper was the improvement of traditional seepage theory of methane-containing coal and fluid-solid coupled model theory,which can be widely used in prevention of coal and gas outburst as well as exploitation of coal bed methane.

  17. The Calculation Model for Operation Cost of Coal Resources Development Based on ANN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海滨

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of analysis and selection of factors influencing operation cost of coal resources development, fuzzy set method and artificial neural network (ANN) were adopted to set up the classification analysis model of coal resources. The collected samples were classified by using this model. Meanwhile, the pattern recognition model for classifying of the coal resources was built according to the factors influencing operation cost. Based on the results achieved above, in the light of the theory of information diffusion, the calculation model for operation cost of coal resources development has been presented and applied in practice, showing that these models are reasonable.

  18. Bioechnology of indirect liquefaction. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, R.; Jain, M.K.; Worden, R.M.; Grethlein, A.J.; Soni, B.; Zeikus, J.G.; Grethlein, H.

    1990-05-07

    The project on biotechnology of indirect liquefaction was focused on conversion of coal derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels using a two-stage, acidogenic and solventogenic, anaerobic bioconversion process. The acidogenic fermentation used a novel and versatile organism, Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, which was fully capable of using CO as the sole carbon and energy source for organic acid production. In extended batch CO fermentations the organism was induced to produce butyrate at the expense of acetate at low pH values. Long-term, steady-state operation was achieved during continuous CO fermentations with this organism, and at low pH values (a pH of 6.0 or less) minor amounts of butanol and ethanol were produced. During continuous, steady-state fermentations of CO with cell recycle, concentrations of mixed acids and alcohols were achieved (approximately 12 g/l and 2 g/l, respectively) which are high enough for efficient conversion in stage two of the indirect liquefaction process. The metabolic pathway to produce 4-carbon alcohols from CO was a novel discovery and is believed to be unique to our CO strain of B. methylotrophicum. In the solventogenic phase, the parent strain ATCC 4259 of Clostridium acetobutylicum was mutagenized using nitrosoguanidine and ethyl methane sulfonate. The E-604 mutant strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum showed improved characteristics as compared to parent strain ATCC 4259 in batch fermentation of carbohydrates.

  19. STRUCTURE-BASED PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR COAL CHAR COMBUSTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHRISTOPHER M. HADAD; JOSEPH M. CALO; ROBERT H. ESSENHIGH; ROBERT H. HURT

    1998-06-04

    During the past quarter of this project, significant progress continued was made on both major technical tasks. Progress was made at OSU on advancing the application of computational chemistry to oxidative attack on model polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and graphitic structures. This work is directed at the application of quantitative ab initio molecular orbital theory to address the decomposition products and mechanisms of coal char reactivity. Previously, it was shown that the �hybrid� B3LYP method can be used to provide quantitative information concerning the stability of the corresponding radicals that arise by hydrogen atom abstraction from monocyclic aromatic rings. In the most recent quarter, these approaches have been extended to larger carbocyclic ring systems, such as coronene, in order to compare the properties of a large carbonaceous PAH to that of the smaller, monocyclic aromatic systems. It was concluded that, at least for bond dissociation energy considerations, the properties of the large PAHs can be modeled reasonably well by smaller systems. In addition to the preceding work, investigations were initiated on the interaction of selected radicals in the �radical pool� with the different types of aromatic structures. In particular, the different pathways for addition vs. abstraction to benzene and furan by H and OH radicals were examined. Thus far, the addition channel appears to be significantly favored over abstraction on both kinetic and thermochemical grounds. Experimental work at Brown University in support of the development of predictive structural models of coal char combustion was focused on elucidating the role of coal mineral matter impurities on reactivity. An �inverse� approach was used where a carbon material was doped with coal mineral matter. The carbon material was derived from a high carbon content fly ash (Fly Ash 23 from the Salem Basin Power Plant. The ash was obtained from Pittsburgh #8 coal (PSOC 1451). Doped

  20. CO2 Emission Reduction and Its Utilization Applied in Indirect Coal Liquefaction Project%煤间接液化项目中CO2的减排及利用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊诚; 李龙; 刘万洲; 金嘉璐; 赵金立

    2012-01-01

    The CO2 emitted from large CTL (Coal to Liquid) Projects is high in purity and intensive. Through selection of advanced process technologies, reasonable optimization of processes and use of the heat and the high heat-value tail gas, not only the energy efficiency can be improved, coal consumption reduced, but also the CO2 emission can be reduced. In addition, based on the identification of the CO2 emission sources, its load and concentration, reasonable use of CO2 was identified. Then an economic evaluation model of CO2 from the CTL project applied in EOR (Enhance Oil Recovery) was built to prove its economic feasibility.%针对大型煤炭间接液化项目中CO2纯度高、排放集中的特点,通过技术选择、工艺优化和对工艺过程中产生的余热和高热值尾气进行充分利用,可大幅减少CO2排放.通过对CO2排放源进行识别,有针对性地确定其合理的利用方式;通过建立煤炭间接液化工厂排放CO2用于驱油的经济评价模型,对其应用经济可行性进行了论证.

  1. Modeling of Sulfur Retention in Circulating Fluidized Bed Coal Combustors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔锐; 吕俊复; 刘青; 吴学安; 岳光溪

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive model for predicting the sulfur retention performance in circulating fluidized bedcombustors was developed which involves the different residence times, the wide particle size distribution andthe different forms of sulfur in the coal. In addition, the reductive decomposition of CaSO4 is highlighted. Thesimulation results from the model show that the sulfur contents, the bed temperature, the sorbent particle sizedistribution and the sorbent activity or the maximum conversion rate can significantly influence the sulfuretention performance in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors.``

  2. Prediction of Coal Consumption in China Based on the Partial Linear Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying; XIE; Chunxiang; ZHAO

    2015-01-01

    China is one of the few countries using coal as the main energy and is the world’s second largest coal consumer. Researching the coal consumption is very necessary. At present,the prediction model of coal consumption is mainly based on time series analysis of price,and it rarely considers the influence of other factors. In this paper,on the basis of demand theory,we establish the multiple impact indicators,and use principal component analysis as well as partial linear model for multiple factors to establish coal consumption model. By using this model to forecast the coal consumption in 2011,we find that the predicted value is close to actual value,which means that the model is good.

  3. A computerized coal-water slurry transportation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljubicic, B.R.; Trostad, B. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Bukurov, Z.; Cvijanovic, P. [Univ. of Novi Sad (Yugoslavia)

    1995-12-01

    Coal-water fuel (CWF) technology has been developed to the point where full-scale commercialization is just a matter of gaining sufficient market confidence in the price stability of alternate fossil fuels. In order to generalize alternative fuel cost estimates for the desired combinations of processing and/or transportation, a great deal of flexibility is required owing to the understood lack of precision in many of the newly emerging coal technologies. Previously, decisions regarding the sequential and spatial arrangement of the various process steps were made strictly on the basis of experience, simplified analysis, and intuition. Over the last decade, computer modeling has progressed from empirically based correlation to that of intricate mechanistic analysis. Nomograms, charts, tables, and many simple rules of thumb have been made obsolete by the availability of complex computer models. Given the ability to view results graphically in real or near real time, the engineer can immediately verify, from a practical standpoint, whether the initial assumptions and inputs were indeed valid. If the feasibility of a project is being determined in the context of a lack of specific data, the ability to provide a dynamic software-based solution is crucial. Furthermore, the resulting model can be used to establish preliminary operating procedures, test control logic, and train plant/process operators. Presented in this paper is a computerized model capable of estimating the delivered cost of CWF. The model uses coal-specific values, process and transport requirements, terrain factors, and input costs to determine the final operating configuration, bill of materials, and, ultimately, the capital, operating, and unit costs.

  4. Structure-Based Predictive model for Coal Char Combustion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurt, R.; Colo, J [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering; Essenhigh, R.; Hadad, C [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Stanley, E. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-09-24

    During the third quarter of this project, progress was made on both major technical tasks. Progress was made in the chemistry department at OSU on the calculation of thermodynamic properties for a number of model organic compounds. Modelling work was carried out at Brown to adapt a thermodynamic model of carbonaceous mesophase formation, originally applied to pitch carbonization, to the prediction of coke texture in coal combustion. This latter work makes use of the FG-DVC model of coal pyrolysis developed by Advanced Fuel Research to specify the pool of aromatic clusters that participate in the order/disorder transition. This modelling approach shows promise for the mechanistic prediction of the rank dependence of char structure and will therefore be pursued further. Crystalline ordering phenomena were also observed in a model char prepared from phenol-formaldehyde carbonized at 900{degrees}C and 1300{degrees}C using high-resolution TEM fringe imaging. Dramatic changes occur in the structure between 900 and 1300{degrees}C, making this char a suitable candidate for upcoming in situ work on the hot stage TEM. Work also proceeded on molecular dynamics simulations at Boston University and on equipment modification and testing for the combustion experiments with widely varying flame types at Ohio State.

  5. Modeling on the Effect of Coal Loads on Kinetic Energy of Balls for Ball Mills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Bai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a solution for the detection and control of coal loads that is more accurate and convenient than those currently used. To date, no research has addressed the use of a grinding medium as the controlled parameter. To improve the accuracy of the coal load detection based on the kinetic energy of balls in a tubular ball mill, a Discrete Element Method (DEM model for ball kinematics based on coal loads is proposed. The operating process for a ball mill and the ball motion, as influenced by the coal quality and the coal load, was analyzed carefully. The relationship between the operating efficiency of a coal pulverizing system, coal loads, and the balls’ kinetic energy was obtained. Origin and Matlab were utilized to draw the variation of parameters with increasing coal loads in the projectile and cascading motion states. The parameters include the balls’ real-time kinetic energy, the friction energy consumption, and the mill’s total work. Meanwhile, a method of balanced adjacent degree and a physical experiment were proposed to verify the considerable effect of the balls’ kinetic energy on coal loads. The model and experiment results indicate that a coal load control method based on the balls’ kinetic energy is therefore feasible for the optimized operation of a coal pulverizing system.

  6. Dynamic mathematical model and numerical calculation method on spontaneous combustion of loose coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Hu(文虎)

    2003-01-01

    Through the experiment of coal spontaneous combustion and relationship particle size with oxidation character of loose coal, some calculation formula of characteristic parameters is got in the process of coal spontaneous combustion. According to these theories of porous medium hydrodynamics, mass transfer and heat transfer, mathematical models of air leak field, oxygen concentration field and temperature field are set up. Through experimental and theoretical analysis, 3-D dynamic mathematical model of coal spontaneous combustion is set up. The method of ascertaining boundary condition of model is analyzed, and finite difference method is adopted to solve 2-D mathematical model.

  7. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  8. Engineering of Ground for Liquefaction Mitigation Using Granular Columnar Inclusions: Recent Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Krishna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Liquefaction was the most hazardous damage during an earthquake. Ground improvement techniques were employed to mitigate liquefaction hazards. Most common methods to improve engineering properties of soils are densification, reinforcement, grouting/mixing and drainage. Among various remedial measures available, installation of columnar granular inclusions is the most widely adopted method for liquefaction mitigation. Approach: Columnar granular inclusions function as drains and permit rapid dissipation of earthquake induced pore pressures by virtue of their high permeability. Results: One of the chief benefits of ground treatment with granular piles is the densification of in situ ground by which the in-situ properties of the ground get modified to mitigate liquefaction potential. Further, the very high deformation modulus and stiffness of the granular pile material provide reinforcement for the in situ soil and offer another mechanism to mitigate liquefaction. The study described briefly the phenomenon of liquefaction and the associated features. A short discussion on various ground improvement methods available for liquefaction mitigation was presented highlighting the importance of columnar inclusions. Construction methods of different granular columnar inclusions like sand compaction piles/ granular piles were discussed briefly. Recent developments in the research of columnar granular inclusions as liquefaction counter measures were presented in relation to physical, numerical and analytical model studies. Conclusion/Recommendations: Columnar granular inclusions were demonstrated to be very effective for liquefaction mitigation in different case studies and research investigations.

  9. HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process materials: chemical analysis and biological testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and biological testing of coal liquefaction materials obtained from the Hydrocarbon Research, Incorporated (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. Materials from both an experimental run and a 25-day demonstration run were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsorption column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biological activity was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay and an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity. Where applicable, the results obtained from the analyses of the CTSL materials have been compared to those obtained from the integrated and nonintegrated two-stage coal liquefaction processes. 18 refs., 26 figs., 22 tabs.

  10. HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process materials: chemical analysis and biological testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and biological testing of coal liquefaction materials obtained from the Hydrocarbon Research, Incorporated (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. Materials from both an experimental run and a 25-day demonstration run were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsorption column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biological activity was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay and an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity. Where applicable, the results obtained from the analyses of the CTSL materials have been compared to those obtained from the integrated and nonintegrated two-stage coal liquefaction processes. 18 refs., 26 figs., 22 tabs.

  11. Survey for making a data book on the new energy technological development. Waste-fueled power generation, solar heat utilization, geothermal power generation, clean energy vehicles, coal liquefaction/gasification, and traversal themes; Shin energy gijutsu kaihatsu kankei data shu sakusei chosa. Haikibutsu hatsuden, taiyonetsu riyo, chinetsu hatsuden, clean energy jidosha, sekitan ekika, gas ka oyobi odanteki tema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The paper concerns the following six fields among the fields of new energy technology: the waste-fueled power generation, solar heat utilization, geothermal power generation, clean energy vehicles, coal liquefaction and coal gasification. The up-to-date data made public were collected and classified into the following items: outline of systems, specific examples of the introduction in Japan and other countries, policies/laws and rules/subsidy systems, production quantity/actual amount of introduction/projected amount of introduction (target), cost, terminology, listing of main related companies and groups, etc. Further, arrangement was traversally conducted on the outlook of the energy introduction by the Japanese government and measures taken for development of new energy by Japan and other countries. Namely, the items of the book are as follows: classification of new energy, outlook for energy supply/demand, cost of new energy technology (power generation) and outlook for the introduction, menus of buying surplus electricity of electric companies, policies/laws and rules/subsidy systems concerning the new energy introduction in Japan and overseas, and a list of organizations engaged in the new energy technological development.

