WorldWideScience

Sample records for cloverleaf skull deformity

  1. Cloverleaf skull with generalised bone dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Warren, P.S.; Fisher, C.C.

    1985-09-01

    A case of cloverleaf skull with generalised bone dysplasia is reported. The authors believe that bone dysplasia associated with cloverleaf is neither identical with thanatophoric dysplasia nor achondroplasia. Until identity of thanatophoric dysplasia and cloverleaf skull with generalised bone dysplasia is proved the diseases should be looked upon as separate entities and the wording ''thanatophoric dysplasia with cloverleaf skull'' should be abolished.

  2. Cloverleaf skull associated with unusual skeletal anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Say, B.; Poznanski, A.K.

    1987-02-01

    A male infant which cloverleaf skull and multiple other birth defects born to unrelated, healthy, young parents is presented. Radiologic findings in addition to the cloverleaf skull configuration included short, wide clavicles, winged scapulae, unusual shapes of ribs with abnormal spacing between them and with prominent costovertebral junctions, and widely separated ischia. Ulnae appeared angular with probable fusion to the midportion of the radial bones bilaterally. There was polydactyly of the hands and feet with grossly abnormal metacarpal and metatarsal bones. Skeletal maturation was normal. Computed tomography of the skull showed dilated lateral and third ventricles as well as agenesis of the corpus callosum. The mother denies any teratogenic exposure during the pregnancy. The findings in this infant do not seem to fit into any previously described syndrome.

  3. Rapid detection of K650E mutation in FGFR3 using uncultured amniocytes in a pregnancy affected with fetal cloverleaf skull, occipital pseudoencephalocele, ventriculomegaly, straight short femurs, and thanatophoric dysplasia type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: A prenatal diagnosis of cloverleaf skull, short limbs, straight femurs, and occipital pseudoencephalocele should include a differential diagnosis of TD2. A molecular analysis of FGFR3 using uncultured amniocytes is useful for the rapid confirmation of TD2 at prenatal diagnosis.

  4. Parents' decision for helmet therapy ion infants with skull deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, R.M. van; Til, J.A. van; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, C.G.M.; Hoir, M.P. L; Boere-Boonekamp, M.M.; IJzerman, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Helmet therapy is regularly prescribed in infants with positional skull deformation. Evidence on the effectiveness is lacking, which complicates decision making. This study aims to assess the relation between parents’ decision for treatment of skull deformation in their infant and their

  5. Parents’ decision for helmet therapy in infants with skull deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, Renske; van Til, Janine Astrid; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina Gerarda Maria; L'Hoir, Monique P.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magdalena M.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Helmet therapy is regularly prescribed in infants with positional skull deformation. Evidence on the effectiveness is lacking, which complicates decision making. This study aims to assess the relation between parents’ decision for treatment of skull deformation in their infant and their

  6. Deformation of skull bone as intracranial pressure changing | Yue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Raised intracranial pressure (ICP), a serious and often fatal condition, is often not preventable. In the present study, the relationship was determined between cranial deformation and ICP change. To record the deformation of skull bone, strain foil was placed on the exterior surface of parietal skull. Prior to construction of ...

  7. Deformation of skull bone as intracranial pressure changing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-03-06

    Mar 6, 2009 ... present study, the relationship was determined between cranial deformation and ICP change. To record the deformation of .... knowledge of cranial cavity importantly composed of skull and dura mater (Figure 2), a thin-walled ..... Observations on the structure and function of the nervous system. Edinburgh ...

  8. A skull stripping method using deformable surface and tissue classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xiaodong; Chang, Ming-Ching

    2010-03-01

    Many neuroimaging applications require an initial step of skull stripping to extract the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. We approach this problem by combining deformable surface models and a fuzzy tissue classification technique. Our assumption is that contrast exists between brain tissue (gray matter and white matter) and cerebrospinal fluid, which separates the brain from the extra-cranial tissue. We first analyze the intensity of the entire image to find an approximate centroid of the brain and initialize an ellipsoidal surface around it. We then perform a fuzzy tissue classification with bias field correction within the surface. Tissue classification and bias field are extrapolated to the entire image. The surface iteratively deforms under a force field computed from the tissue classification and the surface smoothness. Because of the bias field correction and tissue classification, the proposed algorithm depends less on particular imaging contrast and is robust to inhomogeneous intensity often observed in magnetic resonance images. We tested the algorithm on all T1 weighted images in the OASIS database, which includes skull stripping results using Brain Extraction Tool; the Dice scores have an average of 0.948 with a standard deviation of 0.017, indicating a high degree of agreement. The algorithm takes on average 2 minutes to run on a typical PC and produces a brain mask and membership functions for gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. We also tested the algorithm on T2 images to demonstrate its generality, where the same algorithm without parameter adjustment gives satisfactory results.

  9. A novel skull registration based on global and local deformations for craniofacial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qingqiong; Zhou, Mingquan; Shui, Wuyang; Wu, Zhongke; Ji, Yuan; Bai, Ruyi

    2011-05-20

    Craniofacial reconstruction is important in forensic identification. It aims to estimate a facial appearance for human skeletal remains using the relationship between the soft tissue and the underlying bone structure. Various computerized methods have been developed in recent decades. An effective way is to deform a reference skull to the discovered skull, and then apply the same deformation to the skin associated with the reference skull to provide an approximate face for the discovered skull. For this method, the better the two skulls match each other, the more face-like the reconstructed skin surface will be. In this paper, we present a novel skull registration method that can match the two skulls closely, so as to improve the accuracy of the reconstruction. It combines both global and local deformations. A generic thin-plate spline (TPS)-based deformation, which is global, is applied first to roughly align the two skulls based on two groups of manually defined landmarks. Afterwards, the two skulls are largely matched, except some regions, on which some new landmarks are automatically marked. A compact support radial basis functions (CSRBF)-based deformation, which is local, will then be performed on these regions to adjust the initial alignment of the two skulls. Such adjustment can be repeatedly implemented until the two skulls have optimal alignment. In addition, all the skulls and face involved in the registration are represented by their single outer surfaces to facilitate the reconstruction procedure. The experiments demonstrate that our method can create a plausible face even when the reference skull is very different from the discovered skull. As a result, we can make full use of our database to provide multiple estimates for a principle components analysis (PCA) for the final reconstruction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Response to pediatric physical therapy in infants with positional preference and skull deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, R.M. van; Pelsma, M.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, C.G.; IJzerman, M.J.; Vlimmeren, L.A. van; Boere-Boonekamp, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pediatric physical therapy seems to reduce skull deformation in infants with positional preference. However, not all infants show improvement. OBJECTIVE: The study objective was to determine which infant and parent characteristics were related to responses to pediatric physical therapy

  11. The relationship between skull morphology, masticatory muscle force and cranial skeletal deformation during biting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Ibacache, Viviana; Zapata Muñoz, Víctor; O'Higgins, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The human skull is gracile when compared to many Middle Pleistocene hominins. It has been argued that it is less able to generate and withstand high masticatory forces, and that the morphology of the lower portion of the modern human face correlates most strongly with dietary characteristics. This study uses geometric morphometrics and finite element analysis (FEA) to assess the relationship between skull morphology, muscle force and cranial deformations arising from biting, which is relevant in understanding how skull morphology relates to mastication. The three-dimensional skull anatomies of 20 individuals were reconstructed from medical computed tomograms. Maximal contractile muscle forces were estimated from muscular anatomical cross-sectional areas (CSAs). Fifty-nine landmarks were used to represent skull morphology. A partial least squares analysis was performed to assess the association between skull shape and muscle force, and FEA was used to compare the deformation (strains) generated during incisor and molar bites in two individuals representing extremes of morphological variation in the sample. The results showed that only the proportion of total muscle CSA accounted for by the temporalis appears associated with skull morphology, albeit weekly. However, individuals with a large temporalis tend to possess a relatively wider face, a narrower, more vertically oriented maxilla and a lower positioning of the coronoid process. The FEAs showed that, despite differences in morphology, biting results in similar modes of deformation for both crania, but with localised lower magnitudes of strains arising in the individual with the narrowest, most vertically oriented maxilla. Our results suggest that the morphology of the maxilla modulates the transmission of forces generated during mastication to the rest of the cranium by deforming less in individuals with the ability to generate proportionately larger temporalis muscle forces. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All

  12. Response to pediatric physical therapy in infants with positional preference and skull deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, Renske M; Pelsma, Maaike; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina G M; IJzerman, Maarten J; van Vlimmeren, Leo A; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M

    2014-09-01

    Pediatric physical therapy seems to reduce skull deformation in infants with positional preference. However, not all infants show improvement. The study objective was to determine which infant and parent characteristics were related to responses to pediatric physical therapy in infants who were 2 to 4 months old and had positional preference, skull deformation, or both. This was a prospective cohort study. Infants who were 2 to 4 months old and had positional preference, skull deformation, or both were recruited by pediatric physical therapists at the start of pediatric physical therapy. The primary outcome was a good response or a poor response (moderate or severe skull deformation) at 4.5 to 6.5 months of age. Potential predictors for responses to pediatric physical therapy were assessed at baseline with questionnaires, plagiocephalometry, and the Alberta Infant Motor Scale. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses with a stepwise backward elimination method were performed. A total of 657 infants participated in the study. At follow-up, 364 infants (55.4%) showed a good response to therapy, and 293 infants (44.6%) showed a poor response. Multiple logistic regression analysis resulted in the identification of several significant predictors for a poor response to pediatric physical therapy at baseline: starting therapy after 3 months of age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=1.50, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]=1.04-2.17), skull deformation (plagiocephaly [aOR=2.64, 95% CI=1.67-4.17] or brachycephaly [aOR=3.07, 95% CI=2.09-4.52]), and a low parental satisfaction score (aOR=2.64, 95% CI=1.67-4.17). A low parental satisfaction score indicates low parental satisfaction with the infant's head shape. Information about pediatric physical therapy was collected retrospectively and included general therapy characteristics. Because data were collected retrospectively, no adjustment in therapy for individual participants could be made. Several predictors for responses

  13. HElmet therapy Assessment in infants with Deformed Skulls (HEADS: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Wijk Renske M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In The Netherlands, helmet therapy is a commonly used treatment in infants with skull deformation (deformational plagiocephaly or deformational brachycephaly. However, evidence of the effectiveness of this treatment remains lacking. The HEADS study (HElmet therapy Assessment in Deformed Skulls aims to determine the effects and costs of helmet therapy compared to no helmet therapy in infants with moderate to severe skull deformation. Methods/design Pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT nested in a cohort study. The cohort study included infants with a positional preference and/or skull deformation at two to four months (first assessment. At 5 months of age, all children were assessed again and infants meeting the criteria for helmet therapy were asked to participate in the RCT. Participants were randomly allocated to either helmet therapy or no helmet therapy. Parents of eligible infants that do not agree with enrolment in the RCT were invited to stay enrolled for follow up in a non-randomisedrandomised controlled trial (nRCT; they were then free to make the decision to start helmet therapy or not. Follow-up assessments took place at 8, 12 and 24 months of age. The main outcome will be head shape at 24 months that is measured using plagiocephalometry. Secondary outcomes will be satisfaction of parents and professionals with the appearance of the child, parental concerns about the future, anxiety level and satisfaction with the treatment, motor development and quality of life of the infant. Finally, compliance and costs will also be determined. Discussion HEADS will be the first study presenting data from an RCT on the effectiveness of helmet therapy. Outcomes will be important for affected children and their parents, health care professionals and future treatment policies. Our findings are likely to influence the reimbursement policies of health insurance companies. Besides these health outcomes, we will be able to

  14. Insufficient vitamin D supplement use during pregnancy and early childhood: a risk factor for positional skull deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weernink, Marieke G M; van Wijk, Renske M; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina G M; Lanting, Caren I; Grant, Cameron C; van Vlimmeren, Leo A; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency during pregnancy is associated with disturbed skeletal homeostasis during infancy. Our aim was to investigate the influence of adherence to recommendations for vitamin D supplement intake of 10 μg per day (400 IU) during pregnancy (mother) and in the first months of life (child) on the occurrence of positional skull deformation of the child at the age of 2 to 4 months. In an observational case-control study, two hundred seventy-five 2- to 4-month-old cases with positional skull deformation were compared with 548 matched controls. A questionnaire was used to gather information on background characteristics and vitamin D intake (food, time spent outdoors and supplements). In a multiple variable logistic regression analysis, insufficient vitamin D supplement intake of women during the last trimester of pregnancy [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.86, 95% (CI) 1.27-2.70] and of children during early infancy (aOR 7.15, 95% CI 3.77-13.54) were independently associated with an increased risk of skull deformation during infancy. These associations were evident after adjustment for the associations with skull deformation that were present with younger maternal age and lower maternal education, shorter pregnancy duration, assisted vaginal delivery, male gender and milk formula consumption after birth. Our findings suggest that non-adherence to recommendations for vitamin D supplement use by pregnant women and infants are associated with a higher risk of positional skull deformation in infants at 2 to 4 months of age. Our study provides an early infant life example of the importance of adequate vitamin D intake during pregnancy and infancy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Zygomatic bone shape in intentional cranial deformations: a model for the study of the interactions between skull growth and facial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketoff, S; Girinon, F; Schlager, S; Friess, M; Schouman, T; Rouch, P; Khonsari, R H

    2017-04-01

    Intentional cranial deformations (ICD) were obtained by exerting external mechanical constraints on the skull vault during the first years of life to permanently modify head shape. The repercussions of ICD on the face are not well described in the midfacial region. Here we assessed the shape of the zygomatic bone in different types of ICDs. We considered 14 non-deformed skulls, 19 skulls with antero-posterior deformation, nine skulls with circumferential deformation and seven skulls with Toulouse deformation. The shape of the zygomatic bone was assessed using a statistical shape model after mesh registration. Euclidian distances between mean models and Mahalanobis distances after canonical variate analysis were computed. Classification accuracy was computed using a cross-validation approach. Different ICDs cause specific zygomatic shape modifications corresponding to different degrees of retrusion but the shape of the zygomatic bone alone is not a sufficient parameter for classifying populations into ICD groups defined by deformation types. We illustrate the fact that external mechanical constraints on the skull vault influence midfacial growth. ICDs are a model for the study of the influence of epigenetic factors on craniofacial growth and can help to understand the facial effects of congenital skull malformations such as single or multi-suture synostoses, or of external orthopedic devices such as helmets used to correct deformational plagiocephaly. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  16. Neurophysiological changes in deformity correction of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with intraoperative skull-femoral traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Stephen J; Gray, Randolph; Holmes, Laura M; Strantzas, Samuel; Jhaveri, Subir; Zaarour, Christian; Magana, Sofia

    2011-09-15

    Retrospective review of 36 consecutive patients undergoing coronal plane deformity correction with intraoperative skull-femoral traction between 2005 and 2008 with motor evoked potential (MEP)/somatosensory evoked potential monitoring. To determine the prevalence and significance of neurophysiological changes with intraoperative skull-femoral traction in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Intraoperative skeletal traction can be associated with spinal cord stretching and ischemia with resultant electrophysiological changes. The prevalence and risks of such changes and their clinical significance is unknown. Thirty-seven procedures involving 36 patients (27 females and 9 males) with a mean age of 14.8 (12-18) years were divided into two groups on the basis of the presence (group 1, n = 18 procedures) or absence (group 2, n = 19) of significant MEP changes with surgery. They were compared with patients undergoing correction without traction (group 3). Significant differences among the groups were observed in mean preoperative Cobb angle (86° vs. 70° vs. 59°), mean intraoperative posttraction Cobb angle (50.0° vs. 34.6°), traction index (0.41 vs. 0.50), flexibility index (0.14 vs. 0.27 vs. 0.25), and presence of primary lumbar curves (0% vs. 32% vs. 14%). Initial onset of MEP amplitude loss (group 1) occurred at a mean of 94 (1-257) minutes from the onset of surgery, was bilateral in 13 procedures, and improved at a mean of 5.5 (1-29) minutes after decreasing or removing the traction. At closure, complete bilateral recovery to baseline was observed in 10 procedures, recovery to >50% baseline in five, and recovery to traction is associated with frequent changes in MEP monitoring. The thoracic location of the major curve, increasing Cobb angle, and rigidity of major curve are significant risk factors for changes in MEP with traction. The presence of any MEP recordings irrespective of its amplitude at closure was associated with normal neurological function

  17. X-ray screening of the artificially deformed skulls from the Middle Bronze Age of the Low Volga region (paleopathology aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pererva Evgenii Vladimirovich

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the deforming structure on the human skull is one of the most challenging and debated questions in modern archeology and anthropology related to artificial deformation of the skull. This is precisely why the present study attempts to study the pathological artificially deformed skulls of representatives of the Catacomb culture originating from burial mound in the Lower Volga region. The analysis of the bone material was carried out with the use of X-ray method of the frontal and lateral views. Thirteen radiographs of skulls with traces of deliberate artificial deformation were examined. The skull shapes, structure of the skull calvarial bones, state of the cranial sutures, signs of intracranial hypertension, and symptoms of vascular and endocrine pathologies were explored and evaluated. The study discovered that Catacomb culture bearers used a variety of methods of skull deformation. Front occipital, occipital ring strain and conventional acrocephaly deformation modes were revealed. The viability and compatibility with normal human activity of artificial skull deformation was observed. In the childhood and newborn periods, individuals have applied constrictive and restrictive devices, trusses andother appliancesfor a few years, their impact couldresultin the intracranial hypertension syndrome, as well as in problems with cranial sutures obliteration. It is very much likely that the use of strain could stimulate the development of the internal frontal hyperostosis (Morgagni's disease which contributed to the emergence of endocrine abnormities in humans. The increased trauma rate of skeleton bones was observed in population of the Middle Bronze Age, as well as ear diseases which makes us once again address the issue of social and cultural phenomenon of intentional artificial deformation of the head tradition.

  18. Skull fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilar skull fracture; Depressed skull fracture; Linear skull fracture ... Skull fractures may occur with head injuries . The skull provides good protection for the brain. However, a severe impact ...

  19. Modelling and structural analysis of skull/cranial implant: beyond mid-line deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogu, V Phanindra; Kumar, Y Ravi; Kumar Khanara, Asit

    2017-01-01

    This computational study explores modelling and finite element study of the implant under Intracranial pressure (ICP) conditions with normal ICP range (7 mm Hg to 15 mm Hg) or increased ICP (>I5 mm Hg). The implant fixation points allow implant behaviour with respect to intracranial pressure conditions. However, increased fixation points lead to variation in deformation and equivalent stress. Finite element analysis is providing a valuable insight to know the deformation and equivalent stress. The patient CT data (Computed Tomography) is processed in Mimics software to get the mesh model. The implant is modelled by using modified reverse engineering technique with the help of Rhinoceros software. This modelling method is applicable for all types of defects including those beyond the middle line and multiple ones. It is designed with eight fixation points and ten fixation points to fix an implant. Consequently, the mechanical deformation and equivalent stress (von Mises) are calculated in ANSYS 15 software with distinctive material properties such as Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V), Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK). The deformation and equivalent stress results are obtained through ANSYS 15 software. It is observed that Ti6Al4V material shows low deformation and PEEK material shows less equivalent stress. Among all materials PEEK shows noticeably good result. Hence, a concept was established and more clinically relevant results can be expected with implementation of realistic 3D printed model in the future. This will allow physicians to gain knowledge and decrease surgery time with proper planning.

  20. Infant skull fracture (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skull fractures may occur with head injuries. Although the skull is both tough and resilient and provides excellent protection ... a severe impact or blow can result in fracture of the skull and may be accompanied by ...

  1. CLOVERLEAF CYCLOTRON

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, E.M.; Judd, D.L.

    1959-02-01

    A cyclotron is presented embodying a unique magnetic field configuration, which configuration increases in intensity with radius and therefore compensates for the reltivistic mass effect, the field having further convolutions productive of axial stability in the particle beam. By reconciling the seemingly opposed requirements of mass increase compensation on one hand and anial stability on the other, the production of extremely high current particle beams in the relativistie energy range is made feasible. Certain further advantages inhere in the invention, notably an increase in the usable magnet gap, simplified and more efficient extraction of the beam from the accelerator, and ready adaptation to the use of multiply phased excitation as contrasted with the single phased systems herstofore utilized. General

  2. Viscoelastic finite-element analysis of human skull - dura mater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-18

    Mar 18, 2008 ... 1981). MATERIALS AND METHODS. In order to determine the influence of the viscoelastic nature of the human skull and dura mater on their deformation, we made the finite-element analysis of cranial cavity with the ICP scope from 1.5 to 5 kPa respectively. By ignoring the viscoelasticity of human skull.

  3. Everted skull fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Tyagi, Devendra K; Savant, Hemant V

    2011-11-01

    Skull bone fractures are common in trauma. They are usually linear undisplaced or depressed; however, a distinct possibility of elevated fracture remains. We describe an entity of everted fracture skull in which the fracture segment is totally everted. The nature of trauma, management, and complications of this unique case are discussed. A 21-year-old woman involved in a railway accident presented to us with a primary dressing on her wound. Investigations revealed an everted fracture skull. She underwent surgery with good results. We would like to add everted fracture skull to the nomenclature describing skull fractures in addition to elevated compound fracture skull as a new entity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Skull base development and craniosynostosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaser, Susan I. [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Neuroradiology, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Toronto (Canada); Padfield, Nancy [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Neuroradiology, Toronto (Canada); Chitayat, David [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Division of Clinical and Metabolic Genetics, Toronto (Canada); Mount Sinai Hospital and University of Toronto, Prenatal Diagnosis and Medical Genetics Program, Toronto (Canada); Forrest, Christopher R. [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Centre for Craniofacial Care and Research, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Toronto (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Abnormal skull shape resulting in craniofacial deformity is a relatively common clinical finding, with deformity either positional (positional plagiocephaly) or related to premature ossification and fusion of the skull sutures (craniosynostosis). Growth restriction occurring at a stenosed suture is associated with exaggerated growth at the open sutures, resulting in fairly predictable craniofacial phenotypes in single-suture non-syndromic pathologies. Multi-suture syndromic subtypes are not so easy to understand without imaging. Imaging is performed to define the site and extent of craniosynostosis, to determine the presence or absence of underlying brain anomalies, and to evaluate both pre- and postoperative complications of craniosynostosis. Evidence for intracranial hypertension may be seen both pre- and postoperatively, associated with jugular foraminal stenosis, sinovenous occlusion, hydrocephalus and Chiari 1 malformations. Following clinical assessment, imaging evaluation may include radiographs, high-frequency US of the involved sutures, low-dose (20-30 mAs) CT with three-dimensional reformatted images, MRI and nuclear medicine brain imaging. Anomalous or vigorous collateral venous drainage may be mapped preoperatively with CT or MR venography or catheter angiography. (orig.)

  5. Coxsackievirus cloverleaf RNA containing a 5' triphosphate triggers an antiviral response via RIG-I activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Feng

    Full Text Available Upon viral infections, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and stimulate an antiviral state associated with the production of type I interferons (IFNs and inflammatory markers. Type I IFNs play crucial roles in innate antiviral responses by inducing expression of interferon-stimulated genes and by activating components of the adaptive immune system. Although pegylated IFNs have been used to treat hepatitis B and C virus infections for decades, they exert substantial side effects that limit their use. Current efforts are directed toward the use of PRR agonists as an alternative approach to elicit host antiviral responses in a manner similar to that achieved in a natural infection. RIG-I is a cytosolic PRR that recognizes 5' triphosphate (5'ppp-containing RNA ligands. Due to its ubiquitous expression profile, induction of the RIG-I pathway provides a promising platform for the development of novel antiviral agents and vaccine adjuvants. In this study, we investigated whether structured RNA elements in the genome of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3, a picornavirus that is recognized by MDA5 during infection, could activate RIG-I when supplied with 5'ppp. We show here that a 5'ppp-containing cloverleaf (CL RNA structure is a potent RIG-I inducer that elicits an extensive antiviral response that includes induction of classical interferon-stimulated genes, as well as type III IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In addition, we show that prophylactic treatment with CVB3 CL provides protection against various viral infections including dengue virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and enterovirus 71, demonstrating the antiviral efficacy of this RNA ligand.

  6. Skull Base Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    In skull base tumors associated with a low radiosensitivity for conventional radiotherapy (RT), irradiation with proton or carbon ion beams facilitates a safe and accurate application of high tumor doses due to the favorable beam localization properties of these particle beams. Cranial nerves, the brain stem and normal brain tissue can at the same time be optimally spared.

  7. Hot skull: Malignant or feminine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, J.C.; Isslet, J.W. van; Buul, M.M.C. van; Oei, H.Y.; Rijk, P.P. van

    1987-07-01

    Diffusely increased uptake in the calvarium on bone scintigraphy (a hot skull) is often present in patients with bone metastases and metabolic diseases. Excluding these known facts the prevalence of the hot skull and its relation with malignancy and, more specifically, with breast carcinoma have been studied in 673 patients. In women, the hot skull is clearly related to malignancy and to a lesser extent to breast carcinoma. However, another remarkable feature of the hot skull is its predominance in women in general (compared to men) and, therefore, the data suggest that the hot skull can also represent a normal variant of the female skull. We conclude that the hot skull has no clinical value in screening protocols.

  8. Viscoelastic finite-element analysis of human skull - dura mater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-18

    Mar 18, 2008 ... Key words: Viscoelasticity, finite-element analysis (FEA), strain, human skull, dura mater, intracranial pressure. INTRODUCTION. Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the ... We presented the development and validation of a 3D finite-element model intended to better understand the deformation mechanisms of ...

  9. Skull base tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Nader, Remi; van Doormaal, Tristan; Kamel, Mahmoud; Voormolen, Eduard H J; Lasio, Giovanni; Aboud, Emad; Regli, Luca; Tulleken, Cornelius A F; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2010-11-01

    Resident duty-hours restrictions have now been instituted in many countries worldwide. Shortened training times and increased public scrutiny of surgical competency have led to a move away from the traditional apprenticeship model of training. The development of educational models for brain anatomy is a fascinating innovation allowing neurosurgeons to train without the need to practice on real patients and it may be a solution to achieve competency within a shortened training period. The authors describe the use of Stratathane resin ST-504 polymer (SRSP), which is inserted at different intracranial locations to closely mimic meningiomas and other pathological entities of the skull base, in a cadaveric model, for use in neurosurgical training. Silicone-injected and pressurized cadaveric heads were used for studying the SRSP model. The SRSP presents unique intrinsic metamorphic characteristics: liquid at first, it expands and foams when injected into the desired area of the brain, forming a solid tumorlike structure. The authors injected SRSP via different passages that did not influence routes used for the surgical approach for resection of the simulated lesion. For example, SRSP injection routes included endonasal transsphenoidal or transoral approaches if lesions were to be removed through standard skull base approach, or, alternatively, SRSP was injected via a cranial approach if the removal was planned to be via the transsphenoidal or transoral route. The model was set in place in 3 countries (US, Italy, and The Netherlands), and a pool of 13 physicians from 4 different institutions (all surgeons and surgeons in training) participated in evaluating it and provided feedback. All 13 evaluating physicians had overall positive impressions of the model. The overall score on 9 components evaluated--including comparison between the tumor model and real tumor cases, perioperative requirements, general impression, and applicability--was 88% (100% being the best possible

  10. Growing skull fracture stages and treatment strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue-Song; You, Chao; Lu, Ma; Liu, Jia-Gang

    2012-06-01

    A growing skull fracture (GSF) is a rare but significant late complication of skull fractures, usually occurring during infancy and early childhood. Delayed diagnosis and improper treatment could exacerbate this disease. The aim of this study was to introduce a new hypothesis about, describe the stages of, and discuss the treatment strategy for GSF. The authors performed a retrospective review of 27 patients with GSF, who were grouped according to 3 different GSF stages. Over a period of 20 years, 27 patients with GSF (16 males and 11 females) were treated in the authors' department. The mean follow-up period was 26.5 months. Six patients were in the prephase of GSF (Stage 1), 10 patients in the early phase (Stage 2), and 11 in the late phase (Stage 3). All patients underwent duraplasty. All 6 patients at Stage 1 and 5 patients at Stage 2 underwent craniotomy without cranioplasty. Five patients at Stage 2 and all of the patients at Stage 3 underwent cranioplasty with autologous bone and alloplastic materials, respectively. Among all patients, 5 underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement. Symptoms in all patients at Stages 1 and 2 were alleviated or disappeared, and the cranial bones developed without deformity during follow-up. Among patients with Stage 3 GSF, no obvious improvement in neurological deficits was observed. Three patients underwent additional operations because of cranial deformation or infection. The authors identify the stages of GSF according to a new hypothesis. They conclude that accurately diagnosing and treating GSF during Stages 1 and 2 leads to a better prognosis.

  11. Imaging of the Posterior Skull Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Joici; Branstetter, Barton F

    2017-01-01

    The posterior skull base can be involved by a variety of pathologic processes. They can be broadly classified as: traumatic, neoplastic, vascular, and inflammatory. Pathology in the posterior skull base usually involves the lower cranial nerves, either as a source of pathology or a secondary source of symptoms. This review will categorize pathology arising in the posterior skull base and describe how it affects the skull base itself and surrounding structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. MASTICATORY MUSCLES AND THE SKULL: A COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    HERRING, SUSAN W.

    2007-01-01

    Masticatory muscles are anatomically and functionally complex in all mammals, but relative sizes, orientation of action lines, and fascial subdivisions vary greatly among different species in association with their particular patterns of occlusion and jaw movement. The most common contraction pattern for moving the jaw laterally involves a force couple of protrusor muscles on one side and retrusors on the other. Such asymmetrical muscle usage sets up torques on the skull and combines with occlusal loads to produce bony deformations not only in the tooth-bearing jaw bones, but also in more distant elements such as the braincase. Maintenance of bone in the jaw joint, and probably elsewhere in the skull, is dependent on these loads. PMID:17084804

  13. Imaging of skull base: Pictorial essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Abhijit A; Naphade, Prashant S; Chawla, Ashish

    2012-10-01

    The skull base anatomy is complex. Numerous vital neurovascular structures pass through multiple channels and foramina located in the base skull. With the advent of computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), accurate preoperative lesion localization and evaluation of its relationship with adjacent neurovascular structures is possible. It is imperative that the radiologist and skull base surgeons are familiar with this complex anatomy for localizing the skull base lesion, reaching appropriate differential diagnosis, and deciding the optimal surgical approach. CT and MRI are complementary to each other and are often used together for the demonstration of the full disease extent. This article focuses on the radiological anatomy of the skull base and discusses few of the common pathologies affecting the skull base.

  14. Skull base embryology: a multidisciplinary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ieva, Antonio; Bruner, Emiliano; Haider, Thomas; Rodella, Luigi F; Lee, John M; Cusimano, Michael D; Tschabitscher, Manfred

    2014-06-01

    The skull base represents a central and complex bone structure of the skull and forms the floor of the cranial cavity on which the brain lies. Anatomical knowledge of this particular region is important for understanding several pathologic conditions as well as for planning surgical procedures. Embryology of the cranial base is of great interest due to its pronounced impact on the development of adjacent regions including the brain, neck, and craniofacial skeleton. Information from human and comparative anatomy, anthropology, embryology, surgery, and computed modelling was integrated to provide a perspective to interpret skull base formation and variability within the cranial functional and structural system. The skull base undergoes an elaborate sequence of development stages and represents a key player in skull, face and brain development. Furthering our holistic understanding of the embryology of the skull base promises to expand our knowledge and enhance our ability to treat associated anomalies.

  15. Carotid canal dehiscence in the human skull

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastor Vazquez, J.F.; Gil Verona, J.A. [Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valladolid, Ramon y Cajal, 7, E-47005 Valladolid (Spain); Garcia Porrero, M. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valladolid (Spain)

    1999-06-01

    Abnormalities of the floor of the carotid canal have been studied in 538 skulls. These abnormalities range from a fissure to total absence of the floor. This variation may be caused by abnormalities of the internal carotid artery or deficiencies in ossification of the skull base. CT suggests that these changes should be taken into account by surgeons working on the skull base. (orig.) With 4 figs., 8 refs.

  16. Skull mechanics and the evolutionary patterns of the otic notch closure in capitosaurs (Amphibia: Temnospondyli).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuny, Josep; Marcé-Nogué, Jordi; Gil, Lluis; Galobart, Angel

    2012-07-01

    Capitosaurs were among the largest amphibians that have ever lived. Their members displayed an amphibious lifestyle. We provide new information on functional morphology data, using finite element analysis (FEA) which has palaeoecological implications for the group. Our analyses included 17 taxa using (2D) plate models to test four loading cases (bilateral, unilateral and lateral bitings and skull raising system simulation). Our results demonstrates that, when feeding, capitosaurs concentrated the stress at the circumorbital region of the capitosaur skull and cranial sutures probably played a key role in dissipating and absorbing the stress generated during biting. Basal members (as Wetlugasaurus) were probably less specialized forms, while during Middle- and Late Triassic the group radiated into different ecomorphotypes with closed otic notch forms (as Cyclotosaurus) resulting in the strongest skulls during biting. Previous interpretations discussed a trend from an open to closed otic notch associated with lateral repositioning of the tabular horns, but the analysis of the skull-raising system reveals that taxa exhibiting posteriorly directed tabular horns display similar results during skull raising to those of closed otic notch taxa. Our results suggest that various constraints besides otic notch morphology, such as the elongation of the tabular horns, snout length, skull width and position, and size of the orbits affect the function of the skull. On the light of our results, capitosaur skull showed a trend to reduce the stresses and deformation during biting. Capitosaurs could be considered crocodilian analogues as they were top-level predators in fluvial and brackish Triassic ecosystems. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The evolutionary significance of the Wajak skulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storm, P.

    1995-01-01

    Ever since their description by Dubois (1920, 1922) the Wajak skulls Java) have played an important role in the discussions on the evolution of modern humans in Australasia. Because of the robust morphology of the skull, Wajak Man was seen as a link between Pleistocene hominids from Java (Solo) and

  18. Visual Field Map Clusters in High-Order Visual Processing: Organization of V3A/V3B and a New Cloverleaf Cluster in the Posterior Superior Temporal Sulcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Brian; Brewer, Alyssa A

    2017-01-01

    The cortical hierarchy of the human visual system has been shown to be organized around retinal spatial coordinates throughout much of low- and mid-level visual processing. These regions contain visual field maps (VFMs) that each follows the organization of the retina, with neighboring aspects of the visual field processed in neighboring cortical locations. On a larger, macrostructural scale, groups of such sensory cortical field maps (CFMs) in both the visual and auditory systems are organized into roughly circular cloverleaf clusters. CFMs within clusters tend to share properties such as receptive field distribution, cortical magnification, and processing specialization. Here we use fMRI and population receptive field (pRF) modeling to investigate the extent of VFM and cluster organization with an examination of higher-level visual processing in temporal cortex and compare these measurements to mid-level visual processing in dorsal occipital cortex. In human temporal cortex, the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) has been implicated in various neuroimaging studies as subserving higher-order vision, including face processing, biological motion perception, and multimodal audiovisual integration. In human dorsal occipital cortex, the transverse occipital sulcus (TOS) contains the V3A/B cluster, which comprises two VFMs subserving mid-level motion perception and visuospatial attention. For the first time, we present the organization of VFMs in pSTS in a cloverleaf cluster. This pSTS cluster contains four VFMs bilaterally: pSTS-1:4. We characterize these pSTS VFMs as relatively small at ∼125 mm2 with relatively large pRF sizes of ∼2-8° of visual angle across the central 10° of the visual field. V3A and V3B are ∼230 mm2 in surface area, with pRF sizes here similarly ∼1-8° of visual angle across the same region. In addition, cortical magnification measurements show that a larger extent of the pSTS VFM surface areas are devoted to the peripheral visual

  19. An Account of the Inaugural Tessier Skull Exhibition at the University of Paris Descartes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusseldorp, Joseph Richard; Firmin, Françoise

    2015-10-01

    Paul Tessier is widely regarded as the father of modern craniofacial surgery. Upon his passing in 2008, his private collection of human skulls was purchased by the French Association of Facial Surgeons to ensure the collection would remain in France. The first public exhibition of the skulls was held in the medical museum of the University of Paris Descartes in April 2014. From this collection of skulls and the imagination of Tessier an entirely new specialty was created. Modern craniofacial surgery, now is an integral part of any pediatric plastic surgery department. Cranial and facial osteotomies have also become commonplace in both traumatic and aesthetic surgery. The goals for craniofacial deformity are now a return to completely normal appearance and function, as Tessier always believed they should be.

  20. Knowledge of skull base anatomy and surgical implications of human sacrifice among pre-Columbian Mesoamerican cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Serna, Raul; Gomez-Amador, Juan Luis; Barges-Coll, Juan; Arriada-Mendicoa, Nicasio; Romero-Vargas, Samuel; Ramos-Peek, Miguel; Celis-Lopez, Miguel Angel; Revuelta-Gutierrez, Rogelio; Portocarrero-Ortiz, Lesly

    2012-08-01

    Human sacrifice became a common cultural trait during the advanced phases of Mesoamerican civilizations. This phenomenon, influenced by complex religious beliefs, included several practices such as decapitation, cranial deformation, and the use of human cranial bones for skull mask manufacturing. Archaeological evidence suggests that all of these practices required specialized knowledge of skull base and upper cervical anatomy. The authors conducted a systematic search for information on skull base anatomical and surgical knowledge among Mesoamerican civilizations. A detailed exposition of these results is presented, along with some interesting information extracted from historical documents and pictorial codices to provide a better understanding of skull base surgical practices among these cultures. Paleoforensic evidence from the Great Temple of Tenochtitlan indicates that Aztec priests used a specialized decapitation technique, based on a deep anatomical knowledge. Trophy skulls were submitted through a stepwise technique for skull mask fabrication, based on skull base anatomical landmarks. Understanding pre-Columbian Mesoamerican religions can only be realized by considering them in their own time and according to their own perspective. Several contributions to medical practice might have arisen from anatomical knowledge emerging from human sacrifice and decapitation techniques.

  1. REPAIR OF LARGE SKULL BASE DEFECT FOLLOWING EXCISION OF BASALOID SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF MAXILLO - ETHMOID REGION : A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monoj Mukherjee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To present a case of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of maxillo - ethmoid region with intracranial extradural extention and its surgical management including repair of the skull base defect. MATERIAL : A 30 year female presented with progressive bilateral nasal obstruction, facial deformity for 5 years duration. She developed blindness in last 6 months. Recent CT s can showed large heterogeneous enhancing soft tissue mass in right maxillary sinus, nasal cavity and right ethmoid sinus invading the skull base . INTERVENTION : She underwent excision of the mass by modified weber ferguson incision and repair of skull base defect with temporalis muscle flap. Skin defect over the face and nose was repaired by median forehead flap. RESULT : There was total tumor clearance and no CSF leakage following surgery. CONCLUSION : Sinonasal malignancy with intracranial extradural extenti on is not a contraindication for successful surgical management. Resultant skull base defect can be repaired by a temporalis muscle flap to prevent CSF leak and intracranial infection

  2. Contribution of skull roentgenograms to pediatric diagnoses; Interet de la radiographie du crane chez l`enfant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, J.C.; Sirinelli, D. [Hopital Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France)

    1995-06-01

    The place of roentgenograms of the skull has changed substantially over the last tow decades. Skull roentgenograms remain valuable for studying deformities involving all or part of the cranial vault, particularly plagiocephaly and craniosynostosis. They provide little information on the contents of the skull, which can be investigated noninvasively using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and, in infants, ultrasonography. The 1990 consensus panel concluded that patients with head injury should be evaluated mainly on the basis of clinical criteria and that the contribution of roentgenograms is minimal in this setting. In some central nervous system disorders, roentgenograms of the skull can be of use secondarily to look for calcifications or osteolysis. (authors). 10 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Birds have paedomorphic dinosaur skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Marugán-Lobón, Jesús; Racimo, Fernando; Bever, Gabe S; Rowe, Timothy B; Norell, Mark A; Abzhanov, Arhat

    2012-07-12

    The interplay of evolution and development has been at the heart of evolutionary theory for more than a century. Heterochrony—change in the timing or rate of developmental events—has been implicated in the evolution of major vertebrate lineages such as mammals, including humans. Birds are the most speciose land vertebrates, with more than 10,000 living species representing a bewildering array of ecologies. Their anatomy is radically different from that of other vertebrates. The unique bird skull houses two highly specialized systems: the sophisticated visual and neuromuscular coordination system allows flight coordination and exploitation of diverse visual landscapes, and the astonishing variations of the beak enable a wide range of avian lifestyles. Here we use a geometric morphometric approach integrating developmental, neontological and palaeontological data to show that the heterochronic process of paedomorphosis, by which descendants resemble the juveniles of their ancestors, is responsible for several major evolutionary transitions in the origin of birds. We analysed the variability of a series of landmarks on all known theropod dinosaur skull ontogenies as well as outgroups and birds. The first dimension of variability captured ontogeny, indicating a conserved ontogenetic trajectory. The second dimension accounted for phylogenetic change towards more bird-like dinosaurs. Basally branching eumaniraptorans and avialans clustered with embryos of other archosaurs, indicating paedomorphosis. Our results reveal at least four paedomorphic episodes in the history of birds combined with localized peramorphosis (development beyond the adult state of ancestors) in the beak. Paedomorphic enlargement of the eyes and associated brain regions parallels the enlargement of the nasal cavity and olfactory brain in mammals. This study can be a model for investigations of heterochrony in evolutionary transitions, illuminating the origin of adaptive features and inspiring

  4. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.

  5. The genetics of canine skull shape variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenebeck, Jeffrey J; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2013-02-01

    A dog's craniofacial diversity is the result of continual human intervention in natural selection, a process that began tens of thousands of years ago. To date, we know little of the genetic underpinnings and developmental mechanisms that make dog skulls so morphologically plastic. In this Perspectives, we discuss the origins of dog skull shapes in terms of history and biology and highlight recent advances in understanding the genetics of canine skull shapes. Of particular interest are those molecular genetic changes that are associated with the development of distinct breeds.

  6. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures. (b...

  7. Imaging in tuberculosis of the skull and skull-base: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sencer, S.; Aydin, K.; Poyanli, A.; Minareci, O. [Dept. of Radiology, Istanbul School of Medicine, Istanbul Univ., Istanbul (Turkey); Sencer, A.; Hepguel, K. [Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Istanbul School of Medicine, Istanbul Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)

    2003-03-01

    We report a 19-year-old girl, who presented with headache and tonic/clonic seizures. Imaging revealed a lytic parietal skull lesion with an adjacent epidural mass, masses in the right parietal lobe and a posterior skull-base mass. The diagnosis of tuberculosis was made after resection of the extradural mass and later verified with culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The parenchymal and skull-base lesions resolved following antituberculous treatment. We present CT, scintigraphic, angiographic and MRI findings. (orig.)

  8. Photoacoustic investigation of a neonatal skull phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volinski, Bridget; Hariri, Ali; Fatima, Afreen; Xu, Qiuyun; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-03-01

    There is a need for continued research into the diagnosis, prevention and cure of neonatal brain disease and disorders. These disorders lead to fatalities and developmental disorders in infants. Non-invasive imaging techniques are being researched for this purpose. However, the availability of neonatal skull samples for this work is very low. A phantom can be used to simulate the neonatal skull and brain to improve imaging techniques. This study selects a phantom of polyurethane and titanium dioxide and proves its value as a replacement for neonatal skull in research. The methods used for this proof are validation of choice against the literature, transmissivity and acoustic experimentation compared to existing literature, and finally photoacoustic evaluation of the final choice to show its usefulness as a neonatal skull phantom.

  9. Osteocraniostenosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Verloes, A; Narcy, F; Grattagliano, B; Delezoide, A L; Guibaud, P; Schaaps, J P; Le Merrer, M; Maroteaux, P

    1994-01-01

    We report a multiple congenital anomalies (MCA) syndrome in three unrelated fetuses consisting of extremely thin, dense, fishbone-like diaphyses, flared metaphyses, mild micromelic dwarfism, brachydactyly, facial dysmorphism, ocular malformations (microphthalmia, aniridia), cloverleaf skull deformity, and splenic hypoplasia. Histopathological investigations showed abnormalities of the metaphyseal cartilage and adjacent diaphyseal ossification, excessive modelling of the metaphyses, and, in on...

  10. Shape variation in the skull and lower carnassial in a wild population of raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahara, Masakazu

    2013-03-01

    Individual variations in skull and lower carnassial morphology within a wild population of raccoon dog were examined using geometric morphometric techniques. We compared individual morphological variations by using relative warp analysis, and then tested morphological integration between the skull and carnassial by using partial least square (PLS) analysis. The most marked variation in skull shape was the dorsoventral flexion; i.e., deformation from klinorhynchy to airorhynchy. Two remarkable variations were observed, including tilting between the trigonid (or carnassial blade) and the talonid in the lower carnassial, and the relative sizes of the trigonid and the talonid. This observed variation in skull shape was similar to previous reports of variations among dog breeds that correlate with a polymorphism of the Runx2 gene. This polymorphism has also been reported to correlate with snout length, which is strongly related to carnivorous or omnivorous dietary adaptations, across the entire order Carnivora. Our results in the lower carnassial were also similar to previously reported patterns observed for carnivorous or omnivorous dietary adaptations among Carnivora. However, in our PLS analysis between skull and carnassial shapes, we only found a significant correlation in a lower dimension, suggesting a lower degree of integration. These results indicate that shape variations, which could be sources of natural selection in the skull and carnassial, were present in a wild population, suggesting high evolvability of these variations in the raccoon dog and the order Carnivora in general.

  11. Management Strategies for Skull Base Inverted Papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Jessica W; Khichi, Sunny S; Cho, Do-Yeon; Riley, Kristen O; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2016-07-01

    Inverted papilloma attached to the ventral skull base presents a surgical dilemma because surgical removal of the bony pedicle is critical to decrease risk of recurrence. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of endoscopic management of skull base inverted papilloma. Case series with planned data collection. Tertiary medical center. Patients with skull base inverted papilloma. Over 7 years, 49 patients with skull base inverted papilloma were referred for surgical resection. Demographics, operative technique, pathology, complications, recurrence, and postoperative follow-up were evaluated. Average age at presentation was 57 years. Twenty-six patients (53%) had prior attempts at resection elsewhere, and 5 had squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) arising in an inverted papilloma. Six patients (12%) suffered major complications, including skull base osteomyelitis in 2 previously irradiated patients, cerebrospinal fluid leak with pneumocephalus (n = 1), meningitis (n = 1), invasive fungal sinusitis (n = 1), and cerebrovascular accident (n = 1). The mean disease-free interval was 29 months (range, 10-78 months). One patient with SCCA recurred in the nasopharynx (overall 2% recurrence rate). He is disease-free 3 years following endoscopic nasopharyngectomy. Three patients with SCCA had endoscopic resection of the skull base, while 1 subject with inverted papilloma pedicled on the superior orbital roof had an osteoplastic flap in conjunction with a Draf III procedure. All others received endoscopic resection. Removal of the bony pedicle resulted in excellent local control of skull base inverted papillomas. Our experience demonstrates that disease eradication with limited morbidity is attainable with this approach. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  12. A Cloverleaf of Software Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Dines

    2005-01-01

    by senior academic staff. Professors of medicine daily perform specialized surgery and treatments at hospitals. Professors of architecture design new, daring buildings for industry, and professors of civil engineering head the engineering structural design of new, daring bridges. So we speculate what...

  13. Functional relationship between skull form and feeding mechanics in Sphenodon, and implications for diapsid skull development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Neil; Jones, Marc E H; Shi, Junfen; O'Higgins, Paul; Evans, Susan E; Fagan, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The vertebrate skull evolved to protect the brain and sense organs, but with the appearance of jaws and associated forces there was a remarkable structural diversification. This suggests that the evolution of skull form may be linked to these forces, but an important area of debate is whether bone in the skull is minimised with respect to these forces, or whether skulls are mechanically "over-designed" and constrained by phylogeny and development. Mechanical analysis of diapsid reptile skulls could shed light on this longstanding debate. Compared to those of mammals, the skulls of many extant and extinct diapsids comprise an open framework of fenestrae (window-like openings) separated by bony struts (e.g., lizards, tuatara, dinosaurs and crocodiles), a cranial form thought to be strongly linked to feeding forces. We investigated this link by utilising the powerful engineering approach of multibody dynamics analysis to predict the physiological forces acting on the skull of the diapsid reptile Sphenodon. We then ran a series of structural finite element analyses to assess the correlation between bone strain and skull form. With comprehensive loading we found that the distribution of peak von Mises strains was particularly uniform throughout the skull, although specific regions were dominated by tensile strains while others were dominated by compressive strains. Our analyses suggest that the frame-like skulls of diapsid reptiles are probably optimally formed (mechanically ideal: sufficient strength with the minimal amount of bone) with respect to functional forces; they are efficient in terms of having minimal bone volume, minimal weight, and also minimal energy demands in maintenance. © 2011 Curtis et al.

  14. Functional relationship between skull form and feeding mechanics in Sphenodon, and implications for diapsid skull development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Curtis

    Full Text Available The vertebrate skull evolved to protect the brain and sense organs, but with the appearance of jaws and associated forces there was a remarkable structural diversification. This suggests that the evolution of skull form may be linked to these forces, but an important area of debate is whether bone in the skull is minimised with respect to these forces, or whether skulls are mechanically "over-designed" and constrained by phylogeny and development. Mechanical analysis of diapsid reptile skulls could shed light on this longstanding debate. Compared to those of mammals, the skulls of many extant and extinct diapsids comprise an open framework of fenestrae (window-like openings separated by bony struts (e.g., lizards, tuatara, dinosaurs and crocodiles, a cranial form thought to be strongly linked to feeding forces. We investigated this link by utilising the powerful engineering approach of multibody dynamics analysis to predict the physiological forces acting on the skull of the diapsid reptile Sphenodon. We then ran a series of structural finite element analyses to assess the correlation between bone strain and skull form. With comprehensive loading we found that the distribution of peak von Mises strains was particularly uniform throughout the skull, although specific regions were dominated by tensile strains while others were dominated by compressive strains. Our analyses suggest that the frame-like skulls of diapsid reptiles are probably optimally formed (mechanically ideal: sufficient strength with the minimal amount of bone with respect to functional forces; they are efficient in terms of having minimal bone volume, minimal weight, and also minimal energy demands in maintenance.

  15. Morphological convergence in 'river dolphin' skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Charlotte E; Cooper, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    Convergent evolution can provide insights into the predictability of, and constraints on, the evolution of biodiversity. One striking example of convergence is seen in the 'river dolphins'. The four dolphin genera that make up the 'river dolphins' ( Inia geoffrensis, Pontoporia blainvillei, Platanista gangetica and Lipotes vexillifer ) do not represent a single monophyletic group, despite being very similar in morphology. This has led many to using the 'river dolphins' as an example of convergent evolution. We investigate whether the skulls of the four 'river dolphin' genera are convergent when compared to other toothed dolphin taxa in addition to identifying convergent cranial and mandibular features. We use geometric morphometrics to uncover shape variation in the skulls of the 'river dolphins' and then apply a number of phylogenetic techniques to test for convergence. We find significant convergence in the skull morphology of the 'river dolphins'. The four genera seem to have evolved similar skull shapes, leading to a convergent morphotype characterised by elongation of skull features. The cause of this morphological convergence remains unclear. However, the features we uncover as convergent, in particular elongation of the rostrum, support hypotheses of shared feeding mode or diet and thus provide the foundation for future work into convergence within the Odontoceti.

  16. Sound wave propagation on the human skull surface with bone conduction stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrev, Ivo; Sim, Jae Hoon; Stenfelt, Stefan; Ihrle, Sebastian; Gerig, Rahel; Pfiffner, Flurin; Eiber, Albrecht; Huber, Alexander M; Röösli, Christof

    2017-11-01

    into a local coordinate system, indicates that the normal component, with spatially varying phase, is dominant above 2 kHz, consistent with local bending vibration modes and traveling surface waves. Both SLDV and 3D LDV data indicate that sound transmission in the skull bone causes rigid-body-like motion at low frequencies whereas transverse deformations and travelling waves were observed above 2 kHz, with propagation speeds of approximately of 450 m/s at 8 kHz. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Salomon, Rasmus; Jensen, Kenneth Kragh

    Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls: what is the functional interaural canal? Ole Næsbye Larsen, Rasmus Salomon, Kenneth Kragh Jensen, and Jakob Christensen-Dalsgaard Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark The middle ears of birds are acoust......Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls: what is the functional interaural canal? Ole Næsbye Larsen, Rasmus Salomon, Kenneth Kragh Jensen, and Jakob Christensen-Dalsgaard Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark The middle ears of birds...

  18. Lymphocytic adenohypophysitis: skull radiographs and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiwai, S.; Miyamoto, T. [Department of Radiology, Kobe Central Municipal Hospital, Hyogo (Japan); Inoue, Y.; Nemoto, Y.; Tashiro, T. [Department of Radiology, Osaka City University Medical School (Japan); Ishihara, T. [Department of Endocrinology, Kobe Central Municipal Hospital, Hyogo (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Department of Neurosurgery, Kobe Central Municipal Hospital, Hyogo (Japan); Hakuba, A. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City University Medical School, 1-5-7 Asahimachi, Abeno, Osaka, 545 (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    We report the skull radiograph, CT and MRI findings in three patients with lymphocytic adenohypophysitis mimicking pituitary adenoma. All cases were associated with pregnancy. CT demonstrated a pituitary mass but did not differentiate lymphocytic adenohypophysitis from pituitary adenoma. The skull radiographs showed either a normal sella turcica or minimal abnormalities; they did not show ballooning or destruction. The MRI appearances were distinctive: relatively low signal on T1-weighted images; preservation of the bright posterior pituitary lobe despite the presence of a relatively large pituitary mass, less common in macroadenomas; marked contrast enhancement compared with pituitary macroadenomas; and dural enhancement adjacent to a pituitary mass. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 40 refs.

  19. Introduction: surgical management of skull base meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zada, Gabriel; Başkaya, Mustafa K; Shah, Mitesh V

    2017-10-01

    Meningiomas represent the most common primary intracranial neoplasm treated by neurosurgeons. Although multimodal treatment of meningiomas includes surgery, radiation-based treatments, and occasionally medical therapy, surgery remains the mainstay of treatment for most symptomatic meningiomas. Because of the intricate relationship of the dura mater and arachnoid mater with the central nervous system and cranial nerves, meningiomas can arise anywhere along the skull base or convexities, and occasionally even within the ventricular system, thereby mandating a catalog of surgical approaches that neurosurgeons may employ to individualize treatment for patients. Skull base meningiomas represent some of the most challenging pathology encountered by neurosurgeons, on account of their depth, invasion, vascularity, texture/consistency, and their relationship to bony anatomy, cranial nerves, and blood vessels. Resection of complex skull base meningiomas often mandates adequate bony removal to achieve sufficient exposure of the tumor and surrounding region, in order to minimize brain retraction and optimally identify, protect, control, and manipulate sensitive neurovascular structures. A variety of traditional skull base approaches has evolved to address complex skull base tumors, of which meningiomas are considered the paragon in terms of both complexity and frequency. In this supplemental video issue of Neurosurgical Focus, contributing authors from around the world provide instructional narratives demonstrating resection of a variety of skull base meningiomas arising from traditionally challenging origins, including the clinoid processes, tuberculum sellae, dorsum sellae, petroclival region, falco-tentorial region, cerebellopontine angle, and foramen magnum. In addition, two cases of extended endoscopic endonasal approaches for tuberculum sellae and dorsum sellae meningiomas are presented, representing the latest evolution in accessing the skull base for selected tumors

  20. Congenital skull defect and neurofibroma: without scalp and other abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie-Cong; Wei, Liu; Xu, Jia; Liu, Jian-Feng; Gui, Lai

    2012-07-01

    Congenital skull defect is a rare malformation that is usually associated with congenital anomalies of the scalp and comparable lesions in the brain, spinal cord, limbs, and skeletal muscle. Most previously reported cases have described skull defects with aplasia cutis congenita and other congenital abnormalities. Very few patients with skull defects present with an intact scalp or neurofibroma. The authors report an adult patient with a rare congenital skull defect and local neurofibroma.

  1. The good, the bad, and the ugly: the influence of skull reconstructions and intraspecific variability in studies of cranial morphometrics in theropods and Basal saurischians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Foth

    Full Text Available Several studies investigating macroevolutionary skull shape variation in fossil reptiles were published recently, often using skull reconstructions taken from the scientific literature. However, this approach could be potentially problematic, because skull reconstructions might differ notably due to incompleteness and/or deformation of the material. Furthermore, the influence of intraspecific variation has usually not been explored in these studies. Both points could influence the results of morphometric analyses by affecting the relative position of species to each other within the morphospace. The aim of the current study is to investigate the variation in morphometric data between skull reconstructions based on the same specimen, and to compare the results to shape variation occurring in skull reconstructions based on different specimens of the same species (intraspecific variation and skulls of closely related species (intraspecific variation. Based on the current results, shape variation of different skull reconstructions based on the same specimen seems to have generally little influence on the results of a geometric morphometric analysis, although it cannot be excluded that some erroneous reconstructions of poorly preserved specimens might cause problems occasionally. In contrast, for different specimens of the same species the variation is generally higher than between different reconstructions based on the same specimen. For closely related species, at least with similar ecological preferences in respect to the dietary spectrum, the degree of interspecific variation can overlap with that of intraspecific variation, most probably due to similar biomechanical constraints.

  2. Cave crawling in zebra Finch skulls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Salomon, Rasmus; Jensen, Kenneth Kragh

    2014-01-01

    The middle ears of birds are acoustically coupled through an air-filled interaural canal, often illustrated and modelled as a simple tube. It allows sound to propagate through the skull from one ear to the other and considerably enhance the cues for directional hearing by interaction with the ext...

  3. Stature estimation using odontometry and skull anthropometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalia Shalini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the possibility of estimating height from odontometry and anthropometric data of the skull for the positive identification of height in forensic investigations concerned with fragmentary human remains. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 100 Mysorean patients, 50 males, and 50 females. Measurements of mesiodistal widths of the six maxillary anterior teeth, circumference of the skull, and height were made directly on each patient. Anteroposterior diameter of the skull was obtained on the lateral cephalograph. The data collected were subjected to statistical methods. The known heights of the combined data, data for males, and females were regressed against the odontometric and anthropometric variables using linear regression analysis. Results: Significant sexual dimorphism was observed for the parameters studied ( P 0.05. Highly significant correlation was found between height and other parameters when combined data and data for males were regressed. The equation relating height to the combined mesiodistal width of maxillary anterior teeth was derived as height = 982.421 + 13.65 x combined mesiodistal width of maxillary anterior teeth ( P 0.0001. Similarly equations were obtained by regressing height to head circumference and skull diameter ( P 0.0001 for both. The above findings may hence provide reliable method of estimation of height from skeletal remains in the forensic setup.

  4. Skull development in the muscular dystrophic mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, H; Kirkeby, S; Moss, M L

    1989-01-01

    . Marked differences in shape were also noticed. Differences in angular values were primarily found between skull parts, whereas angles between adjacent bones were remarkably similar in the two groups. Only a few exceptions of this condition were observed, as angles between adjacent bones in the posterior...

  5. The Growing-Skull Fracture of Childhood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Black female, aged 2 months, was brought to the hospital on 20 January 1973, after being dropped from a ... A Black male, aged 16 months, was referred from. Butterworth in the Transkei, because his mother had ... Alajouanine and Thurel,' that at least some of the holes found in ancient skulls, long cited by archaeologists ...

  6. Descriptions of anatomical differences between skulls and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The external anatomical differences between the skulls and mandibles of 10 mountain zebras Equus zebra and 10 plains zebras E. burchelli of both sexes were studied. The nomenclature used conforms to Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria (1983). Eleven structural differences are described for the first time and illustrated, viz., ...

  7. [Extended endoscopic endonasal approach to skull base].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Arbolay, Omar; González-González, Justo; Rojas-Manresa, Jorge Luis

    2012-11-01

    Different approaches to the skull base have been developed through the sphenoidal sinus. Traditional boundaries of the trans-sphenoidal approach can be extended in antero-posterior and lateral plane. We review our experience with extended endoscopic endonasal approach in 127 cases. We used the extended endoscopic endonasal approach in 127 patients with different lesions of the skull base. This study specifically focuses on: type of lesions, surgical approach, outcome and surgical complications. Extended endoscopic endonasal approach was used in 127 patients with following lesions: 61 invasive adenomas to cavernous sinus, 10 clival chordomas, 21 craniopharyngiomas, 26 meningiomas, 4 cerebrospinal fluid leakages, one meningoencephalocele, 2 malignan lesions and 2 thyroid ophthalmopathy. In tumoral lesions gross total resection was achieved in 82.5%, with better results in craniopharyngiomas 90.5%, followed by invasive adenomas with 85.2%, and meningiomas with 84.6%. The most frequent complications were the insipid (8.6%) diabetes, meningoencefalitis (3.9%) and the hydrocephalic (3.9%). Mortality was 3.9%. The extended endoscopic endonasal approach is a promising minimally invasive alternative for selective cases with skull base lesions. As techniques and technology advance this approach may become the procedure of choice for most lesions and should be considered an option in the management of the patients with these complex pathologies by skull base surgeon. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Aplasia cutis congenita of the scalp with large underlying skull defect: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leboucq, N. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Montpellier (France)); Montoya y Martinez, P. (Dept. of Craniofacial Recontructive Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Montpellier (France)); Montoya-Vigo, F. (Dept. of Neonatal Paediatrics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Montpellier (France)); Castan, P. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Montpellier (France))

    1994-08-01

    Localised agenesis of the scalp is the most frequent patern in aplasia cutis congenita (ACC), a congenital absence of the skin and occasionally of deeper layers. Several clinical groups are characterised by the location and pattern of skin defects, associated malformations and the mode of inheritance. Death occurs in 20 % of cases, secondary to the associated anomalies, to infections or to haemorrhage from ulceration of the sagittal sinus when there is also a defect of the underlying skull. In this latter case, we close the defect by two rotational scalp flaps (Orticochea technique) at birth. A three-dimensional CT study is useful for showing the extent of the skull defect and the deformity of the craniofacial complex and the changes in the bone after treatment. (orig.)

