WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinical practice patterns

  1. CT-guided pericardiocenteses: Clinical profile, practice patterns and clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichler, Katrin, E-mail: k.eichler@em.uni-frankfurt.d [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Zangos, Stephan; Thalhammer, Axel; Jacobi, Volkmar [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Walcher, Felix; Marzi, Ingo [Department of Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Moritz, Anton [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J.; Mack, Martin G. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness and clinical outcome and technique of CT-guided pericardiocenteses in the treatment of pericardial effusions in adults and children. Methods: 20 drainages were performed in Seldinger-technique under CT-guidance on 20 patients suffering from pericardial effusions and haematomas. In 85%, the etiology of effusion was postoperative. The mean age of the patients was 59 years (minimum 9 years, maximum 86 years).There were 12 male and eight female patients. The inclusion criterion was an echocardiographically relevant proved pericardial effusion. Results: All catheters could be placed successfully (20/20) in the pericardial effusion and allowed for draining of the effusion in all cases under CT-guidance. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 0%. CT-guided pericardiocentesis was successful for withdrawing pericardial fluid and/or relieving tamponade in 100% of all procedures. No major complication was occurred. A total of one minor complication (5%) occurred that required no specific interventions, except for monitoring and appropriate follow-up. We observed one pneumothorax as a minor complication. Conclusions: Pericardial effusions of various causes can be safely, effectively, and quickly managed with CT-guided pericardiocenteses in adults and children. The ventrolateral entry side for the puncture should be preferred to reach the whole effusion and avoid complications, like a pneumothorax.

  2. Paediatric acute asthma management in Australia and New Zealand : practice patterns in the context of clinical practice guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babl, F. E.; Sheriff, N.; Borland, M.; Acworth, J.; Neutze, J.; Krieser, D.; Ngo, P.; Schutz, J.; Thomson, F.; Cotterell, E.; Jamison, S.; Francis, P.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To compare clinical practice guideline (CPG) recommendations and reported physician management of acute paediatric asthma in the 11 largest paediatric emergency departments, all of which have CPGs, in Australia (n= 9) and New Zealand (n= 2). All 11 sites participate in the Paediatric Res

  3. Food and dietary pattern-based recommendations: an emerging approach to clinical practice guidelines for nutrition therapy in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievenpiper, John L; Dworatzek, Paula D N

    2013-02-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for the nutritional management of diabetes mellitus have evolved considerably over the last 25 years. As major diabetes associations have focussed on the individualization of nutrition therapy, there has been a move toward a broader more flexible macronutrient distribution that emphasizes macronutrient quality over quantity. There is now a call for the integration of food- and dietary pattern-based approaches into diabetes association CPGs. The main argument has been that an approach that focuses on nutrients alone misses important nutrient interactions oversimplifying the complexity of foods and dietary patterns, both of which have been shown to have a stronger influence on disease risk than nutrients alone. Although cancer and heart associations have begun to integrate this approach into their dietary guidelines, diabetes associations have not yet adopted this approach. We provide a rationale for the adoption of this approach for The Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) 2013 CPGs for nutrition therapy. The systematic review for the development of these guidelines revealed emerging evidence to support the use of vegetarian, Mediterranean, and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary patterns as well as specific foods such as dietary pulses and nuts in people with diabetes. Popular and conventional weight loss diets were also found to have similar advantages in people with diabetes, although poor dietary adherence remains an issue with these diets. The CDA 2013 CPGs will support an even greater individualization of nutrition therapy for people with diabetes and appeal to a broader range of practice styles of health professionals. PMID:24070749

  4. Designing Clinical Examples To Promote Pattern Recognition: Nursing Education-Based Research and Practical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welk, Dorette Sugg

    2002-01-01

    Sophomore nursing students (n=162) examined scenarios depicting typical and atypical signs of heart attack. Examples were structured to include essential and nonessential symptoms, enabling pattern recognition and improved performance. The method provides a way to prepare students to anticipate and recognize life-threatening situations. (Contains…

  5. Prescription pattern of antihypertensive drugs in Family Practice Clinics at Jordan University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Drabah, Essam; Irshaid, Yacoub; Yasein, Nada; Zmeili, Suheil

    2013-01-01

    The present study represents the current prescribing trend for antihypertensive drugs in family medicine clinics at Jordan University Hospital in Jordan. The study sample involved 416 male and female hypertensive Jordanian patients. Our results demonstrate that 2 hypertensive patients were not receiving any antihypertensive therapy at the time of evaluation, 192 patients were on a single antihypertensive therapy, 157 patients were on two antihypertensive drugs, 52 patients were on triple anti...

  6. Myocarditis in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinagra, Gianfranco; Anzini, Marco; Pereira, Naveen L; Bussani, Rossana; Finocchiaro, Gherardo; Bartunek, Jozef; Merlo, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Myocarditis is a polymorphic disease characterized by great variability in clinical presentation and evolution. Patients presenting with severe left ventricular dysfunction and life-threatening arrhythmias represent a demanding challenge for the clinician. Modern techniques of cardiovascular imaging and the exhaustive molecular evaluation of the myocardium with endomyocardial biopsy have provided valuable insight into the pathophysiology of this disease, and several clinical registries have unraveled the disease's long-term evolution and prognosis. However, uncertainties persist in crucial practical issues in the management of patients. This article critically reviews current information for evidence-based management, offering a rational and practical approach to patients with myocarditis. For this review, we searched the PubMed and MEDLINE databases for articles published from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2015, using the following terms: myocarditis, inflammatory cardiomyopathy, and endomyocardial biopsy. Articles were selected for inclusion if they represented primary data or were review articles published in high-impact journals. In particular, a risk-oriented approach is proposed. The different patterns of presentation of myocarditis are classified as low-, intermediate-, and high-risk syndromes according to the most recent evidence on prognosis, clinical findings, and both invasive and noninvasive testing, and appropriate management strategies are proposed for each risk class. PMID:27489051

  7. Computerizing clinical practice guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie

    It is well described that hospitals have problems with sustaining high quality of care and expedient introduction of new medical knowledge. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been promoted as a remedy to deal with these problems. It is, however, also well described that application and comp......It is well described that hospitals have problems with sustaining high quality of care and expedient introduction of new medical knowledge. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been promoted as a remedy to deal with these problems. It is, however, also well described that application...... and compliance with CPGs in most areas of clinical practice are deficient. Computerization of CPGs has been brought forward as a method to disseminate and to support application of CPGs. Until now, CPG-computerization has focused on development of formal expressions of CPGs. The developed systems have, however......, not gained any extensive application in clinical practice. The basic assumption in this thesis is that the scanty penetration is due to an inappropriate design process when designing computerized CPGs for clinical work practice. This thesis examines the application of guidance within areas where CPG...

  8. PHP Objects, Patterns, and Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Zandstra, Matt

    2010-01-01

    This book takes you beyond the PHP basics to the enterprise development practices used by professional programmers. Updated for PHP 5.3 with new sections on closures, namespaces, and continuous integration, this edition will teach you about object features such as abstract classes, reflection, interfaces, and error handling. You'll also discover object tools to help you learn more about your classes, objects, and methods. Then you'll move into design patterns and the principles that make patterns powerful. You'll learn both classic design patterns and enterprise and database patterns with easy

  9. Hyponatraemia in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, M.; Davies, J S

    2007-01-01

    Hyponatraemia is defined as a serum sodium concentration below 135 mmol/l. It causes major diagnostic and management problems in practice. Hyponatraemic disorders are divided into euvolaemic, hypervolaemic and hypovolaemic. In the evaluation of the hyponatraemic patient, history taking should focus on identifying the potential cause, duration and symptomatology. Clinical examination should include assessment of volume status. Acute hyponatraemia of less than 48 h duration requires prompt corr...

  10. Lexical Concept Distribution Reflects Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Breydo, Eugene; Shubina, Maria; Shalaby, James W.; Einbinder, Jonathan S.; Turchin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    It is not known whether narrative medical text directly reflects clinical reality. We have tested the hypothesis that the pattern of distribution of lexical concept of medication intensification in narrative provider notes correlates with clinical practice as reflected in electronic medication records.

  11. New health professional practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celentano, D D

    1978-10-01

    Career patterns and practice correlates of 143 New Health Professionals (NHPs) educated at one institution are studied to determine similarities among different types of practitioners (Health Associates and Nurse Practitioners). Employment since graduation has been high with low job turnover. Nurse Practitioners (NPs) are found most often in metropolitan areas, while over 50 per cent of Health Associates (HAs) are employed in rural settings. More NPs work in hospitals than HAs, who have a higher rate of employment in private practices, HAs are also involved in a wider range of medical specialties than NPs. In terms of patient care, HAs see more patients than NPs and also have larger primary care caseloads. From a functional perspective, only minimal differences are found in comparing the activities of the practitioners. Most NHPs have high job satisfaction, although HAs anticipate a high rate of job turnover; no differences were found in levels of perceived responsibility nor in the amount of supervision in patient care. Although there were only small differences in the activities of the two groups, numerous contextual and practice correlates were found to differentiate the NHPs, a finding which argues against the current practice of conceptualizing NHPs as a single group. PMID:29997

  12. Somnambulism. Clinical characteristics and personality patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kales, A; Soldatos, C R; Caldwell, A B; Kales, J D; Humphrey, F J; Charney, D S; Schweitzer, P K

    1980-12-01

    Fifty adults with either a present or past complaint of somnambulism were evaluated to determine the development and clinical course of their disorder as well as their personality patterns. Generally, when sleepwalking was outgrown, its onset was before age 10 years and its termination before age 15 years. Current sleepwalkers, compared with past sleepwalkers, started sleepwalking at a later age, had a higher frequency of events, and had episodes earlier in the night. Their episodes were also characterized by more intense clinical manifestations. Furthermore, current sleepwalkers demonstrated high levels of psychopathology, whereas past sleepwalkers had essentially normal psychological patterns. Specifically, the current sleepwalkers showed active, outwardly directed behavioral patterns, suggestive of difficulties in handling aggression. The clinical application of these findings is discussed and practical recommendations are given for the evaluation and management of sleepwalking. PMID:7447621

  13. Treatmnent Patterns for Pediatric Acute CHUs Media: A Gap in Evidence-Based Theory and Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatright, Courtney; Holcomb, Lygia; Replogle, William

    2015-01-01

    Unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics is costly, leads to serious unintended side effects, and increases the risk of developing antibiotic resistance. Children are at high risk of receiving unnecessary antibiotics because they consume more antibiotics than any other age group, likely due to inaccurate prescribing by health care providers. Treatment of acute otitis media is the most common reason children are prescribed antibiotics. Evidence-based guidelines regarding the appropriate treatment of nonsevere acute otitis media in children have been established. A retrospective, descriptive, chart review project was completed comparing the diagnosis and treatment of acute otitis media in children six months to 12 years of age in clinics and the emergency department of a large academic medical center with the American Academy of Pediatrics' treatment guidelines. Findings of the chart review included 100 patient encounters. Documentation indicated that although none of these children with acute otitis media met the guideline criteria for antibiotics, 92 of the 100 children were prescribed antibiotics.

  14. Spectrum of Microbial Diseases and Resistance Patterns at a Private Teaching Hospital in Kenya: Implications for Clinical Practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Maina

    Full Text Available Accurate local prevalence of microbial diseases and microbial resistance data are vital for optimal treatment of patients. However, there are few reports of these data from developing countries, especially from sub-Saharan Africa. The status of Aga Khan University Hospital Nairobi as an internationally accredited hospital and a laboratory with an electronic medical record system has made it possible to analyze local prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility data and compare it with other published data.We have analyzed the spectrum of microbial agents and resistance patterns seen at a 300 bed tertiary private teaching hospital in Kenya using microbial identity and susceptibility data captured in hospital and laboratory electronic records between 2010 and 2014.For blood isolates, we used culture collection within the first three days of hospitalization as a surrogate for community onset, and within that group, Escherichia coli was the most common, followed by Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast, Candida spp. and Klebsiella pneumoniae were the most common hospital onset causes of bloodstream infection. Antimicrobial resistance rates for the most commonly isolated Gram negative organisms was higher than many recent reports from Europe and North America. In contrast, Gram positive resistance rates were quite low, with 94% of S. aureus being susceptible to oxacillin and only rare isolates of vancomycin-resistant enterococci.The current report demonstrates high rates of antimicrobial resistance in Gram negative organisms, even in outpatients with urinary tract infections. On the other hand, rates of resistance in Gram positive organisms, notably S. aureus, are remarkably low. A better understanding of the reasons for these trends may contribute to ongoing efforts to combat antimicrobial resistance globally.

  15. Photodynamic therapy in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Filonenko; L. G. Serova

    2016-01-01

    The review is on opportunities and possibilities of application of photodynamic therapy in clinical practice. The advantages of this method are the targeting of effect on tumor foci and high efficiency along with low systemic toxicity. The results of the set of recent Russian and foreign clinical trials are represented in the review. The method is successfully used in clinical practice with both radical (for early vulvar, cervical cancer and pre-cancer, central early lung cancer, esophageal a...

  16. Pharmacogenetics in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derijks, Luc J. J.; Derijks, H. Jeroen; Touw, Daan J.; Conemans, Jean M. H.; Egberts, Antoine C. G.

    2008-01-01

    The availability of data from pharmacogenetic studies is reflected in therapeutic practice, and pharmacogenetics is slowly entering the medical arena. Preconditions for the utilisation of pharmacogenetic knowledge are that: 1) genetic variation and prevalence are known 2) pharmacological consequence

  17. Representing Practice: Practice Models, Patterns, Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, Isobel; Finlay, Janet; Fincher, Sally

    2011-01-01

    This article critiques learning design as a representation for sharing and developing practice, based on synthesis of three projects. Starting with the findings of the Mod4L Models of Practice project, it argues that the technical origins of learning design, and the consequent focus on structure and sequence, limit its usefulness for sharing…

  18. A Practical Guide to Check the Consistency of Item Response Patterns in Clinical Research Through Person-Fit Statistics: Examples and a Computer Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Rob R; Niessen, A Susan M; Tendeiro, Jorge N

    2016-02-01

    Although there are many studies devoted to person-fit statistics to detect inconsistent item score patterns, most studies are difficult to understand for nonspecialists. The aim of this tutorial is to explain the principles of these statistics for researchers and clinicians who are interested in applying these statistics. In particular, we first explain how invalid test scores can be detected using person-fit statistics; second, we provide the reader practical examples of existing studies that used person-fit statistics to detect and to interpret inconsistent item score patterns; and third, we discuss a new R-package that can be used to identify and interpret inconsistent score patterns.

  19. Mindfulness Meditation in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Paul; Sephton, Sandra; Weissbecker, Inka; Hoover, Katherine; Ulmer, Christi; Studts, Jamie L.

    2004-01-01

    The practice of mindfulness is increasingly being integrated into contemporary clinical psychology. Based in Buddhist philosophy and subsequently integrated into Western health care in the contexts of psychotherapy and stress management, mindfulness meditation is evolving as a systematic clinical intervention. This article describes…

  20. Dabigatran in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageno, Walter; Eikelboom, John; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    confirmed, but VKA use is complicated by need for regular monitoring of the international normalized ratio and multiple drug and food interactions. Dabigatran is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor that can be used with fixed doses, without the need for routine anticoagulation laboratory monitoring...... and the advantage of few drug or diet interactions. Dabigatran is effective for stroke and systemic thromboembolism in AF and for the prophylaxis and treatment of VTE. The drug has a good safety profile and consistently shows a reduction in intracranial hemorrhage risk compared to warfarin. A specific reversal...... agent for dabigatran has been approved by FDA and EU. This review provides a summary of publications assessing clinical utility of dabigatran for different indications....

  1. The clinical practice patterns of fetal ultrasonography in the first-trimester: A questionnaire survey of members of the Korean Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kun Woo; Kwak, Dong Wook; Ko, Hyun Sun; Park, Hyun Soo; Seol, Hyun Joo; Hong, Joon Seok; Yang, Seung Woo; Hwang, Han Sung; Oh, Soo Young; Kim, Moon Young; Kim, Sa Jin

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to survey the current clinical practice of first-trimester ultrasonography among members of the Korean Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology (KSUOG) and to provide basic data for making practical recommendations about first-trimester ultrasonography scan in Korea. Methods This survey was conducted using a self-administered anonymous questionnaire. The first-trimester in this survey was divided into two parts: early and late first-trimester. The survey w...

  2. Clinical Practice. Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Dennis M; Rosen, Clifford J

    2016-01-21

    Key Clinical Points Postmenopausal Osteoporosis Fractures and osteoporosis are common, particularly among older women, and hip fractures can be devastating. Treatment is generally recommended in postmenopausal women who have a bone mineral density T score of -2.5 or less, a history of spine or hip fracture, or a Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) score indicating increased fracture risk. Bisphosphonates (generic) and denosumab reduce the risk of hip, nonvertebral, and vertebral fractures; bisphosphonates are commonly used as first-line treatment in women who do not have contraindications. Teriparatide reduces the risk of nonvertebral and vertebral fractures. Osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures have been reported with treatment but are rare. The benefit-to-risk ratio for osteoporosis treatment is strongly positive for most women with osteoporosis. Because benefits are retained after discontinuation of alendronate or zoledronic acid, drug holidays after 5 years of alendronate therapy or 3 years of zoledronic acid therapy may be considered for patients at lower risk for fracture.

  3. Recombinant erythropoietin in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, T; Marx, G.; Littlewood, T; Macdougall, I

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin (RHuEPO) has revolutionised the treatment of patients with anaemia of chronic renal disease. Clinical studies have demonstrated that RHuEPO is also useful in various non-uraemic conditions including haematological and oncological disorders, prematurity, HIV infection, and perioperative therapies. Besides highlighting both the historical and functional aspects of RHuEPO, this review discusses the applications of RHuEPO in clinical practice a...

  4. Pulse Pressure in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Parenica

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The review presents basic information about the pulse pressure. The variables related to pulse pressure are briefly explained - arterial stiffness, arterial compliance, pulse wave velocity, pulse pressure amplification and augmentation index. We present some recent trials and observational studies that show the importance of pulse pressure in clinical practice. Briefly the possibilities of influencing the pulse pressure are discussed.

  5. Clinical Practice Guidelines and Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai R. Singh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this section we shall see what Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs should be and what they are, the recent case of Xigris and a thriller-like manipulation by the concerned company to enter a performance 'bundle', CPG effectiveness/cost effectiveness and other considerations, how they serve Industry needs, and what methods can possibly assist them actualise their enormous potential.Introduction From the early nineties, a number of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs have been created and published by many different associations and organizations at considerable expense. CPGs are supposed to serve an important purpose. They offer objective consensus of expert opinion on treatment and hence are trusted by hospitals and practicing physicians alike. They can reduce the possibility of inappropriate care being delivered, while helping introduce new knowledge into clinical practice (Grimshaw and Russell, 1993; Merritt et al. , 1997; Woolf et al. , 1999. They are a distillate of biomedical wisdom at a certain point of time applied to better and more efficient patient care. Hence, rigorously developed guidelines can translate complicated research findings into actionable recommendations of clinical care (Shiffman et al. , 2003; Haines and Jones, 1994. Clinical practice guidelines have generally been accepted as an objective consensus on evidence (Baird, 2003. Practice guidelines approved by expert panels are intended to standardize care in such a way as to improve health outcomes (Eichacker et al. , 2006. Major hospitals and knowledge updated physicians feel reassured they are doing the very best by following CPGs. State of the art, and such other fancy labels, can be justifiably applied to them.McMaster et al., (2007 have talked recently of getting guidelines to work in practice. In an effort to make CPGs more effective, developers of such guidelines have started grouping evidence-based interventions into what are called 'bundles'. The justification for

  6. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  7. Research and Clinical Practice Relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Ashammakhi N

    2008-01-01

    To The Editor: I highly value and greet the authors for their editorial. Many important issues related to medical education and its future in Libya have been discussed in this paper [1]. One important point that has been addressed and I feel deserves attention is the “abnormal” relationship between clinical practice and research in Libya. From discussions with colleagues, this problem somehow has evolved from a misconception about educational and training systems that may have occurred in the...

  8. Are clinical practice guidelines impartial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    In A Theory of Justice, John Rawls demands from citizens who decide upon principles of justice and the rules derived from such principles that they abstract from all particularities that constitute their identity as unique individuals. This demand is unrealistic in policy settings where actual policy-makers convene to provide guidance, establish rules regarding public good, and enact legislation. In practice, I argue, policy-makers, legislators, and others involved in developing social rules that pertain to distributive justice formulate such rules as reasonably partial spectators. To illustrate, I show how clinical practice guidelines are established and mediated by a reasonably partial expert panel whose partial action is publicly justifiable, yet whose claims to impartiality are not.

  9. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Liu; Joe Y. Chang

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy.

  10. Laravel design patterns and best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Kilicdagi, Arda

    2014-01-01

    This book is a practical guide packed with clear examples that will help you get to grips with the best practices in Laravel design patterns to create advanced web applications. This book is intended for web application developers working with Laravel who want to increase the efficiency of their web applications. It assumes that you have some experience with the Laravel PHP framework and are familiar with coding OOP methods.

  11. Expert systems in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first expert systems prototypes intended for advising physicians on diagnosis or therapy selection have been designed more than ten years ago. However, a few of them are already in use in clinical practice after years of research and development efforts. The capabilities of these systems to reason symbolically and to mimic the hypothetico-deductive processes used by physicians distinguishes them from conventional computer programs. Their power comes from their knowledge-base which embeds a large quantity of high-level, specialized knowledge captured from medical experts. Common methods for knowledge representation include production rules and frames. These methods also provide a mean for organizing and structuring the knowledge according to hierarchical or causal links. The best expert-systems perform at the level of the experts. They are easy to learn and use, and can communicate with the user in pseudo-natural language. Moreover they are able to explain their line of reasoning. These capabilities make them potentially useful, usable and acceptable by physicians. However if the problems related to difficulties and costs in building expert-systems are on the way to be solved within the next few years, forensic and ethical issues should have to be addressed before one can envisage their routine use in clinical practice

  12. Supernumerary teeth in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Szkaradkiewicz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyperdontia is the condition of having supernumerary teeth, or teeth which appear in addition to the regular number of teeth. The prevalence rates of supernumerary teeth in the permanent dentition amounts 0.1-6.9%, and in deciduous dentition 0.4-0.8%. The presence of supernumerary teeth can be found in everyday dental practice.Case presentation: We describe 3 cases of patients with supernumerary teeth. First patient had supernumerary lateral incisor 12s, second - premolar fused, multicuspid, supernumerary deciduous tooth 64s of having several interconnected roots, and third - erupted odontoma between teeth 13 and 14. In all cases treatment involved the removal of the supernumerary tooth.Conclusions: The decision on proceeding with the supernumerary teeth should be based on the full clinical picture and interview. Early diagnosis and removal of supernumerary teeth allow to avoid or reduce possible complications.

  13. Body composition in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Angela; Garaci, Francesco; Cafarelli, Francesco Pio; Guglielmi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Nutritional status is the results of nutrients intake, absorption and utilization, able to influence physiological and pathological conditions. Nutritional status can be measured for individuals with different techniques, such as CT Body Composition, quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Ultrasound, Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry and Bioimpendance. Because obesity is becoming a worldwide epidemic, there is an increasing interest in the study of body composition to monitor conditions and delay in development of obesity-related diseases. The emergence of these evidence demonstrates the need of standard assessment of nutritional status based on body weight changes, playing an important role in several clinical setting, such as in quantitative measurement of tissues and their fluctuations in body composition, in survival rate, in pathologic condition and illnesses. Since body mass index has been shown to be an imprecise measurement of fat-free and fat mass, body cell mass and fluids, providing no information if weight changes, consequently there is the need to find a better way to evaluate body composition, in order to assess fat-free and fat mass with weight gain and loss, and during ageing. Monitoring body composition can be very useful for nutritional and medical interventional. This review is focused on the use of Body Composition in Clinical Practice. PMID:26971404

  14. Body composition in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Angela; Garaci, Francesco; Cafarelli, Francesco Pio; Guglielmi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Nutritional status is the results of nutrients intake, absorption and utilization, able to influence physiological and pathological conditions. Nutritional status can be measured for individuals with different techniques, such as CT Body Composition, quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Ultrasound, Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry and Bioimpendance. Because obesity is becoming a worldwide epidemic, there is an increasing interest in the study of body composition to monitor conditions and delay in development of obesity-related diseases. The emergence of these evidence demonstrates the need of standard assessment of nutritional status based on body weight changes, playing an important role in several clinical setting, such as in quantitative measurement of tissues and their fluctuations in body composition, in survival rate, in pathologic condition and illnesses. Since body mass index has been shown to be an imprecise measurement of fat-free and fat mass, body cell mass and fluids, providing no information if weight changes, consequently there is the need to find a better way to evaluate body composition, in order to assess fat-free and fat mass with weight gain and loss, and during ageing. Monitoring body composition can be very useful for nutritional and medical interventional. This review is focused on the use of Body Composition in Clinical Practice.

  15. Research and clinical practice relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashammakhi N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To The Editor: I highly value and greet the authors for their editorial. Many important issues related to medical education and its future in Libya have been discussed in this paper [1]. One important point that has been addressed and I feel deserves attention is the “abnormal” relationship between clinical practice and research in Libya. From discussions with colleagues, this problem somehow has evolved from a misconception about educational and training systems that may have occurred in the past. It may also be related to the lack of attention to research that has long existed in Libya [2,3]. The other aspect, shared with many other developing countries, is the misconception of research as unimportant or a luxury aspect of medicine. When it comes to understanding how a system (including healthcare can be updated and developed, the answer is vague! One important reason is a lack of understanding of the impact that research has on developing methods. In developed countries, research is the main academic distinction that leads to appointments for coveted positions in the system and is an important factor for academic promotion. In Libya, there remain arguments about who will be awarded Chair of university clinical departments. Such a post should no doubt be given to those with established academic achievements. When highly qualified persons are at the top of the pyramid this leads to further progress and enhanced research and advancement. The authors have discussed the point of having proper search committees for leadership and faculty positions. I believe that it will help eliminate the current stagnation and help to create innovative solutions. This should lead to improved medical education, health services, and ultimately impact the quality of life of all Libyan citizens.

  16. Django design patterns and best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Ravindran, Arun

    2015-01-01

    If you want to learn how best to utilize commonly found patterns and learn best practices in developing applications with Django, this is the book for you. This book, like Django itself, is accessible to amateur and professional developers alike and assumes little in the way of prior experience. Although written for Python 3, the majority of the code in this book works in Python 2 or can be easily translated.

  17. Patient Preferences and Physician Practice Patterns Regarding Breast Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: There are multiple current strategies for breast radiotherapy (RT). The alignment of physician practice patterns with best evidence and patient preferences will enhance patient autonomy and improve cancer care. However, there is little information describing patient preferences for breast RT and physician practice patterns. Methods and Materials: Using a reliable and valid instrument, we assessed the preferences of 5,000 randomly selected women (with or without cancer) undergoing mammography. To assess practice patterns, 2,150 randomly selected physician-members of American Society for Radiation Oncology were surveyed. Results: A total of 1,807 women (36%) and 363 physicians (17%) provided usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < ±2.3% for patients and < ±5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) 62%, partial breast irradiation (PBI) 28%, and conventionally fractionated whole breast irradiation (CF-WBI) 10%. By comparison, 82% of physicians use CF-WBI for more than 2/3 of women and 56% never use HF-WBI. With respect to PBI, 62% of women preferred three-dimensional (3D)-PBI and 38% favor brachytherapy-PBI, whereas 36% of physicians offer 3D-PBI and 66% offer brachytherapy-PBI. 70% of women prefer once-daily RT over 10 days vs. twice-daily RT over 5 days. 55% of physicians who use PBI do not offer PBI on clinical trial. Conclusions: HF-WBI, while preferred by patients and supported by evidence, falls behind the unproven and less preferred strategy of PBI in clinical practice. There is a discrepancy between women’s preferences for PBI modality and type of PBI offered by physicians. Further alignment is needed between practice patterns, patient preferences, and clinical evidence.

  18. How GPs implement clinical guidelines in everyday clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbæk Le, Jette; Hansen, Helle P; Riisgaard, Helle;

    2015-01-01

    . Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and then analysed using systematic text condensation. RESULTS: Analysis of the interviews revealed three different approaches to the implementation of guidelines in clinical practice. In some practices the GPs prioritized time and resources on collective...

  19. A Critical Approach to Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Marshall

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of publication of clinical practice guidelines for the management of common medical illnesses continues to accelerate. The appropriate dissemination and uptake of high quality practice guidelines can synthesize evidence, improve patient outcomes and enhance the efficiency of health care delivery. However, the methodological rigour and relevance of the growing number of publications labelled ’clinical practice guidelines’ vary widely. Health care payers, providers and advocates must learn to appraise and interpret guideline recommendations critically. A simple and practical nine-question approach to evaluating the quality, relevance and effectiveness of clinical practice guidelines is presented.

  20. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring – Clinical Practice Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Mako

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM became a subject of considerable scientific interest. Due to the increasing use of the ABPM in everyday clinical practice it is important that all the users have a correct knowledge on the clinical indications, the methodology of using the device including some technical issues and the interpretation of results. In the last years several guidelines and position papers have been published with recommendations for the monitoring process, reference values, for clinical practice and research. This paper represents a summary of the most important aspects related to the use of ABPM in daily practice, being a synthesis of recommendations from the recent published guidelines and position papers. This reference article presents the practical and technical issues of ABPM, the use of this method in special situations, the clinical interpretation of measured values including the presentation of different ABPM patterns, derived parameters, the prognostic significance and the limitations of this method.

  1. DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING CLINICAL PRACTICES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PREDICTING MEDICAL DECISIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHEN, JONATHAN H; GOLDSTEIN, MARY K; ASCH, STEVEN M; ALTMAN, RUSS B

    2015-01-01

    Automatically data-mining clinical practice patterns from electronic health records (EHR) can enable prediction of future practices as a form of clinical decision support (CDS). Our objective is to determine the stability of learned clinical practice patterns over time and what implication this has when using varying longitudinal historical data sources towards predicting future decisions. We trained an association rule engine for clinical orders (e.g., labs, imaging, medications) using structured inpatient data from a tertiary academic hospital. Comparing top order associations per admission diagnosis from training data in 2009 vs. 2012, we find practice variability from unstable diagnoses with rank biased overlap (RBO)0.6. Predicting admission orders for future (2013) patients with associations trained on recent (2012) vs. older (2009) data improved accuracy evaluated by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) 0.89 to 0.92, precision at ten (positive predictive value of the top ten predictions against actual orders) 30% to 37%, and weighted recall (sensitivity) at ten 2.4% to 13%, (P<10−10). Training with more longitudinal data (2009-2012) was no better than only using recent (2012) data. Secular trends in practice patterns likely explain why smaller but more recent training data is more accurate at predicting future practices. PMID:26776186

  2. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may be...