  12. Survey for preparing the database for R and D of new engines. Waste power generation, solar heat system, geothermal power generation, clean energy vehicle, coal liquefaction/gasification, and combined systems; Shin energy gijutsu kaihatsu kankei data shu sakusei chosa. Haikibutsu hatsuden, taiyonetsu riyo, chinetsu hatsuden, clean energy jidosha, sekitan ekika gas ka oyobi odanteki tema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The present developmental conditions and issues of new energies are systematically arranged for effective promotion of their diffusion. One hundred and forty six general waste power generation facilities of 558,000kW are in operation in 1995, and among them 89 facilities supplies 1,080 GWh to power companies. 50 industrial waste power facilities of 247,000kW are in operation. 20,000 solar systems and 180,000 hot water heaters are in operation in 1995. Commercial geothermal power generation facilities of 490,000kW and private ones of 36,000kW are in operation. Introduction of expensive clean energy vehicles is making very slow progress. The pilot study on bituminous coal liquefaction is in promotion mainly by NEDO. The experiment of entrained bed coal gasification in Nakoso was successfully completed, and development of a commercial plant is to be expected. Power rates of 10 power companies were reduced in 1996, and unit purchase prices of surplus power of photovoltaic and wind power generation were also revised. The new menu and unit purchase price were announced in 1996 for surplus power of waste power generation and fuel cell. 67 figs., 284 tabs.

  13. Mathematical modeling of maize starch liquefaction catalyzed by α-amylases from Bacillus licheniformis: effect of calcium, pH and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presečki, Ana Vrsalović; Blažević, Zvjezdana Findrik; Vasić-Rački, Ðurđa

    2013-01-01

    The first step of starch hydrolysis, i.e. liquefaction has been studied in this work. Two commercial α-amylases from Bacilllus licheniformis, known as Termamyl and Liquozyme have been used for this purpose. Using starch as the substrate, kinetics of both enzymes has been determined at optimal pH and temperature (pH 7, T = 80 °C) and at 65 °C and pH 5.5. Michaelis-Menten model with uncompetitive product inhibition was used to describe enzyme kinetics. Mathematical models were developed and validated in the repetitive batch and fed-batch reactor. Enzyme inactivation was described by the two-step inactivation model. All experiments were performed with and without calcium ions. The activities of both tested amylases are approximately one hundred times higher at 80 °C than at 65 °C. Lower inactivation rates of enzymes were noticed in the experiments performed at 65 °C without the addition of calcium than in the experiments at 80 °C. Calcium ions in the reaction medium significantly enhance amylase stability at 80 °C and pH 7. At other process conditions (65 °C and pH 5.5) a weaker calcium stabilizing effect was detected.

  14. Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Progress in a study to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids is reported.

  15. Low-rank coal research. Quarterly report, January--March 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    This document contains several quarterly progress reports for low-rank coal research that was performed from January-March 1990. Reports in Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research are in Flue Gas Cleanup, Waste Management, and Regional Energy Policy Program for the Northern Great Plains. Reports in Advanced Research and Technology Development are presented in Turbine Combustion Phenomena, Combustion Inorganic Transformation (two sections), Liquefaction Reactivity of Low-Rank Coals, Gasification Ash and Slag Characterization, and Coal Science. Reports in Combustion Research cover Fluidized-Bed Combustion, Beneficiation of Low-Rank Coals, Combustion Characterization of Low-Rank Coal Fuels, Diesel Utilization of Low-Rank Coals, and Produce and Characterize HWD (hot-water drying) Fuels for Heat Engine Applications. Liquefaction Research is reported in Low-Rank Coal Direct Liquefaction. Gasification Research progress is discussed for Production of Hydrogen and By-Products from Coal and for Chemistry of Sulfur Removal in Mild Gas.

  16. Forecasting Model of Coal Requirement Quantity Based on Grey System Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙继湖

    2001-01-01

    The generally used methods of forecasting coal requirement quantity include the analogy method, the outside-push method and the cause-effect analysis method. However, the precision of forecasting results using these methods is lower. This paper uses the grey system theory, and sets up grey forecasting model GM (1, 3) to coal requirement quantity. The forecasting result for the Chinese coal requirement quantity coincides with the actual values, and this shows that the model is reliable. Finally, this model are used to forecast Chinese coal requirement quantity in the future ten years.

  17. Development of standards and a cost model for coal agglomeration and related studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S.G.; Kuby, O.A.; Korosi, F.A.; Paulin, M.O.

    1982-02-26

    Several topics concerning coal agglomeration and fixed-bed coal gasification, as they relate to an agglomeration-process development program presently being performed for the Department of Energy, are discussed in this report. Specific topics include an examination of the performance of coals in fixed-bed gasifiers, the development of properties' standards by which agglomerates produced in the program may be compared, the development of a cost model to judge the economic feasibility of coal agglomeration for potential users and the maximum binder levels to be considered in the program, the definition of a suitable briquette size for coal gasification, and a study of upgrading methods at the mines to improve agglomeration. Extensive property data and the results of a number of special tests on six coals (Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coal, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal, Wyoming Bighorn subbituminous coal, Montana Rosebud No. 14 subbituminous coal, North Dakota Indian Head lignite and Pennsylvania Nanoth anthracite coal) and on FMC formcoke and Simplex briquettes are reported.

  18. Analytical Model of Water Flow in Coal with Active Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemek, Jakub; Stopa, Jerzy

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents new analytical model of gas-water flow in coal seams in one dimension with emphasis on interactions between water flowing in cleats and coal matrix. Coal as a flowing system, can be viewed as a solid organic material consisting of two flow subsystems: a microporous matrix and a system of interconnected macropores and fractures. Most of gas is accumulated in the microporous matrix, where the primary flow mechanism is diffusion. Fractures and cleats existing in coal play an important role as a transportation system for macro scale flow of water and gas governed by Darcy's law. The coal matrix can imbibe water under capillary forces leading to exchange of mass between fractures and coal matrix. In this paper new partial differential equation for water saturation in fractures has been formulated, respecting mass exchange between coal matrix and fractures. Exact analytical solution has been obtained using the method of characteristics. The final solution has very simple form that may be useful for practical engineering calculations. It was observed that the rate of exchange of mass between the fractures and the coal matrix is governed by an expression which is analogous to the Newton cooling law known from theory of heat exchange, but in present case the mass transfer coefficient depends not only on coal and fluid properties but also on time and position. The constant term of mass transfer coefficient depends on relation between micro porosity and macro porosity of coal, capillary forces, and microporous structure of coal matrix. This term can be expressed theoretically or obtained experimentally. W artykule zaprezentowano nowy model matematyczny przepływu wody i gazu w jednowymiarowej warstwie węglowej z uwzględnieniem wymiany masy między systemem szczelin i matrycą węglową. Węgiel jako system przepływowy traktowany jest jako układ o podwójnej porowatości i przepuszczalności, składający się z mikroporowatej matrycy węglowej oraz z

  19. Research on 3D Modeling and Visualization of Coal Pillars for Surface Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ya-jing; MAO Shan-jun; YAO Ji-ming; JIANG Yun-feng

    2006-01-01

    In order to safely exploit coal resource, protection coal pillars must be prepared in coal mines. Some correlative parameters of protection coal pillar are calculated by Drop face and Drop line methods. Models of protecting surface objects and coal pillars are established by TIN modeling and object-oriented technique. By using ACCESS2000as the database and the VC++ and OpenGL as the language, the calculation of protective coal pillars is realized and the 3D-visulizaiton system for protected objects on ground surface and for coal pillars is developed. The system can obtain the data of characteristic points on the surface interactively from the digitized mine topography map,constructing 3D model automatically. It can also obtain the interrelated parameters of the coal seam and drill hole data from existing geological surveying database to calculate the location, surface area and the total coal columns. The whole process can be computed quickly and accurately. And the 3D visualization system was applied in a mine, showing that the system solve the problem of complex calculation,not only realized the automatic 3D mapping and visualization of coal pillars for buildings protection , but also greatly improves the working efficiency.

  20. Microbial liquefaction of peat for the production of synthetic fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunasekaran, M.

    1988-01-01

    Objectives of this study were: to evaluate the potential of using various microorganisms to hydrolyse and liquify peat; to determine the optimal conditions for peat hydrolysis and liquefaction; to study the co-metabolizable substances; to separate the compounds present in liquified peat by alumina and silica acid chromatography and capillary gas chromatography; and to identify the compounds in liquified peat by capillary GC-Mass spectrometry. Organisms used in the study include: Coprinus comatus, Coriolus hirsutus, Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Lenzites trabea, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Pleurotus ostreatus, P. sapidus, Polyporus adjustus, Neurospora sitophila, Rhizophus arrhizus, Bacillus subtilis, Acinetobacter sp. and Alcaligenes sp. The fungi were maintained and cultivated in potato dextrose agar at 30 C. The bacteria were maintained in nutrient agar at 30 C. We have also initiated work on coal solubilization in addition to the studies on peat liquefaction. A relatively new substratum or semi-solid base for culture media called Pluronic F-127, or Polyol (BASF, New Jersey). Objectives of this study were: (1) to study the growth patterns of Candida ML 13 on pluronic as substratum; (2) to determine the rate of microbial coal solubilization on pluronic F-127 amended in different growth media; (3) to separate the mycelial mat of Candida ML 13 from unsolubilized coal particles and solubilized coal products from pluronic F-127; (4) to determine the effects of pH on microbial coal solubilization in pluronic F-127 media; (5) the effect of concentration of pluronic F-127 in media on coal solubilization; and, (6) to study the role of extracellular factors secreted by Candida ML 13 on coal solubilization in pluronic F-127 media. Results are discussed. 4 refs.

  1. Modelling of coal combustion enhanced through plasma-fuel systems in full-scale boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.S. Askarova; Z. Jankoski; E.I. Karpenko; E.I. Lavrischeva; F.C. Lockwood; V.E. Messerle; A.B. Ustimenko [al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan). Department of Physics

    2005-07-01

    Plasma activation promotes more effective and environmental friendly low-rank coal combustion. This work presents numerical modelling results of plasma thermochemical preparation of pulverized coal for ignition and combustion in the furnace of a utility boiler. Two kinetic mathematical models were used in the investigation of the processes of air-fuel mixture plasma activation, ignition and combustion. A 1D kinetic code, PLASMA-COAL, calculates the concentrations of species, temperatures and velocities of treated coal-air mixtures in a burner incorporating a plasma source. It gives initial data for 3D-modeling of power boilers furnaces by the code FLOREAN. A comprehensive image of plasma activated coal combustion processes in a furnace of pulverised coal fired boiler was obtained. The advantages of the plasma technology are clearly demonstrated. 15 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Free report from Liquefaction Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    The technical report Proceedings From the 2nd U.S.-Japan Workshop on Liquefaction, Large Ground Deformation and Their Effects on Lifelines is available free of charge from the National Center for Earthquake Engineering Research, headquartered at the State University of New York at Buffalo. The 499-page proceedings contain more than 30 reports on case studies of liquefaction and earthquake-induced ground deformation from previous earthquakes in the U.S. and Japan.

  3. Secondary liquefaction in ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of producing ethanol by fermentation, said method comprising a secondary liquefaction step in the presence of a themostable acid alpha-amylase or, a themostable maltogenic acid alpha-amylase.......The invention relates to a method of producing ethanol by fermentation, said method comprising a secondary liquefaction step in the presence of a themostable acid alpha-amylase or, a themostable maltogenic acid alpha-amylase....

  4. Modeling polychlorinated biphenyl sorption isotherms for soot and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantunen, A.P.K.; Koelmans, A.A.; Jonker, M.T.O. [University of Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    Sorption isotherms (pg-ng/L) were measured for 11 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) of varying molecular planarity from aqueous solution to two carbonaceous geosorbents, anthracite coal and traffic soot. All isotherms were reasonably log-log-linear, but smooth for traffic soot and staircase-shaped for coal, to which sorption was stronger and more nonlinear. The isotherms were modeled using seven sorption models, including Freundlich, (dual) Langmuir, and Polanyi-Dubinin-Manes (PDM). PDM provided the best combination of reliability and mechanistically-interpretable parameters. The PDM normalizing factor Z appeared to correlate negatively with sorbate molecular volume, dependent on the degree of molecular planarity. The modeling results supported the hypothesis that maximum adsorption capacities (Q{sub max}) correlate positively with the sorbent's specific surface area. Q{sub max} did not decrease with increasing sorbate molecular size, and adsorption affinities clearly differed between the sorbents. Sorption was consistently stronger but not less linear for planar than for nonplanar PCBs, suggesting surface rather than pore sorption.