  9. Skull base tumors; Tumoren der Schaedelbasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlhelm, F.; Naumann, N.; Grunwald, I.; Reith, W. [Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie des Universitaetsklinikums des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Nabhan, A.; Shariat, K. [Neurochirurgische Klinik des Universitaetsklinikums des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    Modern imaging techniques have great importance in the diagnosis and therapy of skull-base pathologies. Many of these lesions, especially in relation to their specific location, can be evaluated using CT and MR imaging. Tumors commonly found in the anterior skull base include carcinoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, esthesioneuroblastoma and meningioma. In the central cranial fossa, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, metastases, meningioma, pituitary adenoma and neurinoma have to be considered. The most common neoplasms of the posterior skull base, including the CP angle, are neurinoma, meningioma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, chordoma and paraganglioma. One major task of imaging is the evaluation of the exact tumor extent as well as its relationship to the neighboring neurovascular structures. The purpose of this review is to recapitulate the most important anatomical landmarks of the skull base. The typical imaging findings of the most common tumors involving the skull base are also presented. (orig.) [German] Die moderne Bildgebung hat einen besonderen Stellenwert bei der Diagnostik und Therapie von Schaedelbasispathologien. Zahlreiche Laesionen koennen anhand ihrer CT- und MRT-Befunde, insbesondere unter Beruecksichtigung ihrer genauen Lokalisation, artdiagnostisch eingeordnet werden. Im Bereich der vorderen Schaedelbasis sind v. a. Karzinome, Rhabdomyosarkome, Aesthesioneuroblastome und Meningeome vorzufinden. Im Bereich der mittleren Schaedelbasis ist in erster Linie an nasopharyngeale Karzinome, Karzinommetastasen, Meningeome, Hypophysenadenome und Neurinome zu denken. Zu den haeufigsten Tumoren der hinteren Schaedelgrube, unter Einschluss des Kleinhirnbrueckenwinkels, gehoeren Neurinome, Meningeome, nasopharyngeale Karzinome, Karzinommetastasen, Chordome und Paragangliome. Eine wichtige Aufgabe der Schnittbildgebung liegt in der Bestimmung der exakten Tumorausdehnung und in der Beurteilung der Lagebeziehung des Tumors zu den komplexen anatomischen Strukturen wie Hirnnerven und

  10. Modeling skull's acoustic attenuation and dispersion on photoacoustic signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, L.; Behnam, H.; Nasiriavanaki, M. R.

    2017-03-01

    Despite the great promising results of a recent new transcranial photoacoustic brain imaging technology, it has been shown that the presence of the skull severely affects the performance of this imaging modality. In this paper, we investigate the effect of skull on generated photoacoustic signals with a mathematical model. The developed model takes into account the frequency dependence attenuation and acoustic dispersion effects occur with the wave reflection and refraction at the skull surface. Numerical simulations based on the developed model are performed for calculating the propagation of photoacoustic waves through the skull. From the simulation results, it was found that the skull-induced distortion becomes very important and the reconstructed image would be strongly distorted without correcting these effects. In this regard, it is anticipated that an accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in transcranial photoacoustic brain imaging.

  11. A cone-beam computed tomography triple scan procedure to obtain a three-dimensional augmented virtual skull model appropriate for orthognathic surgery planning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennen, G.R.; Mollemans, W.; Clercq, C. De; Abeloos, J.V.S.; Lamoral, P.; Lippens, F.R.C.; Neyt, N.; Casselman, J.W.; Schutyser, F.A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a new approach to acquire a three-dimensional virtual skull model appropriate for orthognathic surgery planning without the use of plaster dental models and without deformation of the facial soft-tissue mask. A "triple" cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan

  12. Osteoradionecrosis of the maxilla and skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komisar, A.; Silver, C.; Kalnicki, S.

    1985-01-01

    Osteoradionecrosis of the maxilla and base of skull are rare phenomena, usually seen after combined therapy for malignancies of the maxillary sinus. While the mandible is most commonly affected by osteoradionecrosis, the maxilla and skull base may also be affected when preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy is combined with surgery. Contributing factors may be: high radiation dosage delivered to the treatment volume (greater than 6000 rads), loss of tissue protective effects due to surgery, decreased vascularity caused by surgery and radiation, and proximity of a contaminated field. Onset of symptoms may vary. One patient presented 25 years after postoperative radiotherapy. Major symptoms were pain, trismus, and purulent discharge. The best diagnostic modality remains the history and physical exam, as the area is readily accessible. CT scans may be helpful in diagnosis and treatment planning. Therapy should follow time honored principles of local wound care. Home irrigations and hyperbaric therapy have been helpful in encouraging early sequestration and rapid healing.

  13. Augmented reality-assisted skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrilo, I; Sarrafzadeh, A; Bijlenga, P; Landis, B N; Schaller, K

    2014-12-01

    Neuronavigation is widely considered as a valuable tool during skull base surgery. Advances in neuronavigation technology, with the integration of augmented reality, present advantages over traditional point-based neuronavigation. However, this development has not yet made its way into routine surgical practice, possibly due to a lack of acquaintance with these systems. In this report, we illustrate the usefulness and easy application of augmented reality-based neuronavigation through a case example of a patient with a clivus chordoma. We also demonstrate how augmented reality can help throughout all phases of a skull base procedure, from the verification of neuronavigation accuracy to intraoperative image-guidance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Slower growth of skull base meningiomas compared with non-skull base meningiomas based on volumetric and biological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Naoya; Rabo, Carter S; Okita, Yoshiko; Kinoshita, Manabu; Kagawa, Naoki; Fujimoto, Yasunori; Morii, Eiichi; Kishima, Haruhiko; Maruno, Motohiko; Kato, Amami; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2012-03-01

    The precise natural history of incidentally discovered meningiomas (IDMs) remains unknown. It has been reported that for symptomatic meningiomas, tumor location can be used to predict growth. As to whether the same is true for IDMs has not been reported. This study aims to answer this question and provide biological evidence for this assumption by extending the study to involve symptomatic cases. A total of 113 IDMs were analyzed by fine volumetry. A comparison of growth rates and patterns between skull base and non-skull base IDMs was made. Subsequently, materials obtained from 210 patients with symptomatic meningiomas who were treated in the authors' hospital during the same period were included for a biological comparison between skull base and non-skull base tumors using the MIB-1 index. The 110 patients with IDMs included 93 females and 17 males, with a mean follow-up period of 46.9 months. There were 38 skull base (34%) and 75 non-skull base (66%) meningiomas. Forty-two (37%) did not exhibit growth of more than 15% of the volume, whereas 71 (63%) showed growth. Only 15 (39.5%) of 38 skull base meningiomas showed growth, whereas 56 (74.7%) of 75 non-skull base meningiomas showed growth (p = 0.0004). In the 71 IDMs (15 skull base and 56 non-skull base), there was no statistical difference between the 2 groups in terms of mean age, sex, follow-up period, or initial tumor volume. However, the percentage of growth (p = 0.002) was significantly lower and the doubling time (p = 0.008) was significantly higher in the skull base than in the non-skull base tumor group. In subsequently analyzed materials from 94 skull base and 116 non-skull base symptomatic meningiomas, the mean MIB-1 index for skull base tumors was markedly low (2.09%), compared with that for non-skull base tumors (2.74%; p = 0.013). Skull base IDMs tend not to grow, which is different from non-skull base tumors. Even when IDMs grow, the rate of growth is significantly lower than that of non-skull base

  15. Skull shape evolution in durophagous carnivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueirido, Borja; Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Martín-Serra, Alberto

    2013-07-01

    In this article, we investigate convergent evolution toward durophagy in carnivoran skull shape using geometric morphometrics in a sample of living and extinct species. Principal components analysis indicate that, in spite of the different dietary resources consumed by durophages-that is, bone-crackers and bamboo-feeders-both groups of carnivorans share portions of skull phenotypic spaces. We identify by discriminant analyses a shared set of adaptations toward durophagy in the skull of carnivores. However, ancestral states indicate that although durophages reached similar phenotypes, the evolutionary pathways that they followed are different depending upon the family to which they belong. Furthermore, while the carnivoran cranium more closely reflects the nature of the resources consumed-that is, soft or hard and tough items-the mandible shows particular feeding adaptations-that is, bamboo or bone. This finding supports the interpretation that the mandible has more evolutionary plasticity than the cranium, which is more limited to evolve toward a particular feeding adaptation. However, we find that the shapes of the cranium and the mandible are highly integrated for the whole order Carnivora. Published studies of teratological cats and dogs indicate that the role of internal constraints in shaping this pattern of integration is absent or weak and malleable by selection. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Plastic deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitter, de L.U.

    1937-01-01

    § 1. Plastic deformation of solid matter under high confining pressures has been insufficiently studied. Jeffreys 1) devotes a few paragraphs to deformation of solid matter as a preface to his chapter on the isostasy problem. He distinguishes two properties of solid matter with regard to its

  17. [Modern skull base surgery from the perspective of neurosurgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetzger, U

    2011-04-01

    At present, modern skull base surgery is a highly sophisticated interdisciplinary collaboration of various diagnostic and therapeutic disciplines. The overall goal is the treatment of complex tumorous, traumatic, vascular and inflammatory processes or developmental disorders of the skull base with preservation of function. The paper presents modern concepts, procedures and minimally invasive strategies in skull base surgery and also critically discusses the current trend to endoscopic and robot-assisted surgical techniques.

  18. Glottic and skull indices in canine brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Caccamo, R; Buracco, P.; La Rosa, G.; Cantatore, M; Romussi, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Forty dogs presented for brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome with laryngeal collapse not over 1st degree (saccule eversion) underwent glottis endoscopic and radiographic skull measurements before surgery. Fifteen Pugs, fifteen French and ten English Bulldogs were included. The goals were prospectively to compare three common brachycephalic breeds for anatomical differences regarding glottis and skull measurements, and to assess if any correlation between glottis and skull me...

  19. Paleopathological findings in radiographs of ancient and modern Greek skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagrigorakis, Manolis J; Karamesinis, Kostas G; Daliouris, Kostas P; Kousoulis, Antonis A; Synodinos, Philippos N; Hatziantoniou, Michail D

    2012-12-01

    The skull, when portrayed radiologically, can be a useful tool in detecting signs of systemic diseases and results of pathological growth mechanisms. The aim of this study was therefore to examine, compare, and classify findings in cranial configuration of pathological origin, in modern and ancient skulls. The material consists of 240 modern and 141 ancient dry skulls. Three radiographs for each skull (lateral, anteroposterior, basilar) provide enough evidence for differential diagnoses. Cases of osteoporosis are among the interesting pathological findings. A prevalence of female modern skulls in those determined as osteoporotic skulls is noted. Special interest is placed on the area of the sella turcica and many variations, regarding the shape and texture, are recognized both in ancient and modern skulls. Malignancies and important causes of cranial destruction are identified in both skull collections. Diploid thickening and osteolytic areas appear commonly among ancient remains. Moreover, from the ancient skull collection, one case possibly recognizable as fibrous dysplasia is noted while another case with an unusual exostosis gives rise to many questions. Interpreted with caution, the results of the present study, which can serve as an approach of paleopathology and paleoradiology, indicate similarity trends in cranial configuration of pathologic origin in modern and ancient people. Radiography and cephalometry were the main diagnostic tools used to gather evidence and are evaluated as a quite appropriate method to examine anthropological material and assess the internal structure of skeletal remains since they are non-destructive techniques.

  20. Contracture deformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deformity - contracture ... Contracture can be caused by any of the following: Brain and nervous system disorders, such as cerebral ... Follow your health care provider's instructions for treating contracture at home. Treatments may include: Doing exercises and ...

  1. A Method for Evaluating Treatment in Infants with Deformational Plagiocephaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanche, Stéphanie; Darvann, Tron Andre; Ólafsdottír, Hildur

    -surgical and involves parental education on infant repositioning to avoid pressure on the attened side, and, in many cases, orthotic molding helmet therapy. The purpose of this work was to develop a method for assessment of helmet therapy employing a statistical analysis of change in head asymmetry. The clinical......Deformational Plagiocephaly (DP) is a term describing head asymmetry and deformation commonly seen in infants. DP affects the back of the head and, to a lesser extent, the forehead. The deformity is thought to result from protracted external pressure to the skull in one position. Treatment is non...

  2. Evolutionary morphology of the rabbit skull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Kraatz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The skull of leporids (rabbits and hares is highly transformed, typified by pronounced arching of the dorsal skull and ventral flexion of the facial region (i.e., facial tilt. Previous studies show that locomotor behavior influences aspects of cranial shape in leporids, and here we use an extensive 3D geometric morphometrics dataset to further explore what influences leporid cranial diversity. Facial tilt angle, a trait that strongly correlates with locomotor mode, significantly predicts the cranial shape variation captured by the primary axis of cranial shape space, and describes a small proportion (13.2% of overall cranial shape variation in the clade. However, locomotor mode does not correlate with overall cranial shape variation in the clade, because there are two district morphologies of generalist species, and saltators and cursorial species have similar morphologies. Cranial shape changes due to phyletic size change (evolutionary allometry also describes a small proportion (12.5% of cranial shape variation in the clade, but this is largely driven by the smallest living leporid, the pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis. By integrating phylogenetic history with our geometric morphometric data, we show that the leporid cranium exhibits weak phylogenetic signal and substantial homoplasy. Though these results make it difficult to reconstruct what the ‘ancestral’ leporid skull looked like, the fossil records suggest that dorsal arching and facial tilt could have occurred before the origin of the crown group. Lastly, our study highlights the diversity of cranial variation in crown leporids, and highlights a need for additional phylogenetic work that includes stem (fossil leporids and includes morphological data that captures the transformed morphology of rabbits and hares.

  3. Skull base training and education using an artificial skull model created by selective laser sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Ohtaki, Masafumi; Fukushima, Takanori; Friedman, Allan H; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2010-06-01

    Practicing skull base approaches on cadavers affords the surgeon a chance to learn complex anatomical relationships and to practice surgical skills. However, there are ethical or legal problems in obtaining cadaver material in some countries. In addition, there is always risk of transmitting infections with cadaveric material. In order to get around these problems, we created a whole skull model which reproduces the detailed anatomy within the skull base using a selective laser sintering (SLS) technique. The first author's head was scanned using multidetector-row computed tomography. The data were reconstructed and converted into the standard triangulation language file system. Powdered material comprised of polyamide nylon and glass beads was laser-sintered in accord with the data derived from the head CT. The model was dissected under a surgical microscope using a high-speed drill, suction, and other surgical instruments. The appearance of both inner and outer cranial surfaces, including sutures, foramens, fissures, and protrusions, were clearly demonstrated. The artificial mastoid did not melt from the heat of the drill when a mastoidectomy was performed. The anatomical structures inside the mastoid and of paranasal sinuses were accurately reproduced in the model. The model created using SLS should be very useful for the teaching skull base approaches avoiding the ethical, legal, and infection problems inherent in cadavers.

  4. Extreme aplasia cutis congenita involving the skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrager, Sebastian; Voin, Vlad; Iwanaga, Joe; Tubbs, R Shane; Johnston, James

    2017-08-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) is a rare congenital malformation of primarily the skin; it is most commonly seen on the scalp but can occur anywhere on the body. The exact etiology is still unclear but there are many suggested causes. Classification systems have been proposed to help categorize patients and assist with treatment. Treatment options are controversial and range from conservative to surgical interventions. We report an extreme case of ACC that included a significant part of the skull. We discuss this case and review salient literature. Although such cases of ACC with bony involvement are rare, this aspect of the pathology should be kept in mind when treating or imaging such patients.

  5. Encephalocele and associated skull defects | Komolafe | West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Encephalocele, Skull defects, Cranioplasty. Résumé L'encéphalite est un problème congénital très fréquent dans le cabinet de la neurochirurgie dans le monde entier, avec la grandeur diverse des défaults du crane. Cet étude a été effectuée afin de déterminer l'importance du problème, évaluer le niveau de la ...

  6. The copper-beaten skull | Mahomed | SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The copper-beaten skull appearance is typically associated with craniosynostosis, where premature fusion of the cranial bone sutures results in the growing brain exerting pressure on the malleable cranium, producing a pattern known as the copper-beaten skull appearance. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • February 2012 ...

  7. Intrauterine skull depression and intracranial hemorrhage in a premature infant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batton, G.D.; DiCarmine, F.; Boal, D.K.

    1988-04-01

    The authors describe a case of a premature infant born with a parietal skull depression who suffered an intraventricular hemorrhage and an ipsilateral intracerebral injury. At 21 months of life the infant's gross motor milestones were delayed and he had moderate spastic hemiplegia. Although skull depressions at birth are usually benign, they may be associated with long-term neurologic sequelae.

  8. Glottic and skull indices in canine brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccamo, Roberta; Buracco, Paolo; La Rosa, Giuseppe; Cantatore, Matteo; Romussi, Stefano

    2014-01-11

    Forty dogs presented for brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome with laryngeal collapse not over 1st degree (saccule eversion) underwent glottis endoscopic and radiographic skull measurements before surgery. Fifteen Pugs, fifteen French and ten English Bulldogs were included. The goals were prospectively to compare three common brachycephalic breeds for anatomical differences regarding glottis and skull measurements, and to assess if any correlation between glottis and skull measurements was present. Linear measurements were used to obtain glottis and skull indices. Correlations between glottis and skull indices and glottic measurements were evaluated. Finally, glottis indices were compared among the three breeds. No correlation was found for glottis and skull indices. The glottic index differed among the three breeds (smaller in Pugs and higher in English Bulldogs), ultimately representing a morphologic indicator of the different larynx shape in the three breeds (more rounded in English Bulldogs, more elliptical in Pugs and in-between in French Bulldogs). The lack of correlation between skull/glottic indices does not support skull morphology as predictor of glottic morphology. As Pugs had the lowest glottic index, it may be speculated that Pugs' original narrow glottic width may predispose to further progressive respiratory deterioration more easily than in the other two breeds.

  9. Viscoelastic finite-element analysis of human skull - dura mater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the work, the dynamic characteristics of the human skull-dura mater system were studied. For the purpose of our analysis, we adopted a model consisted of a hollow sphere. By using the 'Patran and. Ansys' finite element processor, a simplified three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) of a human skull was ...

  10. Paraperesis: a rare complication after depressed skull fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Ali Asmat; Arshad, Anjum; Abida, Khatoon; Minakshi, Sardha

    2012-01-01

    Depressed skull fracture is an inward buckling of the skull bones, often because of direct blow to a small surface area of the skull with a blunt object. Monoparesis is often among its clinical presentations, but midline depressed skull fracture presenting as motor weakness of both lower limbs (Paraperesis) has not yet been reported. We report the case of 55 year old male admitted to emergency department with alleged history of hit on head by a wooden rod. He had pain, mild swelling and a small cut over scalp without any symptoms & signs of neurological deficit. On day two of admission patient developed weakness of both lower limbs. On CT scan patient had bilateral depressed skull fracture of high parietal bone on either side of midline. Patient was managed conservatively, made remarkable recovery and was discharged after 2 weeks. PMID:23133706

  11. Deformation microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Hughes, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Microstructural characterization and modeling has shown that a variety of metals deformed by different thermomechanical processes follows a general path of grain subdivision, by dislocation boundaries and high angle boundaries. This subdivision has been observed to very small structural scales...... of the order of 10 nm, produced by deformation under large sliding loads. Limits to the evolution of microstructural parameters during monotonic loading have been investigated based on a characterization by transmission electron microscopy. Such limits have been observed at an equivalent strain of about 10...

  12. Skulls and Human Evolution: The Use of Casts of Anthropoid Skulls in Teaching Concepts of Human Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipps, John

    1991-01-01

    Proposes the use of a series of 11 casts of fossil skulls as a method of teaching about the theory of human evolution. Students explore the questions of which skulls are "human" and which came first in Homo Sapien development, large brain or upright stance. (MDH)

  13. The Curious History of the Talgai Skull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Allen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the Australian winter of 1886 William Naish, a shearer in summer and a fencing contractor in the winter, erected a farm fence along Dalrymple Creek on East Talgai Station, c.125 km southwest of Brisbane. Work was interrupted by six days of torrential rain. On returning to the site Naish found that the rain had extended an erosion channel which he now had to cross walking to work, and from the extended section he retrieved a skull, heavily encrusted in carbonate, but clearly of human origin. Although it would take three decades to recognise and a further five to confirm, Naish had discovered the first direct proof of the Pleistocene antiquity of humans in Australia. Details of this history of Talgai are taken principally and extensively from Macintosh (1963, 1965, 1967a, 1967b, 1969, Elkin (1978, Gill (1978 and Langham (1978.

  14. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Skull Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Claudia F.E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Over the past 20 years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has advanced due to new techniques involving increased magnetic field strength and developments in coils and pulse sequences. These advances allow increased opportunity to delineate the complex skull base anatomy and may guide the diagnosis and treatment of the myriad of pathologies that can affect the skull base. Objectives The objective of this article is to provide a brief background of the development of MRI and illustrate advances in skull base imaging, including techniques that allow improved conspicuity, characterization, and correlative physiologic assessment of skull base pathologies. Data Synthesis Specific radiographic illustrations of increased skull base conspicuity including the lower cranial nerves, vessels, foramina, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, and effacement of endolymph are provided. In addition, MRIs demonstrating characterization of skull base lesions, such as recurrent cholesteatoma versus granulation tissue or abscess versus tumor, are also provided as well as correlative clinical findings in CSF flow studies in a patient pre- and post-suboccipital decompression for a Chiari I malformation. Conclusions This article illustrates MRI radiographic advances over the past 20 years, which have improved clinicians' ability to diagnose, define, and hopefully improve the treatment and outcomes of patients with underlying skull base pathologies. PMID:25992137

  15. New insights into the skull of Istiodactylus latidens (Ornithocheiroidea, Pterodactyloidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witton, Mark P

    2012-01-01

    The skull of the Cretaceous pterosaur Istiodactylus latidens, a historically important species best known for its broad muzzle of interlocking, lancet-shaped teeth, is almost completely known from the broken remains of several individuals, but the length of its jaws remains elusive. Estimates of I. latidens jaw length have been exclusively based on the incomplete skull of NHMUK R3877 and, perhaps erroneously, reconstructed by assuming continuation of its broken skull pieces as preserved in situ. Here, an overlooked jaw fragment of NHMUK R3877 is redescribed and used to revise the skull reconstruction of I. latidens. The new reconstruction suggests a much shorter skull than previously supposed, along with a relatively tall orbital region and proportionally slender maxilla, a feature documented in the early 20(th) century but ignored by all skull reconstructions of this species. These features indicate that the skull of I. latidens is particularly distinctive amongst istiodactylids and suggests greater disparity between I. latidens and I. sinensis than previously appreciated. A cladistic analysis of istiodactylid pterosaurs incorporating new predicted I. latidens skull metrics suggests Istiodactylidae is constrained to five species (Liaoxipterus brachyognathus, Lonchengpterus zhoai, Nurhachius ignaciobritoi, Istiodactylus latidens and Istiodactylus sinensis) defined by their distinctive dentition, but excludes the putative istiodactylids Haopterus gracilis and Hongshanopterus lacustris. Istiodactylus latidens, I. sinensis and Li. brachyognathus form an unresolved clade of derived istiodactylids, and the similarity of comparable remains of I. sinensis and Li. brachyognathus suggest further work into their taxonomy and classification is required. The new skull model of I. latidens agrees with the scavenging habits proposed for these pterosaurs, with much of their cranial anatomy converging on that of habitually scavenging birds.

  16. New insights into the skull of Istiodactylus latidens (Ornithocheiroidea, Pterodactyloidea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P Witton

    Full Text Available The skull of the Cretaceous pterosaur Istiodactylus latidens, a historically important species best known for its broad muzzle of interlocking, lancet-shaped teeth, is almost completely known from the broken remains of several individuals, but the length of its jaws remains elusive. Estimates of I. latidens jaw length have been exclusively based on the incomplete skull of NHMUK R3877 and, perhaps erroneously, reconstructed by assuming continuation of its broken skull pieces as preserved in situ. Here, an overlooked jaw fragment of NHMUK R3877 is redescribed and used to revise the skull reconstruction of I. latidens. The new reconstruction suggests a much shorter skull than previously supposed, along with a relatively tall orbital region and proportionally slender maxilla, a feature documented in the early 20(th century but ignored by all skull reconstructions of this species. These features indicate that the skull of I. latidens is particularly distinctive amongst istiodactylids and suggests greater disparity between I. latidens and I. sinensis than previously appreciated. A cladistic analysis of istiodactylid pterosaurs incorporating new predicted I. latidens skull metrics suggests Istiodactylidae is constrained to five species (Liaoxipterus brachyognathus, Lonchengpterus zhoai, Nurhachius ignaciobritoi, Istiodactylus latidens and Istiodactylus sinensis defined by their distinctive dentition, but excludes the putative istiodactylids Haopterus gracilis and Hongshanopterus lacustris. Istiodactylus latidens, I. sinensis and Li. brachyognathus form an unresolved clade of derived istiodactylids, and the similarity of comparable remains of I. sinensis and Li. brachyognathus suggest further work into their taxonomy and classification is required. The new skull model of I. latidens agrees with the scavenging habits proposed for these pterosaurs, with much of their cranial anatomy converging on that of habitually scavenging birds.

  17. Chordoma of skull base presenting as nasopharyngeal mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sant Prakash Kataria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While the nasopharynx is most commonly regarded by the otolaryngologist as a primary site of neoplastic involvement, it is also an avenue of spread of base-of-the-skull tumors presenting as bulging nasopharyngeal masses. Chordoma is a relatively rare tumor of the skull base and sacrum thought to originate from embryonic remnants of the notochord. Chordomas arising from the skull base/clivus are typically locally aggressive with lytic bone destruction. The optimal treatment may be photon/proton radiotherapy alone or combined with a gross total resection, when feasible. We report a case of intracranial chordoma presenting as nasopharyngeal mass.

  18. Skull x-ray in the evaluation of endocrine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaron, C; Li, Y P; Hindo, W

    1978-06-01

    The skull x-ray remains invaluable as a first step in the diagnosis of many endocrine disorders. Pituitary tumors commonly cause enlargement or distortion of the sella turcica, which can be seen on skull x-ray. Pinealomas and craniopharyngiomas may also be detected. Hyperparathyroidism can cause granular decalcification in the skull. Hypoparathyroidism produces calcification of the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Lesions due due to metastatic malignancies or eosinophilic granulomas may be noted in cases of diabetes insipidus. Sellar enlargement may be due to the "empty sella" syndrome. Twenty-five percent of all cases of enlarged sella may be accounted for by this syndrome.

  19. Skull base chondrosarcoma: evidence-based treatment paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Orin; Parsa, Andrew T

    2013-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are indolent but invasive chondroid malignancies that can form in the skull base. Standard management of chondrosarcoma involves surgical resection and adjuvant radiation therapy. This review evaluates evidence from the literature to assess the importance of the surgical approach and extent of resection on outcomes for patients with skull base chondrosarcoma. Also evaluated is the ability of the multiple modalities of radiation therapy, such as conventional fractionated radiotherapy, proton beam, and stereotactic radiosurgery, to control tumor growth. Finally, emerging therapies for the treatment of skull-base chondrosarcoma are discussed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Observation of skull-guided acoustic waves in a water-immersed murine skull using optoacoustic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    The skull bone, a curved solid multilayered plate protecting the brain, constitutes a big challenge for the use of ultrasound-mediated techniques in neuroscience. Ultrasound waves incident from water or soft biological tissue are mostly reflected when impinging on the skull. To this end, skull properties have been characterized for both high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) operating in the narrowband far-field regime and optoacoustic imaging applications. Yet, no study has been conducted to characterize the near-field of water immersed skulls. We used the thermoelastic effect with a 532 nm pulsed laser to trigger a wide range of broad-band ultrasound modes in a mouse skull. In order to capture the waves propagating in the near-field, a thin hydrophone was scanned in close proximity to the skull's surface. While Leaky pseudo-Lamb waves and grazing-angle bulk water waves are clearly visible in the spatio-temporal data, we were only able to identify skull-guided acoustic waves after dispersion analysis in the wavenumber-frequency space. The experimental data was found to be in a reasonable agreement with a flat multilayered plate model.

  1. Fin whale sound reception mechanisms: skull vibration enables low-frequency hearing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted W Cranford

    Full Text Available Hearing mechanisms in baleen whales (Mysticeti are essentially unknown but their vocalization frequencies overlap with anthropogenic sound sources. Synthetic audiograms were generated for a fin whale by applying finite element modeling tools to X-ray computed tomography (CT scans. We CT scanned the head of a small fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus in a scanner designed for solid-fuel rocket motors. Our computer (finite element modeling toolkit allowed us to visualize what occurs when sounds interact with the anatomic geometry of the whale's head. Simulations reveal two mechanisms that excite both bony ear complexes, (1 the skull-vibration enabled bone conduction mechanism and (2 a pressure mechanism transmitted through soft tissues. Bone conduction is the predominant mechanism. The mass density of the bony ear complexes and their firmly embedded attachments to the skull are universal across the Mysticeti, suggesting that sound reception mechanisms are similar in all baleen whales. Interactions between incident sound waves and the skull cause deformations that induce motion in each bony ear complex, resulting in best hearing sensitivity for low-frequency sounds. This predominant low-frequency sensitivity has significant implications for assessing mysticete exposure levels to anthropogenic sounds. The din of man-made ocean noise has increased steadily over the past half century. Our results provide valuable data for U.S. regulatory agencies and concerned large-scale industrial users of the ocean environment. This study transforms our understanding of baleen whale hearing and provides a means to predict auditory sensitivity across a broad spectrum of sound frequencies.

  2. Fin whale sound reception mechanisms: skull vibration enables low-frequency hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Ted W; Krysl, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Hearing mechanisms in baleen whales (Mysticeti) are essentially unknown but their vocalization frequencies overlap with anthropogenic sound sources. Synthetic audiograms were generated for a fin whale by applying finite element modeling tools to X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. We CT scanned the head of a small fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) in a scanner designed for solid-fuel rocket motors. Our computer (finite element) modeling toolkit allowed us to visualize what occurs when sounds interact with the anatomic geometry of the whale's head. Simulations reveal two mechanisms that excite both bony ear complexes, (1) the skull-vibration enabled bone conduction mechanism and (2) a pressure mechanism transmitted through soft tissues. Bone conduction is the predominant mechanism. The mass density of the bony ear complexes and their firmly embedded attachments to the skull are universal across the Mysticeti, suggesting that sound reception mechanisms are similar in all baleen whales. Interactions between incident sound waves and the skull cause deformations that induce motion in each bony ear complex, resulting in best hearing sensitivity for low-frequency sounds. This predominant low-frequency sensitivity has significant implications for assessing mysticete exposure levels to anthropogenic sounds. The din of man-made ocean noise has increased steadily over the past half century. Our results provide valuable data for U.S. regulatory agencies and concerned large-scale industrial users of the ocean environment. This study transforms our understanding of baleen whale hearing and provides a means to predict auditory sensitivity across a broad spectrum of sound frequencies.

  3. Fin Whale Sound Reception Mechanisms: Skull Vibration Enables Low-Frequency Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Ted W.; Krysl, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Hearing mechanisms in baleen whales (Mysticeti) are essentially unknown but their vocalization frequencies overlap with anthropogenic sound sources. Synthetic audiograms were generated for a fin whale by applying finite element modeling tools to X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. We CT scanned the head of a small fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) in a scanner designed for solid-fuel rocket motors. Our computer (finite element) modeling toolkit allowed us to visualize what occurs when sounds interact with the anatomic geometry of the whale’s head. Simulations reveal two mechanisms that excite both bony ear complexes, (1) the skull-vibration enabled bone conduction mechanism and (2) a pressure mechanism transmitted through soft tissues. Bone conduction is the predominant mechanism. The mass density of the bony ear complexes and their firmly embedded attachments to the skull are universal across the Mysticeti, suggesting that sound reception mechanisms are similar in all baleen whales. Interactions between incident sound waves and the skull cause deformations that induce motion in each bony ear complex, resulting in best hearing sensitivity for low-frequency sounds. This predominant low-frequency sensitivity has significant implications for assessing mysticete exposure levels to anthropogenic sounds. The din of man-made ocean noise has increased steadily over the past half century. Our results provide valuable data for U.S. regulatory agencies and concerned large-scale industrial users of the ocean environment. This study transforms our understanding of baleen whale hearing and provides a means to predict auditory sensitivity across a broad spectrum of sound frequencies. PMID:25633412

  4. Pseudotumoral allergic fungal sinusitis with skull base involvement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Braun, J J; Dupret, A; Veillon, F; Riehm, S

    2014-01-01

    Here we report a case of pseudotumoral recurrence of allergic fungal sinusitis with involvement of the skull base that was successfully treated with systemic corticosteroids and itraconazole without surgery...

  5. Solitary skull metastasis as initial manifestation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Jun

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A solitary skull metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC prior to diagnosis of the primary tumor without liver dysfunction is a very rare event. Case presentation A 71-year-old male, without known liver disease, presented to our institution with a palpable occipital scalp mass. On brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, a highly enhanced and osteolytic skull tumor was observed. The histological diagnosis obtained from the percutaneous needle biopsy was a cranial metastasis from HCC. The metastatic tumor was removed via occipital craniectomy, and the two primary liver mass lesions were subsequently treated by transarterial chemoembolization. Conclusion An isolated skull metastasis may be the sole initial presentation of HCC. Early diagnosis is essential in order to treat the primary disease. A skull metastasis from HCC should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with subcutaneous scalp mass and osteolytic defects on X-ray.

  6. Eosinophilic granuloma - x-ray of the skull (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... x-ray of the skull shows an eosinophilic granuloma (a lesion made-up of a type of ... This condition can range from a single eosinophilic granuloma to massive infiltration of skin, bone, and body ...

  7. Skull osteometry of the adult alpaca (Vicugna pacos)

    OpenAIRE

    Castañeda C., Henry; Laboratorio de Anatomía Animal y Fauna Silvestre, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Navarrete Z., Miluska; Laboratorio de Anatomía Animal y Fauna Silvestre, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Sato S., Alberto; Laboratorio de Anatomía Animal y Fauna Silvestre, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Chávez R., Alexander; Laboratorio de Anatomía Animal y Fauna Silvestre, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the skull osteometry and to calculate the craniometric indexes of adult alpacas (Vicugna pacos). The study was carried out using 30 heads of adult Huacaya alpacas (15 males and 15 females), from the district of Sicuani, Cusco, Peru. The skulls were obtained by the maceration technique. The anatomical description was applied using the recommended terminology by the Veterinary Anatomical Nomenclature 2012. A digital vernier was used in the measurement and calculatio...

  8. Dural Tears In Patients With Depressed Skull Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Gul; Aurangzeb, Ahsan; Khan, Shahbaz Ali; Hussain, Iqbal; Alam, Sudhair; Khan Afridi, Ehtisham Ahmed; Khan, Baynazir; Bhatti, Sajid Nazir

    2017-01-01

    The presence of skull fracture in patients sustaining traumatic brain injury is an important risk factor for intracranial lesions. Assessment of integrity of dura in depressed skull fracture is of paramount importance because if dura is torn, lacerated brain matter may be present in the wound which needs proper debridement followed by water tight dural closure to prevent meningitis, cerebral abscess, and pseudomeningocoele formation. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of dural tear in patients with depressed skull fractures. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Department of Neurosurgery Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad. All the patients of either patients above 1 year of age with depressed skull fracture were included in this study in consecutive manner. Patients were operated for skull fractures and per-operatively dura in the region of depressed skull fracture was closely observed for any dural tear. The data were collected on a predesigned pro forma. A total of 83 patients were included in this study out of which 57 (68.7%) were males and 26 (31.3%) were females. The age of the patients ranged from 1-50 (mean 15.71±13.49 years). Most common site of depressed skull fracture was parietal 32 (38.6%), followed by Frontal in 24 (28.9%), 21(25.3%) in temporal region, 5(6.0%) were in occipital region and only 1 (1.2%) in posterior fossa. Dural tear was present in 28 (33.7%) patients and it was absent in 55 (66.3%) of patients. In depressed skull fractures, there are high chances of associated traumatic dural tears which should be vigilantly managed.

  9. Peramorphic traits in the tokay gecko skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Juan D; Mapps, Aurelia A; Lewis, Patrick J; Thies, Monte L; Bauer, Aaron M

    2015-08-01

    Traditionally, geckos have been conceived to exhibit paedomorphic features relative to other lizards (e.g., large eyes, less extensively ossified skulls, and amphicoelous and notochordal vertebrae). In contrast, peramorphosis has not been considered an important process in shaping their morphology. Here, we studied different sized specimens of Gekko gecko to document ontogenetic changes in cranial anatomy, especially near maturity. Comparison of this species with available descriptions of other geckos resulted in the identification of 14 cranial characteristics that are expressed more strongly with size increase. These characteristics become move evident in later stages of post-hatching development, especially near maturation, and are, therefore, attributed to peramorphosis (hyperossification). ACCTRAN and DELTRAN character optimizations were applied to these characters using a tree of 11 genera derived from a gekkotan molecular phylogeny. This analysis revealed that G. gecko expresses the majority of these putative peramorphic features near maturity, and that some of these features are also expressed in species closely related to G. gecko. The characters studied have the potential to be applied in future phylogenetic and taxonomic studies of this group of lizards. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. [Human skull development and voice disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piron, A; Roch, J B

    2006-01-01

    The hominisation of the skull comes with the bipedic posture, due to a network of muscular and aponevrotic forces applied to the cranio-facial skeleton. A brief sight of the morphogenetic origine and issues of these forces help to understand more clearly the postural statement of the larynx, his functions, and his many extrinsic biomechanical bounds; then further his most frequently dysfunctions. The larynx is surrounded by several effective systems of protection: active, activo-passive, passive. The architectural features of the components of the laryngeal system allows us to consider the laryngeal function as an auto-balanced system. All the forces engaged are auto-balanced in a continuum of tension. This lead us to the concept of tensegrity system, neologism coming from tensional integrity described by Buckminster Fuller. The laryngeal employement by extrinsic system is pathological in case of chronicity. Any osteopathic treatment, which aims to restore the losses of laryngeal mobility, has to release first the peripherical structures involved in the laryngeal defense, before normalising the larynx itself Finally, the larynx recovers his functions in a tensegrity system.

  11. Pervasive genetic integration directs the evolution of human skull shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Esparza, Mireia; Sjøvold, Torstein; González-José, Rolando; Santos, Mauro; Hernández, Miquel; Klingenberg, Christian Peter

    2012-04-01

    It has long been unclear whether the different derived cranial traits of modern humans evolved independently in response to separate selection pressures or whether they resulted from the inherent morphological integration throughout the skull. In a novel approach to this issue, we combine evolutionary quantitative genetics and geometric morphometrics to analyze genetic and phenotypic integration in human skull shape. We measured human skulls in the ossuary of Hallstatt (Austria), which offer a unique opportunity because they are associated with genealogical data. Our results indicate pronounced covariation of traits throughout the skull. Separate simulations of selection for localized shape changes corresponding to some of the principal derived characters of modern human skulls produced outcomes that were similar to each other and involved a joint response in all of these traits. The data for both genetic and phenotypic shape variation were not consistent with the hypothesis that the face, cranial base, and cranial vault are completely independent modules but relatively strongly integrated structures. These results indicate pervasive integration in the human skull and suggest a reinterpretation of the selective scenario for human evolution where the origin of any one of the derived characters may have facilitated the evolution of the others. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Photogrammetric 3D skull/photo superimposition: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Valeria; Lubelli, Sergio; De Donno, Antonio; Inchingolo, Alessio; Lavecchia, Fulvio; Introna, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    The identification of bodies through the examination of skeletal remains holds a prominent place in the field of forensic investigations. Technological advancements in 3D facial acquisition techniques have led to the proposal of a new body identification technique that involves a combination of craniofacial superimposition and photogrammetry. The aim of this study was to test the method by superimposing various computerized 3D images of skulls onto various photographs of missing people taken while they were still alive in cases when there was a suspicion that the skulls in question belonged to them. The technique is divided into four phases: preparatory phase, 3d acquisition phase, superimposition phase, and metric image analysis 3d. The actual superimposition of the images was carried out in the fourth step. and was done so by comparing the skull images with the selected photos. Using a specific software, the two images (i.e. the 3D avatar and the photo of the missing person) were superimposed. Cross-comparisons of 5 skulls discovered in a mass grave, and of 2 skulls retrieved in the crawlspace of a house were performed. The morphologyc phase reveals a full overlap between skulls and photos of disappeared persons. Metric phase reveals that correlation coefficients of this values, higher than 0.998-0,997 allow to confirm identification hypothesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Giant intradiploic epidermoid cyst with large osteolytic lesions of the skull: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupp Wolfgang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report a case of tumor growth over a period of four decades, presenting with large multicentric lytic lesions of the skull and a profound mass effect, without neurological deficits. Clinical and radiological features of a patient with a giant intradiploic epidermoid and its impact on the choice of treatments are discussed. Case presentation An 81-year-old Caucasian man, who had first noticed a painless subcutaneous swelling over the left frontal scalp about 40 years ago, presented after a short episode of dizziness, which he experienced after treatment of focal retinal detachment. Computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examinations revealed an exceptionally large tumor involving major parts of the skull with extensive destruction of the bone and distinct deformation of the brain. Considering his age and the absence of neurological deficits or pain, the patient refused the option of tumor removal and cranioplasty, yet agreed to a biopsy, which confirmed the suspected diagnosis. Conclusions The course of the disease demonstrates that even patients with large tumors, inducing distinct pathomorphological changes, do not necessarily experience significant impairment of their quality of life without surgery. This is an impressive example of the chance to lead a long and satisfying life without specific medical treatment, avoiding the inherent risks of these procedures. Yet, there is a clear indication for surgery of intradiploic epidermoids in most cases described in the literature.

  14. Deformation of the human brain induced by mild acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayly, P V; Cohen, T S; Leister, E P; Ajo, D; Leuthardt, E C; Genin, G M

    2005-08-01

    Rapid deformation of brain matter caused by skull acceleration is most likely the cause of concussion, as well as more severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The inability to measure deformation directly has led to disagreement and confusion about the biomechanics of concussion and TBI. In the present study, brain deformation in human volunteers was measured directly during mild, but rapid, deceleration of the head (20-30 m/sec2 peak, approximately 40 msec duration), using an imaging technique originally developed to measure cardiac deformation. Magnetic resonance image sequences with imposed "tag" lines were obtained at high frame rates by repeating the deceleration and acquiring a subset of image data each repetition. Displacements of points on tag lines were used to estimate the Lagrangian strain tensor field. Qualitative (visual) and quantitative (strain) results illustrate clearly the deformation of brain matter due to occipital deceleration. Strains of 0.02-0.05 were typical during these events (0.05 strain corresponds roughly to a 5% change in the dimension of a local tissue element). Notably, compression in frontal regions and stretching in posterior regions were observed. The motion of the brain appears constrained by structures at the frontal base of the skull; it must pull away from such constraints before it can compress against the occipital bone. This mechanism is consistent with observations of contrecoup injury in occipital impact.

  15. Leonardo da Vinci's "A skull sectioned": skull and dental formula revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrits, Peter O; Veening, Jan G

    2013-05-01

    What can be learned from historical anatomical drawings and how to incorporate these drawings into anatomical teaching? The drawing "A skull sectioned" (RL 19058v) by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), hides more detailed information than reported earlier. A well-chosen section cut explores sectioned paranasal sinuses and ductus nasolacrimalis. A dissected lateral wall of the maxilla is also present. Furthermore, at the level of the foramen mentale, the drawing displays compact and spongious bony components, together with a cross-section through the foramen mentale and its connection with the canalis mandibulae. Leonardo was the first to describe a correct dental formula (6424) and made efforts to place this formula above the related dental elements. However, taking into account, the morphological features of the individual elements of the maxilla, it can be suggested that Leonardo sketched a "peculiar dental element" on the position of the right maxillary premolar in the dental sketch. The fact that the author did not make any comment on that special element is remarkable. Leonardo could have had sufficient knowledge of the precise morphology of maxillary and mandibular premolars, since the author depicted these elements in the dissected skull. The fact that the author also had access to premolars in situ corroborates our suggestion that "something went wrong" in this part of the drawing. The present study shows that historical anatomical drawings are very useful for interactive learning of detailed anatomy for students in medicine and dentistry. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Case of pycnodysostosis. Observation of skull by CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anegawa, Shigetaka; Bekki, Yoshiaki; Furukawa, Yasuhiro; Yokota, Seishi; Torigoe, Ryuichiro

    1987-07-01

    A 13-year-old boy was presented to the Department of Neurosurgery, Saiseikai Fukuoka General Hospital for further examinations concerning abnormal findings in the skull radiogram taken when he struck his head. His physical features showed some characteristics the same as those of pycnodysostosis as follows - proportionate dwarfism, prominent forehead, short spoon-shaped fingers, bilateral exophthalmos. A skull radiogram revealed widely open cranial sutures with no healing of the fracture and craniotomy which was performed for an acute epidural hematoma 6 years ago. Furthermore, the mandible was hypoplastic with a virtural loss of mandibular angle. CT of the soft tissues showed somewhat dilated cortical sulci and ventricles without any structural abnormalities in the brain. CT of bone algorythum revealed specific characteristics of this disease. The paranasal sinuses were quite hypoplastic. Especially in the maxillary sinuses, frontal sinussus and mastoid air cells, none of developments of sinuses were noted, even though the middle and internal ear seemed to be normal. Moreover, the ethomoid and sphenoid sinuses were noted, although their developments were poor. The appearance of skull base was normal, including the inlets and outlets of cranial nerves or vessels and synchondroses. However, the density of the skull base, especially in the diploe, was higher than normal in Hansfield number. Furthermore, detailed measurements of skull base demonstrated that the skull base itself was also dwarfish. In our study, the development of sinuses in bones with intramembranous ossification are worse than that with endochondral ossification. Furthermore, sutures or synchondroses in the skull base were well-developed than those of the convex. So, it is considered that pycnodysostosis must be the neighboring entity of diseases such as achondroplastic dwarfism or cleidocranial dysplasia. (J.P.N.).

  17. Morphological convergence in ‘river dolphin’ skulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte E. Page

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Convergent evolution can provide insights into the predictability of, and constraints on, the evolution of biodiversity. One striking example of convergence is seen in the ‘river dolphins’. The four dolphin genera that make up the ‘river dolphins’ (Inia geoffrensis, Pontoporia blainvillei, Platanista gangetica and Lipotes vexillifer do not represent a single monophyletic group, despite being very similar in morphology. This has led many to using the ‘river dolphins’ as an example of convergent evolution. We investigate whether the skulls of the four ‘river dolphin’ genera are convergent when compared to other toothed dolphin taxa in addition to identifying convergent cranial and mandibular features. We use geometric morphometrics to uncover shape variation in the skulls of the ‘river dolphins’ and then apply a number of phylogenetic techniques to test for convergence. We find significant convergence in the skull morphology of the ‘river dolphins’. The four genera seem to have evolved similar skull shapes, leading to a convergent morphotype characterised by elongation of skull features. The cause of this morphological convergence remains unclear. However, the features we uncover as convergent, in particular elongation of the rostrum, support hypotheses of shared feeding mode or diet and thus provide the foundation for future work into convergence within the Odontoceti.

  18. Morphological convergence in ‘river dolphin’ skulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    Convergent evolution can provide insights into the predictability of, and constraints on, the evolution of biodiversity. One striking example of convergence is seen in the ‘river dolphins’. The four dolphin genera that make up the ‘river dolphins’ (Inia geoffrensis, Pontoporia blainvillei, Platanista gangetica and Lipotes vexillifer) do not represent a single monophyletic group, despite being very similar in morphology. This has led many to using the ‘river dolphins’ as an example of convergent evolution. We investigate whether the skulls of the four ‘river dolphin’ genera are convergent when compared to other toothed dolphin taxa in addition to identifying convergent cranial and mandibular features. We use geometric morphometrics to uncover shape variation in the skulls of the ‘river dolphins’ and then apply a number of phylogenetic techniques to test for convergence. We find significant convergence in the skull morphology of the ‘river dolphins’. The four genera seem to have evolved similar skull shapes, leading to a convergent morphotype characterised by elongation of skull features. The cause of this morphological convergence remains unclear. However, the features we uncover as convergent, in particular elongation of the rostrum, support hypotheses of shared feeding mode or diet and thus provide the foundation for future work into convergence within the Odontoceti. PMID:29177120

  19. Geometric morphometrics of the skull of Tinamidae (Aves, Palaeognathae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrange, Federico J; Picasso, Mariana B J

    2010-12-01

    The Tinamidae comprise exclusively Neotropical palaegnathous birds, with homogeneous body morphology and no sexual dimorphism. The goal of this work was to explore the variation in skull morphology between taxa and its possible correspondence with features such as diet or gender using geometric morphometric tools. Eleven landmarks were analyzed in 53 skulls of 4 genera that inhabit grasslands: Nothoprocta, Eudromia, Nothura and Rhynchotus. Intrageneric and intergeneric variability was analyzed. The genera studied here can be distinguished based on the geometric shape of their skull, with prenarial region length and neurocranium shape as the most outstanding features. In the genus Eudromia, males and females could be differentiated, while in the genus Nothoprocta, the species differentiated according to their trophic habits. This study allows establishing that genera and, in some cases, the gender of the Tinamidae can be differentiated based on cranial shape. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Properties and architecture of the sperm whale skull amphitheatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Parvez; Amini, Shahrouz; Tadayon, Maryam; Miserez, Ali; Chinsamy, Anusuya

    2016-02-01

    The sperm whale skull amphitheatre cradles an enormous two-tonne spermaceti organ. The amphitheatre separates this organ from the cranium and the cervical vertebrae that lie in close proximity to the base of the skull. Here, we elucidate that this skull amphitheatre is an elastic, flexible, triple-layered structure with mechanical properties that are conjointly guided by bone histology and the characteristics of pore space. We contend that the amphitheatre will flex elastically to equilibrate forces transmitted via the spermaceti organ that arise through diving. We find that collisions from sperm whale aggression do not cause the amphitheatre to bend, but rather localise stress to the base of the amphitheatre on its anterior face. We consider, therefore, that the uniquely thin and extended construction of the amphitheatre, has relevance as an energy absorptive structure in diving. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Sex estimation in forensic anthropology: skull versus postcranial elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spradley, M Katherine; Jantz, Richard L

    2011-03-01

    When the pelvis is unavailable, the skull is widely considered the second best indicator of sex. The goals of this research are to provide an objective hierarchy of sexing effectiveness of cranial and postcranial elements and to test the widespread notion that the skull is superior to postcranial bones. We constructed both univariate and multivariate discriminant models using data from the Forensic Anthropology Data Bank. Discriminating effectiveness was assessed by cross-validated classification, and in the case of multivariate models, Mahalanobis D(2). The results clearly indicate that most postcranial elements outperform the skull in estimating sex. It is possible to correctly sex 88-90% of individuals with joint size, up to 94% with multivariate models of the postcranial bones. The best models for the cranium do not exceed 90%. We conclude that postcranial elements are to be preferred to the cranium for estimating sex when the pelvis is unavailable. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. SPECT/CT in the Diagnosis of Skull Base Osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Kumar, Rakesh; Kumar, Praveen; Jaganthan, Sriram; Patnecha, Manish; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Bandopadhyaya, Gurupad; Malhotra, Arun [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2011-09-15

    Skull base osteomyelitis is a potentially fatal disease. We demonstrate here the utility of SPECT/CT in diagnosing this entity, which was not obvious on a planar bone scan. A {sup 99mT}c MDP bone scan with SPECT/CT was carried out on a patient with clinically suspected skull base osteomyelitis. Findings were correlated with contrast enhanced CT (CECT) and MRI. Planar images were equivocal, but SPECT/CT showed intense uptake in the body of sphenoid and petrous temporal bone as well as the atlas corresponding to irregular bone destruction on CT and MRI. These findings indicate that SPECT/CT may have an additional role beyond planar imaging in the detection of skull base osteomyelitis.

  3. The ecological origins of snakes as revealed by skull evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Filipe O; Fabre, Anne-Claire; Savriama, Yoland; Ollonen, Joni; Mahlow, Kristin; Herrel, Anthony; Müller, Johannes; Di-Poï, Nicolas

    2018-01-25

    The ecological origin of snakes remains amongst the most controversial topics in evolution, with three competing hypotheses: fossorial; marine; or terrestrial. Here we use a geometric morphometric approach integrating ecological, phylogenetic, paleontological, and developmental data for building models of skull shape and size evolution and developmental rate changes in squamates. Our large-scale data reveal that whereas the most recent common ancestor of crown snakes had a small skull with a shape undeniably adapted for fossoriality, all snakes plus their sister group derive from a surface-terrestrial form with non-fossorial behavior, thus redirecting the debate toward an underexplored evolutionary scenario. Our comprehensive heterochrony analyses further indicate that snakes later evolved novel craniofacial specializations through global acceleration of skull development. These results highlight the importance of the interplay between natural selection and developmental processes in snake origin and diversification, leading first to invasion of a new habitat and then to subsequent ecological radiations.

  4. Radiologic assessment of maxillofacial, mandibular, and skull base trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuknecht, Bernhard [University Hospital of Zurich, Institute of Neuroradiology, Zurich (Switzerland); MRI-Medizinisch Radiodiagnostisches Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Graetz, Klaus [University Hospital of Zurich, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-03-01

    Cranio-maxillofacial injuries affect a significant proportion of trauma patients either in isolation or concurring with other serious injuries. Contrary to maxillofacial injuries that result from a direct impact, central skull base and lateral skull base (petrous bone) fractures usually are caused by a lateral or sagittal directed force to the skull and therefore are indirect fractures. The traditional strong role of conventional images in patients with isolated trauma to the viscerocranium is decreasing. Spiral multislice CT is progressively replacing the panoramic radiograph, Waters view, and axial films for maxillofacial trauma, and is increasingly being performed in addition to conventional films to detail and classify trauma to the mandible as well. Imaging thus contributes to accurately categorizing mandibular fractures based on location, into alveolar, mandibular proper, and condylar fractures - the last are subdivided into intracapsular and extracapsular fractures. In the midface, CT facilitates attribution of trauma to the categories central, lateral, or combined centrolateral fractures. The last frequently encompass orbital trauma as well. CT is the imaging technique of choice to display the multiplicity of fragments, the degree of dislocation and rotation, or skull base involvement. Transsphenoid skull base fractures are classified into transverse and oblique types; lateral base (temporal bone) trauma is subdivided into longitudinal and transverse fractures. Supplementary MR examinations are required when a cranial nerve palsy occurs in order to recognize neural compression. Early and late complications of trauma related to the orbit, anterior cranial fossa, or lateral skull base due to infection, brain concussion, or herniation require CT to visualize the osseous prerequisites of complications, and MR to define the adjacent brain and soft tissue involvement. (orig.)

  5. An Aneurysmal Bone Cyst in the Skull Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangjun; Jung, Dong Won; Pak, Min Gyoung; Song, Young Jin; Bae, Woo Yong

    2017-10-01

    An aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is believed to be attributable to intraosseous circulatory disturbance. An ABC is a vascular tumor of the bone caused by bony expansion after partial vascular occlusion and congestion. Most ABCs are found in adolescents (approximately 75% of ABCs are observed in patients under 20 years of age). The most common ABC sites are the long bones of the limbs, the vertebrae, and the cranial bone. Aneurysmal bone cysts in the skull base or ethmoid sinus have been but rarely reported worldwide. The authors report on a patient with a very large ABC in the skull base and the ethmoid sinus; this was successfully managed by a neurosurgeon.

  6. Sagittal synostosis: I. Preoperative morphology of the skull

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guimaraes-Ferreira, J.; Gewalli, F.; David, L.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise the preoperative morphology of the skull in sagittal synostosis in an objective and quantified way. The shapes of the skulls of 105 patients with isolated premature synostosis of the sagittal suture ( SS group) were studied and compared with those...... of a control group of 72 children with unilateral incomplete cleft lip (UICL). A standardised radiocephalometric technique was used to obtain the images. A modification of a method developed by Kreiborg was used to analyse the radiocephalograms, which included the digitisation of 88 landmarks in the calvaria...

  7. Segmentation, surface rendering, and surface simplification of 3-D skull images for the repair of a large skull defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Weibing; Shi, Pengfei; Li, Shuguang

    2009-10-01

    Given the potential demonstrated by research into bone-tissue engineering, the use of medical image data for the rapid prototyping (RP) of scaffolds is a subject worthy of research. Computer-aided design and manufacture and medical imaging have created new possibilities for RP. Accurate and efficient design and fabrication of anatomic models is critical to these applications. We explore the application of RP computational methods to the repair of a pediatric skull defect. The focus of this study is the segmentation of the defect region seen in computerized tomography (CT) slice images of this patient's skull and the three-dimensional (3-D) surface rendering of the patient's CT-scan data. We see if our segmentation and surface rendering software can improve the generation of an implant model to fill a skull defect.

  8. A novel deformation mechanism for superplastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, H.; Sakai, M. (Toyohashi Univ. of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science)

    1999-01-01

    Uniaxial compressive creep tests with strain value up to -0.1 for a [beta]-spodumene glass ceramic are conducted at 1060 C. From the observation of microstructural changes between before and after the creep deformations, it is shown that the grain-boundary sliding takes place via cooperative movement of groups of grains rather than individual grains under the large-scale-deformation. The deformation process and the surface technique used in this work are not only applicable to explain the deformation and flow of two-phase ceramics but also the superplastic deformation. (orig.) 12 refs.

  9. Anatomical Study of the Variations of the Facial bones in Skull of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The morphological features of facial region of the camel skull were investigated. A total of 42 camel skulls (30 mature and 12 immature) from three geographical locations (Maiduguri, Kano and Sokoto) in Nigeria were used in this study. The morphological features of the nasal region of the camel skulls were observed to be ...

  10. Single-layer skull approximations perform well in transcranial direct current stimulation modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rampersad, S.M.; Stegeman, D.F.; Oostendorp, T.F.

    2013-01-01

    In modeling the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation, the representation of the skull is an important factor. In a spherical model, we compared a realistic skull modeling approach, in which the skull consisted of three isotropic layers, to anisotropic and isotropic single-layer

  11. Evaluating Chamberlain's, Mcgregor's, and Mcrae's skull-base lines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traditionally the cranio-cervical junction is assessed by lateral cervical spine and base of skull radiographs which however have diagnostic challenges due to the complexity of the anatomy. Modern day Computed Tomography (CT) offers excellent bony detail and its ability to reconstruct the acquired CT data ...

  12. A Quantitative Analysis of Published Skull Base Endoscopy Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Douglas A.; Ponce, Francisco A.; Little, Andrew S.; Nakaji, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Skull base endoscopy allows for minimal access approaches to the sinonasal contents and cranial base. Advances in endoscopic technique and applications have been published rapidly in recent decades. Setting We utilized an Internet-based scholarly database (Web of Science, Thomson Reuters) to query broad-based phrases regarding skull base endoscopy literature. Participants All skull base endoscopy publications. Main Outcome Measures Standard bibliometrics outcomes. Results We identified 4,082 relevant skull base endoscopy English-language articles published between 1973 and 2014. The 50 top-cited publications (n = 51, due to articles with equal citation counts) ranged in citation count from 397 to 88. Most of the articles were clinical case series or technique descriptions. Most (96% [49/51])were published in journals specific to either neurosurgery or otolaryngology. Conclusions A relatively small number of institutions and individuals have published a large amount of the literature. Most of the publications consisted of case series and technical advances, with a lack of randomized trials. PMID:26949585

  13. Anatomic study of the pterion in Nigerian dry human skulls

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-04-14

    Apr 14, 2012 ... The sphenoparietal type is where the greater wing of the sphenoid articulates with parietal bone to form letter. H,[5] the frontotemporal is the type where the squamous part of the temporal bone articulates with the frontal, the. Anatomic study of the pterion in Nigerian dry human skulls. U Ukoha, CK Oranusi, ...

  14. Dynamic photophysical processes in laser irradiated human cortical skull bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelis, Andreas; Kwan, Chi-Hang; Matvienko, Anna

    2009-02-01

    Modulated luminescence (LUM) technique was applied to analyze photophysical processes in the cortical layer of human skull bones. The theoretical interpretation of the results was based on the optical excitation and decay rate equations of the fluorophore and on the molecular interaction parameter with the photon field density in the matrix of the bone. Using comparisons of the theory with the frequency response of dental LUM it was concluded that the optically active molecular species (fluorophore) in the bones is hydroxyapatite. An effective relaxation lifetime of skull cortical bone was derived theoretically and was found to depend on the intrinsic fluorophore decay lifetime, on the photon field density, and on the thickness of the bone. The experimentally measured dependencies were in excellent agreement with the theoretical model. The theory was able to yield measurements of the optical scattering coefficient, optical absorption coefficient, and mean coupling coefficient. These results show that the quantitative LUM can be used as a sensitive method to measure optical properties of the active fluorophore in cortical skull bones and the optical-field-induced molecular interaction parameter. When calibrated vs. laser intensity, the modulated luminescence can also be used to measure human skull thickness. These traits can be applied to monitor the bone mineral density (BMD) and, ultimately can be used as potential markers of bone health or disease, such as osteoporosis or bone cancer.

  15. [Chordoma of the base of the skull. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicilia, E; Pedra, J; Cánovas, E; Encina, L; Torrent, J; Abdalla, I; Castro, E N

    1990-01-01

    Chordomas of the skull base are neoplasms derived from persistent embryologic remnants. In spite of its histologic classification as benign tumors, the site and the adverse possibilities of the management its behaviour is malignant like. The case here referred to was localized in the basioccipital region and protruded in the rhinopharynx. Perusal of the bibliography and prognostic assessment of these type of patients.

  16. Skull morphometrics of male Subantarctic fur seals ( Arctocephalus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Skull morphometrics of two populations of Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) were compared in order to identify possible geographic variation as an indicator of gene flow between the populations, as well as a potential tool to identify the source of vagrant seals. Nineteen metric variables were recorded from ...