  3. Understanding change in clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copnell, B

    1998-03-01

    The present paper employs a poststructural framework to explore the construction of change in clinical nursing practice, as portrayed in nursing literature. In it a critique of two specific bodies of literature is offered: that which deals with the 'abstract' conception of change (but which is heavily influenced by organizational discourses) and that which describes changes in the clinical setting of critical care nursing practice. It is argued that the discursive constitution of change that is revealed in this analysis disadvantages clinical nurses. Because the context in which change occurs is largely unacknowledged, clinical nursing practice, as experienced and understood by nurses, is also marginalized. Change in clinical practice is under-researched, and such inquiry should be undertaken from the perspective of nurses themselves, and requires an exploration of the discursive context of nursing work. PMID:9611575

  4. Utilization of incontinence clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, B; Moore, K N

    2001-11-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are evidence-based recommendations for best practice and have been developed with the assumption they will be embraced by practitioners; a further assumption is that clinical practice guidelines will improve the delivery of care. In this article, we provide a working definition of evidence-based practice, discuss the strengths and limitations of CPGs, describe the implementation of CPGs in the context of urinary incontinence, and consider the steps that the WOCN has taken to initiate evidence-based practice. Current issues are presented along with initiatives that have resulted in clinical practice guidelines on incontinence from the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada. On the basis of the current literature, it is concluded that clinical practice guidelines can play an important role in WOCN practice and that the implementation of guidelines may improve clinical practice. However, guidelines are only as valid as the evidence on which they are based and may not take into account gender or cultural differences or the effect that comorbid conditions can have on treatment outcomes. Finally, guidelines must follow a comprehensive approach that involves management and staff and includes education, facilitation, evaluation, feedback, and an understanding of change strategies. PMID:11707762

  5. Positron emission tomography clinical practice

    CERN Document Server

    Valk, Peter E; Bailey, Dale L; Townsend, David W; Maisey, Michael N

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a contemporary reference to the science, technology and clinical applications of PET and PET/CT. The opening chapters summarize the scientific aspects of PET and PET/CT including physics, instrumentation, radiation dosimetry and radiation protection. A chapter on normal variants in FDG PET imaging serves as an introduction to the clinical chapters, which cover oncology applications and have been updated to include the impact of FDG PET/CT imaging in oncology. The book concludes with chapters on the use of PET and PET/CT in cardiology and neurology and PET imaging of infectio

  6. Survey of clinical nutrition practices of Canadian gastroenterologists

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Harminder; Duerksen, Donald R

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Nutrition education is a required part of gastrointestinal training programs. The involvement of gastroenterologists in clinical nutrition once their training has been completed is unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine the practice pattern of gastroenterologists in clinical nutrition and their perceived adequacy of nutrition training during their gastroenterology (GI) fellowship.METHODS: The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology mailed a survey to all of its 463...

  7. Impella ventricular support in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burzotta, Francesco; Trani, Carlo; Doshi, Sagar N;

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support represents an evolving field of clinical research and practice. Currently, several cardiac assist devices have been developed but, among different institutions and countries, a large variation in indications for use and device selection exists. The Impella platform ...

  8. Placebo interventions, placebo effects and clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Linde, Klaus; Fässler, Margrit; Meissner, Karin

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the role of placebo interventions and placebo effects in clinical practice. We first describe the relevance of different perspectives among scientists, physicians and patients on what is considered a placebo intervention in clinical practice. We then summarize how placebo effects have been investigated in randomized controlled trials under the questionable premise that such effects are produced by placebo interventions. We further discuss why a shift of focus from the pla...

  9. Loop Diuretics in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Won; Han, Sang Youb

    2015-06-01

    Diuretics are commonly used to control edema across various clinical fields. Diuretics inhibit sodium reabsorption in specific renal tubules, resulting in increased urinary sodium and water excretion. Loop diuretics are the most potent diuretics. In this article, we review five important aspects of loop diuretics, in particular furosemide, which must be considered when prescribing this medicine: (1) oral versus intravenous treatment, (2) dosage, (3) continuous versus bolus infusion, (4) application in chronic kidney disease patients, and (5) side effects. The bioavailability of furosemide differs between oral and intravenous therapy. Additionally, the threshold and ceiling doses of furosemide differ according to the particular clinical condition of the patient, for example in patients with severe edema or chronic kidney disease. To maximize the efficiency of furosemide, a clear understanding of how the mode of delivery will impact bioavailability and the required dosage is necessary.

  10. Positive interventions in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Tayyab

    2009-05-01

    Mainstream psychotherapy has made huge strides in treating symptoms and disorders, but it has largely overlooked happiness as a therapeutic goal despite frequently hearing from clients, "Doctor, I want to be happy." This issue of Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session describes a number of positive interventions for specific clinical problems, such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, loss, grief, and relationship distress. Although the name may suggest it, positive interventions do not imply that rest of psychotherapies are negative. Neither are negatives denied nor minimized. Distinct from self-help recipes proffering instant changes, positive psychology interventions refer to systematic approaches to overcome challenges by using clients' strengths and assets. A hybrid psychotherapy-coaching model and strength-based assessment can ask a client "What is right with you?" All articles are supplemented with rich case illustrations. PMID:19294745

  11. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garattini, Silvio; Jakobsen, Janus C; Wetterslev, Jørn;

    2016-01-01

    Using the best quality of clinical research evidence is essential for choosing the right treatment for patients. How to identify the best research evidence is, however, difficult. In this narrative review we summarise these threats and describe how to minimise them. Pertinent literature was consi...... research are carefully considered and minimised, research results will be more valid and this will benefit patients and heath care systems....

  12. Social media in clinical practice

    CERN Document Server

    Meskó, Bertalan

    2013-01-01

    The number of patients using social media and the number of applications and solutions used by medical professionals online have been sky-rocketing in the past few years, therefore the rational behind creating a well-designed, clear and tight handbook of practical examples and case studies with simple pieces of suggestions about different social media platforms is evident. While the number of e-patients is rising, the number of web-savvy doctors who can meet the expectations of these new generations of patients is not, this huge gap can only be closed by providing medical professionals with ea

  13. Impella ventricular support in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burzotta, Francesco; Trani, Carlo; Doshi, Sagar N;

    2015-01-01

    and the operative protocols, this working group attempted to establish the best clinical practice with the technology. The present paper reviews the main theoretical principles of Impella and provides an up-to-date summary of the best practical aspects of device use which may help others gain the maximal advantage...

  14. Reshaping Clinical Practice for the New Millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Christine A.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the need to train clinical practitioners in social work to address ongoing issues of oppression. Describes a second-year Master's in Social Work clinical practice sequence taught from feminist, poststructuralist, postmodern, and social constructionist perspectives, where students learn to assess the impacts of oppression, discover…

  15. Clinical Practice Guidelines for intestinal occlusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Rudis Miguel Monzón Rodríguez; Carlos Jaime Geroy Gómez; Francisco García Valdéz; Jorge Luis Ulloa Capestany; Maribel Misas Menéndez

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for intestinal occlusion. This document includes the main aspects related with classification, physiopathology, clinical diagnosis, complementary examinations and therapy aimed at the post-operatory treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  16. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebral Abscess Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Barrueta Reyes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebral Abscess Treatment. It has been defined as a festering process caused by any germ and placed inside the cerebral parenchyma; this is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for surgeons and general doctors since the clinical and radiological manifestations are often imprecise. This document describes its etiological agents, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  17. Mayo Clinic Jacksonville electronic radiology practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Richard L.; Berquist, Thomas H.; Rueger, Wolfgang

    1996-05-01

    We have begun a project to implement an Electronic (Filmless) Radiology Practice (ERP) at Mayo Clinic Jacksonville. This project is integrated with the implementation of a project (Automated Clinical Practice--ACP) to eliminate circulation and archival of the current paper Medical Record. The ERP will result in elimination of screen/film radiography and the transmittal of film throughout the institution by the end of 1996. In conjunction with the ACP, paper and film will not circulate within the clinic by the end of this year.

  18. Dentists' dietary perception and practice patterns in a dental practice-based research network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Yokoyama

    Full Text Available Dental caries are largely preventable, and epidemiological evidence for a relationship between diet and oral health is abundant. To date, however, dentists' perceptions about the role of diet and dentists' practice patterns regarding diet counseling have not been clarified.THE PURPOSES OF THIS STUDY WERE TO: (1 examine discordance between dentists' perception of the importance of diet in caries treatment planning and their actual provision of diet counseling to patients, and (2 identify dentists' characteristics associated with their provision of diet counseling.The study used a cross-sectional study design consisting of a questionnaire survey in Japan.The study queried dentists working in outpatient dental practices who were affiliated with the Dental Practice-Based Research Network Japan (JDPBRN, which aims to allow dentists to investigate research questions and share experiences and expertise (n = 282.Dentists were asked about their perceptions on the importance of diet and their practice patterns regarding diet counseling, as well as patient, practice, and dentist background data.The majority of participants (n = 116, 63% recognized that diet is "more important" to oral health. However, among participants who think diet is "more important" (n = 116, only 48% (n = 56 provide diet counseling to more than 20% of their patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis suggested that several variables were associated with providing diet counseling; dentist gender, practice busyness, percentage of patients interested in caries prevention, caries risk assessment, and percentage of patients who receive blood pressure screening.Some discordance exists between dentists' perception of the importance of diet in caries treatment planning and their actual practice pattern regarding diet counseling to patients. Reducing this discordance may require additional dentist education, including nutritional and systemic disease concepts; patient

  19. Night terrors. Clinical characteristics and personality patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kales, J D; Kales, A; Soldatos, C R; Caldwell, A B; Charney, D S; Martin, E D

    1980-12-01

    The development and clinical course of night terrors and the personality patterns of patients with this disorder were evaluated in 40 adults who had a current complaint of night terrors. Compared with a group of adult sleepwalkers, the patients with night terrors had a later age of onset for their disorder, a higher frequency of events, and an earlier time of night for the occurrence of episodes. Both groups had high levels of psychopathology, with higher values for the night terror group. This sleepwalkers showed active, outwardly directed behavioral patterns, whereas the night terror patients showed an inhibition of outward expressions of aggression and a predominance of anxiety, depression, tendencies obsessive-compulsive/, and phobicness. Although night terrors and sleepwalking in childhood seem to be related primarily to genetic and developmental factors, their persistence and especially their onset in adulthood are found to be related more to psychological factors. PMID:7447622

  20. Security patterns in practice designing secure architectures using software patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Buglioni, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Learn to combine security theory and code to produce secure systems Security is clearly a crucial issue to consider during the design and implementation of any distributed software architecture. Security patterns are increasingly being used by developers who take security into serious consideration from the creation of their work. Written by the authority on security patterns, this unique book examines the structure and purpose of security patterns, illustrating their use with the help of detailed implementation advice, numerous code samples, and descriptions in UML. Provides

  1. George Engel's Epistemology of Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraga, Michael; Fuks, Abraham; Boudreau, J Donald

    2014-01-01

    George Engel's (1913-1999) biopsychosocial model, one of the most significant proposals for the renewal of medicine in the latter half of the 20th century, has been understood primarily as a multi-factorial approach to the etiology of disease and as a call to re-humanize clinical practice. This common reading of Engel's model misses the central aspect of his proposal, that the biopsychosocial model is an epistemology for clinical work. By stating the simple fact that the clinician is not dealing directly with a body, but first, and inevitably, with a person, Engel challenged the epistemology implicit in the classical clinical method-a method predicated on the possibility of direct access to the body. Framed in epistemological terms, the issue at stake is not the need to complement medical science with humane virtues, but rather to acknowledge that the object of clinical practice is not the body but the patient.

  2. Peer review practicalities in clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Metcalfe

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Matthew J Metcalfe1, MAL Farrant2, JM Farrant31Department of Vascular Surgery, Imperial College NHS Trust, St Mary’s Hospital, London, UK; 2Department of Anaesthesia, Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Poole Hospital, Dorset, UK; 3Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust, Royal Free Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Peer review processes in teaching requires a reviewer to observe a teacher’s practice in a planned manner. Conversation between the two enables the teacher to reflect on their own teaching, promoting self-improvement. Although a central part of the teaching process, and despite its crucial role in continuing professional development, peer review is not widely practiced in hospital settings. This article explains the process and its benefits. Practical implementations of the process in busy clinical settings are suggested. Its evaluation and incorporation into undergraduate learning and postgraduate clinical practice are described. With enthusiastic support for colleagues and allowances for its implementation, it should become part of the regular teaching practice, improving the quality of teaching delivered.Keywords: teaching, education, clinical practice, peer review

  3. Ethical practice and clinical legal education

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, N. J.

    2005-01-01

    This article is designed to explore a variety of ways in which clinical methods can achieve the goals of educators and the professions in the preparation of student lawyers. In particular I intend to show how clinical methods assist in the development of: - a deeper understanding of the law, and the law in context; - general transferable skills; - legal professional skills; - a sound values basis for ethical practice. In addition, I hope to show that there are ways of using cli...

  4. Clinical Practice Guidelines Infective Endocarditis Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro de la Cruz Avilés

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Infective Endocarditis Treatment. Infectious disease affecting the endocardium produces vegetations and could also affect the septum, the chordae tendinae or mural endocardium. It includes concept, risk factors, classification (and special groups and an update and review of the main clinical aspects, complications and treatment stressing the antibiotic therapy. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  5. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Exogenous Poisoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Díaz Mesa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Exogenous Poisoning. Medical emergencies determined by the exposure to different substances (drugs, medicines, physical or chemical corrosive agents, etc. It includes the classification of toxic substances, clinical diagnosis (main syndromes, and description of therapeutic variations (vital support, antidotes, absorption measurements and increase of elimination and depuration of the toxic substance. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  6. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Potential Donors Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roque Nodal Arruebarrena

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Potential Donors Management. It has been defined as the patient in Glasgow coma with scale higher or equal to 8 who doesn´t present contradictions for transplant (possible donor and who has been diagnosed of encephalic death. This document reviews and updates concepts, lists indications and contraindications for different organs donation, clinical assessment of the donor and its treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  7. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiogenic Shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arelys Falcón Hernández

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiogenic Shock. It has been defined as the persistence of tissue hypoperfusion, usually associated to blood hypotension as the result of heart pumping failure. This document includes a review of the main aspects as concepts, aetiology, diagnosis and treatment. It includes the concept, risk factors, clinical presentations, diagnosis, and therapy based on the possibilities of our environment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  8. Under-forest Breeding Pattern and the Practice Form

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Zhong-ming

    2012-01-01

    Through the development in recent years, China’s under-forest breeding pattern can be divided into four kinds of practice form of under-forest breeding pattern (the pattern of breeding driven by leading enterprises; the pattern of breeding driven by intermediary economic organizations; the pattern of breeding driven by the professional wholesale market; the pattern of breeding driven by the modern animal husbandry demonstration areas), according to difference in the main body participating in signing the operation contract in breeding pattern. In the production practice of under-forest breeding pattern, the most widely used and successful pattern is the pattern of breeding driven by leading enterprises and its derivative forms.

  9. Practical DTCO through design/patterning exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Neal; Meiring, Jason; Bahnas, Mohamed; O'Neill, Joseph; Endo, Toshikazu; Schumacher, Dan; Culp, James; Wawrzynski, Glenn; Lamba, Gurpreet S.; Adam, Kostas; Sturtevant, John; McGinty, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Design Technology Co-Optimization (DTCO) becomes more important with every new technology node. Complex patterning issues can no longer wait to be detected experimentally using test sites because of compressed technology development schedules. Simulation must be used to discover complex interactions between an iteration of the design rules, and a simultaneous iteration of an intended patterning technology. The problem is often further complicated by an incomplete definition of the patterning space. The DTCO process must be efficient and thoroughly interrogate the legal design space for a technology to be successful. In this paper we present our view of DTCO, called Design and Patterning Exploration. Three emphasis areas are identified and explained with examples: Technology Definition, Technology Learning, and Technology Refinement. The Design and Patterning Exploration flows are applied to a logic 1.3x metal routing layer. Using these flows, yield limiting patterns are identified faster using random layout generation, and can be ruled out or tracked using a database of problem patterns. At the same time, a pattern no longer in the set of rules should not be considered during OPC tuning. The OPC recipe may then be adjusted for better performance on the legal set of pattern constructs. The entire system is dynamic, and users must be able to access related teams output for faster more accurate understanding of design and patterning interactions. In the discussed example, the design rules and OPC recipe are tuned at the same time, leading to faster design rule revisions, as well as improved patterning through more customized OPC and RET.

  10. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Encephalic Death Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roque Nodal Arruebarrena

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Encephalic Death Treatment. It has been defined as the irreversible ceasing of all encephalic functions (cerebral hemispheres, of the encephalic stalk and cerebellum. This document includes the diagnostic criteria and its workflow and comments on the diagnostic tests and its legal aspects. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  11. Clinical Practice Guidelines for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandy Viera Valdés

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. These are arrhythmias in which structures placed above the bifurcation of the bundle of His are involved; characterized by tachycardia with abrupt starting and ending. We comment its classification, common characteristics, general treatment and specific conduct for its different variables. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  12. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Critical Patients’ Nutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Patricia Casanova González

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Critical Patients’ Nutrition. This document includes a review and update of aspects related with nutritional assessment of patients in critical condition; indications, contraindications and procedures for enteral and parenteral nutrition and its follow up. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  13. Good clinical practices in phase I studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decousus, H; Perpoint, B; Mismetti, P; Ollagnier, M; Queneau, P

    1990-01-01

    In France, official guidelines for good clinical practices in clinical trials were issued in 1987. In December 1988, a law was passed that fixed the requirements for carrying out experiments in healthy subjects. It will be completed by official guidelines for the structures in which experiments on healthy subjects (and patients as well, when the investigation would not benefit the health of the patients) may be conducted. Hence a battery of recent legal instructions precisely state what good clinical practices are in the setting of phase I studies. Of particular importance are: subject recruitment and selection methods and procedures; specific competence of the investigator, in particular to interpret the pre-trial data; necessary and sufficient facilities to guarantee the subjects' safety; careful quality control to check all laboratory procedures; necessity of written standard operating procedures.

  14. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Bugaj, T. J.; Nikendei, C.

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or “skills labs”, i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that al...

  15. The research and practice based on the full-time visitation model in clinical medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Zhang(Department of Physics and Center for Quantum Spacetime (CQUeST), Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul, 121-742 Korea); Jing Leng; Shu-juan Xu; Zuofeng Zhang; Gangping Wang

    2015-01-01

    Most of the higher medical colleges and universities teaching hospital carry certain clinical teaching tasks, but the traditional teaching pattern of "two stage", including the early stage of the theory of teaching, the late arrangement of clinical practice, had some drawbacks such as practice time is too concentrated and the chasm between students' theory and practice. It is suggested that students contact clinical diagnosis and treatment earlier, visit more patients and increase the ratio o...

  16. Clinical Decision Support Systems: A Useful Tool in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolostoumpis G.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of supporting in decision – making shows an increase in recent years. Based on mathematic simulation tools, knowledge databases, processing methods, medical data and methods, artificial intelligence for coding of the available knowledge and for resolving complex problems arising into clinical practice. Aim: the aim of this review is to present the development of new methods and modern services, in clinical practice and the emergence in their implementation. Data and methods: the methodology that was followed included research of articles that referred to health sector and modern technologies, at the electronic data bases “pubmed” and “medline”. Results: Is a useful tool for medical experts using characteristics and medical data used by the doctors. Constitute innovation for the medical community, and ensure the support of clinical decisions with an overall way by providing a comprehensive solution in the light of the integration of computational decision support systems into clinical practice. Conclusions: Decision Support Systems contribute to improving the quality of health services with simultaneous impoundment of costs (i.e. avoid medical errors

  17. Uses of internet technology in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The practice of medicine has extended itself to vast areas and requires active clinicians to systematize and organize their workload through the use of the most up-to-date digital and computer communication technologies. Computerization and worldwide accessibility of information has especially provided great assistance in this regard. The explosive growth of medical information increases the need for the use of these new methods of organizing and accessing data. This article briefly summarizes a few of the vital tools that internet technology has provided clinical practice, with the aid of basic concepts of internet, database systems, hospital systems and data security and reliability. (author)

  18. Airway management in pierre robin sequence: patterns of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Benjamin; Powitzky, Rosser; Robledo, Candace; Rose, Christopher; Glade, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Objectives : To report survey results from American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association members on the practice patterns of airway obstruction management in patients with Pierre Robin sequence. Design : A 10-question online survey was sent and the data were reviewed. Setting : Online survey of members of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. Patients : Surveys assessed management patterns of patients with Pierre Robin sequence whom a surgeon member of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association treated for airway obstruction. Interventions : The survey comprised data on management strategies for airway obstruction in Pierre Robin sequence, including tracheostomy, tongue-lip adhesion, mandibular distraction, and treatments that falls in the "other" category. Results : A total of 87 American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association members completed the survey. Respondents' results were analyzed as a whole and by individual subspecialty: plastic surgery (n = 33), oromaxillofacial surgery (n = 21), and otolaryngology (n = 29). Although most of the surgeons were trained to manage airway obstruction in Pierre Robin sequence patients using tracheostomy (47%, n = 39) and tongue-lip adhesion (31%, n = 26), 48% reported a current preference for mandibular distraction (n = 40). Of surgeons who preferred to manage Pierre Robin sequence with tongue-lip adhesion (n = 23), 65% were trained to do so (n = 15). Surgeons preferring mandibular distraction (n = 40) and tracheostomy (n = 14) more often reported they were trained to manage Pierre Robin sequence with tracheostomy. Conclusions : Currently there are various practice patterns for the management of airway obstruction in Pierre Robin sequence. Training habits and subspecialty category may influence a surgeon's preference in patients who fail conservative therapy. Treatment guidelines are lacking and may require significant collaboration among centers and subspecialties to develop a more standardized

  19. Clinical photography in the dermatology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witmer, William K; Lebovitz, Peter J

    2012-09-01

    Photography has been accepted for decades as a standard means for documenting dermatologic conditions and as an adjunct to their treatment, in both medical practice and research. The emergence of low-cost easy-to-use digital imaging systems has made good-quality photography more accessible to practitioners, while providing improved functionality in the clinical environment. Primary concerns are controlling lighting and positioning to provide a clear record of the patients skin condition and maintaining consistency over time to assure meaningful comparison of clinical end points.

  20. Clinic Practical Guides for Cerebrovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Angel Buergo Zuaznábar; Otman Fernández Concepción; Jesús Pérez Nellar; Gloria Lara Fernández; Carlos Maya Entenza; Alejandro Pando Cabrera

    2007-01-01

    The clinic practical guides for cerebrovascular diseases are presented. They include different aspects as its concept, classification, and epidemiological data in Cuba as well as worldwide. They also offer its diagnosis, classification, complications and treatment. The frequency of assessment of its application including the tools to measure the quality of life in patients with cerebrovascular accident and the way to proceed with them are shown

  1. Penile Cancer: Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Peter E.; Philippe E. Spiess; Agarwal, Neeraj; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Herr, Harry W.; Inman, Brant A.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Lele, Subodh M.; Michalski, Jeff; Pagliaro, Lance; Pal, Sumanta K.; Patterson, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the penis represents approximately 0.5% of all cancers among men in the United States and other developed countries. Although rare, it is associated with significant disfigurement, and only half of the patients survive beyond 5 years. Proper evaluation of both the primary lesion and lymph nodes is critical, because nodal involvement is the most important factor of survival. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Penile Cancer provide recommendations o...

  2. Clinical decision making in veterinary practice

    OpenAIRE

    Everitt, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to develop an understanding of the factors which influence veterinary surgeons’ clinical decision making during routine consultations. Methods The research takes a qualitative approach using video-cued interviews, in which one of the veterinary surgeon’s own consultations is used as the basis of a semi-structured interview exploring decision making in real cases. The research focuses primarily on small animal consultations in first opinion practice, how...

  3. Caring during clinical practice: Midwives’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmajapi E. Chokwe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring forms the core of nursing and midwifery. Despite caring being an important emotional aspect of midwifery and nursing, there are general public complaints about uncaring behaviour in midwifery. Therefore, there is a need to explore caring from midwives’ point of view with the hope of identifying solutions and recommendations for midwifery practice. Furthermore, the study aimed to stimulate debate and discussion about the caring behaviour of midwives.Objective: To explore caring during clinical practice as perceived and experienced by midwives.Method: The study was contextual, exploratory and qualitative. The participants were midwives working in state and private hospitals in Tshwane,South Africa where BTech II and III midwifery learners were allocated for work integrated learning (WIL. Data collection was carried out through self-report using a questionnaire and focus group. Questionnaires were distributed to 40 midwives at private and state hospitals in Tshwane. This was followed by two focus group sessions to ensure that data is enriched. The hermeneutic interpretive approach was used to analyse data, and analysis continued until saturation.Results: Themes of caring and uncaring related to patient care and midwives emerged. Thefindings illustrated that the midwives had excellent theoretical knowledge of caring, but someof them did not display caring behaviour during clinical practice.Conclusion: Some of the midwives did not display caring behaviour. Implication for practicewas provided based on the research findings. Recommendations included measures of improving caring behaviours during midwifery practice.

  4. [Diverticular disease - clinical patterns and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembcke, Bernhard; Kruis, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Diverticulosis, diverticular disease and diverticulitis have come into focus again because new aspects concerning diagnosis, risk factors and treatment arose only recently which prompted a new Guideline released by the DGVS and DGAV summarising the current evidence. Along with the guideline's essentials for medical practice a diagnosis of diverticulitis is considered unsatisfactory unless a cross-sectional imaging method (either ultrasonography [US] or computed tomography [CT] ) has proven that the clinical findings and inflammation (CRP considered superior to WBC and temperature) are due to diverticular inflammation. For reasons of practicability and considering relevant legislation for radiation exposure protection, US is the primary - and usually effectual - diagnostic method of choice as it is equipotent to CT. While US offers better resolution and enables precise imaging exactly at the location of pain as well as reiterative application, the latter implies advantages in the case of a deep abscess or diverticulitis in difficult locations (e. g. the small pelvis). Clinical evidence and laboratory and imaging findings allow for distinguishing a large number of differential diagnoses and also form the basis of a new classification (classification of diverticular disease, CDD) which comprises all forms of diverticular disease, from diverticulosis to bleeding and to the different facettes of diverticulitis. This classification -which should be applied in any patient with the diagnosis of diverticular disease- is independent of specific diagnostic preferences and applicable both to conservative and operative treatment options. While the number of recurrent episodes is no longer a significant indicator for surgery in diverticulitis, severity and / or complications determine treatment options along with the patients preferences. According to first data, conservative treatment may waive antibiotics under certain circumstances, however they are indispensible in

  5. Patterns, principles, and practices of domain-driven design

    CERN Document Server

    Millett, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Methods for managing complex software construction following the practices, principles and patterns of Domain-Driven Design with code examples in C# This book presents the philosophy of Domain-Driven Design (DDD) in a down-to-earth and practical manner for experienced developers building applications for complex domains. A focus is placed on the principles and practices of decomposing a complex problem space as well as the implementation patterns and best practices for shaping a maintainable solution space. You will learn how to build effective domain models through the use of tactical pat

  6. Dentists’ practice patterns regarding caries prevention: results from a dental practice-based research network

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Yoko; Kakudate, Naoki; Sumida, Futoshi; Matsumoto, Yuki; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Gordan, Valeria V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to (1) quantify dentists' practice patterns regarding caries prevention and (2) test the hypothesis that certain dentists' characteristics are associated with these practice patterns. Design The study used a cross-sectional study design consisting of a questionnaire survey. Participants The study queried dentists who worked in outpatient dental practices who were affiliated with the Dental Practice-Based Research Network Japan, which seeks to engage d...

  7. Appcelerator Titanium patterns and best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Pollentine, Boydlee

    2013-01-01

    The book takes a step-by-step approach to help you understand CommonJS and Titanium architecture patterns, with easy to follow samples and plenty of in-depth explanations If you're an existing Titanium developer or perhaps a new developer looking to start off your Titanium applications "the right way", then this book is for you. With easy to follow examples and a full step-by-step account of architecting a sample application using CommonJS and MVC, along with chapters on new features such as ACS, you'll be implementing enterprise grade Titanium solutions in no time. You should have some JavaSc

  8. From pattern to practice: evaluation of a design pattern fostering trust in Virtual teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusman, Ellen; Van Bruggen, Jan; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    Rusman, E., Van Bruggen, J., & Koper, R. (2007). From pattern to practice: evaluation of a design pattern fostering trust in Virtual teams. Paper at conference workshop ‘Linking CSCL design patterns to authentic educational case studies’ at Computer Supported Collaborative Learning 2007, (CSCL 2007)

  9. Clinical practice is not applied scientific method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, K

    1995-08-01

    Practice is often described as applied science, but real life is far too complex and interactive to be handled by analytical scientific methods. The limitations of usefulness of scientific method in clinical practice result from many factors. The complexity of the large number of ill-defined variables at many levels of the problem. Scientific method focuses on one variable at a time across a hundred identical animals to extract a single, generalizable 'proof' or piece of 'truth'. Clinical practice deals with a hundred variables at one time within one animal from among a clientele of non-identical animals in order to optimize a mix of outcomes intended to satisfy that particular animal's current needs and desires. Interdependence among the variables. Most factors in the illness, the disease, the patient and the setting are interdependent, and cannot be sufficiently isolated to allow their separate study. Practice as a human transaction involving at least two people is too complex to be analysed one factor at a time when the interaction stimulates unpredictable responses. Ambiguous data. Words have many usages. People not only assign different interpretations to the same words, they assign different 'meanings', especially according to the threat or hope they may imply. The perceptual data gleaned from physical examination may be difficult to specify exactly or to confirm objectively. The accuracy and precision of investigational data and their reporting can be low, and are frequently unknown. Differing goals between science and practice. Science strives for exact points of propositional knowledge, verifiable by logical argument using objective data and repetition of the experiment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7661793

  10. 临床药师参与抗凝治疗的实践及工作模式探讨%Introduction and Discussion of Clinical Practice and Working Pattern of Clinical Pharmacist in Anticoagula-tion Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊; 徐航

    2014-01-01

    Close monitoring and medication education are very important in the treatment of anticoagulation . Through clinical pharmacists ’ participation in formulating and adjusting anticoagulant therapy scheme and providing a full range of pharmaceutical service to the patients during hospitalization and before and after discharge from hospital , the treatment compliance of patients was increased , the success rate of anticoagulant therapy was improved and the risk of medication was reduced .%在抗凝治疗过程中,密切的监护和系统的用药教育非常重要。临床药师通过参与患者抗凝方案的制定和调整,并为患者在住院期间、出院前和出院后提供全方位药学服务,可增加患者治疗依从性,提高抗凝治疗成功率,减少患者用药风险。

  11. Litigations and the Obstetrician in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinma, Jib

    2016-01-01

    The expectation of obstetrics is a perfect outcome. Obstetrics malpractice can cause morbidity and mortality that may engender litigation. Globally, increasing trend to litigation in obstetrics practice has resulted in high indemnity cost to the obstetrician with consequent frustration and overall danger to the future of obstetrics practice. The objective was to review litigations and the Obstetrician in Clinical Practice, highlighting medical ethics, federation of gynecology and obstetrics (FIGO's) ethical responsibility guideline on women's sexual and reproductive health and right; examine the relationship between medical ethics and medical laws; X-ray medical negligence and litigable obstetrics malpractices; and make recommendation towards the improvement of obstetrics practices to avert misconduct that would lead to litigation. Review involves a literature search on the internet in relevant journals, textbooks, and monographs. Knowledge and application of medical ethics are important to the obstetricians to avert medical negligence that will lead to litigation. A medical negligence can occur in any of the three triads of medicare viz: Diagnosis, advice/counseling, and treatment. Lawsuits in obstetrics generally center on errors of omission or commission especially in relation to the failure to perform caesarean section or to perform the operation early enough. Fear of litigation, high indemnity cost, and long working hours are among the main reasons given by obstetricians for ceasing obstetrics practice. Increasing global trend in litigation with high indemnity cost to the obstetrician is likely to jeopardize the future of obstetrics care especially in countries without medical insurance coverage for health practitioners. Litigation in obstetrics can be prevented through the Obstetrician's mindfulness of its possibility; acquainting themselves of the medical laws and guidelines related to their practice; ensuring adequate communication with, and consent of

  12. [Asthma clinical practice guidelines: advantages and pitfalls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Vicente; Bellido-Casado, Jesús; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Rodrigo, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    The Clinical Practice Guidelines on asthma have contributed towards unifying concepts and reaching a consensus on performances between different professional groups. However, they have failed in the overall improvement in the management of asthma, the final objective that they are meant to achieve. Today, almost 20 years after they appeared, the majority of asthmatic patients are still inadequately controlled, partly due to lack of follow up by doctors and the rest of health care staff who have to look after them. This lack of follow up of these recommendations is probably associated with a lack of well structured planning in their circulation and implementation. Also, although the recommendations of these guidelines agree in what is essential, they differ in other aspects, which in turn could be determining factors in clinical practice. The purpose of this article has been to establish the main differences in the recommendations that the principal clinical practice guidelines on the disease propose on the diagnosis, classification and treatment of asthma. To do this we have compared, The British Guideline on the Management of Asthma 2007, The Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention/Global Initiative for Asthma 2006 (GINA), the National Prevention program for Education on Asthma (Programa Nacional de Prevención para la Educación del Asma) (NAEPP), the Spanish Guide for the Management of Asthma (Guía Española para el Manejo del Asma 2003) (GEMA) and the ALAT y SEPAR guides, Latin-America and Spain. Recommendations for the Prevention and Treatment of Asthma Exacerbation (América Latina y España. Recomendaciones para la Prevención y el Tratamiento de la Exacerbación Asmática 2008) (ALERTA).