  5. Coal demonstration plants. Quarterly report, January-March 1979. [US DOE-supported

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    Progress in US DOE-supported demonstration plants for the gasification and liquefaction of coal is reported: company, contract number, process description and flowsheet, history and progress in the current quarter. Related projects involve coal feeders, lock hoppers, values, etc. for feeding coal into high pressure systems, coal grinding equipment and measuring and process control instrumentation. (LTN)

  6. A new SOx simulation model of coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yonghua; Chen Hongwei; Zhen Zhi; Feng Zhaoxing; Dong Jianxun [North China Electric Power University, Baoding (China)

    2003-07-01

    It is very important to study the emission of pollutants from a coal combustion device, and we consider the best way is to use numerical simulation for such a study. By using a mathematical model with a post-processing method and based on combustion simulation, this paper reports the calculation of the SOx distribution in a power plant boiler furnace. For the formation of SOx, a conventional chemical reaction model is adopted, and according to the principles of reaction dynamics, a model for the SOx formation is also put forward. It is the first time the calculation and on-site testing an 800MW-unit boiler have been combined in China. The test and calculation results show that the model is reasonable, and such a study will be valuable as a reference for boiler design and clean operation. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Conditional Methods in Modeling CO2 Capture from Coal Syngas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry N. Saulov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gasification of coal or biomass with in-situ CO2 capture is an emerging technology aiming to address the problem of climate change. Development of a CO2 sorbent with desirable properties and understanding the behavior of such a material in carbonation/calcination reactions is an important part of developing the technology. In this paper, we report experimental results describing the carbonation behavior of three synthetic CaO-based sorbents. We also present a physically-based model of the reactive transport processes in sorbent particles, which have complicated pore structures. This modeling is based on the conditional approach (i.e., conditional moment closure (CMC, which has proven to be successful in modeling reactive transport phenomena in porous media. The model predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Simulation of DME synthesis from coal syngas by kinetics model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, H.M.; Lee, S.J.; Yoo, Y.D.; Yun, Y.S.; Kim, H.T. [Ajou University, Suwon (Republic of Korea)

    2009-05-15

    DME (Dimethyl Ether) has emerged as a clean alternative fuel for diesel. In this study it is developed a simulation model through a kinetics model of the ASPEN plus simulator, performed to detect operating characteristics of DME direct synthesis. An overall DME synthesis process is referenced by experimental data of 3 ton/day (TPD) coal gasification pilot plant located at IAE in Korea. Supplying condition of DME synthesis model is equivalently set to 80 N/m{sup 3} of syngas which is derived from a coal gasification plant. In the simulation it is assumed that the overall DME synthesis process proceeds with steady state, vapor-solid reaction with DME catalyst. The physical properties of reactants are governed by Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) EOS in this model. A reaction model of DME synthesis is considered that is applied with the LHHW (Langmuir-Hinshelwood Hougen Watson) equation as an adsorption-desorption model on the surface of the DME catalyst. After adjusting the kinetics of the DME synthesis reaction among reactants with experimental data, the kinetics of the governing reactions inner DME reactor are modified and coupled with the entire DME synthesis reaction. For validating simulation results of the DME synthesis model, the obtained simulation results are compared with experimental results: conversion ratio, DME yield and DME production rate. Then, a sensitivity analysis is performed by effects of operating variables such as pressure, temperature of the reactor, void fraction of catalyst and H{sub 2}/CO ratio of supplied syngas with modified model. According to simulation results, optimum operating conditions of DME reactor are obtained in the range of 265-275{sup o}C and 60 kg/cm{sup 2}. And DME production rate has a maximum value in the range of 1-1.5 of H{sub 2}/CO ratio in the syngas composition.

  9. Seismic liquefaction potential assessment by using relevance vector machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pijush Samui

    2007-01-01

    Determining the liquefaction potential of soil is important in earthquake engineering.This study proposes the use of the Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) to determine the liquefaction potential of soil by using actual cone penetration test(CPT) data.RVM is based on a Bayesian formulation of a linear model with an appropriate prior that results in a sparse representation.The results are compared with a widely used artificial neural network(ANN) model.Overall,the RVM shows good performance and is proven to be more accurate than the ANN model.It also provides probabilistic output.The model provides a viable tool for earthquake engineers to assess seismic conditions for sites that are susceptible to liquefaction.

  10. THE OPTIMUM MODEL AND ITS DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM OF COAL QUALITY BALANCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟祥瑞; 舒航

    1999-01-01

    The meaning and significance of coal quality balance are summarized in this paper. Practical steps concerning constructing the synthetic tech-economic model and its decision support system of coal quality balance using the optimization technology of inverse recurrence of established initializing parameters are also introduced. The principles and methods as being applied in the model system development and procedure construction are discussed accordingly.

  11. Coal conversion. 1979 technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-09-01

    Individual reports are made on research programs which are being conducted by various organizations and institutions for the commercial development of processes for converting coal into products that substitute for these derived from oil and natural gas. Gasification, liquefaction, and demonstration processes and plants are covered. (DLC)

  12. Literature survey of properties of synfuels derived from coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, T. W.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.; Clark, J. S.

    1980-02-01

    A literature survey of the properties of synfuels for ground-based gas turbine applications is presented. Four major concepts for converting coal into liquid fuels are described: solvent extraction, catalytic liquefaction, pyrolysis, and indirect liquefaction. Data on full range syncrudes, various distillate cuts, and upgraded products are presented for fuels derived from various processes, including H-coal, synthoil, solvent-refined coal, donor solvent, zinc chloride hydrocracking, co-steam, and flash pyrolysis. Some typical ranges of data for coal-derived low Btu gases are also presented.

  13. The asymmetric effect of coal price on the China's macro economy using NARDL model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, J. C.; Yang, M. C.

    2016-08-01

    The present work endeavors to explore the asymmetric effect of coal price on the China's macro economy by applying nonlinear autoregressive distributed lag (NARDL) model for the period of January 2005 to June 2015. The obtained results indicate that the coal price has a strong asymmetric effect on China's macro economy in the long-run. Namely one percent increase in coal price leads to 0.6194 percent of the China's macro economy increase; and while the coal price is reduces by 1 percent, the China's macro economy will decrease by 0.008 percent. These data indicate that when coal price rises, the effect on China's macro economy is far greater than the price decline. In the short-run, coal price fluctuation has a positive effect on the China's macro economy.

  14. Modeling of hyperbaric filtration and dewatering of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Sushil

    Generalized models have been developed for continuous hyperbaric filtration to evaluate cake formation, filter capacity/filter area, cake dewatering, air consumption and residual cake saturation/residual cake moisture. Emphasis has been placed on cake structure as being a major controlling factor in fine coal dewatering by filtration. The effects of cake structure, as defined by the distributions of pore size and shape, have been reviewed. A simple model relating cake structure to feed particle characteristics is presented and applied to a practical case of fine coal dewatering. A binary packing model has been proposed to explain the existence of compressibility in non-compressible cakes. This model proposes an inner open-structure in the main cake, with the inner layer being compressible. The variation in the inner cake porosity with applied pressure has been used to explain the change in specific cake resistance and filter capacity (solids cake throughput). Process simulations have been conducted for a single stage and a two stage process, wherein the original feed has been split into a coarse fraction and a fine fraction (and then each fraction processed separately). The process simulations for a two stage process show a lot of promise as this leads to a lowering of the required filter area and the residual cake moisture. The required filter area increases, while the residual cake moisture decreases as the cut size for the two stage process is increased. However, the advantages of a two stage process are adversely affected by an inefficient separation process, which leads to an increased filter area and a higher residual cake moisture and the two stage process approaches a single stage process.

  15. Thermochemical Equilibrium Model of Synthetic Natural Gas Production from Coal Gasification Using Aspen Plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Barrera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of synthetic or substitute natural gas (SNG from coal is a process of interest in Colombia where the reserves-to-production ratio (R/P for natural gas is expected to be between 7 and 10 years, while the R/P for coal is forecasted to be around 90 years. In this work, the process to produce SNG by means of coal-entrained flow gasifiers is modeled under thermochemical equilibrium with the Gibbs free energy approach. The model was developed using a complete and comprehensive Aspen Plus model. Two typical technologies used in entrained flow gasifiers such as coal dry and coal slurry are modeled and simulated. Emphasis is put on interactions between the fuel feeding technology and selected energy output parameters of coal-SNG process, that is, energy efficiencies, power, and SNG quality. It was found that coal rank does not significantly affect energy indicators such as cold gas, process, and global efficiencies. However, feeding technology clearly has an effect on the process due to the gasifying agent. Simulations results are compared against available technical data with good accuracy. Thus, the proposed model is considered as a versatile and useful computational tool to study and optimize the coal to SNG process.

  16. Experimental and Modeling Investigation of Coal Gasification in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CuiLin; ShenYouting; 等

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to study the process of coal gasification.Non-linear programming techniques are used to determine the value of the model parameters that depends on coal species and experimental conditions and thus minimize the difference between experimental results and model predictions.Model predictions being in good agreement with the experimental results show that this method of combining model with experiment is effective for modeling complex processes.

  17. A genetic-algorithm approach for assessing the liquefaction potential of sandy soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sen

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The determination of liquefaction potential is required to take into account a large number of parameters, which creates a complex nonlinear structure of the liquefaction phenomenon. The conventional methods rely on simple statistical and empirical relations or charts. However, they cannot characterise these complexities. Genetic algorithms are suited to solve these types of problems. A genetic algorithm-based model has been developed to determine the liquefaction potential by confirming Cone Penetration Test datasets derived from case studies of sandy soils. Software has been developed that uses genetic algorithms for the parameter selection and assessment of liquefaction potential. Then several estimation functions for the assessment of a Liquefaction Index have been generated from the dataset. The generated Liquefaction Index estimation functions were evaluated by assessing the training and test data. The suggested formulation estimates the liquefaction occurrence with significant accuracy. Besides, the parametric study on the liquefaction index curves shows a good relation with the physical behaviour. The total number of misestimated cases was only 7.8% for the proposed method, which is quite low when compared to another commonly used method.

  18. Modeling forest ecosystem changes resulting from surface coal mining in West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Brown; Andrew J. Lister; Mary Ann Fajvan; Bonnie Ruefenacht; Christine Mazzarella

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this project is to assess the effects of surface coal mining on forest ecosystem disturbance and restoration in the Coal River Subbasin in southern West Virginia. Our approach is to develop disturbance impact models for this subbasin that will serve as a case study for testing the feasibility of integrating currently available GIS data layers, remote...

  19. Mathematical Modelling of the Fixed-Bed Biomass-Coal Co-Gasification Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donskoy Igor G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers mathematical modelling of downdraft fixed-bed gasification process of the mixtures of woody biomass and coal. Biomass/coal ratio, biomass moisture content and air equivalence ratio are varying parameters. Boundaries of the efficient gasification regimes are estimated.

  20. Determination of Japanese buyer valuation of metallurgical coal characteristics by hedonic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerner, R.J. [Griffith University, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia). Graduate School of Management

    2001-09-01

    Considerable efforts have been devoted by econometric researchers to understanding Japanese steel mill (JSM) metallurgical coal valuation policies, and whether such policies disadvantage coal exporters. Much of this research has employed the hedonic regression modeling technique of Rosen and examines the significance of coal quality in establishing market price. This article discusses shortcomings in some such modeling studies, and presents results of additional hedonic modeling to buttress findings of previous work suggesting that cross-cultural bargaining factors rather than coal quality explain lower prices for Australian coals in Japanese market settlements. Policy changes that might be effective in ameliorating bilateral market distortions arising from oligopsony characteristics exhibited in JSM contract settlements are then explored. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Modeling and Simulation of Coal Loading by Cutting Drum in Flat Seams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gospodarczyk, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a methodology for modeling work of a coal shearer work in low longwall coal seams where the wall height does not exceed 1.5 m. In such conditions, an important issue is the process of loading the ore from shearer cutting drum on an armored face conveyor and selection of appropriate kinematic parameters to avoid choking. Discrete element method was used to model coal seam. This method allows for efficient simulation of physical systems composed of many separate components. Methods and algorithms based on existing theoretical models were developed to imitate coal cutting process. Main focus of analysis was put on coal stream movement for different variants of the shearer construction and kinematic parameters.

  2. Modelling of pyrolysis of coal-biomass blends using thermogravimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadhukhan, A.K.; Gupta, P.; Goyal, T.; Saha, R.K. [National Institute for Technology, Durgapur (India).

    2008-11-15

    The primary objective of this work was to develop an appropriate model to explain the co-pyrolysis behaviour of lignite coal-biomass blends with different proportions using a thermogravimetric analyzer. A new parallel-series kinetic model was proposed to predict the pyrolysis behaviour of biomass over the entire pyrolysis regime, while a kinetic model similar to that of Anthony and Howard (Anthony, D.B., Howard, J.B., 1976. Coal devolatilization and hydrogasification. AIChE Journal 22(4), 625-656) was used for pyrolysis of coal. Analysis of mass loss history of blends showed an absence of synergistic effect between coal and biomass. Co-pyrolysis mass-loss profiles of the blends were predicted using the estimated kinetic parameters of coal and biomass. Excellent agreement was found between the predicted and the experimental results.

  3. Modelling of pyrolysis of coal-biomass blends using thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Anup Kumar; Gupta, Parthapratim; Goyal, Tripurari; Saha, Ranajit Kumar

    2008-11-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop an appropriate model to explain the co-pyrolysis behaviour of lignite coal-biomass blends with different proportions using a thermogravimetric analyzer. A new parallel-series kinetic model was proposed to predict the pyrolysis behaviour of biomass over the entire pyrolysis regime, while a kinetic model similar to that of Anthony and Howard [Anthony, D.B., Howard, J.B., 1976. Coal devolatilization and hydrogasification. AIChE Journal 22(4), 625-656] was used for pyrolysis of coal. Analysis of mass loss history of blends showed an absence of synergistic effect between coal and biomass. Co-pyrolysis mass-loss profiles of the blends were predicted using the estimated kinetic parameters of coal and biomass. Excellent agreement was found between the predicted and the experimental results.

  4. Simulation of coal pyrolysis in plasma jet by CPD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y.; Xie, K.; Zhu, S.; Fletcher, T.H. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). State Key Lab. of C1 Chemistry and Technology

    2001-12-01

    Reaction of coal in a plasma jet is complex and extremely rapid, and acetylene and carbon monoxide are the main products in the pyrolysis gas. Coal pyrolysis is assumed as the first step reaction when coal is injected into hot plasma jet with initial average temperature of 3700 K. Chemical percolation devolatalization (CPD) is employed first to simulate this procedure in mechanism. The calculation results indicate coal pyrolysis rate in plasma jet is very fast and the retention time of coal staying in reactor is only several milliseconds. Comparing the calculation with experiment result, it was concluded that the CPD agree with the experiment well when the coal feed rate is larger than about 2.0 g s{sup -1}. As the coal feed rate was increased, the average temperature of coal particle during staying in reactor was reduced and the residual time became long, but it was not found that the residual time influenced the coal conversion evidently. 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. A strategic investment planning model for China's coal and electricity delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuby, M. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Geography); Neuman, S. (Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)); Zhang Chuntai (State Planning Commission, Beijing (China). Economic Inst.) (and others)

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a strategic investment planning model for China's coal and electricity delivery system, including the related sectors of the economy that offer non-transport strategies for reducing the demand for coal transportation. The model has been developed for policy analysis by the World Bank and China's State Planning Commission in order to deal with China's recurring coal and electricity shortages. Various aspects of the modeling system are described, including its precedents in the literature, its strengths and weaknesses, and its applications. An Appendix contains the mathematical formulation of the model, which involves mixed-integer programming. (author).