  17. Intraosseous cystic cavernous angioma with occipital skull osteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakyo Hirai, MD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Intraosseous cavernous angiomas (CAs of the skull are rare, and those cases that appear are commonly localized in the frontal bone. Computed tomography (CT and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI typically show a well-defined intradiploic lytic mass with homogeneous enhancement. We describe an intraosseous cystic CA of the occipital skull in a 46-year-old man who presented with transient right-sided deafness and posterior cervical pain. MRI revealed a large (3.7 cm × 3.2 cm × 4.1 cm extra-axial tumor, compressing the right cerebellar hemisphere, with heterogeneous peripheral enhancement. A CT scan showed osteolytic change of the occipital skull. The tumor was totally resected via a suboccipital approach. Intraoperatively, we found a mainly cystic tumor containing xanthochromic fluid. Histologically, the tumor was diagnosed as a cavernous angioma. This is the first reported case of an intraosseous CA of the skull with cyst formation. The characteristic radiological imaging of the presented case mimicked a malignant tumor with peripheral enhancement and prominent osteolytic change.

  18. Atlas and feature based 3D pathway visualization enhancement for skull base pre-operative fast planning from head CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghdasi, Nava; Li, Yangming; Berens, Angelique; Moe, Kris S.; Bly, Randall A.; Hannaford, Blake

    2015-03-01

    Minimally invasive neuroendoscopic surgery provides an alternative to open craniotomy for many skull base lesions. These techniques provides a great benefit to the patient through shorter ICU stays, decreased post-operative pain and quicker return to baseline function. However, density of critical neurovascular structures at the skull base makes planning for these procedures highly complex. Furthermore, additional surgical portals are often used to improve visualization and instrument access, which adds to the complexity of pre-operative planning. Surgical approach planning is currently limited and typically involves review of 2D axial, coronal, and sagittal CT and MRI images. In addition, skull base surgeons manually change the visualization effect to review all possible approaches to the target lesion and achieve an optimal surgical plan. This cumbersome process relies heavily on surgeon experience and it does not allow for 3D visualization. In this paper, we describe a rapid pre-operative planning system for skull base surgery using the following two novel concepts: importance-based highlight and mobile portal. With this innovation, critical areas in the 3D CT model are highlighted based on segmentation results. Mobile portals allow surgeons to review multiple potential entry portals in real-time with improved visualization of critical structures located inside the pathway. To achieve this we used the following methods: (1) novel bone-only atlases were manually generated, (2) orbits and the center of the skull serve as features to quickly pre-align the patient's scan with the atlas, (3) deformable registration technique was used for fine alignment, (4) surgical importance was assigned to each voxel according to a surgical dictionary, and (5) pre-defined transfer function was applied to the processed data to highlight important structures. The proposed idea was fully implemented as independent planning software and additional data are used for verification and

  19. Micrometeorite Impacts in Beringian Mammoth Tusks and a Bison Skull

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagstrum, Jonathon T.; Firestone, Richard B; West, Allen; Stefanka, Zsolt; Revay, Zsolt

    2010-02-03

    We have discovered what appear to be micrometeorites imbedded in seven late Pleistocene Alaskan mammoth tusks and a Siberian bison skull. The micrometeorites apparently shattered on impact leaving 2 to 5 mm hemispherical debris patterns surrounded by carbonized rings. Multiple impacts are observed on only one side of the tusks and skull consistent with the micrometeorites having come from a single direction. The impact sites are strongly magnetic indicating significant iron content. We analyzed several imbedded micrometeorite fragments from both tusks and skull with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). These analyses confirm the high iron content and indicate compositions highly enriched in nickel and depleted in titanium, unlike any natural terrestrial sources. In addition, electron microprobe (EMP) analyses of a Fe-Ni sulfide grain (tusk 2) show it contains between 3 and 20 weight percent Ni. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) of a particle extracted from the bison skull indicates ~;;0.4 mg of iron, in agreement with a micrometeorite ~;;1 mm in diameter. In addition, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and XRF analyses of the skull show possible entry channels containing Fe-rich material. The majority of tusks (5/7) have a calibrated weighted mean 14C age of 32.9 +- 1.8 ka BP, which coincides with the onset of significant declines<36 ka ago in Beringian bison, horse, brown bear, and mammoth populations, as well as in mammoth genetic diversity. It appears likely that the impacts and population declines are related events, although their precise nature remains to be determined.

  20. Advanced neuronavigation in skull base tumors and vascular lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, V; Spangenberg, P; Mayfrank, L; Reinges, M; Gilsbach, J M; Coenen, V A

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the usefulness of recent advances of neuronavigational technology in the management of skull base tumors and of vascular lesions, treated via a skull base approach. In 16 patients (skull base meningioma n = 9, petrous apex epidermoid n = l, craniopharyngeoma n = 1, giant internal carotid artery aneurysm n = 1, basilar/vertebral artery aneurysm n = 2, brain stem cavernoma n = 2), "advanced" neuronavigation was used. In contrast to "conventional" neuronavigation, the information for the neurosurgeon was enhanced by the intraoperative screen display of 3-dimensional reconstructions of the lesion, vessels, nerves and fiber tracts at risk. The 3-dimensional reconstructions were obtained by preoperative manual or automated segmentation processes. In addition, different imaging modalities (computed tomography [CT] with magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], CT with CT angiography, T (l)- with diffusion-weighted MRI) were fused and shown on the screen. In the cases of tumors, "advanced" neuronavigation facilitated the approach (n = 4), contributed to tailor the approach (n = 2) and helped to identify hidden neurovascular structures (n = 9). In the cases of aneurysms, "advanced" neuronavigation allowed us to reduce the skull base approach to the needs of safe aneurysm clipping (n = 3). In both cases of brain stem cavernoma, "advanced" neuronavigation was deemed useful for definition of the best surgical approach in relation to the pyramidal tract and brain stem nuclei. The authors' experiences suggest that neuronavigation, which displays 3-dimensional reconstructions of lesion, vessels, nerves and fiber tracts during surgery and makes use of image fusion techniques, is an important tool in the neurosurgical management of skull base lesions.

  1. Extensive Allergic Fungal Rhinosinusitis: Ophthalmic and Skull Base Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashishth, Ashish

    2015-09-01

    To review the clinical features, ophthalmic and skull base complications, radiologic correlates, surgical methods and outcomes in cases of extensive allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS). The retrospective review was carried out at a tertiary referral center and included 11 patients with extensive AFRS. Inclusion criteria were confirmed cases of AFRS with intracranial extension, gross erosion of the skull base or medial orbital wall and/or ophthalmic complications of AFRS, including visual loss. Acute bacterial or invasive fungal sinusitis and other non-AFRS sinus pathologies with orbital or skull base complications were excluded from the study. The mean age of patients was 22.7 years. Proptosis was the most common presenting feature followed by diplopia and visual loss. Four patients exhibited unilateral visual loss with one case of sudden acute onset. Intracranial extradural spread to the middle cranial fossa was observed in two cases with cavernous sinus involvement, destruction of the entire cranial base and extension to the petrous temporal bone. Ten patients exhibited co-existing orbital and skull base erosion whereas gross erosion of the lamina papyracea alone was seen in one patient. All patients underwent endoscopic sinus surgery with complete disease clearance. The minimum and maximum follow-up periods were 1 and 3 years, respectively with one documented recurrence 18 months after surgery. Visual recovery was complete after sudden vision loss whereas it was only partial or absent in patients with prolonged vision loss. Cases of extensive AFRS with ophthalmic and skull base complications pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges and merit early intervention with long-term follow-up.

  2. High Resolution Three-Dimensional MR Imaging of the Skull Base: Compartments, Boundaries, and Critical Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Ari Meir; Aygun, Nafi; Herzka, Daniel A; Ishii, Masaru; Gallia, Gary L

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution 3D MRI of the skull base allows for a more detailed and accurate assessment of normal anatomic structures as well as the location and extent of skull base pathologies than has previously been possible. This article describes the techniques employed for high-resolution skull base MRI including pre- and post-contrast constructive interference in the steady state (CISS) imaging and their utility for evaluation of the many small structures of the skull base, focusing on those regions and concepts most pertinent to localization of cranial nerve palsies and in providing pre-operative guidance and post-operative assessment. The concept of skull base compartments as a means of conceptualizing the various layers of the skull base and their importance in assessment of masses of the skull base is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Skull base, orbits, temporal bone, and cranial nerves: anatomy on MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morani, Ajaykumar C; Ramani, Nisha S; Wesolowski, Jeffrey R

    2011-08-01

    Accurate delineation, diagnosis, and treatment planning of skull base lesions require knowledge of the complex anatomy of the skull base. Because the skull base cannot be directly evaluated, imaging is critical for the diagnosis and management of skull base diseases. Although computed tomography (CT) is excellent for outlining the bony detail, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides better soft tissue detail and is helpful for evaluating the adjacent meninges, brain parenchyma, and bone marrow of the skull base. Thus, CT and MR imaging are often used together for evaluating skull base lesions. This article focuses on the radiologic anatomy of the skull base pertinent to MR imaging evaluation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Proton therapy for tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munzenrider, J.E.; Liebsch, N.J. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Univ. Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Charged particle beams are ideal for treating skull base and cervical spine tumors: dose can be focused in the target, while achieving significant sparing of the brain, brain stem, cervical cord, and optic nerves and chiasm. For skull base tumors, 10-year local control rates with combined proton-photon therapy are highest for chondrosarcomas, intermediate for male chordomas, and lowest for female chordomas (94%, 65%, and 42%, respectively). For cervical spine tumors, 10-year local control rates are not significantly different for chordomas and chondrosarcomas (54% and 48%, respectively), nor is there any difference in local control between males and females. Observed treatment-related morbidity has been judged acceptable, in view of the major morbidity and mortality which accompany uncontrolled tumor growth. (orig.)

  5. Variation of BMP3 contributes to dog breed skull diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Schoenebeck

    Full Text Available Since the beginnings of domestication, the craniofacial architecture of the domestic dog has morphed and radiated to human whims. By beginning to define the genetic underpinnings of breed skull shapes, we can elucidate mechanisms of morphological diversification while presenting a framework for understanding human cephalic disorders. Using intrabreed association mapping with museum specimen measurements, we show that skull shape is regulated by at least five quantitative trait loci (QTLs. Our detailed analysis using whole-genome sequencing uncovers a missense mutation in BMP3. Validation studies in zebrafish show that Bmp3 function in cranial development is ancient. Our study reveals the causal variant for a canine QTL contributing to a major morphologic trait.

  6. Skull Base Osteomyelitis in the Emergency Department: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Burak Sayhan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Skull base osteomyelitis (SBO is a rare clinical presentation and usually occurs as a complication of trauma or sinusitis. A 5-year-old child presented to the emergency department with a three-week history of fever associated with drowsiness and left parietal headache, and a week's history of swelling on the left frontoparietal soft tissue. He had suffered a penetrating scalp injury four month ago. On physical examination, there was a tender swelling with purulent stream on the lateral half of his scalp. His vital signs are within normal limits. Plain X-ray of the skull showed a lytic lesion on the left frontoparietal bone. A cranial computed tomography (CT scan demonstrated a large subgaleal abscess at the left frontoparietal region. SBO possesses a high morbidity and mortality; therefore, prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment are mandatory to prevent further complications and to reduce morbidity and mortality significantly.

  7. Penetrating anterior skull base fracture inflicted by a cow's horn

    OpenAIRE

    Adomas Bunevicius; Karolis Bareikis; Laimutis Kalasauskas; Arimantas Tamasauskas

    2016-01-01

    Farm workers are at increased risk for animal-inflicted head injuries that are associated with significant morbidity and occasionally may be fatal. These injuries may cause permanent eye damage with or without concomitant skull base fracture. Here, we present a male farmer who suffered a cow attack that resulted in perforating orbital injury with comminuted frontobasal cranial fracture caused by a cow's horn. The next day, the patient developed nasal and orbital cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak...

  8. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S Naftulin

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Computed Tomography (CT collect three-dimensional data (3D that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM images to stereolithography (STL files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3-4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14-17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4-6 hr; printing = 9-11 hr, post-processing = <30 min. Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1-5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes.

  9. Intracranial hypertension secondary to a skull lesion without mass effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serlin, Yonatan; Benifla, Mony; Kesler, Anat; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    We report and discuss five patients with intracranial hypertension due to a skull lesion reducing cerebral sinus patency with a compressive, non-thrombotic mechanism. We illustrate the importance of a high level of suspicion for this condition in patients presenting with headache, papilledema and increased intracranial pressure in the absence of focal signs or radiological evidence of mass effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mastoid pneumocoele with skull base and cervical spine pneumatisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Ian A; Greig, Sam R; Bird, Philip A

    2013-10-01

    Very uncommonly, Eustachian tube dysfunction can lead to symptomatic chronic elevation of middle ear pressure with aeration of bone and adjacent structures in the skull base and upper cervical spine, and an increased risk of fracture. We present a case demonstrating the natural history of this condition over 11 years before treatment and 10 months after treatment. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  11. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftulin, Jason S; Kimchi, Eyal Y; Cash, Sydney S

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) collect three-dimensional data (3D) that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D) screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images to stereolithography (STL) files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3-4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14-17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4-6 hr; printing = 9-11 hr, post-processing = Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1-5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes.

  12. Hydrologic reconnaissance of Skull Valley, Tooele County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, James W.; Waddell, K.M.

    1968-01-01

    This report is the second in a series by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, which describes the water resources of the western basins of Utah. Its purpose is to present available hydrologic data on Skull Valley, to provide an evaluation of the potential water-resource development of the valley, and to identify needed studies that would help provide an understandingof the valley's water supply.

  13. Fungal Infection of the Sinus and Anterior Skull Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Javadi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available   Abstract   Background: Invasive fungal infection is an opportunistic infection caused commonly   by mucoraccae and aspergillus. It mostly occurs in patients with underlying disease.   Since it has a high mortality and morbidity rate, considering a treatment strategy seems   necessary.   Objective: Since there has not been a clear protocol for treating these patients, we decided   to establish a protocol for fungal infection of sinus and anterior skull base management.   Methods: This retrospective and descriptive case study series included 30 patients.   After confirming the pathogen, the authors came to a proper protocol for treatment which   is mentioned later.   Results: The site involvement included nose and orbital cavity (53.3%, anterior skull   base and brain in conjunction with sinonasal (36.6% and simple nasal cavity involvement   (10%. 86.6% of the patients had underlying diseases. 56.6% of patients had diabetes   as a single underlying disease, while 13.3% had both diabetes and renal failure in   combination. Acute lymphocytic leukemia was present in 6.6%, renal failure in 3.3%, lupus   in 3.3% and chronic lymphocytic leukemia in 3.3% of patients. Mortality rate was   40%. We categorized the patients into 3 groups: only sinonasal, sinonasal and orbit, and   associated anterior skull base and brain involvement.   Conclusion: Early diagnosis is an important factor in improving survival. Anterior   skull base and brain involvement has a very poor prognosis.  

  14. Universal deformation formulas

    OpenAIRE

    Remm, E.; Markl, M.

    2015-01-01

    We give a conceptual explanation of universal deformation formulas for unital associative algebras and prove some results on the structure of their moduli spaces. We then generalize universal deformation formulas to other types of algebras and their diagrams.

  15. Morphometry of the Greater Palatal Canal in Adult Skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Reinaldo A; Cáceres, Felipe; Vera, Cristóbal

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in dry skulls the length and angle between the greater palatine foramen and the foramen rotundum in both the frontal and sagittal planes. In 50 human skulls from the department of morphology, the distance and angulation required to reach the foramen rotundum through the greater palatine canal were measured in the frontal and sagittal planes. A stylet was introduced up to the foramen rotundum in each greater palatine canal and fixed. The skulls were then photographed from a front and lateral view (both right and left). Finally, the stylets were photographed on graph paper. These images were analyzed with Photoshop software. In the frontal plane, mean angulations of 5.32 degrees on the right side and 6.15 degrees on the left side were obtained. In the sagittal plane, mean angulations of 61.66 degrees on the right side and 61.81 degrees on the left side were obtained. Finally, the mean length required to reach the foramen rotundum was 31.95  mm on the right side and 32.49  mm on the left side. Some of these results differ from those stated in the foreign literature (10 degrees front, 70 degrees sagittal). These differences should be considered for both clinical practice and teaching in Chile.

  16. Ground truth data generation for skull-face overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, O; Cavalli, F; Campomanes-Álvarez, B R; Campomanes-Álvarez, C; Valsecchi, A; Huete, M I

    2015-05-01

    Objective and unbiased validation studies over a significant number of cases are required to get a more solid picture on craniofacial superimposition reliability. It will not be possible to compare the performance of existing and upcoming methods for craniofacial superimposition without a common forensic database available for the research community. Skull-face overlay is a key task within craniofacial superimposition that has a direct influence on the subsequent task devoted to evaluate the skull-face relationships. In this work, we present the procedure to create for the first time such a dataset. We have also created a database with 19 skull-face overlay cases for which we are trying to overcome legal issues that allow us to make it public. The quantitative analysis made in the segmentation and registration stages, together with the visual assessment of the 19 face-to-face overlays, allows us to conclude that the results can be considered as a gold standard. With such a ground truth dataset, a new horizon is opened for the development of new automatic methods whose performance could be now objectively measured and compared against previous and future proposals. Additionally, other uses are expected to be explored to better understand the visual evaluation process of craniofacial relationships in craniofacial identification. It could be very useful also as a starting point for further studies on the prediction of the resulting facial morphology after corrective or reconstructive interventionism in maxillofacial surgery.

  17. Micro-mechanical properties of different sites on woodpecker's skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yikun; Wang, Lizhen; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Hongquan; Lin, Chia-Ying; Fan, Yubo

    2017-11-01

    The uneven distributed microstructure featured with plate-like spongy bone in woodpecker's skull has been found to further help reduce the impact during woodpecker's pecking behavior. Therefore, this work was to investigate the micro-mechanical properties and composition on different sites of Great Spotted woodpecker's (GSW) skull. Different sites were selected on forehead, tempus and occiput, which were also compared with those of Eurasian Hoopoe (EH) and Lark birds (LB). Micro structural parameters assessed from micro computed tomography (μCT) occurred significantly difference between GSW, EH and LB. The micro finite element (micro-FE) models were developed and the simulation was performed as a compression process. The maximal stresses of GSW's micro-FE models were all lower than those of EH and LB respectively and few concentrated stresses were noticed on GSW's trabecular bone. Fourier transform infrared mapping suggesting a greater organic content in the occiput of GSW's cranial bone compared with others. The nano-hardness of the GSW's occiput was decreasing from forehead to occiput. The mechanical properties, site-dependent hardness distribution and special material composition of GSW's skull bone are newly found in this study. These factors may lead to a new design of bulk material mimicking these characteristics.

  18. Shape similarities and differences in the skulls of scavenging raptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangdi, S I; Dong, Yiyi; Ma, Yujun; Zhang, Zihui

    2015-04-01

    Feeding adaptations are a conspicuous feature of avian evolution. Bill and cranial shape as well as the jaw muscles are closely related to diet choice and feeding behaviors. Diurnal raptors of Falconiformes exhibit a wide range of foraging behaviors and prey preferences, and are assigned to seven dietary groups in this study. Skulls of 156 species are compared from the dorsal, lateral and ventral views, by using geometric morphometric techniques with those landmarks capturing as much information as possible on the overall shape of cranium, bill, orbits, nostrils and attachment area for different jaw muscles. The morphometric data showed that the skull shape of scavengers differ significantly from other raptors, primarily because of different feeding adaptations. As a result of convergent evolution, different scavengers share generalized common morphology, possessing relatively slender and lower skulls, longer bills, smaller and more sideward orbits, and more caudally positioned quadrates. Significant phylogenetic signals suggested that phylogeny also played important role in shape variation within scavengers. New World vultures can be distinguished by their large nostrils, narrow crania and small orbits; Caracaras typically show large palatines, crania and orbits, as well as short, deep and sharp bill.

  19. The use of free flaps in skull base reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macía, G; Picón, M; Nuñez, J; Almeida, F; Alvarez, I; Acero, J

    2016-02-01

    Skull base tumours are rare, comprising less than 1% of all tumours of the head and neck. Surgical treatment of these tumours involves the approach, the resection, and the reconstruction of the defect, which present a challenge due to the technical difficulty and anatomical complexity. A retrospective study of 17 patients with tumours involving the skull base, treated by resection and immediate reconstruction using microsurgical free flaps, is presented; 11 were men and six were women. The following types of flap were used: osteocutaneous fibula flaps, fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flaps, and myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flaps. The most common histology of the tumours was squamous cell carcinoma. The most frequent point of origin was the paranasal sinuses (58.8%). All of the free flaps used for reconstruction were viable. A cerebrospinal fluid fistula occurred in two patients, and in one of these cases, meningoencephalitis led to death. In conclusion, the reconstruction of large defects of the skull base after ablation requires a viable tissue that in many cases can be obtained only through the use of microvascular free flaps. The type of flap to be selected depends on the anatomical structures and size of the defect to be restored. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Does nasal echolocation influence the modularity of the mammal skull?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, S E; Lofgren, S E

    2013-11-01

    In vertebrates, changes in cranial modularity can evolve rapidly in response to selection. However, mammals have apparently maintained their pattern of cranial integration throughout their evolutionary history and across tremendous morphological and ecological diversity. Here, we use phylogenetic, geometric morphometric and comparative analyses to test the hypothesis that the modularity of the mammalian skull has been remodelled in rhinolophid bats due to the novel and critical function of the nasal cavity in echolocation. We predicted that nasal echolocation has resulted in the evolution of a third cranial module, the 'nasal dome', in addition to the braincase and rostrum modules, which are conserved across mammals. We also test for similarities in the evolution of skull shape in relation to habitat across rhinolophids. We find that, despite broad variation in the shape of the nasal dome, the integration of the rhinolophid skull is highly consistent with conserved patterns of modularity found in other mammals. Across their broad geographical distribution, cranial shape in rhinolophids follows two major divisions that could reflect adaptations to dietary and environmental differences in African versus South Asian distributions. Our results highlight the potential of a relatively simple modular template to generate broad morphological and functional variation in mammals. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  1. Human cadaver brain infusion skull model for neurosurgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabe, Jon; Olabe, Javier; Roda, Jose Maria; Sancho, Vidal

    2011-01-01

    Microsurgical technique and anatomical knowledge require extensive laboratory training. Human cadaver models are especially valuable as they supply a good microsurgical training environment simultaneously providing authentic brain anatomy. We developed the "skull infusion model" as an extension of our previous "brain infusion model" taking it a step further maintaining simplicity but enhancing realism. Four human cadaveric brains donated for educational purposes were explanted at autopsy. The specimens were prepared cannulating carotid and vertebral arteries with plastic tubings, flushed with abundant water and fixed for 1 month in formaldehyde. They were then enclosed with white silk clothing (emulating the dura mater) and inserted into human skulls cut previously into two pieces. Tap water at a flow rate of 10 L/h was infused through the arterial tubings. Diverse microsurgical procedures were performed by two trainees, including craniotomies with microsurgical approaches and techniques such as sylvian fissure exposure, extra-intracranial and intra-intracranial bypass, approaches to the ventricles and choroidal fissure opening. The water infusion fills the arterial system, leaking into the interstitial and cisternal space and finally moistening the whole specimen. This makes vascular microsurgical techniques become extremely realistic, increasing its compliance making manipulations easier and more authentic. Standard microsurgical laboratories frequently have difficulties to work with decapitated human cadaver heads but could have human brains readily available. Using the infusion model and inserting it in a human skull makes the environment much more realistic. Its simplicity and inexpensiveness make it a good alternative for developing microsurgical techniques.

  2. Incidence and location of zygomaticofacial foramen in adult human skulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Kumar. S, Kesavi D

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was to investigate the morphology, topographic anatomy and variations of Zygomaticofacial foramen (ZFF. Frequency variations and Location/distance of ZFF from surrounding standard landmarks were evaluated in 100 adult human dry skulls. The frequency of ZFF was varied from being single to as many as four foramina and absence of ZFF, which was classified into Type I – V for single, double, triple, four foramina and absence of ZFF respectively. The frequency (% of these types was Type I: 46 & 51, Type II: 31 & 26, Type III: 4 & 6, Type IV: 1 & 1 and Type V: 18 & 16 respectively on right & left sides of the skulls. The mean distance of Zygomaticofacial foramen from Zygomaticomaxillary suture, nearest part of Orbital margin, Frontozygomatic suture, Zygomaticotemporal suture and Zygomatic angle was 13.8 & 12.2mm, 6.8 & 6.9mm, 24.8 & 26.7mm, 20.8 & 21.5mm and 12.4 & 13.5mm respectively on right & left sides of skulls. Knowledge on these variables will be helpful for surgeons for various surgical procedures like Orbitozygomatic craniotomy, for nerve block and Malar reduction surgeries.

  3. DTM: Deformable Template Matching

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyungtae; Kwon, Heesung; Robinson, Ryan M.; Nothwang, William D.

    2016-01-01

    A novel template matching algorithm that can incorporate the concept of deformable parts, is presented in this paper. Unlike the deformable part model (DPM) employed in object recognition, the proposed template-matching approach called Deformable Template Matching (DTM) does not require a training step. Instead, deformation is achieved by a set of predefined basic rules (e.g. the left sub-patch cannot pass across the right patch). Experimental evaluation of this new method using the PASCAL VO...

  4. Implant-retained skull prosthesis to cover a large defect of the hairy skull resulting from treatment of a basal cell carcinoma : A clinical report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Jitske; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Visser, Anita

    Skin carcinoma, particularly basal cell carcinoma, and its treatment can result in large defects of the hairy skull. A 53-year-old man is described who was surgically treated for a large basal cell carcinoma invading the skin and underlying tissue at the top of the hairy skull. Treatment consisted

  5. Is solid always best? Cranial performance in solid and fenestrated caecilian skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Maddin, Hillary C; Herzen, Julia; Beckmann, Felix; Summers, Adam P

    2012-03-01

    Caecilians (Lissamphibia: Gymnophiona) are characterized by a fossorial lifestyle that appears to play a role in the many anatomical specializations in the group. The skull, in particular, has been the focus of previous studies because it is driven into the substrate for burrowing. There are two different types of skulls in caecilians: (1) stegokrotaphic, where the squamosal completely covers the temporal region and the jaw closing muscles, and (2) zygokrotaphic, with incomplete coverage of the temporal region by the squamosal. We used 3-D imaging and modeling techniques to explore the functional consequences of these skull types in an evolutionary context. We digitally converted stegokrotaphic skulls into zygokrotaphic skulls and vice versa. We also generated a third, akinetic skull type that was presumably present in extinct caecilian ancestors. We explored the benefits and costs of the different skull types under frontal loading at different head angles with finite element analysis (FEA). Surprisingly, the differences in stress distributions and bending between the three tested skull types were minimal and not significant. This suggests that the open temporal region in zygokrotaphic skulls does not lead to poorer performance during burrowing. However, the results of the FEA suggest a strong relationship between the head angle and skull performance, implying there is an optimal head angle during burrowing.

  6. Divergent Skull Morphology Supports Two Trophic Specializations in Otters (Lutrinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori L Timm-Davis

    Full Text Available Variation in terrestrial mammalian skull morphology is known to constrain feeding performance, which in turn influences dietary habits and ultimately fitness. Among mustelids, otters have evolved two feeding specializations: underwater raptorial capture of prey (mouth-oriented and capture of prey by hand (hand-oriented, both of which have likely associations with morphology and bite performance. However, feeding biomechanics and performance data for otters are sparse. The first goal of this study was to investigate the relationships between feeding morphology and bite performance among two mouth-oriented piscivores (Pteronura brasiliensis and Lontra canadensis and two hand-oriented invertebrate specialists (Enhydra lutris and Aonyx cinerea. Since other vertebrate taxa that are mouth-oriented piscivores tend to possess longer skulls and mandibles, with jaws designed for increased velocity at the expense of biting capability, we hypothesized that mouth-oriented otters would also possess long, narrow skulls indicative of high velocity jaws. Conversely, hand-oriented otters were expected to possess short, blunt skulls with adaptations to increase bite force and crushing capability. Concomitant with these skull shapes we hypothesized that sea otters would possess a greater mandibular bluntness index, providing for a greater mechanical advantage compared to other otter species investigated. A second goal was to examine morphological variation at a finer scale by assessing variation in cranial morphology among three sea otter subspecies. Since diet varies among these subspecies, and their populations are isolated, we hypothesized that the magnitude of mandibular bluntness and concomitant mechanical advantage, as well as occlusal surface area would also vary within species according to their primary food source (fish versus hard invertebrates. Functional expectations were met for comparisons among and within species. Among species the phylogeny suggests

  7. Neck swelling due to skull base (pseudo)meningocele protruding through a congenital skull base bone defect: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajeev; Singh, Bhoopendra; Kedia, Shweta; Laythalling, Rajinder Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Meningocele is defined as a protrusion of the meninges through an opening in the skull or spinal column, forming a bulge or sac filled with cerebrospinal fluid. A pseudomeningocele is defined as a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection formed due to escape of CSF through a dural defect with trapping of CSF into the surrounding soft tissues. We herby report rare occurrence of a large (pseudo)meningocele in a young patient with congenital skull base defect presenting as upper lateral neck swelling. We present the case of a 17-year-old boy who had painless progressive swelling right side of the upper neck without any history of meningitis or CSF leak. He had a history of undergoing cranioplasty using steel plates for nontraumatic boggy swelling right parieto-occipital region at the age of 5 years at another hospital. Clinical examination showed painless swelling right side of the upper neck, with positive cough impulse and transillumination. CT head with cisternography showed a large right skull base defect through which a large pseudomeningocele was herniating, thus producing upper neck swelling and compressing oral cavity. The neck swelling and intraoral bulge reduced in size after the coperitoneal shunt. Differential diagnosis of (pseudo)meningocele should be considered while evaluating a painless progressive upper neck swelling having cough impulse and transillumination in a young patient.

  8. Dog Behavior Co-Varies with Height, Bodyweight and Skull Shape

    OpenAIRE

    McGreevy, Paul D; Dana Georgevsky; Johanna Carrasco; Michael Valenzuela; Duffy, Deborah L.; Serpell, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Dogs offer unique opportunities to study correlations between morphology and behavior because skull shapes and body shape are so diverse among breeds. Several studies have shown relationships between canine cephalic index (CI: the ratio of skull width to skull length) and neural architecture. Data on the CI of adult, show-quality dogs (six males and six females) were sourced in Australia along with existing data on the breeds' height, bodyweight and related to data on 36 behavioral traits of ...

  9. Trepanation and enlarged parietal foramen on skulls from the Loyalty Islands (Melanesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, Sergey V; Sviridov, Alexey A

    2017-06-01

    The goal of this study is a comprehensive examination of openings discovered on two skulls in the collection of skeletal remains from the Loyalty Islands (Melanesia). The skull No. 1524 displayed an evidence of successful trepanation, and the skull No. 7985 revealed openings that were reminiscent of a trepanation, however, we are inclined to believe that in the latter case we are dealing with a rare genetic anomaly - enlarged parietal foramen.

  10. The Development of the Skull of the Egyptian Cobra Naja h. haje (Squamata: Serpentes: Elapidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Khannoon, Eraqi R; Susan E Evans

    2015-01-01

    Background The study of craniofacial development is important in understanding the ontogenetic processes behind morphological diversity. A complete morphological description of the embryonic skull development of the Egyptian cobra, Naja h. haje, is lacking and there has been little comparative discussion of skull development either among elapid snakes or between them and other snakes. Methodology/Principal Findings We present a description of skull development through a full sequence of devel...

  11. Morphological Characterization of the Frontal and Parietal Bones of the Human Skull

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Human Skull by Stephen L Alexander SURVICE Engineering Company, Belcamp, MD Karin Rafaels Survivability/Lethality Analysis Directorate, ARL C...the direction of physiological loading to reinforce the bone. However, the human skull is not generally considered a load-bearing bone. Therefore...Army Research Laboratory Morphological Characterization of the Frontal and Parietal Bones of the Human Skull by Stephen L Alexander SURVICE

  12. [Complex skull defects reconstruction with САD/САМ titanium and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eolchiyan, S A

    2014-01-01

    Predictable and stable functional and aesthetic result is the aim of priority for the neurosurgeon dealing with the reconstruction of large cranial bone defects and complex-formed skull defects involving cranio-orbital region. the paper presents the experience with САD/САМ titanium and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants for complex-formed and large skull bone defects reconstruction. Between 2005 and 2013 nine patients (5 females and 4 males) underwent cranioplasty and cranio-facial reconstruction with insertion of the customized САD/САМ titanium and PEEK implants. Computer-assisted preoperative planning was undertaken by the surgeon and the engineer together in 3 cases to provide accurate implant design. Eight patients had complex-formed and large posttraumatic defects of fronto-orbital (7 cases) and parietal (one case) regions. In two of these cases one-step reconstruction surgery for posttraumatic fronto-orbital defects combined with adjacent orbital roof (one case) and orbito-zygomatic (one case) deformities was performed. One patient underwent one-step primary cranioplasty after cranio-orbital fibrous dysplasia focus resection. Titanium implants were used in 4 cases while PEEK implants - in 5 ones. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months till 8,5 years (median 4,4 years). The accuracy of the implant intraoperative fit was perfect in all cases. Postoperative wounds healed primary and there were no any complications in the series presented. Post-op clinical assessment and CT data testified to high implants precision, good functional and aesthetic outcomes in all patients. САD/САМ titanium and PEEK implants application should allow for optimal reconstruction in the challenging patients with complex-formed and large skull bone defects providing predictable good functional and aesthetic result together with surgery morbidity and duration reduction. Computer-assisted preoperative planning should be undertaken for САD/САМ implants creation in

  13. Growing skull fracture in a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, E Marie; Shores, Andrew; Meintel, Sarah; Hathcock, John T

    2014-09-01

    Growing skull fractures have been reported in humans for many years, usually resulting from injury to the soft skull during the rapid growth period of an infant's life. Nestling raptors have thin, fragile skulls, a rapid growth rate, and compete aggressively for food items. Skull trauma may occur, which may lead to the development of a growing skull fracture. Growing skull fractures may be under-diagnosed in raptor rehabilitation facilities that do not have access to advanced technologic equipment. Three-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography was used to diagnose a growing skull fracture in a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis). The lesion was surgically repaired and the animal was eventually returned to the wild. This is the first report of a growing skull fracture in an animal. In this case, 3-D computed topographic imaging was utilized to diagnose a growing skull fracture in a red-tailed hawk, surgical repair was performed, and the bird recovered completely and was ultimately released.

  14. Risk factors for cerebrospinal leak after endoscopic skull base reconstruction with nasoseptal flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruss, Calvin L; Al Komser, Mohammed; Aghi, Manish K; Pletcher, Steven D; Goldberg, Andrew N; McDermott, Michael; El-Sayed, Ivan H

    2014-09-01

    The use of expanded endonasal surgery (EES) in the treatment of skull base neoplasms has increased significantly in recent years. Since 2006, the nasoseptal flap (NSF) has become the workhorse for the closure of skull base defects involving the anterior and central skull base. We hypothesized that defect site impacts the rate of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak following EES. Retrospective cohort study. Patients who underwent skull base defect repair using a NSF at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) minimally invasive skull base center were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, disease, and defect location and size were recorded along with the presence of a postoperative CSF leak. Data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. One hundred and twenty-one patients met inclusion criteria. Ten patients had a NSF failure with CSF leakage, 2 in the anterior skull base (frontal sinus, ethmoid, cribriform, planum), and 8 in the central skull base (sella, clivus) (P = .047). Dural defect size ≥2.0 cm(2) in the central skull base strongly correlated with the risk of flap failure (P = .034). This study of endoscopic closure of skull base defects using a NSF demonstrates there is an association between both surgical site and dural defect size with NSF failure. Expanded defects of the sella and clivus have an increased risk of failure and may warrant augmented techniques. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  15. Contributions to the functional morphology of caudate skulls: kinetic and akinetic forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Stephan; Lukanov, Simeon; Naumov, Borislav

    2016-01-01

    A strongly ossified and rigid skull roof, which prevents parietal kinesis, has been reported for the adults of all amphibian clades. Our μ-CT investigations revealed that the Buresch’s newt (Triturus ivanbureschi) possess a peculiar cranial construction. In addition to the typical amphibian pleurokinetic articulation between skull roof and palatoquadrate associated structures, we found flexible connections between nasals and frontals (prokinesis), vomer and parasphenoid (palatokinesis), and between frontals and parietals (mesokinesis). This is the first description of mesokinesis in urodelans. The construction of the skull in the Buresch’s newts also indicates the presence of an articulation between parietals and the exocipitals, discussed as a possible kind of metakinesis. The specific combination of pleuro-, pro-, meso-, palato-, and metakinetic skull articulations indicate to a new kind of kinetic systems unknown for urodelans to this date. We discuss the possible neotenic origin of the skull kinesis and pose the hypothesis that the kinesis in T. ivanbureschi increases the efficiency of fast jaw closure. For that, we compared the construction of the skull in T. ivanbureschi to the akinetic skull of the Common fire salamander Salamandra salamandra. We hypothesize that the design of the skull in the purely terrestrial living salamander shows a similar degree of intracranial mobility. However, this mobility is permitted by elasticity of some bones and not by true articulation between them. We comment on the possible relation between the skull construction and the form of prey shaking mechanism that the species apply to immobilize their victims. PMID:27688958

  16. Contributions to the functional morphology of caudate skulls: kinetic and akinetic forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Natchev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A strongly ossified and rigid skull roof, which prevents parietal kinesis, has been reported for the adults of all amphibian clades. Our μ-CT investigations revealed that the Buresch’s newt (Triturus ivanbureschi possess a peculiar cranial construction. In addition to the typical amphibian pleurokinetic articulation between skull roof and palatoquadrate associated structures, we found flexible connections between nasals and frontals (prokinesis, vomer and parasphenoid (palatokinesis, and between frontals and parietals (mesokinesis. This is the first description of mesokinesis in urodelans. The construction of the skull in the Buresch’s newts also indicates the presence of an articulation between parietals and the exocipitals, discussed as a possible kind of metakinesis. The specific combination of pleuro-, pro-, meso-, palato-, and metakinetic skull articulations indicate to a new kind of kinetic systems unknown for urodelans to this date. We discuss the possible neotenic origin of the skull kinesis and pose the hypothesis that the kinesis in T. ivanbureschi increases the efficiency of fast jaw closure. For that, we compared the construction of the skull in T. ivanbureschi to the akinetic skull of the Common fire salamander Salamandra salamandra. We hypothesize that the design of the skull in the purely terrestrial living salamander shows a similar degree of intracranial mobility. However, this mobility is permitted by elasticity of some bones and not by true articulation between them. We comment on the possible relation between the skull construction and the form of prey shaking mechanism that the species apply to immobilize their victims.

  17. Deficiency of zebrafish fgf20a results in aberrant skull remodeling that mimics both human cranial disease and evolutionarily important fish skull morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, W James; Wirgau, Rachel M; Sweet, Elly M; Albertson, R Craig

    2013-01-01

    The processes that direct skull remodeling are of interest to both human-oriented studies of cranial dysplasia and evolutionary studies of skull divergence. There is increasing awareness that these two fields can be mutually informative when natural variation mimics pathology. Here we describe a zebrafish mutant line, devoid of blastema (dob), which does not have a functional fgf20a protein, and which also presents cranial defects similar to both adaptive and clinical variation. We used geometric morphometric methods to provide quantitative descriptions of the effects of the dob mutation on skull morphogenesis. In combination with "whole-mount in situ hybridization" labeling of normal fgf20a expression and assays for osteoblast and osteoclast activity, the results of these analyses indicate that cranial dysmorphologies in dob zebrafish are generated by aberrations in post-embryonic skull remodeling via decreased osteoblasotgenesis and increased osteoclastogenesis. Mutational effects include altered skull vault geometries and midfacial hypoplasia that are consistent with key diagnostic signs for multiple human craniofacial syndromes. These phenotypic shifts also mimic changes in the functional morphology of fish skulls that have arisen repeatedly in several highly successful radiations (e.g., damselfishes and East-African rift-lake cichlids). Our results offer the dob/fgf20a mutant as an experimentally tractable model with which to examine post-embryonic skull development as it relates to human disease and vertebrate evolution. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Analysis of variation of orbital openings in contemporary skulls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlikowska-Sroka, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    The size and symmetry of the eye-socket have puzzled many medical and biological scientists. The orbit is a very complicated skull part because of the great number of bones involved in its structure, and its specific physiological function. The aim of our study was to estimate variations in the shape, size and position of the orbital openings in contemporary human skulls by using computer software. The material consisted of 80 male human skulls of the European population from the beginning of the 20th century. X-ray photographs were taken in the P-A projection, then the images were scanned and calibrated by means of MicroStation 95 Academic Edition software. Tools for measuring the vector elements were used to assess measurements: n-mf, mf-ml, mf-ek, spa--sbk and the area of the orbital opening. The orbital index and the index of morphological asymmetry were assessed. Michalski's tables were used to establish orbit features. The statistical analysis was performed using the Statistica computer software package. Measurements of the eye--socket position in relation to the mid-line were significantly more frequently larger on the left-hand side, which means a more lateral position of orbits on that side. The measurements of breadth, height and area were more frequently larger on the right side. The asymmetry index was significant for orbit width. The majority of the examined orbits were classified as hypsikonch, according to the orbital index. According to Michalski's scale, the dominant size data described orbital openings in the European population from the West Pomeranian region. The awareness of variability in this area is necessary for the correct interpretation of patients' examination results, reconstruction planning, in forensic medicine, and anthropology.

  19. Position and course of the mandibular canal in skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Ayla; Potluri, Anitha; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine and describe the topography of the mandibular canal (MC) in both vertical and occlusal dimensions. Fifty-two adult skulls deposited in the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine skull collection were evaluated in this study. Cone-beam computerized tomographic scans of each skull were obtained. The vertical course of MC was classified into 3 types: straight projection (12.2%), catenary-like configuration (51.1%), and progressive descent from posterior to anterior (36.7%). The evaluation of the buccolingual dimension showed that the mandibular canal was located either in contact with or close to the lingual cortical plate (≤ 2 mm) in the molar region of the majority of the cases. As it proceeds anteriorly it moves toward the buccal aspect of the mandible, where it finally emerges through the mental foramen. Three emerging patterns of mandibular canal were observed: sharp turn (53.2%), soft curved exit (28.8%), and straight path (17.4%). The examination of the vertical dimension showed that the canal was located almost 1 cm above the inferior border of the mandible and then ascended to reach the mental foramen, which is located ~16 mm (range 13.4-20.3 mm) above the inferior border of the mandible. We found a strong correlation between height of the mandible and location of the mental foramen (r = 0.64; P mandibular canal described in vertical and axial dimensions and variation in its path have been classified. In addition to variation in location of MC, it has different anatomic configurations which clinicians should be familiar with in any surgical procedures involving the posterior mandible. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tuberculous osteitis of the skull in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzagmout, Mohammed; Boujraf, Said; Chakour, Khalid; Chaoui, Mohammed E

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis is endemic in developing countries. However, skull tuberculosis is uncommon with few cases reported in the literature. We report a 10-year-old boy admitted for a left parietal painless swelling. A CT scan demonstrated a left parietal bony defect, destroying both inner and outer tables. This was associated with an enhanced epidural collection and scalp swelling. The patient was operated, and the microscopic examination revealed typical tuberculosis granuloma. The clinical presentation and management of this rare location of tuberculosis are discussed.

  1. [Paleopathology of deafness: skulls of the Dupuytren Museum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmoussa, Nadia; Muller, A -L; Kerner, J; Josset, P; Conan, P; Charlier, P

    2015-01-01

    In the 18th and 19th centuries, the Dupuytren Museum was indispensable for the knowledge of pathological anatomy for physicians and surgeons. Nowadays, it is more a museum than a learning unit, but it provides an opportunity to understand through numerous scientific studies the origin of diseases, injuries mechanism and the functional consequences of which could suffer some patients. This study illustrates the interest of the study on pieces in pathological anatomy's museums, this time across selected skulls which belonged to hearing loss people. bizarre.

  2. Mechanics of deformable bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerfeld, Arnold Johannes Wilhelm

    1950-01-01

    Mechanics of Deformable Bodies: Lectures on Theoretical Physics, Volume II covers topics on the mechanics of deformable bodies. The book discusses the kinematics, statics, and dynamics of deformable bodies; the vortex theory; as well as the theory of waves. The text also describes the flow with given boundaries. Supplementary notes on selected hydrodynamic problems and supplements to the theory of elasticity are provided. Physicists, mathematicians, and students taking related courses will find the book useful.

  3. Skull wounds linked with blunt trauma (hammer example). A report of two depressed skull fractures--elements of biomechanical explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delannoy, Yann; Becart, Anne; Colard, Thomas; Delille, Rémi; Tournel, Gilles; Hedouin, Valéry; Gosset, Didier

    2012-09-01

    The lesions of the skull following perforating traumas can create complex fractures. The blunt traumas can, according to the swiftness and the shape of the object used, create a depressed fracture. The authors describe through two clinical cases the lesional characteristic of the blunt traumas, perforating the skull using a hammer. In both cases the cranial lesions were very typical: they were geometrical, square shaped, of the same size than the tool (head and tip of the hammer). On the outer table of the skull, the edges of the wounds were sharp and regular. On the inner table, the edges of the wounds were beveled and irregular. The bony penetration in the depressed fracture results from a rupture of the outer table of the bone under tension, in periphery, by the bend of the bone to the impact (outbending) and then, from the inner table with comminuted bony fragmentation. Breeding on the fractures of the size and the shape of the blunt objects used is inconstant and differs, that it is the objects of flat surface or wide in opposition to those of small surface area. Fractures morphologies depend on one hand on these extrinsic factors and on the other hand, of intrinsic factors (structure of the bone). To identify them, we had previously conducted experimental work on cranial bone samples. The bone was submitted to a device for three-point bending. This work had shown properties of thickness and stiffness of the various areas of the vault. Our cases are consistent with these results and illustrate the variability of bone lesions according to region and mode of use of blunt weapons. Many studies have identified criteria for identification of the weapons and the assistance of digital and biomechanical models will be an invaluable contribution with this aim in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reconstruction of skull defects in the middle ages and renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missori, Paolo; Currà, Antonio; Paris, Harry S; Peschillo, Simone; Fattapposta, Francesco; Paolini, Sergio; Domenicucci, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    In Egyptian, Greco-Roman, and Arabic medicine, the closure of a skull defect was not provided at the end of a therapeutic trepanation or in cases of bone removal. The literature from the Middle Ages and Renaissance disclosed some striking and forgotten practices. Gilbertus Anglicus (c. 1180 to c. 1250) cites the use of a piece of a cup made from wooden bowl (ciphum or mazer) or a gold sheet to cover the gap and protect the brain in these patients; this citation probably reflected a widely known folk practice. Pietro d'Argellata introduced the use of a fixed piece of dried gourd for brain protection to reconstruct a skull defect. In the late Renaissance, the negative folklore describing this outlandish practice likely led to the use of silver and lead sheets. Nevertheless, for centuries, large numbers of surgeons preferred to leave the dura mater uncovered after bone removal, and failed to apply any brain protection. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Penetrating anterior skull base fracture inflicted by a cow's horn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adomas Bunevicius

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Farm workers are at increased risk for animal-inflicted head injuries that are associated with significant morbidity and occasionally may be fatal. These injuries may cause permanent eye damage with or without concomitant skull base fracture. Here, we present a male farmer who suffered a cow attack that resulted in perforating orbital injury with comminuted frontobasal cranial fracture caused by a cow's horn. The next day, the patient developed nasal and orbital cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leak. Computed Tomography cisternography revealed CSF leakage to frontal and maxillary sinuses. The patient was treated using prophylactic antibiotic therapy, lumbar drainage, and underwent craniotomy for debridement and dural tear plastic. Post operative course was uneventful and there were no signs of CSF leak 1 year after the surgery. The case illustrates unusual injury inflicted by a cow's horn and underscores the importance of careful investigation for underlying skull base fracture and CSF leakage in patients sustaining perforating orbital injuries. Adequate and timely management of dural tears is associated with favorable outcomes.

  6. Radiotherapy and radiosurgery for benign skull base meningiomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Amichetti, Maurizio; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2009-01-01

    Meningiomas located in the region of the base of skull are difficult to access. Complex combined surgical approaches are more likely to achieve complete tumor removal, but frequently at a cost of treatment related high morbidity. Local control following subtotal excision of benign meningiomas can be improved with conventional fractionated external beam radiation therapy with a reported 5-year progression-free survival up to 95%. New radiation techniques, including stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have been developed as a more accurate technique of irradiation with more precise tumor localization, and consequently a reduction in the volume of normal brain irradiated to high radiation doses. SRS achieves a high tumour control rate in the range of 85-97% at 5 years, although it should be recommended only for tumors less than 3 cm away more than 3 mm from the optic pathway because of high risk of long-term neurological deficits. Fractionated RT delivered as FSRT, IMRT and protons is useful for larger and irregularly or complex-shaped skull base meningiomas close to critical structures not suitable for single-fraction SRS. The reported results indicate a high tumour control rate in the range of 85-100% at 5 years with a low risk of significant incidence of long-term toxicity. Because of the long natural history of benign meningiomas, larger series and longer follow-up are necessary to compare results and toxicity of different techniques. PMID:19828022

  7. [Asymptomatic skull base metastases: clinical course and therapeutic alternatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, A; Paulazo, C; Oleaga, L; Verger, E

    2017-03-01

    Skull base metastases (SBM) are an infrequent and late type of cancer progression that are associated to poor prognosis. Its clinical manifestations may be grouped in five clinical syndromes and radiotherapy is its more frequent treatment. Because of the improvement in imaging tests and the close follow up of cancer patients, SBM can be diagnosed incidentally. In this group the best option of treatment has not been established. To analyze the clinical features and outcomes of patients with SBM diagnosed incidentally. Between January 2012 and December 2015, 31 patients with diagnoses of SBM from solid primary tumor were reviewed. SBM were diagnosed due to skull base syndromes (n = 24) or incidentally (n = 7). Symptomatic patients were treated with radiotherapy. Patients diagnosed incidentally remained without symptoms of craneal base involvement during the follow up, although they frequently had other types of intracranial progression. A statistically significant difference in survival was observed between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients (p = 0.001). The incidentally diagnosed SBM were frequently associated to other types of intracranial progression, limiting the options of treatment.

  8. Morphological integration and functional modularity in the crocodilian skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Paolo; Buscalioni, Angela D; Teresi, Luciano; Raia, Pasquale; Sansalone, Gabriele; Kotsakis, Tassos; Cubo, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    We explored the morphological organization of the skull within Crocodylidae, analyzing functional and phylogenetic interactions between its 2 constituent functional modules: the rostrum and the postrostrum. We used geometric morphometrics to identify localized shape changes, focusing on the differences between the major clades of the crown-group Crocodylia: Alligatoridae and Crocodylidae. We used published bite performance data to correlate rostral function with postrostral morphology. The skull modules appear more integrated within Alligatoridae than within Crocodyliade. Phylogenetic effects on shape variation are more evident in Alligatoridae than in Crocodylidae, where functional parameters concerning the rostral morphology are proportionally more important than phylogeny. Long-snouted species are characterized by low structural performance, which is significantly associated with a reduction of the pterygoid-quadrate cranial nipper, suggesting that the nipper is important for the ingestion of large food items in generalist species. This functional association is coupled with a significant evolutionary allometry at the clade level, while Alligatoridae and Crocodylidae show different degrees of evolutionary allometry for their entire shape and rostrum. The postrostrum is more conservative than the rostrum in terms of morphospace occupation, evolutionary allometry and phylogenetic signal. © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Modified three-dimensional skull base model with artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, and venous sinuses for training in skull base surgery: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuji; Oyama, Kazutaka; Ueno, Hideaki; Nakao, Yasuaki; Honma, Keiichirou

    2008-12-01

    Experience with dissection of the cavernous sinus and the temporal bone is essential for training in skull base surgery, but the opportunities for cadaver dissection are very limited. A modification of a commercially available prototype three-dimensional (3D) skull base model, made by a selective laser sintering method and incorporating surface details and inner bony structures such as the inner ear structures and air cells, is proposed to include artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, venous sinuses, and the internal carotid artery for such surgical training. The transpetrosal approach and epidural cavernous sinus surgery (Dolenc's technique) were performed on this modified model using a high speed drill or ultrasonic bone curette under an operating microscope. The model could be dissected in almost the same way as a real cadaver. The modified 3D skull base model provides a good educational tool for training in skull base surgery.

  10. An historical skull collection and its use in forensic odontology and anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejrsen, B; Lynnerup, N; Hejmadi, M

    2005-01-01

    The Institute of Forensic Medicine, Copenhagen, houses a collection of historical skulls of unclear origin, marked with a general geographic or "racial descriptor". Would these historical skulls be of any value for the forensic odontologist and anthropologist concerned with teaching and casework?...

  11. Alveolar index as a means of skull classification: a radiological study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alveolar index is an important parameter in intra and inter-ethnic classification of skull and in defining the positional relation of the maxilla to the mandible. The objective of the study was to evaluate the alveolar index of Nigerians using radiographs. 130 (90 males and 40 females) normal lateral view skull radiographs of ...

  12. On two skulls of Delphinus dussumieri Blanford, 1891 (Notes on Cetacea, Delphinoidea I)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bree, van P.J.H.

    1971-01-01

    Two skulls of Delphinus dussumieri in the collections of the British Museum (Natural History) are discussed and their dimensions given. They represent the first ones known about 140 years after the description of the species, based on one skull from the Malabar Coast.

  13. [Cranial wounds of the skull caused by a fencing-foil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Rubal, A; Martínez, F; Tarigo, A

    2006-12-01

    Penetrating stab cranial wounds of the skull by fencing-foil are rare in western countries. This 46-year-old man suffered a penetrating stab wound of the skull through the right orbital region. As a consequence he developed an intracranial hematoma requiring surgical evacuation. Damage of intracranial contents due to transorbital penetrating objects other than missiles is a rare event.

  14. Patterns of integration in the canine skull: an inside view into the relationship of the skull modules of domestic dogs and wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curth, Stefan; Fischer, Martin S; Kupczik, Kornelius

    2017-12-01

    The skull shape variation in domestic dogs exceeds that of grey wolves by far. The artificial selection of dogs has even led to breeds with mismatching upper and lower jaws and maloccluded teeth. For that reason, it has been advocated that their skulls (including the teeth) can be divided into more or less independent modules on the basis of genetics, development or function. In this study, we investigated whether the large diversity of dog skulls and the frequent occurrence of orofacial disproportions can be explained by a lower integration strength between the modules of the skull and by deviations in their covariation pattern when compared to wolves. For that purpose, we employed geometric morphometric methods on the basis of 99 3D-landmarks representing the cranium (subdivided into rostrum and braincase), the mandible (subdivided into ramus and corpus), and the upper and lower tooth rows. These were taken from CT images of 196 dog and wolf skulls. First, we calculated the shape disparity of the mandible and the cranium in dogs and wolves. Then we tested whether the integration strength (measured by RV coefficient) and the covariation pattern (as analysed by partial least squares analysis) of the modules subordinate to the cranium and the mandible can explain differing disparity results. We show, contrary to our expectations, that the higher skull shape diversity in dogs is not explained by less integrated skull modules. Also, the pattern of their covariation in the dog skull can be traced back to similar patterns in the wolf. This shows that existing differences between wolves and dogs are at the utmost a matter of degree and not absolute. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Can skull form predict the shape of the temporomandibular joint? A study using geometric morphometrics on the skulls of wolves and domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curth, Stefan; Fischer, Martin S; Kupczik, Kornelius

    2017-11-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) conducts and restrains masticatory movements between the mammalian cranium and the mandible. Through this functional integration, TMJ morphology in wild mammals is strongly correlated with diet, resulting in a wide range of TMJ variations. However, in artificially selected and closely related domestic dogs, dietary specialisations between breeds can be ruled out as a diversifying factor although they display an enormous variation in TMJ morphology. This raises the question of the origin of this variation. Here we hypothesise that, even in the face of reduced functional demands, TMJ shape in dogs can be predicted by skull form; i.e. that the TMJ is still highly integrated in the dog skull. If true, TMJ variation in the dog would be a plain by-product of the enormous cranial variation in dogs and its genetic causes. We addressed this hypothesis using geometric morphometry on a data set of 214 dog and 60 wolf skulls. We digitized 53 three-dimensional landmarks of the skull and the TMJ on CT-based segmentations and compared (1) the variation between domestic dog and wolf TMJs (via principal component analysis) and (2) the pattern of covariation of skull size, flexion and rostrum length with TMJ shape (via regression of centroid size on shape and partial least squares analyses). We show that the TMJ in domestic dogs is significantly more diverse than in wolves: its shape covaries significantly with skull size, flexion and rostrum proportions in patterns which resemble those observed in primates. Similar patterns in canids, which are carnivorous, and primates, which are mostly frugivorous imply the existence of basic TMJ integration patterns which are independent of dietary adaptations. However, only limited amounts of TMJ variation in dogs can be explained by simple covariation with overall skull geometry. This implies that the final TMJ shape is gained partially independently of the rest of the skull. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Gmb

  16. Diffeomorphic Statistical Deformation Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Sass; Hansen, Mads/Fogtman; Larsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method for constructing diffeomorphic statistical deformation models in arbitrary dimensional images with a nonlinear generative model and a linear parameter space. Our deformation model is a modified version of the diffeomorphic model introduced by Cootes et al....... The modifications ensure that no boundary restriction has to be enforced on the parameter space to prevent folds or tears in the deformation field. For straightforward statistical analysis, principal component analysis and sparse methods, we assume that the parameters for a class of deformations lie on a linear...... manifold and that the distance between two deformations are given by the metric introduced by the L2-norm in the parameter space. The chosen L2-norm is shown to have a clear and intuitive interpretation on the usual nonlinear manifold. Our model is validated on a set of MR images of corpus callosum...

  17. Reappraisal of Neonatal Greenstick Skull Fractures Caused by Birth Injuries: Comparison of 3-Dimensional Reconstructed Computed Tomography and Simple Skull Radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Min; Kim, Hyun Gi; Yoon, Soo Han; Chang, Ki Hong; Park, Moon Sung; Park, Yul-Hyun; Choi, Mi Sun

    2018-01-01

    The most common birth-associated head injuries during vaginal delivery are cephalhematomas and subgaleal hematomas. Cranial injuries are rarely encountered. The neonate cranium is soft and pliable, and greenstick skull fractures (GSFs) are expected to be more frequent than linear or depressed fractures, but they are extremely difficult to detect with simple skull radiography. As a result, no reports have been issued on this topic to date. Recent reports suggest that technological advances in 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) have successfully enhanced the diagnostic accuracy for cranial fractures. The authors researched the types and characteristics of GSFs and the diagnostic accuracy of 3D CT for cranial fractures in neonates. The simple skull radiographs and 3D CT images of 101 neonates were retrospectively evaluated and compared with respect to diagnosis of cranial fractures, and skull GSFs were classified on the basis of 3D CT findings into 5 types depending on multiplicity and location. 3D CT detected 88 cases of cranial fractures, that is, 89 GSFs, 4 combined GSFs and linear fractures, and 3 combined GSFs and depressed fractures. The diagnostic rate of 3DCT was 91% and this was significantly higher than the 13% rate of simple skull radiographs (P injuries among neonates. The diagnostic accuracy of 3D CT was considerably superior than simple skull radiography, but the high radiation exposure levels of 3D CT warrant the need for development of a modality with lower radiation exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quality of life instruments for skull base pathology: systematic review and methodologic appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, John R; Witterick, Ian J; Gullane, Patrick J; Gentili, Fred; Lohfeld, Lynne; Ringash, Jolie; Thoma, Achilles; Vescan, Allan D

    2013-09-01

    Several quality of life (QOL) instruments exist for skull base pathology, however, there have been no attempts to appraise and systematically review these instruments. We systematically reviewed MEDLINE, EMBASE, Central, AMED, Health and Psychosocial Instruments, and PsychoInfo for anterior or central skull base QOL instruments to January 2010. We queried experts, bibliographies, and meeting proceedings from the North American Skull Base Society from 2005 to 2009. Included instruments were evaluated for instrument characteristics, item generation and reduction, field testing, and measurement properties using predefined criteria. We identified 9 QOL instruments: 7 measuring QOL for pituitary pathology, 1 for midface pathology, and 1 for anterior skull base pathology. Eight of the 9 instruments have had some psychometric testing. None demonstrated all of the predefined psychometric properties. There are several QOL instruments for patients with skull base pathology. None of these instruments met all predefined requirements, and further instrument development is needed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Experimental study of transmission of a pulsed focused beam through a skull phantom in nonlinear regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsysar, S. A., E-mail: sergey@acs366.phys.msu.ru; Nikolaeva, A. V.; Khokhlova, V. A.; Yuldashev, P. V. [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Svet, V. D. [Andreyev Acoustics Institute, 4, Shvernik Street, Moscow 117036 (Russian Federation); Sapozhnikov, O. A. [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th Street, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    In the paper the use of receiving and radiating system, which allows to determine the parameters of bone by nonlinear pulse-echo technique and to image of brain structures through the skull bones, was proposed. Accuracy of the skull bone characterization is due to higher measured harmonic and is significantly better than in linear case. In the experimental part focused piezoelectric transducer with diameter 100 mm, focal distance 100 mm, the frequency of 1.092 MHz was used. It was shown that skull bone profiling can be performed with the use of 3rd harmonic since 1st harmonic can be used for visualization of the underlying objects. The use of wideband systems for both skull profiling and brain visualization is restricted by skull attenuation and resulting low effective sensitivity.

  20. Alterations of skull bones found in anencephalic skeletons from an identified osteological collection. Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irurita, Javier; Alemán, Inmaculada; Viciano, Joan; López-Lázaro, Sandra; Botella, Miguel Cecilio

    2015-07-01

    One of the most common conditions during fetal development is anencephaly, which often involves many identification difficulties in the context of physical anthropology, as it causes severe skull challenges. In this paper, we describe the alterations found in the skulls of two perinatal individuals with anencephaly from the osteological collection of identified infants in the Anthropology Laboratory of the University of Granada, Spain. Both subjects of study are in perfect state of preservation. Despite the severe malformations, all skull bones have been targeted and identified, as the possibility of studying a subject with a complete, articulated, and partially mummified skull; the other was disjointed and well preserved. The skull bones of these two individuals affected with anencephaly have been described in detail, allowing this pathological condition to be identified in skeletonized individuals in archaeological or forensic contexts, in cases where these bones did not have anatomical connection or when these were taphonomically altered.