  13. The Sherlock Holmes method in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopeña, B

    2014-04-01

    This article lists the integral elements of the Sherlock Holmes method, which is based on the intelligent collection of information through detailed observation, careful listening and thorough examination. The information thus obtained is analyzed to develop the main and alternative hypotheses, which are shaped during the deductive process until the key leading to the solution is revealed. The Holmes investigative method applied to clinical practice highlights the advisability of having physicians reason through and seek out the causes of the disease with the data obtained from acute observation, a detailed review of the medical history and careful physical examination.

  14. Clinical practice guideline: screening and diagnosing autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, J

    2001-12-01

    The clinical practice guideline (CPG) reviewed in this month's column concerns the screening and diagnosis of autism. Autism is the third most common developmental disability and affects more than 1 in 500 children, or nearly 400,000 people in the United States, in some form. Primary care providers of children, including pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) and family nurse practitioners (FNPs), should reasonably expect to care for at least one child with autism (CWA). The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) has therefore developed guidelines to help healthcare providers facilitate the early identification of children with autism.

  15. The Sherlock Holmes method in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopeña, B

    2014-04-01

    This article lists the integral elements of the Sherlock Holmes method, which is based on the intelligent collection of information through detailed observation, careful listening and thorough examination. The information thus obtained is analyzed to develop the main and alternative hypotheses, which are shaped during the deductive process until the key leading to the solution is revealed. The Holmes investigative method applied to clinical practice highlights the advisability of having physicians reason through and seek out the causes of the disease with the data obtained from acute observation, a detailed review of the medical history and careful physical examination. PMID:24457141

  16. Biosensors in Clinical Practice: Focus on Oncohematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Cortelezzi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are devices that are capable of detecting specific biological analytes and converting their presence or concentration into some electrical, thermal, optical or other signal that can be easily analysed. The first biosensor was designed by Clark and Lyons in 1962 as a means of measuring glucose. Since then, much progress has been made and the applications of biosensors are today potentially boundless. This review is limited to their clinical applications, particularly in the field of oncohematology. Biosensors have recently been developed in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by hematological malignancies, such as the biosensor for assessing the in vitro pre-treatment efficacy of cytarabine in acute myeloid leukemia, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor for assessing the efficacy of imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia. The review also considers the challenges and future perspectives of biosensors in clinical practice.

  17. Ten practical, theory-based tips for clinical course planners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, T.; Westphall, I.; Blichfeldt, S.;

    2008-01-01

    A list of practical advice and examples are given based on the literature. E-learning with cliffhanger text-cases can activate prior knowledge, and selected examination skills can be trained with simulated patients. Patient video recordings can be used to train clinical reasoning skills, including...... pattern recognition and hypothetic-deductive approaches. Interactive approaches, for example, questioning, quizzes or buzz groups imply active involvement and participation. Quizzes and MCQ-testing can provide a formative 'check-up' on learning and point to gaps in understanding for the teachers...

  18. Predictors of Practice Patterns for Lymphedema Care Among Oncology Advanced Practice Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Joanne C.; Cleland, Charles M.; Mei R. Fu

    2012-01-01

    Lymphedema, a debilitating and chronic condition, is considered to be one of the most distressing adverse effects of cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to understand the practice patterns in lymphedema care and identify predictors influencing those patterns among oncology nurses, with a focus on advanced practice nurses. Random and purposive sampling was utilized to recruit 238 oncology nurses who completed the Web-based study. Participants included advanced practice nurses (nurs...

  19. Taking PDT into mainstream clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bown, Stephen G.

    2009-06-01

    Many individuals in the field are frustrated by the slow progress getting PDT established in mainstream clinical practice. The five key reasons are: 1. Lack of adequate evidence of safety and efficacy and optimization of dosimetry. These are fundamental. The number of randomized controlled studies is still small. For some cancer applications, it is difficult to get patients to agree to be randomised, so different approaches must be taken. Anecdotal results are not acceptable to sceptics and regulators. 2. The regulatory processes. The rules get more complex every day, but there is no choice, they must be met. The full bureaucratic strength of the pharmaceutical industry is needed to address these issues. 3. Conservatism of the medical profession. Established physicians are reluctant to change practice, especially if it means referring patients to different specialists. 4. Lack of education. It is amazing how few physicians have even heard of PDT and many that have, are sceptical. The profile of PDT to both the medical profession and the general public needs to be raised dramatically. Patient demand works wonders! 5. Money. Major investment is required to run clinical trials. Pharmaceutical companies may see PDT as a threat (eg reduced market for chemotherapy agents). Licensed photosensitisers are expensive. Why not reduce the price initially, to get the technique established and stimulate demand? PDT has the potential for enormous cost savings for health service providers. With appropriate motivation and resources these problems can be addressed. Possible routes forward will be suggested.

  20. How to critically appraise a clinical practice guideline

    OpenAIRE

    Clubb, Adrian B.; Dahm, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical practice guidelines play a critical role in guiding the evidence-based clinical practice of urology. We describe a systematic approach to critical appraisal of urology guidelines. Materials and Methods: Based on a focused clinical question derived from a clinical scenario, we identified a relevant clinical practice guideline that we critically appraised using the Users’ Guide to the Medical Literature framework as to whether the results are valid, what are the results, and c...

  1. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaj, T J; Nikendei, C

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or "skills labs", i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills. In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I) the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II) an outline of the underlying idea and (III) an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV) the training method's effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V) the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI) the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training. PMID:27579363

  2. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugaj, T. J.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Today, skills laboratories or “skills labs”, i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills.In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II an outline of the underlying idea and (III an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV the training method’s effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training.

  3. PRACTICAL CHRONIC PAIN ASSESSMENT TOOLS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncarić-Katušin, Mirjana; Milošević, Milan; Žilić, Antonio; Mišković, Petar; Majerić-Kogler, Višnja; Žunić, Josip

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to show the role of tools in the evaluation of chronic pain (CP) in general practitioner (GP) everyday clinical practice. The study was done by analyzing electronic database of the first visits of 1090 CP patients referred to the Pain Clinic of the Karlovac General Hospital, Karlovac, Croatia, by their GPs. All patient records were analyzed according to the cause of CP, strongest pain a week before the examination, quality of sleep, and the Patients' Global Impression of Change scale. All statistical analyses were done using the IBM SPSS Statistics version 19.0.0.1 (www.spss.com). CP predominantly occurs in older age group. Patients with musculoskeletal pain accounted for the highest percentage (n = 316; 29%), followed by those with neuropathic pain (n = 253; 23.20%) and those with low back pain (n = 225; 20.60%). The mean pain intensity rating scale score was 8.3 ± 1.8 a week before the examination and the mean quality of sleep score was 6.8 ± 1.9. Moderate and severe sleep quality disorder was significantly present in patients over 65 years of age (p = 0.007), patients with musculoskeletal and neuropathic pain, back pain, and those having rated Patients' Global Impression of Change scale as worsening (p = 0.001). The severity of pain and poor quality of sleep are the leading causes of deterioration of the Patients' Global Impression of Change scale in patients suffering from musculoskeletal and neuropathic pain. In order to treat CP comprehensively, it is important for GPs to evaluate the outcomes of clinical treatment using tools for CP assessment. PMID:27276768

  4. Hand kinematics: Application in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Rath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathological conditions of the hand consequent to injuries, paralysis, disease, arthritis and congenital difference results in loss or limitation of function, deformities, stiffness, inadequate power and poor position for pinch. The pathogenesis of deformities is influenced by bio-mechanical principles of joints and muscle function. The crippling impact of secondary changes due to edema, soft tissue contractures, muscle shortening and functional adaptations also have a mechanical basis. For clinicians and hand therapists, it is necessary to understand these fundamental principles of biomechanics to plan treatment modalities. Interpretation of mechanics of hand deformities in rheumatoid arthritis and paralysis will enable the treating team to identify the appropriate interventions of splinting, therapy and surgical procedures. Basic knowledge of the principles of hand clinical bio-mechanics will help the beginner to sail through the multitude of tendon transfers described in the text books of hand surgery and find the best solution for a particular clinical presentation. Similarly, knowledge of bio-mechanics will provide solutions to an experienced surgeon to plan treatment protocols for complex situations. The article presents a concise summary of the basic principles of hand bio-mechanics for common hand conditions seen in clinical practice. Understanding and applying these principles will help clinicians in planning and devising treatment options for common and complex hand conditions.

  5. Nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Ella; Tabak, Nili

    2012-12-01

    Using Ajzen and Madden's Theory of Planned Behavior, this study investigates factors which influence nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines in their daily ward work. A convenience sample of 91 nurses in internal medicine wards in three Israeli hospitals answered four questionnaires. Data were processed by Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate regression. The main findings were that burnout was negatively correlated with the intention to work according to guidelines and that professionalism (in the sense of a tendency to follow taught procedure rather than personal judgment) was positively correlated with it. Furthermore, nurses who perceive their behavioral control and subjective norms to be positive will be the most determined to work according to guidelines, provided they personally command the necessary resources to do so. PMID:23447906

  6. [Toxoplasmosis in pregnancy - questions in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geleneky, Markéta

    2013-06-01

    Toxoplasmosis acquired during pregnancy is a serious disease that may significantly affect fetal development and cause irreversible or therapeutically hardly influenced damage to the newborn. Early and correct diagnosis of the disease in the mother is essential for determining prognosis and further diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The case study combines a number of factors to be encountered in clinical practice which may complicate diagnostic considerations. One of them is the existence of a rare phenomenon of reinfection - its possible effects on prenatal screening and other interpretations of such findings. Another problem is the evaluation of the origin of sonographically confirmed fetopathy in relation to Toxoplasma etiology and the choice of next steps that should follow in this situation. Finally, the text discusses the selection of postnatal examinations so that they sufficiently contribute to decision-making about the newborn's treatment initiation.

  7. Integrating nurse researchers in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Kjerholt, Mette; Bertelsen, Connie Bøttcher;

    2016-01-01

    on the approaches to evidence-based practice seen in the cases. Results: Regardless of same position, formal level of research expertise and overall responsibility, different approaches related to each ANPs professional profile, interest, academic ambitions and personality were seen. Conclusion: Nurse leaders must......Aim: To create awareness among nurse leaders, of what they may need toconsider, when integrating nurse researchers as advanced nurse practitioners(ANP) at PhD-level among their staff. Background: In a time of transition nurse leaders may be challenged by the change towards evidence-based clinical...... ensure a process where the content and expectations of the particular role are mutually clarified and adjusted to the individual ANP and to the specific context, in order to create a harmonious match. Implications for nursing management In order to clarify expectations regarding the inclusion of nurse...

  8. Instruction of pattern recognition by MATLAB practice 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book describes the pattern recognition by MATLAB practice. It includes possibility and limit of AI, introduction of pattern recognition a vector and matrix, basic status and a probability theory, a random variable and probability distribution, statistical decision theory, data-mining, gaussian mixture model, a nerve cell modeling such as Hebb's learning rule, LMS learning rule, genetic algorithm, dynamic programming and DTW, HMN on Markov model and HMM's three problems and solution, introduction of SVM with KKT condition and margin optimum, kernel trick and MATLAB practice.

  9. Evidence-based practice: a trainee clinical psychologist perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is now the dominant model in health care; its aim is to increase the use of research evidence to inform clinical decision making. Clinical practice guidelines are the predominant method by which research is distilled into practice recommendations. Clinical psychology has its own model which promotes the integration of research evidence with clinical expertise, the scientist practitioner model (SPM). Recent developments within the United Kingdom health service, su...

  10. Application of scientific developments into clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2002, in the Republic of Belarus, the incidence rate of thyroid cancer in comparison with 1986 increased by a factor of 5.7, and amounted to 8,6 cases per 100 000. The increase of prevalence of thyroid cancer continues, especially for adolescents and young adults. For the period of 17 years in the republic have been operated 9526 patients, including 728 children, 414 adolescents and 856 young adults under 35 years. In this group consisting of 1998 patients, in 184 (9.2 %) lung metastases have been diagnosed. In the long-term period after the treatment 19 (0.9 %) died of tumor progression. The remaining 1979 (99.5 %) survived. The minimum lethality of young patients with thyroid cancer is achieved due to the excellent qualification of doctors and technical equipment of the Center, improvement of cancer detection in regions at the pre-hospital stage and timely rehabilitation in case of arisen complications. Scientific developments of the Republican Center contributed to the improvement of treatment of patients with thyroid cancer. Standardization of treatment modes of patients have been developed based on latest developments of the world science in the thyroid research area. The method of optimal treatment of children and adolescents has been developed and introduced into practice. Radioiodine treatment with the use of new technologies has been introduced into clinical practice. The surgical technique has been improved for recurrent, locally-spread and cervical- mediastinal cancer. Clinical-biological features of radiation-induced cancer, including the study on the molecular-genetic level have been studied, and its highly aggressive nature have been determined being revealed by early and multiple metastatic disease. Necessity has been justified to carry out preventive cervical neck lympho-dissection for patients with radiogenic cancer, if metastases have been not clinically revealed. All these developments are represented in the instruction and the treatment

  11. How to Connect the Gap between Clinical Trials and Clinical Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Hong-cai; XU Hong-juan; CHEN Jing; ZHANG Bo-li; LI You-ping; Mike J Clarke

    2008-01-01

    Clinical research methods have been rapidly developing, and the design of clinical trials including traditional Chinese medicine is advancing. To a certain extent, all of these ensure that the results of clinical research are objective and scientific, but whether these results and the resulting guidelines or consensus have much practical significance on clinical practice is still controversial. The authors engage in both clinical practice and clinical research; they strongly feel that it is necessary to discuss the relationship between clinical trials and clinical practice. This essay discusses this relationship in four parts.

  12. An innovative clinical practicum to teach evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancato, Vera C

    2006-01-01

    A clinical practicum was successfully implemented for RN to BSN students to apply evidence-based practice to actual clinical problems affecting nursing practice. The author describes how this practicum was implemented and the requisite resources and support systems. This senior-level capstone course enabled students to understand and value a lifelong learning approach to evidence-based practice.

  13. Identifying clinical course patterns in SMS data using cluster analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Kongsted, Alice

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recently, there has been interest in using the short message service (SMS or text messaging), to gather frequent information on the clinical course of individual patients. One possible role for identifying clinical course patterns is to assist in exploring clinically important...... clinically interpretable and different from those of the whole group. Similar patterns were obtained when the number of SMS time points was reduced to monthly. The advantages and disadvantages of this method were contrasted to that of first transforming SMS data by spline analysis. CONCLUSIONS: This study...

  14. PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF APIXABAN USE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE: VIEW POINT OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Sychev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Apixaban is a "new" oral anticoagulant, direct Xa factor inhibitor with a good evidence base of the efficacy in the prevention of ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. The article is devoted to apixaban use in clinical practice: examination before apixaban administration, clinical situation when laboratory control and monitoring are needed, drugs interactions (at the level of CYP3A4, P-gp, management of patients with bleeding because of apixaban therapy (including antidotes application, perioperative management of patients receiving apixaban.

  15. 门急诊自助服务模式构建的实践研究%Practice of Building Self-help Pattern for Clinic and Emergency Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄正东; 郭雪清; 肖飞; 张伟; 姚国庆; 叶珺; 王光华

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨自助服务模式对缓解门急诊病人“看病难”的效果.方法 以医院信息系统为平台,设计开发门急诊自助服务应用系统.结果 实现了自助挂号、自助取单、自助划卡扣费、自助费用查询及服务质量自助评价等功能,消除了挂号、取单及缴费等需排队等待的环节.结论 自助服务模式的实施,优化了病人就诊流程,提高了工作效率,降低了运营成本, “三长一短”难题得到根本解决.%Objective To explore the efficiency of self-help pattern for reducing out-patients and emergency patients' difficulty in "seeing doctors" . Methods Based on the hospital information system, self-help application system for clinic and emergency was designed and developed. Results Self-help registration, self-help list taken away, self-help billing, self fee query and self-help service quality evaluation have been achieved, which efficiently reduce patients' waiting time. Conclusion The implementation of self-help pattern has optimized the clinic process, improved the work efficiency and reduced operation cost, and the "three long and one short" problem (long time to register, long wait to see a doctor, long wait to receive their drugs but only a short time with the doctor) is improved.

  16. Footwear dermatitis - Clinical patterns and contact allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Handa S; Sharma S; Sharma V; Kaur S.

    1991-01-01

    Thirty patients suspected of contact dermatitis to footwear studied to evaluate various clinical presentations and possible sensitizers. ′V′ chappals and sandals were suspected alone in 12, a combination of open and closed shoes in 15 and closed shoes alone in 3 patients. Commonest affected sites were dorsa of feet and toes in 14 and dorsa of feet corresponding to the shape of footwear in 12 patients. Patch tests were done using a battery of sixteen allergens. Positive patch tes...

  17. The research and practice based on the full-time visitation model in clinical medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the higher medical colleges and universities teaching hospital carry certain clinical teaching tasks, but the traditional teaching pattern of "two stage", including the early stage of the theory of teaching, the late arrangement of clinical practice, had some drawbacks such as practice time is too concentrated and the chasm between students' theory and practice. It is suggested that students contact clinical diagnosis and treatment earlier, visit more patients and increase the ratio of visitation and course. But as more and more students flood into university, clinical visitation has turned into a difficulty to improve students’ ability. To resolve this problem, we have made some efficient practice and exploration in Rizhao City People's Hospital from September 2005 to July 2014. The students were divided into full-time visitation model group and “two stage” pattern group randomly. The single factors are of great difference between the two groups. The full-time visitation model in clinical medical education builds a new mode of practice of clinical practice teaching in the medical stuents' concept of doctor-patient communication, humanistic care to patients, basic theoretical knowledge, clinical practice skills and graduate admission rate increased significantly. Continuous improvement of OSCE exam is needed to make evaluation more scientific, objective and fair.

  18. Conceptualizing clinical nurse leader practice: an interpretive synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Institute of Medicine's Future of Nursing report identifies the clinical nurse leader as an innovative new role for meeting higher health-care quality standards. However, specific clinical nurse leader practices influencing documented quality outcomes remain unclear. Lack of practice clarity limits the ability to articulate, implement and measure clinical nurse leader-specific practice and quality outcomes. PURPOSE AND METHODS: Interpretive synthesis design and grounded theory...

  19. The practice-unit centered clinical database--the implementation.

    OpenAIRE

    Bryner, U. M.

    1991-01-01

    A clinical database system under the name ClinTrac has been developed for the purpose of acquiring, processing, storing, analyzing, and communicating clinical information. The core of this system consists of a practice-unit centered database.

  20. Footwear dermatitis - Clinical patterns and contact allergens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handa S

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty patients suspected of contact dermatitis to footwear studied to evaluate various clinical presentations and possible sensitizers. ′V′ chappals and sandals were suspected alone in 12, a combination of open and closed shoes in 15 and closed shoes alone in 3 patients. Commonest affected sites were dorsa of feet and toes in 14 and dorsa of feet corresponding to the shape of footwear in 12 patients. Patch tests were done using a battery of sixteen allergens. Positive patch tests were seen in 29 patients. Rubber chemicals were the commonest allergens detected in 26 patients, dyes in 10,leather in 6, glues and neoprene cements in 4 and rubber material from suspected footwear as such in 4 patients respectively.

  1. Regional differences in practice patterns and associated outcomes for upper tract urothelial carcinoma in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Michael; Kassouf, Wassim; Rendon, Ricardo; Bell, David; Izawa, Jonathan; Chin, Joseph; Kapoor, Anil; Matsumoto, Edward; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Saad, Fred; Lacombe, Louis; Fradet, Yves; Fairey, Adrian; Jacobson, Niels-Eric; Drachenberg, Darryl; Cagiannos, Ilias; So, Alan; Black, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: We delineated Canadian regional differences in practice patterns in the management of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) after nephroureterectomy and relate these to patient outcomes. Methods: A database was created with 1029 patients undergoing radical nephroureterectomy for UTUC between 1994 and 2009 at 10 Canadian centres. Demographic, clinical and pathological variables were collected from chart review. Practice pattern variables were defined as: open versus laparoscopic nephroureterectomy, management strategy for the distal ureter, performance of lymphadenectomy and administration of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. The outcome measures were overall (OS), disease-specific (DSS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). The centres were divided into three regions (West, Central, East). Cox proportional multivariable linear regression analysis was used to determine the association between regional differences in practice patterns and clinical outcomes. Results: There was a significant difference in practice patterns between regions within Canada for: time from diagnosis to surgery (p = 0.001), type of surgery (open vs. laparoscopic, p < 0.01) and method of management of the distal ureter (p = 0.001). As well, there were significant differences in survival between regions across Canada: 5-year OS (West 70%, Central 81% and East 62%, p < 0.0001) and DSS (West=79%, Central=85%, East=75%, p = 0.007) were significantly different, but there was no difference in RFS (West 47%, Central 48%, East 46%, p = 0.88). Multivariable linear regression analysis demonstrated that the differences in survival were independent of region OS (p = 0.78), DSS (p = 0.30) or RFS (p = 0.43). Conclusion: There is significant disparity in practice patterns between regions within Canada, but these do not appear to have an effect on survival. We believe that the variability in practice is a reflection of the lack of standardized treatments for UTUC and underlines the need for

  2. Application of the CIT concept in the clinical environment: hurdles, practicalities, and clinical benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterr, Annette; Szameitat, Andre; Shen, Shan; Freivogel, Susanna

    2006-03-01

    Basic neuroscience research on brain plasticity, motor learning, and recovery has stimulated new concepts in motor rehabilitation. Combined with the development of methodological goal standards in clinical outcome research, these findings have effectuated the introduction of a double-paradigm shift in physical rehabilitation: (a) the move toward evidence-based procedures and disablement models for the assessment of clinical outcome and (b) the introduction of training-based concepts that are theoretically founded in learning theory. A major drive for new interventions has further come from recent findings on the adaptive capacities of neural networks and their linkage to perception, performance, and long-term recovery. In this context, constraint-induced movement therapy, an intervention initially designed for upper-limb hemiparesis, represents the theoretically and empirically most thoroughly founded training concept. Several clinical trials on constraint-induced therapy (CIT) have shown its efficacy in higher functioning patients; however, the transfer of the treatment into standard health care seems slow. Survey research further suggests a rather poor acceptance of CIT among clinical staff and it seems that the implementation of CIT is hindered by barriers constructed of beliefs and assumptions that demand a critical and evidence-based discussion. Within this context, we have conducted a series of experiments on amended CIT protocols and their application in the clinical environment which addressed the following issues: (1) massed practice: are 6 hours of daily training inevitable to achieve clinical benefits? (2) practicality: what is feasible in the standard care setting and what are the clinical benefits achieved by "feasible compromise CIT protocols?" (3) apprehensions: are concerns on increased muscular tone and pathologic movement patterns justified, and (4) learned nonuse: is the assumption of "hidden" residual abilities valid so that it warrants the

  3. Pareto Fronts in Clinical Practice for Pinnacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, Tomas; Kesteren, Zdenko van; Franssen, Gijs; Damen, Eugène [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vliet, Corine van, E-mail: c.v.vliet@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to develop a framework to objectively perform treatment planning studies using Pareto fronts. The Pareto front represents all optimal possible tradeoffs among several conflicting criteria and is an ideal tool with which to study the possibilities of a given treatment technique. The framework should require minimal user interaction and should resemble and be applicable to daily clinical practice. Methods and Materials: To generate the Pareto fronts, we used the native scripting language of Pinnacle{sup 3} (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA). The framework generates thousands of plans automatically from which the Pareto front is generated. As an example, the framework is applied to compare intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for prostate cancer patients. For each patient and each technique, 3000 plans are generated, resulting in a total of 60,000 plans. The comparison is based on 5-dimensional Pareto fronts. Results: Generating 3000 plans for 10 patients in parallel requires on average 96 h for IMRT and 483 hours for VMAT. Using VMAT, compared to IMRT, the maximum dose of the boost PTV was reduced by 0.4 Gy (P=.074), the mean dose in the anal sphincter by 1.6 Gy (P=.055), the conformity index of the 95% isodose (CI{sub 95%}) by 0.02 (P=.005), and the rectal wall V{sub 65} {sub Gy} by 1.1% (P=.008). Conclusions: We showed the feasibility of automatically generating Pareto fronts with Pinnacle{sup 3}. Pareto fronts provide a valuable tool for performing objective comparative treatment planning studies. We compared VMAT with IMRT in prostate patients and found VMAT had a dosimetric advantage over IMRT.

  4. Sending Expatriates to Japan? Executive staffing practice patterns.

    OpenAIRE

    Ralf Bebenroth; Donghao Li

    2006-01-01

    Our empirical study provides the first insights of executive staffing practice patterns in foreign-owned multinational company (MNC) subsidiaries based in Japan. We explore determinants for parent country nationals (PCN) as top managing directors and - new in the International Human Resource Management (IHRM) literature - also the ratio of PCN found on the board (Ratio) and examine under which conditions they are prevalent in the subsidiaries. We sampled the full range of 3,241 foreign compan...

  5. Using the Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Adherence Questionnaire (PPAQ) to identify practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beehler, Gregory P; Funderburk, Jennifer S; King, Paul R; Wade, Michael; Possemato, Kyle

    2015-12-01

    Primary care-mental health integration (PC-MHI) is growing in popularity. To determine program success, it is essential to know if PC-MHI services are being delivered as intended. The investigation examines responses to the Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Adherence Questionnaire (PPAQ) to explore PC-MHI provider practice patterns. Latent class analysis was used to identify clusters of PC-MHI providers based on their self-report of adherence on the PPAQ. Analysis revealed five provider clusters with varying levels of adherence to PC-MHI model components. Across clusters, adherence was typically lowest in relation to collaboration with other primary care staff. Clusters also differed significantly in regard to provider educational background and psychotherapy approach, level of clinic integration, and previous PC-MHI training. The PPAQ can be used to identify PC-MHI provider practice patterns that have relevance for future clinical effectiveness studies, development of provider training, and quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26622911

  6. Developing a Critical Practice of Clinical Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, W. John

    1985-01-01

    The etymology of the term "clinical supervision" is discussed. How clinical supervision can be used with teachers as an active force toward reform and change is then examined. Through clinical supervision teachers can assist each other to gain control over their own professional lives and destinies. (RM)

  7. Practical mask inspection system with printability and pattern priority verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Hideo; Ozaki, Fumio; Takahara, Kenichi; Inoue, Takafumi; Kikuiri, Nobutaka

    2011-05-01

    Through the four years of study in Association of Super-Advanced Electronics Technologies (ASET) on reducing mask manufacturing Turn Around Time (TAT) and cost, we have been able to establish a technology to improve the efficiency of the review process by applying a printability verification function that utilizes computational lithography simulations to analyze defects detected by a high-resolution mask inspection system. With the advent of Source-Mask Optimization (SMO) and other technologies that extend the life of existing optical lithography, it is becoming extremely difficult to judge a defect only by the shape of a mask pattern, while avoiding pseudo-defects. Thus, printability verification is indispensable for filtering out nuisance defects from high-resolution mask inspection results. When using computational lithography simulations to verify printability with high precision, the image captured by the inspection system must be prepared with extensive care. However, for practical applications, this preparation process needs to be simplified. In addition, utilizing Mask Data Rank (MDR) to vary the defect detection sensitivity according to the patterns is also useful for simultaneously inspecting minute patterns and avoiding pseudo-defects. Combining these two technologies, we believe practical mask inspection for next generation lithography is achievable. We have been improving the estimation accuracy of the printability verification function through discussion with several customers and evaluation of their masks. In this report, we will describe the progress of these practical mask verification functions developed through customers' evaluations.

  8. Practical relevance of pattern uniqueness in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, Paul T

    2013-09-10

    Uniqueness being unprovable, it has recently been argued that individualization in forensic science is irrelevant and, probability, as applied for DNA profiles, should be applied for all identifications. Critiques against uniqueness have omitted physical matching, a realistic and tangible individualization that supports uniqueness. Describing case examples illustrating pattern matches including physical matching, it is indicated that individualizations are practically relevant for forensic science as they establish facts on a definitive basis providing firm leads benefitting criminal investigation. As a tenet of forensic identification, uniqueness forms a fundamental paradigm relevant for individualization. Evidence on the indeterministic and stochastic causal pathways of characteristics in patterns available in the related fields of science sufficiently supports the proposition of uniqueness. Characteristics involved in physical matching and matching achieved in patterned evidence existing in the state of nature are not events amenable for counting; instead these are ensemble of visible units occupying the entire pattern area stretching the probability of re-occurrence of a verisimilitude pattern into infinity offering epistemic support to uniqueness. Observational methods are as respectable as instrumental or statistical methods since they are capable of generating results that are tangible and obviously valid as in physical matching. Applying the probabilistic interpretation used for DNA profiles to the other patterns would be unbefitting since these two are disparate, the causal pathways of the events, the loci, in the manipulated DNA profiles being determinable. While uniqueness enables individualizations, it does not vouch for eliminating errors. Instead of dismissing uniqueness and individualization, accepting errors as human or system failures and seeking remedial measures would benefit forensic science practice and criminal investigation.