  6. Analysis of engineering cycles power, refrigerating and gas liquefaction plant

    CERN Document Server

    Haywood, R W

    1991-01-01

    Extensively revised, updated and expanded, the fourth edition of this popular text provides a rigorous analytical treatment of modern energy conversion plant. Notable for both its theoretical and practical treatment of conventional and nuclear power plant, and its studies of refrigerating and gas-liquefaction plant. This fourth edition now includes material on topics of increasing concern in the fields of energy 'saving' and reduction of environmental pollution. This increased coverage deals specifically with the following areas: CHP (cogeneration) plant, studies of both gas and coal burning p

  7. A novel model for cost performance evaluation of pulverized coal injected into blast furnace based on effective calorific value

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐润生; 张建良; 左海滨; 李克江; 宋腾飞; 邵久刚

    2015-01-01

    The combustion process of pulverized coal injected into blast furnace involves a lot of physical and chemical reactions. Based on the combustion behaviors of pulverized coal, the conception of coal effective calorific value representing the actual thermal energy provided for blast furnace was proposed. A cost performance evaluation model of coal injection was built up for the optimal selection of various kinds of coal based on effective calorific value. The model contains two indicators: coal effective calorific value which has eight sub-indicators and coal injection cost which includes four sub-indicators. In addition, the calculation principle and application of cost performance evaluation model in a Chinese large-scale iron and steel company were comprehensively introduced. The evaluation results finally confirm that this novel model is of great significance to the optimal selection of blast furnace pulverized coal.

  8. Experimental studies on the group ignition of a cloud of coal particles: Volume 2, Pyrolysis and ignition modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annamalai, K.; Ryan, W.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objectives of this work are to formulate a model to simulate transient coal pyrolysis, ignition, and combustion of a cloud of coal particles and to compare results of the program with those reported in the literature elsewhere.

  9. Royal Society, Discussion on New Coal Chemistry, London, England, May 21, 22, 1980, Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    A discussion of new coal chemistry is presented. The chemical and physical structure of coal is examined in the first section, including structural studies of coal extracts, metal and metal complexes in coal and coal microporosity. The second section presents new advances in applied coal technology. The development of liquid fuels and chemicals from coal is given especial emphasis, with papers on the Sasol Synthol process, the Shell-Koppers gasification process, liquefaction and gasification in Germany, the Solvent Refined Coal process, the Exxon Donor Solvent liquefaction process and the Mobil Methanol-to-Gasoline process. Finally, some developments that will be part of the future of coal chemistry in the year 2000 are examined in the third section, including coal-based chemical complexes and the use of coal as an alternative source to oil for chemical feedstocks.

  10. A Reduced Order Model for the Design of Oxy-Coal Combustion Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Rowan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxy-coal combustion is one of the more promising technologies currently under development for addressing the issues associated with greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. Oxy-coal combustion involves combusting the coal fuel in mixtures of pure oxygen and recycled flue gas (RFG consisting of mainly carbon dioxide (CO2. As a consequence, many researchers and power plant designers have turned to CFD simulations for the study and design of new oxy-coal combustion power plants, as well as refitting existing air-coal combustion facilities to oxy-coal combustion operations. While CFD is a powerful tool that can provide a vast amount of information, the simulations themselves can be quite expensive in terms of computational resources and time investment. As a remedy, a reduced order model (ROM for oxy-coal combustion has been developed to supplement the CFD simulations. With this model, it is possible to quickly estimate the average outlet temperature of combustion flue gases given a known set of mass flow rates of fuel and oxidant entering the power plant boiler as well as determine the required reactor inlet mass flow rates for a desired outlet temperature. Several cases have been examined with this model. The results compare quite favorably to full CFD simulation results.

  11. Advanced char burnout models for the simulation of pulverized coal fired boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Severin; S. Wirtz; V. Scherer [Ruhr-University, Bochum (Germany). Institute of Energy Plant Technology (LEAT)

    2005-07-01

    The numerical simulation of coal combustion processes is widely used as an efficient means to predict burner or system behaviour. In this paper an approach to improve CFD simulations of pulverized coal fired boilers with advanced coal combustion models is presented. In simple coal combustion models, first order Arrhenius rate equations are used for devolatilization and char burnout. The accuracy of such simple models is sufficient for the basic aspects of heat release. The prediction of carbon-in-ash is one aspect of special interest in the simulation of pulverized coal fired boilers. To determine the carbon-in-ash levels in the fly ash of coal fired furnaces, the char burnout model has to be more detailed. It was tested, in how far changing operating conditions affect the carbon-in-ash prediction of the simulation. To run several test cases in a short time, a simplified cellnet model was applied. To use a cellnet model for simulations of pulverized coal fired boilers, it was coupled with a Lagrangian particle model, used in CFD simulations, too. 18 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Liquefaction Microzonation of Babol City Using Artificial Neural Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrokhzad, F.; Choobbasti, A.J.; Barari, Amin

    2012-01-01

    that will be less susceptible to damage during earthquakes. The scope of present study is to prepare the liquefaction microzonation map for the Babol city based on Seed and Idriss (1983) method using artificial neural network. Artificial neural network (ANN) is one of the artificial intelligence (AI) approaches...... is proposed in this paper. To meet this objective, an effort is made to introduce a total of 30 boreholes data in an area of 7 km2 which includes the results of field tests into the neural network model and the prediction of artificial neural network is checked in some test boreholes, finally the liquefaction...

  13. Assessment of Research Needs for Coal Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, S.S.

    1983-08-01

    The Coal Combustion and Applications Working Group (CCAWG), at the request of J.W. Mares (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy) and A.W. Trivelpiece (Director, Office of Energy Research), has reviewed and evaluated the U.S. programs on coal combustion and utilization. The important topical areas of coal gasification and coal liquefaction have been deliberately excluded because R and D needs for these technologies were reviewed previously by the DOE Fossil Energy Research Working Group. The CCAWG studies were performed in order to provide an independent assessment of research areas that affect prospects for augmented coal utilization. In this report, we summarize the findings and research recommendations of CCAWG.

  14. Advanced Direct Liquefaction Concepts for PETC Generic Units - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1997-09-01

    Reported here are the results of Laboratory and Bench- Scale experiments and supporting technical and economic assessments conducted under DOE Contract No. DE- AC22- 91PC91040 during the period April 1, 1997 to June 30, 1997. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, CONSOL, Inc., LDP Associates, and Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. This work involves the introduction into the basic two stage liquefaction process several novel concepts which includes dispersed lower- cost catalysts, coal cleaning by oil agglomeration, and distillate hydrotreating and dewaxing. This report includes a data analysis of the ALC- 2 run which was the second continuous run in which Wyodak Black Thunder coal was fed to a two kg/ h bench- scale unit. One of the objectives of that run was to determine the relative activity of several Mo- based coal impregnated catalyst precursors. The precursors included ammonium heptamolybdate (100 mg Mo/ kg dry coal), which was used alone as well as in combination with ferrous sulfate (1% Fe/ dry coal) and nickel sulfate (50 mg Ni/ kg dry coal). The fourth precursor that was tested was phosphomolybdic acid which was used at a level of 100 mg Mo/ kg dry coal. Because of difficulties in effectively separating solids from the product stream, considerable variation in the feed stream occurred. Although the coal feed rate was nearly constant, the amount of recycle solvent varied which resulted in wide variations of resid, unconverted coal and mineral matter in the feed stream. Unfortunately, steady state was not achieved in any of the four conditions that were run. Earlier it was reported that Ni- Mo catalyst appeared to give the best results based upon speculative steady- state yields that were developed.

  15. A depositional model for the Taylor coal bed, Martin and Johnson counties, eastern Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, W.M.; Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Evans, S.D.; Sirek, N.S.; Warrell, M.; Eble, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the Taylor coal bed in Johnson and Martin counties, eastern Kentucky, using field and petrographic techniques to develop a depositional model of the coal bed. Petrography and chemistry of the coal bed were examined. Multiple benches of the Taylor coal bed were correlated over a 10 km distance. Three sites were studied in detail. The coal at the western and eastern sites were relatively thin and split by thick clastic partings. The coal at the central site was the thickest and unsplit. Two major clastic partings are included in the coal bed. Each represents a separate and distinct fluvial splay. The Taylor is interpreted to have developed on a coastal plain with periodic flooding from nearby, structurally-controlled fluvial systems. Doming is unlikely due to the petrographic and chemical trends, which are inconsistent with modern Indonesian models. The depositional history and structural and stratigraphic setting suggest contemporaneous structural influence on thickness and quality of the Taylor coal bed in this area.

  16. Modeling of time dependent subsidence for coal and ore deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryszard Hejmanowski

    2015-01-01

    Coal and ore underground mining generates subsidence and deformation of the land surface. Those defor-mations may cause damage to buildings and infrastructures. The environmental impact of subsidence will not be accepted in the future by the society in many countries. Especially there, where the mining regions are densely urbanized, the acceptance of the ground deformations decreases every year. The only solution is to limit the subsidence or its impact on the infrastructure. The first is not rentable for the mining industry, the second depends on the precise subsidence prediction and good preventing management involved in the mining areas. The precision of the subsidence prediction depends strictly on the mathematical model of the deformation phenomenon and on the uncertainty of the input data. The subsidence prediction in the geological conditions of the raw materials used to be made on the basis of numerical modeling or the stochastic models. A modified solution of the stochastic model by Knothe will be presented in the paper. The author focuses on the precise description of the deposit shape and on the time dependent displacements of the rock mass. A two parameters’ time function has been introduced in the algorithm.

  17. Triple Medium Physical Model of Post Fracturing High-Rank Coal Reservoir in Southern Qinshui Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiqi Liu; Shuxun Sang; Qipeng Zhu; Jiefang Zhang; Hefeng Gao; Huihu Liu; Lixing Lin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, influences on the reservoir permeability, the reservoir architecture and the fluid flow pattern caused by hydraulic fracturing are analyzed. Based on the structure and production fluid flow model of post fracturing high-rank coal reservoir, Warren-Root Model is improved. A new physical model that is more suitable for post fracturing high-rank coal reser-voir is established. The results show that the width, the flow conductivity and the permeability of hydraulic fractures are much larger than natural fractures in coal bed reservoir. Hydraulic frac-ture changes the flow pattern of gas and flow channel to wellbore, thus should be treated as an independent medium. Warrant-Root Model has some limitations and can’t give a comprehensive interpretation of seepage mechanism in post fracturing high-rank coal reservoir. Modified War-rant-Root Model simplifies coal bed reservoir to an ideal system with hydraulic fracture, ortho-gonal macroscopic fracture and cuboid matrix. Hydraulic fracture is double wing, vertical and symmetric to wellbore. Coal bed reservoir is divided into cuboids by hydraulic fracture and fur-ther by macroscopic fractures. Flow behaviors in coal bed reservoir are simplified to three step flows of gas and two step flows of water. The swap mode of methane between coal matrix and macroscopic fractures is pseudo steady fluid channeling. The flow behaviors of methane to well-bore no longer follow Darcy’s Law and are mainly affected by inertia force. The flow pattern of water follows Darcy’s Law. The new physical model is more suitable for post fracturing high-rank coal reservoir.

  18. Soil liquefaction issues at mining dumps at the Lausitz; Bodenverfluessigungsprobleme bei Bergbaukippen in der Lausitz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudla, Wolfram [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Bergbau und Spezialtiefbau; Weissbach, Joerg; Szczyrba, Sebastian [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    For more than 100 years in the Lausitz brown coal is dismantled in open-cast mining. During this time, land with an ara of several 100 km{sup 2} was left as a dump or open-cast mining lakes. These areas are redeveloped by the Lausitz and Central-German Mining Administration Company (Senftenberg, Federal Republic of Germany). The authors of the contribution under consideration report on soil liquefaction issues in mining dumps in the Lausitz. This contribution focuses on a renovation to prevent the sudden transitions from a solid to a liquefied state since 1990 as well as on soil liquefaction on interior dumps at Lausitz. Furthermore, the reasons of the increase in soil pore water pressure and the boundary conditions for liquefaction are described.

  19. Phase equilibrium data for development of correlations for coal fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, R.L. Jr.; Gasem, K.A.M.; Darwish, N.A.; Raff, A.M.

    1991-02-01

    The overall objective of the authors' work is to develop accurate predictive methods for representations of vapor-liquid equilibria in systems encountered in coal-conversion processes. The objectives pursued in the present project include: (1) Measurements of binary vapor-liquid phase behavior data for selected solute gases (e.g., C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 4}) in a series of paraffinic, naphthenic, and aromatic hydrocarbon solvents to permit evaluations of interaction parameters in models for phase behavior. Solubilities of the gases in the liquid phase have been determined. (2) Evaluation of existing equations of state and other models for representations of phase behavior in systems of the type studied experimentally; development of new correlation frameworks as needed. (3) Generalization of the interaction parameters for the solutes studied to a wide spectrum of heavy solvents; presentation of final results in formats useful in the design/optimization of coal liquefaction processes.