  1. [Skull cult. Trophy heads and tzantzas in pre-Columbian America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carod-Artal, F J

    2012-07-16

    The skull cult is a cultural tradition that dates back to at least Neolithic times. Its main manifestations are trophy heads, skull masks, moulded skulls and shrunken heads. The article reviews the skull cult in both pre-Columbian America and the ethnographic present from a neuro-anthropological perspective. The tradition of shaping and painting the skulls of ancestors goes back to the Indo-European Neolithic period (Natufian culture and Gobekli Tepe). In Mesoamerica, post-mortem decapitation was the first step of a mortuary treatment that resulted in a trophy head, a skull for the tzompantli or a skull mask. The lithic technology utilised by the Mesoamerican cultures meant that disarticulation had to be performed in several stages. Tzompantli is a term that refers both to a construction where the heads of victims were kept and to the actual skulls themselves. Skull masks are skulls that have been artificially modified in order to separate and decorate the facial part; they have been found in the Templo Mayor of Tenochtitlan. The existence of trophy heads is well documented by means of iconographic representations on ceramic ware and textiles belonging to the Paraca, Nazca and Huari cultures of Peru. The Mundurucu Indians of Brazil and the Shuar or Jivaroan peoples of Amazonian Ecuador have maintained this custom down to the present day. The Shuar also shrink heads (tzantzas) in a ritual process. Spanish chroniclers such as Fray Toribio de Benavente 'Motolinia' and Gaspar de Carvajal spoke of these practices. In pre-Columbian America, the tradition of decapitating warriors in order to obtain trophy heads was a wide-spread and highly developed practice.

  2. A study of dentition in pre-Columbian skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastlicht, S

    1976-10-01

    Dentition in pre-Hispanic Mexican skulls has been examined in ancient Tenochtitlan--present-day Mexico City--and many different regions of the country, recently excavated. We have reached the conclusion that then, as now, there existed similar dental anomalies in number and position: the lack of certain teeth and the impaction of third molars and upper canines. So far, we have found decay only in back teeth Figs. 11 and 12 A and B). Most frequent was attrition, the severe wearing away of the chewing surface, which must certainly have been due to the primitive diet of seed, hard and dry, mixed with some abrasive material, produced by the grinding of stone against stone (metate) (Figs. 13 and 14) and the use of the teeth as tools. Finally, we should emphasize that we still find shovel-shaped teeth in the pre-Columbian dentition of Mongoloid influence, as well as in some of the present-day Mexican population.

  3. Aneurysmal bone cyst at the base of the skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Arun; Rastogi, Shalabh; Singh, P P; Sharma, Sonal

    2012-05-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts have been described as pseudocysts in view of their lack of an epithelial lining. These cysts are uncommon, but when they do occur they typically involve the long bones of the extremities, the membranous bones of the thorax and pelvis, and the vertebrae. Skull involvement is uncommon. We present the case of a 14-year-old girl who presented with nasal obstruction and a swelling of the right cheek. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography detected a heterogeneous cystic mass involving the sphenoid and ethmoid bones. The mass was excised via a lateral rhinotomy approach, and it was identified as an aneurysmal bone cyst on histologic examination. The patient experienced a recurrence in the right sphenoid sinus within 3 months, and the lesion was removed via transnasal endoscopy.

  4. [Human identification by comparison if skull roentgen image].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Hansjürg; Wirth, Ingo; Reisinger, Walter

    2002-01-01

    Comparison of X-rays was found to provide information just as accurate as dactyloscopy for person identification, which is attributable to the high variability of the skeletal system. Reported in this paper is the case of an unknown dead female whose body was found in a condition of advanced decay. That is why conventional methods of criminological identification were not practicable. Only inadequate results were obtained from a muscular sample, while no findings at all were obtainable from DNA analysis of two molars. Identification was achievable only after six months had passed from discovery of the corpse, when two X-rays of the presumed person's skull were retrieved. This case of successful identification has once again provided evidence to the fact that even in our era of DNA research X-ray comparison has retained a firm position in forensic diagnostics.

  5. British Museum Exhibition Review: The Jericho Skull, Creating an Ancestor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara Hirst

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The temporary exhibit at the British Museum, open 15th December-19th February, and located to the right of the main entrance in the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Gallery (Room 59; is dedicated to a single Neolithic crania from Jericho, known as the Jericho Skull. This exhibit demonstrates the value of relatively recent technologies in archaeological research, highlighting the previously hidden information made possible through CT scanning and the value of these methods in both archaeological research but also in communicating archaeology in a visually stimulating manner which allows an exhibit to take a single item, and create an in depth exhibit featuring both the original material and two cranial 3D prints along with a facial reconstruction.

  6. Interspecific variation of ontogeny and skull shape among porpoises (Phocoenidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galatius, Anders; Berta, Annalisa; Frandsen, Marie Schou

    2011-01-01

    . dioptrica, for which large series were available, were further compared in terms of ontogeny of cranial shape by three-dimensional geometric morphometrics. Ph. dalli and P. dioptrica generally showed further development of cranial sutures than the other species. Postnatal skull shape development was similar...... for all species studied; the majority of interspecific shape differences are present at parturition. Smaller species had a higher rate of shape development relative to growth in size than Ph. dalli and P. dioptrica, but they still showed less allometric development due to less postnatal growth....... Interspecific shape differences indicate phylogenetic relationships similar to that proposed based on morphology or convergent evolution of the two pelagic species, Ph. dalli and P. dioptrica, under the scenarios suggested by recent molecular studies. A shape trend coinciding with habitat preference...

  7. Penetrating skull injury with six inch fence rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Kamlesh; Singh, Amit Kumar; Das, Shishir

    2012-01-01

    In this study we are describing an unusual case of the boundary fence (6 inch long) penetrating through the skull vault and lodging into the middle cranial fossa. A 10 years old male child fell onto his house fence while playing on the terrace. The metal fence penetrated through the scalp, parietal bone, midbrain and the midface, fracturing the parietal and the midfacial bones. CT-scans were obtained to view the trajectory and the position of the fence. The amount of midbrain injury was also accessed. The degree of morbidity vis-à-vis the type of injury was surprisingly low. Safe access to the fence was made through a bicoronal incision and modified bifrontal craniectomy to retrieve the lodged portion of the fence. These kind of penetrating injuries are rare considering the thickness of the vault. Proper preoperative planning and team approach is required for the safe surgical removal of the objects. PMID:23833500

  8. The Spherical Deformation Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Asgar

    2003-01-01

    Miller et al. (1994) describe a model for representing spatial objects with no obvious landmarks. Each object is represented by a global translation and a normal deformation of a sphere. The normal deformation is defined via the orthonormal spherical-harmonic basis. In this paper we analyse...... the spherical deformation model in detail and describe how it may be used to summarize the shape of star-shaped three-dimensional objects with few parameters. It is of interest to make statistical inference about the three-dimensional shape parameters from continuous observations of the surface and from...

  9. Pediatric Thumb Flexion Deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreve, Mark; Chu, Alice

    2016-03-01

    Pediatric trigger thumb and congenital clasped thumb are the two most common pediatric thumb flexion deformities. Both might appear similar, however, they are caused by varying etiologies, and treatment is vastly different. Pediatric trigger thumb is due to a size mismatch of the flexor tendon and the thumb pulley system, develops over time, typically manifests as a locked interphalangeal joint, and is treated with observation or surgical release. Congenital clasped thumb, although presenting in varying degrees of severity, is due to a congenital absence or hypoplasia of one or more of the thumb extensors and is treated with either splinting for supple deformities or surgery for more complex deformities.

  10. Prophylactic intravenous nimodipine treatment in skull base surgery: pharmacokinetic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, C; Vogel, A-S; Simmermacher, S; Rachinger, J C; Prell, J; Strauss, C; Reinsch, M; Kunter, U; Wienke, A; Neumann, J; Scheller, K

    2012-05-01

    Nimodipine is primarily used in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Clinical trials revealed also a beneficial effect of prophylactic nimodipine treatment on cranial nerve functions following vestibular schwannoma surgery. The unknown pharmacokinetics of prophylactically administered nimodipine were investigated. Samples were taken from 27 patients with skull base lesions. Prophylactic intravenous nimodipine infusion was started 5.8-25.8 h (mean 17.9 h) before surgery. Nimodipine concentrations were determined in serum (intra- and postoperatively), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (intraoperatively), and tissue samples. Wide interindividual differences were observed. Mean concentrations for nimodipine were 46.9 ng/ml (SD: 6.4; min. 4.1 and max. 92.7 ng/ml) in intraoperative serum, 73.2 ng/ml (SD: 16.7; min. 6.6 and max. 253 ng/ml) in postoperative serum and 8.3 ng/ml (SD: 1.5; min. 1.0 und max. 29.7 ng/ml) in intraoperative CSF. The correlation between intra- and postoperative serum (p=0.004, r=0.560) and between intra-operative serum and CSF concentration (p=0.003, r=0.567) were statistically significant. Furthermore the correlation between intraoperative serum concentration and concentrations collected from vestibular nerves was high (r=0.711), but not statistically significant (p=0.178). Interindividually, continously administered intravenous nimodipine produces considerably variable serum levels. Controls of nimodipine serum concentrations may be useful to optimize nimodipine medication in skull base surgery and in the management of SAH. The serum nimodipine level is a useful marker for CSF and intracranial nerve tissue concentrations of nimodipine. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Herida penetrante del cráneo Skull penetrating wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvei González Orlandi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El traumatismo craneoencefálico es común en los servicios de urgencia de instituciones que atienden a pacientes politraumatizados y se ha convertido en un problema de salud para muchos países. El traumatismo penetrante del cráneo ocupa un lugar especial por su baja frecuencia. En este trabajo se presenta el caso de un paciente varón, de 52 años de edad, que sufrió una herida penetrante del cráneo producida por un arma blanca que quedó retenida en la región frontotemporal izquierda. Tras un estudio imaginológico se procedió al tratamiento quirúrgico de urgencia, y el paciente evoluciona satisfactoriamente después de 25 días de hospitalización. En la actualidad se encuentra en tratamiento de rehabilitación por una hemiparesia derecha residual.The cranioencephalic trauma is common in the emergence centers to care for patients with multiple traumata and it becames in a health problem in many countries. Skull penetrating trauma is located in a special place due to its low frequency. In present paper a case of male patient aged 52 severely skull-injured with penetrating wound caused by a cold steel that remained introduced into the left frontotemporal region. After an imaging study the emergence surgical treatment was applied and patient evolves adequately after 25 days of hospitalization. Nowadays, she is under rehabilitation treatment due to a residual right hemiparesis.

  12. Pituitary and skull-base lesions and the litigious patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Alan C; Darlin, Spencer; Lai, Wanda; Svider, Peter F; Jacob, Jeffrey T; Liu, James K; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Folbe, Adam J

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate litigation relating to the diagnosis and management of pituitary and ventral skull base lesions and delineate allegations involved in the decision to pursue medicolegal proceedings. Publically available federal and court records were accessed via the Westlaw Next database. Jury verdict and settlement reports relevant to pituitary and anterior skull-base lesions were accessed, and litigation was reviewed for alleged injuries, defendant specialty, patient demographics, and other factors raised in proceedings. Of 75 cases included, 50.7% were resolved in the defendant's favor. The most frequent physician specialties cited as defendants included primary care (20%), neurosurgery (17%), and radiology (16%), while otolaryngologists were defendants in only 5% of cases. Fifty-two (69%) did not involve surgical intervention; the most common allegations in these proceedings were misdiagnosis, permanent injury (19%), requiring additional procedures as a result of misdiagnosis (17%), permanent endocrine dysfunction (14%), and visual sequelae (12%). Among surgical cases, the most common allegations raised included permanent injury (17%), postoperative complications (14%), intraoperative complications (13%), and death (10%). Among cases resolved with payment, there was no statistical difference in payment between surgical cases ($5.7M) and nonsurgical cases ($4.8M). Misdiagnosis of endocrinopathy, failure to appropriately workup patients presenting with neurologic complaints, and radiologic misdiagnosis play important roles in the pursuit of litigation in nonsurgical cases. Sustaining permanent sequelae including endocrine and visual injury play an important role in surgical cases. Postoperative management appears to play just as important a role in the decision to pursue litigation as intraoperative considerations. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  13. Interspecific variation of ontogeny and skull shape among porpoises (Phocoenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatius, Anders; Berta, Annalisa; Frandsen, Marie Schou; Goodall, R Natalie P

    2011-02-01

    All extant members of Phocoenidae (porpoises) have been characterized as pedomorphic based on skeletal characters. To investigate the ontogenetic background for pedomorphosis and assess interspecific differences in ontogeny among phocoenids, samples of the six extant species were compared in terms of development of both epiphyseal and cranial suture fusion. Across all species, full maturity of the vertebral column was rare. Vertebral epiphyseal development did not progress so far in most Phocoena phocoena as in Phocoenoides dalli and Phocoena dioptrica. P. phocoena, Phocoena spinipinnis, Ph. dalli, and P. dioptrica, for which large series were available, were further compared in terms of ontogeny of cranial shape by three-dimensional geometric morphometrics. Ph. dalli and P. dioptrica generally showed further development of cranial sutures than the other species. Postnatal skull shape development was similar for all species studied; the majority of interspecific shape differences are present at parturition. Smaller species had a higher rate of shape development relative to growth in size than Ph. dalli and P. dioptrica, but they still showed less allometric development due to less postnatal growth. Interspecific shape differences indicate phylogenetic relationships similar to that proposed based on morphology or convergent evolution of the two pelagic species, Ph. dalli and P. dioptrica, under the scenarios suggested by recent molecular studies. A shape trend coinciding with habitat preference was detected; in species with pelagic preference the position and orientation of the foramen magnum aligned the skull with the vertebral column; the rostrum showed less ventral inclination, and the facial region was larger and more concave in lateral aspect. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Skull registration for prone patient position using tracked ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Grace; Ungi, Tamas; Baum, Zachary; Lasso, Andras; Kronreif, Gernot; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2017-03-01

    PURPOSE: Tracked navigation has become prevalent in neurosurgery. Problems with registration of a patient and a preoperative image arise when the patient is in a prone position. Surfaces accessible to optical tracking on the back of the head are unreliable for registration. We investigated the accuracy of surface-based registration using points accessible through tracked ultrasound. Using ultrasound allows access to bone surfaces that are not available through optical tracking. Tracked ultrasound could eliminate the need to work (i) under the table for registration and (ii) adjust the tracker between surgery and registration. In addition, tracked ultrasound could provide a non-invasive method in comparison to an alternative method of registration involving screw implantation. METHODS: A phantom study was performed to test the feasibility of tracked ultrasound for registration. An initial registration was performed to partially align the pre-operative computer tomography data and skull phantom. The initial registration was performed by an anatomical landmark registration. Surface points accessible by tracked ultrasound were collected and used to perform an Iterative Closest Point Algorithm. RESULTS: When the surface registration was compared to a ground truth landmark registration, the average TRE was found to be 1.6+/-0.1mm and the average distance of points off the skull surface was 0.6+/-0.1mm. CONCLUSION: The use of tracked ultrasound is feasible for registration of patients in prone position and eliminates the need to perform registration under the table. The translational component of error found was minimal. Therefore, the amount of TRE in registration is due to a rotational component of error.

  15. Extremely deformable structures

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a new research stimulus has derived from the observation that soft structures, such as biological systems, but also rubber and gel, may work in a post critical regime, where elastic elements are subject to extreme deformations, though still exhibiting excellent mechanical performances. This is the realm of ‘extreme mechanics’, to which this book is addressed. The possibility of exploiting highly deformable structures opens new and unexpected technological possibilities. In particular, the challenge is the design of deformable and bi-stable mechanisms which can reach superior mechanical performances and can have a strong impact on several high-tech applications, including stretchable electronics, nanotube serpentines, deployable structures for aerospace engineering, cable deployment in the ocean, but also sensors and flexible actuators and vibration absorbers. Readers are introduced to a variety of interrelated topics involving the mechanics of extremely deformable structures, with emphasis on ...

  16. Secondary skull reconstruction with autogenous split calvarial bone grafts versus nonautogenous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Jong; Choi, Jong Woo; Chung, In Wook

    2014-07-01

    Skull reconstructions, which can be required for various reasons, including decompressive craniectomy, trauma, and tumors, are challenging issues in plastic surgery. Moreover, obtaining a low complication ratio in secondary skull reconstructions is more difficult than in primary skull reconstructions. Because standardized protocols have not been established, we here compare cranioplasty performance using fresh autogenous split calvarial bone grafts and allogenic or alloplastic materials in secondary revisional cases. Surgical correction of skull defects was performed in 25 patients in our center between 2005 and 2012. Only secondary cranioplasty cases were reviewed retrospectively. There were 17 men and 8 women, with ages ranging from 8 to 62 years at the time of surgery. The mean follow-up was 55.6 months. The surgical procedure in each case was a routine cranioplasty. In most of the cases, a 1-piece split calvarial bone graft was used while minimizing the separation of the bone flap into multiple pieces. In comparison with the skull reconstructional approach using nonautogenous materials, the functional and esthetic results of skull reconstruction using autogenous calvarial bone grafts were better and more consistent in secondary revisional cases. The group that received autogenous calvarial bone grafts showed a reconstruction success rate of 80% without esthetic and functional complications. In contrast, the group that received nonautogenous materials had a 30% success rate. Secondary cranial defect reconstructions with autogenous calvarial bone grafts showed better functional and esthetic results than skull reconstructions with nonautogenous materials.

  17. Radiological assessment of skull base changes in children with syndromic craniosynostosis: role of "minor" sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandrelli, Rosalinda; D'Apolito, Gabriella; Gaudino, Simona; Stefanetti, Mariangela; Massimi, Luca; Di Rocco, Concezio; Colosimo, Cesare

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to identify the premature synostosis of "major" and "minor" sutures of the four "sutural arches" of the skull and to perform a morphometric analysis in children with syndromic craniosynostosis in order to evaluate changes in the skull base linked with premature suture synostosis. We reviewed multiplanar high-resolution CT images, implemented with 3D reconstructions, from 18 patients with complex syndromic craniosynostosis and compared them with 18 age-matched healthy subjects. We assessed the calvarial sutures and their extension to the skull base, and then we correlated specific types of synostosis with the size, shape and symmetry of the cranial fossae. We found a marked asymmetry of the skull base growth in all patients. The synostotic involvement around the coronal ring caused a reduction in the growth of the anterior and middle fossae. The size of the posterior cranial fossa was related not only to "major" but also to "minor" suture synostosis of the lambdoid and parieto-squamosal arches. Changes in the skull base and craniofacial axis symmetry are due to structural and functional relationships between "major" and "minor" skull sutures, suggesting a structural and functional relationship between the neurocranium and basicranium. The early recognition of prematurely closed skull base sutures may help clinicians and neurosurgeons to establish correct therapeutic approaches.

  18. An innovative transparent cranial window based on skull optical clearing An innovative transparent cranial window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, T. H.; Luo, Q. M.; Zhu, D.

    2012-06-01

    Noninvasive optical methods for viewing the structural and functional organization of cortex have been playing important roles in brain research, which usually suffer from turbid skull. Various cranial window models based on surgical operation have been proposed, but have respective limitations. Here, an innovative transparent cranial window of mouse was established by topically treatment with a skull optical clearing solution (SOCS), rather than by craniotomy. Based on the experiment of optical clearing efficacy of skull in vitro, we found that the turbid skull became transparent within 25 min after application of SOCS. The USAF target is visible through the treated skull, and the calculated resolution can achieve 8.4 μm. After the in vivo skull was topically treated with SOCS, the cortical micro-vessels can be visible clearly. The quantitative analysis indicated that the minimum resolution diameter of micro-vessels in 14.4±0.8 μm through the transparent cranial window closed to that in 12.8±0.9 μm of the exposed cortical micro-vessels. Further, preliminary results from Laser Speckle Imaging demonstrated that there was no influence on cortical blood flow distribution of mouse after topically treatment with SOCS on skull. This transparent cranial window will provide a convenient model for cortex imaging in vivo, which is very significant for neuroscience research.

  19. Coexistence of Wormian Bones With Metopism, and Vice Versa, in Adult Skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirpan, Sibel; Aksu, Funda; Mas, Nuket; Magden, Abdurrahman Orhan

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate coexistence of Wormian bones with metopism, and vice versa, in adult skulls. A total of 160 dry adult human skulls of unknown sex and ages were randomly selected from the Gross Anatomy Laboratory of Medical School of Dokuz Eylul University. The skulls were examined for presence of metopism, Wormian bones (WB), and coexistence of WBs with metopism and vice versa. Topographic distribution of the WBs was macroscopically evaluated within the skulls including metopism. The photographs were being taken with Canon 400B (55 mm objective). The frequency of metopism and WBs in 160 skulls is 7.50% (12/160) and 59.3% (95/160), respectively, P coexistence of WBs with metopism was found as 11 of 12 skulls (91.66%), whereas the incidence of coexistence of metopism with WBs was found as 11 of 95 skulls (11.58%), P coexistence of WBs with metopism (11/12, 91.66%) and coexistence of metopism with WBs (11/95, 11.58%). The factors leading to metopism may also lead to WBs, whereas that the factors leading to WBs may not lead to metopism.

  20. Characteristic MR findings of growing skull fracture in chiIdren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Yoon, Hye Kyung [Soonchunhyang Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyung Jin; Cho, Jae Min; Chung, Hye Won [School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-01

    Leptomeningeal cyst or growing skull fracture can occur in young infants or children following head trauma. We present MR imaging findings in five children with growing skull fracture. We reviewed the MR images of five children (M: F=2:3) with growing skull fracture. The mean age was 7.5 years. The time interval between the occurrence of head trauma and the presentation of growing skull fracture varied from three months to 12 years. We reviewed the precontrast CT scans and/or the plain skull radiographs in those patients for whom these studies were available. The most common location of the growing skull fracture was the parietal bone (n=3). On the MR images, there were bone defects with posttraumatic cystic encephalomalacia or porencephalic cysts. Marginal bony thickening and diploic space widening were noted in four patients. MR imaging was excellent for visualizing the parenchymaI changes and pericranial lesions. In children with growing skull fracture, MR imaging can clearly depict trauma-related parenchymal changes, pericerebral lesions as well as bony edge thickening with remodeling.

  1. An historical skull collection and its use in forensic odontology and anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejrsen, B; Lynnerup, N; Hejmadi, M

    2005-12-01

    The Institute of Forensic Medicine, Copenhagen, houses a collection of historical skulls of unclear origin, marked with a general geographic or "racial descriptor". Would these historical skulls be of any value for the forensic odontologist and anthropologist concerned with teaching and casework? We tried to clarify this question by recording non-metric dental traits and by performing craniometric analyses. A morphological and morphometric investigation of anatomical/dental traits in 80 adult skulls was performed. For each skull four non-metric dental traits using the ASU-System and three non-metric cranial traits were recorded. Nineteen cranial measures were also taken following the FORDISC programme manual. The non-metrical data were tabulated as frequencies, and the metric data were entered in the FORDISC programme. Observed non-metric trait frequencies were compared with published data. The FORDISC programme computed a discriminatory analysis for each skull and thereby assigned the skull to the most probable ethnic category. The results for the non-metric traits showed that the traits generally followed the expected frequencies in 80% of the cases. The FORDISC programme correctly assigned ethnicity based on skull measurements in overall 70% of the cases. It was found that this historical collection does show expected dental non-metric and craniometric traits and the collection may be of value in forensic casework in terms of comparison and for teaching purposes.

  2. Deformations of singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Stevens, Jan

    2003-01-01

    These notes deal with deformation theory of complex analytic singularities and related objects. The first part treats general theory. The central notion is that of versal deformation in several variants. The theory is developed both in an abstract way and in a concrete way suitable for computations. The second part deals with more specific problems, specially on curves and surfaces. Smoothings of singularities are the main concern. Examples are spread throughout the text.

  3. High-resolution interferometric imaging of stress propagation in pediatric and adult skulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conerty, Michelle D.; Castracane, James; Clow, Lawrence P., Jr.; Koltai, Peter J.; Mouzakes, Jason

    1997-05-01

    Variations based on bone growth and development make stress and fracture propagation differ greatly in pediatric skulls as compared to adult skulls. Differentiating the stress propagation between the pediatric and adult skulls can improve diagnostic prediction when presented with direct frontal impact on a pediatric skull, a fairly common occurrence in the clinical environment. Critical diagnostic information can be learned from an in depth study of stress propagation as a function of impact force at critical locations on the periorbital region of the human skull. The Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology at Albany Medical College and InterScience, Inc. are utilizing electronic speckle pattern interferometry detection (ESPI) and high resolution imaging to evaluate and compare stress propagation in pediatric and adult skulls. A dual detection ESPI system was developed which integrates a medium resolution (2/3') CCD capable of real-time image processing, with a high resolution, megapixel detector capable of limited real time acquisition and image processing in software. Options to allow for high speed detection include integrating a custom, high performance image intensifier with the megapixel detector leg to be used as a high speed gate. The dual optical layout will allow for continuous and pulsed ESPI evaluation of calibrated impacts at specific landmarks on the skull. The goal of this work is to produce a full quantitative analysis of the stress propagation in pediatric versus adult skulls for a better understanding of bone dynamics. The work presented below concentrates on the development of the dual detection ESPI system and initial results achieved with an adult cadaver skull.

  4. Prevalence of skull pathologies in European harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) during 1981–2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertoldi, Cino; Jensen, Lasse Fast; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen

    2018-01-01

    Harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) inhabit the seas surrounding Denmark and are an important top predator in the marine food chain. This trophic position exposes them to environmental contaminants with disease epidemics and hunting being additional threats to this population. It is therefore important...... to the skulls with one or more of the lesions. A discriminant analysis allowed high discriminatory capacity to separate healthy skulls from the skulls with pathologies, simply by the utilization of the HU data. Former studies of BMD in marine mammals have shown that exposure to environmental chemicals alter BMD...

  5. Landmark based augmented reality endoscope system for sinus and skull-base surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoranaghatte, Ramesh U; Giraldez, Jaime Garcia; Zheng, Guoyan

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic video stream during sinus and skull base surgeries can be augmented with the preoperatively chosen landmark to provide effective navigation for the operating surgeon. Currently available systems try to augment with CT or MR image slices. This will be of not much help since there is too much information overlaid. We have developed a simplified landmark based Augmented Reality (AR) system for endoscopic sinus/skull-base surgeries. Results are presented from the experiments with plastic skull and cadaver specimen. Subjective evaluation from a experienced surgeon confirms the effectiveness of the system.

  6. [The anatomy of a reduced skull model--visualisation of Leonardo da Vinci's anthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahner, E

    2008-04-02

    The article focuses on a rare example of a miniature skull of unknown origin. The profoundness of the anatomical details, conjoint with outstanding virtuosity, reminds of Leonardo da Vinci's anatomical skull studies and asks for additional interpretation beside the emblematic "memento mori"-character. Following the miscellaneous topics of his skull studies an anatomical-anthropological interpretation is proposed. For such a project the mergence of anthropology, history of medicine and history of art was mandatory. Concerning some discrepancies within the anatomical realism, the depiction of a pathology is discussed and beyond the visualisation of a historic concept of brain function.

  7. Effect of small and large animal skull bone on photoacoustic signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiuyun; Volinski, Bridget; Hariri, Ali; Fatima, Afreen; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has proved to be a promising non-invasive technique for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment monitoring of neurological disorders in small and large animals. Skull bone effects both light illumination and ultrasound propagation. Hence, the PA signal is largely affected. This study aims to quantify and compare the attenuation of PA signal due to the skull obstacle in the light illumination path, in the ultrasound propagation path, or in both. The effect of mouse, rat, and mesocephalic dog skull bones, ex-vivo, is quantitatively studied.

  8. Effect of Skull Type on the Relative Size of Cerebral Cortex and Lateral Ventricles in Dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Anders M; Berendt, Mette; Holst, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    of age. We used a continuous variable, the cranial index (CrI) to indicate skull shape and compared it with MRI volume measurements derived using Cavalieri's principle. We found a negative correlation between CrI and the ratio of cortical to ventricular volume. Breeds with a high CrI (large laterolateral...... compared to rostrocaudal cranial cavity dimension) had a smaller ratio of cortical to ventricular volume (low C:V ratio) than breeds with lower CrI skull types. It is important to consider this effect of skull shape on the relative volume estimates of the cerebral cortex and ventricles when trying...

  9. Performance of computed tomography of the head to evaluate for skull fractures in infants with suspected non-accidental trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culotta, Paige A.; Tran, Quynh-Anh; Donaruma-Kwoh, Marcella [Texas Children' s Hospital, Section of Public Health Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Crowe, James E.; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Mehollin-Ray, Amy R.; Tran, H.B.; Dodge, Cristina T. [Texas Children' s Hospital, The Edward B. Singleton, MD, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Camp, Elizabeth A. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Cruz, Andrea T. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Children' s Hospital, Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Young children with suspected abusive head trauma often receive skull radiographs to evaluate for fractures as well as computed tomography (CT) of the head to assess for intracranial injury. Using a CT as the primary modality to evaluate both fracture and intracranial injury could reduce exposure to radiation without sacrificing performance. To evaluate the sensitivity of CT head with (3-D) reconstruction compared to skull radiographs to identify skull fractures in children with suspected abusive head trauma. This was a retrospective (2013-2014) cross-sectional study of infants evaluated for abusive head trauma via both skull radiographs and CT with 3-D reconstruction. The reference standard was skull radiography. All studies were read by pediatric radiologists and neuroradiologists, with ten percent read by a second radiologist to evaluate for interobserver reliability. One hundred seventy-seven children (47% female; mean/median age: 5 months) were included. Sixty-two (35%) had skull fractures by radiography. CT with 3-D reconstruction was 97% sensitive (95% confidence interval [CI]: 89-100%) and 94% specific (CI: 87-97%) for skull fracture. There was no significant difference between plain radiographs and 3-D CT scan results (P-value = 0.18). Kappa was 1 (P-value <0.001) between radiologist readings of CTs and 0.77 (P = 0.001) for skull radiographs. CT with 3-D reconstruction is equivalent to skull radiographs in identifying skull fractures. When a head CT is indicated, skull radiographs add little diagnostic value. (orig.)

  10. A finite element head and neck model as a supportive tool for deformable image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihun; Saitou, Kazuhiro; Matuszak, Martha M; Balter, James M

    2016-07-01

    A finite element (FE) head and neck model was developed as a tool to aid investigations and development of deformable image registration and patient modeling in radiation oncology. Useful aspects of a FE model for these purposes include ability to produce realistic deformations (similar to those seen in patients over the course of treatment) and a rational means of generating new configurations, e.g., via the application of force and/or displacement boundary conditions. The model was constructed based on a cone-beam computed tomography image of a head and neck cancer patient. The three-node triangular surface meshes created for the bony elements (skull, mandible, and cervical spine) and joint elements were integrated into a skeletal system and combined with the exterior surface. Nodes were additionally created inside the surface structures which were composed of the three-node triangular surface meshes, so that four-node tetrahedral FE elements were created over the whole region of the model. The bony elements were modeled as a homogeneous linear elastic material connected by intervertebral disks. The surrounding tissues were modeled as a homogeneous linear elastic material. Under force or displacement boundary conditions, FE analysis on the model calculates approximate solutions of the displacement vector field. A FE head and neck model was constructed that skull, mandible, and cervical vertebrae were mechanically connected by disks. The developed FE model is capable of generating realistic deformations that are strain-free for the bony elements and of creating new configurations of the skeletal system with the surrounding tissues reasonably deformed. The FE model can generate realistic deformations for skeletal elements. In addition, the model provides a way of evaluating the accuracy of image alignment methods by producing a ground truth deformation and correspondingly simulated images. The ability to combine force and displacement conditions provides

  11. Skull bone tumor resection with intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescence imaging: A series of four surgical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunsho Asayama

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Our experience illustrates that intraoperative ICG fluorescence examination might be a useful supplemental method for skull bone tumor resection, especially for tumors extending under the bone surface or similar to normal bone in appearance.

  12. Effect of Skull Resistivity on the Relative Sensitivity Distributions of EEG and MEG Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Malmivuo, J

    2001-01-01

    The authors have previously published calculations that show that, despite the high resistivity of the skull, the spatial sensitivity of magnetoencephalography, MEG, is no better than that of electroencephalography, EEG...

  13. Atypical Presentation of Skull Metastasis from Rectal Adenocarcinoma as an Initial Symptom of Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Fırat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most malignant rectal tumors are histopathologically characterized as adenocarcinoma and generally metastasize to distant organs such as the lungs or the liver. Metastasis of rectal carcinomas to the skull is extremely rare. This study reports the initial diagnosis of rectal adenocarcinoma recurrence in a 65-year-old female with scalp metastasis. The patient’s history indicated a colorectal adenocarcinoma that was resected five years earlier. A skull metastasis from a rectal adenocarcinoma has not yet been reported in the literature as an initial symptom for recurrence. This paper suggests that skull metastasis from any part of the body must be considered in the differential diagnosis of soft tissue tumors in the skull even in the absence of intestinal symptoms.

  14. Negative pressure dressing combined with a traditional approach for the treatment of skull burn

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gumus, N

    2012-01-01

    .... In this study, as an alternative approach to the treatment of burned skull, negative pressure dressing is used to facilitate separation of the necrotic bones from healthy margins of the cranium...

  15. The size of venous foramina and skull capacity in man and selected vertebrate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, J

    2008-05-01

    In many experiments it was proved that brain cooling systems in mammals and birds depend on the flow of the cool venous blood into the cranial cavity through a well-developed system of foramina. In order to investigate the anatomical basis of this mechanism a morphological study was undertaken. On 10 species of mammals and birds, a correlation between the skull capacity and the size of its main venous foramina was determined. A computer system of image analysis was used. In man the skull that was the largest, however consisted venous foramina of the smallest size. Moreover, the asymmetry of the foramina and the concentration of the outflow in one dominant foramen was the greatest. Probably the dominance of only one venous foramen on each side of the human skull provides the reduction of flow resistance and creates more advantageous conditions for blood outflow from the skull, and therefore, better conditions for brain cooling.

  16. A new giant pterosaur with a robust skull from the latest Cretaceous of Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffetaut, E.; Grigorescu, D.; Csiki, Z.

    2002-02-01

    A new giant pterosaur, Hatzegopteryx thambema, nov.gen., nov.sp., from the Maastrichtian Densuş-Ciula Formation of Romania is remarkable for its very large size (estimated wing span >=12 m) and for the robustness of its large skull, which may have been nearly 3 m long. The stout skull bones contrast with the usually thin and slender skull elements of other pterosaurs, and raise the question of how the weight of the skull was reduced in order to make flight possible. The answer probably lies in the very peculiar internal structure of the bones, which consists of a dense network of very thin trabeculae enclosing small alveoli. This structure is reminiscent of expanded polystyrene and, like it, probably combined strength with lightness.

  17. Separating Wild from Domestic American Mink Neovison vison Based on Skull Morphometries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ashley L. Tamlin; Jeff Bowman; David F. Hackett

    2009-01-01

    Domestication can change animal traits such as skull size and shape. Given that domestic American mink Neovison vison may escape from farms within the native range of wild mink, we were interested in determining whether 1...

  18. Separating wild from domestic American mink Neovison vison based on skull morphometrics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tamlin, Ashley L; Bowman, Jeff; Hackett, David F

    2009-01-01

    Domestication can change animal traits such as skull size and shape. Given that domestic American mink Neovison vison may escape from farms within the native range of wild mink, we were interested in determining whether 1...

  19. A Comparative Taphonomic Analysis of 24 Trophy Skulls from Modern Forensic Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucha, Josephine M; Pokines, James T; Bartelink, Eric J

    2017-09-01

    Cranial remains retained from fallen enemies are commonly referred to as "trophy skulls," and many such crania were acquired as souvenirs by U.S. servicemembers during WWII and the Vietnam conflict. These remains increasingly have become the subject of forensic anthropological analysis as their possessors, typically veterans or their relatives, try to discard or repatriate them. The present research uses a qualitative analytical approach to review 24 cases of reported trophy skulls (14 previously unpublished cases and 10 from the literature) to determine which perimortem and postmortem characteristics are most useful for generating a taphonomic profile. Overall, the taphonomic signature of trophy remains includes traits relating to acquisition and preparation, ornamental display, and subsequent curation. Contextual evidence and the biological profile also are considered when determining the possible origin of human cranial remains as a trophy skull. Thorough taphonomic analysis will aid in identifying these types of remains as trophy skulls. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Treatment experience of surgical repair for long-term skull defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-cheng FAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Retrospective analysis was performed on 30 patients of skull defect who underwent surgical repair. Intraoperative and postoperative curative effect was evaluated on those patients, and the results showed that the incidence rate of intraoperative dura mater defect (P = 0.001, early postoperative complications [new epilepsy (P = 0.035 and effusion (P = 0.021] and late postoperative complications [foreign body sensation (P = 0.035 and dizziness and headache (P = 0.050] in long-term skull defect group were all higher than those in control group. In conclusion, surgical repair of long-term skull defect incurring high risk and various complications will not be an ideal management. Therefore, early surgical treatment for skull defect is suggested. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.12.016

  1. On the integral use of foundational concepts in verifying validity during skull-photo superimposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, Paul T

    2017-09-01

    Often cited reliability test on video superimposition method integrated scaling face-images in relation to skull-images, tragus-auditory meatus relationship in addition to exocanthion-Whitnall's tubercle relationship when orientating the skull-image and wipe mode imaging in addition to mix mode imaging when obtaining skull-face image overlay and evaluating the goodness of match. However, a report that found higher false positive matches in computer assisted superimposition method transited from the above foundational concepts and relied on images of unspecified sizes that are lesser than 'life-size', frontal plane landmarks in the skull- and face- images alone for orientating the skull-image and mix images alone for evaluating the goodness of match. Recently, arguing the use of 'life-size' images as 'archaic', the authors who tested the reliability in the computer assisted superimposition method have denied any method transition. This article describes that the use of images of unspecified sizes at lesser than 'life-size' eliminates the only possibility to quantify parameters during superimposition which alone enables dynamic skull orientation when overlaying a skull-image with a face-image in an anatomically acceptable orientation. The dynamic skull orientation process mandatorily requires aligning the tragus in the 2D face-image with the auditory meatus in the 3D skull-image for anatomically orientating the skull-image in relation to the posture in the face-image, a step not mentioned by the authors describing the computer assisted superimposition method. Furthermore, mere reliance on mix type images during image overlay eliminates the possibility to assess the relationship between the leading edges of the skull- and face-image outlines as also specific area match among the corresponding craniofacial organs during superimposition. Indicating the possibility of increased false positive matches as a consequence of the above method transitions, the need for testing

  2. Variation of skull morphometry of Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra) in Denmark and Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertoldi, C; Madsen, AB; Randi, E

    1998-01-01

    reduction in size of the traits in males, and an increase with time in the variances of the traits in females, whereas in the Lausitzian population, no significant changes in the same traits over the same time period were observed. The skulls were also investigated for fluctuating asymmetry (FA......) and a negative correlation was found between the size of a skull and FA in the males from both populations, whereas no correlations were found in the females....

  3. Upper Elementary Students Creatively Learn Scientific Features of Animal Skulls by Making Movable Books

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Julie L.; Gray, Phyllis; Zhbanova, Ksenia S.; Audrey C. RULE

    2015-01-01

    Arts integration in science has benefits of increasing student engagement and understanding. Lessons focusing on form and function of animal skulls provide an effective example of how handicrafts integrated with science instruction motivate students and support learning. The study involved students ages 9-12 during a week-long summer day camp. Students applied animal skull concepts of eye positions of predators and prey, relative eye sizes of nocturnal animals compared to tunnel-dwellers, ...

  4. The Making of a Skull Base Team and the Value of Multidisciplinary Approach in the Management of Sinonasal and Ventral Skull Base Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyderman, Carl H; Wang, Eric W; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Gardner, Paul A

    2017-04-01

    The management of sinonasal and ventral skull base malignancies is best performed by a team. Although the composition of the team may vary, it is important to have multidisciplinary representation. There are multiple obstacles, both individual and institutional, that must be overcome to develop a highly functioning team. Adequate training is an important part of team-building and can be fostered with surgical telementoring. A quality improvement program should be incorporated into the activities of a skull base team. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Post-laminectomy deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Stumpf Lutz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present the deformities and evaluate the results of their treatment. Methods: Retrospective study of patients with deformity following surgical access to the spinal canal. Fifteen patients who met the inclusion criteria were included. Patients without complete data in medical records were excluded. Results: Fourteen patients underwent surgical treatment and one patient received conservative treatment with vest type TLSO. The average angle of kyphosis correction was 87° preoperatively to 38° postoperatively, while the associated scoliosis correction was 69° preoperatively to 23° postoperatively. Conclusions: The prevention of deformity should be emphasized to avoid laminectomy alone, while laminoplasty should be the procedure of choice for canal access in surgeries where there is no need for resection of the posterior elements.

  6. Breast deformities and mastopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahabedian, Maurice Y

    2011-04-01

    LEARNING OBJECTIONS: After reviewing this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Appreciate the diversity of approaches for the correction of breast deformities and mastopexy. 2. Review the salient literature. 3. Understand patient selection criteria and indications. Breast deformities and mastopexy continue to challenge plastic surgeons. Deformities such as Poland syndrome, tuberous breast, gynecomastia, and other congenital conditions are uncommon; therefore, management experience is often limited. Various techniques have been described, with no general consensus regarding optimal management. Mastopexy has become more common and is performed both with and without augmentation mammaplasty. However, a variety of techniques are available, and a thorough understanding of the indications, patient selection criteria, and techniques is important to optimize outcomes. This article will review these and other conditions to provide a better understanding of the current available data and evidence for these operations.

  7. Autogenous Deformation of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autogenous deformation of concrete can be defined as the free deformation of sealed concrete at a constant temperature. A number of observed problems with early age cracking of high-performance concretes can be attributed to this phenomenon. During the last 10 years , this has led to an increased...... focus on autogenous deformation both within concrete practice and concrete research. Since 1996 the interest has been significant enough to hold international, yearly conferences entirely devoted to this subject. The papers in this publication were presented at two consecutive half-day sessions...... at the American Concrete Institute’s Fall Convention in Phoenix, Arizona, October 29, 2002. All papers have been reviewed according to ACI rules. This publication, as well as the sessions, was sponsored by ACI committee 236, Material Science of Concrete. The 12 presentations from 8 different countries indicate...

  8. The skull and mandible of the African elephant (Loxodonta africana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, N J; Bezuidenhout, A J; Seegers, C D

    1995-12-01

    In the present study the bones of the skull, excluding the hyoid apparatus, are described. All the bones are aerated by sinuses. In the occipital bone the squamous part is aerated from the sinus of the parietal bone, the lateral part is aerated from the tympanic bulla and the basal part from the sinus of the basisphenoid bone. Condylar foramens and hypoglossal canals are absent. A small interparietal bone is present at birth. At an early age it fuses with the surrounding cranial bones. The squamous part of the temporal bone lies sagittally in young animals, but moves progressively to a transverse plane as the animals age. A foramen lacerum is represented by jugular and oval foramens and the carotid canal. The body of the basisphenoid bone is excavated by the massive maxillary tuberosity. The latter extends to the oval foramen and contains the developing molar teeth. The ethmoturbinate, nasal and lacrimal bones are exceptionally small. In old bulls the palatine process of the incisive bones and their sinuses are gradually displaced by the palatine process of the maxillae.

  9. A Decision Tree for Nonmetric Sex Assessment from the Skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Natalie R; Dudzik, Beatrix; Cloutier, Alesia

    2018-01-01

    This study uses five well-documented cranial nonmetric traits (glabella, mastoid process, mental eminence, supraorbital margin, and nuchal crest) and one additional trait (zygomatic extension) to develop a validated decision tree for sex assessment. The decision tree was built and cross-validated on a sample of 293 U.S. White individuals from the William M. Bass Donated Skeletal Collection. Ordinal scores from the six traits were analyzed using the partition modeling option in JMP Pro 12. A holdout sample of 50 skulls was used to test the model. The most accurate decision tree includes three variables: glabella, zygomatic extension, and mastoid process. This decision tree yielded 93.5% accuracy on the training sample, 94% on the cross-validated sample, and 96% on a holdout validation sample. Linear weighted kappa statistics indicate acceptable agreement among observers for these variables. Mental eminence should be avoided, and definitions and figures should be referenced carefully to score nonmetric traits. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Morphological integration of the skull in craniofacial anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richtsmeier, J T; Deleon, V B

    2009-08-01

    OBJECTIVES - To understand how surgical interventions impact the organization and internal integration of the major components of the skull, we address the functional and developmental relationships during perinatal development. METHODS - A number of methods for quantifying modularity and integration of morphological data are available. Here, measures derived from three-dimensional computed tomographic (CT) images are used to investigate the statistical relationships among measures of the cranial vault, face and cranial base. First, we establish the pattern of associations among quantitative measures in a sample of children unaffected by a craniofacial anomaly. We statistically compare these normative patterns of cranial integration to those of a sample of children with a facial anomaly (complete unilateral complete cleft lip and palate), and to children with a neurocranial anomaly (isolated sagittal synostosis). Finally, we test whether surgery affects the strength and pattern of associations among measures within the cranial base in the affected children. RESULTS - Our analyses reveal strong internal integration of the cranial base in unaffected children and in our samples of unoperated cleft lip and palate, and sagittal synostosis. Post-operatively, the magnitude of integration of the cranial base is reduced relative to the pre-operative condition in both samples of children with craniofacial anomalies. CONCLUSION - Our results show how the cranial base adjusts to its broader structural context, and provides added support for the developmental and structural integration of cranial base with both cranial vault and face.

  11. Application of CUSA Excel ultrasonic aspiration system in resection of skull base meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hailiang; Zhang, Haishi; Xie, Qing; Gong, Ye; Zheng, Mingzhe; Wang, Daijun; Zhu, Hongda; Chen, Xiancheng; Zhou, Liangfu

    2014-12-01

    Here, we introduced our short experience on the application of a new CUSA Excel ultrasonic aspiration system, which was provided by Integra Lifesciences corporation, in skull base meningiomas resection. Ten patients with anterior, middle skull base and sphenoid ridge meningioma were operated using the CUSA Excel ultrasonic aspiration system at the Neurosurgery Department of Shanghai Huashan Hospital from August 2014 to October 2014. There were six male and four female patients, aged from 38 to 61 years old (the mean age was 48.5 years old). Five cases with tumor located at anterior skull base, three cases with tumor on middle skull base, and two cases with tumor on sphenoid ridge. All the patents received total resection of meningiomas with the help of this new tool, and the critical brain vessels and nerves were preserved during operations. All the patients recovered well after operation. This new CUSA Excel ultrasonic aspiration system has the advantage of preserving vital brain arteries and cranial nerves during skull base meningioma resection, which is very important for skull base tumor operations. This key step would ensure a well prognosis for patients. We hope the neurosurgeons would benefit from this kind of technique.

  12. The Maturation of Skulls in Postnatal Risso’s Dolphins (Grampus griseus from Taiwanese Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ing Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The degree of fusion between bones is a useful indicator of skeletal and sexual maturity for cetacean specimens preserved in museum collections. The aim of this study was twofold: first, to examine the degree of fusion between bony elements in skulls of Risso’s dolphins (Grampus griseus Cuvier, 1812 from Taiwanese waters; and second, to analyze the relationship between skull maturity, body length, sexual maturity, and estimated age, with the aim of determining a useful skull predictor for maturity in Risso’s dolphins. The stage of fusion of 20 superficial sutures or joints between selected skull bones was examined on 33 clean, dry skulls, which were salvaged from stranded or bycaught dead Risso’s dolphins in Taiwanese waters during the years of 1994 – 2001. The bones of the caudoventral braincase fused early in development (basioccipital-exoccipital synchondrosis, supraoccipital- exoccipital suture, whereas fusion along the nuchal crest (fronto-interparietal and fronto-parietal sutures occurred later. Some sutures remained open in some adult specimens (lacrimal/maxilla-frontal, squamosal-parietal, squamosal-exoccipital sutures, and the intermandibular symphysis. Bilateral asymmetry of the fusion process was not detected. Advanced fusion occurred in the fronto-interparietal suture along the medial aspect of the nuchal crest, and in the rostral nasal-frontal and distal maxilla-incisive sutures at total body length > 250 cm, and may be useful skull indicators of sexual maturity.

  13. The non-destructive prediction of the aluminium content in pressed skulls of aluminium dross

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varužan Kevorkijan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available During production of primary and secondary aluminium, various amounts of aluminium dross, a mixture consisting of molten aluminium metal and different oxide compounds, is skimmed per tonne of molten metal. In order to preserve the maximum aluminium content in hot dross for further extraction, it is necessary to cool the dross (e.g. by pressing immediately after skimming. During pressing, the skimmed dross is transformed into so-called pressed skulls, convenient for storage, transport or further inhouse processing. Pressed skulls, which represent a valuable source of aluminium, are generally valued on a free-metal recovery basis. Therefore, it is important and useful to develop a method of fast and cost-effective non-destructive measurement of the free aluminium content in pressed skulls, independent of the technology of pressed skulls recycling. Following the theoretical considerations presented in this work, a practical industrial methodology was developed for non-destructive prediction of the amount of free aluminium in pressed skulls, wAl, based on non-destructive measurement of the density, ρ, of the pressed skulls.

  14. The skull roof tracks the brain during the evolution and development of reptiles including birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Matteo; Mongiardino Koch, Nicolás; Pritchard, Adam C; Hanson, Michael; Hoffman, Eva; Bever, Gabriel S; Balanoff, Amy M; Morris, Zachary S; Field, Daniel J; Camacho, Jasmin; Rowe, Timothy B; Norell, Mark A; Smith, Roger M; Abzhanov, Arhat; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S

    2017-10-01

    Major transformations in brain size and proportions, such as the enlargement of the brain during the evolution of birds, are accompanied by profound modifications to the skull roof. However, the hypothesis of concerted evolution of shape between brain and skull roof over major phylogenetic transitions, and in particular of an ontogenetic relationship between specific regions of the brain and the skull roof, has never been formally tested. We performed 3D morphometric analyses to examine the deep history of brain and skull-roof morphology in Reptilia, focusing on changes during the well-documented transition from early reptiles through archosauromorphs, including nonavian dinosaurs, to birds. Non-avialan taxa cluster tightly together in morphospace, whereas Archaeopteryx and crown birds occupy a separate region. There is a one-to-one correspondence between the forebrain and frontal bone and the midbrain and parietal bone. Furthermore, the position of the forebrain-midbrain boundary correlates significantly with the position of the frontoparietal suture across the phylogenetic breadth of Reptilia and during the ontogeny of individual taxa. Conservation of position and identity in the skull roof is apparent, and there is no support for previous hypotheses that the avian parietal is a transformed postparietal. The correlation and apparent developmental link between regions of the brain and bony skull elements are likely to be ancestral to Tetrapoda and may be fundamental to all of Osteichthyes, coeval with the origin of the dermatocranium.

  15. Role of Leukocyte-Platelet-Rich Fibrin in Endoscopic Endonasal Skull Base Surgery Defect Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatova, Liuba; Campbell, Raewyn G; Elkhatib, Ahmad H; Schmidt, Thomas W; Pinto, Nelson R; Pinto, Jaime M; Prevedello, Daniel M; Ditzel Filho, Leo F; Otto, Bradley A; Carrau, Ricardo L

    2017-02-01

    Objective Advancements in endoscopic endonasal approaches have increased the extent and complexity of skull base resections, in turn demanding the development of novel techniques for skull base defect reconstruction. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the effect of leukocyte-platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) on the postoperative healing after endoscopic skull base surgery. Methods Between January and May of 2015, 47 patients underwent endoscopic endonasal resection of sellar, parasellar, and suprasellar lesions with the application of L-PRF membranes during the skull base reconstruction at two surgical centers. Early postoperative records were retrospectively reviewed. Results We found that 21 days following the surgery, 17/41 patients (42%) demonstrated improvement in the crusting score as compared with their 7 day postoperative examination. Ten of these patients (23%) showed no crusting. Fourteen (34%) patients had no change in the crusting score. Six patient records were incomplete. A total of 4/47 cases (8.5%) had postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak requiring surgical repair. Conclusion This study demonstrates the potential utility of L-PRF membranes for skull base defect reconstruction. Future studies will be conducted to better assess the role of L-PRF in endoscopic skull base surgery.

  16. Dietary hardness, loading behavior, and the evolution of skull form in bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Sharlene E; Grosse, Ian R; Dumont, Elizabeth R

    2012-08-01

    The morphology and biomechanics of the vertebrate skull reflect the physical properties of diet and behaviors used in food acquisition and processing. We use phyllostomid bats, the most diverse mammalian dietary radiation, to investigate if and how changes in dietary hardness and loading behaviors during feeding shaped the evolution of skull morphology and biomechanics. When selective regimes of food hardness are modeled, we found that species consuming harder foods have evolved skull shapes that allow for more efficient bite force production. These species have shorter skulls and a greater reliance on the temporalis muscle, both of which contribute to a higher mechanical advantage at an intermediate gape angle. The evolution of cranial morphology and biomechanics also appears to be related to loading behaviors. Evolutionary changes in skull shape and the relative role of the temporalis and masseter in generating bite force are correlated with changes in the use of torsional and bending loading behaviors. Functional equivalence appears to have evolved independently among three lineages of species that feed on liquids and are not obviously morphologically similar. These trends in cranial morphology and biomechanics provide insights into behavioral and ecological factors shaping the skull of a trophically diverse clade of mammals. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  17. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoacoustically-induced responses in ex-vivo murine skulls immersed in water. Dispersion of the guided waves was found to reasonably agree with the prediction of a multilayered flat plate model. We observed a skull-guided wave propagation over a lateral distance of at least 3 mm, with a half-decay length in the direction perpendicular to the skull ranging from 35 to 300 μm at 6 and 0.5 MHz, respectively. Propagation losses are mostly attributed to the heterogenous acoustic properties of the skull. It is generally anticipated that our findings may facilitate and broaden the application of ultrasound-mediated techniques in brain diagnostics and therapy.

  18. Automatic Sex Determination of Skulls Based on a Statistical Shape Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex determination from skeletons is an important research subject in forensic medicine. Previous skeletal sex assessments are through subjective visual analysis by anthropologists or metric analysis of sexually dimorphic features. In this work, we present an automatic sex determination method for 3D digital skulls, in which a statistical shape model for skulls is constructed, which projects the high-dimensional skull data into a low-dimensional shape space, and Fisher discriminant analysis is used to classify skulls in the shape space. This method combines the advantages of metrical and morphological methods. It is easy to use without professional qualification and tedious manual measurement. With a group of Chinese skulls including 127 males and 81 females, we choose 92 males and 58 females to establish the discriminant model and validate the model with the other skulls. The correct rate is 95.7% and 91.4% for females and males, respectively. Leave-one-out test also shows that the method has a high accuracy.

  19. Application of computer-aided three-dimensional skull model with rapid prototyping technique in repair of zygomatico-orbito-maxillary complex fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei Zhong; Zhang, Mei Chao; Li, Shao Ping; Zhang, Lei Tao; Huang, Yu

    2009-06-01

    With the advent of CAD/CAM and rapid prototyping (RP), a technical revolution in oral and maxillofacial trauma was promoted to benefit treatment, repair of maxillofacial fractures and reconstruction of maxillofacial defects. For a patient with zygomatico-facial collapse deformity resulting from a zygomatico-orbito-maxillary complex (ZOMC) fracture, CT scan data were processed by using Mimics 10.0 for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. The reduction design was aided by 3D virtual imaging and the 3D skull model was reproduced using the RP technique. In line with the design by Mimics, presurgery was performed on the 3D skull model and the semi-coronal incision was taken for reduction of ZOMC fracture, based on the outcome from the presurgery. Postoperative CT and images revealed significantly modified zygomatic collapse and zygomatic arch rise and well-modified facial symmetry. The CAD/CAM and RP technique is a relatively useful tool that can assist surgeons with reconstruction of the maxillofacial skeleton, especially in repairs of ZOMC fracture.

  20. Heat treatment deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavaro, A. (Soliveri SpA, Caravaggio (Italy))

    1990-02-01

    Types and causes of heat treatement derived isotropic and anisotropic dilatancies in ferrous materials are reviewed. The concepts are developed in such a way as to allow extension to all materials exhibiting martensitic tempering behaviour. This paper intends to illustrate the basic processes of dimensional variations undergone by the materials under heat treatments. The parametric analysis includes an analysis of the interactions amongst the parameters themselves. The relative importance of each parameter is assessed in order to determine methods to attenuate deformation action. Simplified examples are offered to provide technicians explanations as to why specific deformations occur and indications on improved materials working techniques.

  1. Nail Deformities and Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, James Rory J

    2015-12-01

    A variety of nail deformities commonly presents in the primary care office. An understanding of nail anatomy coupled with inspection of the nails at routine office visits can reveal undetected disorders. Some problems are benign, and treatment should be attempted by the primary care provider, such as onychomycosis, paronychia, or ingrown toenails. For conditions such as benign melanonychia, longitudinal ridges, isolated Beau lines, and onycholysis, clinicians may offer reassurance to patients who are concerned about the change in their nails. For deformities such as early pterygium or clubbing, a thorough evaluation and referral to an appropriate specialist may be warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Joining by plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Ken-ichiro; Bay, Niels; Fratini, Livan

    2013-01-01

    As the scale and complexity of products such as aircraft and cars increase, demand for new functional processes to join mechanical parts grows. The use of plastic deformation for joining parts potentially offers improved accuracy, reliability and environmental safety as well as creating opportuni......As the scale and complexity of products such as aircraft and cars increase, demand for new functional processes to join mechanical parts grows. The use of plastic deformation for joining parts potentially offers improved accuracy, reliability and environmental safety as well as creating...

  3. Three-dimensional stereotactic atlas of the adult human skull correlated with the brain, cranial nerves, and intracranial vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Thaung, Thant Shoon Let; Chua, Beng Choon; Yi, Su Hnin Wut; Ngai, Vincent; Yang, Yili; Chrzan, Robert; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2015-05-15

    Although the adult human skull is a complex and multifunctional structure, its 3D, complete, realistic, and stereotactic atlas has not yet been created. This work addresses the construction of a 3D interactive atlas of the adult human skull spatially correlated with the brain, cranial nerves, and intracranial vasculature. The process of atlas construction included computed tomography (CT) high-resolution scan acquisition, skull extraction, skull parcellation, 3D disarticulated bone surface modeling, 3D model simplification, brain-skull registration, 3D surface editing, 3D surface naming and color-coding, integration of the CT-derived 3D bony models with the existing brain atlas, and validation. The virtual skull model created is complete with all 29 bones, including the auditory ossicles (being among the smallest bones). It contains all typical bony features and landmarks. The created skull model is superior to the existing skull models in terms of completeness, realism, and integration with the brain along with blood vessels and cranial nerves. This skull atlas is valuable for medical students and residents to easily get familiarized with the skull and surrounding anatomy with a few clicks. The atlas is also useful for educators to prepare teaching materials. It may potentially serve as a reference aid in the reading and operating rooms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cervical Spine Deformity in Long-Standing, Untreated Congenital Muscular Torticollis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Mohammed Ahmed; Yun, In Sik; Park, Hanna; Kim, Yong Oock

    2017-01-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a benign condition. With early diagnosis and appropriate management, it can be cured completely, leaving no residual deformity. However, long-standing, untreated CMT can lead to permanent craniofacial deformities and asymmetry. Four adult patients presented to the author with long-standing, untreated CMT. Initial clinical assessment demonstrated tightness of the sternocleidomastoid muscle on the affected side. Investigation of cervical spine using 3-dimensional computed tomography scans with cervical segmentation allowed a 3-dimensional module to be separately created for each vertebra to detect any anatomical changes. A change in the axis of the vertebral column was noted when compared to that of the skull. Also, there were apparent anatomical changes affecting the vertebrae, which were most noticeable at the level of the atlas and axis vertebrae. These changes decreased gradually till reaching the seventh cervical vertebra, which appeared to be normal in all patients. The changes in the atlas vertebra were mostly due to its intimate relation with the skull base. The changes of the axis were the most significant, affecting mainly the superior articular facet, the lamina, and the body. There were seemingly permanent changes along the cervical spine region in the adult patients with long-standing, untreated CMT in the form of bending and rotation deformities that might result in residual torticollis postoperatively.

  5. An investigation into the accuracy and reliability of skull-photo superimposition in a South African sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, G M; Steyn, M

    2012-03-10

    One of the aims of forensic science is to determine the identities of victims of crime. In some cases the investigators may have ideas as to the identities of the victims and in these situations, ante mortem photographs of the victims could be used in order to try and establish identity through skull-photo superimposition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of a newly developed digital photographic superimposition technique on a South African sample of cadaver photographs and skulls. Forty facial photographs were selected and for each photo, 10 skulls (including the skull corresponding to the photo) were used for superimposition. The investigator did not know which of the 10 skulls corresponded to the photograph in question. The skulls were scanned 3-dimensionally, using a Cyberware™ Model 3030 Colour-3D Scanhead scanner. The photos were also scanned. Superimposition was done in 3D Studio Max and involved a morphological superimposition, whereby a skull is superimposed over the photo and assessed for a morphological match. Superimposition using selected anatomical landmarks was also performed to assess the match. A total of 400 skull-photo superimpositions were carried out using the morphological assessment and another 400 using the anatomical landmarks. In 85% of cases the correct skull was included in the possible matches for a particular photo using morphological assessment. However, in all of these cases, between zero and three other skulls out of 10 possibilities could also match a specific photo. In the landmark based assessment, the correct skull was included in 80% of cases. Once again, however, between one and seven other skulls out of 10 possibilities also matched the photo. This indicates that skull-photo superimposition has limited use in the identification of human skeletal remains, but may be useful as an initial screening tool. Corroborative techniques should also be used in the identification process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier

  6. Insufficient vitamin D supplement use during pregnancy and early childhood : a risk factor for positional skull deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weernink, M.G.; Wijk, R.M. van; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, C.G.; Lanting, C.I.; Grant, C.C.; Vlimmeren, L.A. van; Boere-Boonekamp, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency during pregnancy is associated with disturbed skeletal homeostasis during infancy. Our aim was to investigate the influence of adherence to recommendations for vitamin D supplement intake of 10 μg per day (400 IU) during pregnancy (mother) and in the first months of life

  7. Insufficient vitamin D supplement use during pregnancy and early childhood: a risk factor for positional skull deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weernink, Marieke Geertruida Maria; van Wijk, Renske; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina Gerarda Maria; Lanting, Caren I.; Grant, Cameron C.; van Vlimmeren, Leo A.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magdalena M.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency during pregnancy is associated with disturbed skeletal homeostasis during infancy. Our aim was to investigate the influence of adherence to recommendations for vitamin D supplement intake of 10 μg per day (400 IU) during pregnancy (mother) and in the first months of life

  8. Insufficient vitamin D supplement use during pregnancy and early childhood: a risk factor for positional skull deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weernink, M.G.; Wijk, R.M. van; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, C.G.; Lanting, C.I.; Grant, C.C.; van Vlimmeren, L.A.; Boere-Boonekamp, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency during pregnancy is associated with disturbed skeletal homeostasis during infancy. Our aim was to investigate the influence of adherence to recommendations for vitamin D supplement intake of 10 mug per day (400 IU) during pregnancy (mother) and in the first months of life

  9. Marginally Deformed Starobinsky Gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codello, A.; Joergensen, J.; Sannino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We show that quantum-induced marginal deformations of the Starobinsky gravitational action of the form $R^{2(1 -\\alpha)}$, with $R$ the Ricci scalar and $\\alpha$ a positive parameter, smaller than one half, can account for the recent experimental observations by BICEP2 of primordial tensor modes....