  9. Practical relevance of pattern uniqueness in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, Paul T

    2013-09-10

    Uniqueness being unprovable, it has recently been argued that individualization in forensic science is irrelevant and, probability, as applied for DNA profiles, should be applied for all identifications. Critiques against uniqueness have omitted physical matching, a realistic and tangible individualization that supports uniqueness. Describing case examples illustrating pattern matches including physical matching, it is indicated that individualizations are practically relevant for forensic science as they establish facts on a definitive basis providing firm leads benefitting criminal investigation. As a tenet of forensic identification, uniqueness forms a fundamental paradigm relevant for individualization. Evidence on the indeterministic and stochastic causal pathways of characteristics in patterns available in the related fields of science sufficiently supports the proposition of uniqueness. Characteristics involved in physical matching and matching achieved in patterned evidence existing in the state of nature are not events amenable for counting; instead these are ensemble of visible units occupying the entire pattern area stretching the probability of re-occurrence of a verisimilitude pattern into infinity offering epistemic support to uniqueness. Observational methods are as respectable as instrumental or statistical methods since they are capable of generating results that are tangible and obviously valid as in physical matching. Applying the probabilistic interpretation used for DNA profiles to the other patterns would be unbefitting since these two are disparate, the causal pathways of the events, the loci, in the manipulated DNA profiles being determinable. While uniqueness enables individualizations, it does not vouch for eliminating errors. Instead of dismissing uniqueness and individualization, accepting errors as human or system failures and seeking remedial measures would benefit forensic science practice and criminal investigation. PMID:23849815

  10. Defining Clinical Excellence in Adult Infectious Disease Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chida, Natasha M; Ghanem, Khalil G; Auwaerter, Paul G; Wright, Scott M; Melia, Michael T

    2016-09-01

    Clinical excellence should be recognized, particularly in the current climate that appropriately prioritizes relationship-centered care. In order to develop a recognition model, a definition of clinical excellence must be created and agreed upon. A paradigm recently suggested by C. Christmas describes clinical excellence through the following domains: diagnostic acumen, professionalism and humanism, communication and interpersonal skills, skillful negotiation of the healthcare system, knowledge, taking a scholarly approach to clinical practice, and having passion for clinical medicine. This work references examples of infectious disease (ID) clinical excellence across Christmas' domains and, in doing so, both examines how the definition of clinical excellence applies to ID practice and highlights the importance of ID physicians. Emphasizing such aspirational standards may not only inspire trainees and practicing physicians to pursue their own fulfilling clinical ID careers, it may also encourage health systems to fully value outstanding ID physicians who labor tirelessly to provide patients with exceptional care. PMID:27419186

  11. Defining Clinical Excellence in Adult Infectious Disease Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chida, Natasha M.; Ghanem, Khalil G.; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Wright, Scott M.; Melia, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical excellence should be recognized, particularly in the current climate that appropriately prioritizes relationship-centered care. In order to develop a recognition model, a definition of clinical excellence must be created and agreed upon. A paradigm recently suggested by C. Christmas describes clinical excellence through the following domains: diagnostic acumen, professionalism and humanism, communication and interpersonal skills, skillful negotiation of the healthcare system, knowledge, taking a scholarly approach to clinical practice, and having passion for clinical medicine. This work references examples of infectious disease (ID) clinical excellence across Christmas' domains and, in doing so, both examines how the definition of clinical excellence applies to ID practice and highlights the importance of ID physicians. Emphasizing such aspirational standards may not only inspire trainees and practicing physicians to pursue their own fulfilling clinical ID careers, it may also encourage health systems to fully value outstanding ID physicians who labor tirelessly to provide patients with exceptional care. PMID:27419186

  12. Noninvasive ventilation: A survey of practice patterns of its use in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chawla Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims : To understand the practice patterns of noninvasive ventilation (NIV use by Indian physicians. Subjects and Methods : Around three thousand physicians from all over India were mailed a questionnaire that could capture the practice patterns of NIV use. Results : Completed responses were received from 648 physicians (21.6%. Majority ( n = 469, 72.4%, age 40 ± 9 years, M:F 409:60 use NIV in their clinical practice. NIV was most exclusively being used in the ICU setting (68.4% and the commonest indication for its use was chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (71.4%. A significant number did not report use of a conventional ventilator for NIV support (62%. Oronasal mask was the overwhelming favorite among the sampled physicians (68.2%. In most of the cases, the treating physician initiated NIV (60.8% and a baseline blood gas analysis was performed in only 71.1% of the cases (315/443. Nasal bridge pressure sores was the commonest complication (64.2%. Conclusions : NIV is being widely used in clinical practice in India for various indications. COPD is the most common indication for its deployment. There seems to be a marked variability in the patterns relating to actual deployment of NIV, including the site of initiation, protocols for initiation followed, and monitoring of patients.

  13. Advancing evidence-based practice in primary care physiotherapy : Guideline implementation, clinical practice, and patient preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Bernhardsson, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Research on physiotherapy treatment interventions has increased dramatically in the past 25 years and it is a challenge to transfer research findings into clinical practice, so that patients benefit from effective treatment. Development of clinical practice guidelines is a potentially useful strategy to implement research evidence into practice. However, the impact of guideline implementation in Swedish primary care physiotherapy is unknown. To achieve evidence-based practice (EBP), research ...

  14. Pattern of uveitis in a referral uveitis clinic in India

    OpenAIRE

    Das Debashis; Biswas Jyotirmay; Ganesh Sudha

    1995-01-01

    The pattern of uveitis changes over time with the emergence or identification of new uveitic entities. The aim of this prospective study was to obtain a correct incidence pattern and aetiology of uveitis cases seen in a uveitis clinic. We studied all new uveitic cases seen in a-one year period. A standard clinical protocol was followed for each case. Of the 465 new uveitic cases, anterior uveitis was most commonly encountered (170 cases, 36.5%), followed by posterior uveitis (132 cases...

  15. Communication course for midwives teaching students in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe; Pedersen, Pernille Mølholt

    2016-01-01

    -clinically (Rosenbaum et al. 2013) and our own experience teaching Danish midwifery students indicates the same problem in our program. Providing an opportunity for the clinical teachers to learn, discuss and practice communication issues with each other and with theoretical teachers can represent an important...... taking place in clinical practice and try to align the educational efforts in school and clinical settings for the benefit of the students PERSPECTIVES It is known that students in medical education find that clinical learning experiences do not reinforce the communication skills they learn pre...

  16. Clinical Features and Surgical Treatment of A-pattern Exotropia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingchang Chen; Guanghuan Mai; Daming Deng; Xiaoming Lin; Yan Guo; Xiao Yang; Chunxiu Yuan

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical characteristics and determine the effective surgical managements of A-pattern exotropia.Methods: Thirty-two patients with A-pattern exotropia underwent superior oblique muscle weakening procedures, medial rectus resection or (and) lateral rectus recession. Preand post-operative eye position, deviation angle, superior oblique function and binocular vision were examined and analyzed in the cases.Results: Overaction of the superior oblique muscles (31/32) and underaction of the medial rectus muscle (20/32) were presented in the cases. Postoperatively, a satisfactory ocular alignment was obtained in 28 cases (87.5%), and the A-pattern was corrected in 31 cases (96.9%). Four cases got binocular vision after surgery.Conclusions: As one of the most common forms of A and V patterns, A-pattern exotropia showed clinical characteristics of superior oblique muscle overaction and medial rectus muscle underacion, which should be the primary factors in the etiology of A-pattern exotropia, and superior oblique weakening procedures combined with horizontal surgery should be an effective approach to A-pattern exotropia treatment.

  17. Enhancing reflective practice through online learning: impact on clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, J; Radloff, A

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Traditionally, radiographers and radiation therapists function in a workplace environment that is protocol-driven with limited functional autonomy. The workplace promotes a culture of conformity and discourages practitioners from reflective and critical thinking, essential attributes for continuing learning and advancing workplace practices. As part of the first author’s doctoral study, a continuing professional development (CPD) educational framework was used to design and implement ...

  18. Using socioeconomic evidence in clinical practice guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Aldrich, Rosemary; Kemp, Lynn; Williams, Jenny Stewart; Harris, Elizabeth; Simpson, Sarah; Wilson, Amanda; McGill, Katie; Byles, Julie; Lowe, Julia; Jackson, Terri

    2003-01-01

    The effects of socioeconomic position on health have been largely ignored in clinical guidelines. Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council has produced a framework to ensure that they are taken into account

  19. Multivariate analysis of 2-DE protein patterns - Practical approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Jacobsen, Susanne; Grove, H.;

    2007-01-01

    , although different subsets of protein spots were selected. The explorative approach of using multivariate data analysis and variable selection in the analyses of 2-DEs seems to be promising as a fast, reliable and convenient way of screening and transforming many gel images into spot quantities.......Practical approaches to the use of multivariate data analysis of 2-DE protein patterns are demonstrated by three independent strategies for the image analysis and the multivariate analysis on the same set of 2-DE data. Four wheat varieties were selected on the basis of their baking quality. Two...

  20. Research for superconducting energy storage patterns and its practical countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D. H.; Cui, D. J.; Li, B.; Teng, Y.; Zheng, G. L.; Wang, X. Q.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we attempt to introduce briefly the significance, the present status, as well as the working principle of the primary patterns of the superconducting energy storage system, first of all. According to the defect on the lower energy storage density of existed superconducting energy storage device, we proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density, in which, a brand-new but a tentative proposal regarding the concept of energy compression was emphasized. This investigation has a certain reference value towards the practical application of the superconducting energy storage.

  1. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Clinical Urological Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Tommaso; Mazzoli, Sandra; Lanzafame, Paolo;

    2016-01-01

    issues in everyday urological practice that require special attention: the role of ABU in pre-operative prophylaxis and in women affected by recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTIs). Nowadays, this is the time to think over our practice and change our way of thinking. Here, we aimed to summarize...... the current literature knowledge in terms of ABU management in patients undergoing urological surgery and in patients with rUTIs. In the last years, the approach to patient with ABU has changed totally. Prior to all surgical procedures that do not enter the urinary tract, ABU is generally not considered...

  2. Female Pattern Hair Loss: a clinical and pathophysiological review*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Paulo Müller; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2015-01-01

    Female Pattern Hair Loss or female androgenetic alopecia is the main cause of hair loss in adult women and has a major impact on patients' quality of life. It evolves from the progressive miniaturization of follicles that lead to a subsequent decrease of the hair density, leading to a non-scarring diffuse alopecia, with characteristic clinical, dermoscopic and histological patterns. In spite of the high frequency of the disease and the relevance of its psychological impact, its pathogenesis is not yet fully understood, being influenced by genetic, hormonal and environmental factors. In addition, response to treatment is variable. In this article, authors discuss the main clinical, epidemiological and pathophysiological aspects of female pattern hair loss. PMID:26375223

  3. 77 FR 49448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Baltimore District Office,...

  4. Change in stated clinical practice associated with participation in the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Richman, Joshua S; Qvist, Vibeke;

    2010-01-01

    Clinical researchers have attempted many methods to translate scientific evidence into routine clinical practice, with varying success. Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide an important, practitioner-friendly venue to test these methods. Dentist practitioner-investigators from the Den...

  5. Incorporating comorbidities into latent treatment pattern mining for clinical pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhengxing; Dong, Wei; Ji, Lei; He, Chunhua; Duan, Huilong

    2016-02-01

    In healthcare organizational settings, the design of a clinical pathway (CP) is challenging since patients following a particular pathway may have not only one single first-diagnosis but also several typical comorbidities, and thus it requires different disciplines involved to put together their partial knowledge about the overall pathway. Although many data mining techniques have been proposed to discover latent treatment information for CP analysis and reconstruction from a large volume of clinical data, they are specific to extract nontrivial information about the therapy and treatment of the first-diagnosis. The influence of comorbidities on adopting essential treatments is crucial for a pathway but has seldom been explored. This study proposes to extract latent treatment patterns that characterize essential treatments for both first-diagnosis and typical comorbidities from the execution data of a pathway. In particular, we propose a generative statistical model to extract underlying treatment patterns, unveil the latent associations between diagnosis labels (including both first-diagnosis and comorbidities) and treatments, and compute the contribution of comorbidities in these patterns. The proposed model extends latent Dirichlet allocation with an additional layer for diagnosis modeling. It first generates a set of latent treatment patterns from diagnosis labels, followed by sampling treatments from each pattern. We verify the effectiveness of the proposed model on a real clinical dataset containing 12,120 patient traces, which pertain to the unstable angina CP. Three treatment patterns are discovered from data, indicating latent correlations between comorbidities and treatments in the pathway. In addition, a possible medical application in terms of treatment recommendation is provided to illustrate the potential of the proposed model. Experimental results indicate that our approach can discover not only meaningful latent treatment patterns exhibiting

  6. Depression Screening Patterns for Women in Rural Health Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudiver, Fred; Edwards, Joellen Beckett; Pfortmiller, Deborah T.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Rates and types of screening for depression in rural primary care practices are unknown. Purpose: To identify rates of depression screening among rural women in a sample of rural health clinics (RHCs). Methods: A chart review of 759 women's charts in 19 randomly selected RHCs across the nation. Data were collected from charts of female…

  7. Orienting Nursing Students to Cost Effective Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessner, Muriel W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes five principles for cost-effective clinical practice: efficient use of self, efficient use of equipment and supplies, delegation of work, critical path method, and organization of the environment. (SK)

  8. Effects of feedback of information on clinical practice: a review.

    OpenAIRE

    Mugford, M; Banfield, P; O'Hanlon, M

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish what is known about the role of feedback of statistical information in changing clinical practice. DESIGN--Review of 36 studies of interventions entailing the use of statistical information for audit or practice review, which used a formal research design. SUBJECTS--Papers identified from computer searches of medical and health service management publications, of which 36 describing studies of interventions designed to influence clinical care and including information ...

  9. Evaluating clinical dermatology practice in medical undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, J M; Sanmartín, V; Martí, R M; Morales, J L; Soler, J; Purroy, F; Pujol, R

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of competences (the set of knowledge, skills and attitudes required to perform a job to a professional level) is considered a fundamental part of medical training. Dermatology competences should include, in addition to effective clinical interviewing and detailed descriptions of skin lesions, appropriate management (diagnosis, differentiation, and treatment) of common skin disorders and tumors. Such competences can only be acquired during hospital clerkships. As a way of certifying these competences, we propose evaluating the different components as follows: knowledge, via clinical examinations or critical incident discussions; communication and certain instrumental skills, via structured workplace observation and scoring using a set of indicators; and attitudes, via joint evaluation by staff familiar with the student. PMID:23664251

  10. [Hypnotic communication and hypnosis in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrli, Hans

    2014-07-01

    In addition to usual medical care it is often critical to consider the patient's inner world in order to sensitively differentiate between harmful and helpful suggestive elements. The respective abilities in terms of hypnotic communication can be easily learned. Confident, empathic attention and a calm, understanding and figurative language narrowing the focus on positive emotions and positive change, which have been shown to improve the patient's chances of healing, are of particular importance. Proper clinical hypnosis goes one step further: it makes explicit use of suggestions, trance, and trance phenomena. The major clinical indications for hypnosis include psychosomatic disorders, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, depression, and pain syndromes. Hypnosis can also be employed as an adjunct for surgical therapy.

  11. Potential Uses of Probiotics in Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, Gregor; Jass , Jana; Sebulsky, M. Tom; McCormick, John K.

    2003-01-01

    Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. There is now mounting evidence that selected probiotic strains can provide health benefits to their human hosts. Numerous clinical trials show that certain strains can improve the outcome of intestinal infections by reducing the duration of diarrhea. Further investigations have shown benefits in reducing the recurrence of urogenital infections in women, while promisi...

  12. Myeloproliferative neoplasms: Morphology and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbui, Tiziano; Thiele, Jürgen; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2016-06-01

    In myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), controversy persists regarding the usefulness and reproducibility of bone marrow (BM) features. Disagreements concerning the WHO classification are mainly focused on the discrimination between essential thrombocythemia (ET) and prefibrotic/early primary myelofibrosis (prePMF) and prodromal polycythemia vera (PV). Criticism mostly refers to lack of standardization of distinctive BM features precluding correct morphological pattern recognition. The distinction between WHO-defined ET and prePMF is not trivial because outcome is significantly worse in prePMF. Morphology was generally considered to be non-specific for the diagnosis of PV. Recent studies have revealed under-diagnosis of morphologically and biologically consistent PV. PMID:26718907

  13. Identifying influenza-like illness presentation from unstructured general practice clinical narrative using a text classifier rule-based expert system versus a clinical expert

    OpenAIRE

    MacRae, Jayden; Love, Tom; Michael G Baker; Dowell, Anthony; Carnachan, Matthew; Stubbe, Maria; McBain, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background We designed and validated a rule-based expert system to identify influenza like illness (ILI) from routinely recorded general practice clinical narrative to aid a larger retrospective research study into the impact of the 2009 influenza pandemic in New Zealand. Methods Rules were assessed using pattern matching heuristics on routine clinical narrative. The system was trained using data from 623 clinical encounters and validated using a clinical expert as a gold standard against a m...

  14. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    disease was present in 6% of GP consultations, and the suspicion was associated with an increased use referrals and diagnostic imaging. The suspicion was associated with an increased risk of being diagnosed with serious disease including cancer and had a positive predictive value for a new diagnosis...... to reduce patients’ mortality and morbidity from cancer, but also because it probably pays to do so from a cost-effectiveness perspective. The findings in Study II underscore that the current guidelines regarding PSA testing for general practice should be followed to avoid inflicting iatrogenic harm...

  15. Patterns of clinical mastitis manifestations in Danish organic dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaarst, Mette; Enevoldsen, Carsten

    1997-01-01

    Danish organic dairy production is characterized by a low input of antibiotics for udder treatment and a high input of other mastitis control procedures. A study was conducted in 14 organic dairy herds with the objectives of obtaining a comprehensive description of clinical mastitis cases...... and identifying characteristic patterns in these results. Clinical signs, inflammatory reactions and microbiological identifications were obtained from 367 cases of clinical mastitis occurring over 18 months. Cow characteristics and preincident values such as milk yield and somatic cell count were obtained...... for each cow. Signs of previous udder inflammation were present in two-thirds of the clinical mastitis cases. Severe local inflammatory reactions were found in 21% of the cases and some indication of generalized signs such as fever and reduced appetite were found in 35% of the cases. Logistic regression...

  16. Characteristics and Clinical Practices of Rural Marriage and Family Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, James

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a subset of data collected from the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) Practice Research Network project conducted in 2002. A sample of 47 clinical members of AAMFT who indicated they practiced in a rural community provided descriptive information on demographic characteristics, training, clinical…

  17. Active Interventions in Clinical Practice: Contributions of Gestalt Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Marilyn; Dolan, Mary M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes two dimensions of Gestalt therapy that can enhance clinical practice--orientation to the present and active-experimental style--and examines them in relation to some traditional principles of practice. Gestalt theory offers a method of discovery that is a combination of phenomenology and behaviorism. (JAC)

  18. Clinical practice guideline: tonsillitis II. Surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windfuhr, Jochen P; Toepfner, Nicole; Steffen, Gregor; Waldfahrer, Frank; Berner, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    In 2013, a total of 84,332 patients had undergone extracapsular tonsillectomies (TE) and 11,493 a tonsillotomy (TT) procedure in Germany. While the latter is increasingly performed, the number of the former is continually decreasing. However, a constant number of approximately 12,000 surgical procedures in terms of abscess-tonsillectomies or incision and drainage are annually performed in Germany to treat patients with a peritonsillar abscess. The purpose of this part of the clinical guideline is to provide clinicians in any setting with a clinically focused multi-disciplinary guidance through the surgical treatment options to reduce inappropriate variation in clinical care, improve clinical outcome and reduce harm. Surgical treatment options encompass intracapsular as well as extracapsular tonsil surgery and are related to three distinct entities: recurrent episodes of (1) acute tonsillitis, (2) peritonsillar abscess and (3) infectious mononucleosis. Conservative management of these entities is subject of part I of this guideline. (1) The quality of evidence for TE to resolve recurrent episodes of tonsillitis is moderate for children and low for adults. Conclusions concerning the efficacy of TE on the number of sore throat episodes per year are limited to 12 postoperative months in children and 5-6 months in adults. The impact of TE on the number of sore throat episodes per year in children is modest. Due to the heterogeneity of data, no firm conclusions on the effectiveness of TE in adults can be drawn. There is still an urgent need for further research to reliably estimate the value of TE compared to non-surgical therapy of tonsillitis/tonsillo-pharyngitis. The impact of TE on quality of life is considered as being positive, but further research is mandatory to establish appropriate inventories and standardized evaluation procedures, especially in children. In contrast to TE, TT or comparable procedures are characterized by a substantially lower postoperative

  19. Literature and medicine: contributions to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, R; Banks, J T; Connelly, J E; Hawkins, A H; Hunter, K M; Jones, A H; Montello, M; Poirer, S

    1995-04-15

    Introduced to U.S. medical schools in 1972, the field of literature and medicine contributes methods and texts that help physicians develop skills in the human dimensions of medical practice. Five broad goals are met by including the study of literature in medical education: 1) Literary accounts of illness can teach physicians concrete and powerful lessons about the lives of sick people; 2) great works of fiction about medicine enable physicians to recognize the power and implications of what they do; 3) through the study of narrative, the physician can better understand patients' stories of sickness and his or her own personal stake in medical practice; 4) literary study contributes to physicians' expertise in narrative ethics; and 5) literary theory offers new perspectives on the work and the genres of medicine. Particular texts and methods have been found to be well suited to the fulfillment of each of these goals. Chosen from the traditional literary canon and from among the works of contemporary and culturally diverse writers, novels, short stories, poetry, and drama can convey both the concrete particularity and the metaphorical richness of the predicaments of sick people and the challenges and rewards offered to their physicians. In more than 20 years of teaching literature to medical students and physicians, practitioners of literature and medicine have clarified its conceptual frameworks and have identified the means by which its studies strengthen the human competencies of doctoring, which are a central feature of the art of medicine. PMID:7887555

  20. Literature and medicine: contributions to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, R; Banks, J T; Connelly, J E; Hawkins, A H; Hunter, K M; Jones, A H; Montello, M; Poirer, S

    1995-04-15

    Introduced to U.S. medical schools in 1972, the field of literature and medicine contributes methods and texts that help physicians develop skills in the human dimensions of medical practice. Five broad goals are met by including the study of literature in medical education: 1) Literary accounts of illness can teach physicians concrete and powerful lessons about the lives of sick people; 2) great works of fiction about medicine enable physicians to recognize the power and implications of what they do; 3) through the study of narrative, the physician can better understand patients' stories of sickness and his or her own personal stake in medical practice; 4) literary study contributes to physicians' expertise in narrative ethics; and 5) literary theory offers new perspectives on the work and the genres of medicine. Particular texts and methods have been found to be well suited to the fulfillment of each of these goals. Chosen from the traditional literary canon and from among the works of contemporary and culturally diverse writers, novels, short stories, poetry, and drama can convey both the concrete particularity and the metaphorical richness of the predicaments of sick people and the challenges and rewards offered to their physicians. In more than 20 years of teaching literature to medical students and physicians, practitioners of literature and medicine have clarified its conceptual frameworks and have identified the means by which its studies strengthen the human competencies of doctoring, which are a central feature of the art of medicine.

  1. Clinical practice guidelines and patient decision aids. An inevitable relationship.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijden, T. van der; Boivin, A.; Burgers, J.S.; Schunemann, H.J.; Elwyn, G.

    2012-01-01

    As health professionals and patients are moving toward shared models of decision making, there is a growing need for integrated decision support tools that facilitate uptake of best evidence in routine clinical practice in a patient-centered manner. This article charts the landscape of clinical prac

  2. Improving Clinical Practices for Children with Language and Learning Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhi, Alan G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This lead article of the Clinical Forum addresses some of the gaps that exist between clinical practice and current knowledge about instructional factors that influence learning and language development. Method: Topics reviewed and discussed include principles of learning, generalization, treatment intensity, processing interventions,…

  3. Clinical Practice Guideline for Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D and its metabolites have clinical significance because they play a critical function in calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. Although not all of the pathologic mechanisms have been adequately described, vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency, as measured by low levels of 25-OH vitamin D, are associated with a variety of clinical conditions including osteoporosis, falls and fractures in the elderly, decreased immune function, bone pain, and possibly colon cancer and cardiovascular health.2 Apart from inadequate dietary intake, patients may present with low levels of vitamin D if they receive inadequate sunlight. The astronaut population is potentially vulnerable to low levels of vitamin D for several reasons. Firstly, they may train for long periods in Star City, Russia, which by virtue of its northern latitude receives less sunlight in winter months. Secondly, astronauts are deprived of sunlight while aboard the International Space Station (ISS). In addition, ISS crew members are exposed to microgravity for prolonged durations and are likely to develop low bone mineral density despite the use of countermeasures. Therefore, closely monitoring and maintaining adequate vitamin D levels is important for the astronaut corps.

  4. Clinical practice: Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, Deniz

    2013-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is recognised as a cause of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and usually acquired during the first years of life. While there is a decline in the prevalence of H. pylori infection in northern and western European countries, the infection is still common in southern and eastern parts of Europe and Asia. Symptoms of H. pylori-related PUD are nonspecific in children and may include epigastric pain, nausea and/or vomiting, anorexia, iron deficiency anaemia and hematemesis. Besides, only a small proportion of children develop symptoms and clinically relevant gastrointestinal disease. H. pylori infection can be diagnosed either by invasive tests requiring endoscopy and biopsy or non-invasive tests including the (13)C-urea breath test, detection of H. pylori antigen in stool and detection of antibodies in serum, urine and saliva. The aim of treatment is at least 90 % eradication rate of the bacteria, and a combination of two antibiotics plus a proton pump inhibitor has been recommended as first-line treatment. However, frequent use of antibiotics during childhood is associated with a decline in eradication rates and the search for new treatment strategies as well. This is an overview of the latest knowledge and evidence-based guidelines regarding clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of H. pylori infection in childhood. PMID:23015042

  5. Nutritional aspects of detoxification in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, John C

    2015-01-01

    Detoxification is a vital cellular task that, if lacking, can lead to early morbidity and mortality. The process of detoxification involves the mobilization, biotransformation, and elimination of toxicants of exogenous and endogenous origin. This article discusses the phase I and phase II detoxification and biotransformation pathways and promotes using food to support these highly complex processes. The author identifies the comprehensive elimination diet as a useful therapeutic tool for clinicians and patients to use to achieve detoxification. Using this diet, the patient removes the most common allergenic foods and beverages from the diet and replaces them with nonallergenic choices for a period of 4 wk, gradually adding back the eliminated foods and observing their effects. Another effective clinical tool that the author discusses is the detox-focused core food plan, which identifies the variety of foods required to supply key nutrients that can maximize the effectiveness of detoxification. Finally, the author provides a case study in which these tools were used to help a patient suffering from major, debilitating illnesses that resulted from exposure to malathion, including severe vomiting and diarrhea, headaches, night sweats, severe arthralgias and myalgias, episcleritis, and shortness of breath. The article details the interventions used and the clinical results (ie, successful resolution of most issues after 3 mo). PMID:26026145

  6. Potential uses of probiotics in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Gregor; Jass, Jana; Sebulsky, M Tom; McCormick, John K

    2003-10-01

    Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. There is now mounting evidence that selected probiotic strains can provide health benefits to their human hosts. Numerous clinical trials show that certain strains can improve the outcome of intestinal infections by reducing the duration of diarrhea. Further investigations have shown benefits in reducing the recurrence of urogenital infections in women, while promising studies in cancer and allergies require research into the mechanisms of activity for particular strains and better-designed trials. At present, only a small percentage of physicians either know of probiotics or understand their potential applicability to patient care. Thus, probiotics are not yet part of the clinical arsenal for prevention and treatment of disease or maintenance of health. The establishment of accepted standards and guidelines, proposed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization, represents a key step in ensuring that reliable products with suitable, informative health claims become available. Based upon the evidence to date, future advances with single- and multiple-strain therapies are on the horizon for the management of a number of debilitating and even fatal conditions. PMID:14557292

  7. Functional MRI in clinical practice: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In clinical practice, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a valuable non-invasive tool particularly during preoperative work-up of brain tumour and epilepsy patients. In this pictorial essay, we review expected areas of eloquent cortical activation during the four major clinical paradigms, discuss pitfalls related to fMRI and look at clinical examples where fMRI was particularly valuable in preoperative planning.

  8. Research for superconducting energy storage patterns and its practical countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density for SMES system. • Increasing the effective current density in the superconducting coils or optimizing the configuration of the SMES coil could improve the energy storage density. • A new conceive of energy compression is also proposed. -- Abstract: In this paper, we attempt to introduce briefly the significance, the present status, as well as the working principle of the primary patterns of the superconducting energy storage system, first of all. According to the defect on the lower energy storage density of existed superconducting energy storage device, we proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density, in which, a brand-new but a tentative proposal regarding the concept of energy compression was emphasized. This investigation has a certain reference value towards the practical application of the superconducting energy storage

  9. Research for superconducting energy storage patterns and its practical countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, D.H., E-mail: lindehua_cn@yahoo.com.cn [College of Physics, Chongqing University, JD Duz (USA)-CQU Institute for Superconductivity, Chongqing 400030 (China); Cui, D.J.; Li, B.; Teng, Y.; Zheng, G.L. [College of Physics, Chongqing University, JD Duz (USA)-CQU Institute for Superconductivity, Chongqing 400030 (China); Wang, X.Q. [College of Physics, Chongqing University, JD Duz (USA)-CQU Institute for Superconductivity, Chongqing 400030 (China); State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Transmission, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density for SMES system. • Increasing the effective current density in the superconducting coils or optimizing the configuration of the SMES coil could improve the energy storage density. • A new conceive of energy compression is also proposed. -- Abstract: In this paper, we attempt to introduce briefly the significance, the present status, as well as the working principle of the primary patterns of the superconducting energy storage system, first of all. According to the defect on the lower energy storage density of existed superconducting energy storage device, we proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density, in which, a brand-new but a tentative proposal regarding the concept of energy compression was emphasized. This investigation has a certain reference value towards the practical application of the superconducting energy storage.

  10. Exploring accountability of clinical ethics consultants: practice and training implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Kathryn L; Daly, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Clinical ethics consultants represent a multidisciplinary group of scholars and practitioners with varied training backgrounds, who are integrated into a medical environment to assist in the provision of ethically supportable care. Little has been written about the degree to which such consultants are accountable for the patient care outcome of the advice given. We propose a model for examining degrees of internally motivated accountability that range from restricted to unbounded accountability, and support balanced accountability as a goal for practice. Finally, we explore implications of this model for training of clinical ethics consultants from diverse academic backgrounds, including those disciplines that do not have a formal code of ethics relating to clinical practice.