  20. Combined ANN prediction model for failure depth of coal seam floors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lian-guo; ZHANG Zhi-kang; LU Yin-long; YANG Hong-bo; YANG Sheng-qiang; SUN Jian; ZHANG Jin-yao

    2009-01-01

    Failure depth of coal seam floors is one of the important considerations that must be kept in mind when mining is carried out above a confined aquifer. In order to study the factors that affect the failure depth of coal seam floors such as mining depth, coal seam pitch, mining thickness, workface length and faults, we propose a combined artificial neural networks (ANN) prediction model for failure depth of coal seam floors on the basis of existing engineering data by using genetic algorithms to train the ANN. A practical engineering application at the Taoyuan Coal Mine indicates that this method can effectively determine the network struc-ture and training parameters, with the predicted results agreeing with practical measurements. Therefore, this method can be applied to relevant engineering projects with satisfactory results.

  1. Determination of Liquefaction Potential using Artificial Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrokhzad, F; Choobbasti, A.J; Barari, Amin

    2011-01-01

    The authors propose an alternative general regression model based on neural networks, which enables analysis of summary data obtained by liquefaction analysis according to usual methods. For that purpose, the data from some thirty boreholes made during field investigations in Babol, in the Iranian...

  2. Combining a Spatial Model and Demand Forecasts to Map Future Surface Coal Mining in Appalachia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Strager

    Full Text Available Predicting the locations of future surface coal mining in Appalachia is challenging for a number of reasons. Economic and regulatory factors impact the coal mining industry and forecasts of future coal production do not specifically predict changes in location of future coal production. With the potential environmental impacts from surface coal mining, prediction of the location of future activity would be valuable to decision makers. The goal of this study was to provide a method for predicting future surface coal mining extents under changing economic and regulatory forecasts through the year 2035. This was accomplished by integrating a spatial model with production demand forecasts to predict (1 km2 gridded cell size land cover change. Combining these two inputs was possible with a ratio which linked coal extraction quantities to a unit area extent. The result was a spatial distribution of probabilities allocated over forecasted demand for the Appalachian region including northern, central, southern, and eastern Illinois coal regions. The results can be used to better plan for land use alterations and potential cumulative impacts.

  3. Marine impact on liquefaction processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osch, M.M.E. van; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Oldenburg, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade the interest for liquefied natural gas (LNG) is growing. A tendency is to produce and transport LNG on large floating vessels. One important choice in designing such a vessel is the liquefaction process. Several processes have been developed in recent years, ranging from mixed ref

  4. Study on Model for Assessmentof Quality Management Performance of Coal Preparation Plant in CIMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the method to calculate intangible quality cost is put forward for the first time based on theproduction and management characteristics of coal preparation plant. A model for assessment of quality manage-ment performance of coal preparation plant is established on the ground of quality cost. By using of CIMS integra-tion environment the strategy to carry out the model and the application example are also offered. It provides a newand feasible way to assess performance quality management of coal preparation plant.

  5. Neuronet Modelling of the Processes of Budgeting and Use of Labour Resources at Coal Mining Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hlіnska Olha M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers issues of efficient budgeting and use of labour resources at coal mining enterprises. It proves expediency of use of modern neuronet, namely, multilayer perceptron, for solution of tasks of modelling the process of budgeting and use of labour resources at coal mining enterprises. It shows that Statistika is the best software package for creation of neuronets of the multilayer perceptron architecture. On the basis of analysis and comparative characteristic the article selects the topology and builds a neuronet model of budgeting and use of labour resources at coal mining enterprises.

  6. Results of a modeling workshop concerning development of the Beluga coal resource in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of a modeling workshop concerning development of the Beluga coal resource in Alaska. The workshop was facilitated by the AEA Group...

  7. Detailed model for practical pulverized coal furnaces and gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philips, S.D.; Smoot, L.D.

    1989-08-01

    The need to improve efficiency and reduce pollutant emissions commercial furnaces has prompted energy companies to search for optimized operating conditions and improved designs in their fossil-fuel burning facilities. Historically, companies have relied on the use of empirical correlations and pilot-plant data to make decisions about operating conditions and design changes. The high cost of collecting data makes obtaining large amounts of data infeasible. The main objective of the data book is to provide a single source of detailed three-dimensional combustion and combustion-related data suitable for comprehensive combustion model evaluation. Five tasks were identified as requirements to achieve the main objective. First, identify the types of data needed to evaluate comprehensive combustion models, and establish criteria for selecting the data. Second, identify and document available three-dimensional combustion data related to pulverized coal combustion. Third, collect and evaluate three-dimensional data cases, and select suitable cases based on selection criteria. Fourth, organize the data sets into an easy-to-use format. Fifth, evaluate and interpret the nature and quality of the data base. 39 refs., 15 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. Liquefaction, flow, and associated ground failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youd, T. Leslie

    1973-01-01

    Ambiguities in the use of the term liquefaction and in defining the relation between liquefaction and ground failure have led to encumbered communication between workers in various fields and between specialists in the same field, and the possibility that evaluations of liquefaction potential could be misinterpreted or misapplied. Explicit definitions of liquefaction and related concepts are proposed herein. These definitions, based on observed laboratory behavior, are then used to clarify the relation between liquefaction and ground failure. Soil liquefaction is defined as the transformation of a granular material from a solid into a liquefied state as a consequence of increased pore-water pressures. This definition avoids confusion between liquefaction and possible flow-failure conditions after liquefaction. Flow-failure conditions are divided into two types: (1) unlimited flow if pore-pressure reductions caused by dilatancy during flow deformation are not sufficient to solidify the material and thus arrest flow, and (2) limited flow if they are sufficient to solidify the material after a finite deformation. After liquefaction in the field, unlimited flow commonly leads to flow landslides, whereas limited flow leads at most to lateral-spreading landslides. Quick-condition failures such as loss of bearing capacity form a third type of ground failure associated with liquefaction.

  9. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Final report, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The Advanced Concepts for Direct Coal Liquefaction program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 1991 to develop technologies that could significantly reduce the cost of producing liquid fuels by the direct liquefaction of coal. The advanced 2-stage liquefaction technology that was developed at Wilsonville over the past 10 years has contributed significantly toward decreasing the cost of producing liquids from coal to about $33/bbl. It remains, however, the objective of DOE to further reduce this cost to a level more competitive with petroleum based products. This project, among others, was initiated to investigate various alternative approaches to develop technologies that might ultimately lead to a 25 % reduction in cost of product. In this project a number of novel concepts were investigated, either individually or in a coupled configuration that had the potential to contribute toward meeting the DOE goal. The concepts included mature technologies or ones closely related to them, such as coal cleaning by oil agglomeration, fluid coking and distillate hydrotreating and dewaxing. Other approaches that were either embryonic or less developed were chemical pretreatment of coal to remove oxygen, and dispersed catalyst development for application in the 2-stage liquefaction process. This report presents the results of this project. It is arranged in four sections which were prepared by participating organizations responsible for that phase of the project. A summary of the overall project and the principal results are given in this section. First, however, an overview of the process economics and the process concepts that were developed during the course of this program is presented.

  10. Structure Based Predictive Model for Coal Char Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Robert Essenhigh; Christopher Hadad

    2000-12-30

    This unique collaborative project has taken a very fundamental look at the origin of structure, and combustion reactivity of coal chars. It was a combined experimental and theoretical effort involving three universities and collaborators from universities outside the U.S. and from U.S. National Laboratories and contract research companies. The project goal was to improve our understanding of char structure and behavior by examining the fundamental chemistry of its polyaromatic building blocks. The project team investigated the elementary oxidative attack on polyaromatic systems, and coupled with a study of the assembly processes that convert these polyaromatic clusters to mature carbon materials (or chars). We believe that the work done in this project has defined a powerful new science-based approach to the understanding of char behavior. The work on aromatic oxidation pathways made extensive use of computational chemistry, and was led by Professor Christopher Hadad in the Department of Chemistry at Ohio State University. Laboratory experiments on char structure, properties, and combustion reactivity were carried out at both OSU and Brown, led by Principle Investigators Joseph Calo, Robert Essenhigh, and Robert Hurt. Modeling activities were divided into two parts: first unique models of crystal structure development were formulated by the team at Brown (PI'S Hurt and Calo) with input from Boston University and significant collaboration with Dr. Alan Kerstein at Sandia and with Dr. Zhong-Ying chen at SAIC. Secondly, new combustion models were developed and tested, led by Professor Essenhigh at OSU, Dieter Foertsch (a collaborator at the University of Stuttgart), and Professor Hurt at Brown. One product of this work is the CBK8 model of carbon burnout, which has already found practical use in CFD codes and in other numerical models of pulverized fuel combustion processes, such as EPRI's NOxLOI Predictor. The remainder of the report consists of detailed

  11. Model documentation coal market module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This report documents the approaches used in developing the Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of the coal market module`s three submodules. These are the Coal Production Submodule (CPS), the Coal Export Submodule (CES), the Coal Expert Submodule (CES), and the Coal Distribution Submodule (CDS).

  12. Probabilistic liquefaction hazard analysis at liquefied sites of 1956 Dunaharaszti earthquake, in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Győri, Erzsébet; Gráczer, Zoltán; Tóth, László; Bán, Zoltán; Horváth, Tibor

    2017-04-01

    Liquefaction potential evaluations are generally made to assess the hazard from specific scenario earthquakes. These evaluations may estimate the potential in a binary fashion (yes/no), define a factor of safety or predict the probability of liquefaction given a scenario event. Usually the level of ground shaking is obtained from the results of PSHA. Although it is determined probabilistically, a single level of ground shaking is selected and used within the liquefaction potential evaluation. In contrary, the fully probabilistic liquefaction potential assessment methods provide a complete picture of liquefaction hazard, namely taking into account the joint probability distribution of PGA and magnitude of earthquake scenarios; both of which are key inputs in the stress-based simplified methods. Kramer and Mayfield (2007) has developed a fully probabilistic liquefaction potential evaluation method using a performance-based earthquake engineering (PBEE) framework. The results of the procedure are the direct estimate of the return period of liquefaction and the liquefaction hazard curves in function of depth. The method combines the disaggregation matrices computed for different exceedance frequencies during probabilistic seismic hazard analysis with one of the recent models for the conditional probability of liquefaction. We have developed a software for the assessment of performance-based liquefaction triggering on the basis of Kramer and Mayfield method. Originally the SPT based probabilistic method of Cetin et al. (2004) was built-in into the procedure of Kramer and Mayfield to compute the conditional probability however there is no professional consensus about its applicability. Therefore we have included not only Cetin's method but Idriss and Boulanger (2012) SPT based moreover Boulanger and Idriss (2014) CPT based procedures into our computer program. In 1956, a damaging earthquake of magnitude 5.6 occurred in Dunaharaszti, in Hungary. Its epicenter was located

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF HEXANE SOLUBLE OILS FROM LIQUEFACTION OF TWO BITUMINOUS COALS%两种烟煤的液化及液化油的组成特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱继升; LawrenceP.Norcio

    2001-01-01

    Two high-volatile subbituminous coals, DECS-6 of US and Yanzhou coal of China, were liquefied or co-liquefied with HDPE or PVC at 400?℃, 30?min under 7?MPa hydrogen. The results show that Yanzhou coal is easier to be liquefied or co-liquefied than DECS-6 coal under the experimental conditions used and the hexane-soluble oil from Yanzhou coal has more low boiling point fractions than that from DECS-6 coal. The aromatics in hexane soluble oils mainly consist of alkylbeneze, alkylnaphthalene, phenanthrene-,pyrene-, chrysene-, and benzopyrene- compounds, the polars mainly compose of compounds containing O, S and N etc.%在400 ℃、30 min、7 MPa冷氢压条件下两种煤液化结果表明,兖州煤比DECS-6(美国煤)煤更容易液化或共液化,这可能与兖州煤硫含量比较高有关,但DECS-6煤的油收率要高于兖州煤,表明EDCS-6煤容易裂解生成小分子化合物。同种煤液化油的沸点分布特征基本一致。UV(紫外光谱)特征表明,液化油中单环芳烃主要为烷基取代苯类化合物,二环芳烃组分主要是烷基取代萘类化合物,三环芳烃主要为渺位缩合的菲类化合物,四环芳烃主要为芘、屈艹类化合物,五环芳烃以苯并芘类化合物为主,而极性化合物可归属为含O、S、N的极性芳香化合物。

  14. Modeling and Prediction of Coal Ash Fusion Temperature based on BP Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Suzhen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal ash is the residual generated from combustion of coal. The ash fusion temperature (AFT of coal gives detail information on the suitability of a coal source for gasification procedures, and specifically to which extent ash agglomeration or clinkering is likely to occur within the gasifier. To investigate the contribution of oxides in coal ash to AFT, data of coal ash chemical compositions and Softening Temperature (ST in different regions of China were collected in this work and a BP neural network model was established by XD-APC PLATFORM. In the BP model, the inputs were the ash compositions and the output was the ST. In addition, the ash fusion temperature prediction model was obtained by industrial data and the model was generalized by different industrial data. Compared to empirical formulas, the BP neural network obtained better results. By different tests, the best result and the best configurations for the model were obtained: hidden layer nodes of the BP network was setted as three, the component contents (SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO were used as inputs and ST was used as output of the model.

  15. Thermodynamic and rheological properties of solid-liquid systems in coal processing. Quarterly technical report: March 1, 1993 to May 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabadi, V.N.; Ilias, S. [North Carolina A and T State Univ., Greensboro, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1993-11-01

    The viscosity of coal derived liquids is an important property that is required for the design of the coal liquefaction processes, as well as for understanding the flow characteristics of coal liquids. Coal liquids are complex undefined mixtures and boil over a wide range of temperatures. One method of characterizing coal liquids is to treat coal liquids as a continuous distribution of molecular weights. Upon review of the literature for viscosity correlations, the authors quickly concluded that there is no accurate method available that may be successfully applied to coal liquids. They generally believe that correlations based on molecular structure of materials are superior to those that use solely the characterization parameters such as refractive index, critical properties, density, boiling points etc. A few correlations in the literature do consider molecular structures in viscosity determinations. Using important features in these correlations, they set out to develop a new viscosity correlation that would apply to model coal aromatic compounds, their mixtures and finally to coal derived liquids themselves. The correlation for pure compounds and mixtures has been developed and is discussed below. Attempts are now being made to apply this to coal derived liquids.