  10. [A virtual deformable mandible model used for reconstruction computer aided design of large mandibular defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Cai, Zhigang; Peng, Xin; Wang, Yang; Liu, Huiyuan; Guo, Chuanbin

    2014-07-01

    To establish a three- dimensional virtual deformable mandible model used for individual reconstruction design of large mandibular defect. A virtual deformable mandible model has been established by a 3D animation software. The model could be used for preoperative reconstruction design of large mandibular defects cases. According to the temporomandibular joint fossa position, maxillary dental arch, the normal relationship of cranio-maxillofacial profile, and the morphology of the residual segments of mandible, the virtual mandible model could be scaled and adjusted and a virtual mandible with individual features was obtained. Three normal skulls have been used to validate the adjustment ability of the virtual deformable mandible model. The preoperative reconstruction design process of 1 typical large mandibular defect case was demonstrated. The deformation matching ability of the virtual deformable mandible model was very good. The registration between the design model and the original mandible was over 90%. The design effect of the large mandiblar defect case was satisfied. Virtual deformable mandible model is a new feasible method to aid preoperative reconstruction design of large mandibular defects.

  11. Evaluation of porous vitreous carbon or silicon implants by radiology in rat's skull; Avaliacao radiologica de implantes de carbono vitreo poroso ou silicone em cranio de ratos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccari-Mazzetti, Marcelo Paulo; Kobata, Celio Toshiro [Lusiada University of Santos, SP (Brazil). Hospital Defeitos da Face. Dept. of Surgery]. E-mail: mmgvaccari@ig.com.br; Fabiani, Paulo [Lusiada University of Santos, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology; Martins, Dulce Maria Fonseca Soares [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery. Div. of Plastic Surgery; Gomes, Paulo de Oliveira [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery. Div. of Operatory Technique and Experimental Surgery; Martins, Jose Luiz [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery. Div. of Pediatric Surgery

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: Evaluate by CT the use of porous vitreous carbon (PVC) and silicon (S) implants as the replacement bone in the craniofacial skeleton of rats. Methods: 40 rats divided in: Group A (n=20) PVC submitted to the implant of a fragment in skull. After the euthanasia, the animals were divided into two subgroups: A I: 10 animals, studied in the 7th postoperative day (P.O) and AII: 10 animals, studied in the 28th P.O. In group B, S, 20 rats were submitted to S implant in the skull. All other steps were identical to group A, with designation of subgroups BI and BII. CT with beams in axial cuts of 1 mm thickness to obtain 3-D information It was used Hounsfield scale for evaluate the radio density of the implant. They were used non parametric tests to analyze the results. Results: The 7th PO boss remained in the two groups, but for 28th PO, observed reduction in the volume of the implant in Group A, not observed in group B. CT studies noticed different radio densities around all of S prostheses (pseudo capsule), that do not appeared in CPV implants. The S has remained unchanged in the CT, but the CPV has had a modification in its radio density (p{<=}0,05), in all implants. Conclusion: In CT evaluation the implants of CPV have greater deformation that the S, which makes them not suitable for replacement of membranous bone in the rat skull. (author)

  12. Deformation of chlorite in naturally deformed low-grade rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bons, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    The intracrystalline deformation of chlorite in naturally deformed low-grade rocks was investigated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). As in other phyllosilicates, the deformation of chlorite is dominated by the (001) slip plane. Slip along this plane is very easy through the generation

  13. Intraoperative biopsy of the major cranial nerves in the surgical strategy for adenoid cystic carcinoma close to the skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarsitano, Achille; Pizzigallo, Angelo; Gessaroli, Manlio; Sturiale, Carmelo; Marchetti, Claudio

    2012-02-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands has a propensity for perineural invasion, which could favor spread along the major cranial nerves, sometimes to the skull base and through the foramina to the brain parenchyma. This study evaluated the relationship between neural spread and relapse in the skull base. During surgery, we performed multiple biopsies with extemporaneous examination of the major nerves close to the tumor to guide the surgical resection. The percentage of actuarial local control at 5 years for patients with a positive named nerve and skull base infiltration was 12.5%, compared with 90.0% in patients who were named nerve-negative and without infiltration of the skull base (P = .001). Our study shows that local control of disease for patients who are named nerve-positive with skull base infiltration is significantly more complex compared with patients who are named nerve-negative without infiltration of the skull base. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  14. Oldest known pantherine skull and evolution of the tiger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji H Mazák

    Full Text Available The tiger is one of the most iconic extant animals, and its origin and evolution have been intensely debated. Fossils attributable to extant pantherine species-lineages are less than 2 MYA and the earliest tiger fossils are from the Calabrian, Lower Pleistocene. Molecular studies predict a much younger age for the divergence of modern tiger subspecies at <100 KYA, although their cranial morphology is readily distinguishable, indicating that early Pleistocene tigers would likely have differed markedly anatomically from extant tigers. Such inferences are hampered by the fact that well-known fossil tiger material is middle to late Pleistocene in age. Here we describe a new species of pantherine cat from Longdan, Gansu Province, China, Panthera zdanskyi sp. nov. With an estimated age of 2.55-2.16 MYA it represents the oldest complete skull of a pantherine cat hitherto found. Although smaller, it appears morphologically to be surprisingly similar to modern tigers considering its age. Morphological, morphometric, and cladistic analyses are congruent in confirming its very close affinity to the tiger, and it may be regarded as the most primitive species of the tiger lineage, demonstrating the first unequivocal presence of a modern pantherine species-lineage in the basal stage of the Pleistocene (Gelasian; traditionally considered to be Late Pliocene. This find supports a north-central Chinese origin of the tiger lineage, and demonstrates that various parts of the cranium, mandible, and dentition evolved at different rates. An increase in size and a reduction in the relative size of parts of the dentition appear to have been prominent features of tiger evolution, whereas the distinctive cranial morphology of modern tigers was established very early in their evolutionary history. The evolutionary trend of increasing size in the tiger lineage is likely coupled to the evolution of its primary prey species.

  15. Oldest Known Pantherine Skull and Evolution of the Tiger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazák, Ji H.; Christiansen, Per; Kitchener, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    The tiger is one of the most iconic extant animals, and its origin and evolution have been intensely debated. Fossils attributable to extant pantherine species-lineages are less than 2 MYA and the earliest tiger fossils are from the Calabrian, Lower Pleistocene. Molecular studies predict a much younger age for the divergence of modern tiger subspecies at tigers would likely have differed markedly anatomically from extant tigers. Such inferences are hampered by the fact that well-known fossil tiger material is middle to late Pleistocene in age. Here we describe a new species of pantherine cat from Longdan, Gansu Province, China, Panthera zdanskyi sp. nov. With an estimated age of 2.55–2.16 MYA it represents the oldest complete skull of a pantherine cat hitherto found. Although smaller, it appears morphologically to be surprisingly similar to modern tigers considering its age. Morphological, morphometric, and cladistic analyses are congruent in confirming its very close affinity to the tiger, and it may be regarded as the most primitive species of the tiger lineage, demonstrating the first unequivocal presence of a modern pantherine species-lineage in the basal stage of the Pleistocene (Gelasian; traditionally considered to be Late Pliocene). This find supports a north-central Chinese origin of the tiger lineage, and demonstrates that various parts of the cranium, mandible, and dentition evolved at different rates. An increase in size and a reduction in the relative size of parts of the dentition appear to have been prominent features of tiger evolution, whereas the distinctive cranial morphology of modern tigers was established very early in their evolutionary history. The evolutionary trend of increasing size in the tiger lineage is likely coupled to the evolution of its primary prey species. PMID:22016768

  16. Expression of Cathepsin K in Skull Base Chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kaibing; Ma, Junpeng; Wang, Liang; Wang, Ke; Li, Da; Hao, Shuyu; Yang, Yang; Du, Jiang; Jia, Guijun; Zhang, Liwei; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association between cathepsin K and the clinical characteristics of skull base chordoma (SBC). This study included 58 paraffin-embedded samples and 85 frozen samples of 94 patients. All clinical data corresponding to these patients were available. Immunohistochemical staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were performed. Positive rate of immunohistochemical staining slices and delta cycle threshold value of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction represented the cathepsin K expression level in protein and gene level separately. In protein level, expression level (EL) of invasive tumors was increased compared with noninvasive tumors (P = 0.006), EL of tumors with dura erosion was increased compared with tumors without dura erosion (P = 0.001). Tumors with septa exhibited increased EL compared with tumors without septa (P = 0.001). Tumors with lobulation exhibited increased EL compared with tumors without lobulation (P = 0.000). Higher EL of cathepsin K was associated with reduced progression-free survival (PFS) (P = 0.015). In gene level, tumors with septa showed higher EL than tumors without septa (P = 0.015), and tumors with lobulation showed higher EL than tumors without lobulation (P = 0.049). Cathepsin K EL was an independent risk factor for reduced PFS, and an increased level of cathepsin K in SBC was associated with reduced PFS (P = 0.042). Increased cathepsin K expression in SBC was associated with tumor invasion and reduced PFS. The cathepsin K level in SBC also was associated with tumor stage, tumor lobulation, and septa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Oldest known pantherine skull and evolution of the tiger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazák, Ji H; Christiansen, Per; Kitchener, Andrew C

    2011-01-01

    The tiger is one of the most iconic extant animals, and its origin and evolution have been intensely debated. Fossils attributable to extant pantherine species-lineages are less than 2 MYA and the earliest tiger fossils are from the Calabrian, Lower Pleistocene. Molecular studies predict a much younger age for the divergence of modern tiger subspecies at tigers would likely have differed markedly anatomically from extant tigers. Such inferences are hampered by the fact that well-known fossil tiger material is middle to late Pleistocene in age. Here we describe a new species of pantherine cat from Longdan, Gansu Province, China, Panthera zdanskyi sp. nov. With an estimated age of 2.55-2.16 MYA it represents the oldest complete skull of a pantherine cat hitherto found. Although smaller, it appears morphologically to be surprisingly similar to modern tigers considering its age. Morphological, morphometric, and cladistic analyses are congruent in confirming its very close affinity to the tiger, and it may be regarded as the most primitive species of the tiger lineage, demonstrating the first unequivocal presence of a modern pantherine species-lineage in the basal stage of the Pleistocene (Gelasian; traditionally considered to be Late Pliocene). This find supports a north-central Chinese origin of the tiger lineage, and demonstrates that various parts of the cranium, mandible, and dentition evolved at different rates. An increase in size and a reduction in the relative size of parts of the dentition appear to have been prominent features of tiger evolution, whereas the distinctive cranial morphology of modern tigers was established very early in their evolutionary history. The evolutionary trend of increasing size in the tiger lineage is likely coupled to the evolution of its primary prey species.

  18. Analysis of Associated Spinal Fractures in Cases of Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage or Skull Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunoki M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH or skull fracture are typically admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery for fear of delayed neurological deterioration. Neurosurgeons, therefore, must be careful not to overlook a spinal fracture in these patients. In this study, we investigated the occurrence and risk factor of spinal fracture in patients with traumatic ICH or skull fracture. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the hospital records of 134 patients admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery at Kagawa Rosai Hospital for traumatic ICH or skull fracture. The etiology of trauma, level of consciousness, presence or absence of ICH, skull fracture, craniotomy and spinal surgery were investigated. Furthermore, in cases of spinal fracture, its type, neurological symptoms, treatment were investigated. Results: In an analysis of 134 patients, Ground level fall and traffic accident were the most frequent etiologies of trauma (47.0% and 23.9% respectively. Glasgow coma scale on admission was 15-13 for 106 patients (79.1%. Spinal fracture was identified in 10 of 134 patients (7.5%. Two patients had cervical, 8 had thoracolumbar fractures. In the analysis of risk factors, an accidental fall and skull fracture was observed significantly more in the spinal fracture cases. Conclusion: The majority of traumatic ICH or skull fracture cases treated in the Department of Neurosurgery were caused by minor head impacts. When treating these patients, it is necessary to investigate not only the cervical, but also the thoracolumbar spine, especially when the cause of injury is an accidental fall and a skull fracture is identified.

  19. STUDY ON NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN INDIA VARIATIONS OF HUMAN SKULL- A SECONDARY RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameskutty Baby Jacob Kaithackal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Identity of a human being with regard to sex, race, age etc. can be revealed if the skull is suitably examined. The general concept of ethnic and geographic variations being reflected in the body as variations in size, shape, etc. can be checked for in the case of skeleton also. This article is formed out of a term paper study submitted by myself in 2016 to the Yenepoya University, Mangalore, Karnataka, as part of the postgraduate diploma course in Forensic Anthropology. The research was based on a question whether there is a significant difference between human skulls from North and South India. The aims/objectives were bi-fold: to analyse the difference in male and female skull from North Indian and South Indian regions from review of scholarly literature and to explore the possibility identification of individuals from cranial features unique to North and South India. MATERIALS AND METHODS The original articles available on this type of work were extensively reviewed to recognise any traits that differentiated the skulls with regard to their regional variation. RESULTS At the end of the scrutiny of such papers, a summary of the features that distinguished skulls as belonging to northern or southern parts of India was tried. The Indian cranial series, though varied widely in shape, the absence of any statistically significant difference between them made it unreliable to predict skull as male or female by morphometric estimation. The studies by different scholars did not propose for a uniform distinctiveness between north and south Indian skulls. CONCLUSION It was concluded that analysing a single specimen to be of a distinct geographic origin should be done more cautiously when compared to a setting of series analysis where variability might be there of course.

  20. Endoscopic skull base training using 3D printed models with pre-existing pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Vairavan; Narayanan, Prepageran; Rajagopalan, Raman; Karuppiah, Ravindran; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Wormald, Peter-John; Van Hasselt, Charles Andrew; Waran, Vicknes

    2015-03-01

    Endoscopic base of skull surgery has been growing in acceptance in the recent past due to improvements in visualisation and micro instrumentation as well as the surgical maturing of early endoscopic skull base practitioners. Unfortunately, these demanding procedures have a steep learning curve. A physical simulation that is able to reproduce the complex anatomy of the anterior skull base provides very useful means of learning the necessary skills in a safe and effective environment. This paper aims to assess the ease of learning endoscopic skull base exposure and drilling techniques using an anatomically accurate physical model with a pre-existing pathology (i.e., basilar invagination) created from actual patient data. Five models of a patient with platy-basia and basilar invagination were created from the original MRI and CT imaging data of a patient. The models were used as part of a training workshop for ENT surgeons with varying degrees of experience in endoscopic base of skull surgery, from trainees to experienced consultants. The surgeons were given a list of key steps to achieve in exposing and drilling the skull base using the simulation model. They were then asked to list the level of difficulty of learning these steps using the model. The participants found the models suitable for learning registration, navigation and skull base drilling techniques. All participants also found the deep structures to be accurately represented spatially as confirmed by the navigation system. These models allow structured simulation to be conducted in a workshop environment where surgeons and trainees can practice to perform complex procedures in a controlled fashion under the supervision of experts.

  1. Computer vision and soft computing for automatic skull-face overlay in craniofacial superimposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campomanes-Álvarez, B Rosario; Ibáñez, O; Navarro, F; Alemán, I; Botella, M; Damas, S; Cordón, O

    2014-12-01

    Craniofacial superimposition can provide evidence to support that some human skeletal remains belong or not to a missing person. It involves the process of overlaying a skull with a number of ante mortem images of an individual and the analysis of their morphological correspondence. Within the craniofacial superimposition process, the skull-face overlay stage just focuses on achieving the best possible overlay of the skull and a single ante mortem image of the suspect. Although craniofacial superimposition has been in use for over a century, skull-face overlay is still applied by means of a trial-and-error approach without an automatic method. Practitioners finish the process once they consider that a good enough overlay has been attained. Hence, skull-face overlay is a very challenging, subjective, error prone, and time consuming part of the whole process. Though the numerical assessment of the method quality has not been achieved yet, computer vision and soft computing arise as powerful tools to automate it, dramatically reducing the time taken by the expert and obtaining an unbiased overlay result. In this manuscript, we justify and analyze the use of these techniques to properly model the skull-face overlay problem. We also present the automatic technical procedure we have developed using these computational methods and show the four overlays obtained in two craniofacial superimposition cases. This automatic procedure can be thus considered as a tool to aid forensic anthropologists to develop the skull-face overlay, automating and avoiding subjectivity of the most tedious task within craniofacial superimposition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Postural deformities in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doherty, K.M.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Peralta, M.C.; Silveira-Moriyama, L.; Azulay, J.P.; Gershanik, O.S.; Bloem, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    Postural deformities are frequent and disabling complications of Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonism. These deformities include camptocormia, antecollis, Pisa syndrome, and scoliosis. Recognition of specific postural syndromes might have differential diagnostic value in patients

  3. The effect of intra-operative skeletal (skull femoral) traction on apical vertebral rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Subir N; Zeller, Reinhard; Miller, Stephen; Lewis, Stephen J

    2009-03-01

    The study design is a retrospective review of consecutive case series. Our goal was to identify and quantify the effect of skeletal traction on the apical vertebral rotation (AVR). Intra-operative skeletal traction has been used for the correction of large magnitude idiopathic and neuromuscular scoliosis. The ability of skeletal traction to correct the rotational deformity of the spine has not been characterized. Following REB approval, retrospective analysis of 22 (AIS = 14, neuromuscular = 8) consecutive pediatric patients having surgical posterior instrumented correction and fusion for their scoliosis was performed. Intra-operative skeletal traction with approximately 50% body weight was achieved with smooth distal femoral pins. Counter-traction up to 25% was used through Gardner-Wells tongs. The AVR of the major curve was assessed using the Nash-Moe grading system by a radiologist and a senior spine surgeon not involved in the treatment of these cases. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the significance. The overall mean AVR of the major structural curve was 3.1 +/- 0.8 and reduced to 2.4 +/- 0.6 (p = 0.0001) following traction. The AVR decreased by one or more Nash-Moe grades with traction in 14/22 (64%) patients. The Cobb angle corrected from a mean of 88.2 degrees to 49.1 degrees (44.3%, p = 0.00001) with traction. The decrease in AVR correlated with the higher magnitude Cobb angles (correlation 0.53, p = 0.014). Patients with pre-traction AVR > or = 3 showed the largest change with traction (3.4-2.5, p = 0.000004). There was very good association between the radiologist and the spine surgeon, 0.72(standing films) and 0.63(traction films). The minor structural curve corrected from a mean Cobb of 53.5 degrees to 33.8 degrees (37.8%) with AVR decreasing from a mean of 1.9 to 1.4 (p = 0.014). Significant apical derotation occurs with the use of intra-operative skull-skeletal traction in the correction of high magnitude scoliotic curves. This

  4. Spinal cord intramedullary pressure in thoracic scoliotic deformity: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, David B; Fessler, R David; Farley, Chad W; Al-Nafi, Sami; Holtz, Jeffrey R; Wiebracht, Nathan D; Look, Andrew C; Kuntz, Charles

    2015-02-15

    In vitro cadaveric study of thoracic spinal cord intramedullary pressure (IMP) in scoliotic deformity. To define the relationship between thoracic scoliotic deformity and spinal cord IMP. Clinical studies of patients with thoracic scoliosis without other spinal pathology (spinal stenosis, etc.) have rarely reported an associated thoracic myelopathy. Previous clinical and cadaveric studies of kyphosis have reported associated myelopathy and increased spinal cord IMP. We sought to determine if IMP changes in response to main thoracic scoliotic deformity. In 6 fresh-frozen cadavers, a progressive main thoracic scoliotic deformity was created. Cadavers were positioned sitting with physiological spinal alignment, head stabilized using a skull clamp and spine segmentally instrumented from occiput to L3. The T3-T4 ligamentum flavum was removed, dura opened, and 3 pressure sensors were advanced caudally to T4-T5, T7-T8, and T10-T11 within the cord parenchyma. A step-wise main thoracic scoliotic deformity was then induced by sequentially releasing and retightening the skull clamp while coronally bending, concavity compressing, and convexity distracting posterior segmental instrumentation, allowing closure of lateral segmental osteotomies. After each step, fluoroscopic images and pressure measurements were obtained; the T4-T11 coronal Cobb angle was measured. Induction of main thoracic scoliosis did not significantly increase IMP. The mean main thoracic maximal scoliotic deformity created was 77° ± 2° (range: 71°-84°). At maximal deformity, the mean ΔIMP at T4-T5, T7-T8, T10-T11 was 2.2 ± 1.9 mm Hg, 1.0 ± 0.7 mm Hg, and 1.0 ± 0.8 mm Hg, respectively. In this cadaveric study, main thoracic scoliotic deformity did not significantly increase thoracic IMP. This correlates with clinical presentation such that clinical studies of patients with thoracic scoliosis without other spinal pathology have rarely reported an associated thoracic myelopathy with the thoracic

  5. Cosmetic and Functional Nasal Deformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nasal complaints. Nasal deformity can be categorized as “cosmetic” or “functional.” Cosmetic deformity of the nose results in a less ... taste , nose bleeds and/or recurrent sinusitis . A cosmetic or functional nasal deformity may occur secondary to ...

  6. Miniaturization and its effects on cranial morphology in plethodontid salamanders, genus Thorius (Amphibia, Plethodontidae): II. The fate of the brain and sense organs and their role in skull morphogenesis and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanken, J

    1983-09-01

    Relative size and arrangement of the brain and paired sense organs are examined in three species of Thorius, a genus of minute, terrestrial salamanders that are among the smallest extant tailed tetrapods. Analogous measurements of representative species of three related genera of larger tropical (Pseudoeurycea, Chiropterotriton) and temperate (Plethodon) salamanders are used to identify changes in gross morphology of the brain and sense organs that have accompanied the evolution of decreased head size in Thorius and their relation to associated changes in skull morphology. In adult Thorius, relative size (area measured in frontal plane, and length) of the eyes, otic capsules, and brain each is greater than in adults of all of the larger genera; relative size of the nasal capsules is unchanged or slightly smaller. Interspecific scaling phenomena--negative allometry of otic capsule, eye and brain size, isometry or slight positive allometry of nasal capsule size, all with respect to skull length--also are characteristic of intraspecific (ontogenetic) comparisons in both T. narisovalis and Pseudoeurycea goebeli. Predominance of the brain and eyes in Thorius results in greater contact and overlap among these structures and the nasal capsules in the anterior portion of the head. This is associated with anterior displacement of both the eyes and nasal capsules, which now protrude anterior to the skull proper; a change in eye shape; and medial deformation of anterior braincase walls. Posteriorly, predominance of the otic capsules has effected a reorientation of the jaw suspensorium to a fully vertical position that is correlated with the novel presence of a posteriorly directed squamosal process and shift in origin of the quadropectoralis muscle. Many of these changes in cranial morphology may be explained simply as results of mechanical (physical) interactions among the skeletal, nervous, and sensory components during head development at reduced size. This provides

  7. Pediatric breast deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Kerry; Fernandez, Sarah; Iteld, Larry; Panthaki, Zubin; Armstrong, Milton B; Thaller, Seth

    2006-05-01

    Congenital breast anomalies represent a relatively common set of disorders encountered by pediatric plastic surgeons with a spectrum of severity that ranges widely from the relatively benign polythelia to the very complex disorders such as Poland's syndrome and tuberous breast deformities. While the former can be treated in a single surgical setting with minimal morbidity, the more complicated disorders often require a staged reconstructive algorithm. Some disorders also require a multidisciplinary management for both workup and management. Although rarely a source of functional morbidity, these physical deformities are often a significant source of psychological stress for the adolescent male or female who feels alienated from their peers. The purpose of this article is to review the most common congenital breast disorders including the diagnosis, workup, and management especially the timing of surgical intervention as guided by normal developmental milestones.

  8. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option.

  9. Integration of Brain and Skull in Prenatal Mouse Models of Apert and Crouzon Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motch Perrine, Susan M; Stecko, Tim; Neuberger, Thomas; Jabs, Ethylin W; Ryan, Timothy M; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2017-01-01

    The brain and skull represent a complex arrangement of integrated anatomical structures composed of various cell and tissue types that maintain structural and functional association throughout development. Morphological integration, a concept developed in vertebrate morphology and evolutionary biology, describes the coordinated variation of functionally and developmentally related traits of organisms. Syndromic craniosynostosis is characterized by distinctive changes in skull morphology and perceptible, though less well studied, changes in brain structure and morphology. Using mouse models for craniosynostosis conditions, our group has precisely defined how unique craniosynostosis causing mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptors affect brain and skull morphology and dysgenesis involving coordinated tissue-specific effects of these mutations. Here we examine integration of brain and skull in two mouse models for craniosynostosis: one carrying the FGFR2c C342Y mutation associated with Pfeiffer and Crouzon syndromes and a mouse model carrying the FGFR2 S252W mutation, one of two mutations responsible for two-thirds of Apert syndrome cases. Using linear distances estimated from three-dimensional coordinates of landmarks acquired from dual modality imaging of skull (high resolution micro-computed tomography and magnetic resonance microscopy) of mice at embryonic day 17.5, we confirm variation in brain and skull morphology in Fgfr2cC342Y/+ mice, Fgfr2+/S252W mice, and their unaffected littermates. Mutation-specific variation in neural and cranial tissue notwithstanding, patterns of integration of brain and skull differed only subtly between mice carrying either the FGFR2c C342Y or the FGFR2 S252W mutation and their unaffected littermates. However, statistically significant and substantial differences in morphological integration of brain and skull were revealed between the two mutant mouse models, each maintained on a different strain. Relative to the effects of

  10. Integration of Brain and Skull in Prenatal Mouse Models of Apert and Crouzon Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Motch Perrine

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain and skull represent a complex arrangement of integrated anatomical structures composed of various cell and tissue types that maintain structural and functional association throughout development. Morphological integration, a concept developed in vertebrate morphology and evolutionary biology, describes the coordinated variation of functionally and developmentally related traits of organisms. Syndromic craniosynostosis is characterized by distinctive changes in skull morphology and perceptible, though less well studied, changes in brain structure and morphology. Using mouse models for craniosynostosis conditions, our group has precisely defined how unique craniosynostosis causing mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptors affect brain and skull morphology and dysgenesis involving coordinated tissue-specific effects of these mutations. Here we examine integration of brain and skull in two mouse models for craniosynostosis: one carrying the FGFR2c C342Y mutation associated with Pfeiffer and Crouzon syndromes and a mouse model carrying the FGFR2 S252W mutation, one of two mutations responsible for two-thirds of Apert syndrome cases. Using linear distances estimated from three-dimensional coordinates of landmarks acquired from dual modality imaging of skull (high resolution micro-computed tomography and magnetic resonance microscopy of mice at embryonic day 17.5, we confirm variation in brain and skull morphology in Fgfr2cC342Y/+ mice, Fgfr2+/S252W mice, and their unaffected littermates. Mutation-specific variation in neural and cranial tissue notwithstanding, patterns of integration of brain and skull differed only subtly between mice carrying either the FGFR2c C342Y or the FGFR2 S252W mutation and their unaffected littermates. However, statistically significant and substantial differences in morphological integration of brain and skull were revealed between the two mutant mouse models, each maintained on a different strain. Relative

  11. Anatomical and radiographic study of the white-eared opossum (Didelphis albiventris skull1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno C. Schimming

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study was made to investigate the anatomical features of the white-eared opossum skull, by osteology and radiographic anatomy. For this, five animals were used without sexual distinction. The skull was examined by radiographic and macroscopic characteristics. The skulls were then subjected to maceration. The skull was described macroscopically according to standard views, i.e. dorsal and caudal, lateral, ventral, and midsagittal. The skull can be divided into facial (viscerocranium and cranial (neurocranium regions. The facial region was elongated and more developed than neurocranium. The supraorbital foramen was absent. The tympanic bulla is not well developed. The zygomatic arch was formed by zygomatic process of the temporal bone, zygomatic process of the maxilla, and temporal process of the zygomatic bone. There was no significant difference between bones found in this study when compared with those described for others mammals. These findings may contribute to the better understanding of the anatomy and biology of the white-eared opossum.

  12. Teamwork in skull base surgery: An avenue for improvement in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Nancy; Carrau, Ricardo L; Kelly, Daniel F; Prevedello, Daniel M; Kassam, Amin B

    2013-01-01

    During the past several decades, numerous centers have acquired significant expertise in the treatment of skull base pathologies. Favorable outcomes are not only due to meticulous surgical planning and execution, but they are also related to the collaborative efforts of multiple disciplines. We review the impact of teamwork on patient care, elaborate on the key processes for successful teamwork, and discuss its challenges. Pubmed and Medline databases were searched for publications from 1970 to 2012 using the following keywords: "teamwork", "multidisciplinary", "interdisciplinary", "surgery", "skull base", "neurosurgery", "tumor", and "outcome". Current literature testifies to the complexity of establishing and maintaining teamwork. To date, few reports on the impact of teamwork in the management of skull base pathologies have been published. This lack of literature is somewhat surprising given that most patients with skull base pathology receive care from multiple specialists. Common factors for success include a cohesive and well-integrated team structure with well-defined procedural organization. Although a multidisciplinary work force has clear advantages for improving today's quality of care and propelling research efforts for tomorrow's cure, teamwork is not intuitive and requires training, guidance, and executive support. Teamwork is recommended to improve quality over the full cycle of care and consequently patient outcomes. Increased recognition of the value of an integrated team approach for skull base pathologies will hopefully encourage centers, physicians, allied health caregivers, and scientists devoted to treating these patients and advancing the field of knowledge to invest the time, effort, and resources to optimize and organize their collective expertise.

  13. Independent instances of "souvenir" Asian skulls from the Tampa Bay area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienker, C W; Wood, J E; Diggs, C A

    1990-05-01

    In the summer of 1984, police in Pinellas County, Florida, confiscated six identically colored imported Asian skulls (in a shipping case) from a private citizen. In May 1988, in nearby Hillsborough County, police confiscated a very similar skull from another private citizen, who allegedly had found it in an abandoned house. Aside from slight color differences between the six found in Pinellas County and the one found in Hillsborough County, the skulls are virtually identical in their osteological characteristics and condition and in the vital statistics derived from each. Each skull is as clean and dry as those typically sold by commercial scientific supply outlets in the United States. Each is edentulous (primarily premortem), between approximately 20 and 60 years of age at death, and morphologically Asian. Five of the seven are morphologically male, one is morphologically female, and one is a mosaic with respect to gender-related features. Police, medical examiners, coroners, and forensic anthropologists should be aware of such "souvenir" specimens, in the event that they encounter similar skulls. Discriminant function analyses for race and sex yield considerably conflicting results, which underscores the need for using extreme caution when interpreting forensic science estimates based on such techniques.

  14. A skull-based multiple dipole phantom for EEG and MEG studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, M.E.; Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mosher, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    A versatile phantom for use in evaluating forward and inverse methods for MEG and EEG has been designed and is currently being constructed. The phantom consists of three major components: (i) a 32-element cur- rent dipole array, (ii) a PC-controlled dipole driver with 32 isolated channels allowing independent control of each dipole, (iii) spherical and human-skull mounts in which the dipole array is placed. Materials were selected throughout the phantom to produce minimal field distortions and artifacts to enable acquisition of high quality EEG and MEG data. The dipoles are made from a rigid narrow (0.84 mm) stainless steel coax cable. The dipole drivers can be configured as either current or voltage sources, are independently programmable and fully isolated, and are capable of producing arbitrary bipolar waveforms up to a 200 Hz bandwidth. The spherical mount is a single shell sphere filled with conductive gelatin. The human skull mount has three shells: ``brain`` (conducting gelatin), ``skull`` (the skull is impregnated with a low conductivity conducting gelatin), and ``scalp`` (a thin layer of rubber latex mixed with NaCl to achieve a conductivity matched to the brain). The conductivities will be adjusted to achieve approximately an 80:1:80 ratio. Data collected to date from the spherical phantom shows excellent agreement between measured surface potentials and that predicted from theory (27 of the 32 dipoles give better than 99.9% rms fit) and negligible leakage between dipoles. We are currently completing construction of the skull mount.

  15. Embryonic development of the skull of the Andean lizard Ptychoglossus bicolor (Squamata, Gymnophthalmidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Jaimes, Carlos; Jerez, Adriana; Ramírez-Pinilla, Martha Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The study of cranial design and development in Gymnophthalmidae is important to understand the ontogenetic processes behind the morphological diversity of the group and to examine the possible effects of microhabitat use and other ecological parameters, as well as phylogenetic constraints, on skull anatomy. Complete morphological descriptions of embryonic skull development within Gymnophthalmidae are non-existent. Likewise, very little is known about the complete chondrocranium of the family. Herein, the development of the skull of the semi-fossorial lizard Ptychoglossus bicolor is described along with an examination of the chondrocranium of other gymnophthalmid taxa and the teiid Cnemidophorus lemniscatus. Cranial chondrification begins with early condensations in the ethmoid, orbitotemporal and occipital regions of the chondrocranium as well as the viscerocranium. Ossification of the skull starts with elements of the dermatocranium (pterygoid, prefrontal, maxilla and jugal). The orbitosphenoid is the last chondral bone to appear. At birth, the skull is almost completely ossified and exhibits a large frontoparietal fontanelle. In general terms, the chondrocranium of the gymnophthalmids studied is characteristic of lacertiform terrestrial lizards, in spite of their life habits, and resembles the chondrocranium of C. lemniscatus in many aspects. However, the gymnophthalmids show great variation in the orbitosphenoid and a complex nasal capsule. The latter exhibits greater development of some nasal cartilages, which make it more complex than in C. lemniscatus. These characteristics might be related to microhabitat use and the well-developed olfactory and vomeronasal systems observed within this clade. PMID:22881276

  16. Infiltrative mass of the skull base and nasopharynx: A diagnostic conundrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish M. George

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory skull base masses are enigmatic and often behaviourally unpredictable. We present a case of idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis (IHP forming a central skull base mass to illustrate the process required when one investigates such skull base lesions. This is the first description of mass forming or tumefactive IHP extending into the nasopharynx. A 32-year old woman presented with frontal headaches and nasal discharge. She then deteriorated and was admitted with worsening headaches, serosanguinous nasal discharge and bilateral ophthalmoplegia. Multimodality imaging confirmed a destructive central skull base soft tissue mass involving the posterior clivus, floor of sphenoid sinus, nasopharynx and extending into both cavernous sinuses. Unfortunately, the patient continued to deteriorate despite treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Cerebrospinal fluid, blood tests and transnasal biopsies for histology and microbiology did not reveal a diagnosis. Further neuroimaging revealed extension of the mass. Early corticosteroid treatment demonstrated radical improvement although an initial reducing regime resulted in significant rebound deterioration. She was stable on discharge with slowly reducing low dose oral prednisolone and azathioprine. We discuss the complexity of this case paying special attention to the process followed in order to arrive at a diagnosis of idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis based on both the clinical progression and the detailed analysis of serial skull base imaging. Knowledge of the potential underlying aetiologies, characteristic radiological features, common pathogens and the impact on blood serology can narrow the potential differentials and may avoid the morbidity associated with extensive resective procedures.

  17. Varying positions and anthropometric measurement of supraorbital and supratrochlear canal/foramen in adult human skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A; Shrestha, S; Singh, M

    2013-06-01

    The supratrochlear and supraorbital notches and foramina have been studied in 312 adult skulls of known age and sex. Out of them, in males 49.4% had bilateral supraorbital notches and 13.5% had bilateral foramina, 18.91% had a notch on one side and a foramen on the other side. Bilateral supratrochlear notch was present in 5.4% skulls, 9.65% skulls had bilateral supratrochlear canals and 8.49% had unilateral supratrochlear foramina/ notch on one or the other side. In females, 32% had bilateral supraorbital foramina and 30.18% had bilateral supraorbital notches. 37.7% had unilateral foramen/notch. Supratrochlear canal was present in 13.2% skulls on one or the other side. Bilateral notch was present in 2 skulls (3.77%) only. There was a significant difference between the frequency of supraorbital foramina and notches in males whereas there was no significant difference between the two in females. The distances of the notches/foramina from the midline and also from the temporal crest were measured. The distance of the supraorbital and supratrochlear foramen from the supraorbital rim was measured. There was no significant difference between the two genders. Knowledge of the anatomy of the region is important for those doing forehead and brow lift surgery in order to avoid injuring the neurovascular bundles passing through these notches and foramina, hence the gender wise present study. The methods of study and clinical relevance are discussed.

  18. [Feasibility of a novel material for the reconstruction of skull base in a canine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-qiang; Qi, Song-tao

    2012-02-07

    To explore the therapeutic efficacy of a novel complex material of shape-memory alloy brace and artificial dura (nitinol brace and NormalGEN) for the reconstruction of skull base in a canine model with lateral media skull base defect. The complex of nitinol brace and NormalGEN was developed with corresponding apparatus. A common adult dog model with lateral media skull base defect was established and then reconstructed with the complex. At Month 3 post-operation, cranial lateral radiographic projection, three-dimensional reconstruction of computer tomography, 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging and histopathological examination were detected. Five animal models and cranial reconstructions were made. All survived without any complication, such as leakage of cerebrospinal fluid, local tissue eminence and neurological function defect. The imaging detection showed that nitinol brace was distinct and satisfactorily positioned without shift and artifact. And histopathological examination showed that granulation tissue substituted NormalGEN and grew around the brace with numerous fibroblasts. The complex of shape-memory alloy brace and artificial is suitable for the reconstruction of skull base on dog model with lateral media skull base defect.

  19. Endoscopic extradural subtemporal approach to lateral and central skull base: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Fuminari; Komatsu, Mika; Di Ieva, Antonio; Tschabitscher, Manfred

    2013-11-01

    Endoscopy has provided a less invasive approach to skull base surgery, mainly through endonasal routes, but has been limited in its applications due to potential complications. The aims of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of the purely endoscopic extradural transcranial approach to lateral and central skull base through a subtemporal keyhole and to better understand potential distortions of the related anatomy via endoscopy. Ten fresh cadaver heads were studied with 4-mm 0° and 30° endoscopes to develop the surgical approach and to identify surgical landmarks. The endoscopic extradural subtemporal approach was divided into 3 sections after exposure of the extradural space in the middle cranial fossa: 1) exposure of the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus and the preauricular infratemporal fossa; 2) anterior petrosectomy and posterior cranial fossa exploration; and 3) unroofing of the tympanic cavity and exposure of the facial nerve. This keyhole endoscopic technique clearly visualized anatomical landmarks of the lateral and central skull base via an extradural subtemporal route. The endoscopic extradural subtemporal approach was feasible. This approach could display a wide range of lateral and central skull base structures with minimal invasiveness. The use of extradural space would be key to performing safe and effective endoscopic skull base surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Are Diet Preferences Associated to Skulls Shape Diversification in Xenodontine Snakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaczko, Julia; Sherratt, Emma; Setz, Eleonore Z F

    2016-01-01

    Snakes are a highly successful group of vertebrates, within great diversity in habitat, diet, and morphology. The unique adaptations for the snake skull for ingesting large prey in more primitive macrostomatan snakes have been well documented. However, subsequent diversification in snake cranial shape in relation to dietary specializations has rarely been studied (e.g. piscivory in natricine snakes). Here we examine a large clade of snakes with a broad spectrum of diet preferences to test if diet preferences are correlated to shape variation in snake skulls. Specifically, we studied the Xenodontinae snakes, a speciose clade of South American snakes, which show a broad range of diets including invertebrates, amphibians, snakes, lizards, and small mammals. We characterized the skull morphology of 19 species of xenodontine snakes using geometric morphometric techniques, and used phylogenetic comparative methods to test the association between diet and skull morphology. Using phylogenetic partial least squares analysis (PPLS) we show that skull morphology is highly associated with diet preferences in xenodontine snakes.

  1. Postnatal development of the skull of Dinilysia patagonica (Squamata-stem Serpentes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanferla, Agustín; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S

    2014-03-01

    The snake skull represents a profound transformation of the ancestral squamate cranium in which dermal skull roof bones were integrated with the braincase, in a manner convergent with that which occurred during the origin of mammals. However, the ontogeny of snake characters at the origin of the clade has until now been inaccessible. Here we describe a postnatal ontogenetic series of the Late Cretaceous stem snake Dinilysia patagonica and compare it to that of extant lizards and snakes. Comparative analysis indicates notable ontogenetic changes, including advanced state of ossification, isometric growth of the otic capsule, fusion of the stylohyal to the quadrate, and great posterior elongation of the supratemporal. Of these transformations, the unfused condition of braincase bones and the retention of a large otic capsule in adults are examples of paedomorphic and peramorphic processes, respectively. Some ontogenetic transformations detected, in particular those present in middle ear, skull roof and suspensorium, are strikingly similar to those present in extant snakes. Nevertheless, Dinilysia retains a lizard-like paroccipital process without an epiphyseal extremity, and a calcified epiphysis that caps the sphenoccipital tubercle. Finally, the integration of the dermal skull roof with the braincase is similar to that seen in mammals with regard to the overall closure of the braincase, but the two evolutionary and developmental modules appear less integrated in snakes in that the parietal bone of the dermal skull roof progressively overlaps the supraoccipital of the chondrocranial braincase. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [Treatment of chin deformities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera Serna, Eduardo; Scola Pliego, Esteban; Mir Ulldemolins, Nuria; Martínez Morán, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Facial beauty depends on the form, proportion and position of its various units. The chin is the most prominent element of the lower third of the face, both in the frontal view and in profile. The surgical approach to chin deformities did not start until the second half of the twentieth century. The development of silicone prostheses and the emergence of sliding genioplasty offered surgeons a whole new range of options to modify the size and position of the chin. We have performed a historical review of chin surgery, the multiple aesthetic analyses available and the advantages and disadvantages of the different alloplastic materials and osteotomies. To do so, a comprehensive search through current scientific literature on the topic has been carried out, focusing on large series, long-term follow-up studies, research in animal models and medical evidence. As happens in almost any topic in facial plastic surgery, no strong evidence useful in ENT practice for handling chin deformities can be found in today's scientific literature. Ethnicity influences the aesthetic analysis; the type and degree of deformity to be corrected will determine the allo-plastic augmentation of the chin or the suitability of osteotomy. Porous polyethylene (Medpor, Porex Surgical, Newman, Ca, USA) and solid silicone (Silastic, Michigan Medical Corporation, Santa Barbara, Ca, USA) show a clear advantage over other alloplastic materials. Moderate-to-severe retrogenia benefits from sliding genioplasty strategies rather than prosthetic enlargement.

  3. Anatomical Description of Zygomatic Foramina in African American Skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Chundury, Rao V; Blandford, Alexander D; Perry, Julian D

    2017-03-31

    The zygomaticofacial/temporal/orbital nerve is a terminal branch of the zygomatic nerve and exits the orbit through zygomatic foramina. The nomenclature in the literature varies with some studies identifying all 3 foramina on the malar surface of the zygoma, while others describe each along different aspects of the zygoma. In this study, foramen on the malar surface of the zygoma is termed zygomatic foramen, and the authors describe anatomical variations in the position and number of these foramina in an African American population. Sixty-two African American skulls from the Hamann-Todd collection of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History were studied. The primary outcome was the number of zygomatic foramina on the malar surface of the zygomatic bone. Secondary outcomes included the location of foramina relative to the orbital rim and the frontozygomatic suture. Mean and standard deviation were used to describe measurements. Chi-squared and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to analyze measurements between left and right hemicrania. The average number of foramina was 1.98 ± 0.93. More foramina were found on the right (2.13 ± 0.98) when compared with the left (1.68 ± 0.79; p = 0.001). The average distance between the lateral-most and medial-most foramina was 9.7 ± 5.0 mm. The distance from the orbital rim to the lateral foramen was 8.4 ± 4.2 mm, and distance from the orbital rim to the medial foramen was 7.7 ± 2.1 mm. The frontozygomatic suture was 22.9 ± 3.9 mm from the lateral foramen and 27.9 ± 3.6 mm from the medial foramen. The locations of the foramina in relation to the frontozygomatic suture and orbital rim were consistent with other populations. However, in this African American population, more zygomatic foramina were noted compared with previously published results in Korean, Indian, Brazilian, and West Anatolian populations. Surgeons should be cognizant of zygomatic foramina in this population to reduce potential neurovascular complications.

  4. Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring for Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches to the Skull Base: A Technical Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lober, Robert M.; Doan, Adam T.; Matsumoto, Craig I.; Kenning, Tyler J.; Evans, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during endoscopic, endonasal approaches to the skull base is both feasible and safe. Numerous reports have recently emerged from the literature evaluating the efficacy of different neuromonitoring tests during endonasal procedures, making them relatively well-studied. The authors report on a comprehensive, multimodality approach to monitoring the functional integrity of at risk nervous system structures, including the cerebral cortex, brainstem, cranial nerves, corticospinal tract, corticobulbar tract, and the thalamocortical somatosensory system during endonasal surgery of the skull base. The modalities employed include electroencephalography, somatosensory evoked potentials, free-running and electrically triggered electromyography, transcranial electric motor evoked potentials, and auditory evoked potentials. Methodological considerations as well as benefits and limitations are discussed. The authors argue that, while individual modalities have their limitations, multimodality neuromonitoring provides a real-time, comprehensive assessment of nervous system function and allows for safer, more aggressive management of skull base tumors via the endonasal route. PMID:27293965

  5. [Anatomy of the skull base and the cranial nerves in slice imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bink, A; Berkefeld, J; Zanella, F

    2009-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are suitable methods for examination of the skull base. Whereas CT is used to evaluate mainly bone destruction e.g. for planning surgical therapy, MRI is used to show pathologies in the soft tissue and bone invasion. High resolution and thin slice thickness are indispensible for both modalities of skull base imaging. Detailed anatomical knowledge is necessary even for correct planning of the examination procedures. This knowledge is a requirement to be able to recognize and interpret pathologies. MRI is the method of choice for examining the cranial nerves. The total path of a cranial nerve can be visualized by choosing different sequences taking into account the tissue surrounding this cranial nerve. This article summarizes examination methods of the skull base in CT and MRI, gives a detailed description of the anatomy and illustrates it with image examples.

  6. Anatomic study of cranial nerve emergence and associated skull foramina in cats using CT and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Eymeric; Degueurce, Christophe; Ruel, Yannick; Dennis, Ruth; Begon, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the brain of four normal cats were reviewed retrospectively to assess the emergence and course of the cranial nerves (CNs). Two-millimeter-thick images were obtained in transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes using a 1.5 T unit. CN skull foramina, as anatomic landmarks for MR imaging, were identified by computed tomography performed on an isolated cat skull using thin wire within each skull foramen. Thin slice (1 mm slice thickness) images were obtained with a high-resolution bone filter scan protocol. The origins of CNs II, V, VII, and VIII and the group of IX, X, XI, and XII could be identified. The pathway and proximal divisions of CNs V were described. CNs III, IV, and VI were not distinguished from each other but could be seen together in the orbital fissure. CN V was characterized by slight contrast enhancement.

  7. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, F.; Kinnaird, C.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A.; Seidler, R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either the vestibulo-spinal reflex (saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)), or the ocular muscle response (utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)). Some researchers have reported that air-conducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying otolith-specific deficits, including gait and balance problems that astronauts experience upon returning to earth. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that skull taps elicit similar patterns of cortical activity as the auditory tone bursts, and previous vestibular imaging studies. Subjects wore bilateral MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in the supine position, with eyes closed. Subjects received both forms of the stimulation in a counterbalanced fashion. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular system, resulting in the vestibular cortical response. Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate our stimulation method, we measured the ocular VEMP outside of the scanner. This measurement showed that both skull tap and auditory

  8. Solitary Osteochondroma of the Skull Base: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Hiroki; Oya, Soichi; Abe, Atsushi; Matsui, Toru

    2015-07-01

    We report a case of an osteochondroma in the posterior clinoid process that occurred in a 43-year-old man with trochlear nerve palsy. Although the potential preoperative diagnoses based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging included other intracranial tumors such as calcified meningioma, thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography effectively differentiated osteochondroma from those possibilities. Via an orbitozygomatic approach, a subtotal resection was achieved with a good relief of symptoms. Twenty-two cases of solitary osteochondromas in the skull base have been reported that have demonstrated little risk of recurrence or malignant transformation. However, surgery for skull base osteochondromas does carry a significant risk with a reported mortality > 10%. Although some previous reports advocate complete resection as the only curative method for skull base osteochondromas, the risks of total resection should be weighed against the chance for recurrence; our review of the literature demonstrated a relatively high mortality and an extremely low incidence of recurrence.

  9. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field properties unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoacoustically-induced responses in ex-vivo murine skulls immersed in water. Dispersion of the guided waves was found to reasonably agree with the prediction of a multilayered flat plate model. It is generally anticipated that our findings may facilitate and broaden the application of ultrasound-mediated techniques in brain diagnostics and therapy.

  10. A Complete Skull of an Early Cretaceous Sauropod and the Evolution of Advanced Titanosaurians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaher, Hussam; Pol, Diego; Carvalho, Alberto B.; Nascimento, Paulo M.; Riccomini, Claudio; Larson, Peter; Juarez-Valieri, Rubén; Pires-Domingues, Ricardo; da Silva, Nelson Jorge; de Almeida Campos, Diógenes

    2011-01-01

    Advanced titanosaurian sauropods, such as nemegtosaurids and saltasaurids, were diverse and one of the most important groups of herbivores in the terrestrial biotas of the Late Cretaceous. However, little is known about their rise and diversification prior to the Late Cretaceous. Furthermore, the evolution of their highly-modified skull anatomy has been largely hindered by the scarcity of well-preserved cranial remains. A new sauropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous of Brazil represents the earliest advanced titanosaurian known to date, demonstrating that the initial diversification of advanced titanosaurians was well under way at least 30 million years before their known radiation in the latest Cretaceous. The new taxon also preserves the most complete skull among titanosaurians, further revealing that their low and elongated diplodocid-like skull morphology appeared much earlier than previously thought. PMID:21326881

  11. A complete skull of an early cretaceous sauropod and the evolution of advanced titanosaurians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussam Zaher

    Full Text Available Advanced titanosaurian sauropods, such as nemegtosaurids and saltasaurids, were diverse and one of the most important groups of herbivores in the terrestrial biotas of the Late Cretaceous. However, little is known about their rise and diversification prior to the Late Cretaceous. Furthermore, the evolution of their highly-modified skull anatomy has been largely hindered by the scarcity of well-preserved cranial remains. A new sauropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous of Brazil represents the earliest advanced titanosaurian known to date, demonstrating that the initial diversification of advanced titanosaurians was well under way at least 30 million years before their known radiation in the latest Cretaceous. The new taxon also preserves the most complete skull among titanosaurians, further revealing that their low and elongated diplodocid-like skull morphology appeared much earlier than previously thought.

  12. An exceptional fossil skull from South America and the origins of the archosauriform radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Felipe L.; França, Marco A. G.; Lacerda, Marcel B.; Butler, Richard J.; Schultz, Cesar L.

    2016-03-01

    Birds, dinosaurs, crocodilians, pterosaurs and their close relatives form the highly diverse clade Archosauriformes. Archosauriforms have a deep evolutionary history, originating in the late Permian, prior to the end-Permian mass extinction, and radiating in the Triassic to dominate Mesozoic ecosystems. However, the origins of this clade and its extraordinarily successful body plan remain obscure. Here, we describe an exceptionally preserved fossil skull from the Lower Triassic of Brazil, representing a new species, Teyujagua paradoxa, transitional in morphology between archosauriforms and more primitive reptiles. This skull reveals for the first time the mosaic assembly of key features of the archosauriform skull, including the antorbital and mandibular fenestrae, serrated teeth, and closed lower temporal bar. Phylogenetic analysis recovers Teyujagua as the sister taxon to Archosauriformes, and is congruent with a two-phase model of early archosauriform evolution, in response to two mass extinctions occurring at the end of the Guadalupian and the Permian.

  13. Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring for Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches to the Skull Base: A Technical Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harminder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during endoscopic, endonasal approaches to the skull base is both feasible and safe. Numerous reports have recently emerged from the literature evaluating the efficacy of different neuromonitoring tests during endonasal procedures, making them relatively well-studied. The authors report on a comprehensive, multimodality approach to monitoring the functional integrity of at risk nervous system structures, including the cerebral cortex, brainstem, cranial nerves, corticospinal tract, corticobulbar tract, and the thalamocortical somatosensory system during endonasal surgery of the skull base. The modalities employed include electroencephalography, somatosensory evoked potentials, free-running and electrically triggered electromyography, transcranial electric motor evoked potentials, and auditory evoked potentials. Methodological considerations as well as benefits and limitations are discussed. The authors argue that, while individual modalities have their limitations, multimodality neuromonitoring provides a real-time, comprehensive assessment of nervous system function and allows for safer, more aggressive management of skull base tumors via the endonasal route.

  14. Methods on Skull Stripping of MRI Head Scan Images-a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalavathi, P; Prasath, V B Surya

    2016-06-01

    The high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) brain images contain some non-brain tissues such as skin, fat, muscle, neck, and eye balls compared to the functional images namely positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) which usually contain relatively less non-brain tissues. The presence of these non-brain tissues is considered as a major obstacle for automatic brain image segmentation and analysis techniques. Therefore, quantitative morphometric studies of MR brain images often require a preliminary processing to isolate the brain from extra-cranial or non-brain tissues, commonly referred to as skull stripping. This paper describes the available methods on skull stripping and an exploratory review of recent literature on the existing skull stripping methods.

  15. Lamellation of the diploe in the skulls of patients with sickle cell anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A O; Lagundoye, S B; Johnson, C L

    1975-12-01

    This study describes the radiological and pathological findings in a necropsy series of 70 skulls of Nigerian patients with sickle cell gene, and 70 controls matched for sex and age with no sickle cell gene. 6 (35%) of the 17 patients with sickle anaemia, or 17% of 35 patients with sickle cell gene excluding the trait, all under age 10 years, were shown to have bone trabeculae within the diploe arranged in stripes parallel to the curvature of the cranial tables on radiography. Histological examination of the skulls with curvilinear stripes showed long trabeculae of bone within the diploe similarly arranged in parallel rows but joint at variable intervals by short bridges of bone. The radiolucent areas between trabeculae corresponded to areas of marrow hyperplasia. A skull radiograph in an African child presenting with this radiological sign should raise the suspicion of sickel cell disease.

  16. Temporalis muscle hypertrophy and reduced skull eccentricity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straathof, C S M; Doorenweerd, N; Wokke, B H A; Dumas, E M; van den Bergen, J C; van Buchem, M A; Hendriksen, J G M; Verschuuren, J J G M; Kan, H E

    2014-10-01

    Muscle hypertrophy and muscle weakness are well known in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Decreased muscle force can have secondary effects on skeletal growth and development such as facial and dental morphology changes. In this study, we quantified temporal muscle thickness, circumference, and eccentricity of the skull and the head on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the head of 15 Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and 15 controls. Average temporal muscle thickness was significantly increased in patients (12.9 ± 5.2 mm) compared to controls (6.8 ± 1.4 mm) (P muscle thickness and skull eccentricity were significantly negatively correlated in patients, and positively in controls. Hypertrophy of the temporal muscles and changes in skull eccentricity appear to occur early in the course of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Further studies in younger patients are needed to confirm a causal relationship. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Bone markers in craniofacial bone deformations and dysplasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Seifert

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Various forms of bony deformations and dysplasias are often present in the facial skeleton. Bone defects can be either localized or general. Quite often they are not only present in the skull but also can be found in other parts of the skeleton. In many cases the presence and levels of specific bone markers should be measured in order to fully describe their activity and presence in the skeleton. Fibrous dysplasia (FD is the most common one in the facial skeleton; however, other bone deformations regarding bone growth and activity can also be present. Every clinician should be aware of all common, rare and uncommon bony diseases and conditions such as cherubism, Paget’s disease, osteogenesis imperfecta and others related to genetic conditions. We present standard (calcium, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, alkaline phosphatase, vitamin D and specialized bone markers (pyridinium, deoxypyridinium, hydroxyproline, RANKL/RANK/OPG pathway, growth hormone, insulin-like growth hormone-1 that can be used to evaluate, measure or describe the processes occurring in craniofacial bones.

  18. High-speed documented experimental gunshot to a skull-brain model and radiologic virtual autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thali, Michael J; Kneubuehl, Beat P; Vock, Peter; Allmen, Gabriel v; Dirnhofer, Richard

    2002-09-01

    The authors documented and evaluated experimental gunshots to a skull-brain model with high-speed photography and subsequent radiographic examination for comparison of the morphologic findings in the model. The artificial skull was a polyurethane ball constructed in layers, with a porous diploe sandwiched between a tabula externa and a tabula interna. The brain itself was simulated with gelatin 10% at 4 degrees C, a material well known in wound ballistics. Gunshots were fired at the model from a distance of 10 m and documented with high-speed photography (up to 50 million frames/sec). Subsequently, a complete examination of the artificial skull was performed, including spiral computed tomography (with two-dimensional and three-dimensional reconstructions) and classic skull autopsy. The high-speed photographs clearly showed the dynamic development of the skull fracture system from an external perspective. The subsequent radiographic examination of the entire head volume created two-dimensional reformations in any plane and three-dimensional reconstructions of the gunshot injury of the polyurethane skull-brain model, especially the wound channel and the fracture system. Thanks to the model and high-speed photographs, the dynamic development of the morphology of a gunshot wound could be documented and studied. The data from computed tomography, using two-dimensional and three-dimensional postprocessing with a perspective view, were very similar to those from classic head autopsy, but derived in a hands-off and nondestructive manner. This examination method leads the way to radiographic digital autopsy or virtual autopsy.

  19. A morphologic and morphometric study of foramen vesalius in dry adult human skulls of gujarat region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Binita B; Singh, Praveen R; Rajguru, Jaba

    2015-02-01

    The foramen Vesalius is located within bony plate between the foramen ovale and the foramen rotundum in the floor of middle cranial fossa. This foramen allows passage of emissary veins which communicate cavernous sinus and pterygoid plexus of veins. To study the morphological and morphometric variations of foramen Vesalius in dry adult human skulls. One hundred and fifty dry adult human skulls were studied for variations in size, shape, presence/absence and any duplication/multiplication of the foramen Vesalius. After collecting data, appropriate statistical analysis was done. The mean maximum dimension of foramen Vesalius was 0.98±0.67 mm on right side and 1.12±0.73 mm on left side. Foramen Vesalius was present in 90 (60%) skulls out of 150 observed. The incidence was 41(27.33%) on right side and 49 (32.67%) on left side. Foramen Vesalius was present unilaterally in 32 (35.56%) and bilaterally in 29 (32.23%) out of 90 skulls. Duplication of this foramen was observed in two skulls (one right side and one on left side). Foramen Vesalius was round in 72%, oval in 24% and irregular in 4% of total foramina present. Foramen Vesalius was present in 60% of total skulls studied. The foramen showed variations in incidence and shapes, while there was no statistically significant difference in the maximum dimension between foramen Vesalius on right and left side. There could be some developmental reasons to explain these variations. The findings of this study could be important to anatomists and also equally essential for clinicians who approach middle cranial cavity for various procedures.

  20. Relationship between skull asymmetry and CT findings. Supine head position preference and brain damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamori, Yuriko; Yuge, Mariko; Kanda, Toyoko; Ashida, Hiromi; Fukase, Hiroshi

    1987-07-01

    In order to clarify the relationship between brain damage and skull asymmetry or supine head position preference, we classified CT findings of 330 cases with cerebral palsy or risk of motor disturbance into 6 groups according to skull shape. Those were severe (I, n = 37) and mild (II, n = 114) grades in the right occipital flatness, severe (III, n = 34) and mild (IV, n = 58) grades in the left occipital flatness, long skull with temporal flatness (V, n = 33) and symmetric round skull (control, n = 54). It was considered that the asymmetry of cortical atrophy in appearance was formed physicaly by skull asymmetry but that the asymmetric dilatation in appearance of lateral ventricle was related to the asymmetry of brain damage. The severity and the asymmetry of brain damage were tend to increase the grade of skull asymmetry. The incidence of cases with the right occipital flatness was 1.6 times more frequently than the left sided. The incidence of cases whose left (lateral) ventricle was larger than the right was 4.1 times more than the cases whose right ventricle was larger than the left. The cases with occipital flatness in the contralateral side of the larger lateral ventricle were found more than the cases with occipital flatness in the ipsilateral side of the larger ventricle, that is to say, the direction of supine head position preference during early infant was suspected to be the more severely disturbed side of body. These results suggest that the supine head position preference to the right in newborn babies and infants with scoliosis or cerebral palsy might be the result of transient or permanent asymmetric (left > right) brain dysfunction.