  11. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cutaneous Lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Angela M; Hurley, M Yadira

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which are broadly divided into cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and cutaneous B-cell lymphomas. These classifications include numerous distinct entities, all with varying clinical presentations and disease courses. Herein, we will review the cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, including Mycosis Fungoides, Sézary syndrome, CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders, as well as other less common entities. Cutaneous B-cell lymphomas will also be discussed, including primary cutaneous marginal zoned lymphoma, cutaneous follicle-center lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type, as well as other less common entities. Accurate and early diagnosis is key, as the treatment and prognosis varies significantly between conditions. PMID:26455060

  12. Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines for Rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Yuka; Tan, Jerry; Baibergenova, Akerke; Barankin, Benjamin; Cochrane, Chris L; Humphrey, Shannon; Lynde, Charles W; Marcoux, Danielle; Poulin, Yves; Rivers, Jason K; Sapijaszko, Mariusz; Sibbald, R Gary; Toole, John; Ulmer, Marcie; Zip, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    Rosacea is a chronic facial inflammatory dermatosis characterized by background facial erythema and flushing and may be accompanied by inflammatory papules and pustules, cutaneous fibrosis and hyperplasia known as phyma, and ocular involvement. These features can have adverse impact on quality of life, and ocular involvement can lead to visual dysfunction. The past decade has witnessed increased research into pathogenic pathways involved in rosacea and the introduction of novel treatment innovations. The objective of these guidelines is to offer evidence-based recommendations to assist Canadian health care providers in the diagnosis and management of rosacea. These guidelines were developed by an expert panel of Canadian dermatologists taking into consideration the balance of desirable and undesirable outcomes, the quality of supporting evidence, the values and preferences of patients, and the costs of treatment. The 2015 Cochrane review "Interventions in Rosacea" was used as a source of clinical trial evidence on which to base the recommendations. PMID:27207355

  13. Vancomycin Resistance Pattern of Staphylococcus Aureus among Clinical Samples

    OpenAIRE

    S Saadat; K Solhjoo; A. Kazemi; Erfanian, S. (MSc); Ashrafian, F. (MSc)

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Vancomycin is used for treatment of methicillin-resistant S. Aureus (MRSA) infections; therefore, resistance to this antibiotic is increasing. We aimed to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern and frequency of vancomycin resistant S. Areas (VRSA) strains isolated from clinical samples. Material and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 100 S. Aureus isolates collected from hospitals in Shiraz during six months, 2012, were identified by biochemical, microbiolo...

  14. Practice patterns in FNA technique: A survey analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher; J; DiMaio; Jonathan; M; Buscaglia; Seth; A; Gross; Harry; R; Aslanian; Adam; J; Goodman; Sammy; Ho; Michelle; K; Kim; Shireen; Pais; Felice; Schnoll-Sussman; Amrita; Sethi; Uzma; D; Siddiqui; David; H; Robbins; Douglas; G; Adler; Satish; Nagula

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To ascertain fine needle aspiration(FNA) tech-niques by endosonographers with varying levels of ex-perience and environments.METHODS: A survey study was performed on United States based endosonographers. The subjects complet-ed an anonymous online electronic survey. The main outcome measurements were differences in needle choice, FNA technique, and clinical decision making among endosonographers and how this relates to years in practice, volume of EUS-FNA procedures, and prac-tice environment.RESULTS: A total of 210(30.8%) endosonographers completed the survey. Just over half(51.4%) identified themselves as academic/university-based practitioners. The vast majority of respondents(77.1%) identified themselves as high-volume endoscopic ultrasound(EUS)(> 150 EUS/year) and high-volume FNA(> 75 FNA/year) performers(73.3). If final cytology is non-diagnostic, high-volume EUS physicians were more likely than low volume physicians to repeat FNA with a core needle(60.5% vs 31.2%; P = 0.0004), and low volume physicians were more likely to refer patients for either surgical or percutaneous biopsy,(33.4% vs 4.9%, P < 0.0001). Academic physicians were more likely to repeat FNA with a core needle(66.7%) compared to community physicians(40.2%, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: There is significant variation in EUS-FNA practices among United States endosonographers. Differences appear to be related to EUS volume and practice environment.

  15. A model for reflection for good clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balla, John I; Heneghan, Carl; Glasziou, Paul; Thompson, Matthew; Balla, Margaret E

    2009-12-01

    Rationale and aim The rapidly changing knowledge base of clinical practice highlights the need to keep abreast of knowledge changes that are most relevant for the practitioner. We aimed to develop a model for reflection on clinical practice that identified the key elements of medical knowledge needed for good medical practice. Method The dual theory of cognition, an integration of intuitive and analytic processes, provided the framework for the study. The design looked at the congruence between the clinical thinking process and the dual theory. A one-year study was conducted in general practice clinics in Oxfordshire, UK. Thirty-five general practitioners participated in 20-minute interviews to discuss how they worked through recently seen clinical cases. Over a one-year period 72 cases were recorded from 35 interviews. These were categorized according to emerging themes, which were manually coded and substantiated with verbatim quotations. Results There was a close fit between the dual theory and participants' clinical thinking processes. This included instant problem framing, consistent with automatic intuitive thinking, focusing on the risk and urgency of the case. Salient features accounting for these choices were recognizable. There was a second reflective phase, leading to the review of initial judgements. Conclusions The proposed model highlights the critical steps in decision making. This allows regular recalibration of knowledge that is most critical at each of these steps. In line with good practice, the model also links the crucial knowledge used in decision making, to value judgments made in relation to the patient. PMID:20367693

  16. Clinical practice: vegetarian infant and child nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Winckel, Myriam; Vande Velde, Saskia; De Bruyne, Ruth; Van Biervliet, Stephanie

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this review is to give insight on the benefits and risks of vegetarianism, with special emphasis on vegetarian child nutrition. This eating pattern excluding meat and fish is being adopted by a growing number of people. A vegetarian diet has been shown to be associated with lower mortality of ischaemic heart disease and lower prevalence of obesity. Growth in children on a vegetarian diet including dairy has been shown to be similar to omnivorous peers. Although vegetarianism in adolescents is associated with eating disorders, there is no proof of a causal relation, as the eating disorder generally precedes the exclusion of meat from the diet. A well-balanced lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, including dairy products, can satisfy all nutritional needs of the growing child. In contrast, a vegan diet, excluding all animal food sources, has at least to be supplemented with vitamin B(12), with special attention to adequate intakes of calcium and zinc and energy-dense foods containing enough high-quality protein for young children. The more restricted the diet and the younger the child, the greater the risk for deficiencies. PMID:21912895

  17. Clinical practice: vegetarian infant and child nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Winckel, Myriam; Vande Velde, Saskia; De Bruyne, Ruth; Van Biervliet, Stephanie

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this review is to give insight on the benefits and risks of vegetarianism, with special emphasis on vegetarian child nutrition. This eating pattern excluding meat and fish is being adopted by a growing number of people. A vegetarian diet has been shown to be associated with lower mortality of ischaemic heart disease and lower prevalence of obesity. Growth in children on a vegetarian diet including dairy has been shown to be similar to omnivorous peers. Although vegetarianism in adolescents is associated with eating disorders, there is no proof of a causal relation, as the eating disorder generally precedes the exclusion of meat from the diet. A well-balanced lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, including dairy products, can satisfy all nutritional needs of the growing child. In contrast, a vegan diet, excluding all animal food sources, has at least to be supplemented with vitamin B(12), with special attention to adequate intakes of calcium and zinc and energy-dense foods containing enough high-quality protein for young children. The more restricted the diet and the younger the child, the greater the risk for deficiencies.

  18. Variability of CSF Alzheimer's disease biomarkers: implications for clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J B Vos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers are increasingly being used for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the influence of CSF intralaboratory and interlaboratory variability on diagnostic CSF-based AD classification of subjects and identified causes of this variation. METHODS: We measured CSF amyloid-β (Aβ 1-42, total tau (t-tau, and phosphorylated tau (p-tau by INNOTEST enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays (ELISA in a memory clinic population (n = 126. Samples were measured twice in a single or two laboratories that served as reference labs for CSF analyses in the Netherlands. Predefined cut-offs were used to classify CSF biomarkers as normal or abnormal/AD pattern. RESULTS: CSF intralaboratory variability was higher for Aβ1-42 than for t-tau and p-tau. Reanalysis led to a change in biomarker classification (normal vs. abnormal of 26% of the subjects based on Aβ1-42, 10% based on t-tau, and 29% based on p-tau. The changes in absolute biomarker concentrations were paralleled by a similar change in levels of internal control samples between different assay lots. CSF interlaboratory variability was higher for p-tau than for Aβ1-42 and t-tau, and reanalysis led to a change in biomarker classification of 12% of the subjects based on Aβ1-42, 1% based on t-tau, and 22% based on p-tau. CONCLUSIONS: Intralaboratory and interlaboratory CSF variability frequently led to change in diagnostic CSF-based AD classification for Aβ1-42 and p-tau. Lot-to-lot variation was a major cause of intralaboratory variability. This will have implications for the use of these biomarkers in clinical practice.

  19. Daptomycin, a lipopeptide antibiotic in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Florian; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres; Schelling, Gustav

    2008-08-01

    Gram-positive cocci are one of the leading causes of infections in clinical medicine. Since the invention of antibiotic substances, multidrug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of such infections. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is responsible for 60% of nosocomial infections in the US. The first-choice drug used in these cases is the glycopeptide vancomycin; however, vancomycin is associated with a significant number of adverse side effects, such as nephro- and ototoxicity. Thus, the discovery of new drugs against MRSA and other multidrug-resistant cocci is of utmost interest. Daptomycin, a lipopeptide, is one of these new drugs and has been successfully used in the treatment of complicated skin and skin-structure infections and right-sided endocarditis. Because of its potency and pharmacological profile, it is increasingly used for new indications not yet approved by the FDA. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of daptomycin, with particular emphasis on potential new indications for which it could be used in the future.

  20. Clinical practice: Obstructive renal candidiasis in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Veena; Voort, Judith VanDer

    2011-10-01

    Renal candidiasis is an increasingly common condition affecting predominantly premature infants receiving neonatal intensive care or term infants with urogenital tract anomalies. Multiple risk factors are usually present. Although rare, some infants develop an obstructive uropathy due to fungal balls, and this requires prompt detection and intervention to preserve kidney function. The management of obstructive renal bezoars is challenging and not well summarised in the past. This is mainly due to scarce literature confined to case reports or case series only. This review clarifies various definitions used in relation to renal candidiasis and identifies infants particularly at risk of obstruction. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and the role of imaging are discussed. A summary of the recent literature is provided to outline the range of existing treatment options available with published drug dosages and mode of delivery used. No single approach is successful in all cases and clinicians need to be aware of the different options available: apart from adequate urinary drainage and use of systemic +/- local antifungal agents, additional treatment with fibrinolytic agents and/or endoscopic or open surgical removal may be required. A new simplified algorithm for use in management is proposed. We hope this review will help clinicians in their management of patients presenting with this complex and challenging diagnosis.

  1. Innovation in clinical pharmacy practice and opportunities for academic--practice partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbins, Paul O; Micek, Scott T; Badowski, Melissa; Cheng, Judy; Gallagher, Jason; Johnson, Samuel G; Karnes, Jason H; Lyons, Kayley; Moore, Katherine G; Strnad, Kyle

    2014-05-01

    Clinical pharmacy has a rich history of advancing practice through innovation. These innovations helped to mold clinical pharmacy into a patient-centered discipline recognized for its contributions to improving medication therapy outcomes. However, innovations in clinical pharmacy practice have now waned. In our view, the growth of academic–practice partnerships could reverse this trend and stimulate innovation among the next generation of pioneering clinical pharmacists. Although collaboration facilitates innovation,academic institutions and health care systems/organizations are not taking full advantage of this opportunity. The academic–practice partnership can be optimized by making both partners accountable for the desired outcomes of their collaboration, fostering symbiotic relationships that promote value-added clinical pharmacy services and emphasizing continuous quality improvement in the delivery of these services. Optimizing academic–practice collaboration on a broader scale requires both partners to adopt a culture that provides for dedicated time to pursue innovation, establishes mechanisms to incubate ideas, recognizes where motivation and vision align, and supports the purpose of the partnership. With appropriate leadership and support, a shift in current professional education and training practices, and a commitment to cultivate future innovators, the academic–practice partnership can develop new and innovative practice advancements that will improve patient outcomes. PMID:24877189

  2. Academic physiatry. Balancing clinical practice and academic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabois, M

    1992-04-01

    The need for continued and diversified growth of both scholarly and clinical activities within academic physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) departments is discussed with reference to the demands placed on academic departments by the various components of their mission, such as administration, clinical service, education and research. The expansion and improvement of clinical services should include the following components: program development, resources needed, finances required and marketing. Clinical subspecialization of faculty and solid affiliation with nonacademic hospitals and rehabilitation facilities is essential for academic PM&R. The faculty should include three categories: clinical faculty, clinical-research faculty and research faculty. Adequate financial resources must comprise an appropriate balance of academic funds, clinical income and grant sources. Clinical funds will play a greater role as other sources of funds diminish. Any practice plan must recognize the equality of the differing faculty members' practices, whether their interests are clinical, educational or research-oriented. The expansion and intensification of clinical programs by academy PM&R departments could increase competition in the medical community. Sensitivity to the perceptions of other practitioners and institutions, careful planning and cooperation will help the field grow and improve levels of care for the patients we serve in light of the changing medical care environment.

  3. Unsafe clinical practices as perceived by final year baccalaureate nursing students: Q methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Killam Laura A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nursing education necessitates vigilance for clinical safety, a daunting challenge given the complex interchanges between students, patients and educators. As active learners, students offer a subjective understanding concerning safety in the practice milieu that merits further study. This study describes the viewpoints of senior undergraduate nursing students about compromised safety in the clinical learning environment. Methods Q methodology was used to systematically elicit multiple viewpoints about unsafe clinical learning from the perspective of senior students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program offered at multiple sites in Ontario, Canada. Across two program sites, 59 fourth year students sorted 43 theoretical statement cards, descriptive of unsafe clinical practice. Q-analysis identified similarities and differences among participant viewpoints yielding discrete and consensus perspectives. Results A total of six discrete viewpoints and two consensus perspectives were identified. The discrete viewpoints at one site were Endorsement of Uncritical Knowledge Transfer, Non-student Centered Program and Overt Patterns of Unsatisfactory Clinical Performance. In addition, a consensus perspective, labelled Contravening Practices was identified as responsible for compromised clinical safety at this site. At the other site, the discrete viewpoints were Premature and Inappropriate Clinical Progression, Non-patient Centered Practice and Negating Purposeful Interactions for Experiential Learning. There was consensus that Eroding Conventions compromised clinical safety from the perspective of students at this second site. Conclusions Senior nursing students perceive that deficits in knowledge, patient-centered practice, professional morality and authenticity threaten safety in the clinical learning environment. In an effort to eradicate compromised safety associated with learning in the clinical milieu, students and educators

  4. Unsafe clinical practices as perceived by final year baccalaureate nursing students: Q methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Nursing education necessitates vigilance for clinical safety, a daunting challenge given the complex interchanges between students, patients and educators. As active learners, students offer a subjective understanding concerning safety in the practice milieu that merits further study. This study describes the viewpoints of senior undergraduate nursing students about compromised safety in the clinical learning environment. Methods Q methodology was used to systematically elicit multiple viewpoints about unsafe clinical learning from the perspective of senior students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program offered at multiple sites in Ontario, Canada. Across two program sites, 59 fourth year students sorted 43 theoretical statement cards, descriptive of unsafe clinical practice. Q-analysis identified similarities and differences among participant viewpoints yielding discrete and consensus perspectives. Results A total of six discrete viewpoints and two consensus perspectives were identified. The discrete viewpoints at one site were Endorsement of Uncritical Knowledge Transfer, Non-student Centered Program and Overt Patterns of Unsatisfactory Clinical Performance. In addition, a consensus perspective, labelled Contravening Practices was identified as responsible for compromised clinical safety at this site. At the other site, the discrete viewpoints were Premature and Inappropriate Clinical Progression, Non-patient Centered Practice and Negating Purposeful Interactions for Experiential Learning. There was consensus that Eroding Conventions compromised clinical safety from the perspective of students at this second site. Conclusions Senior nursing students perceive that deficits in knowledge, patient-centered practice, professional morality and authenticity threaten safety in the clinical learning environment. In an effort to eradicate compromised safety associated with learning in the clinical milieu, students and educators must embody the ontological

  5. Feedback: an essential element of student learning in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynes, Mary P; Raftery, Sara E C

    2008-11-01

    Clinical practice is an essential component of the nursing curriculum. In order for the student to benefit fully from the experience regular performance feedback is required. Feedback should provide the student with information on current practice and offer practical advice for improved performance. The importance of feedback is widely acknowledged however it appears that there is inconsistency in its provision to students. The benefits of feedback include increased student confidence, motivation and self-esteem as well as improved clinical practice. Benefits such as enhanced interpersonal skills and a sense of personal satisfaction also accrue to the supervisor. Barriers to the feedback process are identified as inadequate supervisor training and education, unfavourable ward learning environment and insufficient time spent with students. In addition to the appropriate preparation of the supervisor effective feedback includes an appreciation of the steps of the feedback process, an understanding of the student response to feedback and effective communication skills.

  6. The Brave New World of clinical cancer research: Adaptive biomarker-driven trials integrating clinical practice with clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donald A

    2015-05-01

    Clinical trials are the final links in the chains of knowledge and for determining the roles of therapeutic advances. Unfortunately, in an important sense they are the weakest links. This article describes two designs that are being explored today: platform trials and basket trials. Both are attempting to merge clinical research and clinical practice.

  7. Good Clinical Practice Guidance and Pragmatic Clinical Trials: Balancing the Best of Both Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentz, Robert J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Berdan, Lisa G; Rorick, Tyrus; O'Brien, Emily C; Ibarra, Jenny C; Curtis, Lesley H; Peterson, Eric D

    2016-03-01

    Randomized, clinical trials are commonly regarded as the highest level of evidence to support clinical decisions. Good Clinical Practice guidelines have been constructed to provide an ethical and scientific quality standard for trials that involve human subjects in a manner aligned with the Declaration of Helsinki. Originally designed to provide a unified standard of trial data to support submission to regulatory authorities, the principles may also be applied to other studies of human subjects. Although the application of Good Clinical Practice principles generally led to improvements in the quality and consistency of trial operations, these principles have also contributed to increasing trial complexity and costs. Alternatively, the growing availability of electronic health record data has facilitated the possibility for streamlined pragmatic clinical trials. The central tenets of Good Clinical Practice and pragmatic clinical trials represent potential tensions in trial design (stringent quality and highly efficient operations). In the present article, we highlight potential areas of discordance between Good Clinical Practice guidelines and the principles of pragmatic clinical trials and suggest strategies to streamline study conduct in an ethical manner to optimally perform clinical trials in the electronic age.

  8. Utilization of FibroScan in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonder, Alan; Afdhal, Nezam

    2014-02-01

    The evaluation of liver fibrosis is critical, particularly to rule out cirrhosis. Novel non-invasive tests such as transient ultrasound elastography are widely used to stage liver fibrosis as an alternative to liver biopsy, and this technology has recently been approved in the US. In this review, we discuss the performance characteristics of elastography for a variety of liver diseases and highlight practical appropriate suggestions for how to incorporate this technology into clinical practice.

  9. The psychiatric cultural formulation: translating medical anthropology into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2012-03-01

    This article reviews proposed revisions to the DSM-IV Outline for Cultural Formulation for clinical practice. The author begins by exploring the theoretical development of and assumptions involved in the Cultural Formulation. A case presentation is then used to demonstrate shortcomings in the current implementation of the Cultural Formulation based on older definitions of culture. Finally, the author recommends practical questions based on the growing anthropological literature concerning the interpersonal elements of culture and the social course of illness. A simple clear format that clinically translates social science concepts has the potential to increase use of the Cultural Formulation by all psychiatrists, not just those specializing in cultural psychiatry.

  10. Teaching Effectiveness: Preparing Occupational Therapy Students for Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane C. OBrien PhD, MS.MEdL, OTR/L

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Medical educators must examine the ability of teaching methodologies to prepare students for clinical practice. Two types of assessment methods commonly used in medical education include the Short Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE and the Integrated Performance Procedural Instrument (IPPI. The use of these methods in occupational therapy (OT education is less understood. With the increasing number of students enrolled in programs, faculty face challenges to examine how clinical competence is established using data to determine teaching effectiveness. This study examines two educational methodologies used in OT curriculum: the long written case study (IPPI and short performance-based OSCE. The authors describe the effectiveness of each examination as it relates to student performance in clinical practice (as measured by the Fieldwork Performance Evaluation [FWPE]. The findings obtained from separate focus group sessions with faculty and students further provide insight into the advantages and disadvantages of the educational methodologies.

  11. Dual Perspectives on Theory in Clinical Practice: Practice Makes Perfect: The Incompatibility of Practicing Speech and Meaningful Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhi, Alan G.

    2000-01-01

    This article uses a case study to suggest that some children view speech-language therapy as a separate situation for learning practicing new sounds and language forms whereas the purpose of talking outside of therapy is meaningful communication. Clinical implications of this potential incompatibility between practicing speech and communicating…

  12. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pre-eclampsia and Eclampsia Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Carlos Alvarez Li

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pre-eclampsia and Eclampsia Treatment. This disease is part of a group of conditions known as hypertensive disease in pregnancy that have in common the existence of high blood pressure. This document includes a review and update of the main clinical aspects, concepts, classification and treatment stressing the use of drugs that cause hypotension and magnesium sulphate. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  13. A model for ethical practices in clinical phonetics and linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Thomas W

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of clinical phonetics and linguistics as an area of scientific inquiry gives rise to the need for guidelines that define ethical and responsible conduct. The diverse membership of the International Clinical Phonetics and Linguistics Association (ICPLA) and the readership of this journal are uniquely suited to consider ethical issues from diverse perspectives. Accordingly, this paper introduces a multi-tiered six-factor model for ethical practices to stimulate discussion of ethical issues.

  14. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Catheter Infections Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkys Rodríguez Llerena

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Catheter Infections Treatment. It has been defined as the presence of local or systemic signs without other obvious infection site, plus the microbiologic evidence involving the catheter. This document includes a review and update of concepts, main clinical aspects, and treatment and stresses the importance of prophylactic treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  15. Impact of an audiology clinic in one general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Khunti, K; Carr, M

    1997-01-01

    There is a large demand for the provision of hearing aids. However, there are lengthy delays involved between referral and fitment of National Health Service (NHS) hearing aids. This report shows that a general practice based audiology clinic can lead to an increase in the number of patients referred and fitted with a hearing aid. The introduction of the clinic also led to reduced waiting times for patients to be fitted with hearing aids.

  16. Evaluation of clinical teaching models for nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxon, Lyn; Maginnis, Cathy

    2009-07-01

    Clinical placements provide opportunities for student nurses to learn experientially. To create a constructive learning environment staff need to be friendly, approachable, available and willing to teach. There must be adequate opportunities for students to develop confidence and competence in clinical skills with a focus on student learning needs rather than service needs of facilities. A popular model for clinical teaching of nursing students is the preceptor model. This model involves a student working under the supervision of individual registered nurses who are part of the clinical staff. This model was failing to meet students' needs in acute nursing practice areas, largely due to Registered Nurse staff shortages and demanding workloads. The students' evaluations led to the trial of a 'cluster' or group model of eight students, with a clinical facilitator who is paid by the university, in each acute nursing ward. Evaluation of twenty nursing students' perceptions of their acute nursing practice clinical placements was conducted using a mixed method approach to evaluate the two models of student supervision. Results indicate that the students prefer small groups with the clinical facilitator in one area. Thus evaluation and feedback from students and the perceptions of their clinical placement is essential. PMID:18722161

  17. Practice Patterns in the Care of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Ujash; Wasserstein, David; Moineddin, Rahim; Jenkinson, Richard; Kreder, Hans; Jaglal, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Over the last decade, there has been a growing body of level I evidence supporting non-operative management (focused on early range of motion and weight bearing) of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Despite this emerging evidence, there have been very few studies evaluating its uptake. Our primary objective was to determine whether the findings from a landmark trial assessing the optimal management strategy for acute Achilles tendon ruptures influenced the practice patterns of orthopaedic surgeons in Ontario, Canada over a 12-year time period. As a second objective we examined whether patient and provider predictors of surgical repair utilization differed before and after dissemination of the landmark trial results. Methods: Using provincial health administrative databases, we identified Ontario residents ≥ 18 years of age with an acute Achilles tendon rupture from April 2002 to March 2014. The proportion of surgically repaired ruptures was calculated for each calendar quarter and year. A time series analysis using an interventional autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model was used to determine whether changes in the proportion of surgically repaired ruptures were chronologically related to the dissemination of results from a landmark trial by Willits et al. (first quarter, 2009). Spline regression was then used to independently identify critical time-points of change in the surgical repair rate to confirm our findings. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess for differences in patient (baseline demographics) and provider (hospital type) predictors of surgical repair utilization before and after the landmark trial. Results: In 2002, ˜19% of acute Achilles tendon ruptures in Ontario were surgically repaired, however, by 2014 only 6.5% were treated operatively. A statistically significant decrease in the rate of surgical repair (p < 0.001) was observed after the results from a landmark trial were presented at a major

  18. [Clinical practice as an arborescent and rhizomorphic practice in surgical nursing work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Lenice Dutra; Lunardi, Wilson Danilo Filho; Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; de Figueiredo, Paula Pereira

    2013-12-01

    A qualitative and exploratory case study was conducted in a surgery unit of a university hospital. The study aimed to analyze the nurses' work from the perspective of health care production and clinical practice. The subjects of the study were six nurses. Non-participant observations, documentary research and in-depth interviews were carried out, followed by discursive textual analysis. Nursing work is organized according to two interconnected and interdependent perspectives: a clinical model, which forms the central structure of its practice, and a structure formed by multiple and heterogeneous elements. in this way, the clinical model of health care is organized as a centered structure that enables the fulfillment of biological needs and acts as a basis for connecting disparate knowledge and practices that expand practice through interconnections with the work environment. PMID:24626366

  19. [Quality assurance and quality improvement in medical practice. Part 3: Clinical audit in medical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godény, Sándor

    2012-02-01

    The first two articles in the series were about the definition of quality in healthcare, the quality approach, the importance of quality assurance, the advantages of quality management systems and the basic concepts and necessity of evidence based medicine. In the third article the importance and basic steps of clinical audit are summarised. Clinical audit is an integral part of quality assurance and quality improvement in healthcare, that is the responsibility of any practitioner involved in medical practice. Clinical audit principally measures the clinical practice against clinical guidelines, protocols and other professional standards, and sometimes induces changes to ensure that all patients receive care according to principles of the best practice. The clinical audit can be defined also as a quality improvement process that seeks to identify areas for service improvement, develop and carry out plans and actions to improve medical activity and then by re-audit to ensure that these changes have an effect. Therefore, its aims are both to stimulate quality improvement interventions and to assess their impact in order to develop clinical effectiveness. At the end of the article key points of quality assurance and improvement in medical practice are summarised.

  20. The clinical practice of interventional radiology: a European perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Aoife N

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current clinical environment in which interventional radiology (IR) is practiced throughout Europe. A survey, comprising 12 questions on IR clinical practice, was sent to 1800 CIRSE members. Members were asked to return one survey per department. Two hundred seventy-four departments returned completed questionnaires, 22% from the United Kingdom (n = 60), 11% from Germany (n = 30), 8% from Austria (n = 23), and the remainder spread over Europe. Experts, with more than 10 years of IR experience, comprised 74% of the survey group. Almost one-third of the radiologists dedicated more than 80% of their clinical sessions to IR alone (27%; n = 75), with two-thirds practicing in a university teaching hospital setting (66%; n = 179). Few institutions have dedicated IR inpatient hospital beds (17%; n = 46), however, to compensate, day case beds are available (31%), IR admitting rights are in place (64% overall, 86% for in-patients, and 89% for day cases), and elective IR admissions can be made through other clinicians (87%). IR outpatient clinics are run at 26% of departments, with an average of two sessions per week. Dedicated nurses staff the majority of IR suites (82%), but clinical junior doctors are lacking (46%). Hospital management\\'s refusing access to beds was the most commonly cited reason for not developing a clinical IR service (41%). In conclusion, there is marked variation across European centers in the current practice of IR. Half do not have dedicated junior doctors and only a small minority have inpatient hospital beds. If IR is to be maintained as a dedicated clinical specialty, these issues need to be addressed urgently.

  1. The Clinical Practice of Interventional Radiology: A European Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current clinical environment in which interventional radiology (IR) is practiced throughout Europe. A survey, comprising 12 questions on IR clinical practice, was sent to 1800 CIRSE members. Members were asked to return one survey per department. Two hundred seventy-four departments returned completed questionnaires, 22% from the United Kingdom (n = 60), 11% from Germany (n = 30), 8% from Austria (n = 23), and the remainder spread over Europe. Experts, with more than 10 years of IR experience, comprised 74% of the survey group. Almost one-third of the radiologists dedicated more than 80% of their clinical sessions to IR alone (27%; n = 75), with two-thirds practicing in a university teaching hospital setting (66%; n = 179). Few institutions have dedicated IR inpatient hospital beds (17%; n = 46), however, to compensate, day case beds are available (31%), IR admitting rights are in place (64% overall, 86% for in-patients, and 89% for day cases), and elective IR admissions can be made through other clinicians (87%). IR outpatient clinics are run at 26% of departments, with an average of two sessions per week. Dedicated nurses staff the majority of IR suites (82%), but clinical junior doctors are lacking (46%). Hospital management's refusing access to beds was the most commonly cited reason for not developing a clinical IR service (41%). In conclusion, there is marked variation across European centers in the current practice of IR. Half do not have dedicated junior doctors and only a small minority have inpatient hospital beds. If IR is to be maintained as a dedicated clinical specialty, these issues need to be addressed urgently.

  2. Rules for the certification of good practices in clinical laboratories. No regulation. 3-2009. Good Laboratory Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulation for Certification of Good Practices in clinical laboratories, hereinafter Regulation establishes the methodology and procedures for clinical laboratories to demonstrate their state of compliance with good practices, according to Regulation 3-2009, and that the CECMED can verify.

  3. Best practices for clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jamie K; Hall, Robert L; O'Brien, Peter; Strauss, Volker; Vahle, John L

    2011-02-01

    The Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) and American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASCVP) convened a Clinical Pathology in Carcinogenicity Studies Working Group to recommend best practices for inclusion of clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies. Regulatory guidance documents and literature were reviewed, and veterinary pathologists from North America, Japan, and Europe were surveyed regarding current practices, perceived value, and recommendations for clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies. For two-year rodent carcinogenicity studies, the Working Group recommends that clinical pathology testing be limited to collection of blood smears at scheduled and unscheduled sacrifices to be examined only if indicated to aid in the diagnosis of possible hematopoietic neoplasia following histopathologic evaluation. Additional clinical pathology testing is most appropriately used to address specific issues from prior toxicity studies or known test article-related class effects. Inadequate data were available to make a recommendation concerning clinical pathology testing for alternative six-month carcinogenicity assays using genetically modified mice, although the Working Group suggests that it may be appropriate to use the same approach as for two-year carcinogenicity studies since the study goal is the same.