  16. SHENHUA PLANS EIGHT COAL-TO-OIL PROJECTS IN NORTH CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ China's biggest coal producer, Shenhua Group, plans to convert coal into 30 million tons ofoil by the year 2020 in four northern provinces. Three of eight projects planned will be completed by 2010, Zhang Yuzhuo, in charge of Shenhua's coal liquefaction business, told an energy forum hosted by the China Energy Research Society in Beijing on June 15.

  17. A dynamic optimization model of an integrated coal supply chain system and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Hong-jun; ZHOU Mei-hua; LIU Man-zhi; ZHANG Yu; HUANG Yan-bo

    2009-01-01

    Various nodes, logistics, capital flows, and information flows are required to make systematic decisions concerning the operation of an integrated coal supply system. We describe a quantitative analysis of such a system. A dynamic optimization model of the supply chain is developed. It has achieved optimal system profit under conditions guaranteeing a certain level of customer satisfaction. Applying this model to coal production of the Xuzhou coal mines allows recommendations for a more systematic use of washing and processing, transportation and sale resources for commercial co al production to be made. The results show that this model, which is scientific and effective, has an important value for making reasonable decisions related to complex coal enterprises.

  18. Simulation modeling of fluidized bed coal gasifier for new topping cycle system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piao, Guilin; Yamazaki, Ryohei; Mori, Shigekatsu; Fujima, Yukihisa [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-12-31

    A new topping cycle coal power generation process is to be developed as a Japanese national project of high efficiency power generation process of coal. This process consists of a combination system of a pressurized bubbling fluidized-bed coal gasifier and a pressurized bubbling fluidized-bed combustor in series. To evaluate the performances and also to determine specifications and operation parameters of this process, it is extremely important to analyze the behavior and the performance of this system by a reasonable simulation model. A simulation model of this new process is developed in this paper. It is demonstrated by calculated results from this model that the carbon conversion in the gasifier, the composition and the heating value of produced gas are strongly dependent on operating conditions. Heat recovery by the steam in the combustor is also estimated as the function of coal feed rate.

  19. Model test of helical angle effect on coal loading performance of shear drum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kuidong Gao; Changlong Du; Songyong Liu; Lin Fu

    2012-01-01

    The work presented in this paper focuses on improving coal loading performance of shear drum.Employing the similarity theory,we carried out a dimensional analysis of the correlation parameters which influence coal loading performance of shear drum.On the basis of similarity criterion,proportional relationship between the model and the prototype was taken on the condition of taking 1/3 as the similarity coefficient.Besides taking 1600 mm drum as the prototype,four helical angle models of shearer drums (15°,18°,21°,24°) were developed.Simultaneously,based on an established cutting test-bed,coal loading performance tests for the four drums were carried out at the same drum rotational and haulage speeds.After analyzing the data of coal-loading performance and torque,we concluded that:both the coal loading performance and torque vary along the track of the parabola with the opening side facing downwards;the best coal loading performance arises when the helical angle is at 19.3°,while the biggest torque arises at 22.1°;and the coal loading performance had nonlinear relationship with the torque.

  20. Mathematical modeling for coupled solid elastic-deformation and gas leak flow in multi-coal-seams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙培德

    2002-01-01

    Based on the new viewpoint of solid and gas interaction mechanics, gas leakage in a double deformable coal seam can be understood. That is, under the action of geophysical fields, the methane flow in a double deformable coal seam can be essentially considered to be compressible with time-dependent and mixed permeation and diffusion through a pore-cleat deformable heterogeneous and anisotropy medium. Based on this new viewpoint, a coupled mathematical model for coal seam deformation and gas leakage in a double coal seam was formulated and numerical simulations for gas emission from the coal seam are presented. It is found that coupled models might be closer to reality.

  1. Coal technology program. Progress report, September 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-10-01

    A successful hydrocarbonization experiment at 300 psi of hydrogen and approximately 1050/sup 0/F was completed with Illinois No. 6 coal that had been chemically pretreated with aqueous CaO and NaOH. In pressurized carbonization, one successful experiment at approximately 1100/sup 0/F and 415 psi of methane was completed with vacuum distillation residue from the H-Coal process. In the thick section pressure vessel work, procedures are being developed with the DATA TRAK heat treating facility to allow preparation of relatively large heat treated samples of 2 /sup 1///sub 4/ Cr-1 Mo steel. In the Gas-Fired Potassium Boiler Project, the potassium system installation was completed, the fill and drain tank was filled with potassium, and the checkout of the instruments and controls was nearly completed. The Coal-Fired Alkali Metal Power System Design Study was completed and a draft report describing the design was issued. Cesium was selected as the working fluid for the topping cycle. For the reference design, the furnace operated at atmospheric pressure and the cycle conditions for the power conversion systems were 1500/sup 0/F (1089 K) to 900/sup 0/F (756 K) for the topping cycle and 2400 psi (16.5 MPa)/1000/sup 0/F (811 K)/1000/sup 0/F (811 K) to 1 /sup 1///sub 2/ in. Hg (5079 Pa) for the steam system. ORNL was requested by DOE to develop a program for testing coal feeders currently under development. Work was continued on process modeling, the preparation of a Synthetic Fuels Research Digest, a survey of industrial coal conversion equipment capabilities, and studies of flash hydropyrolysis, hot gas purification processes, processes for heat recovery, and hydrogen production by the steam/molten iron process. Process and program analysis studies were continued on low-Btu gasification, direct combustion, advanced power conversion systems, liquefaction, high-Btu gasification, in-situ gasification, and coal beneficiation.

  2. Matter-elements model and application for prediction of coal and gas outburst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Shou-jian; XU Jiang; TAO Yun-qi; CHENG Ming-jun

    2009-01-01

    The theory and method of extenics were applied to establish classical field mat-ter elements and segment field matter elements for coal and gas outburst. A mat-ter-element model for prediction was established based on five matter-elements, which in-cluded gas pressure, types of coal damage, coal rigidity, initial speed of methane diffusion and in-situ stress. Each index weight was given fairly and quickly through the improved analytic hierarchy process, which need not carry on consistency checks, so accuracy of assessment can be improved.

  3. Damage Model of Brittle Coal-Rock and Damage Energy Index of Rock Burst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹光志; 张东明; 魏作安; 李东伟

    2003-01-01

    Based on the mechanical experiment of brittle coal-rock and the damage mechanical theory, a damage model was established. Coal-Rock damage mechanical characteristic was researched. Furthermore, interior energy transformation mechanism of rock was analyzed from the point of view of damage mechanics and damage energy release rate of brittle coal rock was derived. By analyzing the energy transformation of rock burst, a new conception, damage energy index of rock burst, was put forward. The condition of rock burst was also established.

  4. A coupled DEM and LBM model for simulation of outbursts of coal and gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Xue; Liang Yuan; Junfeng Wang; Yucang Wang; Jun Xie

    2015-01-01

    An outburst of coal and gas is a major hazard in underground coal mining. It is generally accepted that an outburst occurs when certain conditions of stress, coal gassiness and physical–mechanical properties of coal are met. Outbursting is recognized as a two-step process, i.e., initiation and development. In this paper, we present a fully-coupled solid and fluid code to model the entire process of an outburst. The deformation, failure and fracture of solid (coal) are modeled with the discrete element method, and the flow of fluid (gas and water) such as free flow and Darcy flow are modeled with the lattice Boltzmann method. These two methods are coupled in a two-way process, i.e., the solid part provides a moving boundary condition and transfers momentum to the fluid, while the fluid exerts a dragging force upon the solid. Gas desorption from coal occurs at the solid–fluid boundary, and gas diffusion is implemented in the solid code where particles are assumed to be porous. A simple 2D example to simulate the process of an outburst with the model is also presented in this paper to demonstrate the capability of the coupled model.

  5. Modelling of Rayleigh-type seam waves in disturbed coal seams and around a coal mine roadway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essen, Katja; Bohlen, Thomas; Friederich, Wolfgang; Meier, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Wave propagation in coal seams is numerically modelled in order to identify approaches towards the reconnaissance beyond the heading face of an advancing coal mine roadway. Complete synthetic wavefields including P-SV body waves and Rayleigh-type seam waves are calculated using a Green's function approach for simple, laterally homogeneous models and a parallel elastic 2-D/3-D finite difference modelling code for more realistic geometries. For a simple three-layer model the wavefield within the seam is dominated by a fundamental Rayleigh seam mode symmetrical with respect to the centre of the seam on the vertical component and antisymmetrical on the horizontal component. If the seam contains an interleaved dirt band with higher velocities and density, higher modes dominate the wave propagation, depending on the thickness of the dirt band. Wave propagation in laterally inhomogeneous coal seam models with disturbances like seam ends, faults, thinning, washouts and seam splitting is strongly influenced by the type of disturbance. Amplitudes of seam waves reflected from these disturbances strongly depend on the fault throw and the degree of thinning or washout. In some cases, conversion to higher modes can occur. In all investigated models, those Rayleigh seam wave phases are preferably reflected, which have frequencies above the fundamental mode Airy phase. Lower frequency phases are preferably transmitted. However, seam waves are not reflected from a seam splitting disturbance. Thus a detection of seam splitting with reflected seam waves appears to be impossible. FD computations for 3-D models containing an ending tunnel parallel to the seam and a source beyond the heading face of the tunnel show that seam waves are converted into Rayleigh waves at the tunnel face. They propagate along the surface of the tunnel and interfere with the seam waves propagating beside the tunnel. This effect has to be taken into account for subsequent treatment of experimental data, where

  6. Novel fragmentation model for pulverized coal particles gasification in low temperature air thermal plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Rastko D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New system for start-up and flame support based on coal gasification by low temperature air thermal plasma is planned to supplement current heavy oil system in Serbian thermal power plants in order to decrease air pollutions emission and operational costs. Locally introduced plasma thermal energy heats up and ignites entrained coal particles, thus starting chain process which releases heat energy from gasified coal particles inside burner channel. Important stages during particle combustion, such as particle devolatilisation and char combustion, are described with satisfying accuracy in existing commercial CFD codes that are extensively used as powerful tool for pulverized coal combustion and gasification modeling. However, during plasma coal gasification, high plasma temperature induces strong thermal stresses inside interacting coal particles. These stresses lead to “thermal shock” and extensive particle fragmentation during which coal particles with initial size of 50-100 m disintegrate into fragments of at most 5-10 m. This intensifies volatile release by a factor 3-4 and substantially accelerates the oxidation of combustible matter. Particle fragmentation, due to its small size and thus limited influence on combustion process is commonly neglected in modelling. The main focus of this work is to suggest novel approach to pulverized coal gasification under high temperature conditions and to implement it into commercial comprehensive code ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. Proposed model was validated against experimental data obtained in newly built pilot scale D.C plasma burner test facility. Newly developed model showed very good agreement with experimental results with relative error less than 10%, while the standard built-in gasification model had error up to 25%.

  7. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids. Quarterly report No. 3, March 18, 1993--June 17, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Webster, I.A. [Unocal Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The design of industrial catalysts requires that the diffusivity of the reacting species within the catalyst be accurately known. Nowhere is this more important than in the area of coal liquefaction and upgrading of coal liquids. In this area one is faced with the task of processing a number of heavy oils, containing metals and other contaminants, in a variety of process dependent solvents. It is important, therefore, on the basis of predicting catalyst activity, selectivity, and optimizing reactor performance, that the diffusivities of these oil species be accurately known. It is the purpose of this project to provide a correct concept of coal asphaltenes by careful and detailed investigations of asphaltene transport through porous systems under realistic process temperature and pressure conditions. The experimental studies will be coupled with detailed, in-depth statistical and molecular dynamics models intended to provide a fundamental understanding of the overall transport mechanisms.

  8. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids. Quarterly report No. 12, June 18, 1995--September 17, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Webster, I.A. [Unocal Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The design of industrial catalysts requires that the diffusivity of the reacting species within the catalyst be accurately known. Nowhere is this more important than in the area of coal liquefaction and upgrading of coal liquids. In this area one is faced with the task of processing a number of heavy oils, containing metals and other contaminants, in a variety of process dependent solvents. It is important, therefore, on the basis of predicting catalyst activity, selectivity, and optimizing reactor performance, that the diffusivities of these oil species be accurately known. It is the purpose of the project described here to provide such a correct concept of coal asphaltenes by careful and detailed investigations of asphaltene transport through porous systems under realistic process temperature and pressure conditions. The experimental studies will be coupled with detailed, in-depth statistical and molecular dynamics models intended to provide a fundamental understanding of the overall transport mechanisms.

  9. Sulfur retention by ash during coal combustion. Part II. A model of the process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilije Manovic; Borislav Grubor; Mladen Ilic; Branimir Jovancicevic

    2003-07-01

    An overall model for sulfur self-retention in ash during coal particle combustion is developed in this paper. It is assumed that sulfur retention during char combustion occurs due to the reaction between SO{sub 2} and CaO in the form of uniformly distributed non-porous grains. Parametric analysis shows that the process of sulfur self-retention is limited by solid diffusion through the non-porous product layer formed on the CaO grains and that the most important coal characteristics which influence sulfur self-retention are coal rank, content of sulfur forms, molar Ca/S ratio and particle radius. A comparison with the experimentally obtained values in a FB reactor showed that the model can adequately predict the kinetics of the process, the levels of the obtained values of the SSR efficiencies, as well as the influence of temperature and coal particle size.