  1. Topographic analysis of the skull vibration-induced nystagmus test with piezoelectric accelerometers and force sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Georges; Lion, Alexis; Perrin, Philippe; Ouedraogo, Evariste; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2016-03-23

    Vibration-induced nystagmus is elicited by skull or posterior cervical muscle stimulations in patients with vestibular diseases. Skull vibrations delivered by the skull vibration-induced nystagmus test are known to stimulate the inner ear structures directly. This study aimed to measure the vibration transfer at different cranium locations and posterior cervical regions to contribute toward stimulus topographic optimization (experiment 1) and to determine the force applied on the skull with a hand-held vibrator to study the test reproducibility and provide recommendations for good clinical practices (experiment 2). In experiment 1, a 100 Hz hand-held vibrator was applied on the skull (vertex, mastoids) and posterior cervical muscles in 11 healthy participants. Vibration transfer was measured by piezoelectric sensors. In experiment 2, the vibrator was applied 30 times by two experimenters with dominant and nondominant hands on a mannequin equipped to measure the force. Experiment 1 showed that after unilateral mastoid vibratory stimulation, the signal transfer was higher when recorded on the contralateral mastoid than on the vertex or posterior cervical muscles (Pvibration transfer was measured on vertex and posterior cervical muscles. Experiment 2 showed that the force applied to the mannequin varied according to the experimenters and the handedness, higher forces being observed with the most experienced experimenter and with the dominant hand (10.3 ± 1.0 and 7.8 ± 2.9 N, respectively). The variation ranged from 9.8 to 29.4% within the same experimenter. Bone transcranial vibration transfer is more efficient from one mastoid to the other mastoid than other anatomical sites. The mastoid is therefore the optimal site for skull vibration-induced nystagmus test in patients with unilateral vestibular lesions and enables a stronger stimulation of the healthy side. In clinical practice, the vibrator should be placed on the mastoid and should be held by the clinician

  2. "Anterior skull base and pericranial flap ossification after frontofacial monobloc advancement".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morice, Anne; Paternoster, Giovanna; Ostertag, Agnès; James, Syril; Cohen-Solal, Martine; Khonsari, Roman H; Arnaud, Eric

    2017-10-12

    Frontofacial monobloc advancement (FFMBA) creates a communication between the anterior cranial fossa and nasal cavities. To tackle this issue, trans-orbital pericranial pedicled flaps (PF) are routinely performed in our center. This study aimed to assess the post-operative ossification of the anterior skull base and PF following FFMBA, and to identify factors influencing this ossification. Measurements of the skull base only (SB) and of the ossified PF together with the SB (SB-OPF) were performed on CT scans at the naso-frontal (NF) and the naso-ethmoïdo-frontal (NEF) junctions. The total thickness of the skull vault was measured and a qualitative defect score for the anterior skull base was computed. Twenty-two patients who underwent FFMBA at a median age of 3.1 years (1.9 - 3.6) were included: 14 with Crouzon (CS), 5 with Pfeiffer (PS) and 3 with Apert syndrome (AS). One year and five years after surgery, the distraction gap was completely ossified in the anterior skull base midline in all patients. SB-OPF was thicker in patients than in controls at these two time points (p OPF thicknesses (p = 0.01 and p = 0.03) and lower defect scores than patients with CS or AS (p = 0.03) one year post-operatively. As ossification of the PF and total re-ossification of the anterior SB midline were observed in all patients, we indicate that performing PF in FFMBA could promote the re-ossification of the anterior skull base.

  3. Congenital muscle dystrophy and diet consistency affect mouse skull shape differently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassov, Alexander; Toro-Ibacache, Viviana; Krautwald, Mirjam; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Kupczik, Kornelius

    2017-11-01

    The bones of the mammalian skull respond plastically to changes in masticatory function. However, the extent to which muscle function affects the growth and development of the skull, whose regions have different maturity patterns, remains unclear. Using muscle dissection and 3D landmark-based geometric morphometrics we investigated the effect of changes in muscle function established either before or after weaning, on skull shape and muscle mass in adult mice. We compared temporalis and masseter mass and skull shape in mice with a congenital muscle dystrophy (mdx) and wild type (wt) mice fed on either a hard or a soft diet. We found that dystrophy and diet have distinct effects on the morphology of the skull and the masticatory muscles. Mdx mice show a flattened neurocranium with a more dorsally displaced foramen magnum and an anteriorly placed mandibular condyle compared with wt mice. Compared with hard diet mice, soft diet mice had lower masseter mass and a face with more gracile features as well as labially inclined incisors, suggesting reduced bite strength. Thus, while the early-maturing neurocranium and the posterior portion of the mandible are affected by the congenital dystrophy, the late-maturing face including the anterior part of the mandible responds to dietary differences irrespective of the mdx mutation. Our study confirms a hierarchical, tripartite organisation of the skull (comprising neurocranium, face and mandible) with a modular division based on development and function. Moreover, we provide further experimental evidence that masticatory loading is one of the main environmental stimuli that generate craniofacial variation. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  4. SPECTRUM OF SKULL FRACTURES IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY (TBI – A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhola Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a considerable cause of morbidity and mortality in India and around the world. Head injury provides one of the major contributions to death and better practical understanding of intracranial injuries is essential to the forensic expert. The cross sectional CT imaging makes the radiologic contribution to forensic autopsy more valuable and may improve accuracy of forensic investigation. To this reason we retrospectively evaluated the patterns of skull fractures on CT scan imaging of deceased patients. METHODS This cross sectional analysis was conducted in the department of forensic medicine Career institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow over a period of two years 2013-2015. In this study, we reviewed images of all the deceased patients (died in our hospital who underwent CT scanning at index admission for head injury. Demographic details and mode of injury was recorded from available data. Age was presented using mean and standard deviation, gender, mode of injury and type of skull fractures were presented as numbers and percentages. RESULTS Linear skull fractures were 172 out of which RTA due to unknown was 99 followed by fall of unknown reason was 32, RTA fall from two wheeler was 32. The cause of death in all these cases was due to head injury associated with fracture of skull or intracranial hemorrhages or brain injury. CONCLUSION Majority of fatal head injuries are due to road traffic accidents (RTA especially in younger and middle age, followed by fall from height. The common skull fracture type was linear (fissured skull fractures followed by depressed fractures. Retrospective CT evaluated has reinforced reporting medico legal of these cases.

  5. Distinct features of intraspecific and intrapopulation variability of the skull size in the red fox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gos'kov, A M; Bol'shakov, V N; Korytin, N S

    2017-05-01

    The range of chronographic variability of the average size of the skull in the red fox (data collected by the authors) from a compact area in the Middle Urals has been assessed for a 30-year period, and the results obtained have been compared with the published data on the geographical variability within the vast species range. The range of changes of the average dimensions of the skull over time spanned almost the entire range of geographical variability. Therefore, the problem of search for factors that determine the morphological diversity arises.

  6. Chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst in the anterior skull base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Jie Wang, MD, PhD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC, especially in the anterior skull base, is an extremely rare condition. A 5-year-old boy presented with a large space-occupying lesion in the anterior skull base along with a left sided-epistaxis, proptosis and decreased vision. Radical excision of the lesion was performed by an endoscopic transnasal and transethmoidal approach. The patient recovered without any recurrence during a follow-up period of up to 28 months. Here, we review this rare case and discuss the clinical presentation and surgical treatment.

  7. [Identification of the skulls of paratroopers from Ressl Street in Prague].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlcek, E

    1989-02-17

    The paper presents an overall report on the skull identification of paratroopers shot in Ressl Street, Prague. The victims, members of the underground group, assassinated R. Heydrich in June 1942. The skull identification is based on the paratroopers' photographies and, in particular, on the stomatological findings which was compared with the dentition visible in some photographs, especially those showing them smiling. None of the skully examined belonged to the actual assassins (J. Kubis, J. Gabcík). It is highly probable that they were those of the other members of the underground group.

  8. [Application of damper craniofixators from nitinol in plasty of skull defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkov, A V; Davydov, E A; Safarov, B I; Il'in, A A; Kollerov, M Iu; Cheremkin, S N; Ulitin, A Iu

    2010-01-01

    An overview of the methods of fixation of the skull bones is presented,as well as discussion and characterization of different methods of fixation. A new system of fixation of the skull bones was used in osseous-plastic trepanation and reconstructive operations using nitinol craniofixators. Results of cranioplasty using craniofixators were analyzed in 62 patients with craniocerebral injuries and its consequences, vascular and oncological diseases of the brain. There were no complications in the postoperative period. Articles made of nitinol are very strong, elastic and have the effect of thermo-mechanical memory of the form.

  9. Eosinophilic granuloma of the skull base: patient with unique clinical moreover, radiographic presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Dalili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report presents an eight-year-old girl having periauricular swelling and severe pain during mouth opening on the right-side temporomandibular joint (TMJ. CBCT showed extensive destruction of the base of the skull and the roof of the glenoid fossa on the right side. The findings based on CT and MRI images with and without contrast are discussed herein. This report highlights a skull base eosinophilic granuloma that mimics TMJ disorder and the importance of proper evaluation of CBCT images to make an early diagnosis.

  10. Skull-base Osteomyelitis: a Dreaded Complication after Trivial Fall and Inadequate Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundan Mittal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Skull-based osteomyelitis is bony infection which generally originates from inadequately treated chronic infection, adjoining tissue infection or after trauma.Case: 11 month female child had a trivial fall while standing near a bucket. The child developed fracture of right clavicle and left orbital swelling which was inadequately treated. This resulted in in spread of infection to adjoining tissues, skull bones, sinuses and brain.Conclusion: Cranial base osteomyelitis is rare but dreaded condition which requires early diagnosis and prompt treatment to avoid mortality and morbidity in form of neurological deficits and permanent disability

  11. Results of scintigraphy of the skull in 84 patients with craniosynostosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchandise, X.; Dhellemmes, P.; Pellerin, P.; Dujardin, M.H. (CHU de Lille (France))

    Theoretically, bone scintigraphy in premature closure of the sutures of the skull is attractive: as fixation of the bone seeking tracer is due to osteogenic activity, hyperfixation would be observed on the suture while it is closing and hypofixation once closure is achieved. Indeed, skull scintigraphy usually shows a very abnormal pattern in craniosynostosis but interpretation of sutural activity is unfortunately far from being unequivocal. Analysis of the abnormalities found in bone scintigraphy brings a dynamic dimension to the understanding of phenomena which lead to craniosynostosis. The correlation with histopathological data should explicit this contribution.

  12. Heat and mass transfer during the inductive skull melting process of glasses and oxides; Waerme- und Stofftransport beim induktiven Skull-Schmelzen von Glaesern und Oxiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nacke, Bernard; Niemann, Benjamin [Leibniz Univ. Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Elektroprozesstechnik; Schlesselmann, Dirk [Auer Lighting GmbH, Bad Gandersheim (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    The skull melting technology is a melting process for innovative materials in the range of glasses. A hitherto unknown problem under glass melting by means of this technology is the fact that the processes in the interior of the molten mass are still unknown. Under this aspect, the authors of the contribution under consideration present an overview of the inductive melting process for glasses in an inductor crucible developed at the Institute for Electrotechnology (Hanover, Federal Republic of Germany). A newly developed numerical model is presented in order to simulate the heat and mass transfer in a molten glass. This simulation enables a future optimization of the design of the inductor crucible and the melting process. The transient three-dimensional melting flow during the melting of glasses and oxides by means of the skull meeting process also can be simulated by the newly developed numerical model.

  13. Confocal reflectance and two-photon microscopy studies of a songbird skull for preparation of transcranial imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Haidar, Darine; Oliver, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    We present experiments and analyses of confocal reflectance and two-photon microscopy studies of zebra finch skull samples. The thin and hollow structure of these birds' skulls is quite translucent, which can allow in vivo transcranial two-photon imaging for brain activation monitoring. However, the skull structure is also quite complex, with high refractive index changes on a macroscopic scale. These studies aim at exploring the geometrical and scattering properties of these skull samples with the use of several confocal microscopy contrasts. Moreover, the study of the axial reflectance exponential decay is used to estimate the scattering coefficients of the bone. Finally, two-photon imaging experiments of a fluorescent object located beneath the skull are carried out. It reveals that two-photon fluorescence can be collected through the skull with a strong signal. It also reveals that the spatial resolution loss is quite high and cannot be fully explained by the bulk scattering properties of the bone, but also by the presence of the high refractive index inhomogeneity of this pneumatic skull structure. Even if the optical properties of the skull are different during in vivo experiments, these preliminary studies are aimed at preparing and optimizing transcranial brain activation monitoring experiments on songbirds.

  14. On the dimensions of three skulls of the species of dolphin Lipotes vexillifer Miller, 1918 (Cetacea, Platanistoidea, Iniidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bree, van P.J.H.; Purves, P.E.

    1975-01-01

    The dimensions are given of three skulls of Lipotes vexillifer, the only specimens preserved in collections outside of China. At the same time drawings of the Lipotes vexillifer skull in the British Museum (Natural History) have been made and published with a photograph of the London specimen before

  15. Clinicopathological significance of p16, cyclin D1, Rb and MIB-1 levels in skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-qi Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the expression of p16, cyclin D1, retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb and MIB-1 in skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma tissues, and to determine the clinicopathological significance of the above indexes in these diseases. Methods: A total of 100 skull base chordoma, 30 chondrosarcoma, and 20 normal cartilage tissue samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The expression levels of p16, cyclinD1, Rb and MIB-1 proteins were assessed for potential correlation with the clinicopathological features. Results: As compared to normal cartilage specimen (control, there was decreased expression of p16, and increased expression of cyclin D1, Rb and MIB-1 proteins, in both skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma specimens. MIB-1 LI levels were significantly increased in skull base chordoma specimens with negative expression of p16, and positive expression of cyclin D1 and Rb (P  0.05. However, p16 and MIB-1 levels correlated with the intradural invasion, and expression of p16, Rb and MIB-1 correlated with the number of tumor foci (P < 0.05. Further, the expression of p16 and MIB-1 appeared to correlate with the prognosis of patients with skull base chordoma. Conclusions: The abnormal expression of p16, cyclin D1 and Rb proteins might be associated with the tumorigenesis of skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma. Keywords: p16, Cyclin D1, Rb, MIB-1, Skull base chordoma, Skull base chondrosarcoma

  16. Craniometric characteristics of polar bear skulls from two periods with contrasting levels of industrial pollution and sea ice extent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertoldi, C.; Sonne, C.; Dietz, R.

    2009-01-01

    A morphometric study was conducted on six skull traits and seven teeth traits of 282 polar bear Ursus maritimus skulls sampled in East Greenland from 1892 to 2002, the polar bear material originated from two distinct periods: one period covering 1892-1939 and the other from 1961-2002. The first p...

  17. Two immigrants with tuberculosis of the ear, nose, and throat region with skull base and cranial nerve involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardus, R.A.; Jansen, J.C.; Steens, S.C.A.; Arend, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    We report two immigrants with tuberculosis of the skull base and a review of the literature. A Somalian man presented with bilateral otitis media, hearing loss, and facial and abducens palsy. Imaging showed involvement of both mastoid and petrous bones, extending via the skull base to the

  18. Three-dimensional reconstruction of computed tomography scan images for estimating skull damage in electrical burned patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Yan, Hong; Peng, Yizhi; Li, Xiaolu; Hu, Jianian; Wu, Jun

    2012-09-01

    Three cases of skull osteomyelitis due to electrical burn and delayed wound closure are presented. For better estimating skull damage before operation, 3-dimensional reconstruction of computed tomography scan images were used. Three-dimensional computed tomography could provide superior and visible stereoscopic images and help clinicians "see" the damage before operation and make more detailed therapeutic planning.

  19. Formation and subdivision of deformation structures during plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, B.; Poulsen, H.F.; Lienert, U.

    2006-01-01

    During plastic deformation of metals and alloys, dislocations arrange in ordered patterns. How and when these self-organization processes take place have remained elusive, because in situ observations have not been feasible. We present an x-ray diffraction method that provided data on the dynamics...... of individual, deeply embedded dislocation structures. During tensile deformation of pure copper, dislocation-free regions were identified. They showed an unexpected intermittent dynamics, for example, appearing and disappearing with proceeding deformation and even displaying transient splitting behavior....... Insight into these processes is relevant for an understanding of the strength and work-hardening of deformed materials....

  20. Rotary deformity in degenerative spondylolisthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Gwon; Kim, Jeong; Kho, Hyen Sim; Yun, Sung Su; Oh, Jae Hee; Byen, Ju Nam; Kim, Young Chul [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    We studied to determine whether the degenerative spondylolisthesis has rotary deformity in addition to forward displacement. We have made analysis of difference of rotary deformity between the 31 study groups of symptomatic degenerative spondylolisthesis and 31 control groups without any symptom, statistically. We also reviewed CT findings in 15 study groups. The mean rotary deformity in study groups was 6.1 degree(the standard deviation is 5.20), and the mean rotary deformity in control groups was 2.52 degree(the standard deviation is 2.16)(p < 0.01). The rotary deformity can be accompanied with degenerative spondylolisthesis. We may consider the rotary deformity as a cause of symptomatic degenerative spondylolisthesis in case that any other cause is not detected.

  1. q-deformed Brownian motion

    CERN Document Server

    Man'ko, V I

    1993-01-01

    Brownian motion may be embedded in the Fock space of bosonic free field in one dimension.Extending this correspondence to a family of creation and annihilation operators satisfying a q-deformed algebra, the notion of q-deformation is carried from the algebra to the domain of stochastic processes.The properties of q-deformed Brownian motion, in particular its non-Gaussian nature and cumulant structure,are established.

  2. Plastic Deformation of Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2013-01-01

    parameters by TEM and EBSD and apply strength-structural relationships established for the bulk metal deformed to high strains. This technique has been applied to steel deformed by high energy shot peening and a calculated stress gradient at or near the surface has been successfully validated by hardness......Plastic deformation of metal surfaces by sliding and abrasion between moving parts can be detrimental. However, when the plastic deformation is controlled for example by applying different peening techniques hard surfaces can be produced which can increase the fracture resistance and fatigue life...

  3. Angular Limb Deformities: Growth Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarrel, Taralyn M

    2017-08-01

    Angular limb deformities are common in foals; however, the importance of the deformity and if treatment is required depend on the degree of deformity relative to normal conformation for stage of growth, the breed and discipline expectations, age, and response to conservative therapies. This article addresses the importance of the foal conformation examination to determine which foals need surgical intervention to correct an angular deformity and when. Techniques for surgical growth retardation include the transphyseal staple, screw and wire transphyseal bridge, and transphyseal screw. Appropriate timing for intervention for each location and complications associated with each procedure are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Deformable paper origami optoelectronic devices

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2017-01-19

    Deformable optoelectronic devices are provided, including photodetectors, photodiodes, and photovoltaic cells. The devices can be made on a variety of paper substrates, and can include a plurality of fold segments in the paper substrate creating a deformable pattern. Thin electrode layers and semiconductor nanowire layers can be attached to the substrate, creating the optoelectronic device. The devices can be highly deformable, e.g. capable of undergoing strains of 500% or more, bending angles of 25° or more, and/or twist angles of 270° or more. Methods of making the deformable optoelectronic devices and methods of using, e.g. as a photodetector, are also provided.

  5. Preoperative Visualization of Cranial Nerves in Skull Base Tumor Surgery Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Su, Shaobo; Yue, Shuyuan; Zhao, Yan; Li, Yonggang; Chen, Xiaochen; Ma, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To visualize cranial nerves (CNs) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with special parameters. This study also involved the evaluation of preoperative estimates and intraoperative confirmation of the relationship between nerves and tumor by verifying the accuracy of visualization. 3T magnetic resonance imaging scans including 3D-FSPGR, FIESTA, and DTI were used to collect information from 18 patients with skull base tumor. DTI data were integrated into the 3D slicer for fiber tracking and overlapped anatomic images to determine course of nerves. 3D reconstruction of tumors was achieved to perform neighboring, encasing, and invading relationship between lesion and nerves. Optic pathway including the optic chiasm could be traced in cases of tuberculum sellae meningioma and hypophysoma (pituitary tumor). The oculomotor nerve, from the interpeduncular fossa out of the brain stem to supraorbital fissure, was clearly visible in parasellar meningioma cases. Meanwhile, cisternal parts of trigeminal nerve and abducens nerve, facial nerve were also imaged well in vestibular schwannomas and petroclival meningioma cases. The 3D-spatial relationship between CNs and skull base tumor estimated preoperatively by tumor modeling and tractography corresponded to the results determined during surgery. Supported by DTI and 3D slicer, preoperative 3D reconstruction of most CNs related to skull base tumor is feasible in pathological circumstances. We consider DTI Technology to be a useful tool for predicting the course and location of most CNs, and syntopy between them and skull base tumor.

  6. Upper Elementary Students Creatively Learn Scientific Features of Animal Skulls by Making Movable Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Julie L.; Gray, Phyllis; Zhbanova, Ksenia S.; Rule, Audrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Arts integration in science has benefits of increasing student engagement and understanding. Lessons focusing on form and function of animal skulls provide an effective example of how handicrafts integrated with science instruction motivate students and support learning. The study involved students ages 9-12 during a week-long summer day camp.…

  7. Phenotypic plasticity in skull and dental morphology in the prairie deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus bairdii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, P; Lundrigan, B L; Gillespie, B W; Zelditch, M L

    1996-08-01

    Morphologists and systematists have long suspected that dietary consistency can affect skull and dental form in mammals. We examined plasticity of skull shape and tooth morphology in prairie deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus bairdii) by feeding mice diets that differed in consistency but not nutritional quality. Shape differences were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively, using both landmark-based morphometrics and traditional distance measurements. Mice fed a gruel made of laboratory chow soaked in water differed from those fed hard blocks of chow by a slight anterior shift in the incisor tips, a narrowed zygomatic plate, a reduction in size of the masseteric tubercles, an overall decrease in skull size in lateral view, and an increase in overall size in ventral view. Disparities between our results and previous studies may be due to the differences in behavior between the inbred, relatively inactive laboratory strains commonly used in experimental studies and the outbred, constantly active species used here. Also, in contrast to previous studies, the statistical analysis employed here took into account both family relationships of the animals and the large number of statistical comparisons performed. Failure to consider these factors would have resulted in an exaggerated estimate of the effects of diet on skull form and may taint other studies that have explored the same aspects of plasticity.

  8. The application of finite element analysis in the skull biomechanics and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Felippe Bevilacqua; Rossi, Ana Cláudia; Freire, Alexandre Rodrigues; Ferreira Caria, Paulo Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Empirical concepts describe the direction of the masticatory stress dissipation in the skull. The scientific evidence of the trajectories and the magnitude of stress dissipation can help in the diagnosis of the masticatory alterations and the planning of oral rehabilitation in the different areas of Dentistry. The Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is a tool that may reproduce complex structures with irregular geometries of natural and artificial tissues of the human body because it uses mathematical functions that enable the understanding of the craniofacial biomechanics. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the advantages and limitations of FEA in the skull biomechanics and Dentistry study. The keywords of the selected original research articles were: Finite element analysis, biomechanics, skull, Dentistry, teeth, and implant. The literature review was performed in the databases, PUBMED, MEDLINE and SCOPUS. The selected books and articles were between the years 1928 and 2010. The FEA is an assessment tool whose application in different areas of the Dentistry has gradually increased over the past 10 years, but its application in the analysis of the skull biomechanics is scarce. The main advantages of the FEA are the realistic mode of approach and the possibility of results being based on analysis of only one model. On the other hand, the main limitation of the FEA studies is the lack of anatomical details in the modeling phase of the craniofacial structures and the lack of information about the material properties.

  9. Visual outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy of benign anterior skull base tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Wiencke, Anne Katrine; Munck af Rosenschold, Per

    2014-01-01

    To determine visual outcome including the occurrence of radiation induced optic neuropathy (RION) as well as tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) of benign anterior skull base meningiomas or pituitary adenomas. Thirty-nine patients treated with FSRT for anterior...

  10. Surgical resection of a huge cemento-ossifying fibroma in skull base by intraoral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao-Bing; Li, Yun-Peng; Lei, De-Lin; Li, Xiao-Dong; Tian, Lei

    2011-03-01

    Cemento-ossifying fibroma, also known as ossifying fibroma, usually occurs in the mandible and less commonly in the maxilla. The huge example in the skull base is even rare. We present a case of a huge cemento-ossifying fibroma arising below the skull base of a 30-year-old woman patient. Radiologic investigations showed a giant, lobulated, heterogeneous calcified hard tissue mass, which is well circumscribed and is a mixture of radiolucent and radiopaque, situated at the rear of the right maxilla to the middle skull base. The tumor expands into the right maxillary sinus and the orbital cavity, fusing with the right maxilla at the maxillary tuberosity and blocking the bilateral choanas, which caused marked proptosis and blurred vision. The tumor was resected successfully by intraoral approach, and pathologic examination confirmed the lesion to be a cemento-ossifying fibroma. This case demonstrates that cemento-ossifying fibroma in the maxilla, not like in the mandible, may appear more aggressive because the extensive growth is unimpeded by anatomic obstacles and that the intraoral approach can be used to excise the tumor in the skull base.

  11. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droege, L.H.; Hinsche, T.; Hess, C.F.; Wolff, H.A. [University Hospital of Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Canis, M. [University of Goettingen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Alt-Epping, B. [University of Goettingen, Department of Palliative Medicine, Goettingen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  12. Arrow injury to the skull base | Ogunleye | West African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An unsual case of penetrating nasal injury with middle skull base involvement, from fired arrow is reported. The arrow was surgically removed and the patient remains well with no sequelae. We therefore present this case because of its rarity. The anatomical principles underlying the surgical management of the lesions are ...

  13. Fibrous Dysplasia with Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Presenting as Painful Solitary Skull lesion

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jung Won; Kim, Jae Hoon; Han, Seung Hoon; Kang, Hee In

    2010-01-01

    We report a rare case of fibrous dysplasia with the development of a secondary aneurysmal bone cyst presenting as solitary tumor of calvarium. Although fibrous dysplasia with aneurysmal bone cyst is rare, it should be taken into account in differential diagnosis of the osteolytic solitary skull lesion.

  14. Secondary skull fractures in head wounds inflicted by captive bolt guns: autopsy findings and experimental simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdekamp, Markus Grosse; Kneubuehl, Beat P; Ishikawa, Takaki; Nadjem, Hadi; Kromeier, Jan; Pollak, Stefan; Thierauf, Annette

    2010-11-01

    Apart from one article published by Rabl and Sigrist in 1992 (Rechtsmedizin 2:156-158), there are no further reports on secondary skull fractures in shots from captive bolt guns. Up to now, the pertinent literature places particular emphasis on the absence of indirect lesions away from the impact point, when dealing with the wounding capacity of slaughterer's guns. The recent observation of two suicidal head injuries accompanied by skull fractures far away from the bolt's path gave occasion to experimental studies using simulants (glycerin soap, balls from gelatin) and skull–brain models. As far as ballistic soap was concerned, the dimensions of the bolt's channel were assessed by multi-slice computed tomography before cutting the blocks open. The test shots to gelatin balls and to skull-brain models were documented by means of a high-speed motion camera. As expected, the typical temporary cavity effect of bullets fired from conventional guns could not be observed when captive bolt stunners were discharged. Nevertheless, the visualized transfer of kinetic energy justifies the assumption that the secondary fractures seen in thin parts of the skull were caused by a hydraulic burst effect.

  15. A fossil skull fragment of a walrus from the mouth of the river Scheldt (Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feen, van der P.J.

    1968-01-01

    An occipito-parietal skull fragment of a male specimen of Odobenus antverpiensis (Rutten, 1907), from the mouth of the River Scheldt (Netherlands) is described and figured. The animal lived probably about the transition Scaldisian-Merxemian (Pliocene-Pleistocene). It lived in coastal marine

  16. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials: skull taps can cause a stimulus direction dependent double-peak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmeslet, Berit; Westin, Magnus; Brantberg, Krister

    2011-02-01

    To explore the mechanisms for skull tap induced ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP). An electro-mechanical "skull tapper" was used to test oVEMP in response to four different stimulus sites (forehead, occiput and above each ear) in healthy subjects (n=20) and in patients with unilateral loss of vestibular function (n=10). In normals, the oVEMP in response to forehead taps and the contra-lateral oVEMP to taps above the ears were similar. These responses had typical oVEMP features, i.e. a short-latency negative peak (n10) followed by a positive peak (p15). In contrast, the ipsi-lateral oVEMP to the laterally directed skull taps, as well as the oVEMP to occiput taps, had an initial double negative peak (n10+n10b). In patients with unilateral loss of vestibular function, the crossed responses from the functioning labyrinth were very similar to the corresponding oVEMP in normals. The present data support a theory that skull tapping may cause both a response that is more stimulus direction dependent and one that is less so. Whereas the stimulus direction dependent occurrence of the negative double-peak might reveal the functional status of one part of the labyrinth, the rather stimulus direction-independent response might reveal the functional status of other parts. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. On skulls of Stenella longirostris (Gray, 1828) from the eastern Atlantic (Notes on Cetacea, Delphinoidea IV)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bree, van P.J.H.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements of skulls of Stenella longirostris (Gray, 1828) from South Africa, the Ivory Coast, Liberia and Sénégal are published along with some other particulars. According to the author the dolphins from near the Goto Islands, Japan, described by Mizue et al. (1964) probably do not belong to

  18. Cranial Suture Closure in Domestic Dog Breeds and Its Relationships to Skull Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Madeleine; Haussman, Sinah

    2016-04-01

    Bulldog-type brachycephalic domestic dog breeds are characterized by a relatively short and broad skull with a dorsally rotated rostrum (airorhynchy). Not much is known about the association between a bulldog-type skull conformation and peculiar patterns of suture and synchondrosis closure in domestic dogs. In this study, we aim to explore breed-specific patterns of cranial suture and synchondrosis closure in relation to the prebasial angle (proxy for airorhynchy and thus bulldog-type skull conformation) in domestic dogs. For this purpose, we coded closure of 18 sutures and synchondroses in 26 wolves, that is, the wild ancestor of all domestic dogs, and 134 domestic dogs comprising 11 breeds. Comparisons of the relative amount of closing and closed sutures and synchondroses (closure scores) in adult individuals showed that bulldog-type breeds have significantly higher closure scores than non-bulldog-type breeds and that domestic dogs have significantly higher closure scores than the wolf. We further found that the prebasial angle is significantly positively correlated with the amount of closure of the basispheno-presphenoid synchondrosis and sutures of the nose (premaxillo-nasal and maxillo-nasal) and the palate (premaxillo-maxillary and interpalatine). Our results show that there is a correlation between patterns of suture and synchondrosis closure and skull shape in domestic dogs, although the causal relationships remain elusive. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Applicability of the da Vinci robotic system in the skull base surgical approach. Preclinical investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Nogueras Jimenez, Francisco J; Segura Fernandez-Nogueras, Miguel; Jouma Katati, Majed; Arraez Sanchez, Miguel Ángel; Roda Murillo, Olga; Sánchez Montesinos, Indalecio

    2015-01-01

    The role of robotic surgery is well established in various specialties such as urology and general surgery, but not in others such as neurosurgery and otolaryngology. In the case of surgery of the skull base, it has just emerged from an experimental phase. To investigate possible applications of the da Vinci surgical robot in transoral skull base surgery, comparing it with the authors' experience using conventional endoscopic transnasal surgery in the same region. A transoral transpalatal approach to the nasopharynx and medial skull base was performed on 4 cryopreserved cadaver heads. We used the da Vinci robot, a 30° standard endoscope 12mm thick, dual camera and dual illumination, Maryland forceps on the left terminal and curved scissors on the right, both 8mm thick. Bone drilling was performed manually. For the anatomical study of this region, we used 0.5cm axial slices from a plastinated cadaver head. Various skull base structures at different depths were reached with relative ease with the robot terminals Transoral robotic surgery with the da Vinci system provides potential advantages over conventional endoscopic transnasal surgery in the surgical approach to this region. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Depressed Skull Fractures: A Pattern of Abusive Head Injury in Three Older Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anselm C. W.; Ou, Yvonne; Fong, Dawson

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe a pattern of abusive head injury in a series of children older than 4 years of age. Methods: A hospital chart review of abused children with skull fractures from 1999 to 2001 was carried out. The clinical features, social background, and subsequent outcome and management are described. Results: An 11-year-old girl and a pair…

  1. Skull traction for cervical spinal injury in Enugu: A 5‑year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-05

    Nov 5, 2015 ... Background: Treatment of cervical spine injury is the most challenging of all the injuries of the spine, and there is yet no agreement on the best method of care. Objective: We studied the complications and outcome of two skull traction devices used to treat cases of cervical spine injury in three centers in ...

  2. Skull ontogeny and modularity in two species of Lagenorhynchus: Morphological and ecological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo, Daniela L; Viglino, Mariana; Flores, David A; Cappozzo, Humberto L

    2017-02-01

    Comparisons of skull shape between closely related species can provide information on the role that phylogeny and function play in cranial evolution. We used 3D-anatomical landmarks in order to study the skull ontogeny of two closely related species, Lagenorhynchus obscurus and Lagenorhynchus australis, with a total sample of 52 skulls. We found shared trends between species, such as the relative compression of the neurocranium and the enlargement of the rostrum during ontogeny. However, these are common mammalian features, associated with prenatal brain development and sensory capsules. Moreover, we found a posterior displacement of the external nares and infraorbital foramina, and a strong development of the rostrum in an anteroposterior direction. Such trends are associated with the process of telescoping and have been observed in postnatal ontogeny of other odontocetes, suggesting a constraint in the pattern. Interspecific differences related to the deepness of facial region, robustness of the feeding apparatus and rostrum orientation may be related with the specific lifestyles of L. obscurus and L. australis. We also tested the presence of three different modules in the skull (basicranium, neurocranium, rostrum), all of which presented strong integration. Only the rostrum showed a different ontogenetic trajectory between species. Even though we detected directional asymmetry, changes in this feature along ontogeny were not detectable. Because asymmetry may be related to echolocation, our results suggest a functional importance of directional asymmetry from the beginning of postnatal life. J. Morphol. 278:203-214, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals,Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Analysis of factors affecting the long-term functional outcome of patients with skull base meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Naoyuki; Ohkawa, Toshika; Miki, Junichirou; Nishibayahsi, Hiroki; Ogura, Mitsuhiro; Uematsu, Yuji; Itakura, Toru

    2011-07-01

    We analyzed the factors that affect the long-term clinical outcome of a series of patients with skull base meningiomas. Clinical records of 73 patients with cranial base meningiomas were reviewed retrospectively, of whom 13 patients experienced a recurrence at various times following the initial surgery. The mean follow-up time was 90.4 ± 21.2 months (range=60-124 months). Based on the location of the recurrence, patients with recurrence were divided into peripheral (n=6) and central (n=7) skull base groups. Of several variables analyzed using a multivariate logistic regression model, "high MIB-1 (Ki-67 proliferation antigen) labeling index" was an independent variable predicting poor long-term functional outcomes. Recurrence of the tumor at the central skull base was also a strong predictor of poor long-term outcomes. An increased proliferative potential, as indicated by a high MIB-1 labeling index, may induce repeated recurrences, eventually leading to worse functional outcomes, particularly for patients with central skull base meningiomas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rare case of solitary plasmacytoma of the skull in a young male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Received: 24 Nov. 2016. Accepted: 22 Feb. 2017. Published: 21 Apr. 2017. How to cite this article: ... diagnosis of a destructive calvarial mass lesion even in this age group. Rare case of solitary plasmacytoma of the skull in a young male patient. Read online: Scan this QR code with your smart phone or mobile device.

  5. Comparison between two-dimensional and midsagittal three-dimensional cephalometric measurements of dry human skulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damstra, Janalt; Fourie, Zacharias; Ren, Yijin

    The aim of this study was to compare two- and three-dimensional cephalometric values by using a three-dimensional analysis based on the midsagittal plane. Spherical metal markers were fixed on to the anatomical landmarks of 10 human skulls, which were examined radiographically with conventional

  6. Early medical skull surgery for treatment of post-traumatic osteomyelitis 5,000 years ago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaolo Petrone

    Full Text Available Here we describe the findings of a unique example of the early techniques adopted in neurosurgery around 5000 years ago, consisting in a double well healed skull trephination associated with a post-cranial traumatic event occurring intra vitam to a young male from the Early Chalcolithic cemetery of Pontecagnano (South Italy, ca. 4,900 - 4,500 cal BP. Morphological, X-ray and 3D-CT scan skull-cap evaluation revealed that the main orifice was produced by scraping, obtained by clockwise rotary motion of a right-handed surgeon facing the patient, while the partial trephination was carried out by using a stone point as a drilling tool. In both cases, bone regrowth is indicative of the individual's prolonged postoperative survival and his near-complete recovery. The right femur shows a poorly healed mid-shaft fracture presumably induced by a high energy injury, and a resulting chronic osteomyelitis, affecting both femurs by hematogenous spread of the infection. Our observations on the visual and radiological features of skull and femur lesions, along with evidence on the timing of experimental bone regrowth vs. healing of lower limb fractures associated to long-term bone infections now suggest that this young man underwent a double skull trephination in order to alleviate his extremely painful condition induced by chronic osteomyelitis, which is thought to have been the cause of death.

  7. The journey of discovering skull base anatomy in ancient Egypt and the special influence of Alexandria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhadi, Ali M; Kalb, Samuel; Perez-Orribo, Luis; Little, Andrew S; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2012-08-01

    The field of anatomy, one of the most ancient sciences, first evolved in Egypt. From the Early Dynastic Period (3100 BC) until the time of Galen at the end of the 2nd century ad, Egypt was the center of anatomical knowledge, including neuroanatomy. Knowledge of neuroanatomy first became important so that sacred rituals could be performed by ancient Egyptian embalmers during mummification procedures. Later, neuroanatomy became a science to be studied by wise men at the ancient temple of Memphis. As religious conflicts developed, the study of the human body became restricted. Myths started to replace scientific research, squelching further exploration of the human body until Alexander the Great founded the city of Alexandria. This period witnessed a revolution in the study of anatomy and functional anatomy. Herophilus of Chalcedon, Erasistratus of Chios, Rufus of Ephesus, and Galen of Pergamon were prominent physicians who studied at the medical school of Alexandria and contributed greatly to knowledge about the anatomy of the skull base. After the Royal Library of Alexandria was burned and laws were passed prohibiting human dissections based on religious and cultural factors, knowledge of human skull base anatomy plateaued for almost 1500 years. In this article the authors consider the beginning of this journey, from the earliest descriptions of skull base anatomy to the establishment of basic skull base anatomy in ancient Egypt.

  8. A small skull from Flores dated to the 20th century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Chiara; Persson, Liselott; Alexandersen, Verner

    2012-01-01

    from the middle or upper Palaeolithics. The metric cranial data analysed in FORDISC, characterize the skull as a male Vietnamese rather than a Chinese or White individual. Tooth morphology shows the sundadont pattern and tooth size corresponds to that of teeth from Bali, Java and Malayan Orang Asli...

  9. The Ethics of Infidelity in Country of My Skull | Rostan | Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For some readers, Antjie Krog's integration of others' personal testimonies and her fictionalised, extramarital romance in Country of My Skull were controversial approaches to representing personal and political atrocities. This essay argues that these two prominent literary features in her book – the citations and the romantic ...

  10. Sex identification from the skull of the Hausa/Fulani in northern Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Hausa / Fulani is one of the major races in Nigeria, with scanty craniometrical records for sex identification, a useful resource in forensic study and anthropometry. Methods:Craniometry of non-pathologic radiographs of the skull was done to evaluate the sexually dimorphic characteristics in the bones.

  11. Rare case of solitary plasmacytoma of the skull in a young male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solitary plasmacytoma of bone without signs of multiple myeloma is a rare entity. It usually presents as an osteolytic lesion in the axial skeleton of an elderly patient. Here, we report a case of solitary plasmacytoma in the skull of a young male patient which emphasises the need to consider it in the differential diagnosis of a ...

  12. Elevated temperature deformation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J. M.

    The paper demonstrates a novel nondestructive test and data analysis technique for quantitative measurement of circumferentially varying flexural moduli of 2D involute carbon-carbon tag rings containing localized wrinkles and dry plies at room and rocket nozzle operating temperatures. Room temperature computed tomography (CT) deformation tests were performed on 11 carbon-carbon rings selected from the cylinders and cones fabricated under the NDE data application program and two plexiglass rings fabricated under this program. This testing and analysis technique is found to have primary application in validation of analytical models for carbon-carbon performance modeling. Both effects of defects assumptions, the effects of high temperature environments, and failure-related models can be validated effectively. The testing and analysis process can be interwoven in a manner that increases the engineering understanding of the material behavior and permits rapid resolution of analysis questions. Specific recommendations for the development and implementation of this technique are provided.

  13. Marginal deformations & rotating horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anninos, Dionysios; Anous, Tarek; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito

    2017-12-01

    Motivated by the near-horizon geometry of four-dimensional extremal black holes, we study a disordered quantum mechanical system invariant under a global SU(2) symmetry. As in the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model, this system exhibits an approximate SL(2, ℝ) symmetry at low energies, but also allows for a continuous family of SU(2) breaking marginal deformations. Beyond a certain critical value for the marginal coupling, the model exhibits a quantum phase transition from the gapless phase to a gapped one and we calculate the critical exponents of this transition. We also show that charged, rotating extremal black holes exhibit a transition when the angular velocity of the horizon is tuned to a certain critical value. Where possible we draw parallels between the disordered quantum mechanics and charged, rotating black holes.

  14. Dog behavior co-varies with height, bodyweight and skull shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Paul D; Georgevsky, Dana; Carrasco, Johanna; Valenzuela, Michael; Duffy, Deborah L; Serpell, James A

    2013-01-01

    Dogs offer unique opportunities to study correlations between morphology and behavior because skull shapes and body shape are so diverse among breeds. Several studies have shown relationships between canine cephalic index (CI: the ratio of skull width to skull length) and neural architecture. Data on the CI of adult, show-quality dogs (six males and six females) were sourced in Australia along with existing data on the breeds' height, bodyweight and related to data on 36 behavioral traits of companion dogs (n = 8,301) of various common breeds (n = 49) collected internationally using the Canine Behavioral Assessment and Research Questionnaire (C-BARQ). Stepwise backward elimination regressions revealed that, across the breeds, 33 behavioral traits all but one of which are undesirable in companion animals correlated with either height alone (n = 14), bodyweight alone (n = 5), CI alone (n = 3), bodyweight-and-skull shape combined (n = 2), height-and-skull shape combined (n = 3) or height-and-bodyweight combined (n = 6). For example, breed average height showed strongly significant inverse relationships (p<0.001) with mounting persons or objects, touch sensitivity, urination when left alone, dog-directed fear, separation-related problems, non-social fear, defecation when left alone, owner-directed aggression, begging for food, urine marking and attachment/attention-seeking, while bodyweight showed strongly significant inverse relationships (p<0.001) with excitability and being reported as hyperactive. Apart from trainability, all regression coefficients with height were negative indicating that, across the breeds, behavior becomes more problematic as height decreases. Allogrooming increased strongly (p<0.001) with CI and inversely with height. CI alone showed a strong significant positive relationship with self-grooming (p<0.001) but a negative relationship with chasing (p = 0.020). The current study demonstrates how aspects of CI (and therefore brain shape

  15. Skull base surgery for tumors in children: long-term clinical and functional outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayhurst, Caroline; Williams, Dawn; Yousaf, Jawad; Richardson, David; Pizer, Barry; Mallucci, Conor

    2013-05-01

    Skull base tumors in children are rare but require complex approaches with potential morbidity to the developing craniofacial skeleton, in addition to tumor-related morbidity. Reports of long-term clinical and functional outcome following skull base approaches in children are scarce. The authors report long-term outcome in children with tumors undergoing multidisciplinary skull base surgery. A retrospective analysis was undertaken of children undergoing surgery at a single institution between 1998 and 2008 for benign and malignant lesions of the anterior, middle, or posterior cranial base. Patients with craniopharyngioma, pituitary tumors, and optic glioma were excluded. Histology, surgical morbidity, length of hospital stay, progression-free survival, and adjuvant therapy were recorded. Functional and cognitive outcome was assessed prospectively using the Late Effects Severity Score (LESS). Twenty-three children ranging in age from 13 months to 15 years underwent skull base approaches for resection of tumors during the study period. The median follow-up duration was 60 months. Tumor types included meningioma, schwannoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma, angiofibroma, and chordoma. Complete resection was achieved in 12 patients (52%). Thirteen patients (57%) had benign histology. The median hospital stay was 7 days. There were 3 deaths, 1 perioperative and 2 from tumor progression. Two patients had CSF leakage (9%) and 2 developed meningitis. Two children (9%) had residual neurological deficit at last follow-up evaluation. Thirteen (59%) of 22 surviving patients received adjuvant therapy. The majority of the patients remain in mainstream education and 19 of the 20 surviving children have an LESS of 3 or lower. Children tolerate complex skull base procedures well, with minimal surgical-related morbidity as well as good long-term tumor control rates and functional outcomes from maximal safe resection combined with adjuvant treatment when required.

  16. Comparative skull analysis suggests species-specific captivity-related malformation in lions (Panthera leo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Saragusty

    Full Text Available Lion (Panthera leo populations have dramatically decreased worldwide with a surviving population estimated at 32,000 across the African savannah. Lions have been kept in captivity for centuries and, although they reproduce well, high rates of stillbirths as well as morbidity and mortality of neonate and young lions are reported. Many of these cases are associated with bone malformations, including foramen magnum (FM stenosis and thickened tentorium cerebelli. The precise causes of these malformations and whether they are unique to captive lions remain unclear. To test whether captivity is associated with FM stenosis, we evaluated 575 lion skulls of wild (N = 512 and captive (N = 63 origin. Tiger skulls (N = 276; 56 captive, 220 wild were measured for comparison. While no differences were found between males and females or between subadults and adults in FM height (FMH, FMH of captive lions (17.36±3.20 mm was significantly smaller and with greater variability when compared to that in wild lions (19.77±2.11 mm. There was no difference between wild (18.47±1.26 mm and captive (18.56±1.64 mm tigers in FMH. Birth origin (wild vs. captive as a factor for FMH remained significant in lions even after controlling for age and sex. Whereas only 20/473 wild lions (4.2% had FMH equal to or smaller than the 5th percentile of the wild population (16.60 mm, this was evident in 40.4% (23/57 of captive lion skulls. Similar comparison for tigers found no differences between the captive and wild populations. Lions with FMH equal to or smaller than the 5th percentile had wider skulls with smaller cranial volume. Cranial volume remained smaller in both male and female captive lions when controlled for skull size. These findings suggest species- and captivity-related predisposition for the pathology in lions.

  17. Fraktalnist deformational relief polycrystalline aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М.В. Карускевич

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available  The possibility of the fractal geometry method application for the analisys of surface deformation structures under cyclic loading is presented.It is shown, that deformation relief of the alclad aluminium alloyes meets the criteria of the fractality. For the fractal demention estimation the method of  “box-counting”can be applied.

  18. Permanent deformation of asphalt mixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, A.A.A.; Van de Ven, M.F.C.; Muraya, P.M.

    This dissertation describes the results of a research that was conducted on the permanent deformation of asphalt mixtures. Central to this research was the separate characterization of the contribution of the aggregate skeleton and the bituminous mortar towards resistance to permanent deformation.

  19. Permanent deformation of asphalt mixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muraya, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation describes the results of a research that was conducted on the permanent deformation of asphalt mixtures. Central to this research was the separate characterization of the contribution of the aggregate skeleton and the bituminous mortar towards resistance to permanent deformation.

  20. Metastable vacua and geometric deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Amariti, A; Girardello, L; Mariotti, A

    2008-01-01

    We study the geometric interpretation of metastable vacua for systems of D3 branes at non isolated toric deformable singularities. Using the L^{aba} examples, we investigate the relations between the field theoretic susy breaking and restoration and the complex deformations of the CY singularities.

  1. A magnetic resonance imaging-compatible, large-scale array for trans-skull ultrasound surgery and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Gregory T; White, P Jason; King, Randy L; McDannold, Nathan; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2005-08-01

    Advances in ultrasound transducer array and amplifier technologies have prompted many intriguing scientific proposals for ultrasound therapy. These include both mildly invasive and noninvasive techniques to be used in ultrasound brain surgery through the skull. In previous work, it was shown how a 500-element hemisphere-shaped transducer could correct the wave distortion caused by the skull with a transducer that operates at a frequency near 0.8 MHz. Because the objective for trans-skull focusing is its ultimate use in a clinical context, a new hemispheric phased-array system has now been developed with acoustic parameters that are optimized to match the values determined in preliminary studies. The transducer was tested by focusing ultrasound through ex vivo human skulls and into a brain phantom by means of a phase-adaptive focusing technique. Simultaneously, the procedure was monitored by the use of magnetic resonance guidance and thermometry. The ultrasound focus of a 500-element 30-cm-diameter, 0.81-MHz array could be steered electronically through the skull over a volume of approximately 30 x 30 x 26 mm. Furthermore, temperature monitoring of the inner and outer surfaces of the skull showed that the array could coagulate targeted brain tissue without causing excessive skull heating. The successful outcome of these experiments indicates that intensities high enough to destroy brain tissue can be produced without excessive heating of the surrounding areas and without producing large magnetic resonance noise and artifacts.

  2. The oldest anatomical handmade skull of the world c. 1508: 'the ugliness of growing old' attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missinne, Stefaan J

    2014-06-01

    The author discusses a previously unknown early sixteenth-century renaissance handmade anatomical miniature skull. The small, naturalistic skull made from an agate (calcedonia) stone mixture (mistioni) shows remarkable osteologic details. Dr. Saban was the first to link the skull to Leonardo. The three-dimensional perspective of and the search for the senso comune are discussed. Anatomical errors both in the drawings of Leonardo and this skull are presented. The article ends with the issue of physiognomy, his grotesque faces, the Perspective Communis and his experimenting c. 1508 with the stone mixture and the human skull. Evidence, including the Italian scale based on Crazie and Braccia, chemical analysis leading to a mine in Volterra and Leonardo's search for the soul in the skull are presented. Written references in the inventory of Salai (1524), the inventory of the Villa Riposo (Raffaello Borghini 1584) and Don Ambrogio Mazenta (1635) are reviewed. The author attributes the skull c. 1508 to Leonardo da Vinci.

  3. Radiological assessment of skull base changes in children with syndromic craniosynostosis: role of ''minor'' sutures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calandrelli, Rosalinda; D' Apolito, Gabriella; Gaudino, Simona; Stefanetti, Mariangela; Colosimo, Cesare [Universita Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Institute of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Massimi, Luca; Di Rocco, Concezio [Universita Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Institute of Neurosurgery, Rome (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    This study aims to identify the premature synostosis of ''major'' and ''minor'' sutures of the four ''sutural arches'' of the skull and to perform a morphometric analysis in children with syndromic craniosynostosis in order to evaluate changes in the skull base linked with premature suture synostosis. We reviewed multiplanar high-resolution CT images, implemented with 3D reconstructions, from 18 patients with complex syndromic craniosynostosis and compared them with 18 age-matched healthy subjects. We assessed the calvarial sutures and their extension to the skull base, and then we correlated specific types of synostosis with the size, shape and symmetry of the cranial fossae. We found a marked asymmetry of the skull base growth in all patients. The synostotic involvement around the coronal ring caused a reduction in the growth of the anterior and middle fossae. The size of the posterior cranial fossa was related not only to ''major'' but also to ''minor'' suture synostosis of the lambdoid and parieto-squamosal arches. Changes in the skull base and craniofacial axis symmetry are due to structural and functional relationships between ''major'' and ''minor'' skull sutures, suggesting a structural and functional relationship between the neurocranium and basicranium. The early recognition of prematurely closed skull base sutures may help clinicians and neurosurgeons to establish correct therapeutic approaches. (orig.)

  4. Can computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging differentiate between malignant pathology and osteomyelitis in the central skull base?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, F D; Derbyshire, S G; Lewis-Jones, H

    2015-09-01

    Central skull base osteomyelitis is clinically difficult to distinguish from malignancy. The computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of six patients with central skull base osteomyelitis were compared with scans from patients with a range of skull base conditions. Computed tomography scans of central skull base osteomyelitis show much less bony destruction relative to the magnetic resonance imaging changes, whereas malignancy cases were associated with similar bony destruction on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In magnetic resonance imaging scans, it was possible to confirm previous findings of clival hypointensity on T1-weighted images relative to normal fatty marrow. In addition, there were signs of pre- and para-clival soft tissue infiltration, with the obliteration of normal fat planes and frank soft tissue masses in all six central skull base osteomyelitis patients. Signal intensity on T2-weighted images of the clivus was high in five central skull base osteomyelitis patients. With intravenous contrast, fascial plane anatomy appeared restored in central skull base osteomyelitis cases, almost in keeping with that of non-involved areas. This was not a feature in any of the malignant conditions.

  5. Nuclear deformation at finite temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassid, Y; Gilbreth, C N; Bertsch, G F

    2014-12-31

    Deformation, a key concept in our understanding of heavy nuclei, is based on a mean-field description that breaks the rotational invariance of the nuclear many-body Hamiltonian. We present a method to analyze nuclear deformations at finite temperature in a framework that preserves rotational invariance. The auxiliary-field Monte Carlo method is used to generate a statistical ensemble and calculate the probability distribution associated with the quadrupole operator. Applying the technique to nuclei in the rare-earth region, we identify model-independent signatures of deformation and find that deformation effects persist to temperatures higher than the spherical-to-deformed shape phase-transition temperature of mean-field theory.

  6. Deformation of Man Made Objects

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrahim, Mohamed

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a framework for 3D object deformation with primary focus on man-made objects. Our framework enables a user to deform a model while preserving its defining characteristics. Moreover, our framework enables a user to set constraints on a model to keep its most significant features intact after the deformation process. Our framework supports a semi-automatic constraint setting environment, where some constraints could be automatically set by the framework while others are left for the user to specify. Our framework has several advantages over some state of the art deformation techniques in that it enables a user to add new features to the deformed model while keeping its general look similar to the input model. In addition, our framework enables the rotation and extrusion of different parts of a model.

  7. Reliability assessment of a novel cervical spine deformity classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Christopher P; Smith, Justin S; Eastlack, Robert; Blaskiewicz, Donald J; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank; Bess, Shay; Kim, Han Jo; Mundis, Gregory M; Klineberg, Eric; Gupta, Munish; O'Brien, Michael; Hostin, Richard; Scheer, Justin K; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Fu, Kai-Ming G; Hart, Robert; Albert, Todd J; Riew, K Daniel; Fehlings, Michael G; Deviren, Vedat; Lafage, Virginie

    2015-12-01

    Despite the complexity of cervical spine deformity (CSD) and its significant impact on patient quality of life, there exists no comprehensive classification system. The objective of this study was to develop a novel classification system based on a modified Delphi approach and to characterize the intra- and interobserver reliability of this classification. Based on an extensive literature review and a modified Delphi approach with an expert panel, a CSD classification system was generated. The classification system included a deformity descriptor and 5 modifiers that incorporated sagittal, regional, and global spinopelvic alignment and neurological status. The descriptors included: "C," "CT," and "T" for primary cervical kyphotic deformities with an apex in the cervical spine, cervicothoracic junction, or thoracic spine, respectively; "S" for primary coronal deformity with a coronal Cobb angle ≥ 15°; and "CVJ" for primary craniovertebral junction deformity. The modifiers included C2-7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA), horizontal gaze (chin-brow to vertical angle [CBVA]), T1 slope (TS) minus C2-7 lordosis (TS-CL), myelopathy (modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association [mJOA] scale score), and the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-Schwab classification for thoracolumbar deformity. Application of the classification system requires the following: 1) full-length standing posteroanterior (PA) and lateral spine radiographs that include the cervical spine and femoral heads; 2) standing PA and lateral cervical spine radiographs; 3) completed and scored mJOA questionnaire; and 4) a clinical photograph or radiograph that includes the skull for measurement of the CBVA. A series of 10 CSD cases, broadly representative of the classification system, were selected and sufficient radiographic and clinical history to enable classification were assembled. A panel of spinal deformity surgeons was queried to classify each case twice, with a minimum of 1 intervening week. Inter- and

  8. Non-human primate skull effects on the cavitation detection threshold of FUS-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shih-Ying; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Marquet, Fabrice; Chen, Cherry C.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-11-01

    Microbubble (MB)-assisted focused ultrasound is a promising technique for delivering drugs to the brain by noninvasively and transiently opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and monitoring BBB opening using passive cavitation detection (PCD) is critical in detecting its occurrence, extent as well as assessing its mechanism. One of the main obstacles in achieving those objectives in large animals is the transcranial attenuation. To study the effects, the cavitation response through the in-vitro non-human primate (NHP) skull was investigated. In-house manufactured lipid-shelled MB (medium diameter: 4-5 um) were injected into a 4-mm channel of a phantom below a degassed monkey skull. A hydrophone confocally aligned with the FUS transducer served as PCD during sonication (frequency: 0.50 MHz, peak rarefactional pressures: 0.05-0.60 MPa, pulse length: 100 cycles, PRF: 10 Hz, duration: 2 s) for four cases: water without skull, water with skull, MB without skull and MB with skull. A 5.1-MHz linear-array transducer was also used to monitor the MB disruption. The frequency spectra, spectrograms, stable cavitation dose (SCD) and inertial cavitation dose (ICD) were quantified. Results showed that the onset of stable cavitation and inertial cavitation in the experiments occurred at 50 kPa, and was detectable throught the NHP skull since the both the detection thresholds for stable cavitation and inertial cavitation remained unchanged compared to the non-skull case, and the SCD and ICD acquired transcranially may not adequately represent the true extent of stable and inertial cavitation due to the skull attenuation.

  9. A Novel Method for Quantifying Human In Situ Whole Brain Deformation Under Rotational Loading Using Sonomicrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshareef, Ahmed; Giudice, J Sebastian; Forman, Jason; Salzar, Robert S; Panzer, Matthew B

    2017-11-27

    Traumatic brain injuries are one of the least understood injuries to the body. Finite element (FE) models of the brain have been crucial for understanding concussion and for developing injury mitigation systems; however, the experimental brain deformation data currently used to validate these models are limited. The objective of this study was to develop a methodology for the investigation of in situ three-dimensional brain deformation during pure rotational loading of the head, using sonomicrometry. Sonomicrometry uses ultrasonic pulses to measure the dynamic distances between piezoelectric crystals implanted in any sound-transmitting media. A human cadaveric head-neck specimen was acquired 14 hours post-mortem and was instrumented with an array of 32 small sonomicrometry crystals embedded in the head: 24 crystals were implanted in the brain, and 8 were fixed to the inner skull. A dynamic rotation was then applied to the head using a closed-loop controlled test device. Four pulses with different severity level were applied about three orthogonal anatomical axes of rotation. A repeated test of the highest severity rotation was conducted in each axes to assess repeatability. All tests were completed within 56 hours post-mortem. Overall, the combined experimental and sonomicrometry methods were demonstrated to reliably and repeatedly capture three-dimensional dynamic deformation of an intact human brain. These methods provide a framework for using sonomicrometry to acquire multidimensional experimental data required for FE model development and validation, and will lend insight into the deformations sustained by the brain during impact.

  10. A Rhinocerotid Skull Cooked-to-Death in a 9.2 Ma-Old Ignimbrite Flow of Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre-Olivier Antoine; Orliac, Maeva J.; Gokhan Atici; Inan Ulusoy; Erdal Sen; H Evren Çubukçu; Ebru Albayrak; Neşe Oyal; Erkan Aydar; Sevket Sen

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preservation of fossil vertebrates in volcanic rocks is extremely rare. An articulated skull (cranium and mandible) of a rhinoceros was found in a 9.2±0.1 Ma-old ignimbrite of Cappadocia, Central Turkey. The unusual aspect of the preserved hard tissues of the skull (rough bone surface and brittle dentine) allows suspecting a peri-mortem exposure to a heating source. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe and identify the skull as belonging to the large two-horned rhinoce...

  11. Modified human crania from Göbekli Tepe provide evidence for a new form of Neolithic skull cult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresky, Julia; Haelm, Juliane; Clare, Lee

    2017-06-01

    Archaeological excavations at Göbekli Tepe, a transitional Neolithic site in southeast Turkey, have revealed the earliest megalithic ritual architecture with characteristic T-shaped pillars. Although human burials are still absent from the site, a number of fragmented human bones have been recovered from fill deposits of buildings and from adjacent areas. We focus on three partially preserved human skulls, all of which carry artificial modifications of a type so far unknown from contemporaneous sites and the ethnographic record. As such, modified skull fragments from Göbekli Tepe could indicate a new, previously undocumented variation of skull cult in the Early Neolithic of Anatolia and the Levant.

  12. On infinitesimal conformai deformations of surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлия Степановна Федченко

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A new form of basic equations for conformai deformations is found. The equations involve tensor fields of displacement vector only. Conditions for trivial deformations as well as infinitesimal conformai deformations are studied.