  4. Supporting Clinical Practice Candidates in Learning Community Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJarnette, Nancy K.; Sudeck, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to monitor pre-service teacher candidates' progression and implementation of the learning community philosophy along with classroom management strategies. The study took place during their final semester of clinical practice. Data were collected from self-reports, surveys, university supervisor…

  5. Terminal sedation and euthanasia: A comparison of clinical practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.C. Rietjens (Judith); J.J.M. van Delden (Johannes); A. van der Heide (Agnes); A.M. Vrakking (Astrid); B.D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen (Bregje); P.J. van der Maas (Paul); G. van der Wal (Gerrit)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: An important issue in the debate about terminal sedation is the extent to which it differs from euthanasia. We studied clinical differences and similarities between both practices in the Netherlands. Methods: Personal interviews were held with a nationwide stratified sample o

  6. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Early Weaning from Mechanical Ventilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Eddy Pereira Valdés

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Early Weaning from Mechanical Ventilation. Weaning is the process, gradual or rapid, that leads to the turn off of mechanical ventilation and allows restoring spontaneous ventilation. The guidelines describe the procedure for rapid weaning from mechanical ventilation and emphasizes on spontaneous ventilation test. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  7. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Niurka Mercedes Galende Hernández; Diosdania Alfonso Falcón; Carlos Alberto Martell Alonso; Alexis Díaz Mesa; Inti Santana Carballosa

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. This concept includes simple chronic bronchitis, asthmatic bronchitis, chronic obstructive bronchitis, and pulmonary emphysema; although this two last are the most commonly included. Risk factors, classification and treatment are commented, stressing the strategy of mechanical ventilation and the indications for mechanical invasive and no invasive ventilation. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most i...

  8. A practical clinical approach to management of the difficult airway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eindhoven, GB; Dercksen, B; Regtien, JG; Borg, PAJ; Wierda, JMKH

    2001-01-01

    Difficult airway management represents a challenge in anaesthesia. In the last decades airway difficulty awareness has improved as a result of better anticipation and decision-making. Airway algorithms and protocols have a more prominent role in training and in clinical anaesthesia practice. In addi

  9. From Paper Based Clinical Practice Guidelines to Declarative Workflow Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao

    2009-01-01

    We present a field study of oncology workflow, involving doctors, nurses and pharmacists at Danish hospitals and discuss the obstacles, enablers and challenges for the use of computer based clinical practice guidelines. Related to the CIGDec approach of Pesic and van der Aalst we then describe how...

  10. The Use of Bone Age in Clinical Practice - Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.D. Martin; J.M. Wit; Z.E. Hochberg; L. Sävendahl; R.R. van Rijn; O. Fricke; N. Cameron; J. Caliebe; T. Hertel; D. Kiepe; K. Albertsson-Wikland; H.H. Thodberg; G. Binder; M.B. Ranke

    2011-01-01

    This review examines the role of skeletal maturity ('bone age', BA) assessment in clinical practice. BA is mainly used in children with the following conditions: short stature (addressed in part 1 of this review), tall stature, early or late puberty, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (all addressed

  11. Normal Personality Assessment in Clinical Practice: The NEO Personality Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Paul T.; McCrae, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    The NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI) is described as a measure of five factors of personality and its use in clinical assessment and treatment practice is reviewed. Data from 17 adult men and women show links between NEO-PI scales and other measures of psychopathology. (SLD)

  12. Multifunction laser systems in clinical and resort practice

    OpenAIRE

    ZABULONOV, Yuriy; Vladimirov, Alexander; Chukhraiev, Nikolay; Elmehsenawi, Yousry; Zukow, Walery

    2016-01-01

    SHUPYKNATIONALMEDICALACADEMY OF POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION UKRAINIANSOCIETY OFPHYSICAL AND REHABILITATION MEDICINE RADOM UNIVERSITY       Yuriy Zabulonov, Alexander Vladimirov, Nikolay Chukhraiev, Yousry Elmehsenawi, Walery Zukow       MULTIFUNCTION LASER SYSTEMS IN CLINICAL AND RESORT PRACTICE   Edited by Yuriy Zabulonov, Alexander Vladimirov, Nikolay Chukhraiev, Yousry Elmehsenawi, Walery Zukow  ...

  13. Theory and practice of clinical pharmacodynamics in oncology drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchment, Ralph E; Doroshow, James H

    2016-08-01

    The clinical development of molecularly targeted cancer therapies is enhanced by proof of mechanism of action as well as proof of concept, which relate molecular pharmacodynamics to efficacy via changes in cancer cell biology and physiology resulting from drug action on its intended target. Here, we present an introduction to the field of clinical pharmacodynamics, its medical and laboratory aspects, and its practical incorporation into clinical trials. We also describe key success factors that are useful for judging the quality of clinical pharmacodynamic studies, including biopsy quality and suitability, specimen handling, assay fitness-for-purpose, and reagent quality control. This introduction provides not only context for the following articles in this issue, but also an appreciation of the role of well-conducted clinical pharmacodynamic studies in oncology drug development. PMID:27663474

  14. Grading journals in clinical practice: a delicate issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, V

    1997-12-01

    Offering students opportunities to gain a strong sense of self, a positive professional image, and a chance to articulate their clinical practice is a challenge for nurse educators. Writing journals in clinical placements is one way in which students can create a dialogue with their teacher and reflect upon and explore their clinical experiences in the context in which these experiences occur. However, grading journals according to numerous predetermined criteria can sabotage the benefits and opportunities of writing journals. Judgment and control are two aspects of evaluation and subsequent grading that can sabotage the benefits. Limiting predetermined criteria and not assigning grades to students' journals are two answers to this delicate issue. To function as competent practitioners, nursing students must be able to meet standards of practice; they must achieve a strong sense of self and a positive professional image. Clinical placements offer students the opportunity to explore the experience of clinical nursing and the context in which these experiences unfold. As students acquire skills and explore the practice of nursing, they also face the reality that their instructors will award a judgment of worth to their efforts. This evaluation is necessary to determine whether students have met the required standards. Evaluation and subsequent grades, therefore, must be an integral part of the students' clinical experience. Writing journals is often used as a method of exploring experiences in clinical nursing. Journals are also used as a method of clinical evaluation. Assigning a grade to student journals has a detrimental effect on the purpose of the assignment. An emphasis on exploring the purpose of writing journals and an analysis of the impact that grading has on this exercise will expose the incompatibility between writing and grading journals.

  15. Clinical audit: Development of the criteria of good practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soimakallio, S; Alanen, A; Järvinen, H; Ahonen, A; Ceder, K; Lyyra-Laitinen, T; Paunio, M; Sinervo, T; Wigren, T

    2011-09-01

    Clinical audit is a systematic review of the procedures in order to improve the quality and the outcome of patient care, whereby the procedures are examined against agreed standards for good medical RADIOLOGICAL procedures. The criteria of good procedures (i.e. the good practice) are thus the cornerstones for development of clinical audits: these should be the basis of assessments regardless of the type of the audit--external, internal, comprehensive or partial. A lot of criteria for good practices are available through the recommendations and publications by international and national professional societies and other relevant organisations. For practical use in clinical audits, the criteria need to be compiled, sorted out and agreed on for the particular aims of an audit (comprehensive or partial, external or internal). The national professional and scientific societies can provide valuable contribution to this development. For examination--or treatment-specific criteria--preliminary consensus needs to be obtained with the help of clinical experts, while clinical audits can be useful as a benchmarking tool to improve the criteria. PMID:21979432

  16. The frontline clinical manager identifying direct reports' level of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, M Anne; Roussel, Linda; Pennington, Sandra L; Hoying, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Patricia Benner applied the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition to describe and interpret skill acquisition and clinical judgment in nursing practice. Operational definitions for the 5 levels of her original Novice to Expert Theory were used by the study participants in a large Midwestern pediatric hospital to self-identify their level of practice. The frontline clinical managers of these direct care registered nurses (RNs) used the same tool to rate their direct reports. The aim of this portion of a larger study was to determine if the clinical manager's perception of their direct reports was the same as that of the RNs. The results of this study are being used by one study unit's clinical managers as the basis for implementing the Hersey and Blanchard Situational Leadership Model. The clinical managers work with their direct reports depending on the level of practice and the details of the task to be performed. One example is creating therapeutic relationships with each other and with families to ensure a safe environment for all.

  17. The frontline clinical manager identifying direct reports' level of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, M Anne; Roussel, Linda; Pennington, Sandra L; Hoying, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Patricia Benner applied the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition to describe and interpret skill acquisition and clinical judgment in nursing practice. Operational definitions for the 5 levels of her original Novice to Expert Theory were used by the study participants in a large Midwestern pediatric hospital to self-identify their level of practice. The frontline clinical managers of these direct care registered nurses (RNs) used the same tool to rate their direct reports. The aim of this portion of a larger study was to determine if the clinical manager's perception of their direct reports was the same as that of the RNs. The results of this study are being used by one study unit's clinical managers as the basis for implementing the Hersey and Blanchard Situational Leadership Model. The clinical managers work with their direct reports depending on the level of practice and the details of the task to be performed. One example is creating therapeutic relationships with each other and with families to ensure a safe environment for all. PMID:23934257

  18. Clinical audit: Development of the criteria of good practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical audit is a systematic review of the procedures in order to improve the quality and the outcome of patient care, whereby the procedures are examined against agreed standards for good medical Radiological procedures. The criteria of good procedures (i.e. the good practice) are thus the cornerstones for development of clinical audits: these should be the basis of assessments regardless of the type of the audit-external, internal, comprehensive or partial. A lot of criteria for good practices are available through the recommendations and publications by international and national professional societies and other relevant organisations. For practical use in clinical audits, the criteria need to be compiled, sorted out and agreed on for the particular aims of an audit (comprehensive or partial, external or internal). The national professional and scientific societies can provide valuable contribution to this development. For examination-or treatment-specific criteria- preliminary consensus needs to be obtained with the help of clinical experts, while clinical audits can be useful as a benchmarking tool to improve the criteria. (authors)

  19. Queering know-how: clinical skill acquisition as ethical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cressida J; Thachuk, Angela

    2015-06-01

    Our study of queer women patients and their primary health care providers (HCPs) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, reveals a gap between providers' theoretical knowledge of "cultural competency" and patients' experience. Drawing on Patricia Benner's Dreyfusian model of skill acquisition in nursing, we suggest that the dissonance between the anti-heteronormative principles expressed in interviews and the relative absence of skilled anti-heteronormative clinical practice can be understood as a failure to grasp the field of practice as a whole. Moving from "knowing-that" to "knowing-how" in terms of anti-heteronormative clinical skills is not only a desirable epistemological trajectory, we argue, but also a way of understanding better and worse ethical practice. PMID:25037245

  20. Reflections on Speech-Language Therapists' Talk: Implications for Clinical Practice and Education. Clinical Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Alison; Armstrong, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Background: Research into the practices of speech-language therapists in clinical sessions is beginning to identify the way communication in clinical interactions both facilitates and potentially impedes the achievement of therapy goals. Aims: This target article aims to raise the issues that arise from critical reflections on the communication of…

  1. 77 FR 49449 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Office of Regulatory Affairs...

  2. The good laboratory practice and good clinical practice requirements for the production of radiopharmaceuticals in clinical research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vos, FJ; De Decker, M; Dierckx, RA

    2005-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals account for more than 95% of the group of sterile pharmaceutical products and should therefore be handled and produced with care. Since the introduction of the European directive, all pharmaceuticals used in clinical studies must be prepared under good manufacturing practice (GM

  3. A framework for effective management of change in clinical practice: dissemination and implementation of clinical practice guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Moulding, N. T.; Silagy, C. A.; Weller, D P

    1999-01-01

    Theories from social and behavioural science can make an important contribution to the process of developing a conceptual framework for improving use of clinical practice guidelines and clinician performance. A conceptual framework for guideline dissemination and implementation is presented which draws on relevant concepts from diffusion of innovation theory, the transtheoretical model of behaviour change, health education theory, social influence theory, and social ec...

  4. Improvements in Renal Replacement Therapy Practice Patterns in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Külli Kõlvald

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical performance indicators (CPI are important tools to assess and improve the quality of renal replacement therapy (RRT. The aim of the current study was to compare the results of a longitudinal set of CPI in RRT patients and to determine the extent to which the guidelines for anaemia, calcium phosphate management and other CPI are met in Estonian renal centres. Methods: A long-term retrospective, observational, cross-sectional CPI analysis was undertaken in RRT patients from 2007 to 2011. The following CPI set of well-designed measures based on good evidence was analysed: anaemia management variables, laboratory analyses of mineral metabolism, nutritional status variables and dialysis adequacy variables. Results: Relatively small changes in the analysed mean CPI values were noticed during the study period. In the course of the study, we noticed an improvement in anaemia control, but not all centres achieved the standard of >80% of the dialysis patients with a haemoglobin (Hb level >100 g/l. There was a trend of decreasing Hb concentrations below 125 g/l in both haemodialysis (HD and peritoneal dialysis (PD patients. In 2011, hyperphosphataemia was present in 58% of the HD and 47% of the PD patients, whereas centre differences varied between 50 and 60% of both the HD and PD patients. HD adequacy was achieved in 77% of the HD patients. Conclusion: An improvement in the data collection was noticed, and the analysis of CPI allows renal centres to assess and compare their practices with others. The collection and evaluation of CPI of RRT patients is an important improvement and significantly increases the awareness of nephrologists.

  5. Clinical Nurse Leader Integration Into Practice: Developing Theory To Guide Best Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, M.

    2016-01-01

    © 2015. Numerous policy bodies have identified the clinical nurse leader (CNL) as an innovative new role for meeting higher health care quality standards. Although there is growing evidence of improved care environment and patient safety and quality outcomes after redesigning care delivery microsystems to integrate CNL practice, significant variation in CNL implementation has been noted across reports, making it difficult to causally link CNL practice to reported outcomes. This variability re...

  6. Preparing Occupational Therapy Students for the Complexities of Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J. Knecht-Sabres DHS, OTR/L

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the effect of a unique amalgam of adult learning methodologies near the end of the occupational therapy (OT students’ didactic education as a means to enhance readiness for clinical practice. Results of quantitative and qualitative data analysis indicated that the use of standardized patients, in combination with a sequential, semistructured, and progressively challenging series of client cases, in an OT adult practice (intervention course, improved the students’ self-perception of their level of comfort and skill on various foundational, yet essential, OT-related competencies.

  7. Clinical audit and quality systems - practical implementation in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical audit is a new concept of significant importance for the quality of radiological practices, introduced by the EC Medical Exposure Directive (MED, 97/43/EURATOM). By definition, clinical audit means 'a systematic examination or review of medical radiological procedures which seeks to improve the quality and the outcome of patient care, through structured review whereby radiological practices, procedures, and results are examined against agreed standards for good medical radiological procedures, with modifications of the practices where indicated and the application of new standards if necessary'. In its most profound meaning, being introduced in the medical exposure directive, clinical audit can be seen as a review of the success in implementing the justification and optimization principles, and therefore, it is to a large extent an issue of radiation safety for the patient. According to the directive, clinical audits shall be 'carried out in accordance with national procedures'. For the last few years, parallel to the development of the MED in Europe, there has been a worldwide tendency to implement appropriate quality systems (QS) in the health care organizations, in accordance with the international quality standards (ISO 9000 series etc). Such quality systems have been applied for a long time and very widely by the industry. It is a strong belief that the development of quality systems for health care would result in equal benefits as trusted in industry, in terms of efficiency and safety of health care services. For radiological practices, the quality systems are expected to become a framework for improving the optimization of practices and for maintaining good radiation safety, as well as providing a mechanism to prevent mistakes and accidents. In some countries, like the UK and The Netherlands, there are legal requirements to establish and maintain quality systems at certain type of radiological units. In some countries and some radiological units

  8. Good Practice for Introducing Radiopharmaceuticals for Clinical Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of new radiopharmaceuticals can provide extremely valuable information in the evaluation of cancer, as well as heart and brain diseases. Information that often times cannot be obtained by other means. However, there is a perceived need in many Member States for a useful reference to facilitate and expedite the introduction of radiopharmaceuticals already in clinical use in other countries. This publication intends to provide practical support for the introduction of new radiotracers, including recommendations on the necessary steps needed to facilitate and expedite the introduction of radiopharmaceuticals in clinical use, while ensuring that a safe and high quality product is administered to the patient at all times

  9. Experimental Psychopathology: From laboratory studies to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Philippot

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, David Barlow (2004, a pioneer in the field of anxiety disorders, has proposed that psychologists should abandon the concept of psychotherapy and rather use the one of “psychological treatment”. The provoking idea behind this proposal is that the concept of psychotherapy, relying on the notion of “therapeutic school” should be discarded by professional psychologists because it relies too much on conceptions based on pre-scientific models. Barlow (2004 insists that, today, psychology as an empirical science has gathered sufficient knowledge and know-how to found clinical practice. It is no longer necessary to rely on pre-scientific theories. Further, Barlow’s perspective opens clinical practice to the entire field of psychology, i.e. to the advances accomplished by research on emotion, cognition, learning, development, etc.

  10. Motion analysis of the shoulder in adults: kinematics and electromyography for the clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parel, Ilaria; Jaspers, Ellen; DE Baets, Liesbet; Amoresano, Amedeo; Cutti, Andrea G

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the principal aspects of kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) analysis of the shoulder and their potential for the every-day clinical practice are described. The text reports a brief description of standard recommendations for movement assessment, an overview of the main quantitative motion analysis protocols and a description of the most commonly investigated scapulothoracic muscles. To assess the possibility of using these protocols for clinical applications, reliability and repeatability of kinematic and EMG measures were investigated and reference data for scapulohumeral joint kinematics were provided. The last part of the manuscript reports the integration of the quantitative analysis of scapula dyskinesis within the widely accepted Constant-Murley clinical score. In addition, examples of assessment of muscles activity and recruitment patterns are discussed since they are crucial for the clinical evaluation of common shoulder pathologies.

  11. Electromyogram pattern recognition for control of powered upper-limb prostheses: State of the art and challenges for clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Scheme, MSc, PEng

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Using electromyogram (EMG signals to control upper-limb prostheses is an important clinical option, offering a person with amputation autonomy of control by contracting residual muscles. The dexterity with which one may control a prosthesis has progressed very little, especially when controlling multiple degrees of freedom. Using pattern recognition to discriminate multiple degrees of freedom has shown great promise in the research literature, but it has yet to transition to a clinically viable option. This article describes the pertinent issues and best practices in EMG pattern recognition, identifies the major challenges in deploying robust control, and advocates research directions that may have an effect in the near future.

  12. Promoting a Strategic Approach to Clinical Nurse Leader Practice Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Marjory; Avolio, Alice E; Ott, Karen M; Miltner, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    The Office of Nursing Services of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) piloted implementation of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) into the care delivery model and established a strategic goal in 2011 to implement the CNL role across the VA health care system. The VA Office of Nursing Services CNL Implementation and Evaluation (CNL I&E) Service was created as one mechanism to facilitate that goal in response to a need identified by facility nurse executives for consultative support for CNL practice integration. This article discusses strategies employed by the CNL I&E consultative team to help facility-level nursing leadership integrate CNLs into practice. Measures of success include steady growth in CNL practice capacity as well as positive feedback from nurse executives about the value of consultative engagement. Future steps to better integrate CNL practice into the VA include consolidation of lessons learned, collaboration to strengthen the evidence base for CNL practice, and further exploration of the transformational potential of CNL practice across the care continuum. PMID:26636231

  13. Clinical Practice Guidelines for postoperative period of thoracic surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Carlos Alvarez Li

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for postoperative period of thoracic surgery. It is the period between the suture of the surgical wound and the total rehabilitation of the patient, which usually occurs in the Intensive Care Unit. This document includes a review and update of the main aspects such as classification, postoperative treatment, stressing the actions to face any complication. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  14. MRI Contrast Agents: Evolution of Clinical Practice and Dose Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rihan

    2016-08-01

    Accurate detection of lesions throughout the body is of paramount importance in contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Optimal contrast agent performance is therefore of great importance and given the number of MRI contrast agent options today, this topic is of much ongoing study. The goal of this review article is to bring the read up to date on pertinent articles that relate to the evolution of radiological clinical practice and dose optimization pertaining to gadolinium contrast agents. PMID:27367313

  15. Acute Myocardial Infarction. An Update of the Clinical Practice Guideline

    OpenAIRE

    Yanier Coll Muñoz; Francisco de Jesús Valladares Carvajal; Claudio González Rodríguez

    2016-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines present all relevant evidence on a particular issue in order to help physicians select the best treatment strategies. This guideline aims to optimize the diagnostic process and treatment of acute myocardial infarction, to assess adherence to issued guidelines and to propose changes based on the results obtained. It refers to patients with ischemic symptoms or their equivalents, persistent ST-segment elevation or ST-segment and T-wave changes consistent with the di...

  16. REMAXOL: MECHANISMS OF ACTION AND APPLICATION IN REAL CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yu. Ilchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main pathogenic effects of the original nativedrug — remaxol combining properties of balanced polyionic solution (methionine, inosine, nicotinamide and succinic acid were introduced additionally, antioxidant, antihypoxant and hepatotropic agent are considered in review. The results of its application in clinical practice among patients with alcoholic fatty liver disease, metabolic disorders, viral hepatitis, drug hepatotoxicity and in the perioperative period are presented.

  17. Clinical practice of risk assessment of sexual violence

    OpenAIRE

    Judge, Joseph Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Background: Risk assessment of sexual violence involves evidence based evaluation of the risks posed by sexual offenders. It informs risk management; the provision of treatment that reduces the risk of future sexual violence. Previous research has focused on assessment of the predictive accuracy of different risk assessment tools, as well as the identification of risk factors that are associated with recidivism. In contrast, the clinical practice of risk assessment is a research a...

  18. ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Identification of Practical Pharmacology Skills Useful for Good Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shilpa, R. Divya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Awareness about animal ethics is increasing everywhere. This increased awareness coupled with strict regulations discouraging the use of animals for routine experiments have tied the hands of many pharmacologists. They are now forced to develop alternative experiments without using animals. At present, there is acute need to come out with more innovative and useful practical exercises for pharmacology practical sessions. In this background, the present study was undertaken to develop the much-needed alternative experiments. Aims and Objective: To identify new pharmacological practical skills useful for good clinical practice. Material and Methods: A pre-tested questionnaire was administered to 110 doctors of different categories like house surgeons, postgraduate students, assistant professors and professors who are working in a tertiary care hospital. They were asked to give their suggestions regarding new pharmacology practical skills useful for good clinical practice. Statistical analysis: Responses of the participants to the questions asked were tabulated and analyzed. Suggestions given by them were listed out and studied. Results: Use of emergency drugs, dosage calculation, drugs used in pregnancy, case discussions and prescription writing exercises received a lot of support from the participants. Research methodology, cost calculation, animal experiments and interpretation of data of animal experiments did not receive support from the participants. Suggestions given by the participants regarding useful pharmacological skills belonged to the areas like therapeutics, safe use of drugs, recent advances, analysis of information given by the medical representatives and analyzing articles in journals for knowing the efficacy of drugs. Conclusion: Exercises relevant to the clinical practice, as identified in this study, can be introduced as practical pharmacology exercises. Steps are to be taken to highlight the importance of research

  19. General practitioners and clinical practice guidelines: a reexamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, Isabelle; Ventelou, Bruno; Guerville, Marc-André; Paraponaris, Alain; Verger, Pierre

    2011-08-01

    General practitioners' (GPs') use of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) may be influenced by various contextual and attitudinal factors. This study examines general attitudes toward CPGs to establish profiles according to these attitudes and to determine if these profiles are associated with awareness and with use of CPGs in daily practice. The authors conducted a cross-sectional telephone survey of 1,759 French GPs and measured (a) their general attitudes toward CPGs and (b) their awareness and use in daily practice of CPGs for six specific health problems. A bivariate probit model was used with sample selection to analyze the links between GPs' general attitudes and CPG awareness/use. The authors found three GP profiles according to their opinions toward CPGs and a positive association between these profiles and CPG awareness but not use. It is important to build awareness of CPGs before GPs develop negative attitudes toward them. PMID:21536601

  20. SELF WOUND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES BEFORE ATTENDING ANTIRABIES VACCINE CLINIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Mishra, Smita Panda, Prakash Chandra Panda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In INDIA almost 20000 people die (40% of world death each year from rabies. Most of these deaths could be prevented by post exposure prophylaxis with wound washing, rabies immunoglobulin & vaccination. Local wound management alone can reduce viral load by up to 80%. Objective: To study self-wound management practices in animal exposure patients before attending a tertiary level ARV clinic. Methodology: Data regarding wound management was collected by individual interview of patients attending the ARV clinic during OCT 2011 to MAR 2012. The data collected in the form of a questionnaire. Analysis of data was done in the Department Of Community Medicine, V.S.S. Medical College, Burla. Results: Total 493 cases of animal exposure were attended during the study period. Most common biting animal was dog (94.5%. 31% of cases were under the age of 10 years & 23% belongs to the age of 10-19 years. Male to female ratio was 3:1. Most of the cases (91% were of category III exposure. Immediate management of wound was practiced by 63-77% of cases before visiting ARV clinic; only 2% wash the wound with running water & soap for 15 minutes. 39% of cases applied Dettol/savlon at the wound side & other 38% applied turmeric, red chilli, kerosene, Band-Aid & ghee locally. Most cases (61% reported to ARV clinic within 24hours.

  1. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, Pritam P; Kamath, Maya; Tarale, Kavita; Kusugal, Preethi B

    2014-02-01

    The longevity of fixed partial denture depends on the type of luting cement used with tooth preparation. The clinician's understating of various cements, their advantages and disadvantages is of utmost importance. In recent years, many luting agents cements have been introduced claiming clinically better performance than existing materials due to improved characteristics. Both conventional and contemporary dental luting cements are discussed here. The various agents discussed are: Zinc phosphate, Zinc polycarboxylate, Zinc oxide-eugenol, Glass-ionomer, Resin modified GIC, Compomers and Resin cement. The purpose of this article is to provide a discussion that provides a clinical perspective of luting cements currently available to help the general practitioner make smarter and appropriate choices. How to cite the article: Lad PP, Kamath M, Tarale K, Kusugal PB. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):116-20. PMID:24653615

  2. Transition questions in clinical practice - validity and reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein

    2008-01-01

    of construct validity and reproducibility of a TQ and make proposals for standardised use. One-hundred-and-ninety-one patients with low back pain and/or leg pain were followed over an 8-week period receiving 3 disability and 2 pain questionnaires together with a 7-point TQ. Reproducibility was determined using...... are reproducible in patients with low back pain and/or leg pain. Despite critique of several biases, our results have reinforced the construct validity of TQ’s as an outcome measure since only 1 hypothesis was rejected. On the basis of our findings we have outlined a proposal for a standardised use of transition......Transition questions in CLINICAL practice - validity and reproducibility Lauridsen HH1, Manniche C3, Grunnet-Nilsson N1, Hartvigsen J1,2 1   Clinical Locomotion Science, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. e-mail: hlauridsen...

  3. Planning practice-based clinical teaching: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, D L

    1997-01-01

    Among the many roles clinicians are expected to perform is that of educator of junior colleagues. However, most clinicians have received little or no developmental instruction for this role. Furthermore, the nature of medical education is changing, and the skills required of new graduates are being refocused. This series of three articles presents a guide to some of the philosophical and educational issues at the heart of current changes in medical education. As well as developing an argument for making practice-based clinical teaching student-centred and problem-orientated, suggestions for planning and implementing teaching which utilise these approaches are outlined. In this first article the changing nature of clinical teaching is discussed and the educational principles of problem-based and student-centred learning are defined. The second article looks at the steps involved in planning a clinical teaching session. The third and final article looks at the development and implementation of teaching sessions. PMID:9009018

  4. Clinical Nurse Leader Integration Into Practice: Developing Theory To Guide Best Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Numerous policy bodies have identified the clinical nurse leader (CNL) as an innovative new role for meeting higher health care quality standards. Although there is growing evidence of improved care environment and patient safety and quality outcomes after redesigning care delivery microsystems to integrate CNL practice, significant variation in CNL implementation has been noted across reports, making it difficult to causally link CNL practice to reported outcomes. This variability reflects the overall absence in the literature of a well-defined CNL theoretical framework to help guide standardized application in practice. To address this knowledge gap, an interpretive synthesis with a grounded theory analysis of CNL narratives was conducted to develop a theoretical model for CNL practice. The model clarifies CNL practice domains and proposes mechanisms by which CNL-integrated care delivery microsystems improve health care quality. The model highlights the need for a systematic approach to CNL implementation including a well-thought out strategy for care delivery redesign; a consistent, competency-based CNL workflow; and sustained macro-to-micro system leadership support. CNL practice can be considered an effective approach to organizing nursing care that maximizes the scope of nursing to influence the ways care is delivered by all professions within a clinical microsystem.

  5. Clinical Nurse Leader Integration Into Practice: Developing Theory To Guide Best Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Numerous policy bodies have identified the clinical nurse leader (CNL) as an innovative new role for meeting higher health care quality standards. Although there is growing evidence of improved care environment and patient safety and quality outcomes after redesigning care delivery microsystems to integrate CNL practice, significant variation in CNL implementation has been noted across reports, making it difficult to causally link CNL practice to reported outcomes. This variability reflects the overall absence in the literature of a well-defined CNL theoretical framework to help guide standardized application in practice. To address this knowledge gap, an interpretive synthesis with a grounded theory analysis of CNL narratives was conducted to develop a theoretical model for CNL practice. The model clarifies CNL practice domains and proposes mechanisms by which CNL-integrated care delivery microsystems improve health care quality. The model highlights the need for a systematic approach to CNL implementation including a well-thought out strategy for care delivery redesign; a consistent, competency-based CNL workflow; and sustained macro-to-micro system leadership support. CNL practice can be considered an effective approach to organizing nursing care that maximizes the scope of nursing to influence the ways care is delivered by all professions within a clinical microsystem. PMID:26802589

  6. 基于能力本位的重症监护护理硕士专业学位研究生临床实践模式的构建%Constructing a clinical practice patterns for intensive care nursing masters with professional degree based on competence based education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭洁; 宋琦; 王建荣; 黄叶莉; 马燕兰; 彭小玲

    2014-01-01

    目的 构建科学实用的重症监护护理硕士专业学位研究生临床实践模式,规范专业型研究生临床实践行为,全面提高临床实践质量.方法 在能力本位理论的指导下,根据文献阅读、理论分析、问卷调查、半结构访谈和德尔菲专家咨询的结果,确定重症监护专业学位护理硕士研究生临床实践模式的各级指标.结果 咨询10所三级甲等医院及1所护理学院的16名专家,有效问卷回收率分别为93.75%和100.00%,专家权威系数为0.94,肯德尔和谐系数为0.257(x2=402.73,P< 0.01),构建的重症监护专业学位护理硕士研究生临床实践模式包括6个1级指标,47个2级指标和112个3级指标.结论 专家积极性和权威程度较高,各项指标的专家意见集中,研究结果科学可靠,可以作为重症监护专业学位护理硕士研究生临床实践的参考依据.%Objective Constructing a scientific and practical clinical practice patterns for intensive care nursing masters with professional degree.Methods Based on the competence based education,a clinical practice patterns for intensive care nursing master with professional degree was developed by literature review,questionnaire survey,unstructured interview and Delphi technique.Results 16 experts from 10 third-level and first-class hospitals and 1 Nursing College were consulted,the retrieving rates of questionnaire were 93.75%,100.00%,respectively.The authoritative coefficients were 0.94 and the coordination coefficients were 0.257.The index system consisted of 6 first dimensions,47 second-dimensions and 112 items.Conclusions The positivity and authority of experts in this study were in high degree,the concentration and harmonization of experts' opinions were relatively high.The results had high reliability and feasibility.It can be used to provide objective and quantitative reference for intensive care nursing master with professional degree.