  10. Sulfur retention by ash during coal combustion. Part II. A model of the process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANIMIR JOVANCICEVIC

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available An overall model for sulfur self-retention in ash during coal particle combustion is developed in this paper. It is assumed that sulfur retention during char combustion occurs due to the reaction between SO2 and CaO in the form of uniformly distributed non-porous grains. Parametric analysis shows that the process of sulfur self-retention is limited by solid difussion through the non-porous product layer formed on the CaO grains and that the most important coal characteristics which influence sulfur self-retention are coal rank, content of sulfur forms, molar Ca/S ratio and particle radius. A comparison with the experimentally obtained values in a FB reactor showed that the model can adequately predict the kinetics of the process, the levels of the obtained values of the SSR efficiencies, as well as the influence of temperature and coal particle size.

  11. A transverse isotropic model for microporous solids: Application to coal matrix adsorption and swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, D. N.; Vandamme, M.; Dangla, P.; Pereira, J.-M.; Vidal-Gilbert, S.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the adsorption-induced swelling in coal is critical for predictable and enhanced coal bed methane production. The coal matrix is a natural anisotropic disordered microporous solid. We develop an elastic transverse isotropic poromechanical model for microporous solids which couples adsorption and strain through adsorption stress functions and expresses the adsorption isotherm as a multivariate function depending on fluid pressure and solid strains. Experimental data from the literature help invert the anisotropic adsorptive-mechanical properties of Brzeszcze coal samples exposed to CO2. The main findings include the following: (1) adsorption-induced swelling can be modeled by including fluid-specific and pressure-dependent adsorption stress functions into equilibrium equations, (2) modeling results suggest that swelling anisotropy is mostly caused by anisotropy of the solid mechanical properties, and (3) the total amount of adsorbed gas measured by immersing coal in the adsorbate overestimates adsorption amount compared to in situ conditions up to ˜20%. The developed fully coupled model can be upscaled to determine the coal seam permeability through permeability-stress relationships.

  12. A simple numerical model to estimate the effect of coal selection on pulverized fuel burnout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, J.K.; Hurt, R.H.; Niksa, S.; Muzio, L.; Mehta, A.; Stallings, J. [Brown University, Providence, RI (USA). Division Engineering

    2003-06-01

    The amount of unburned carbon in ash is an important performance characteristic in commercial boilers fired with pulverized coal. Unburned carbon levels are known to be sensitive to fuel selection, and there is great interest in methods of estimating the burnout propensity of coals based on proximate and ultimate analysis - the only fuel properties readily available to utility practitioners. A simple numerical model is described that is specifically designed to estimate the effects of coal selection on burnout in a way that is useful for commercial coal screening. The model is based on a highly idealized description of the combustion chamber but employs detailed descriptions of the fundamental fuel transformations. The model is validated against data from laboratory and pilot-scale combustors burning a range of international coals, and then against data obtained from full-scale units during periods of coal switching. The validated model form is then used in a series of sensitivity studies to explore the role of various individual fuel properties that influence burnout.

  13. Earthquake Risk - MO 2013 Liquefaction Potential (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Soil liquefaction potential was determined using existing geologic and alluvium maps. Quaternary, Tertiary, and Cretaceous-age sediments, and alluvium deposits are...

  14. Evaluation for Earthquake Liquefaction of Loess Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun; Wang Lanmin; Wang Ping

    2009-01-01

    ugh the sinusoid loading dynamic triaxial test, the liquefaction property of saturated loess and sand selected from a civil airport of Lanzhou, Gansu is examined. Based on the laboratory results, a comprehensive assessment on the earthquake liquefaction potential of the loess and sand is given, using the liquefaction resistance shear stress method and the results of seismic hazard assessment. It is found that under the effect of ground motion with exceedance probability of 10% within 50 years, the loess in the study is more susceptible to liquefaction than sand.

  15. Wave liquefaction in soils with clay content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, Özgür; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of clay content (in silt-clay and sand-clay mixtures) on liquefaction beneath progressive waves. The experiments showed that the influence of clay content is very significant. Susceptibility of silt to liquefaction...... is increased with increasing clay content, up to 30%, beyond which the mixture of silt and clay is not liquefied. Sand may become prone to liquefaction with the introduction of clay, contrary to the general perception that this type of sediment is normally liquefaction resistant under waves....

  16. Numerical Simulation of Oxy-coal Combustion for a Swirl Burner with EDC Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔凯; 刘冰; 吴玉新; 杨海瑞; 吕俊复; 张海

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of oxy-coal combustion for a swirl burner with a specially designed preheating chamber are studied numerically. In order to increase the accuracy in the prediction of flame temperature and igni-tion position, eddy dissipation concept (EDC) model with a skeletal chemical reaction mechanism was adopted to describe the combustion of volatile matter. Simulation was conducted under six oxidant stream conditions with dif-ferent O2/N2/CO2 molar ratios:21/79/0, 30/70/0, 50/50/0, 21/0/79, 30/0/70 and 50/0/50. Results showed that O2 en-richment in the primary oxidant stream is in favor of combustion stabilization, acceleration of ignition and increase of maximum flame temperature, while the full substitution of N2 by CO2 in the oxidant stream delays ignition and decreases the maximum flame temperature. However, the overall flow field and flame shapes in these cases are very similar at the same flow rate of the primary oxidant stream. Combustion characteristics of the air-coal is similar to that of the oxy-coal with 30%O2 and 70%CO2 in the oxidant stream, indicating that the rear condition is suitable for retrofitting an air-coal fired boiler to an oxy-coal one. The swirl burner with a specially designed preheating chamber can increase flame temperature, accelerate ignition and enhance burning intensity of pulverized coal under oxy-coal combustion. Also, qualitative experimental validation indicated the burner can reduce the overall NOx emission under certain O2 enrichment and oxy-coal combustion conditions against the air-coal combustion.

  17. Modeling and numerical analysis of an atypical convective coal drying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stakic, M.; Tsotsas, E. [Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    This work presents modeling and numerical simulation of batch convective coal drying in a deep packed bed after a high-pressure steam treatment (a part of the Fleissner coal drying process). The process is atypical, because ambient air is used to dry, and cool hot particles, while usually, e.g., in the deep packed bed drying of biomaterials, hot air is contacting cold particles. Product-specific data (intraparticle mass transfer, gas-solids moisture equilibrium) for coal (here lignite) are taken from the literature. Available data on coal drying in packed beds of medium height are used for model validation. Then, the model is applied to the considered industrial process. The design point of the process is critically reviewed, and alternatives are developed by systematically simulating the influence of inlet air conditions (temperature, humidity, flow-rate) and coal particle size. This type of analysis is necessary for efficiently scheduling plant dryers, since coal particle size may change, and air inlet temperature and humidity are changing with the ambient conditions.

  18. The two-factor model of evaluating mining rights of coal resources based on options

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-suo; ZOU Shao-hui; SHI Xin-min

    2008-01-01

    MRCR could be regarded as a multi-stage compounding real option, based on option theory, assuming the convenience yield of coal reserves to be constant, built a one-factor model of valuating MRCR with the stochastic value of coal reserves. On the basis of our one-factor model, set up a two-factor model of evaluating MRCR assuming the convenience yield follows the mean-reverting process. When applied to valuate the MRCR of a coalmine, this model gives higher values than the one-factor model and the NPV. This is because the increase of convenience yield can improve the executive opportunity of MRCR.

  19. Proximate analysis based multiple regression models for higher heating value estimation of low rank coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkaya, Ali Volkan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yildiz Technical University, 34349 Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-02-15

    In this paper, multiple nonlinear regression models for estimation of higher heating value of coals are developed using proximate analysis data obtained generally from the low rank coal samples as-received basis. In this modeling study, three main model structures depended on the number of proximate analysis parameters, which are named the independent variables, such as moisture, ash, volatile matter and fixed carbon, are firstly categorized. Secondly, sub-model structures with different arrangements of the independent variables are considered. Each sub-model structure is analyzed with a number of model equations in order to find the best fitting model using multiple nonlinear regression method. Based on the results of nonlinear regression analysis, the best model for each sub-structure is determined. Among them, the models giving highest correlation for three main structures are selected. Although the selected all three models predicts HHV rather accurately, the model involving four independent variables provides the most accurate estimation of HHV. Additionally, when the chosen model with four independent variables and a literature model are tested with extra proximate analysis data, it is seen that that the developed model in this study can give more accurate prediction of HHV of coals. It can be concluded that the developed model is effective tool for HHV estimation of low rank coals. (author)

  20. Modelling of the relationship between trace elements and three species of sulfur in coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Based on the determination of several trace elements in coal particulate of different specific gravity, three-variables regression equations relate the contents of trace elements Be, Cd,Co, Pb, Cu, Ni, As and three species of sulfur in coal were well established. For elements Cd, Co, Pb, Cu and Ni, the regression equations were successfully used for prediction of these trace elements in individual part of coal with different specificgravity. Factor analysis was also used to analyze the data sets.The results showed that a three factor model can interpret the datasets reasonably. Trace elements Cd, Co, Pb, Cu, Ni, inorganic sulfide and total sulfur in coal are high correlated with the first factor. Trace elements Be, sulfate and organic sulfide are high correlated with the second factor and trace elements Cr and As are high correlated with the third factor. The factors can be interpreted by the chemical properties of these elements.

  1. EVALUATION OF BIOMASS AND COAL CO-GASIFICATION OF BRAZILIAN FEEDSTOCK USING A CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Abstract Coal and biomass are energy sources with great potential for use in Brazil. Coal-biomass co-gasification enables the combination of the positive characteristics of each fuel, besides leading to a cleaner use of coal. The present study evaluates the potential of co-gasification of binary coal-biomass blends using sources widely available in Brazil. This analysis employs computational simulations using a reliable thermodynamic equilibrium model. Favorable operational conditions at high temperatures are determined in order to obtain gaseous products suitable for energy cogeneration and chemical synthesis. This study shows that blends with biomass ratios of 5% and equivalence ratios ≤ 0.3 lead to high cold gas efficiencies. Suitable gaseous products for chemical synthesis were identified at biomass ratios ≤ 35% and moisture contents ≥ 40%. Formation of undesirable nitrogen and sulfur compounds was also analyzed.

  2. Multiaxial Formulation and Numerical Implementation of a Constitutive Model for the Evaluation of Large Liquefaction-induced Deformation%砂土液化大变形本构模型的三维化及其数值实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王睿; 张建民; 王刚

    2013-01-01

    Based on the physics of large post-liquefaction deformation of sand and the related elastic-plastic constitutive model suited for two dimensional stress space, mapping rules for plasticity and dilatancy are formulated in three dimensional stress space, and the three dimensional model for the analysis of post-liquefaction deformation of sand is established. According to the features of the model, for the model's numerical implementation into the open-source finite element platform OpenSees, the semi-explicit Cutting Plane algorithm is used as the stress integration scheme, and the Pegasus algorithm is used to locate the stress projection on the bounding surface. Combined with coupled u-p elements, simulations on an undrained cyclic torsional shear test is conducted, and a three dimensional site response analysis is also performed, the simulation and analysis exhibite the model's great capabilities in simulating small to large deformation in the pre-to post-liquefaction regime of sand.%基于砂土液化大变形机理和适用于二维条件的边界面弹塑性本构模型,发展了符合三维应力空间中边界面和剪胀面上的应力映射规则,建立了三维应力空间中砂土液化大变形本构模型.针对模型特点采用半显式的Cutting Plane算法进行应力积分,并采用Pegasus求根算法根据映射规则计算边界面上的应力映射点,在OpenSees开源有限元平台上实现了三维模型的数值化.结合完全耦合的u-p格式有限元单元,对饱和砂土不排水循环扭剪试验进行了模拟,并进行了一个真三维倾斜地基的动力反应分析.计算结果表明模型和所采用的数值算法具有很好的模拟和分析三维条件下砂土液化后大变形的能力.

  3. Quick-response evaluation of energy-related occupational safety and health programs. Task Order 1: mortality study of 50 workers exposed to coal-liquefaction processes at a Union Carbide Plant, Institute, West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, A.

    1977-11-01

    A study was undertaken of 50 Union Carbide employees who had been exposed to high-boiling oils containing polycyclic hydrocarbons, coal tar, and pitch. The exposures occurred as a result of a coal-hydrogenation process initiated at the West Virginia facility in May of 1952. Workers were given annual physical examinations and, beginning in 1955, quarterly skin inspections. A review of the findings does not support the initial hypothesis that those workers exposed to heavy streams of toxic materials who developed cancerous skin lesions were at risk for developing systemic carcinoma. Indeed, there was a marked lack of cancer-related deaths or morbidity in the study group after a latency period of 18 to 20 years. One case of lung cancer was reported in a subject at 60 years of age, after a lifetime of smoking. One case of prostatic cancer was diagnosed at 77 years of age. A review of the five deaths listed indicated all were cardiac related including coronary disease, arteriosclerotic disease, cor pulmonale, and myocardial disease.

  4. Application of Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology for modeling of some Turkish coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Aslan; Y. Cebeci [Cumhuriyet University, Sivas (Turkey). Mining Engineering Department

    2007-01-15

    The aim of our research was to apply Box-Behnken experimental design and response surface methodology for modeling of some Turkish coals. As a base for this study, standard Bond grindability tests were initially done and Bond work indexes (Wi) values were calculated for three Turkish coals. The Box-Behnken experimental design was used to provide data for modeling and the variables of model were Bond work index, grinding time and ball diameter of mill. Coal grinding tests were performed changing these three variables for three size fractions of coals (-3350 + 1700 {mu}m, -1700 + 710 {mu}m and -710 {mu}m). Using these sets of experimental data obtained by mathematical software package (MATLAB 7.1), mathematical models were then developed to show the effect of each parameter and their interactions on product 80% passing size (d{sub 80}). Predicted values of d80 obtained using model equations were in good agreement with the experimental values of d{sub 80} (R{sup 2} value of 0.96 for -3350 + 1700 {mu}m, R{sup 2} value of 0.98 for -1700 + 710 {mu}m and R{sup 2} value of 0.94 for -710 {mu}m). This study proved that Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology could efficiently be applied for modeling of grinding of some Turkish coals. 19 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Refining and end use study of coal liquids I - pilot plant studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erwin, J.; Moulton, D.S.