  13. Low-profile 1-piece bifrontal craniotomy for anterior skull base approach and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozlen, Fatma; Abuzayed, Bashar; Dashti, Reza; Isler, Cihan; Tanriover, Necmettin; Sanus, Galip Zihni

    2010-01-01

    The anterior skull base is a location of many pathologic lesions. These pathologic lesions are treated by bifrontal craniotomy and anterior skull base approach, either primarily or combined with facial osteotomies. To obtain wide exposure, low-profile craniotomies are preferred. In this article, we attempt to describe our own technique of frontal craniotomy for anterior skull base approach. In this technique, the frontal bone, frontal sinus, and the superior supraorbital bar are elevated in en bloc fashion. Bicoronal skin incision is followed by dissection and retraction of the skin flap in the epigaleal plan. The pericranial galeal flap is dissected separately in subperiosteal fashion until the superior orbital rim. After dissection and retraction of the tip of the temporal muscles, bilateral pterional key burr holes and 1 or 2 parasagittal burr holes are opened. The sagittal burr hole(s) is placed in the point where the upper horizontal surface of the frontal bone slopes vertically downward the forehead. With the craniotome rotating tip (Midas F2/8TA23, Medtronic Inc, Ft Worth, TX), bone cut is made between the pterional key burr holes, passing through the superior orbital bar and the anterior wall of the frontal sinus. To minimize the brain retraction, the operating microscope is placed beside the head, and exposure from the lateral view angle is obtained. Reconstruction of the defect is performed by using pericranial galeal flap and/or Cortoss (Orthovita, Malvern, PA). With this approach, wide exposure of the anterior skull base pathologic lesions was achieved with minimal brain retraction. In the postoperative period, patients tolerated this approach well with favorable functional and cosmetic outcomes. No infections or adverse effects related to this technique or Cortoss were observed. Anterior skull base pathologic lesions can be widely exposed by low-profile bicoronal craniotomy and anterior skull base approach with minimal brain retraction. This wide

  14. Perceptual transparency from image deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Maruya, Kazushi; Nishida, Shin’ya

    2015-01-01

    Human vision has a remarkable ability to perceive two layers at the same retinal locations, a transparent layer in front of a background surface. Critical image cues to perceptual transparency, studied extensively in the past, are changes in luminance or color that could be caused by light absorptions and reflections by the front layer, but such image changes may not be clearly visible when the front layer consists of a pure transparent material such as water. Our daily experiences with transparent materials of this kind suggest that an alternative potential cue of visual transparency is image deformations of a background pattern caused by light refraction. Although previous studies have indicated that these image deformations, at least static ones, play little role in perceptual transparency, here we show that dynamic image deformations of the background pattern, which could be produced by light refraction on a moving liquid’s surface, can produce a vivid impression of a transparent liquid layer without the aid of any other visual cues as to the presence of a transparent layer. Furthermore, a transparent liquid layer perceptually emerges even from a randomly generated dynamic image deformation as long as it is similar to real liquid deformations in its spatiotemporal frequency profile. Our findings indicate that the brain can perceptually infer the presence of “invisible” transparent liquids by analyzing the spatiotemporal structure of dynamic image deformation, for which it uses a relatively simple computation that does not require high-level knowledge about the detailed physics of liquid deformation. PMID:26240313

  15. Spacetimes for λ-deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfetsos, Konstadinos [Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Athens,Athens 15784 (Greece); Thompson, Daniel C. [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel andThe International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, B-1050, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-12-29

    We examine a recently proposed class of integrable deformations to two-dimensional conformal field theories. These λ-deformations interpolate between a WZW model and the non-Abelian T-dual of a Principal Chiral Model on a group G or, between a G/H gauged WZW model and the non-Abelian T-dual of the geometric coset G/H. λ-deformations have been conjectured to represent quantum group q-deformations for the case where the deformation parameter is a root of unity. In this work we show how such deformations can be given an embedding as full string backgrounds whose target spaces satisfy the equations of type-II supergravity. One illustrative example is a deformation of the Sl(2,ℝ)/U(1) black-hole CFT. A further example interpolates between the ((SU(2)×SU(2))/(SU(2)))×((SL(2,ℝ)×SL(2,ℝ))/(SL(2,ℝ)))×U(1){sup 4} gauged WZW model and the non-Abelian T-dual of AdS{sub 3}×S{sup 3}×T{sup 4} supported with Ramond flux.

  16. Investigation of an outbreak of craniofacial deformity in yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes) chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, K N; Young, M J; Alley, M R

    2014-09-01

    To investigate an outbreak of severe craniofacial deformity in yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes, hōiho) chicks at a single breeding site on the Otago Peninsula in the South Island of New Zealand. Morbidity and mortality of yellow-eyed penguins breeding on the coastal regions of Otago was monitored from November 2008 to March 2009. Dead chicks and unhatched eggs were recovered and examined. Between October and December 2008 32 eggs were recorded at 17 nests in the Okia Reserve. Eleven chicks survived to about 90 days of age, of which eight were found to have moderate to severe craniofacial deformity. The six most severe chicks were subject to euthanasia and examined in detail at necropsy, and the remaining two affected chicks were released to the wild after a period of care in a rehabilitation centre. Post-mortem samples were analysed for inorganic and organic toxins. The six deformed chicks all had severe shortening of the mandible and maxilla by 20-50 mm. The rostral and caudal regions of the skull were approximately 40 and 80% of normal length, respectively. Other, more variable lesions included cross bill deformity, malformed bill keratin, microphthalmia with misshapen scleral ossicles and oral soft tissue excess thought to be secondary to bony malformations. During the same year, mild sporadic bill deformities were also reported in 10 unrelated chicks from >167 chicks at other breeding sites on the southern Otago coast. Concentrations of organic toxins and heavy metals in body tissues from affected chicks were apparently similar to those in unaffected chicks on other beaches. No cause of this outbreak of craniofacial deformity could be established although the high prevalence at a single site suggests that it was due to an unidentified local teratogen.

  17. Hepatocellular carcinoma metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Ryang; Kanda, Fumio; Kobessho, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Koji; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Kudo, Masatoshi; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2006-11-07

    We describe a rare case of HCV-related recurrent multiple hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves in a 50-year-old woman. The patient presented with symptoms of ptosis, fixation of the right eyeball, and left abducens palsy, indicating disturbances of the right oculomotor and trochlear nerves and bilateral abducens nerves. Brain contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed an ill-defined mass with abnormal enhancement around the sella turcica. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed that the mass involved the clivus, cavernous sinus, and petrous apex. On contrast-enhanced MRI with gadolinium-chelated contrast medium, the mass showed inhomogeneous intermediate enhancement. The diagnosis of metastatic HCC to the skull base was made on the basis of neurological findings and imaging studies including CT and MRI, without histological examinations. Further studies may provide insights into various methods for diagnosing HCC metastasizing to the craniospinal area.

  18. A giant vagal schwannoma with unusual extension from skull base to the mediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy S Vijendra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical vagal schwannoma is an extremely rare neoplasm. Middle aged people are usually affected. These tumors usually present as asymptomatic masses. These tumors are almost always benign. Preoperative diagnosis of these lesions is important due to the morbidity associated with its excision. Preoperative tissue diagnosis is not accurate. The imaging modality can be done to assess the extent and for planning the treatment. Surgical excision with preservation of neural origin is the treatment option. Giant vagal schwannomas are extremely rare. Only one case has been reported in the literature till date. There has no reported case of extensive vagal schwannoma from skull base to the mediastinum. Here, we describe the asymptomatic presentation of an unusual appearing giant cervical vagal schwannoma with an extension from skull base to the mediastinum.

  19. Comparative analysis of morphogeometric parameters of forward cranial pole depending on type of a skull basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleshkina О.Yu.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is comparison of parameters of a forward cranial pole depending on type of a skull basis. The research material contained 100 adult skulls divided into three craniotypes. The method of craniotopometry was used for measuring the parameters and further calculation of average value and their comparison among themselves. Results. The research helped to reveal that length of a forward cranial pole, length of a lateral part on the right and at the left, a corner f.c.-s-n prevail at flexibasilar craniotype. Conclusions. The width of a forward cranial pole, width of a lateral part on the right and at the left, a corner f.c.-n-g are more at platibasilar craniotype

  20. A Wormian Bone, Mimicking an Entry Gunshot Wound of the Skull, in an Anthropological Specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Marcos Paulo Salles; Simões, Márcia Pereira; Gamba, Thiago de Oliveira; Flores, Isadora Luana; Haiter Neto, Francisco; Durão, Carlos Henrique; Daruge Júnior, Eduardo; Cunha, Eugénia

    2016-05-01

    Wormian bones (WB) are irregular small cranial ossicles found along suture lines and fontanels. In Brazil, gunshot wounds to the skull are quite common in young individuals. Nevertheless, as far as we know, this is the first report of a WB giving an erroneous aspect of gunshot entrance due to its displacement position. The present manuscript describes the case of a Brazilian young man who died due to ballistic trauma, where a gaping bony defect on the right side of the skull was thought to be the exit wound of an injury related to the destruction found on the left side, highly suggestive of firearm injury. Thus, this case study has brought to light similarities between a traumatic lesion and an orifice of a WB, with emphasis on differential diagnosis during routine anthropological examinations. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. Cytological diagnosis of solitary plasmacytoma of the skull: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Banyameen Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solitary plasmacytoma (SPC of the skull (SPS is rare, and only a few cases have been reported in the literature so far. Plasmacytoma of the skull has a wide spectrum of pathology, including a quite benign, SPC, and an extremely malignant, multiple myeloma at the two ends of the spectrum. SPC of bone including SPS is characterized by a radiologically solitary bone lesion, neoplastic plasma cells in the biopsy specimen, fewer than 5% plasma cells in bone marrow, <2.0 g/dl monoclonal protein in the serum when present and negative urine test for Bence Jones protein (monoclonal light chain. For diagnosing, a comprehensive examination and analysis, which includes radiological examination, immunoglobulin, biochemistry, test for Bence Jones protein in the urine and bone marrow is needed.

  2. Direct measurement of the wavelength of sound waves in the human skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Carmen L; Doman, Darrel A; Brown, Jeremy A; Bance, Manohar; Adamson, Robert B A

    2013-01-01

    The results of a study of the three-dimensional vibration of two dry human skulls in response to harmonic excitation are presented. The vibratory response exhibits three distinct types of motion across the range of audible frequencies. At low frequencies below 1000 Hz, whole-head quasi-rigid motion is seen. At the middle frequencies between 1000 and 6000 Hz, the motion exhibits a series of increasingly complex modal patterns. Above 6000 Hz, the response is wavelike and clear wavefronts can be distinguished in the vibration data. In this regime the relationship between wavelength and frequency is calculated and compared to a number of theories of skull vibration that have been proposed.

  3. Relative age determination of the skull of the chacma baboon (Papio ursinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. van Niekerk

    1983-03-01

    Full Text Available Relative age determination was carried out on the skulls of 261 chacma baboons (Papio ursinus, 117 from the Loskopdam Nature Reserve and 144 from the Messina district in the Northern Transvaal. Seven age groups were distinguished, of which classes I-IV were based on the eruption and displacement of milk and permanent teeth. Adults with a complete set of permanent dentition were subdivided into three additional classes (V- VII, mainly on the basis of the degree of molar attrition. For comparative purposes the pattern of maturation of craniometric parameters which reflect the general size and shape of the skull, as well as the degree of closure of ectocranial sutures, were treated on the same basis. From this it is apparent that a most reliable estimate of relative age can be obtained by using all the above-mentioned criteria.

  4. The application of computer-aided designated titanium mesh in repairing skull defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei ZHANG

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the clinical value of repairing skull defects with titanium alloy-mesh of computer-aided design.  Methods A retrospective analysis was done on clinical data of 86 cases with skull defects who underwent repairing using titanium mesh with two-dimensional or three-dimensional computer-aided design.  Results All the incisions achieved primary healing other than one case conducting reoperation due to exposed titanium mesh. Two cases got subcutaneous exudate, one obtained painful mastication and one experienced proliferation of scalp scar.  Conclusions With the computer-aided designated titanium mesh, relevant operation can resume the original state to maximum extent, lower surgical risk, decrease post-operational complications and then obtain satisfying clinical effect. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.01.015

  5. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach in Skull Base Chondrosarcoma Associated with Maffucci Syndrome: Case Series and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer-Furlan, André; Balsalobre, Leonardo; Vellutini, Eduardo A S; Stamm, Aldo C

    2016-01-01

    Maffucci syndrome is a nonhereditary disorder in which patients develop multiple enchondromas and cutaneous, visceral, or soft tissue hemangiomas. The potential malignant progression of enchondroma into a secondary chondrosarcoma is a well-known fact. Nevertheless, chondrosarcoma located at the skull base in patients with Maffuci syndrome is a very rare condition, with only 18 cases reported in the literature. We report 2 other cases successfully treated through an expanded endoscopic endonasal approach and discuss the condition based on the literature review. Skull base chondrosarcoma associated with Maffucci syndrome is a rare condition. The disease cannot be cured, therefore surgical treatment should be performed in symptomatic patients aiming for maximal tumor resection with function preservation. The endoscopic endonasal approach is a safe and reliable alternative for the management of these tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus mimicking intraosseous lesions of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalali, Elnaz; Tadinada, Aditya [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus is a developmental variant that is not always well recognized and is often confused with other pathologies associated with the skull base. This report describes the case of a patient referred for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging for dental implant therapy. CBCT demonstrated a well-defined incidental lesion in the left sphenoid sinus with soft tissue-like density and sclerotic borders with internal curvilinear opacifications. The differential diagnoses included intraosseous lipoma, arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus, chondrosarcoma, chondroid chordoma, and ossifying fibroma. The radiographic diagnosis of arrested pneumatization was based on the location of the lesion, its well-defined nature, the presence of internal opacifications, and lack of expansion. Gray-scale CBCT imaging of the area demonstrated values similar to fatty tissue. This case highlighted the fact that benign developmental variants associated with the skull base share similar radiographic features with more serious pathological entities.

  7. Left-right asymmetry of the gnathostome skull: its evolutionary, developmental, and functional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Fish, Jennifer; Depew, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    Much of the gnathostome (jawed vertebrate) evolutionary radiation was dependent on the ability to sense and interpret the environment and subsequently act upon this information through utilization of a specialized mode of feeding involving the jaws. While the gnathostome skull, reflective of the vertebrate baüplan, typically is bilaterally symmetric with right (dextral) and left (sinistral) halves essentially representing mirror images along the midline, both adaptive and abnormal asymmetries have appeared. Herein we provide a basic primer on studies of the asymmetric development of the gnathostome skull, touching briefly on asymmetry as a field of study, then describing the nature of cranial development and finally underscoring evolutionary and functional aspects of left-right asymmetric cephalic development. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Craniofacial approaches and reconstruction in skull base surgery: techniques for the oral and maxillofacial surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treasure, Trevor E; Dean, Jeffrey S; Gear, Robert D

    2013-12-01

    Skull base surgery (SBS) is considered the standard of care in treating benign and malignant lesions of the cranial base. SBS is a multidisciplinary team approach used to treat these complex lesions that may have intracranial extension. SBS can be broken down into 3 steps. Transfacial access is performed, followed by resection with sound oncologic principles, and then reconstruction of the cranial base and facial structures. Functional and esthetic concerns must be addressed by the surgeons. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons frequently perform elective facial osteotomies and treat victims of cranial base trauma. These same principles can be applied to SBS as a part of the skull base team. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-linear elastic deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Ogden, R W

    1997-01-01

    Classic in the field covers application of theory of finite elasticity to solution of boundary-value problems, analysis of mechanical properties of solid materials capable of large elastic deformations. Problems. References.

  10. Nonlinear Deformable-body Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2010-01-01

    "Nonlinear Deformable-body Dynamics" mainly consists in a mathematical treatise of approximate theories for thin deformable bodies, including cables, beams, rods, webs, membranes, plates, and shells. The intent of the book is to stimulate more research in the area of nonlinear deformable-body dynamics not only because of the unsolved theoretical puzzles it presents but also because of its wide spectrum of applications. For instance, the theories for soft webs and rod-reinforced soft structures can be applied to biomechanics for DNA and living tissues, and the nonlinear theory of deformable bodies, based on the Kirchhoff assumptions, is a special case discussed. This book can serve as a reference work for researchers and a textbook for senior and postgraduate students in physics, mathematics, engineering and biophysics. Dr. Albert C.J. Luo is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, IL, USA. Professor Luo is an internationally recognized scientist in the field of non...

  11. Axisymmetric finite deformation membrane problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, W.W.

    1980-12-12

    Many biomechanic problems involve the analysis of finite deformation axisymmetric membranes. This paper presents the general formulation for solving a class of axisymmetric membrane problems. The material nonlinearity, as well as the geometric nonlinearity, is considered. Two methods are presented to solve these problems. The first method is solving a set of differential equilibrium equations. The governing equations are reduced to three first-order ordinary-differential equations with explicit derivatives. The second method is the Ritz method where a general potential energy functional valid for all axisymmetric deformed positions is presented. The geometric admissible functions that govern the deformed configuration are written in terms of a series with unknown coefficients. These unknown coefficients are determined by the minimum potential energy principle that of all geometric admissible deformed configurations, the equilibrium configuration minimizes the potential energy. Some examples are presented. A comparison between these two methods is mentioned.

  12. Characteristic classes in deformation quantization

    OpenAIRE

    Willwacher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In deformation quantization, one can associate five characteristic functions to (stable) formality morphisms on cochains and chains and to "two-brane" formality morphisms. We show that these characteristic functions agree.

  13. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dröge, L H; Hinsche, T; Canis, M; Alt-Epping, B; Hess, C F; Wolff, H A

    2014-02-01

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting.

  14. First Application of 7-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery of Skull Base Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Thomas F; Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Padormo, Francesco; Pawha, Puneet S; Delman, Bradley N; Shrivastava, Raj K; Balchandani, Priti

    2017-07-01

    Successful endoscopic endonasal surgery for the resection of skull base tumors is reliant on preoperative imaging to delineate pathology from the surrounding anatomy. The increased signal-to-noise ratio afforded by 7-T MRI can be used to increase spatial and contrast resolution, which may lend itself to improved imaging of the skull base. In this study, we apply a 7-T imaging protocol to patients with skull base tumors and compare the images with clinical standard of care. Images were acquired at 7 T on 11 patients with skull base lesions. Two neuroradiologists evaluated clinical 1.5-, 3-, and 7-T scans for detection of intracavernous cranial nerves and internal carotid artery (ICA) branches. Detection rates were compared. Images were used for surgical planning and uploaded to a neuronavigation platform and used to guide surgery. Image analysis yielded improved detection rates of cranial nerves and ICA branches at 7 T. The 7-T images were successfully incorporated into preoperative planning and intraoperative neuronavigation. Our study represents the first application of 7-T MRI to the full neurosurgical workflow for endoscopic endonasal surgery. We detected higher rates of cranial nerves and ICA branches at 7-T MRI compared with 3- and 1.5-T MRI, and found that integration of 7 T into surgical planning and guidance was feasible. These results suggest a potential for 7-T MRI to reduce surgical complications. Future studies comparing standardized 7-, 3-, and 1.5-T MRI protocols in a larger number of patients are warranted to determine the relative benefit of 7-T MRI for endonasal endoscopic surgical efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of the relative locations of the greater palatine foramen in adult Chinese skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T M; Kuo, K J; Shih, C; Ho, L L; Liu, J C

    1988-01-01

    One hundred dry skulls of adult Chinese of both sexes were studied. They were homogeneous in the form of maxillary arch and having full eruption of the upper third molar, without missing teeth and malposition of teeth. Our findings revealed that the mean distance from the center of the greater palatine foramen (GPF) to the midsagittal plane of the hard palate was 16.00 mm, and to the posterior border of the hard palate, 4.11 mm. The location of the GPF related to the maxillary molars was expressed as percentage in 5 relations. We found that the most common location of the GPF was between the maxillary second and third molars (relation III: 48%), and less common was lingual to the maxillary third molar (relation IV: 33.5%). The usually accepted description of the GPF location was lingual to the second molar (relation II), but in our study this relative position occurred in only 17% of the skulls. The long axis of the greater palatine canal directing to the GPF in the oral cavity was found to be directed anteriorly in 181 openings (90.5%) of the 200 GPF, and only 19 openings (9.5%) directed vertically. The bilateral symmetry of GPF on both sides of each skull was remarkable. The discrepancy of our observations on the Chinese skulls from those on other ethnic groups was discussed. Our findings suggest, therefore, the existence of an ethnic variation and the necessity of a more accurate method of locating the GPF in clinical practice.

  16. Postoperative otorhinolaryngologic complications in transnasal endoscopic surgery to access the skull base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Landini Lutaif Dolci

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The large increase in the number of transnasal endoscopic skull base surgeries is a consequence of greater knowledge of the anatomic region, the development of specific materials and instruments, and especially the use of the nasoseptal flap as a barrier between the sinus tract (contaminated cavity and the subarachnoid space (sterile area, reducing the high risk of contamination. Objective: To assess the otorhinolaryngologic complications in patients undergoing endoscopic surgery of the skull base, in which a nasoseptal flap was used. Methods: This was a retrospective study that included patients who underwent endoscopic skull base surgery with creation of a nasoseptal flap, assessing for the presence of the following post-surgical complications: cerebrospinal fluid leak, meningitis, mucocele formation, nasal synechia, septal perforation (prior to posterior septectomy, internal nasal valve failure, epistaxis, and olfactory alterations. Results: The study assessed 41 patients undergoing surgery. Of these, 35 had pituitary adenomas (macro- or micro-adenomas; sellar and suprasellar extension, three had meningiomas (two tuberculum sellae and one olfactory groove, two had craniopharyngiomas, and one had an intracranial abscess. The complications were cerebrospinal fluid leak (three patients; 7.3%, meningitis (three patients; 7.3%, nasal fossa synechia (eight patients; 19.5%, internal nasal valve failure (six patients; 14.6%, and complaints of worsening of the sense of smell (16 patients; 39%. The olfactory test showed anosmia or hyposmia in ten patients (24.3%. No patient had mucocele, epistaxis, or septal perforation. Conclusion: The use of the nasoseptal flap has revolutionized endoscopic skull base surgery, making the procedures more effective and with lower morbidity compared to the traditional route. However, although mainly transient nasal morbidities were observed, in some cases, permanent hyposmia and anosmia resulted

  17. Through-skull vasculature assessment using fluorescence brain imaging on murine models at around 800 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Gau, Yung-Tian A.; Rahmim, Arman; Wong, Dean F.; Bergles, Dwight E.; Kang, Jin U.

    2017-02-01

    We describe a scanning near-infrared fluorescence imager for through-skull non-invasive brain imaging on live murine models. The captured photoluminescence feature through scattering media was enhanced using a high sensitivity scientific CMOS sensor with the obtained spatial resolution of 15.63 μm, depth of field of 5 mm and an average local signal-to-noise ratio of 37.5 dB.

  18. Radio-anatomical analysis of the pericranial flap "money box approach" for ventral skull base reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Alfonso; Langdon, Cristóbal; López-Chacon, Mauricio; Cordero, Arturo; Enseñat, Joaquim; Carrau, Ricardo; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Alobid, Isam

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the versatility of the pericranial flap (PCF) to reconstruct the ventral skull base, using the frontal sinus as a gate for its passage into the sinonasal corridor "money box approach." Anatomic-radiological study and case series. Various approaches and their respective defects (cribriform, transtuberculum, clival, and craniovertebral junction) were completed in 10 injected specimens. The PCF was introduced into the nose through the uppermost portion of the frontal sinus (money box approach). Computed tomography (CT) scans (n = 50) were used to measure the dimensions of the PCF and the skull base defects. The vertical projection of the external ear canal was used as the reference point to standardize the incisions for the PCF. The surface area and maximum length of the PCF were 121.5 ± 19.4 cm2 and 18.3 ± 1.3 cm, respectively. Using CT scans, we determined that to reconstruct defects secondary to transcribriform, transtuberculum, clival, and craniovertebral approaches, the PCF distal incision must be placed respectively at -3.7 ± 2.0 cm (angle -17.4 ± 8.5°), -0.2 ± 2.0 cm (angle -1.0 ± 9.3°), +5.5 ± 2.3 cm (angle +24.4 ± 9.7°), +8.4 ± 2.4 cm (angle +36.6 ± 11.5°), as related to the reference point. Skull base defects in our clinical cohort (n = 6) were completely reconstructed uneventfully with the PCF. The PCF renders enough surface area to reconstruct all possible defects in the ventral and median skull base. Using the uppermost frontal sinus as a gateway into the nose (money box approach) is feasible and simple. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:2482-2489, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. DESCRIPTION OF DENTAL CARIES AND EFFECTS OF FOODS ON TOOTH DESTRUCTION IN SKULLS OF PAWON MAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalina Ahmad

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The skeleton of Pawon Man’s that lived in Mesolitic era aged 5,660±170 BP - 9,500± 200 BP (Before Present years before Christ (BC has been used for forensic odontology research.  However, there has not been any research on dental caries of Pawon Man. The aim of this research was to describe the dental caries in skulls of Pawon Man. The type of the research was descriptive by using purposive sampling. The samples were from four Pawon Man skulls and their teeth. The research was conducted by using clinical examination. All aspects were recorded, collected and presented in tabular form. The result shows that 12.5% of the samples from 32 teeth of skulls of Pawon Man I, III, IV and V had experienced dental caries. Clinical examination shows presence of dental caries in samples of Pawon Man III of  permanent mandibular third molar tooth of region 4(48 in lingual area and buccal lesion of lower left third molar (38. In Pawon IV, lingual lesion of lower left permanent second molar (37 and in lower left permanent third molar (38. All lesions are only in enamel which is code 1 according to ICDAS code. In conclusion, the dental caries in skulls of Pawon Man was low due to their low sugar diets from fruits and sugar-rich plants (fructose sugars. Consumption of hard foods and evidence of presence of animal teeth and mollusks had contributed to the higher percentage of dental attrition compared to dental caries.   Keywords: dental caries, clinical, pawon man

  20. The non-destructive prediction of the aluminium content in pressed skulls of aluminium dross

    OpenAIRE

    Varužan Kevorkijan; Srečo Davor Škapin; Uroš Kovačec

    2012-01-01

    During production of primary and secondary aluminium, various amounts of aluminium dross, a mixture consisting of molten aluminium metal and different oxide compounds, is skimmed per tonne of molten metal. In order to preserve the maximum aluminium content in hot dross for further extraction, it is necessary to cool the dross (e.g. by pressing) immediately after skimming. During pressing, the skimmed dross is transformed into so-called pressed skulls, convenient for storage, transport or furt...

  1. A tomographic study of the skull base in primary spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannetti, Alexandre Varella [Hospital das Clinicas, Service of Neurosurgery, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Federal University of Minas Gerais, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Guimaraes, Roberto Eustaquio S. [Hospital das Clinicas, Services Otorhinolaryngology, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Federal University of Minas Gerais, Department of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Santiago, Ana Paula M.S. [Hospital das Clinicas, Services Radiology, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Perpetuo, Francisco Otaviano L.; Machado, Marco Antonio O. [Computed Tomography Center of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    This study aims to evaluate the existence of anatomic abnormalities in the skull base that could contribute to the origin of primary spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks (PSL). Twenty PSL patients were compared with 20 healthy individuals. The following features were measured through an analysis of computed tomography scans: the angles of the petrosal bones and skull base in both the sagittal and coronal planes; the anteroposterior and mediolateral diameters of the anterior skull base, sella, and sphenoid sinus; the depth of the olfactory fossa; the pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus; the position of the crista galli; and the state of the dorsum sellae. Body mass index (BMI) was compared. There were no differences between the two groups with respect to the angles and diameters of the anterior cranial fossa and the sphenoid sinus or the depth of the olfactory fossa. Pneumatization of the lateral recess of the sphenoid sinus was more frequent in the PSL group (55%) than in the control group (25%, p = 0.053). The dorsum sellae were eroded in 30% of the PSL patients but intact in all healthy subjects. PSL subjects showed higher sellae (1.0 versus 0.8 cm, p = 0.002). The average BMI of PSL patients was higher than that of the control group. Global alterations in the skull base of PSL patients were not found. The increase in the height of sellae and the erosion of its dorsum suggest intracranial hypertension. The higher BMI in the case group confirms the relation between obesity and PSL. (orig.)

  2. Challenges in Linear Accelerator Radiotherapy for Chordomas and Chondrosarcomas of the Skull Base: Focus on Complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauptman, Jason S., E-mail: jhauptman@mednet.ucla.edu [Division of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Barkhoudarian, Garni; Safaee, Michael; Gorgulho, Alessandra [Division of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tenn, Steven; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Selch, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); De Salles, Antonio A.F. [Division of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Intracranial chordomas and chondrosarcomas are histologically low-grade, locally invasive tumors that infiltrate the skull base. Currently, consensus therapy includes surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy. Radiation delivery is typically limited by the proximity of these tumors to critical skull base structures. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 cases of chordomas and 2 cases of chondroid chondrosarcomas of the skull based treated with linear accelerator stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT, n = 10) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, n = 5). The average time to the most recent follow-up visit was 4.5 years. The tumor characteristics, treatment details, and outcomes were recorded. Each radiation plan was reviewed, and the dosage received by the brainstem, optic apparatus, and pituitary was calculated. Results: Of the 10 patients treated with SRT, 6 were found to have unchanged or decreased tumor size as determined from radiographic follow-up. Of the 5 patients treated with SRS, 3 were found to have stable or unchanged tumors at follow-up. The complications included 1 SRT patient who developed endocrinopathy, 2 patients (1 treated with SRS and the other with SRT), who developed cranial neuropathy, and 1 SRS patient who developed visual deficits. Additionally, 1 patient who received both SRS and SRT within 2 years for recurrence experienced transient medial temporal lobe radiation changes that resolved. Conclusions: Where proton beam therapy is unavailable, linear accelerator-based SRT or radiosurgery remains a safe option for adjuvant therapy of chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base. The exposure of the optic apparatus, pituitary stalk, and brainstem must be considered during planning to minimize complications. If the optic apparatus is included in the 80% isodose line, it might be best to fractionate therapy. Exposure of the pituitary stalk should be kept to <30 Gy to minimize endocrine dysfunction. Brainstem exposure should be

  3. Amphibian skull evolution: the developmental and functional context of simplification, bone loss and heterotopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Rainer R

    2014-12-01

    Despite their divergent morphology, extant and extinct amphibians share numerous features in the timing and spatial patterning of dermal skull elements. Here, I show how the study of these features leads to a deeper understanding of morphological evolution. Batrachians (salamanders and frogs) have simplified skulls, with dermal bones appearing rudimentary compared with fossil tetrapods, and open cheeks resulting from the absence of other bones. The batrachian skull bones may be derived from those of temnospondyls by truncation of the developmental trajectory. The squamosal, quadratojugal, parietal, prefrontal, parasphenoid, palatine, and pterygoid form rudimentary versions of their homologs in temnospondyls. In addition, failure to ossify and early fusion of bone primordia both result in the absence of further bones that were consistently present in Paleozoic tetrapods. Here, I propose a new hypothesis explaining the observed patterns of bone loss and emargination in a functional context. The starting observation is that jaw-closing muscles are arranged in a different way than in ancestors from the earliest ontogenetic stage onwards, with muscles attaching to the dorsal side of the frontal, parietal, and squamosal. The postparietal and supratemporal start to ossify in a similar way as in branchiosaurids, but are fused to neighboring elements to form continuous attachment areas for the internal adductor. The postfrontal, postorbital, and jugal fail to ossify, as their position is inconsistent with the novel arrangement of adductor muscles. Thus, rearrangement of adductors forms the common theme behind cranial simplification, driven by an evolutionary flattening of the skull in the batrachian stem. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)], e-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications.

  5. Localized intraoperative virtual endoscopy (LIVE) for surgical guidance in 16 skull base patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerle, Stephan K; Daly, Michael J; Chan, Harley; Vescan, Allan; Witterick, Ian; Gentili, Fred; Zadeh, Gelareh; Kucharczyk, Walter; Irish, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Previous preclinical studies of localized intraoperative virtual endoscopy-image-guided surgery (LIVE-IGS) for skull base surgery suggest a potential clinical benefit. The first aim was to evaluate the registration accuracy of virtual endoscopy based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging under clinical conditions. The second aim was to implement and assess real-time proximity alerts for critical structures during skull base drilling. Patients consecutively referred for sinus and skull base surgery were enrolled in this prospective case series. Five patients were used to check registration accuracy and feasibility with the subsequent 11 patients being treated under LIVE-IGS conditions with presentation to the operating surgeon (phase 2). Sixteen skull base patients were endoscopically operated on by using image-based navigation while LIVE-IGS was tested in a clinical setting. Workload was quantitatively assessed using the validated National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) questionnaire. Real-time localization of the surgical drill was accurate to ~1 to 2 mm in all cases. The use of 3-mm proximity alert zones around the carotid arteries and optic nerve found regular clinical use, as the median minimum distance between the tracked drill and these structures was 1 mm (0.2-3.1 mm) and 0.6 mm (0.2-2.5 mm), respectively. No statistical differences were found in the NASA-TLX indicators for this experienced surgical cohort. Real-time proximity alerts with virtual endoscopic guidance was sufficiently accurate under clinical conditions. Further clinical evaluation is required to evaluate the potential surgical benefits, particularly for less experienced surgeons or for teaching purposes. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  6. Growing skull fracture with cerebrospinal fluid fistula: A rare case report and its management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Saurabh; Gandhi, Ashok; Sharma, Achal; Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2015-01-01

    The growing skull fracture (GSF) occurs in younger age group as a sequel of trauma. The most common site of these lesions is parietal region. Here we are presenting a case of GSF of posterior fossa with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula. As per literature, we have not found a single case of GSF in the posterior fossa with CSF fistula. The aim of this presentation is discussing the unusual presentation of GSF and its management.

  7. Normal age-related conversion of bone marrow in the skull base. Assessment with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Koki; Tomura, Noriaki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Izumi, Junichi; Kurosawa, Ryo; Sashi, Ryuji; Watarai, Jiro [Akita Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the normal age-related sequence of conversion from hematopoietic to fatty marrow in the skull base by means of MR imaging. We retrospectively reviewed T1-weighted MR images of the skull base for the distribution of hematopoietic and fatty marrow. The subjects consisted of 169 MR examinations that were performed with the spin-echo technique. The age of the subjects ranged from 0 months to 20 years old. Patients with known marrow abnormalities were excluded from this study. Marrow conversion was assessed in the presphenoid, postsphenoid, basiocciput, petrous apex, clivus, zygomatic bone, and condyle of the mandible. The signal intensity was visually graded, and the signal intensity ratio was determined on the basis of the intensities of the subcutaneous fat and air. The signal intensity of all observed regions was as low as that of muscles until 3 months of age. Conversion of hematopoietic to fatty marrow first occurred in the zygomatic bone until 6 months of age. The presphenoid increased in signal intensity from 5 months to 2 years of age, and the sphenoid sinus began to be pneumatic at this age. Marrow conversion of the postsphenoid and basiocciput was later than that of the presphenoid. Most of the bone marrow of the skull base appeared as fatty conversion until 3 years of age, although some mandibular condyles appeared hematopoietic at 3 years of age. The normal age-related conversion from hematopoietic to fatty marrow in the skull base followed a well-defined sequence. Knowledge of the normal bone marrow conversion by MR imaging is essential for the recognition of pathologic marrow processes. (author)

  8. Septicemia, meningitis, and skull osteomyelitis complicating infected cephalhematoma caused by ESBL-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakwan, Narongsak; Nakwan, Narongwit; Wannaro, Jeerawan; Dissaneevate, Pathikan; Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2011-01-01

    An infected cephalhematoma is a rare condition in neonates. We report a case of an 18-day-old neonate who was diagnosed with an infected cephalhematoma caused by an extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli complicated with septicemia, meningitis, and skull osteomyelitis. He was successfully treated with meropenem and surgical incision and drainage. ESBL-producing E. coli may cause infection of a cephalhematoma in neonates.

  9. Beak and skull shapes of human commensal and non-commensal house sparrows Passer domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyahi, Sepand; Hammer, Øyvind; Arbabi, Tayebeh; Sánchez, Antonio; Roselaar, Cees S; Aliabadian, Mansour; Sætre, Glenn-Peter

    2013-09-17

    The granivorous house sparrow Passer domesticus is thought to have developed its commensal relationship with humans with the rise of agriculture in the Middle East some 10,000 years ago, and to have expanded with the spread of agriculture in Eurasia during the last few thousand years. One subspecies, P. d. bactrianus, residing in Central Asia, has apparently maintained the ancestral ecology, however. This subspecies is not associated with human settlements; it is migratory and lives in natural grass- and wetland habitats feeding on wild grass seeds. It is well documented that the agricultural revolution was associated with an increase in grain size and changes in seed structure in cultivated cereals, the preferred food source of commensal house sparrow. Accordingly, we hypothesize that correlated changes may have occurred in beak and skull morphology as adaptive responses to the change in diet. Here, we test this hypothesis by comparing the skull shapes of 101 house sparrows from Iran, belonging to five different subspecies, including the non-commensal P. d. bactrianus, using geometric morphometrics. The various commensal house sparrow subspecies share subtle but consistent skeletal features that differ significantly from those of the non-commensal P. d. bactrianus. Although there is a marked overall size allometry in the data set, the shape difference between the ecologically differentiated sparrows cannot be explained by differences in size alone. Relative to the size allometry commensal house sparrows exhibit a skull shape consistent with accelerated development (heterochrony), resulting in a more robust facial cranium and a larger, more pointed beak. The difference in skull shape and robustness of the beak between commensal and non-commensal house sparrows is consistent with adaptations to process the larger and rachis encapsulated seeds of domesticated cereals among human associated populations.

  10. The Skull Development of Parrots with Special Reference to the Emergence of a Morphologically Unique Cranio-Facial Hinge

    OpenAIRE

    Tokita, Masayoshi

    2003-01-01

    The order Psittaciformes (parrots) has unique morphological features in the head that are evolutionarily novel. To better understand the unique evolution of the head in parrots, the developmental pattern of the skull of the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) was initially described on the basis of transparent skeletal specimens. Although the fundamental pattern of the skull development of birds is conserved in parrots, some differences were observed between parrots and other groups of birds...

  11. Factors associated with successful magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound treatment: efficiency of acoustic energy delivery through the skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won Seok; Jung, Hyun Ho; Zadicario, Eyal; Rachmilevitch, Itay; Tlusty, Tal; Vitek, Shuki; Chang, Jin Woo

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) was recently introduced as treatment for movement disorders such as essential tremor and advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Although deep brain target lesions are successfully generated in most patients, the target area temperature fails to increase in some cases. The skull is one of the greatest barriers to ultrasonic energy transmission. The authors analyzed the skull-related factors that may have prevented an increase in target area temperatures in patients who underwent MRgFUS. The authors retrospectively reviewed data from clinical trials that involved MRgFUS for essential tremor, idiopathic PD, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Data from 25 patients were included. The relationships between the maximal temperature during treatment and other factors, including sex, age, skull area of the sonication field, number of elements used, skull volume of the sonication field, and skull density ratio (SDR), were determined. Among the various factors, skull volume and SDR exhibited relationships with the maximum temperature. Skull volume was negatively correlated with maximal temperature (p = 0.023, r(2) = 0.206, y = 64.156 - 0.028x, whereas SDR was positively correlated with maximal temperature (p = 0.009, r(2) = 0.263, y = 49.643 + 11.832x). The other factors correlate with the maximal temperature, although some factors showed a tendency to correlate. Some skull-related factors correlated with the maximal target area temperature. Although the number of patients in the present study was relatively small, the results offer information that could guide the selection of MRgFUS candidates.

  12. Extra-dimensional Demons: a method for incorporating missing tissue in deformable image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithiananthan, Sajendra; Schafer, Sebastian; Mirota, Daniel J; Stayman, J Webster; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Reh, Douglas D; Gallia, Gary L; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2012-09-01

    A deformable registration method capable of accounting for missing tissue (e.g., excision) is reported for application in cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided surgical procedures. Excisions are identified by a segmentation step performed simultaneous to the registration process. Tissue excision is explicitly modeled by increasing the dimensionality of the deformation field to allow motion beyond the dimensionality of the image. The accuracy of the model is tested in phantom, simulations, and cadaver models. A variant of the Demons deformable registration algorithm is modified to include excision segmentation and modeling. Segmentation is performed iteratively during the registration process, with initial implementation using a threshold-based approach to identify voxels corresponding to "tissue" in the moving image and "air" in the fixed image. With each iteration of the Demons process, every voxel is assigned a probability of excision. Excisions are modeled explicitly during registration by increasing the dimensionality of the deformation field so that both deformations and excisions can be accounted for by in- and out-of-volume deformations, respectively. The out-of-volume (i.e., fourth) component of the deformation field at each voxel carries a magnitude proportional to the excision probability computed in the excision segmentation step. The registration accuracy of the proposed "extra-dimensional" Demons (XDD) and conventional Demons methods was tested in the presence of missing tissue in phantom models, simulations investigating the effect of excision size on registration accuracy, and cadaver studies emulating realistic deformations and tissue excisions imparted in CBCT-guided endoscopic skull base surgery. Phantom experiments showed the normalized mutual information (NMI) in regions local to the excision to improve from 1.10 for the conventional Demons approach to 1.16 for XDD, and qualitative examination of the resulting images revealed major differences: the

  13. Skulls, brains, and memorial culture: on cerebral biographies of scientists in the nineteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagner, Michael

    2003-06-01

    In this paper, I will argue that the scientific investigation of skulls and brains of geniuses went hand in hand with hagiographical celebrations of scientists. My analysis starts with late-eighteenth century anatomists and anthropologists who highlighted quantitative parameters such as the size and weight of the brain in order to explain intellectual differences between women and men and Europeans and non-Europeans, geniuses and ordinary persons. After 1800 these parameters were modified by phrenological inspections of the skull and brain. As the phrenological examination of the skulls of Immanuel Kant, Wilhelm Heinse, Arthur Schopenhauer and others shows, the anthropometrical data was interpreted in light of biographical circumstances. The same pattern of interpretation can be found in non-phrenological contexts: Reports about extraordinary brains were part of biographical sketches, mainly delivered in celebratory obituaries. It was only in this context that moral reservations about dissecting the brains of geniuses could be overcome, which led to a more systematic investigation of brains of geniuses after 1860.

  14. On the cost-effectiveness of Carbon ion radiation therapy for skull base chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäkel, Oliver; Land, Beate; Combs, Stephanie Elisabeth; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Debus, Jürgen

    2007-05-01

    The cost-effectiveness of Carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) for patients with skull base chordoma is analyzed. Primary treatment costs and costs for recurrent tumors are estimated. The costs for treatment of recurrent tumors were estimated using a sample of 10 patients presenting with recurrent chordoma at the base of skull at DKFZ. Using various scenarios for the local control rate and reimbursements of Carbon ion therapy the cost-effectiveness of ion therapy for these tumors is analyzed. If local control rate for skull base chordoma achieved with carbon ion therapy exceeds 70.3%, the overall treatment costs for carbon RT are lower than for conventional RTI. The cost-effectiveness ratio for carbon RT is 2539 Euro per 1% increase in survival, or 7692 Euro per additional life year. Current results support the thesis that Carbon ion RT, although more expensive, is at least as cost-effective as advanced photon therapies for these patients. Ion RT, however, offers substantial benefits for the patients such as improved control rates and less severe side effects.

  15. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for skull base metastases developing with cranial nerve symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kosaki, Katsura; Nagai, Aiko

    2010-06-01

    Skull base metastases are challenging situations because they often involve critical structures such as cranial nerves. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which can give high doses to the tumors sparing normal structures. We treated 11 cases of skull base metastases from other visceral carcinomas. They had neurological symptoms due to cranial nerve involvement including optic nerve (3 patients), oculomotor (3), trigeminal (6), abducens (1), facial (4), acoustic (1), and lower cranial nerves (1). The interval between the onset of cranial nerve symptoms and Novalis SRT was 1 week to 7 months. Eleven tumors of 8-112 ml in volume were treated by Novalis SRT with 30-50 Gy in 10-14 fractions. The tumors were covered by 90-95% isodose. Imaging and clinical follow-up has been obtained in all 11 patients for 5-36 months after SRT. Seven patients among 11 died from primary carcinoma or other visceral metastases 9-36 months after Novalis SRT. All 11 metastatic tumors were locally controlled until the end of the follow-up time or patient death, though retreatment for re-growth was done in 1 patient. In 10 of 11 patients, cranial nerve deficits were improved completely or partially. In some patients, the cranial nerve symptoms were relieved even during the period of fractionated SRT. Novalis SRT is thought to be safe and effective treatment for skull base metastases with involvement of cranial nerves and it may improve cranial nerve symptoms quickly.

  16. Construction of a three-dimensional interactive model of the skull base and cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakizawa, Yukinari; Hongo, Kazuhiro; Rhoton, Albert L

    2007-05-01

    The goal was to develop an interactive three-dimensional (3-D) computerized anatomic model of the skull base for teaching microneurosurgical anatomy and for operative planning. The 3-D model was constructed using commercially available software (Maya 6.0 Unlimited; Alias Systems Corp., Delaware, MD), a personal computer, four cranial specimens, and six dry bones. Photographs from at least two angles of the superior and lateral views were imported to the 3-D software. Many photographs were needed to produce the model in anatomically complex areas. Careful dissection was needed to expose important structures in the two views. Landmarks, including foramen, bone, and dura mater, were used as reference points. The 3-D model of the skull base and related structures was constructed using more than 300,000 remodeled polygons. The model can be viewed from any angle. It can be rotated 360 degrees in any plane using any structure as the focal point of rotation. The model can be reduced or enlarged using the zoom function. Variable transparencies could be assigned to any structures so that the structures at any level can be seen. Anatomic labels can be attached to the structures in the 3-D model for educational purposes. This computer-generated 3-D model can be observed and studied repeatedly without the time limitations and stresses imposed by surgery. This model may offer the potential to create interactive surgical exercises useful in evaluating multiple surgical routes to specific target areas in the skull base.

  17. A case of generalized lymphatic anomaly causing skull-base leakage and bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Kenichi; Goji, Aya; Inoue, Miki; Kawahito, Masami; Taki, Masako; Mori, Kazuhiro

    2017-05-01

    Generalized lymphatic anomaly is a multifocal lymphatic malformation that affects the skin, thoracic viscera, and bones. A 3year-old Japanese boy presented with right facial palsy due to cystic tumors in the ipsilateral petrous bone. Pericardial effusion had been found incidentally and generalized lymphatic anomaly had been diagnosed by pericardial biopsy. Petrous bone tumor had been followed up without surgery. At the age of seven he presented with fever and disturbance of consciousness, and bacterial meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae was diagnosed. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed middle skull-base leakage due to lymphatic malformation. He achieved complete recovery under intensive care with antibiotics and mechanical ventilation. One year later, he presented with multiple cystic formations in bilateral femora. At the 3-year follow-up, the patient was healthy with no recurrence of meningitis and osteolytic lesions in the femora were non-progressive. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful for demonstration of skull-base leakage by generalized lymphatic anomaly. We should consider generalized lymphatic anomaly among the differential diagnoses for skull-base leakage. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Designing of skull defect implants using C1 rational cubic Bezier and offset curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Najihah; Majid, Ahmad Abd; Piah, Abd Rahni Mt; Rajion, Zainul Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    Some of the reasons to construct skull implant are due to head trauma after an accident or an injury or an infection or because of tumor invasion or when autogenous bone is not suitable for replacement after a decompressive craniectomy (DC). The main objective of our study is to develop a simple method to redesign missing parts of the skull. The procedure begins with segmentation, data approximation, and estimation process of the outer wall by a C1 continuous curve. Its offset curve is used to generate the inner wall. A metaheuristic algorithm, called harmony search (HS) is a derivative-free real parameter optimization algorithm inspired from the musical improvisation process of searching for a perfect state of harmony. In this study, data approximation by a rational cubic Bézier function uses HS to optimize position of middle points and value of the weights. All the phases contribute significantly in making our proposed technique automated. Graphical examples of several postoperative skulls are displayed to show the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  19. An Innovate Robotic Endoscope Guidance System for Transnasal Sinus and Skull Base Surgery: Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, D T; Sommer, F; Scheithauer, M O; Greve, J; Hoffmann, T K; Schuler, P J

    2017-12-01

    Objective  Advanced transnasal sinus and skull base surgery remains a challenging discipline for head and neck surgeons. Restricted access and space for instrumentation can impede advanced interventions. Thus, we present the combination of an innovative robotic endoscope guidance system and a specific endoscope with adjustable viewing angle to facilitate transnasal surgery in a human cadaver model. Materials and Methods  The applicability of the robotic endoscope guidance system with custom foot pedal controller was tested for advanced transnasal surgery on a fresh frozen human cadaver head. Visualization was enabled using a commercially available endoscope with adjustable viewing angle (15-90 degrees). Results  Visualization and instrumentation of all paranasal sinuses, including the anterior and middle skull base, were feasible with the presented setup. Controlling the robotic endoscope guidance system was effectively precise, and the adjustable endoscope lens extended the view in the surgical field without the common change of fixed viewing angle endoscopes. Conclusion  The combination of a robotic endoscope guidance system and an advanced endoscope with adjustable viewing angle enables bimanual surgery in transnasal interventions of the paranasal sinuses and the anterior skull base in a human cadaver model. The adjustable lens allows for the abandonment of fixed-angle endoscopes, saving time and resources, without reducing the quality of imaging.

  20. Extraction Strategy for DNA Recovery from Putrefied Teeth and Skull Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwa Kamoun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Forensic samples are commonly exposed to harsh environmental conditions which affect the degree of sample (DNA preservation and subsequent genetic profiling. The aim of this study was to develop a better strategy for DNA extraction from hard putrefied tissues (Teeth and Skull bone. Jaw (teeth and the skull samples were collected from the putrefied corpses and the authors were asked to determine if the two specimens belonged to the same body. The DNA was extracted by phenol-chloroform and DNA IQ™ System Kit. The PowerPlex®  16 and the PowerPlex® Y System Kits were used for autosomal STR and Y-STR genotyping, respectively. DNA profiling found evidence in favor of DNA degradation. Phenol-Chloroform extracted-DNA was re-extracted by using DNA IQ ™ System kit and managed to identify 13 autosomal STR loci and 13 Y-STR markers from doubly extracted DNA. In conclusion, the combination of two DNA extraction methods (phenol-chloroform + DNA IQ™ improved the quality of DNA extracted from putrefied teeth and skull bone.

  1. Congenital depressed skull fracture in the absence of trauma: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tovar-Spinoza ZS

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Zulma S Tovar-Spinoza, Peter D KimDepartment of Neurosurgery, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse NYAbstract: There are limited reports of neonatal depressed skull fractures in the absence of any known trauma or obvious risk factors. Here we describe a male neonate with a significant frontal nontraumatic depressed fracture, his course of treatment, and a literature review. A male neonate was attended for a significant congenital depressed skull fracture in the left frontal bone. He was born full term after an uncomplicated delivery to a multiparous mother who was a human immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV-positive immigrant from sub-Saharan Africa. The pregnancy was otherwise uncomplicated. There was no history of trauma to the mother during the pregnancy or delivery. Ultrasonography had been unremarkable. No other abnormalities were noted. The patient was brought to the operating room at the age of 13 days for elevation of his fracture due to its nonreducible nature. A small linear incision was made just posterior to the coronal suture. The dura mater was stripped and a combination of Penfield and periostial elevators was used to elevate the depressed fracture. Nontraumatic depressed skull fractures are uncommon in neonates. The cause of this entity has not been identified, and many theories about its origin have been proposed. Treatment can be either surgical or conservative.Keywords: neonatal, congenital, depressed fracture, spontaneous, nontraumatic

  2. Profound reversible seasonal changes of individual skull size in a mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro, Javier; Dechmann, Dina K N; LaPoint, Scott; Wikelski, Martin; Hertel, Moritz

    2017-10-23

    Postnatal size changes in most vertebrates are unidirectional and finite once the individual reaches full size [1]. In rare cases, changes of body length may occur in response to harsh environmental conditions. Such reactionary changes are distinct from seasonal, often anticipatory morphological changes, such as the reversible size change of some adult bird brains [2]. A unique pattern of profound anatomical change known as Dehnel's phenomenon has been described for the body, skull and brain size of red-toothed shrews and some mustelids [3-5]. The seasonal 20% decrease and 15% re-growth of the most common proxy, braincase height, were documented at population level from extracted skulls post-mortem. Quantifying intra-individual change had so far been methodologically prohibitive. Here, we followed the intra-individual change in skull size and body mass throughout the full cycle in wild recaptured shrews (Sorex araneus). Using X-ray images we showed that individuals decreased the size of their braincases in anticipation of winter by an average of 15.3%. Braincases then partially regrew in spring by 9.3%. Body mass decreased by 17.6% and then dramatically increased by 83.4% in spring. Thus, we demonstrate that the dramatic changes incurred by Dehnel's phenomenon occur in the individual's bone and other tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Long-term results following cranial hydroxyapatite prosthesis implantation in a large skull defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Lucia; Staffa, Guido; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Salamanna, Francesca; Parrilli, Annapaola; Serchi, Elena; Pressato, Daniele; Arcangeli, Elena; Fini, Milena

    2012-04-01

    A large skull defect may occur after different events such as trauma, tumor resection, and vascular injuries. There is still some doubt about the best material to use for reconstruction. Hydroxyapatite ceramic is one of the materials in use, and its biocompatibility and osteoconductivity are well established. This study evaluated the interaction of a commercial hydroxyapatite custom-made prosthesis implanted in a large skull defect, to assess its osteointegration and its habitability with newly formed bone over time. Ten sheep underwent craniectomy and reconstruction of the skull defect with a porous hydroxyapatite cranial prosthesis. The animals were divided into two groups: animals in group A were euthanized after 6 months and animals in group B were euthanized after 12 months. At the end of the experimental periods, each implant was evaluated macroscopically and radiologically, and analyzed by micro-computed tomography, histology, histomorphometry, and microhardness techniques. During the study, no adverse events occurred, and there was no evidence of inflammation or negative tissue reactions. Histology and histomorphometry showed new bone formation inside the implant in both experimental periods; newly formed bone had increased significantly (p prosthesis showed its osteoconductivity and good biocompatibility. A low rate of fibrous tissue formation and a high rate of bony regeneration were found.

  4. Optical properties of mice skull bone in the 455- to 705-nm range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleh, Soleimanzad; Hirac, Gurden; Frédéric, Pain

    2017-01-01

    Rodent brain is studied to understand the basics of brain function. The activity of cell populations and networks is commonly recorded in vivo with wide-field optical imaging techniques such as intrinsic optical imaging, fluorescence imaging, or laser speckle imaging. These techniques were recently adapted to unrestrained mice carrying transcranial windows. Furthermore, optogenetics studies would benefit from optical stimulation through the skull without implanting an optical fiber, especially for longitudinal studies. In this context, the knowledge of bone optical properties is requested to improve the quantitation of the depth and volume of imaged or stimulated tissues. Here, we provide experimental measurements of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of freshly excised mice skull for wavelengths between 455 and 705 nm. Absorption coefficients from 6 to 8 months mice skull samples range between 1.67±0.28 mm-1 at 455 nm and 0.47±0.07 mm-1 at 705 nm, whereas reduced scattering coefficients were in the range of 2.79±0.26 mm-1 at 455 nm up to 2.29±0.12 mm-1 at 705 nm. In comparison, measurements carried out on 4 to 5 weeks mice showed similar spectral profiles but smaller absorption and reduced scattering coefficients by a factor of about 2 and 1.5, respectively.

  5. Translocated pedicled buccal fat pad: closure of anterior and middle skull base defects after tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherekaev, Vasily A; Golbin, Denis A; Belov, Alexander I

    2012-01-01

    Problem of closure of skull base defects after removal of craniobasal lesions, especially, craniofacial, is one of the most challenging in neurosurgery. Persistent skull base defect produces extremely high risk of cerebrospinal fluid leaks and consecutive infectious complications. Local pedicled grafts are the preferred material for plasty. In this study, the authors present original technique of using a pedicled buccal fat pad (BFP) graft. Anatomy and functions of BFP are discussed in details as well as surgical technique illustrated by 2 case reports. From 2004 to 2010, 188 patients with anterior and middle skull base mass lesions were operated on in Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute (Moscow, Russia) using BFP as plastic material for closure of different defects (male-female ratio=61:127; mean age was 47 years [range, 10-74 years]). In 93.6% of cases, pedicled BFP flap was applied; in 6.4%, free flap was used. Follow-up period ranged between 1 and 7 years. Only 1 case of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak was observed; flap rejection was not registered in the series. High effectiveness and minimal invasiveness are principal advantages of the described technique, which is applied in neurosurgery for the first time. Other benefits include proximity of donor site and defect, simplicity of surgical technique, minimal postoperative discomfort, and very low risk of benign complications.

  6. [Skull and mandible. On Joseph Beuys' "ancient sled." Medical art history observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, H

    1999-05-01

    Few people are aware that Joseph Beuys (1921-1986), one of the most important artists at the end of the twentieth century, studied various aspects of the human skull. Beuys used teeth (especially molars), antlers, and horns as organically differentiated formations of solid substances of the viscerocranium, associating them in a very visual way with the "streaming circulation" principle. In addition, in his early drawings, in particular, Beuys replaced the lower jaw with a sledge. The artist has thus created interesting and strange constructions concerned with the structure of the jaw and the craniovertebral transition. Certain characteristic structural elements of sledges show a remarkable formal analogy to the ramus of mandible. The base of the body of mandible becomes a sliding surface, the iron runners of the sledge. Replacing the lower jaw with a sledge raises questions concerning movement and the effect of energy on the skull and on the earth. The artist's understanding of anatomy goes for beyond than that of normal medicine. It is formed by his thinking, his energy plan, and by his own theory of metamorphosis. With his skull and Urschlitten motif, Beuys makes us aware of the transitory layers of consciousness between life and death. "Head" and "sledge" are early forms of sculptural thinking in the work of Joseph Beuys.

  7. [Neurophysiological identification of the cranial nerves in endoscopic endonasal surgery of skull base tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkarubo, A N; Ogurtsova, A A; Moshchev, D A; Lubnin, A Yu; Andreev, D N; Koval', K V; Chernov, I V

    Intraoperative identification of the cranial nerves is a useful technique in removal of skull base tumors through the endoscopic endonasal approach. Searching through the scientific literature found one pilot study on the use of triggered electromyography (t-EMG) for identification of the VIth nerve in endonasal endoscopic surgery of skull base tumors (D. San-Juan, et al, 2014). The study objective was to prevent iatrogenic injuries to the cranial nerves without reducing the completeness of tumor tissue resection. In 2014, 5 patients were operated on using the endoscopic endonasal approach. Surgeries were performed for large skull base chordomas (2 cases) and trigeminal nerve neurinomas located in the cavernous sinus (3). Intraoperatively, identification of the cranial nerves was performed by triggered electromyography using a bipolar electrode (except 1 case of chordoma where a monopolar electrode was used). Evaluation of the functional activity of the cranial nerves was carried out both preoperatively and postoperatively. Tumor resection was total in 4 out of 5 cases and subtotal (chordoma) in 1 case. Intraoperatively, the IIIrd (2 patients), Vth (2), and VIth (4) cranial nerves were identified. No deterioration in the function of the intraoperatively identified nerves was observed in the postoperative period. In one case, no responses from the VIth nerve on the right (in the cavernous sinus region) were intraoperatively obtained, and deep paresis (up to plegia) of the nerve-innervated muscles developed in the postoperative period. The nerve function was not impaired before surgery. The t-EMG technique is promising and requires further research.

  8. [Streptococcus milleri: An unusual cause of skull extensive osteomyelitis in an immunocompetent patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquenne, C; Dernis, E; Zehrouni, A; Bizon, A; Duquenne, M

    2017-09-01

    Streptococcus milleri (Streptococcus anginosus, intermedius and constellatus) are commensal organisms, which can become pathogenic and cause infection with frequent abscess formation, local or metastatic extension. Osteomyelitis of the skull has been rarely reported in this type of infection. Skull osteomyelitis due to Streptococcus milleri is reported in a 61-year-old immunocompetent man without any medical history, occurring 10 months after a head injury without any wound or complication at initial presentation. A progressive right parieto-occipital headache with worsening and increased acute phase reactants evoked a giant cell arteritis. After few days of corticosteroid therapy (0.5 mg/kg/day), diagnosis of subcutaneous abscess associated to an extensive osteomyelitis of the skull due to Streptococcus milleri was diagnosed. The outcome was favorable after drainage of one liter of pus, irrigation, debridement and antibiotherapy by amoxicillin for 8 weeks. It is necessary to discuss the differential diagnosis of giant cell arteritis particularly when symptoms are unusual. Even a short-term corticosteroid therapy may dramatically exacerbate an undetected infection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  9. Large-scale diversification of skull shape in domestic dogs: disparity and modularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Abby Grace; Klingenberg, Christian Peter

    2010-03-01

    Abstract: The variation among domestic dog breeds offers a unique opportunity to study large-scale diversification by microevolutionary mechanisms. We use geometric morphometrics to quantify the diversity of skull shape in 106 breeds of domestic dog, in three wild canid species, and across the order Carnivora. The amount of shape variation among domestic dogs far exceeds that in wild species, and it is comparable to the disparity throughout the Carnivora. The greatest shape distances between dog breeds clearly surpass the maximum divergence between species in the Carnivora. Moreover, domestic dogs occupy a range of novel shapes outside the domain of wild carnivorans. The disparity among companion dogs substantially exceeds that of other classes of breeds, suggesting that relaxed functional demands facilitated diversification. Much of the diversity of dog skull shapes stems from variation between short and elongate skulls and from modularity of the face versus that of the neurocranium. These patterns of integration and modularity apply to variation among individuals and breeds, but they also apply to fluctuating asymmetry, indicating they have a shared developmental basis. These patterns of variation are also found for the wolf and across the Carnivora, suggesting that they existed before the domestication of dogs and are not a result of selective breeding.

  10. A New Snake Skull from the Paleocene of Bolivia Sheds Light on the Evolution of Macrostomatans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanferla, Agustín; Zaher, Hussam; Novas, Fernando E.; de Muizon, Christian; Céspedes, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Macrostomatan snakes, one of the most diverse extant clades of squamates, display an impressive arsenal of cranial features to consume a vast array of preys. In the absence of indisputable fossil representatives of this clade with well-preserved skulls, the mode and timing of these extraordinary morphological novelties remain obscure. Here, we report the discovery of Kataria anisodonta n. gen. n. sp., a macrostomatan snake recovered in the Early Palaeocene locality of Tiupampa, Bolivia. The holotype consists of a partial, minute skull that exhibits a combination of booid and caenophidian characters, being the presence of an anisodont dentition and diastema in the maxilla the most distinctive trait. Phylogenetic analysis places Kataria basal to the Caenophidia+Tropidophiidae, and represents along with bolyeriids a distinctive clade of derived macrostomatans. The discovery of Kataria highlights the morphological diversity in the maxilla among derived macrostomatans, demonstrating the relevance of maxillary transformations in the evolution of this clade. Kataria represents the oldest macrostomatan skull recovered, revealing that the diversification of macrostomatans was well under way in early Tertiary times. This record also reinforces the importance of Gondwanan territories in the history of snakes, not only in the origin of the entire group but also in the evolution of ingroup clades. PMID:23469206

  11. A morphological and morphometric study of jugular foramen in dry skulls with its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandni Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Jugular foramen of human skull is one of the most interesting foramina. It is a complex bony canal, numerous vital structures, including nerves and vessels are transmitted through it. Most of the intracranial and extra cranial lesions of posterior cranial fossa might affect the structures in jugular foramen in addition to intrinsic abnormalities. As the neurosurgeons have become courageous in approaching this area, so there is a need to become familiar with this area. Hence, the present study was done to examine the anatomy of jugular foramen, including its morphological features and dimensions. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 50 dried skulls. 100 jugular foramina were studied on both right and left side of skulls. The length, width of jugular foramen and width and depth of jugular fossa were measured using vernier calipers. Presence of dome, complete and incomplete septation was also looked for. Results: The mean right and left anteroposterior diameter, latero-medial diameter, area, jugular fossa width, depth in our study was 11.22, 16.52, 187.34, 6.83, 11.58 mm and 9.52, 16.02, 153.2, 5.69, 11.13 mm. Dome was present in jugular foramen in 74% on the right side and 58% on the left side. Complete septation in jugular foramen is seen in 44% on the right side and 42% on the left side. Conclusion: This study will help the neurosurgeons while doing surgery in this region.