  7. Successful clinical and organisational change in endodontic practice: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, M; Englander, M; Tegelberg, Å; Wolf, E

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explicate and describe the qualitative meaning of successful clinical and organizational change in endodontic practice, following a comprehensive implementation program, including the integration of the nickel-titanium-rotary-technique. After an educational intervention in the Public Dental Service in a Swedish county, thematic in-depth interviews were conducted, with special reference to the participants' experience of the successful change. Interviews with four participants, were purposively selected on the basis of occupation (dentist, dental assistant, receptionist, clinical manager), for a phenomenological human scientific analysis. Four constituents were identified as necessary for the invariant, general structure of the phenomenon: 1) disclosed motivation, 2) allowance for individual learning processes, 3) continuous professional collaboration, and 4) a facilitating educator. The perceived requirements for achieving successful clinical and organizational change in endodontic practice were clinical relevance, an atmosphere which facilitated discussion and allowance for individual learning patterns. The qualities required in the educator were acknowledged competence with respect to scientific knowledge and clinical expertise, as well as familiarity with conditions at the dental clinics. The results indicate a complex interelationship among various aspects of the successful change process.

  8. International patterns of practice in radiotherapy for bone metastases: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel McDonald

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Radiation therapy is the standard treatment for symptomatic bone metastases. Several randomized control trials and meta-analyses have concluded a similar efficacy in pain relief when comparing single versus multiple fraction regimes. However, there continues to be reluctance to conform to published guidelines that recommend a single treatment for the palliation of painful bone metastases. The purpose of this literature review is to summarize international patterns of practice, and to determine if guidelines recommending single fraction treatment have been implemented in clinical care. Methods: A literature search was conducted in Ovid Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central. Search words included, ‘bone metastases’, ‘radiation therapy’, ‘radiotherapy’, ‘patterns of practice’, and ‘dose fractionation’. Both prospective and retrospective studies that investigated the prescription of radiotherapy to bone metastases using actual patient databases were included. Articles were excluded if they investigated hypothetical scenarios. Results: Six hundred and thirteen results were generated from the literature search. Twenty-six articles met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 11 were Canadian, 8 were European, 6 were American, and 1 was Australian. The use of single fraction radiotherapy (SFRT ranged from 3% to 75%, but was generally lower in American studies. Choice of fractionation depended on a variety of factors, including patient age, prognosis, site of irradiation, and physician experience. Conclusion: Despite the publication of robust randomized control trials, meta-analyses, and clinical practice guidelines recommending the use of a single treatment to palliate uncomplicated bone metastasis, SFRT is internationally underutilized.

  9. Base Station Antenna Pattern Distortion in Practical Urban Deployment Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio; Nguyen, Huan Cong; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard;

    2014-01-01

    In real urban deployments, base station antennas are typically not placed in free space conditions. Therefore, the radiation pattern can be affected by mounting structures and nearby obstacles located in the proximity of the antenna (near-field), which are often not taken into consideration. Also...... presents a combination of near-field and far-field simulations aimed to provide an overview of the distortion experienced by the base station antenna pattern in two different urban deployment scenarios: rooftop and telecommunications tower. The study illustrates how, in comparison with the near...

  10. [Eslicarbazepine acetate in clinical practice. Efficacy and safety results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Castro, Pedro J; Payán-Ortiz, Manuel; Cimadevilla, José M; Quiroga-Subirana, Pablo; Fernández-Pérez, Javier

    2013-03-16

    INTRODUCTION. Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a new antiepileptic drug (AED) licensed in Spain in February 2011 as an adjunctive therapy in adults with partial seizures with or without secondary generalization. Clinical trials with ESL have demonstrated acceptable efficacy and safety. AIM. To evaluate the results of ESL in our epilepsy unit during its first year of clinical experience with this AED. PATIENTS AND METHODS. We included all patients who started treatment with ESL at our epilepsy unit from March 2011 to May 2012. We collected the following variables: gender, aetiology of epilepsy, epileptogenic area, reason for switch to ESL, clinical response after initiation of ESL, adverse effects of ESL, refractoriness criteria and treatment discontinuation. A bivariate factor-to-factor correlation study was carried out to establish associations between the independent variables and the clinical response. RESULTS. We recruited 105 patients (51.4% male). 20,7% of patients remained seizure-free and 58.4% showed > 50% improvement after introduction of ESL. At 6 months, 18.1% had experienced some type of side effect, with cognitive disorders being the most common, and 11.5% had discontinued treatment. Combination with lacosamide proved to be significantly less effective in the control of seizures. Combination of ESL with the rest of sodium channel inhibitors was similar in efficacy to others combinations. CONCLUSIONS. ESL is a well-tolerated and effective AED when is used as adjunctive treatment with most of other AED in clinical practice. PMID:23483464

  11. Clinical significance of patterns of incidental thyroid uptake at 18F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incidental uptake of 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) in the thyroid gland is not uncommonly encountered in day-to-day practice of oncological 18F-FDG positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). These are often felt to be “nuisance lesions” by referring clinicians and radiologists alike. However, recognition of the importance of different patterns of FDG uptake in the thyroid gland and knowledge of the possible underlying aetiologies are crucial in ensuring that patients are managed appropriately in the clinical context of their primary diagnosis, as the underlying pathological condition may be clinically important in a significant minority of such cases. This review describes the various patterns of 18F-FDG uptake within the thyroid and discusses the clinical significance and possible impact on patient management. Incidental low-grade homogeneous diffuse increased thyroid 18F-FDG uptake is usually seen in the patients with chronic thyroiditis, Grave's disease, and hypothyroidism. Thyroid function tests and antibody profiling are advised in these patients. Incidental focal 18F-FDG thyroid uptake should raise the possibility of underlying malignancy. Ultrasound with or without fine-needle aspiration cytology is usually recommended for the evaluation of these lesions. Heterogeneous uptake with prominent focal uptake in the thyroid should be further evaluated to exclude malignancy

  12. Best Practices in Clinical Supervision: another step in delineating effective supervision practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, L Dianne

    2014-01-01

    Across the helping professions, we have arrived at a point where it is possible to create statements of best practices in supervision that are based on available empirical research; credentialing, ethical, and legal guidelines; and consensus opinion. Best practices are different from, but certainly complementary to, statements of supervision competencies. In this paper, I highlight the differences between competencies and best practices, and then describe the development and content of one comprehensive statement, the Best Practices in Clinical Supervision created for the field of counseling and counselor education. I then illustrate the applicability of the Best Practices across disciplines and countries through a comparison and contrast with several other existing documents. I conclude with a brief look at the development of supervisor expertise, which requires not only declarative knowledge (competencies) and procedural knowledge (statements of best practices), but also reflective knowledge. The latter is composed of insights built over years of supervision education, experience, and self-reflection regarding necessary adaptions and improvisations that inform an individualized approach to supervision practice.

  13. Introduction of pattern recognition by MATLAB practice 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of this book starts introduction and examples of pattern recognition. This book describes a vector and matrix, basic statistics and a probability distribution, statistical decision theory and probability density function, liner shunt, vector quantizing and clustering GMM, PCA and KL conversion, LDA, ID 3, a nerve cell modeling, HMM, SVM and Ada boost. It has direction of MATLAB in the appendix.

  14. New drugs in general practice: prescribing patterns and external influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentinus, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis several studies are presented with the objective to detect and elucidate the patterns by which new drugs are prescribed by general practitioners (GPs). Furthermore, we studied the influences of medical specialists and community pharmacists as important factors on the GP's decision to

  15. 2011 Clinical Practice Guidelines for Type 2 Diabetes in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hyun Ko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available As in other countries, type 2 diabetes is major health concern in Korea. A dramatic increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and its chronic complications has led to an increase in health costs and economic burdens. Early detection of high risk individuals, hidden diabetic patients, and improvement in the quality of care for the disease are the first steps to mitigate the increase in prevalence. The Committee of Clinical Practice Guidelines of the Korean Diabetes Association revised and updated the '3rd Clinical Practice Guidelines' at the end of 2010. In the guidelines, the committee recommended active screening of high risk individuals for early detection and added the hemoglobin A1c level to the diagnostic criteria for type 2 diabetes based on clinical studies performed in Korea. Furthermore, the committee members emphasized that integrating patient education and self-management is an essential part of care. The drug treatment algorithm based on the degree of hyperglycemia and patient characteristics were also updated.

  16. Treating sarcopenia in clinical practice: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Spiegeleer, Anton; Petrovic, Mirko; Boeckxstaens, Pauline; Van Den Noortgate, Nele

    2016-08-01

    Sarcopenia - or the loss of muscle mass, strength and function with ageing - represents an important health issue of the twenty-first century because of its devastating effects in addition to an increased prevalence of aged people. The devastating health effects of sarcopenia are multiple: an increased falls risk, a decreased physical ability and quality of life and an independent increase of all-cause mortality. Although the ultimate remedy for sarcopenia yet has to be found, some interventions have proven their merit and might be of practical use in clinical practice, especially for geriatricians, who deal most with sarcopenia. This review intends to summarize the current therapeutic interventions, their proposed mechanism of action as well as their clinical value. The results of our review highlight the importance of exercise (50% resistance training, 50% endurance training), nutrition (25-30 g proteins with essential amino acids every meal and long-chain ω-3 fatty acids) and limitation of alcohol and smoking. In addition, studies also suggest a place for vitamin D (aim serum levels >30 ng/L), testosterone (aim serum levels >300 ng/dL) and creatine (15-20 g/d for five days, thereafter 3-5 g/d). In conclusion, although more studies are needed to elucidate the exact effectiveness and safety of many sarcopenia interventions, the current evidence already provides clinically useful information, which might benefit the patient with (pre-)sarcopenia. PMID:27112427

  17. Effects of healing touch in clinical practice: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Joel G; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2011-09-01

    Hands-on healing and energy-based interventions have been found in cultures throughout history around the world. These complementary therapies, rooted in ancient Eastern healing practices, are becoming mainstream. Healing Touch, a biofield therapy that arose in the nursing field in the late 1980s, is used in a variety of settings (i.e., pain centers, surgical settings, and private practices) with reported benefits (i.e., decreased anxiety, pain, and depressive behaviors; increased relaxation and a sense of well-being). However, clinical trial data concerning the effectiveness of Healing Touch have not been evaluated using a systematic, evidence-based approach. Thus, this systematic review is aimed at critically evaluating the data from randomized clinical trials examining the clinical efficacy of Healing Touch as a supportive care modality for any medical condition.

  18. Effects of healing touch in clinical practice: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Joel G; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2011-09-01

    Hands-on healing and energy-based interventions have been found in cultures throughout history around the world. These complementary therapies, rooted in ancient Eastern healing practices, are becoming mainstream. Healing Touch, a biofield therapy that arose in the nursing field in the late 1980s, is used in a variety of settings (i.e., pain centers, surgical settings, and private practices) with reported benefits (i.e., decreased anxiety, pain, and depressive behaviors; increased relaxation and a sense of well-being). However, clinical trial data concerning the effectiveness of Healing Touch have not been evaluated using a systematic, evidence-based approach. Thus, this systematic review is aimed at critically evaluating the data from randomized clinical trials examining the clinical efficacy of Healing Touch as a supportive care modality for any medical condition. PMID:21228402

  19. Current clinical practices in stroke rehabilitation: regional pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Pradeep; Oelschlager, Ashley; Agah, Arvin; Pohl, Patricia S; Ahmad, S Omar; Liu, Wen

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed at understanding the current physical and occupational therapy practices in stroke rehabilitation in the Midwest. The insights gained from this pilot study will be used in a future study aimed at understanding stroke rehabilitation practices across the nation. Researchers and clinicians in the field of stroke rehabilitation were interviewed, and past studies in the literature were analyzed. Through these activities, we developed a 37-item questionnaire that was sent to occupational and physical therapists practicing in Kansas and Missouri who focus on the care of people who have had a stroke (n = 320). A total of 107 respondents returned a com pleted questionnaire, which gives a response rate of about 36%. The majority of respondents had more than 12 years of experience treating patients with stroke. Consensus of 70% or more was found for 80% of the items. The preferred approaches for the rehabilitation of people who have had a stroke are the Bobath and Brunnstrom methods, which are being used by 93% and 85% of the physical and occupational therapists, respectively. Even though some variability existed in certain parts of the survey, in general clinicians agreed on different treatment approaches in issues dealing with muscle tone, weakness, and limited range of motion in stroke rehabilitation. Some newer treatment approaches that have been proven to be effective are practiced only by a minority of clinicians. The uncertainty among clinicians in some sections of the survey reveals that more evidence on clinical approaches is needed to ensure efficacious treatments. PMID:19009470

  20. An Appraisal of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Connie M; Wu, Annie M; Young, Benjamin K; Wu, Dominic J; Margo, Curtis E; Greenberg, Paul B

    2016-07-01

    The objective is to evaluate the methodological quality of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) published by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), Canadian Ophthalmological Society (COS), and Royal College of Ophthalmologists (RCO) for diabetic retinopathy. Four evaluators independently appraised the CPGs using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument, which covers 6 domains (Scope and Purpose, Stakeholder Involvement, Rigor of Development, Clarity of Presentation, Applicability, and Editorial Independence). Scores ranged from 35% to 78% (AAO), 60% to 92% (COS), and 35% to 82% (RCO). Intraclass correlation coefficients for the reliability of mean scores were 0.78, 0.78, and 0.79, respectively. The strongest domains were Scope and Purpose, and Clarity of Presentation (COS). The weakest were Stakeholder Involvement (AAO), Rigor of Development (AAO, RCO), Applicability, and Editorial Independence (RCO). Diabetic retinopathy practice guidelines can be improved by targeting Stakeholder Involvement, Rigor of Development, Applicability, and Editorial Independence. PMID:25742906

  1. Practical Approaches for Mining Frequent Patterns in Molecular Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naulaerts, Stefan; Moens, Sandy; Engelen, Kristof; Berghe, Wim Vanden; Goethals, Bart; Laukens, Kris; Meysman, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Pattern detection is an inherent task in the analysis and interpretation of complex and continuously accumulating biological data. Numerous itemset mining algorithms have been developed in the last decade to efficiently detect specific pattern classes in data. Although many of these have proven their value for addressing bioinformatics problems, several factors still slow down promising algorithms from gaining popularity in the life science community. Many of these issues stem from the low user-friendliness of these tools and the complexity of their output, which is often large, static, and consequently hard to interpret. Here, we apply three software implementations on common bioinformatics problems and illustrate some of the advantages and disadvantages of each, as well as inherent pitfalls of biological data mining. Frequent itemset mining exists in many different flavors, and users should decide their software choice based on their research question, programming proficiency, and added value of extra features. PMID:27168722

  2. Relevance of guideline-based ICD indications to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jefairi, Nora; Burri, Haran

    2014-01-01

    The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) has established itself as life-saving therapy in patients at risk for sudden cardiac death. Remarkable technological advances have made ICDs easier and safer to implant, with improved therapeutic and diagnostic functions and reduced morbidity. Guidelines on ICD indications have been proposed by American and European scientific societies since a number of years, based upon trials and expert opinion. In the context of variable economic and political constraints, it is questionable whether these guidelines may be applied to all settings. This review discusses the guideline-based indications, critically examines their applicability to clinical practice, and discusses alternatives to ICD therapy.

  3. The use of bone age in clinical practice - Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, D.D.; Caliebe, J.; Binder, Gitte Sommer;

    2011-01-01

    This review examines the role of skeletal maturity ('bone age', BA) assessment in clinical practice. BA is mainly used in children with the following conditions: short stature (addressed in part 1 of this review), tall stature, early or late puberty, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (all......-up in BA that is usually appropriate for the height of the child. Response to GH is dependent on BA delay in young children with idiopathic short stature, and GH dosage appears to affect BA acceleration. In chronic renal failure, BA is delayed until puberty but then increases due to increased sensitivity...

  4. The development of precision medicine in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyan; Xia, Jinglin; Shehab, Mohamed; Wang, Xiangdong

    2015-12-01

    Precision medicine allows a dramatic expansion of biological data, while there is still an urgent need to understand and insight the exact meaning of those data to human health and disease. This has led to an increasing wealth of data unanalyzed. The concept of precision medicine is about the customization of healthcare, with decisions and practices tailored to an individual patient based on their intrinsic biology in addition to clinical "signs and symptoms". Construction of a standardized model for the integration of data from various platforms is the central mission of the 'New Disease Management Model'. The model is helpful for the development of new taxonomy of diseases and subtypes, to personalize therapy based on patient genetic profiles. A rapid progression of precision therapy has been made recently. Clinical trials have shown the therapeutic efficacy of discovered and developed therapeutic agents has improved. However, next-generation drugs would be designed for disease subtypes with more specificity, efficacy and lower toxicity. PMID:26302883

  5. Clinical application of pharmacogenetics: focusing on practical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Matthew T; McCarthy, Jeanette J; Shin, Jaekyu

    2015-01-01

    Recent large-scale genetic-based studies have transformed the field of pharmacogenetics to identify, characterize and leverage genetic information to inform patient care. Genetic testing can be used to alter drug selection, optimize drug dosing and prevent unnecessary adverse events. As precision medicine becomes the mainstay in the clinic, it becomes critical for clinicians to utilize pharmacogenetics to guide patient care. One primary challenge is identifying patients where genetic tests that can potentially impact patient care. To address this challenge, our review highlights many practical issues clinicians may encounter: identifying candidate patients and clinical laboratories for pharmacogenetic testing, selecting highly curated resources to help asses test validity, reimbursing costs of pharmacogenetic tests, and interpreting of pharmacogenetic test results.

  6. Measuring Effects on the Clinical Practice from a Configured EHR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, John; Simonsen, Jesper; K. Iversen, Rikke

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the project was to measure the clinical usability of an EHR configured by use of participatory design with clinicians from a neurological stroke unit in order to get input to the County’s future strategy for incremental implementation of EHR. The content of the EHR was defined...... during a series of workshops with the clinicians after which the XML configuration files were written and deployed. In parallel with this, the participants from the University specified a number of effects related to the clinical practice to be measured. Measurements were focused on the requested effects...... and acquired using various techniques including questionnaires, interviews, observations, and Task Load Index (TLX) ratings. In total, 15 nursing handovers, 8 ward rounds, and 11 patient conferences involving a total of 35 patients and more than 20 clinicians were included in the measurements. Data from...

  7. From asthma severity to control: a shift in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren

    2009-01-01

    -driven management rather than management based on disease severity. Good asthma control is associated with reductions in patients' perception of the asthma burden, reduced healthcare resource utilisation, lower levels of impairment/restriction, normal quality of life, and low risk of exacerbations. Asthma control...... involves the control of several outcomes. Its assessment should include components relevant to achievement of best possible clinical control and reduction of future risk of adverse outcomes. Focusing on a single or a few outcomes can lead to incorrect control assessment and increased risk of under......-treatment. Several validated asthma control assessment tools have been developed to facilitate correct assessment of the level of control in clinical practice. It is hoped that focusing on control will reduce the frequency of sub-optimal treatment in the primary care setting. Further validation of the best way to...

  8. A JAVA-based multimedia tool for clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maojo, V; Herrero, C; Valenzuela, F; Crespo, J; Lazaro, P; Pazos, A

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a specific language for the representation of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) and Windows C++ and platform independent JAVA applications for multimedia presentation and edition of electronically stored CPGs. This approach facilitates translation of guidelines and protocols from paper to computer-based flowchart representations. Users can navigate through the algorithm with a friendly user interface and access related multimedia information within the context of each clinical problem. CPGs can be stored in a computer server and distributed over the World Wide Web, facilitating dissemination, local adaptation, and use as a reference element in medical care. We have chosen the Agency for Health Care and Policy Research's heart failure guideline to demonstrate the capabilities of our tool.

  9. Clinical uses of the medicinal leech: A practical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Porshinsky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, is an excellent example of the use of invertebrates in the treatment of human disease. Utilized for various medical indications since the ancient times, the medicinal leech is currently being used in a narrow range of well-defined and scientifically-grounded clinical applications. Hirudotherapy is most commonly used in the setting of venous congestion associated with soft tissue replantations and free flap-based reconstructive surgery. This is a comprehensive review of current clinical applications of hirudotherapy, featuring a comprehensive search of all major medical search engines (i.e. PubMed, Google Scholar, ScientificCommons and other cross-referenced sources. The authors focus on indications, contraindications, practical application/handling of the leech, and therapy-related complications.

  10. Treatment of Anemia in Patients with Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ... Physicians The full report is titled “Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ...

  11. Study of Clinical Practical Model of Urinary System Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to improve the clinical treatment level of urinary system injury, it is necessary to build up an animal model of urinary system wound, which is not only analogous to real clinical practice, but also simple and practical. Methods: We have developed the third generation of firearm fragment wound generator based on the first and the second producer. The best explosive charge of the blank cartridge was selected by gradient powder loading experiments. The firearm fragment injuries were made to the bulbous urethra of 10 New Zealand male rabbits. One week preoperatively and 2, 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, all the animals underwent urethroscopy and urethrography. At 2, 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, two animals were randomly selected and killed, and the urethra was cut off for pathological examination. Results: The shooting distance of the third generation of firearm fragment wound generator is 2 cm. The best explosive charge of the blank cartridge is 1 g of nitrocotton. All rabbits survived the procedures and stayed alive until they were killed. Injuries were limited to bulbous urethra and distal urethra. Round damaged areas, 1-1.5 cm in length, on the ventral wall were observed. Ureteroscopy results showed that canal diameter gradually shrank by over 50% in 9 rabbits. The rate of success was 90%. Urethrography result noted that a 1-1.3 cm stricture was formed at the bulbous urethra. Histology results of injured stricture urethra showed that fibrous connective tissue hyperplasia and hyaline degeneration caused further stricture in the canal. Conclusions: The third generation of firearm fragment wound generator imitates the bullet firing process and is more accurate and repeatable. The corresponding rabbit model of traumatic complex urethral stricture simulates the real complex clinical conditions. This animal model provides a standardized platform for clinical researches on treating traumatic injuries to the urinary system.

  12. Spirometry utilization in Ontario: practice patterns and policy implications

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, B; Anderson, G; Dales, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe growth and regional variation in the use of spirometry (flow studies) in Ontario. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP) fee-for-service billing data for spirometry from the 1989-90 to 1994-95 fiscal years. SETTING: Physicians' office practices in Ontario. OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of flow studies and associated expenditures, number and specialty of physicians performing flow studies and the distribution of their billings, number of studie...

  13. Anthropogenic soils in central Amazonia: farmers’ practices, agrobiodiversity and land-use patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braga Junqueira, A.

    2015-01-01

    Keywords: Terra Preta; Amazonian Dark Earths; Shifting cultivation; Homegardens; Intensification; Diversification; Smallholder farming. André Braga Junqueira (2015). Anthropogenic soils in central Amazonia: farmers’ practices, agrobiodiversity and land-use patterns. PhD thesis, Wagening

  14. Contemporary practice patterns in the management of newly diagnosed hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    McAlister, F A; Teo, K. K.; Lewanczuk, R Z; G. Wells; Montague, T J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine what proportion of patients with hypertension are managed in accordance with guidelines established by the Canadian Hypertension Society. DESIGN: Retrospective medical record review. SETTING: Outpatients seen in primary care offices and internal medicine referral clinics in Edmonton. PATIENTS: All 969 adults who presented with a new diagnosis of essential hypertension from Sept. 1, 1993, to Dec. 31, 1995. OUTCOME MEASURES: Initial laboratory tests performed, advice con...

  15. A Clinical Librarian-Nursing Partnership to Bridge Clinical Practice and Research in an Oncology Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginex, Pamela K; Hernandez, Marisol; Vrabel, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Nurses today work in practice settings where the expectation is to "draw upon the best evidence to provide the care most appropriate to each patient" (Olsen, Goolsby, & McGinnis, 2009, p. 10) while caring for patients with high acuity in highly specialized settings. Within the nursing profession, the Magnet Recognition Program® advocates for exemplary professional practice and the generation of new knowledge through research and clinical innovation. Nurses working in a clinical setting are often the best resource to identify important clinical questions and gaps in practice, but a lack of resources presents challenges to nurses in fully developing their questions and identifying the most appropriate methods to answer them. These challenges often fall into three broad categories: individual nurse characteristics, organizational characteristics, and environmental characteristics (Dobbins, Ciliska, Cockerill, Barnsley, & DiCenso, 2002). Creating a dedicated partnership between nurses and library staff is one method that can overcome these challenges to use existing resources and support nurses who are asking and answering important clinical questions (DePalma, 2005; Vrabel, 2005). 
. PMID:27541547

  16. Incorporation of pharmacogenomics into routine clinical practice: the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) guideline development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudle, Kelly E; Klein, Teri E; Hoffman, James M; Muller, Daniel J; Whirl-Carrillo, Michelle; Gong, Li; McDonagh, Ellen M; Sangkuhl, Katrin; Thorn, Caroline F; Schwab, Matthias; Agundez, Jose A G; Freimuth, Robert R; Huser, Vojtech; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Iwuchukwu, Otito F; Crews, Kristine R; Scott, Stuart A; Wadelius, Mia; Swen, Jesse J; Tyndale, Rachel F; Stein, C Michael; Roden, Dan; Relling, Mary V; Williams, Marc S; Johnson, Samuel G

    2014-02-01

    The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) publishes genotype-based drug guidelines to help clinicians understand how available genetic test results could be used to optimize drug therapy. CPIC has focused initially on well-known examples of pharmacogenomic associations that have been implemented in selected clinical settings, publishing nine to date. Each CPIC guideline adheres to a standardized format and includes a standard system for grading levels of evidence linking genotypes to phenotypes and assigning a level of strength to each prescribing recommendation. CPIC guidelines contain the necessary information to help clinicians translate patient-specific diplotypes for each gene into clinical phenotypes or drug dosing groups. This paper reviews the development process of the CPIC guidelines and compares this process to the Institute of Medicine's Standards for Developing Trustworthy Clinical Practice Guidelines.

  17. Sleep pattern and practice among adolescents school children in Nigerian secondary schools

    OpenAIRE

    Maduabuchi, Josephat Chinawa; Obu, Herbert Anayo; Chukwu, Barthlomew Friday; Aronu, Ann Ebele; Manyike, Pius Chukwuka; Chinawa, Awoere Tamunosiki

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Some adolescents may have sleep disorder at some point during adolescence. Determining the pattern and practice of sleep among adolescents could be useful to establish a lasting sleep hygiene program among adolescents. The objectives of this study are to describe sleep pattern and practice among adolescent in Nigerian secondary schools. Methods Sleep habits were investigated using a random sampling of adolescents from secondary schools from February to April 2013. A self-administ...

  18. Pressure Ulcers in Adults: Prediction and Prevention. Clinical Practice Guideline Number 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This package includes a clinical practice guideline, quick reference guide for clinicians, and patient's guide to predicting and preventing pressure ulcers in adults. The clinical practice guideline includes the following: overview of the incidence and prevalence of pressure ulcers; clinical practice guideline (introduction, risk assessment tools…

  19. [Still the social factor: crisis in the clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, Fernando J

    2014-01-01

    Consultations in our hospital center are problematic, mainly due to the poor living situation which patients come from (the suburbs of Buenos Aires). The housing situation, the environment and the economic or political conditions of these patients frame "the social" emergency that sets the context and the impact in the different psychopathological symptoms that they present. These conditions should also be reviewed from our theoretical assessment together with the clinical approach that our assistance practice studies. From a perception viewpoint we observe that "self-perception is far from any ideals. The perception of their environment is threatening and has no future". We constantly note the loss of the value of words and speech, when we hear our patients, wo have turned language into just an abject joy, as in the word of the addict. These issues must be studied from a theoretical point of view to be applied clinically. Such analysis reveals that our practice takes place in a context of failure. However, we cannot move backwards in "potential treatment" as Lacan states in the ethics as regards psychosis.

  20. The prevalence of adrenal incidentaloma in routine clinical practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2011-03-10

    The prevalence of adrenal incidentaloma (AI) on computed tomography (CT) in the general population has been reported to be as high as 4.2%. However, many of the previous studies in this field utilised a prospective approach with analysis of CT scans performed by one or more radiologists with a specialist interest in adrenal tumours and a specific focus on identifying the presence of an adrenal mass. A typical radiology department, with a focus on the patient\\'s presenting complaint as opposed to the adrenal gland, may not be expected to diagnose as many adrenal incidentalomas as would be identified in a dedicated research protocol. We hypothesised that the number of AI reported in routine clinical practice is significantly lower than the published figures would suggest. We retrospectively reviewed the reports of all CT thorax and abdomen scans performed in our hospital over a 2 year period. 3,099 patients underwent imaging, with 3,705 scans performed. The median age was 63 years (range 18-98). Thirty-seven true AI were diagnosed during the time period studied. Twenty-two were diagnosed by CT abdomen (22\\/2,227) and 12 by CT thorax (12\\/1,478), a prevalence of 0.98 and 0.81% with CT abdomen and thorax, respectively, for AI in routine clinical practice.

  1. The prevalence of adrenal incidentaloma in routine clinical practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2012-02-01

    The prevalence of adrenal incidentaloma (AI) on computed tomography (CT) in the general population has been reported to be as high as 4.2%. However, many of the previous studies in this field utilised a prospective approach with analysis of CT scans performed by one or more radiologists with a specialist interest in adrenal tumours and a specific focus on identifying the presence of an adrenal mass. A typical radiology department, with a focus on the patient\\'s presenting complaint as opposed to the adrenal gland, may not be expected to diagnose as many adrenal incidentalomas as would be identified in a dedicated research protocol. We hypothesised that the number of AI reported in routine clinical practice is significantly lower than the published figures would suggest. We retrospectively reviewed the reports of all CT thorax and abdomen scans performed in our hospital over a 2 year period. 3,099 patients underwent imaging, with 3,705 scans performed. The median age was 63 years (range 18-98). Thirty-seven true AI were diagnosed during the time period studied. Twenty-two were diagnosed by CT abdomen (22\\/2,227) and 12 by CT thorax (12\\/1,478), a prevalence of 0.98 and 0.81% with CT abdomen and thorax, respectively, for AI in routine clinical practice.

  2. What impact does anatomy education have on clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire France; Mathias, Haydn Socrates

    2011-01-01

    There is continuing debate regarding doctors' knowledge of anatomy as an appropriate preparation for professional practice. This exploratory case study examined alumni's experiences of learning anatomy. The aim was to inform curriculum development and to gain a better understanding of how anatomy knowledge is applied in practice. A total of 140 medical student alumni from the University of Southampton participated in this study (49% males, 51% females). Participants completed a Likert scale questionnaire with free comment sections. Descriptive results found that: using cadaveric material was an effective way of learning anatomy; assessment was a major motivator; and around half of students forgot a lot of anatomy but that knowledge came back easily. Statistical analysis revealed associations between certain positive and negative factors in learning. Links were also seen with current job role, revealing that those who responded to positive factors were involved in careers which involved a great deal of anatomy and vice versa. To facilitate learning, anatomy should be taught throughout the curriculum and use human cadavers. Relating knowledge to practice requires transformation of knowledge and is best facilitated by the learning being situated in clinical contexts.