    1995-12-31

    The Office of Fossil Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center is examining the ways in which coal liquids may best be integrated into the refinery of the 2000-2015 time frame and what performance and emission properties will prevail among the slate of fuels produced. The study consists of a Basic Program administered by Bechtel Group, Inc. to build a linear programming refinery model and provide processing and fuel properties data through subcontractors Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and M.W. Kellogg Company. The model will be used in an Option 1 to devise a slate of test fuels meeting advanced specifications, which will be produced and tested for physical ASTM-type properties, engine performance, and vehicle emissions. Three coal liquids will be included: a direct liquid from bituminous coal, another from subbituminous, and a Fischer-Tropsch indirect liquefaction product. This paper reports the work to date on fractions of the first direct liquid including naphtha hydrotreating, heavy distillate hydrotreating, FCC of the heavy distillate hydrotreater products. Also reported are the first stages of work on the indirect liquefaction wax including feed preparation and FCC tests of blends with petroleum FCC feed.

  6. A Study on the Hydrotreating of Coal Hydroliquefaction Residue and its Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsheng Gao

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydro-conversion of coal hydroliquefaction residue obtained from a 6t/day pilot plant of Shenhua Group in Shanghai was carried out under the hydrotreating condition. The coal hydroliquefaction residue and its product were extracted in sequence with n-hexane, toluene and tetrahydrofuran in a Soxhlet apparatus. The n-hexane soluble fractions increased with the increase of reaction temperature and time. Its amount increased from 14.14% to a maximum of 40.86% under the conditions of 470 °C and 30 min, which meant that moderate extension of coal residence time in the coal hydroliquefaction reactor is beneficial to the increase of oil yield. A 4-lumped kinetic model of coal hydroliquefaction residue hydro-conversion was performed using solubility-based lumped fractions. In the model, the tetrahydrofuran insoluble fractions were classified into two parts: easily reactive part and unreactive part. The kinetic parameters were estimated by a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method and a nonlinear least squares method, and the apparent activation energies were calculated according to the Arrhenius Equation. A large quantity of total catalyst consisting of remained liquefaction catalyst, part of the mineral from raw coal and additive Fe-based catalyst could considerably reduce the apparent activation energy of hydro-conversion for the toluene insoluble/tetrahydrofuran insoluble fractions to 36.79 kJ•mol-1. The calculated values of the model coincided well with the experimental values.

  7. Modeling polychlorinated biphenyl sorption isotherms for soot and coal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jantunen, A.P.K.; Koelmans, A.A.; Jonker, M.T.O.

    2010-01-01

    Sorption isotherms (pg-ng/L) were measured for 11 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) of varying molecular planarity from aqueous solution to two carbonaceous geosorbents, anthracite coal and traffic soot. All isotherms were reasonably log-log-linear, but smooth for traffic soot and staircase-shaped

  8. Hydrogen bonding in asphaltenes and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, N.C.; Tewari, K.C.

    1978-04-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate and to determine the nature of hydrogen bonding and other molecular interactions that occur in asphaltene and coal liquids, and to seek possible correlations between the interactions and the viscosity. The asphaltene components of samples of centrifuged liquid product, CLP, and solvent-refined coal, SRC, supplied by the Pittsburgh Energy Research Center, are isolated by solvent fractionation. The compositions of the asphaltenes are obtained by elemental analysis and the molecular weights by vapor pressure osmometry. The acid/neutral and base components of the asphaltenes are separated and again elemental analysis and molecular weights are obtained. The magnetic resonance, infrared and calorimetric methods are used to determine the strength of hydrogen-bond and other molecular interactions in the fractions isolated. Investigations on the toluene-insoluble and heavy-oil fractions are also carried out. In addition, extensive proton magnetic resonance, near infrared and calorimetric studies are carried out for o-phenylphenol and quinoline, which serve as model compounds for the aromatic phenols and the heteronuclear aromatic base nitrogens, respectively, found in coal liquefaction products. This is the final report, giving a summary of activities under the Contract for the entire period.

  9. A poromechanical model for coal seams saturated with binary mixtures of CH4 and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoosokhan, Saeid; Vandamme, Matthieu; Dangla, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Underground coal bed reservoirs naturally contain methane which can be produced. In parallel of the production of this methane, carbon dioxide can be injected, either to enhance the production of methane, or to have this carbon dioxide stored over geological periods of time. As a prerequisite to any simulation of an Enhanced Coal Bed Methane recovery process (ECBM), we need state equations to model the behavior of the seam when cleats are saturated with a miscible mixture of CH4 and CO2. This paper presents a poromechanical model of coal seams exposed to such binary mixtures filling both the cleats in the seam and the porosity of the coal matrix. This model is an extension of a previous work which dealt with pure fluid. Special care is dedicated to keep the model consistent thermodynamically. The model is fully calibrated with a mix of experimental data and numerical data from molecular simulations. Predicting variations of porosity or permeability requires only calibration based on swelling data. With the calibrated state equations, we predict numerically how porosity, permeability, and adsorbed amounts of fluid vary in a representative volume element of coal seam in isochoric or oedometric conditions, as a function of the pressure and of the composition of the fluid in the cleats.

  10. Industrial-scale Fixed-bed Coal Gasification:Modeling, Simulation and Thermodynamic Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何畅; 冯霄; 李安学; 刘永健

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a process model to simulate the behavior of an industrial-scale pressurized Lurgi fixed-bed coal gasifier using Aspen Plus and General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). Reaction characteristics in the fixed-bed gasifier comprising four sequential reaction zones-drying, pyrolysis, combustion and gasification are respectively modeled. A non-linear programming (NLP) model is developed for the pyrolysis zone to estimate the products composition which includes char, coal gases and distillable liquids. A four-stage model with restricted equilibrium temperature is used to study the thermodynamic equilibrium characteristics and calculate the composi-tion of syngas in the combustion and gasification zones. The thermodynamic analysis shows that the exergetic effi-ciency of the fixed-bed gasifier is mainly determined by the oxygen/coal ratio. The exergetic efficiency of the proc-ess will reach an optimum value of 78.3%when the oxygen/coal and steam/coal mass ratios are 0.14 and 0.80, re-spectively.

  11. An analytical model of the mechanical properties of bulk coal under confined stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G.X.; Wang, Z.T.; Rudolph, V.; Massarotto, P.; Finley, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an analytical model which can be used to relate the structural parameters of coal to its mechanical properties such as elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio under a confined stress condition. This model is developed primarily to support process modeling of coalbed methane (CBM) or CO2-enhanced CBM (ECBM) recovery from coal seam. It applied an innovative approach by which stresses acting on and strains occurring in coal are successively combined in rectangular coordinates, leading to the aggregated mechanical constants. These mechanical properties represent important information for improving CBM/ECBM simulations and incorporating within these considerations of directional permeability. The model, consisting of constitutive equations which implement a mechanically consistent stress-strains correlation, can be used as a generalized tool to study the mechanical and fluid behaviors of coal composites. An example using the model to predict the stress-strain correlation of coal under triaxial confined stress by accounting for the elastic and brittle (non-elastic) deformations is discussed. The result shows a good agreement between the prediction and the experimental measurement. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experiment and mechanism of vibration liquefaction and compacting of saturated bulk solid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The paper studies the probability of industrial application of vibration liquefaction of bulk solid from the opposite point of view, and proposing turning its harmful effects into benefits. Utilizing a new device of vibration liquefaction and by compacting saturated bulk solid, a set of additional device for experiment was designed. These experiments examined the problems related to vibration liquefaction of fine-ores and tailings on the basis of DSA-1 type direct shear apparatus, including models of straight tubes, curved tubes and a sandbox. The changing properties of tailings under vibration and the mechanism of vibration liquefaction and compacting of tailings were studied, and future application of the technique to mines has been put forward.

  13. Low-rank coal research. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--June 30, 1989, including quarterly report, April--June 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  14. Recording-based identification of site liquefaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Yuxian; Zhang Yushan; Liang Jianwen; Ray Ruichong Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Reconnaissance reports and pertinent research on seismic hazards show that liquefaction is one of the key sources of damage to geotechnical and structural engineering systems. Therefore, identifying site liquefaction conditions plays an important role in seismic hazard mitigation. One of the widely used approaches for detecting liquefaction is based on the time-frequency analysis of ground motion recordings, in which short-time Fourier transform is typically used. It is known that recordings at a site with liquefaction are the result of nonlinear responses of seismic waves propagating in the liquefied layers underneath the site. Moreover, Fourier transform is not effective in characterizing such dynamic features as time-dependent frequency of the recordings rooted in nonlinear responses. Therefore, the aforementioned approach may not be intrinsically effective in detecting liquefaction. An alternative to the Fourier-based approach is presented in this study,which proposes time-frequency analysis of earthquake ground motion recordings with the aid of the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), and offers justification for the HHT in addressing the liquefaction features shown in the recordings. The paper then defines the predominant instantaneous frequency (PIF) and introduces the PIF-related motion features to identify liquefaction conditions at a given site. Analysis of 29 recorded data sets at different site conditions shows that the proposed approach is effective in detecting site liquefaction in comparison with other methods.

  15. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, M.; Davis, R.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  16. Recording-based identification of site liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuxian; Zhang, Yushan; Liang, Jianwen; Zhang, Ray Ruichong

    2005-12-01

    Reconnaissance reports and pertinent research on seismic hazards show that liquefaction is one of the key sources of damage to geotechnical and structural engineering systems. Therefore, identifying site liquefaction conditions plays an important role in seismic hazard mitigation. One of the widely used approaches for detecting liquefaction is based on the time-frequency analysis of ground motion recordings, in which short-time Fourier transform is typically used. It is known that recordings at a site with liquefaction are the result of nonlinear responses of seismic waves propagating in the liquefied layers underneath the site. Moreover, Fourier transform is not effective in characterizing such dynamic features as time-dependent frequency of the recordings rooted in nonlinear responses. Therefore, the aforementioned approach may not be intrinsically effective in detecting liquefaction. An alternative to the Fourier-based approach is presented in this study, which proposes time-frequency analysis of earthquake ground motion recordings with the aid of the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), and offers justification for the HHT in addressing the liquefaction features shown in the recordings. The paper then defines the predominant instantaneous frequency (PIF) and introduces the PIF-related motion features to identify liquefaction conditions at a given site. Analysis of 29 recorded data sets at different site conditions shows that the proposed approach is effective in detecting site liquefaction in comparison with other methods.

  17. More efficient operation of coal fired power plants using nonlinear models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulsari, A.; Wemberg, A.; Anttila, A.; Multas, A. [Nonlinear Solution Oy, Turku (Finland)

    2010-07-15

    Abstract: Coal fired power plants should be operated in such a way that the emissions are kept clearly below desired limits and the combustion efficiency is as high as can be achieved. This requires a lot of quantitative knowledge of the effects of the process variables and fuel characteristics on the emissions and efficiency. Mathematical models can be developed with different approaches. Physical models are too slow to be used for on-line process guidance, and require too many assumptions and simplifications. It is feasible to develop empirical or semi-empirical models from normal production data of the power plant. This technical communication explains with an example of a coal fired power plant how nonlinear models are an effective means of determining the best operating conditions at any given load for a given type of coal.

  18. Model experiment of underground coal gasification (UCG) with blind hole type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L. [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China). College of Mineral Resource and Earth Science

    2001-06-01

    The technology of underground coal gasification of the blind-hole type is put forward in order to meet the demands of recovering coal resources under buildings, railways and water bodies. The method of blind-hole type underground gasification is explained briefly. The model test platform, test system and test process are introduced and the test results are analysed. Measurement results indicate that the nature of the gasification agent not only affects the stove body temperature distribution, but determines the coal gas compositions and heat value. Under the action of high temperature, the structure and surface appearance of the coal bodies around the blind-hole gasifier are changed, forming a distillation combine zone, thus improves the load-carrying ability and integral stability of the coal bodies around the gasification stove. Hence the method of blind-hole underground gasification makes possible the recovery for coal resources lying under buildings, railways and water bodies. It will undoubtedly lay an important theoretical foundation for the technique of UCG to move a step further in the direction of commercialised production. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Modeling of pulverized coal combustion stabilization by means of plasma torches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miroslav Sijercic; Srdjan Belosevic; Predrag Stefanovic [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Science, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-07-01

    Application of plasma-system for pulverized coal ignition and combustion stabilization in utility boiler furnaces promises to achieve certain savings compared to the use of heavy oil burners. Plasma torches are built in air-coal dust mixture ducts between coal mills and burners. Characteristics of processes in the ducts with plasma-system for pulverized coal combustion stabilization are analyzed in the paper, with respect to the modeling and numerical simulation of mass, momentum and heat transfer in two-phase turbulent gas particle flow. The simulations have been performed for three different geometries of the air-coal dust mixture ducts with plasma torches, for TENT A1 utility boiler and pulverized lignite Kolubara-Field 'D'. Selected results of numerical simulation of processes are presented. The plasma-system thermal effect is discussed regarding corresponding savings of liquid fuel. The results of numerical simulations have been analyzed with respect to the processes in the duct and especially with respect to the influence of the duct shape to a temperature field at the out let cross section, as a basis for the duct geometry optimization. It has been emphasized that numerical simulation of processes can be applied in analysis and optimization of pulverized coal ignition and combustion stabilization and enables efficient and cost-effective scaling-up procedure from laboratory to industrial level. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Assessing coal burnout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, A. [Pacific Power, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    1999-11-01

    Recent research has allowed a quantitative description of the basic process of burnout for pulverized coals to be made. The Cooperative Research Centre for Black Coal Utilization has built on this work to develop a coal combustion model which will allow plant engineers and coal company representatives to assess their coals for combustion performance. The paper describes the model and its validation and outlines how it is run. 2 figs.