  12. Venous Sinus Stenting in the Management of Patients with Intracranial Hypertension Manifesting with Skull Base Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rajiv R; Solomon, David; Moghekar, Abhay; Goodwin, C Rory; Stewart, C Matthew; Ishii, Masaru; Gailloud, Philippe; Gallia, Gary L

    2017-10-01

    A subset of patients with skull base cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are found to have elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). In these patients, elevated ICP is thought to contribute to both the pathophysiology of the leak and postoperative leak recurrences. Current strategies for postoperative ICP control include medical therapy and shunting procedures. The aim of this study is to report the use of venous sinus stenting (VSS) in the management of patients with skull base CSF leaks caused by elevated ICP. We performed a retrospective investigation of 2 patients who underwent surgical repair of skull base CSF leaks and were found to have elevated ICP associated with venous sinus stenosis and subsequently treated with VSS. Two patients underwent successful surgical repair of skull base CSF leaks with perioperative ICP monitoring via temporary lumbar catheters. Postoperative CSF pressure measurement demonstrated elevated ICP. Both patients were found to have venous sinus stenosis on further workup and subsequently underwent VSS for treatment of intracranial hypertension. Both patients had improvement in their symptoms with no evidence of recurrent CSF leak at follow-up. Patients with skull base CSF leaks of unknown etiology should undergo CSF pressure monitoring postoperatively and, if found to be elevated, be treated for intracranial hypertension. In patients unresponsive to, or intolerant of, medical therapy, VSS can provide an alternative option to medical and surgical shunting procedures for treatment of intracranial hypertension in patients with skull base CSF leaks and venous sinus stenosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Three-dimensional computer simulations of feeding behaviour in red and giant pandas relate skull biomechanics with dietary niche partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueirido, Borja; Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Serrano-Alarcón, Francisco J; Martín-Serra, Alberto; Pastor, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    The red (Ailurus fulgens) and giant (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) pandas are mammalian carnivores convergently adapted to a bamboo feeding diet. However, whereas Ailurus forages almost entirely on younger leaves, fruits and tender trunks, Ailuropoda relies more on trunks and stems. Such difference in foraging mode is considered a strategy for resource partitioning where they are sympatric. Here, we use finite-element analysis to test for mechanical differences and similarities in skull performance between Ailurus and Ailuropoda related to diet. Feeding simulations suggest that the two panda species have similar ranges of mechanical efficiency and strain energy profiles across the dentition, reflecting their durophagous diet. However, the stress distributions and peaks in the skulls of Ailurus and Ailuropoda are remarkably different for biting at all tooth locations. Although the skull of Ailuropoda is capable of resisting higher stresses than the skull of Ailurus, the latter is able to distribute stresses more evenly throughout the skull. These differences in skull biomechanics reflect their distinct bamboo feeding preferences. Ailurus uses repetitive chewing in an extended mastication to feed on soft leaves, and Ailuropoda exhibits shorter and more discrete periods of chomp-and-swallow feeding to break down hard bamboo trunks.

  14. Anatomical network analysis shows decoupling of modular lability and complexity in the evolution of the primate skull.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja Esteve-Altava

    Full Text Available Modularity and complexity go hand in hand in the evolution of the skull of primates. Because analyses of these two parameters often use different approaches, we do not know yet how modularity evolves within, or as a consequence of, an also-evolving complex organization. Here we use a novel network theory-based approach (Anatomical Network Analysis to assess how the organization of skull bones constrains the co-evolution of modularity and complexity among primates. We used the pattern of bone contacts modeled as networks to identify connectivity modules and quantify morphological complexity. We analyzed whether modularity and complexity evolved coordinately in the skull of primates. Specifically, we tested Herbert Simon's general theory of near-decomposability, which states that modularity promotes the evolution of complexity. We found that the skulls of extant primates divide into one conserved cranial module and up to three labile facial modules, whose composition varies among primates. Despite changes in modularity, statistical analyses reject a positive feedback between modularity and complexity. Our results suggest a decoupling of complexity and modularity that translates to varying levels of constraint on the morphological evolvability of the primate skull. This study has methodological and conceptual implications for grasping the constraints that underlie the developmental and functional integration of the skull of humans and other primates.

  15. Anatomical network analysis shows decoupling of modular lability and complexity in the evolution of the primate skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Altava, Borja; Boughner, Julia C; Diogo, Rui; Villmoare, Brian A; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Modularity and complexity go hand in hand in the evolution of the skull of primates. Because analyses of these two parameters often use different approaches, we do not know yet how modularity evolves within, or as a consequence of, an also-evolving complex organization. Here we use a novel network theory-based approach (Anatomical Network Analysis) to assess how the organization of skull bones constrains the co-evolution of modularity and complexity among primates. We used the pattern of bone contacts modeled as networks to identify connectivity modules and quantify morphological complexity. We analyzed whether modularity and complexity evolved coordinately in the skull of primates. Specifically, we tested Herbert Simon's general theory of near-decomposability, which states that modularity promotes the evolution of complexity. We found that the skulls of extant primates divide into one conserved cranial module and up to three labile facial modules, whose composition varies among primates. Despite changes in modularity, statistical analyses reject a positive feedback between modularity and complexity. Our results suggest a decoupling of complexity and modularity that translates to varying levels of constraint on the morphological evolvability of the primate skull. This study has methodological and conceptual implications for grasping the constraints that underlie the developmental and functional integration of the skull of humans and other primates.

  16. Beyond the functional matrix hypothesis: a network null model of human skull growth for the formation of bone articulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Altava, Borja; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2014-09-01

    Craniofacial sutures and synchondroses form the boundaries among bones in the human skull, providing functional, developmental and evolutionary information. Bone articulations in the skull arise due to interactions between genetic regulatory mechanisms and epigenetic factors such as functional matrices (soft tissues and cranial cavities), which mediate bone growth. These matrices are largely acknowledged for their influence on shaping the bones of the skull; however, it is not fully understood to what extent functional matrices mediate the formation of bone articulations. Aiming to identify whether or not functional matrices are key developmental factors guiding the formation of bone articulations, we have built a network null model of the skull that simulates unconstrained bone growth. This null model predicts bone articulations that arise due to a process of bone growth that is uniform in rate, direction and timing. By comparing predicted articulations with the actual bone articulations of the human skull, we have identified which boundaries specifically need the presence of functional matrices for their formation. We show that functional matrices are necessary to connect facial bones, whereas an unconstrained bone growth is sufficient to connect non-facial bones. This finding challenges the role of the brain in the formation of boundaries between bones in the braincase without neglecting its effect on skull shape. Ultimately, our null model suggests where to look for modified developmental mechanisms promoting changes in bone growth patterns that could affect the development and evolution of the head skeleton. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  17. MSX1 gene in the etiology orofacial deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Paradowska-Stolarz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The muscle segment homeobox (MSX1 gene plays a crucial role in epithelial-mesenchymal tissue interactions in craniofacial development. It plays a regulative role in cellular proliferation, differentiation and cell death. The human MSX1 domain was also found in cow (Bt 302906, mouse (Mm 123311, rat (Rn13592001, chicken (Gg 170873 and clawed toad (XI 547690. Cleft lip and palate is the most common anomaly of the facial part of the skull. The etiology is not fully understood, but it is believed that the key role is played by the genetic factor activated by environmental factors. Among the candidate genes whose mutations could lead to formation of the cleft, the MSX1 homeobox gene is mentioned. Mutations in the gene MSX1 can lead to isolated cleft deformities, but also cause other dismorphic changes. Among the most frequently mentioned is loss of permanent tooth buds (mostly of less than 4 teeth – hypodontia, including second premolars. Mutations of MSX1 are observed in the Pierre- Robin sequence, which may be one of the features of congenital defects or is observed as an isolated defect. Mutation of the gene can lead to the occurrence of a rare congenital defect Wiktop (dental-nail syndrome. Deletion of a fragment MSX1 (4p16.3 located in the WHS critical region, may be a cause of some symptoms of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

  18. Dog behavior co-varies with height, bodyweight and skull shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D McGreevy

    Full Text Available Dogs offer unique opportunities to study correlations between morphology and behavior because skull shapes and body shape are so diverse among breeds. Several studies have shown relationships between canine cephalic index (CI: the ratio of skull width to skull length and neural architecture. Data on the CI of adult, show-quality dogs (six males and six females were sourced in Australia along with existing data on the breeds' height, bodyweight and related to data on 36 behavioral traits of companion dogs (n = 8,301 of various common breeds (n = 49 collected internationally using the Canine Behavioral Assessment and Research Questionnaire (C-BARQ. Stepwise backward elimination regressions revealed that, across the breeds, 33 behavioral traits all but one of which are undesirable in companion animals correlated with either height alone (n = 14, bodyweight alone (n = 5, CI alone (n = 3, bodyweight-and-skull shape combined (n = 2, height-and-skull shape combined (n = 3 or height-and-bodyweight combined (n = 6. For example, breed average height showed strongly significant inverse relationships (p<0.001 with mounting persons or objects, touch sensitivity, urination when left alone, dog-directed fear, separation-related problems, non-social fear, defecation when left alone, owner-directed aggression, begging for food, urine marking and attachment/attention-seeking, while bodyweight showed strongly significant inverse relationships (p<0.001 with excitability and being reported as hyperactive. Apart from trainability, all regression coefficients with height were negative indicating that, across the breeds, behavior becomes more problematic as height decreases. Allogrooming increased strongly (p<0.001 with CI and inversely with height. CI alone showed a strong significant positive relationship with self-grooming (p<0.001 but a negative relationship with chasing (p = 0.020. The current study demonstrates how aspects of CI (and therefore brain shape

  19. An uncovered risk factor of sonothrombolysis: Substantial fluctuation of ultrasound transmittance through the human skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuojun; Komatsu, Teppei; Mitsumura, Hidetaka; Nakata, Norio; Ogawa, Takeki; Iguchi, Yasuyuki; Yokoyama, Masayuki

    2017-05-01

    Sonothrombolysis is one of the most feasible methods for enhancing clot lysis with a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in cases of acute ischemic strokes. For safe and efficient clinical practices of sonothrombolysis, accurate estimation of ultrasound transmittance through the human skull is critical. Previously, we reported substantial and periodic fluctuation of ultrasound transmittance through a bone-phantom plate following changes to ultrasound frequency, the thickness of the bone-phantom plate, and the distance between a transducer and the bone-phantom plate. In the present study, we clarify the transmittance behavior of medium-frequency ultrasound (from 400kHz to 600kHz) through the human skull, and examine reduction of the transmittance fluctuation. For the study, we measured transmittance of sinusoidal ultrasound waves at 400kHz, 500kHz, and 600kHz at 13 temple spots on 3 human skulls by changing the distance between a transducer and the skull bone, and found substantial and periodic fluctuation in the transmittance behaviors for these sinusoidal voltage excitations. Degrees of the fluctuation varied depending on the measurement spots. A fluctuation ratio between the maximum transmittance and the minimum transmittance reached 3 in some spots. This large transmittance fluctuation is considered to be a risk factor for sonothrombolysis therapies. We examined a modulated ultrasound wave to reduce the fluctuation, and succeeded in obtaining considerable reduction. The average fluctuation ratios for 400-kHz, 500-kHz, and 600-kHz waves were 2.38, 2.38, and 2.07, respectively. We successfully reduced the ratio to 1.72 by using a periodic selection of random frequency (PSRF)-type of modulation wave. The thus obtained results indicate that attention to the fluctuation in ultrasound transmittance through the skull is necessary for safe and effective sonothrombolysis therapies, and that modulated ultrasound waves constitute a powerful method for reducing

  20. [Biomechanics analysis of the impact of maxillofacial injury on skull base damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P; Yang, Z Y; Liu, Y; Li, Y; Tan, Y H

    2016-08-01

    To analyze the impact of maxillofacial injury on skull base. A three-dimensional(3D)finite-element model of cranio-maxillofacial bone was established by CT scan data. A lead cylinder in base diameter of 3 cm was designed as an impactor. There regions(upper right maxilla, left infraorbital margin and left zygomatic body)subjected to an impact at the speed of 8.6 m/s(about 30 km/h)was simulated. Thirteen landmarks at the skull base were selected. The values of stress at the end of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 ms were obtained, and the results were analyzed. The dynamic process of the fracture of the jaw and the stress distribution and conduction of the skull base were successfully simulated in three parts of the face. When the impact was on the right maxillary bone region, the stress values of the three points(medial foramen rotundum, medial foramen rotundum, anterior clivus reached the peak at each time point, 26.2, 22.4, 21.5 MPa(t=0.5 ms)and 70.0, 55.0, 45.0 MPa(t=1.0 ms)and 38.0, 26.5, 39.5 MPa(t=1.5 ms)and 26.0, 19.0, 23.0 MPa(t=2.0 ms), respectively. When the impact was on the left margo infraorbitalis orbitaeta region, the stress values of the two points(medial left foramen rotundum, posterior clivus)reached the peak at each time point, 8.8, 16.0 MPa(t=0.5 ms)and 10.0, 18.0 MPa(t=1.0 ms)and 5.5, 6.0 MPa(t=1.5 ms)and 11.5, 12.5 MPa(t=2.0 ms), respectively. When the impact was on the body of left zygomatic bone, the stress values of posterior clivus were 45.0 MPa(t=0.5 ms), 40.0 MPa(t=1.0 ms), 12.0 MPa(t=1.5 ms), 42.5 MPa(t= 2.0 ms), respectively. According to the difference of stress distribution and conduction of maxillofacial and skull base bone, the speed and the path of force transfer to the skull base were different. Finite-element dynamic simulation can be used for the biomechanics research on maxillofacial trauma.

  1. Interactive Character Deformation Using Simplified Elastic Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the results of our research into realistic skin and model deformation methods aimed at the field of character deformation and animation. The main contributions lie in the properties of our deformation scheme. Our approach preserves the volume of the deformed object while

  2. Bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Arun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral cleft lip nose deformity is a multi-factorial and complex deformity which tends to aggravate with growth of the child, if not attended surgically. The goals of primary bilateral cleft lip nose surgery are, closure of the nasal floor and sill, lengthening of the columella, repositioning of the alar base, achieving nasal tip projection, repositioning of the lower lateral cartilages, and reorienting the nares from horizontal to oblique position. The multiplicity of procedures in the literature for correction of this deformity alludes to the fact that no single procedure is entirely effective. The timing for surgical intervention and its extent varies considerably. Early surgery on cartilage may adversely affect growth and development; at the same time, allowing the cartilage to grow in an abnormal position and contributing to aggravation of deformity. Some surgeons advocate correction of deformity at an early age. However, others like the cartilages to grow and mature before going in for surgery. With peer pressure also becoming an important consideration during the teens, the current trend is towards early intervention. There is no unanimity in the extent of nasal dissection to be done at the time of primary lip repair. While many perform limited nasal dissection for the fear of growth retardation, others opt for full cartilage correction at the time of primary surgery itself. The value of naso-alveolar moulding (NAM too is not universally accepted and has now more opponents than proponents. Also most centres in the developing world have neither the personnel nor the facilities for the same. The secondary cleft nasal deformity is variable and is affected by the extent of the original abnormality, any prior surgeries performed and alteration due to nasal growth. This article reviews the currently popular methods for correction of nasal deformity associated with bilateral cleft lip, it′s management both at the time of cleft lip repair

  3. Static response of deformable microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Sidhore, Tanmay C.

    2017-11-01

    Microfluidic channels manufactured from PDMS are a key component of lab-on-a-chip devices. Experimentally, rectangular microchannels are found to deform into a non-rectangular cross-section due to fluid-structure interactions. Deformation affects the flow profile, which results in a nonlinear relationship between the volumetric flow rate and the pressure drop. We develop a framework, within the lubrication approximation (l >> w >> h), to self-consistently derive flow rate-pressure drop relations. Emphasis is placed on handling different types of elastic response: from pure plate-bending, to half-space deformation, to membrane stretching. The ``simplest'' model (Stokes flow in a 3D rectangular channel capped with a linearly elastic Kirchhoff-Love plate) agrees well with recent experiments. We also simulate the static response of such microfluidic channels under laminar flow conditions using ANSYSWorkbench. Simulations are calibrated using experimental flow rate-pressure drop data from the literature. The simulations provide highly resolved deformation profiles, which are difficult to measure experimentally. By comparing simulations, experiments and our theoretical models, we show good agreement in many flow/deformation regimes, without any fitting parameters.

  4. Optimised low-dose multidetector CT protocol for children with cranial deformity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, Jose Luis [Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Department of Radiology, Vigo, Pontevedra (Spain); Pombar, Miguel Angel [Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago, Department of Radiophysics, Santiago de Compostela, La Coruna (Spain); Pumar, Jose Manuel [Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago, Department of Radiology, Santiago de Compostela, La Coruna (Spain); Campo, Victor Miguel del [Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Department of Public Health, Vigo, Pontevedra (Spain)

    2013-08-15

    To present an optimised low-dose multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) protocol for the study of children with cranial deformity. Ninety-one consecutive MDCT studies were performed in 80 children. Studies were performed with either our standard head CT protocol (group 1, n = 20) or a low-dose cranial deformity protocol (groups 2 and 3). Group 2 (n = 38), initial, and group 3 (n = 33), final and more optimised. All studies were performed in the same 64-MDCT equipment. Cranial deformity protocol was gradationally optimised decreasing kVp, limiting mA range, using automatic exposure control (AEC) and increasing the noise index (NI). Image quality was assessed. Dose indicators such us CT dose index volume (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP) and effective dose (E) were used. The optimised low-dose protocol reached the following values: 80 kVp, mA range: 50-150 and NI = 23. We achieved a maximum dose reduction of 10-22 times in the 1- to 12-month-old cranium in regard to the 2004 European guidelines for MDCT. A low-dose MDCT protocol that may be used as the first diagnostic imaging option in clinically selected patients with skull abnormalities. (orig.)

  5. Repair of large frontal temporal parietal skull defect with digitally reconstructed titanium mesh: a report of 20 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang-ge CHENG

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the clinical effect and surgical technique of the repair of large defect involving frontal, temporal, and parietal regions using digitally reconstructed titanium mesh. Methods Twenty patients with large frontal, temporal, and parietal skull defect hospitalized in Air Force General Hospital from November 2006 to May 2012 were involved in this study. In these 20 patients, there were 13 males and 7 females, aged 18-58 years (mean 39 years, and the defect size measured from 7.0cm×9.0cm to 11.5cm×14.0cm (mean 8.5cm×12.0cm. Spiral CT head scan and digital three-dimensional reconstruction of skull were performed in all the patients. The shape and geometric size of skull defect was traced based on the symmetry principle, and then the data were transferred into digital precision lathe to reconstruct a titanium mesh slightly larger (1.0-1.5cm than the skull defect, and the finally the prosthesis was perfected after pruning the border. Cranioplasty was performed 6-12 months after craniotomy using the digitally reconstructed titanium mesh. Results The digitally reconstructed titanium mesh was used in 20 patients with large frontal, temporal, parietal skull defect. The surgical technique was relatively simple, and the surgical duration was shorter than before. The titanium mesh fit to the defect of skull accurately with satisfactory molding effect, good appearance and symmetrical in shape. No related complication was found in all the patients. Conclusion Repair of large frontal, temporal, parietal skull defect with digitally reconstructed titanium mesh is more advantageous than traditional manual reconstruction, and it can improve the life quality of patients.

  6. FGF/FGFR signaling coordinates skull development by modulating magnitude of morphological integration: evidence from Apert syndrome mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus Martínez-Abadías

    Full Text Available The fibroblast growth factor and receptor system (FGF/FGFR mediates cell communication and pattern formation in many tissue types (e.g., osseous, nervous, vascular. In those craniosynostosis syndromes caused by FGFR1-3 mutations, alteration of signaling in the FGF/FGFR system leads to dysmorphology of the skull, brain and limbs, among other organs. Since this molecular pathway is widely expressed throughout head development, we explore whether and how two specific mutations on Fgfr2 causing Apert syndrome in humans affect the pattern and level of integration between the facial skeleton and the neurocranium using inbred Apert syndrome mouse models Fgfr2(+/S252W and Fgfr2(+/P253R and their non-mutant littermates at P0. Skull morphological integration (MI, which can reflect developmental interactions among traits by measuring the intensity of statistical associations among them, was assessed using data from microCT images of the skull of Apert syndrome mouse models and 3D geometric morphometric methods. Our results show that mutant Apert syndrome mice share the general pattern of MI with their non-mutant littermates, but the magnitude of integration between and within the facial skeleton and the neurocranium is increased, especially in Fgfr2(+/S252W mice. This indicates that although Fgfr2 mutations do not disrupt skull MI, FGF/FGFR signaling is a covariance-generating process in skull development that acts as a global factor modulating the intensity of MI. As this pathway evolved early in vertebrate evolution, it may have played a significant role in establishing the patterns of skull MI and coordinating proper skull development.

  7. Finite Deformation of Magnetoelastic Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barham, Matthew Ian [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-05-31

    A nonlinear two-dimensional theory is developed for thin magnetoelastic lms capable of large deformations. This is derived directly from three-dimensional theory. Signi cant simpli cations emerge in the descent from three dimensions to two, permitting the self eld generated by the body to be computed a posteriori. The model is specialized to isotropic elastomers with two material models. First weak magnetization is investigated leading to a free energy where magnetization and deformation are un-coupled. The second closely couples the magnetization and deformation. Numerical solutions are obtained to equilibrium boundary-value problems in which the membrane is subjected to lateral pressure and an applied magnetic eld. An instability is inferred and investigated for the weak magnetization material model.

  8. In situ deformations in the immature brain during rapid rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nicole G; Natesh, Rahul; Szczesny, Spencer E; Ryall, Karen; Eucker, Stephanie A; Coats, Brittany; Margulies, Susan S

    2010-04-01

    Head trauma is the leading cause of death and debilitating injury in children. Computational models are important tools used to understand head injury mechanisms but they must be validated with experimental data. In this communication we present in situ measurements of brain deformation during rapid, nonimpact head rotation in juvenile pigs of different ages. These data will be used to validate computational models identifying age-dependent thresholds of axonal injury. Fresh 5 days (n=3) and 4 weeks (n=2) old piglet heads were transected horizontally and secured in a container. The cut surface of each brain was marked and covered with a transparent, lubricated plate that allowed the brain to move freely in the plane of rotation. For each brain, a rapid (20-28 ms) 65 deg rotation was applied sequentially at 50 rad/s, 75 rad/s, and 75 rad/s. Each rotation was digitally captured at 2500 frames/s (480x320 pixels) and mark locations were tracked and used to compute strain using an in-house program in MATLAB. Peak values of principal strain (E(peak)) were significantly larger during deceleration than during acceleration of the head rotation (p<0.05), and doubled with a 50% increase in velocity. E(peak) was also significantly higher during the second 75 rad/s rotation than during the first 75 rad/s rotation (p<0.0001), suggesting structural alteration at 75 rad/s and the possibility that similar changes may have occurred at 50 rad/s. Analyzing only lower velocity (50 rad/s) rotations, E(peak) significantly increased with age (16.5% versus 12.4%, p<0.003), which was likely due to the larger brain mass and smaller viscoelastic modulus of the 4 weeks old pig brain compared with those of the 5 days old. Strain measurement error for the overall methodology was estimated to be 1%. Brain tissue strain during rapid, nonimpact head rotation in the juvenile pig varies significantly with age. The empirical data presented will be used to validate computational model predictions of

  9. Computing layouts with deformable templates

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Chihan

    2014-07-27

    In this paper, we tackle the problem of tiling a domain with a set of deformable templates. A valid solution to this problem completely covers the domain with templates such that the templates do not overlap. We generalize existing specialized solutions and formulate a general layout problem by modeling important constraints and admissible template deformations. Our main idea is to break the layout algorithm into two steps: a discrete step to lay out the approximate template positions and a continuous step to refine the template shapes. Our approach is suitable for a large class of applications, including floorplans, urban layouts, and arts and design. Copyright © ACM.

  10. Cavity coalescence in superplastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowell, M.J.; Livesey, D.W.; Ridley, N.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the probability distribution function of particles randomly dispersed in a solid has been applied to cavitation during superplastic deformation and a method of predicting cavity coalescence developed. Cavity size distribution data were obtained from two microduplex nickel-silver alloys deformed superplastically to various extents at elevated temperature, and compared to theoretical predictions. Excellent agreement occurred for small void sizes but the model underestimated the number of voids in the largest size groups. It is argued that the discrepancy results from a combination of effects due to non-random cavity distributions and to enhanced growth rates and incomplete spheroidization of the largest cavities.

  11. Polycrystal deformation and single crystal deformation: Dislocation structure and flow stress in copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, X.; Borrego, A.; Pantleon, W.

    2001-01-01

    The relation between the polycrystal deformation and single crystal deformation has been studied for pure polycrystalline copper deformed in tension. The dislocation microstructure has been analyzed for grains of different orientation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and three types...

  12. Space-based monitoring of ground deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobakht Ersi, Fereydoun; Safari, Abdolreza; Gamse, Sonja

    2016-07-01

    Ground deformation monitoring is valuable to understanding of the behaviour of natural phenomena. Space-Based measurement systems such as Global Positioning System are useful tools for continuous monitoring of ground deformation. Ground deformation analysis based on space geodetic techniques have provided a new, more accurate, and reliable source of information for geodetic positioning which is used to detect deformations of the Ground surface. This type of studies using displacement fields derived from repeated measurments of space-based geodetic networks indicates how crucial role the space geodetic methods play in geodynamics. The main scope of this contribution is to monitor of ground deformation by obtained measurements from GPS sites. We present ground deformation analysis in three steps: a global congruency test on daily coordinates of permanent GPS stations to specify in which epochs deformations occur, the localization of the deformed GPS sites and the determination of deformations.

  13. Deformations of the Almheiri-Polchinski model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyono, Hideki; Okumura, Suguru; Yoshida, Kentaroh [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2017-03-31

    We study deformations of the Almheiri-Polchinski (AP) model by employing the Yang-Baxter deformation technique. The general deformed AdS{sub 2} metric becomes a solution of a deformed AP model. In particular, the dilaton potential is deformed from a simple quadratic form to a hyperbolic function-type potential similarly to integrable deformations. A specific solution is a deformed black hole solution. Because the deformation makes the spacetime structure around the boundary change drastically and a new naked singularity appears, the holographic interpretation is far from trivial. The Hawking temperature is the same as the undeformed case but the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy is modified due to the deformation. This entropy can also be reproduced by evaluating the renormalized stress tensor with an appropriate counter-term on the regularized screen close to the singularity.

  14. The radiological and histopathological differential diagnosis of chordoid neoplasms in skull base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Bin-cai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Chordoid neoplasms refer to tumors appearing to have histological features of embryonic notochord, which is characterized by cords and lobules of neoplastic cells arranged within myxoid matrix. Because of radiological and histological similarities with myxoid matrix and overlapping immunohistochemical profile, chordoma, chordoid meningioma, chordoid glioma, and rare extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma enter in the radiological and histological differential diagnosis at the site of skull base. However, there is always a great challenge for histopathologists to make an accurate diagnosis when encountering a chordoid neoplasm within or near the central nervous system. The aim of this study is to investigate and summarize the radiological, histological features and immunohistochemical profiles of chordoid neoplasms in skull base, and to find a judicious panel of immunostains to unquestionably help in diagnostically challenging cases. Methods A total of 23 cases of chordoid neoplasms in skull base, including 10 chordomas, 5 chordoid meningiomas, 3 chordoid gliomas and 5 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, were collected from the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University and Guangdong Tongjiang Hospital. MRI examination was performed on the patients before surgical treatment. Microscopical examination and immunohistochemical staining study using vimentin (Vim, pan-cytokeratin (PCK, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, S?100 protein (S-100, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, D2-40, Galectin-3, CD3, CD20, Ki-67 were performed on the samples of cases. The clinicopathological data of the patients was also analyzed retrospectively. Results Most of chordomas were localized in the clivus with heterogeneous hyperintensity on T2WI scanning. The breakage of clivus was observed in most cases. Histologically, the tumor cells of chordoma exhibited bland nuclear features and some contained abundant vacuolated cytoplasm (the so

  15. Osteomielitis tuberculosa de la bóveda craneal Tubercular osteomielitis of the skull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isael Olazábal Armas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la osteomielitis tuberculosa del cráneo es una entidad rara y sólo ocurre en el 0,01 % de los pacientes con infección por Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, aunque esta frecuencia de presentación se incrementa notablemente en las personas portadoras de algún grado de inmunodeficiencia. El cuadro clínico suele ser de inicio insidioso y caracterizarse por la presencia de dolor local de intensidad progresiva. Objetivo: presentar un caso clínico poco frecuente con osteomielitis crónica de la bóveda craneal, secundaria a infección por Mycobacterium Tuberculoso. Presentación del caso: paciente de 5 años de edad con historia de dolor y aumento de volumen de la región interparietal del cráneo. Al examen físico se constató aumento de volumen con fluctuación de dicha región y defecto óseo irregular. Se realizó Rayos x de cráneo donde se pudo observar una lesión osteolítica de la bóveda craneal. Se practicó exéresis del hueso. En la recuperación post operatoria, se utilizaron durante las 2 primeras semanas la vancomicina y el ceftriaxone. La evolución clínica no fue satisfactoria, hasta que se obtuvo un cultivo positivo de Mycobacterium Tuberculoso, momento en que se comenzó tratamiento específico antituberculoso. El paciente evolucionó favorablemente después de cinco semanas del diagnóstico inicial. Conclusiones: la osteomielitis tuberculosa de la bóveda craneal aunque es poco frecuente puede verse, sobre todo, en países con una alta prevalencia de la enfermedad. Su diagnóstico y tratamiento oportuno pueden evitar complicaciones intracraneales.Background: tubercular osteomielitis of the skull is a rare entity that only occurs in the 0.01 % of patients infected by Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, although this frequency of presentation increases significantly in people who are carriers of some degree of immunodeficiency. The clinical picture is usually insidious at the onset of the disease and is characterized by the

  16. Angular Deformities oi" the lines in tjlliltlren

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    done to detect wrist bulges, chest wall costo- chondral swelling (rickety-rosary), Harrison's sulcus and bossing of the skull. Radiographs of the knees and the wrists if there were bulges were requested in additionto a full blood count, haemoglobin genotype to exclude sickle cell disease and blood chemistry for serum calcium ...

  17. Patterns and prevalence of violence-related skull trauma in medieval London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowka, Kathryn

    2017-11-01

    This study aims to identify the patterns and prevalence of violence-related skull trauma (including the cranium and mandible) among a large sample of skeletons from medieval London (1050-1550 AD). In total, data from 399 skulls, representing six different sites from across medieval London, were analyzed for evidence of trauma and assessed for the likelihood that it was caused by violence. The sites include the three parish cemeteries of St Nicholas Shambles (GPO75), St Lawrence Jewry (GYE92), and St Benet Sherehog (ONE94); the two monastic houses of London Blackfriars (PIC87) and St Mary Graces (MIN86); and the early inmate cemetery from the medieval hospital of St Mary Spital (NRT85). The overall findings suggest that violence affected all aspects of medieval London society, but how that violence was characterized largely depended on sex and burial location. Specifically, males from the lay cemeteries appear to have been the demographic most affected by violence-related skull injuries, particularly blunt force trauma to the cranial vault. Using both archaeological and historical evidence, the results suggest that violence in medieval London may have been more prevalent than in other parts of medieval England, particularly rural environments, but similar to other parts of medieval Europe. However, more studies focusing on medieval trauma, and violence specifically, need to be carried out to further strengthen these results. In particular, males from the lay cemeteries were disproportionately affected by violence-related trauma, especially blunt force trauma. It perhaps indicates a means of informal conflict resolution as those of lower status did not always have the newly established medieval legal system available to them. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Individual prefabricated titanium implants and titanium mesh in skull base reconstructive surgery. A report of cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, J; Ridder, G J; Spetzger, U; Teszler, C B; Fradis, M; Maier, W

    2004-05-01

    Titanium implants can be shaped by traditional hand forming, press shaping, modular construction by welding, construction on full-size models shaped from CT coordinates and, most recently, by computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) that consist in the direct prefabrication of individual implants by milling them out of a solid block of titanium. The aim of our study was to present a set of preliminary cases of an ongoing program of reconstructive procedures of the skull base using titanium implants. The subjects underwent ablative procedures of the skull base with reconstruction either by titanium mesh or individual prefabricated CAD/CAM implants. Six patients have been operated on successfully since 2000: two received prefabricated CAD/CAM titanium plates and four others underwent reconstruction with titanium mesh. The stability of CAD/CAM plates is superior to that of mesh, thus it is more useful in reconstructing large lesions of the frontal skull base and the temporal and occipital bones. Titanium mesh was successfully used for defects smaller than 100 cm(2) or where selected viscerocranial defects are complicated in design and less reproducible by CAD/CAM. The intraoperative design, shaping and adjustment characteristic of titanium mesh can be dispensed with when CAD/CAM implants are used. The 3-D data set used in the CAD/CAM process also operates in the navigated simulation and planning of the ablation contours, the latter being of great assistance in establishing the optimal future defect. As a disadvantage, CAD/CAM technology is more expensive than titanium mesh, and the process is time-consuming as it is carried out in advance of surgery.

  19. Verifying three-dimensional skull model reconstruction using cranial index of symmetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woon-Man Kung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Difficulty exists in scalp adaptation for cranioplasty with customized computer-assisted design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM implant in situations of excessive wound tension and sub-cranioplasty dead space. To solve this clinical problem, the CAD/CAM technique should include algorithms to reconstruct a depressed contour to cover the skull defect. Satisfactory CAM-derived alloplastic implants are based on highly accurate three-dimensional (3-D CAD modeling. Thus, it is quite important to establish a symmetrically regular CAD/CAM reconstruction prior to depressing the contour. The purpose of this study is to verify the aesthetic outcomes of CAD models with regular contours using cranial index of symmetry (CIS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From January 2011 to June 2012, decompressive craniectomy (DC was performed for 15 consecutive patients in our institute. 3-D CAD models of skull defects were reconstructed using commercial software. These models were checked in terms of symmetry by CIS scores. RESULTS: CIS scores of CAD reconstructions were 99.24±0.004% (range 98.47-99.84. CIS scores of these CAD models were statistically significantly greater than 95%, identical to 99.5%, but lower than 99.6% (p<0.001, p = 0.064, p = 0.021 respectively, Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test. These data evidenced the highly accurate symmetry of these CAD models with regular contours. CONCLUSIONS: CIS calculation is beneficial to assess aesthetic outcomes of CAD-reconstructed skulls in terms of cranial symmetry. This enables further accurate CAD models and CAM cranial implants with depressed contours, which are essential in patients with difficult scalp adaptation.

  20. Health-related quality of life in patients with skull base tumours.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, M O

    2012-02-03

    The objective of the investigation was to report on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients diagnosed with skull base tumours using the Short Form Health Survey questionnaire (SF-36). Those patients suffering with vestibular schwannoma were examined to determine the effect facial nerve function had on their quality of life. It took place at the tertiary referral centre at the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh. A prospective study of 70 consecutive patients was taken, who harboured the following tumours: 54 vestibular schwannomas, 13 meningiomas, two haemangioblastomas and one hypoglossal schwannoma. Patients were interviewed using the short form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire. Facial nerve function was assessed in those patients who had vestibular schwannomas. The entire cohort of live skull base patients were assessed after a median follow-up time of 38.4 months. Patients with vestibular schwannoma treated conservatively with interval MRI had a quality of life similar to t he normal population. Those who underwent surgery had a significant difference in two of the SF-36 domains. No statistically significant correlation was found at final assessment between the degree of facial nerve functioning and any of the domains of SF-36. Patients with non-vestibular tumours had an impaired HRQoL in seven of the eight domains. Patients with skull base tumours have a significant impairment of their HRQoL. A conservative policy of follow up with interval MRI for patients with small vestibular schwannomas may therefore be more appropriate to preserve their HRQoL. Facial nerve outcome has little influence on quality of life in vestibular schwannoma patients.

  1. The Development of the Skull of the Egyptian Cobra Naja h. haje (Squamata: Serpentes: Elapidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khannoon, Eraqi R.; Evans, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The study of craniofacial development is important in understanding the ontogenetic processes behind morphological diversity. A complete morphological description of the embryonic skull development of the Egyptian cobra, Naja h. haje, is lacking and there has been little comparative discussion of skull development either among elapid snakes or between them and other snakes. Methodology/Principal Findings We present a description of skull development through a full sequence of developmental stages of the Egyptian cobra, and compare it to other snakes. Associated soft tissues of the head are noted where relevant. The first visible ossification centres are in the supratemporal, prearticular and surangular, with slight ossification visible in parts of the maxilla, prefrontal, and dentary. Epiotic centres of ossification are present in the supraoccipital, and the body of the supraoccipital forms from the tectum posterior not the tectum synoticum. The venom glands are visible as distinct bodies as early at stage 5 and enlarge later to extend from the otic capsule to the maxilla level with the anterior margin of the eye. The gland becomes more prominent shortly before hatching, concomitant with the development of the fangs. The tongue shows incipient forking at stage 5, and becomes fully bifid at stage 6. Conclusions/Significance We present the first detailed staging series of cranial development for the Egyptian cobra, Naja h. haje. This is one of the first studies since the classical works of G. de Beer and W. Parker that provides a detailed description of cranial development in an advanced snake species. It allows us to correct errors and misinterpretations in previous accounts which were based on a small sample of specimens of uncertain age. Our results highlight potentially significant variation in supraoccipital formation among squamates and the need for further research in this area. PMID:25860015

  2. The development of the skull of the Egyptian Cobra Naja h. haje (Squamata: Serpentes: Elapidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eraqi R Khannoon

    Full Text Available The study of craniofacial development is important in understanding the ontogenetic processes behind morphological diversity. A complete morphological description of the embryonic skull development of the Egyptian cobra, Naja h. haje, is lacking and there has been little comparative discussion of skull development either among elapid snakes or between them and other snakes.We present a description of skull development through a full sequence of developmental stages of the Egyptian cobra, and compare it to other snakes. Associated soft tissues of the head are noted where relevant. The first visible ossification centres are in the supratemporal, prearticular and surangular, with slight ossification visible in parts of the maxilla, prefrontal, and dentary. Epiotic centres of ossification are present in the supraoccipital, and the body of the supraoccipital forms from the tectum posterior not the tectum synoticum. The venom glands are visible as distinct bodies as early at stage 5 and enlarge later to extend from the otic capsule to the maxilla level with the anterior margin of the eye. The gland becomes more prominent shortly before hatching, concomitant with the development of the fangs. The tongue shows incipient forking at stage 5, and becomes fully bifid at stage 6.We present the first detailed staging series of cranial development for the Egyptian cobra, Naja h. haje. This is one of the first studies since the classical works of G. de Beer and W. Parker that provides a detailed description of cranial development in an advanced snake species. It allows us to correct errors and misinterpretations in previous accounts which were based on a small sample of specimens of uncertain age. Our results highlight potentially significant variation in supraoccipital formation among squamates and the need for further research in this area.

  3. A Novel Augmented Reality Navigation System for Endoscopic Sinus and Skull Base Surgery: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Yang, Jian; Chu, Yakui; Wu, Wenbo; Xue, Jin; Liang, Ping; Chen, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objective To verify the reliability and clinical feasibility of a self-developed navigation system based on an augmented reality technique for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery. Materials and Methods In this study we performed a head phantom and cadaver experiment to determine the display effect and accuracy of our navigational system. We compared cadaver head-based simulated operations, the target registration error, operation time, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index scores of our navigation system to conventional navigation systems. Results The navigation system developed in this study has a novel display mode capable of fusing endoscopic images to three-dimensional (3-D) virtual images. In the cadaver head experiment, the target registration error was 1.28 ± 0.45 mm, which met the accepted standards of a navigation system used for nasal endoscopic surgery. Compared with conventional navigation systems, the new system was more effective in terms of operation time and the mental workload of surgeons, which is especially important for less experienced surgeons. Conclusion The self-developed augmented reality navigation system for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery appears to have advantages that outweigh those of conventional navigation systems. We conclude that this navigational system will provide rhinologists with more intuitive and more detailed imaging information, thus reducing the judgment time and mental workload of surgeons when performing complex sinus and skull base surgeries. Ultimately, this new navigational system has potential to increase the quality of surgeries. In addition, the augmented reality navigational system could be of interest to junior doctors being trained in endoscopic techniques because it could speed up their learning. However, it should be noted that the navigation system serves as an adjunct to a surgeon’s skills and knowledge, not as a substitute. PMID:26757365

  4. Analysis of radiological features relative to histopathology in 42 skull-base chordomas and chondrosarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamir, M. Necmettin [Marmara University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: koray.ozduman@yale.edu; Ozduman, Koray [Marmara University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-06-15

    Chordomas and chondrosarcomas are malignant tumors that are reported to have similar clinical presentations and radiological features but different behaviors and outcomes. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether specific radiological features of skull-base chordomas or chondrosarcomas are correlated with histopathology, and thus allow preoperative diagnosis. The study involved 32 classic chordomas, 6 chondroid chordomas and 4 chondrosarcomas (42 tumors total). For each case, tumor size and extent, the detailed anatomy involved, and magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography findings were analyzed. Tumor extent was assessed using a novel method that assessed presence/absence in 18 defined skull-base zones. The chondrosarcomas presented significantly earlier in life than the chordomas (means, 20.5 years versus 36 years, respectively). At time of diagnosis, the median tumor volume was 23 cm{sup 3} (range, 1.2-78.8 cm{sup 3}) and the mean tumor extent was 6.7 {+-} 2.9 zones. There were no differences between chordomas and chondrosarcomas, or between the two chordoma subgroups, with respect to lesion volume or extent. Comparison of other imaging findings revealed no features that were diagnostic for either chordoma or chondrosarcoma. The data support previous claims that chondrosarcomas present earlier in life than chordomas, but this finding is not diagnostic. There is wide variation in the extent of skull-base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, and in the specific anatomical structures these tumors involve. None of the MRI or CT features of these tumors appear to be useful for differentiating chordomas from chondrosarcomas preoperatively. For surgical planning, specific, area-oriented definition of tumor extent might provide more useful information than tumor-type classification schemes.

  5. Skull base chondrosarcoma radiosurgery: report of the North American Gamma Knife Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Hideyuki; Sheehan, Jason; Sneed, Penny K; McBride, Heyoung L; Young, Byron; Duma, Christopher; Mathieu, David; Seymour, Zachary; McDermott, Michael W; Kondziolka, Douglas; Iyer, Aditya; Lunsford, L Dade

    2015-11-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a potentially important option for patients with skull base chondrosarcomas. The object of this study was to analyze the outcomes of SRS for chondrosarcoma patients who underwent this treatment as a part of multimodality management. Seven participating centers of the North American Gamma Knife Consortium (NAGKC) identified 46 patients who underwent SRS for skull base chondrosarcomas. Thirty-six patients had previously undergone tumor resections and 5 had been treated with fractionated radiation therapy (RT). The median tumor volume was 8.0 cm3 (range 0.9-28.2 cm3), and the median margin dose was 15 Gy (range 10.5-20 Gy). Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate progression-free and overall survival rates. At a median follow-up of 75 months after SRS, 8 patients were dead. The actuarial overall survival after SRS was 89% at 3 years, 86% at 5 years, and 76% at 10 years. Local tumor progression occurred in 10 patients. The rate of progression-free survival (PFS) after SRS was 88% at 3 years, 85% at 5 years, and 70% at 10 years. Prior RT was significantly associated with shorter PFS. Eight patients required salvage resection, and 3 patients (7%) developed adverse radiation effects. Cranial nerve deficits improved in 22 (56%) of the 39 patients who deficits before SRS. Clinical improvement after SRS was noted in patients with abducens nerve paralysis (61%), oculomotor nerve paralysis (50%), lower cranial nerve dysfunction (50%), optic neuropathy (43%), facial neuropathy (38%), trochlear nerve paralysis (33%), trigeminal neuropathy (12%), and hearing loss (10%). Stereotactic radiosurgery for skull base chondrosarcomas is an important adjuvant option for the treatment of these rare tumors, as part of a team approach that includes initial surgical removal of symptomatic larger tumors.

  6. A Novel Augmented Reality Navigation System for Endoscopic Sinus and Skull Base Surgery: A Feasibility Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    Full Text Available To verify the reliability and clinical feasibility of a self-developed navigation system based on an augmented reality technique for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery.In this study we performed a head phantom and cadaver experiment to determine the display effect and accuracy of our navigational system. We compared cadaver head-based simulated operations, the target registration error, operation time, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index scores of our navigation system to conventional navigation systems.The navigation system developed in this study has a novel display mode capable of fusing endoscopic images to three-dimensional (3-D virtual images. In the cadaver head experiment, the target registration error was 1.28 ± 0.45 mm, which met the accepted standards of a navigation system used for nasal endoscopic surgery. Compared with conventional navigation systems, the new system was more effective in terms of operation time and the mental workload of surgeons, which is especially important for less experienced surgeons.The self-developed augmented reality navigation system for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery appears to have advantages that outweigh those of conventional navigation systems. We conclude that this navigational system will provide rhinologists with more intuitive and more detailed imaging information, thus reducing the judgment time and mental workload of surgeons when performing complex sinus and skull base surgeries. Ultimately, this new navigational system has potential to increase the quality of surgeries. In addition, the augmented reality navigational system could be of interest to junior doctors being trained in endoscopic techniques because it could speed up their learning. However, it should be noted that the navigation system serves as an adjunct to a surgeon's skills and knowledge, not as a substitute.

  7. A Novel Augmented Reality Navigation System for Endoscopic Sinus and Skull Base Surgery: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Yang, Jian; Chu, Yakui; Wu, Wenbo; Xue, Jin; Liang, Ping; Chen, Lei

    2016-01-01

    To verify the reliability and clinical feasibility of a self-developed navigation system based on an augmented reality technique for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery. In this study we performed a head phantom and cadaver experiment to determine the display effect and accuracy of our navigational system. We compared cadaver head-based simulated operations, the target registration error, operation time, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index scores of our navigation system to conventional navigation systems. The navigation system developed in this study has a novel display mode capable of fusing endoscopic images to three-dimensional (3-D) virtual images. In the cadaver head experiment, the target registration error was 1.28 ± 0.45 mm, which met the accepted standards of a navigation system used for nasal endoscopic surgery. Compared with conventional navigation systems, the new system was more effective in terms of operation time and the mental workload of surgeons, which is especially important for less experienced surgeons. The self-developed augmented reality navigation system for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery appears to have advantages that outweigh those of conventional navigation systems. We conclude that this navigational system will provide rhinologists with more intuitive and more detailed imaging information, thus reducing the judgment time and mental workload of surgeons when performing complex sinus and skull base surgeries. Ultimately, this new navigational system has potential to increase the quality of surgeries. In addition, the augmented reality navigational system could be of interest to junior doctors being trained in endoscopic techniques because it could speed up their learning. However, it should be noted that the navigation system serves as an adjunct to a surgeon's skills and knowledge, not as a substitute.

  8. A Review of Techniques Used in the Management of Growing Skull Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezina, Noemie; Al-Halabi, Becher; Shash, Hani; Dudley, Roy R; Gilardino, Mirko S

    2017-05-01

    Growing skull fractures (GSFs) are rare complications of pediatric head trauma that comprise skull fractures associated with an underlying dural tear and an intact arachnoid membrane. They are often misdiagnosed, and delay in management can lead to progression of the disease along with its neurological sequelae. Multiple clinical reports and qualitative reviews on this entity exist. To our knowledge, this represents the largest clinical review reporting on established techniques in the management of these fractures. A literature search was performed on the databases Embase, Medline, Cochrane, and PubMed from their inception until February 2015 using the terms "Growing," "Skull," "Fracture," and their equivalent terms. Studies included were case series with 5 or more patients describing GSFs and their management. Twenty-two articles reporting 440 patients were included in the analysis. The mean age at trauma was 8.8 months, with the mean at presentation of 21.9 months and 57.8% of the patients being males. Most commonly, a combined dura-cranioplasty was done in 61.6% of the patients. A range of autoplastic and alloplastic materials were used in both of these techniques. Improvement from preoperative clinical status in seizures and neurological deficits was noted in 18 (12.7%) and 11 (7.05%) of the patients, respectively, following operative repair and medical management. Early recognition is crucial in the management and treatment of GSF. Children at risk for developing GSF should be monitored clinically for up to 3 months following the initial insult. The surgical treatment depends on the size of the fracture and the age of the patient. A summary of the presentation, management, associated outcomes, complications, and recommendations discussed in the literature are reported within.

  9. The development of the skull of the Egyptian Cobra Naja h. haje (Squamata: Serpentes: Elapidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khannoon, Eraqi R; Evans, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    The study of craniofacial development is important in understanding the ontogenetic processes behind morphological diversity. A complete morphological description of the embryonic skull development of the Egyptian cobra, Naja h. haje, is lacking and there has been little comparative discussion of skull development either among elapid snakes or between them and other snakes. We present a description of skull development through a full sequence of developmental stages of the Egyptian cobra, and compare it to other snakes. Associated soft tissues of the head are noted where relevant. The first visible ossification centres are in the supratemporal, prearticular and surangular, with slight ossification visible in parts of the maxilla, prefrontal, and dentary. Epiotic centres of ossification are present in the supraoccipital, and the body of the supraoccipital forms from the tectum posterior not the tectum synoticum. The venom glands are visible as distinct bodies as early at stage 5 and enlarge later to extend from the otic capsule to the maxilla level with the anterior margin of the eye. The gland becomes more prominent shortly before hatching, concomitant with the development of the fangs. The tongue shows incipient forking at stage 5, and becomes fully bifid at stage 6. We present the first detailed staging series of cranial development for the Egyptian cobra, Naja h. haje. This is one of the first studies since the classical works of G. de Beer and W. Parker that provides a detailed description of cranial development in an advanced snake species. It allows us to correct errors and misinterpretations in previous accounts which were based on a small sample of specimens of uncertain age. Our results highlight potentially significant variation in supraoccipital formation among squamates and the need for further research in this area.

  10. Skull and mandible formation in the cuckoo (Aves, Cuculidae): contributions to the nomenclature in avian osteology and systematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posso, Sérgio Roberto; Donatelli, Reginaldo José

    2005-01-01

    The study of the contributions of different bones to the formation of the skeleton in birds is necessary: (1) to establish homologies in comparative anatomy; (2) to delimit each bone structure correctly, mainly in relation to the skull and mandible where the bones are fused to each other in adults; and (3) to standardize nomenclature in avian osteology. In this paper at least one young specimen belonging to each sub-family of Cuculidae was examined in order to identify each bone in terms of boundaries and contributions to skull and mandible formation. These cuckoos specimens were also compared with adults and young of turacos and hoatzin. The results show little variation of skull and jaw among the young cuckoos studied compared with the variations among adult specimens. However, it provides new suggestions for the boundaries and nomenclature of certain osseous structures in the skull and mandible of birds, specifically fissura zona flexoria craniofacialis, prominetia frontoparietalis, crista temporalis transversa, processus squamosalis, fossa laterosphenoidalis, tuberculum laterosphenoidale and processus retroangularis. This study also provides more reliable homologies for use in cladistic analysis and above all it contributes to the phylogenetic position of Cuculidae within Neognathae, specifically the skull formation suggest that turacos and hoatzin are more similar to each other than either is to the cuckoos.

  11. Can endocranial volume be estimated accurately from external skull measurements in great-tailed grackles (Quiscalus mexicanus)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Corina J; Palmstrom, Christin R

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing need to validate and collect data approximating brain size on individuals in the field to understand what evolutionary factors drive brain size variation within and across species. We investigated whether we could accurately estimate endocranial volume (a proxy for brain size), as measured by computerized tomography (CT) scans, using external skull measurements and/or by filling skulls with beads and pouring them out into a graduated cylinder for male and female great-tailed grackles. We found that while females had higher correlations than males, estimations of endocranial volume from external skull measurements or beads did not tightly correlate with CT volumes. We found no accuracy in the ability of external skull measures to predict CT volumes because the prediction intervals for most data points overlapped extensively. We conclude that we are unable to detect individual differences in endocranial volume using external skull measurements. These results emphasize the importance of validating and explicitly quantifying the predictive accuracy of brain size proxies for each species and each sex.

  12. Can endocranial volume be estimated accurately from external skull measurements in great-tailed grackles (Quiscalus mexicanus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina J. Logan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing need to validate and collect data approximating brain size on individuals in the field to understand what evolutionary factors drive brain size variation within and across species. We investigated whether we could accurately estimate endocranial volume (a proxy for brain size, as measured by computerized tomography (CT scans, using external skull measurements and/or by filling skulls with beads and pouring them out into a graduated cylinder for male and female great-tailed grackles. We found that while females had higher correlations than males, estimations of endocranial volume from external skull measurements or beads did not tightly correlate with CT volumes. We found no accuracy in the ability of external skull measures to predict CT volumes because the prediction intervals for most data points overlapped extensively. We conclude that we are unable to detect individual differences in endocranial volume using external skull measurements. These results emphasize the importance of validating and explicitly quantifying the predictive accuracy of brain size proxies for each species and each sex.

  13. Grist for Riedl's mill: a network model perspective on the integration and modularity of the human skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Altava, Borja; Marugán-Lobón, Jesús; Botella, Héctor; Bastir, Markus; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2013-12-01

    Riedl's concept of burden neatly links development and evolution by ascertaining that structures that show a high degree of developmental co-dependencies with other structures are more constrained in evolution. The human skull can be precisely modeled as an articulated complex system of bones connected by sutures, forming a network of structural co-dependencies. We present a quantitative analysis of the morphological integration, modularity, and hierarchical organization of this human skull network model. Our overall results show that the human skull is a small-world network, with two well-delimited connectivity modules: one facial organized around the ethmoid bone, and one cranial organized around the sphenoid bone. Geometric morphometrics further support this two-module division, stressing the direct relationship between the developmental information enclosed in connectivity patterns and skull shape. Whereas the facial module shows a hierarchy of clustered blocks of bones, the bones of the cranial modules show a regular pattern of connections. We analyze the significance of these arrangements by hypothesizing specific structural roles for the most important bones involved in the formation of both modules, in the context of Riedl's burden. We conclude that it is the morphological integration of each group of bones that defines the semi-hierarchical organization of the human skull, reflecting fundamental differences in the ontogenetic patterns of growth and the structural constraints that generate each module. Our study also demonstrates the adequacy of network analysis as an innovative tool to understand the morphological complexity of anatomical systems. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Clinical anatomy and imaging of the cranial nerves and skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ruchira M; Klein, Joshua P

    2012-09-01

    Evaluation of patients with cranial neuropathies requires an understanding of brainstem anatomy and nerve pathways. Advances in neuroimaging, particularly high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have enabled visualization of these tiny structures and their related pathology. This review provides an approach toward using imaging in the evaluation of cranial nerve (CN) and skull base anatomy and pathology. Because brainstem nuclei are inextricably linked to the information contained within CNs, they are briefly mentioned whenever relevant; however, a comprehensive discussion of brainstem syndromes is beyond the scope of this review. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Unusual Case of Occult Brucella Osteomyelitis in the Skull Detected by Bone Scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Myung Hee; Lim, Seok Tae; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Lee, Chang Seob [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Brucellosis is a worldwide infectious disease of animals that can be transmitted to humans. Osteoarticular involvement is the most common complication of brucellosis. A 47-year-old man, who was a stock breeder, complained of myalgia with fever and chills for 2 weeks. The serology titers and blood cultures for brucellosis were positive. Bone scintigraphy demonstrated a focally increased uptake in the left supra orbital area. Plain radiographs showed an osteolytic lesion, and an MRI revealed signal abnormalities in the corresponding site. We present an unusual case of occult Brucella osteomyelitis in the frontal bone of the skull detected by done scintigraphy.

  16. Tip of an Iceberg: Skull Fracture as an Adult Presentation of Encephalocraniocutaneous Lipomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinead Culleton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The severity of seizures presenting to the emergency department ranges from benign to life threatening. There are also a wide number of possible etiologies. Computed tomography (CT emergency imaging may be required at presentation to elucidate a possible cause and assess signs of intracranial trauma. This case describes a serious seizure episode in a young man while on holiday. A CT brain showed a skull fracture as a consequence of seizure-related head trauma but unexpectedly there were image findings consistent with encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis. The important radiological features of encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis and a differential diagnosis are presented.

  17. The localization and morphology of pterion in adult West Anatolian skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Funda; Akyer, Sahika Pınar; Kale, Ayşin; Geylan, Serdar; Gayretli, Ozcan

    2014-07-01

    The pterion is an important skull landmark because it is located where the frontal, the great wing of sphenoid, parietal, and squamous parts of the temporal bone junction. The objectives of this study were to determine the localization and the shape of pterion on skulls and to find out the distances between the pterion and some certain anatomic landmarks on neighboring structures. The study was performed on the skulls of 128 (256 sides) adult West Anatolian people. All of the morphometric measurements of the distances between the pterion and the anatomic landmarks were performed using a Vernier caliper with an accuracy of 0.1 mm. The pterion was classified into 4 types: the sphenoparietal, frontotemporal, stellate, or epipteric types. The incidences of types of pterion in the skulls were also found as the sphenoparietal type (85.2%), the epipteric type (8.2%), the stellate type (5.5%), and the frontotemporal type (1.1%). The mean (SD) distances from the center of the pterion to the zygomatic arch were measured as 40.02 (4.06) mm and 39.88 (4.01) mm; to the frontozygomatic suture, 31.80 (4.51) mm and 31.44 (4.73) mm; to the zygomatic angle, 41.54 (4.95) mm and 41.35 (5.14) mm; to the mastoid process, 82.48 (5.45) mm and 81.81 (5.50) mm; and to the external acoustic meatus, 53.29 (4.55) mm and 56.22 (4.60) mm, on the right and left sides, respectively. The mean (SD) distances between the foremost point of pterion and the anterior edge of the lateral wall of the orbit were 31.02 (5.78) mm and 32.31 (5.79) mm on the right and left sides, respectively. The localization and the shape of pterion are of importance because it is an anatomic landmark and should be of use in surgical approaches and interventions via the pterion.

  18. Ocepeia (Middle Paleocene of Morocco): The Oldest Skull of an Afrotherian Mammal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheerbrant, Emmanuel; Amaghzaz, Mbarek; Bouya, Baadi; Goussard, Florent; Letenneur, Charlène

    2014-01-01

    While key early(iest) fossils were recently discovered for several crown afrotherian mammal orders, basal afrotherians, e.g., early Cenozoic species that comprise sister taxa to Paenungulata, Afroinsectiphilia or Afrotheria, are nearly unknown, especially in Africa. Possible stem condylarth-like relatives of the Paenungulata (hyraxes, sea-cows, elephants) include only Abdounodus hamdii and Ocepeia daouiensis from the Selandian of Ouled Abdoun Basin, Morocco, both previously only documented by lower teeth. Here, we describe new fossils of Ocepeia, including O.grandis n. sp., and a sub-complete skull of O. daouiensis, the first known before the Eocene for African placentals. O.daouiensis skull displays a remarkable mosaic of autapomophic, ungulate-like and generalized eutherian-like characters. Autapomorphies include striking anthropoid-like characters of the rostrum and dentition. Besides having a basically eutherian-like skull construction, Ocepeia daouiensis is characterized by ungulate-like, and especially paenungulate-like characters of skull and dentition (e.g., selenodonty). However, some plesiomorphies such as absence of hypocone exclude Ocepeia from crown Paenungulata. Such a combination of plesiomorphic and derived characters best fits with a stem position of Ocepeia relative to Paenungulata. In our cladistic analyses Ocepeia is included in Afrotheria, but its shared derived characters with paenungulates are not optimized as exclusive synapomorphies. Rather, within Afrotheria Ocepeia is reconstructed as more closely related to insectivore-like afroinsectiphilians (i.e., aardvarks, sengis, tenrecs, and golden moles) than to paenungulates. This results from conflict with undetected convergences of Paenungulata and Perissodactyla in our cladistic analysis, such as the shared bilophodonty. The selenodont pattern best supports the stem paenungulate position of Ocepeia; that, however, needs further support. The remarkable character mosaic of Ocepeia makes it the

  19. EEG Source Reconstruction Performance as a Function of Skull Conductance Contrast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2015-01-01

    Through simulated EEG we investigate the effect of the for-ward model’s applied skull:scalp conductivity ratio on the source reconstruction performance. We show that having a higher conductivity ratio generally leads to improvement of the solution. Additionally we see a clear connection between...... higher conductivity ratios and lower coherence, thus a reduction of the ill-posedness of the EEG inverse problem. Finally we show on real EEG data the stability of the strongest source recovered across conductivity ratios....

  20. Never neglect the atmospheric pressure effect on a brain with a skull defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Hsiao-Yue; Kuo, Jinn-Rung

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we report an unusual case of a patient who presented with a severe, sinking skin flap after a decompressive craniectomy and ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery due to a traumatic brain injury. After cranioplasty, the patient’s neurological deficiency improved and was confirmed by transcranial Doppler sonography. In addition to discussing the pathogenesis of the sinking skin flap, we emphasize the importance of cranioplasty for neurological improvement and remind the surgeon to “never neglect the atmospheric pressure effect on a brain with a skull defect”. PMID:24741332