  3. Paying for prevention in clinical practice: Aligning provider remuneration with system objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Evidence on the efficacy of preventive procedures in oral health care has not been matched by uptake of prevention in clinical practice. Reducing oral disease in the population reduces the size of the future market for treatment. Hence a provider's intention to adopt prevention in clinical practice may be offset by the financial implications of such behaviour. Effective prevention may therefore depend upon prevention-friendly methods of remuneration if providers are to be rewarded appropriately for doing what the system expects them to do. This paper considers whether changing the way providers are paid for delivering care can be expected to change the utilisation of preventive care in the population in terms of the proportion of the population receiving preventive care, the distribution of preventive care in the population and the pattern of preventive care received. A conceptual framework is presented that identifies the determinants of rewards under different approaches to provider remuneration. The framework is applied to develop recommendations for paying for prevention in clinical practice. Literature on provider payment in dental care is reviewed to assess the evidence base for the effects of changing payment methods, identify gaps in the evidence-base and inform the design of future research on dental remuneration.

  4. Expressing best practices in (risk) analysis and testing of safety-critical systems using patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzner, Wolfgang; Sieverding, Sven; Kacimi, Omar;

    2014-01-01

    use. This paper introduces workflow patterns to describe such best practices in a systematic way that efficiently represents this know¬ledge, and also provides a way to relate different patterns, making them easier to identify and use, and cover as wide a range of experiences as possible. The value...

  5. Nursing students in clinical practice--developing a model for clinical supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggman-Laitila, Arja; Elina, Eriksson; Riitta, Meretoja; Kirsi, Sillanpää; Leena, Rekola

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a model for clinical supervision to promote the clinical practice of nursing students. The study was implemented in Finland and it was carried out in three phases. Firstly, data were collected by means of a literature review and focus group interviews. Secondly, the data were analysed and described in expert groups, and finally the model itself was evaluated by 23 nursing experts. The data of literature review and focus group interviews consisted of 27 studies and four groups from three organisations: nurses (n=7), managers (n=6), teachers (n=8) and students (n=6). The data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The model devolved from the study includes the concepts describing prerequisites, content and influence of clinical supervision. The prerequisites are nursing skills, a holistic view of the nursing curriculum, pedagogical, organisational, development, cooperation and interaction competence and decision-making skills. The content of clinical supervision includes support of professional development, pedagogical competence, research and development activities and collaborative working. Clinical supervision has influence on students' professional and personal development and conception of the future of nursing profession, students' preparedness for career planning and the teacher's and preceptor's professional development. The model could unify the notions of all parties concerned of the prerequisites, content and influence of clinical supervision. Furthermore, the entire supervision process and its control could be clarified. The model may be utilised in selecting and educating preceptors and evaluating the quality of clinical supervision. PMID:17936544

  6. Integrating feedback from a clinical data warehouse into practice organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Andrew; Moshyk, Andriy; Diab, Hassan; Caron, Philippe; de Lorenzi, Fabien; Bisson, Guy; Menard, Line; Lefebvre, Richard; Gauthier, Patricia; Grondin, Richard; Desautels, Michel

    2006-01-01

    A patient oriented hospital information system (ARIANE) was inaugurated at the Sherbrooke University hospital (CHUS) in 1990 and a clinical data warehouse (CDW) completed 2004. The CDW is updated from ARIANE every 24h and includes ICD discharge diagnosis data, visit DRG and SNOMED encoding. The data is encrypted on storage. Data is accessed according to institutional approval. To facilitate data access two levels of tool have been made accessible using a web-browser. The first level consists of a 'dashboard' that has a defined design and enables a set of pre-determined dynamic queries about a patient population. This level can be operated with minimal training. The second level uses a convivial database query tool, which requires some prior training. Two prototype dashboards have been designed and evaluated for acceptability. The first for the emergency department enables analysis of patient occupancy. The second for the biochemistry department enables quality assurance evaluation. In most cases worldwide the clinical data warehouse is only beginning to be exploited, often impeded by lack of connection between different enterprise databases. Our CDW is expected rapidly to create a culture change so that clinical practice can be continuously evaluated using compiled data readily available from the electronic health record/hospital information system.

  7. Do pressure ulcer risk assessment scales improve clinical practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kottner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Jan Kottner1, Katrin Balzer21Department of Nursing Science, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany; 2Nursing Research Group, Institute for Social Medicine, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, GermanyAbstract: Standardized assessment instruments are deemed important for estimating pressure ulcer risk. Today, more than 40 so-called pressure ulcer risk assessment scales are available but still there is an ongoing debate about their usefulness. From a measurement point of view pressure ulcer (PU risk assessment scales have serious limitations. Empirical evidence supporting the validity of PU risk assessment scale scores is weak and obtained scores contain varying amounts of measurement error. The concept of pressure ulcer risk is strongly related to the general health status and severity of illness. A clinical impact due do the application of these scales could also not be demonstrated. It is questionable whether completion of standardized pressure ulcer risk scales in clinical practice is really needed.Keywords: Braden pressure ulcer, prevention, risk assessment, nursing assessment, predictive value, clinical effectiveness, review

  8. Lactation management clinic-positive reinforcement to hospital breastfeeding practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanavati, R N; Mondkar, J A; Fernandez, A R; Raghavan, K R

    1994-11-01

    Supportive breastfeeding policies in the hospital constitute the foundation for initiation of successful breastfeeding by mothers, constant reinforcement and support to all lactating mothers is however essential to maintain lactation. The objective, methodology and outcome of the Lactation Management Clinic which constitutes a hospital-based mother support group is described. The study was carried out over a period of 2 1/2 years and 519 mothers had attended this clinic. Analysis of the data revealed that at the time of the 1st visit to the clinic, 65.9% mothers had already started supplementary top feeds and the commonest reason encountered was mother's own assessment of inadequate milk seen in 73.6% mothers. Two-thirds (66.9%) of babies in our study were roomed in right from the first day of life, 75.3% of babies had received colostrum and 67.1% babies had not received any prelacteal feeds and yet faced problems at lactation. Mother and infant evaluation revealed no complications with 86.5% mothers and with 54.5% babies. Local breast problems were detected in 19.3% mothers. Faulty positioning was observed in 47.2% patients. Psychological support to mothers was the most important form of therapy given. Seventy eight per cent mothers practiced exclusive breastfeeding subsequently while 21.2% of mothers were partially successful in lactation. Only 3 mothers had lactation failure.

  9. The Influence of Advanced General Dentistry Training on Practice Patterns of Iowa Dental Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolden, Aljernon J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study compared the practice patterns of 41 dentists with graduate training in general dentistry with those of 41 dentists without such training, in terms of number and types of procedures performed, patient characteristics, professional and community activities, and practice characteristics. Some differences were found, particularly in patient…

  10. Racial and ethnic disparities in the clinical practice of emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Lynne D; Babcock Irvin, Charlene; Tamayo-Sarver, Joshua H

    2003-11-01

    There is convincing evidence that racial and ethnic disparities exist in the provision of health care, including the provision of emergency care; and that stereotyping, biases, and uncertainty on the part of health care providers all contribute to unequal treatment. Situations, such as the emergency department (ED), that are characterized by time pressure, incomplete information, and high demands on attention and cognitive resources increase the likelihood that stereotypes and bias will affect diagnostic and treatment decisions. It is likely that there are many as-yet-undocumented disparities in clinical emergency practice. Racial and ethnic disparities may arise in decisions made by out-of-hospital personnel regarding ambulance destination, triage assessments made by nursing personnel, diagnostic testing ordered by physicians or physician-extenders, and in disposition decisions. The potential for disparate treatment includes the timing and intensity of ED therapy as well as patterns of referral, prescription choices, and priority for hospital admission and bed assignment. At a national roundtable discussion, strategies suggested to address these disparities included: increased use of evidence-based clinical guidelines; use of continuous quality improvement methods to document individual and institutional disparities in performance; zero tolerance for stereotypical remarks in the workplace; cultural competence training for emergency providers; increased workforce diversity; and increased epidemiologic, clinical, and services research. Careful scrutiny of the clinical practice of emergency medicine and diligent implementation of strategies to prevent disparities will be required to eliminate the individual behaviors and systemic processes that result in the delivery of disparate care in EDs. PMID:14597493

  11. Pattern of breast diseases: preliminary report of breast clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To find out the pattern of breast disease in this part of the county and create public awareness about breast diseases especially cancer. Design: Ac cross sectional and cohort study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Department of Surgery, Jinnah Hospital /Allama Iqbal Medical College, Lahore from March 1999 to July 2000. Subjects and Methods: All the female patients reported were included in this study. They were diagnosed by history, physical examination and rel event investigations like ultrasonography, mammography, FNAS and biopsy. Appropriate medical and surgical management was carried out. The breast cancer was treated according to TNA staging system by multidisciplinary approach. Method of breast self examination (BSE) was taught with the help of charts and brochures. Results: The age ranged from 10 years to 75 years. Maximum number of patients (30%) was seen between 20-29 years of age while 15 (1%) cases did not suffer from any disease. Among 1485 patients the common conditions were non cyclical mastalgia in 362 (24.37%), fibroadenoma in 289 (19.46%), fibrocystic disease in 276(17.98%) breast abscess in 149 (10%) and breast cancer (6.19%). Other diseases were puberty mastitis 49(3.2%), galactocele 40(2.69%), accessory breast 45(3%) and nipple discharge 28(1.88%). Among the palpable lumps, breast caner accounted for 11.75%. The commonest age of presentation of breast cancer was 5th decade (31%) followed by 4th decade (26%). Majority of cancer patients (45%) presented in stage III. All the women with beast abscesses were lactating. Non cyclical mastalgia was commonly seen in 4th decade (30.66%) while 44.63% patients of fibroadenoma reported in the 2nd decade. Fibrocystic disease was reported between 3rd and 4th decade (62.17%). Conclusion: Commonest being conditions were non cyclical mastalgia followed by fibroadenoma while breast cancer contributed a significant percentage of palpable lumps. Due to effective public awareness

  12. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for liver cirrhosis 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Hiroshi; Saito, Hidetsugu; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Uto, Hirofumi; Obara, Katsutoshi; Sakaida, Isao; Shibuya, Akitaka; Seike, Masataka; Nagoshi, Sumiko; Segawa, Makoto; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Kato, Akinobu; Hashimoto, Etsuko; Michitaka, Kojiro; Murawaki, Toshikazu; Sugano, Kentaro; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-07-01

    The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for liver cirrhosis in 2015. Eighty-three clinical questions were selected, and a literature search was performed for the clinical questions with use of the MEDLINE, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases for the period between 1983 and June 2012. Manual searching of the latest important literature was added until August 2015. The guidelines were developed with use of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. This digest version in English introduces selected clinical questions and statements related to the management of liver cirrhosis and its complications. Branched-chain amino acids relieve hypoalbuminemia and hepatic encephalopathy and improve quality of life. Nucleoside analogues and peginterferon plus ribavirin combination therapy improve the prognosis of patients with hepatitis B virus related liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C related compensated liver cirrhosis, respectively, although the latter therapy may be replaced by direct-acting antivirals. For liver cirrhosis caused by primary biliary cirrhosis and active autoimmune hepatitis, urosodeoxycholic acid and steroid are recommended, respectively. The most adequate modalities for the management of variceal bleeding are the endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices and the balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration following endoscopic obturation with cyanoacrylate for gastric varices. Beta-blockers are useful for primary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding. The V2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan is a useful add-on therapy in careful diuretic therapy for ascites. Albumin infusion is useful for the prevention of paracentesis-induced circulatory disturbance and renal failure. In addition to disaccharides, the nonabsorbable antibiotic rifaximin is useful for the management of encephalopathy. Anticoagulation therapy is proposed for

  13. Family meetings in palliative care: Multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Hanlon Brendan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Support for family carers is a core function of palliative care. Family meetings are commonly recommended as a useful way for health care professionals to convey information, discuss goals of care and plan care strategies with patients and family carers. Yet it seems there is insufficient research to demonstrate the utlility of family meetings or the best way to conduct them. This study sought to develop multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines for conducting family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting based on available evidence and consensus based expert opinion. Methods The guidelines were developed via the following methods: (1 A literature review; (2 Conceptual framework; (3 Refinement of the guidelines based on feedback from an expert panel and focus groups with multidisciplinary specialists from three palliative care units and three major teaching hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Results The literature review revealed that no comprehensive exploration of the conduct and utility of family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting has occurred. Preliminary clinical guidelines were developed by the research team, based on relevant literature and a conceptual framework informed by: single session therapy, principles of therapeutic communication and models of coping and family consultation. A multidisciplinary expert panel refined the content of the guidelines and the applicability of the guidelines was then assessed via two focus groups of multidisciplinary palliative care specialists. The complete version of the guidelines is presented. Conclusion Family meetings provide an opportunity to enhance the quality of care provided to palliative care patients and their family carers. The clinical guidelines developed from this study offer a framework for preparing, conducting and evaluating family meetings. Future research and clinical implications are outlined.

  14. The humanization of catheter room design: its clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    American scholar Engeer has proposed biological, psychological and sociological medicine pattern, which has been well accepted by the society, It has manifested the medical arena humanism return and has made the profound influence on the nursing development. The idea, 'the human is a whole', has gradually become the mainstream of the nurse service concept, meanwhile, the environment has more and more become a beneficial part for diagnosing and treating in hospitalization. The improvement and more user-friendly design of the diagnosing and treating environment has already become an important ring linked with the whole nursing work. At the beginning of the fitting up design for the Catheter Lab Room of Interventional Radiology in General Hospital of PLA, the authors receive the idea 'the environment experience and admiration of the patient', put more attention to the humanization in the diagnosing and treating environmental construction. The functional compartments are separated clearly. The color, the background music as well as the video are designed to be coordinated with each other in order to produce a relaxing system. Practice for the past three years indicates that the use of humanization environment design can markedly reduce the patient intense and the anxious level in perioperative period, it can also significantly promote the patient to be restored to health. This article will describe user-friendly diagnosing and treating environmental construction practice in the Catheter Lab Room of Interventional Radiology in General Hospital of PLA. (authors)

  15. Learning Patterns in Music Practice: Links between Disposition, Practice Strategies and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    StGeorge, Jennifer Mary; Holbrook, Allyson Patricia; Cantwell, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Research into musical practice has over recent decades focused on the technical and organisational strategies employed by novices and experts. What has been less studied are the background factors or influences on the quality of this music practice. Drawing on interview data collected from 66 children and adults from a mixed methods project, we…

  16. Study of Clinical Practical Model of Urinary System Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Li; Yuan-Yi Wu; Wei-Jun Fu; Ying-Xin Jia; Bing-Hong Zhang; Yong-De Xu; Zhong-Xin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background:In order to improve the clinical treatment level of urinary system injury,it is necessary to build up an animal model of urinary system wound,which is not only analogous to real clinical practice,but also simple and practical.Methods:We have developed the third generation of firearm fragment wound generator based on the first and the second producer.The best explosive charge of the blank cartridge was selected by gradient powder loading experiments.The firearm fragment injuries were made to the bulbous urethra of 10 New Zealand male rabbits.One week preoperatively and 2,4 and 8 weeks postoperatively,all the animals underwent urethroscopy and urethrography.At 2,4 and 8 weeks postoperatively,two animals were randomly selected and killed,and the urethra was cut off for pathological examination.Results:The shooting distance of the third generation of firearm fragment wound generator is 2 cm.The best explosive charge of the blank cartridge is 1 g of nitrocotton.All rabbits survived the procedures and stayed alive until they were killed.Injuries were limited to bulbous urethra and distal urethra.Round damaged areas,1-1.5 cm in length,on the ventral wall were observed.Ureteroscopy results showed that canal diameter gradually shrank by over 50% in 9 rabbits.The rate of success was 90%.Urethrography result noted that a 1-1.3 cm stricture was formed at the bulbous urethra.Histology results of injured stricture urethra showed that fibrous connective tissue hyperplasia and hyaline degeneration caused further stricture in the canal.Conclusions:The third generation of firearm fragment wound generator imitates the bullet firing process and is more accurate and repeatable.The corresponding rabbit model of traumatic complex urethral stricture simulates the real complex clinical conditions.This animal model provides a standardized platform for clinical researches on treating traumatic injuries to the urinary system.

  17. International Patterns of Practice in the Management of Radiation Therapy-induced Nausea and Vomiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate international patterns of practice in the management of radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV). Methods and Materials: Oncologists prescribing radiation therapy in the United States, Canada, The Netherlands, Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Italy, France, Hong Kong, Singapore, Cyprus, and Israel completed a Web-based survey that was based on 6 radiation therapy-only clinical cases modeled after the minimal-, low-, moderate-, and high-emetic risk levels defined in the antiemetic guidelines of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer. For each case, respondents estimated the risks of nausea and vomiting separately and committed to an initial management approach. Results: In total, 1022 responses were received. Risk estimates and management decisions for the minimal- and high-risk cases varied little and were in line with guideline standards, whereas those for the low- and moderate-risk cases varied greatly. The most common initial management strategies were as follows: rescue therapy for a minimal-risk case (63% of respondents), 2 low-risk cases (56% and 80%), and 1 moderate-risk case (66%); and prophylactic therapy for a second moderate-risk case (75%) and a high-risk case (95%). The serotonin (5-HT)3 receptor antagonists were the most commonly recommended prophylactic agents. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of a decision for prophylactic or rescue therapy were risk estimates of nausea and vomiting, awareness of the American Society of Clinical Oncology antiemetic guideline, and European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology membership. Conclusions: Risk estimates and management strategies for RINV varied, especially for low- and moderate-risk radiation therapy cases. Radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting are under-studied treatment sequelae. New observational and translational studies are needed to allow for individual patient risk

  18. International Patterns of Practice in the Management of Radiation Therapy-induced Nausea and Vomiting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, Kristopher; Zhang Liying [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lutz, Stephen [Blanchard Valley Health Systems, Findlay, Ohio (United States); Baardwijk, Angela van [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Linden, Yvette van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Holt, Tanya [Radiation Oncology Mater Centre, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Arnalot, Palmira Foro [Parc de Salut Mar. Universitat Pompeu Fabra Barcelona (Spain); Lagrange, Jean-Leon [AP-HP Hopital Henri-Mondor, Universite Paris Est Creteil, Creteil (France); Maranzano, Ernesto [' S. Maria' Hospital, Terni (Italy); Liu, Rico [Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Wong, Kam-Hung [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wong, Lea-Choung [National University Cancer Institute (Singapore); Vassiliou, Vassilios [Bank of Cyprus Oncology Centre, Nicosia (Cyprus); Corn, Benjamin W. [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); De Angelis, Carlo; Holden, Lori; Wong, C. Shun [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: Edward.Chow@sunnybrook.ca [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate international patterns of practice in the management of radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV). Methods and Materials: Oncologists prescribing radiation therapy in the United States, Canada, The Netherlands, Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Italy, France, Hong Kong, Singapore, Cyprus, and Israel completed a Web-based survey that was based on 6 radiation therapy-only clinical cases modeled after the minimal-, low-, moderate-, and high-emetic risk levels defined in the antiemetic guidelines of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer. For each case, respondents estimated the risks of nausea and vomiting separately and committed to an initial management approach. Results: In total, 1022 responses were received. Risk estimates and management decisions for the minimal- and high-risk cases varied little and were in line with guideline standards, whereas those for the low- and moderate-risk cases varied greatly. The most common initial management strategies were as follows: rescue therapy for a minimal-risk case (63% of respondents), 2 low-risk cases (56% and 80%), and 1 moderate-risk case (66%); and prophylactic therapy for a second moderate-risk case (75%) and a high-risk case (95%). The serotonin (5-HT){sub 3} receptor antagonists were the most commonly recommended prophylactic agents. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of a decision for prophylactic or rescue therapy were risk estimates of nausea and vomiting, awareness of the American Society of Clinical Oncology antiemetic guideline, and European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology membership. Conclusions: Risk estimates and management strategies for RINV varied, especially for low- and moderate-risk radiation therapy cases. Radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting are under-studied treatment sequelae. New observational and translational studies are needed to allow for individual patient risk

  19. Clinical roundtable monograph: a multidisciplinary approach to the use of oncotype DX in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradishar, William J; Hansen, Nora M; Susnik, Barbara

    2009-04-01

    Recently, recommendations for the use of the Oncotype DX assay in estrogen receptor-positive node-negative breast cancer patients were incorporated into guidelines from both the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. The Oncotype DX assay is a diagnostic test which measures changes in a set of 21 genes in order to predict the likelihood of disease recurrence and also to predict which patients are most likely to respond to chemotherapy. Oncotype DX has been available commercially since January 2004 and has been used for more than 85,000 patients. Drs. William J. Gradishar, Nora M. Hansen, and Barbara Susnik answered questions regarding the incorporation of the Oncotype DX breast cancer assay into routine clinical practice. This expert dialog offers an update and clinical insights into when, how, and why clinicians might incorporate the Oncotype DX assay into the management of their breast cancer patients. Also, the latest research into the benefit of the Oncotype DX assay in node-positive patients is discussed. Finally, sample case studies offer clinically relevant examples of the practical application of the Oncotype DX assay.

  20. Site Characteristics Influencing the Translation of Clinical Research Into Clinical Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Marie; Getz, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    , although both academic and independent sites generate the same level of knowledge, academic sites share more of this knowledge with sponsor companies. This study suggests new strategies that sponsors can leverage to drive greater transfer of clinical research knowledge into clinical practice and ultimately...... on to sponsor companies and may ultimately assist in positioning new products and driving commercialization success. This study evaluates site characteristics that influence the acquisition and sharing of knowledge gained through clinical trial experience. The impact of 2 central site characteristics...... on the process of translating drug experience is assessed: site location (North America/rest of the world) and site type or setting (academic/independent). The results show that investigative sites located outside North America generate and share more knowledge than those within North America. Furthermore...

  1. [Analysis of an intercultural clinical practice in a judicial setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindama, Yolande

    2007-01-01

    This article analyses an intercultural clinical practice in a legal setting from an anthropological and psychoanalytical perspective, demonstrating necessary reorganizations inherent to the framework. The culture of the new country and its founding myth being implicit to the judicial framework, the professional intervening introduces psychoanalytical references particularly totemic principles and the symbolic father by making genealogy, a universal object of transmission as guarantee of fundamental taboos of humanity. The metacultural perspective in this approach integrates ethnopsychoanalytical principles put forth by Devereux as well as the method although this latter has been adapted to the framework. This approach allows to re-question Devereux's ethnopsychoanalytical principles by opening the debate on the perspective of a psychoanalytical as well as psychiatric. PMID:18253668

  2. [Clinical practice guidelines and knowledge management in healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollenschläger, Günter

    2013-10-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are key tools for the translation of scientific evidence into everyday patient care. Therefore guidelines can act as cornerstones of evidence based knowledge management in healthcare, if they are trustworthy, and its recommendations are not biased by authors' conflict of interests. Good medical guidelines should be disseminated by means of virtual (digital/electronic) health libraries - together with implementation tools in context, such as guideline based algorithms, check lists, patient information, a.s.f. The article presents evidence based medical knowledge management using the German experiences as an example. It discusses future steps establishing evidence based health care by means of combining patient data, evidence from medical science and patient care routine, together with feedback systems for healthcare providers. PMID:24326702

  3. Mechanical Lumbar Traction: What Is Its Place in Clinical Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Summary evidence concludes that mechanical lumbar traction is not effective for treating acute or chronic nonspecific low back pain (LBP). However, many physical therapists continue to use it, primarily as an additional modality. Indeed, expert clinical opinion, theoretical models, and some research evidence suggest that certain patients with LBP respond positively to traction. A study published in the March 2016 issue of JOSPT investigates the effectiveness of traction in prone as an adjunct to an extension-oriented exercise program in patients with LBP and leg pain and explores whether a previously identified set of patient characteristics is associated with better outcomes from traction. In this Perspectives for Practice, the authors explain the impact of their findings for clinicians treating these patients. PMID:26928736

  4. Neuroplasticity and Clinical Practice: Building Brain Power for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this review is on driving neuroplasticity in a positive direction using evidence-based interventions that also have the potential to improve general health. One goal is to provide an overview of the many ways new neuroscience can inform treatment protocols to empower and motivate clients to make the lifestyle choices that could help build brain power and could increase adherence to healthy lifestyle changes that have also been associated with simultaneously enhancing vigorous longevity, health, happiness, and wellness. Another goal is to explore the use of a focus in clinical practice on helping clients appreciate this new evidence and use evolving neuroscience in establishing individualized goals, designing strategies for achieving them and increasing treatment compliance. The timing is urgent for such interventions with goals of enhancing brain health across the lifespan and improving statistics on dementia worldwide. PMID:27507957

  5. Glucose Biosensors: An Overview of Use in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Hyung Yoo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Blood glucose monitoring has been established as a valuable tool in the management of diabetes. Since maintaining normal blood glucose levels is recommended, a series of suitable glucose biosensors have been developed. During the last 50 years, glucose biosensor technology including point-of-care devices, continuous glucose monitoring systems and noninvasive glucose monitoring systems has been significantly improved. However, there continues to be several challenges related to the achievement of accurate and reliable glucose monitoring. Further technical improvements in glucose biosensors, standardization of the analytical goals for their performance, and continuously assessing and training lay users are required. This article reviews the brief history, basic principles, analytical performance, and the present status of glucose biosensors in the clinical practice.

  6. [Clinical practice guidelines and knowledge management in healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollenschläger, Günter

    2013-10-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are key tools for the translation of scientific evidence into everyday patient care. Therefore guidelines can act as cornerstones of evidence based knowledge management in healthcare, if they are trustworthy, and its recommendations are not biased by authors' conflict of interests. Good medical guidelines should be disseminated by means of virtual (digital/electronic) health libraries - together with implementation tools in context, such as guideline based algorithms, check lists, patient information, a.s.f. The article presents evidence based medical knowledge management using the German experiences as an example. It discusses future steps establishing evidence based health care by means of combining patient data, evidence from medical science and patient care routine, together with feedback systems for healthcare providers.

  7. Neuroplasticity and Clinical Practice: Building Brain Power for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this review is on driving neuroplasticity in a positive direction using evidence-based interventions that also have the potential to improve general health. One goal is to provide an overview of the many ways new neuroscience can inform treatment protocols to empower and motivate clients to make the lifestyle choices that could help build brain power and could increase adherence to healthy lifestyle changes that have also been associated with simultaneously enhancing vigorous longevity, health, happiness, and wellness. Another goal is to explore the use of a focus in clinical practice on helping clients appreciate this new evidence and use evolving neuroscience in establishing individualized goals, designing strategies for achieving them and increasing treatment compliance. The timing is urgent for such interventions with goals of enhancing brain health across the lifespan and improving statistics on dementia worldwide.

  8. Neuroplasticity and Clinical Practice: Building Brain Power for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this review is on driving neuroplasticity in a positive direction using evidence-based interventions that also have the potential to improve general health. One goal is to provide an overview of the many ways new neuroscience can inform treatment protocols to empower and motivate clients to make the lifestyle choices that could help build brain power and could increase adherence to healthy lifestyle changes that have also been associated with simultaneously enhancing vigorous longevity, health, happiness, and wellness. Another goal is to explore the use of a focus in clinical practice on helping clients appreciate this new evidence and use evolving neuroscience in establishing individualized goals, designing strategies for achieving them and increasing treatment compliance. The timing is urgent for such interventions with goals of enhancing brain health across the lifespan and improving statistics on dementia worldwide. PMID:27507957

  9. Scandinavian clinical practice guidelines on general anaesthesia for emergency situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadegaard Jensen, Anders; Callesen, T; Hagemo, J S;

    2010-01-01

    Emergency patients need special considerations and the number and severity of complications from general anaesthesia can be higher than during scheduled procedures. Guidelines are therefore needed. The Clinical Practice Committee of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care...... Medicine appointed a working group to develop guidelines based on literature searches to assess evidence, and a consensus meeting was held. Consensus opinion was used in the many topics where high-grade evidence was unavailable. The recommendations include the following: anaesthesia for emergency patients...... influence on intubation conditions, and should be chosen on other grounds. Ketamine should be considered in haemodynamically compromised patients. Opioids may be used to reduce the stress response following intubation. For optimal intubation conditions, succinylcholine 1-1.5 mg/kg is preferred. Outside...

  10. [Specific clinical, epidemiological patterns and laboratory diagnostics of enterovirus infection in the Republic of Belarus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amvros'eva, T V; Poklonskaia, N V; Bogush, Z F; Kazinets, O N; Germanovich, F A; Fisenko, E G; Titov, L P; Kvacheva, Z B; Bezruchko, A A; Scheslenok, E P

    2005-01-01

    The clinical and epidemiological patterns as well as the results of the laboratory verification of the outbreak of enterovirus infection (EVI) in Minsk during the period of summer-autumn, 2000, are presented. During this outbreak a variety of clinical forms were observed, the serous meningitis being prevalent (57.5%). Practically simultaneous occurrence of infection on the territory of all administrative districts of the city, the predominant involvement of children aged up to 14 years into the outbreak, a high proportion of simultaneous casualities in the multiple foci. A number of circulating enteroviruses (EV)--ECHO 30, ECHO 6 of three serotypes and Coxsackie B5--were simultaneously isolated from clinical material. EV of the same serotypes were isolated from tap drinking water, and neutralizing antibodies to these serotypes were often detected in the patients blood sera. Infectious EV were also present in samples of bottled water and in water reservoirs used for bathing. The routes of EV transmission and the improvement of EVI control are discussed.

  11. Comparing Integrated and Disciplinary Clinical Training Patterns for Dental Interns: Advantages, Disadvantages, and Effect on Students' Self-Confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junrong; Feng, Xiaoli; Chen, Aijie; Zhang, Yanli; Liu, Qi; Shao, Longquan

    2016-03-01

    In China, the five-year program of undergraduate education for stomatology consists of four years of lecture courses and one year of internship focused on clinical training. Dental schools provide this clinical training either in their own clinics (referred to as the one-stage pattern because all forms of practice are completed together) or by placing students in external clinics usually at non-affiliated hospitals (referred to as the three-stage program because the three primary areas are taught separately). The aims of this study were to investigate differences in teaching effect between the one-stage and the three-stage patterns and to evaluate advantages and disadvantages of the two patterns. A three-section, 31-item questionnaire was designed to assess basic and clinic information about the interns' training and their self-confidence in performing clinical procedures. The survey was administered to graduates who finished the fifth-year internship in 2012-14. Of the 356 individuals invited to participate, 303 graduates who spent their intern years in 43 academic dental institutions returned completed surveys (response rate of 85%). The one-stage group (n=121) reported longer independent operation time than the three-stage group (n=182) (pconfident in oral hygiene instruction and scale and polish (overall median=5), but showed low confidence in rubber dam placement and four other procedures (overall median=2). The one-stage group rated their confidence level higher than the three-stage group on comprehensive skills such as arranging appointments and managing patients and procedures needing long treatment periods such as molar endodontics. The three-stage group showed higher confidence on more specialized procedures such as surgical extractions and suturing. This study found that both of the two intern patterns had advantages and shortcomings in clinical training in various procedures. Combining the two could be a way to improve clinical education in China.

  12. The attitude of Belgian social insurance physicians towards evidence-based practice and clinical practice guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aertgeerts Bert

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based medicine has broadened its scope and is starting to reach insurance medicine. Although still in its initial stages, physicians in the area of insurance medicine should keep up-to-date with the evidence on various diseases in order to correctly assess disability and to give appropriate advice about health care reimbursement. In order to explore future opportunities of evidence-based medicine to improve daily insurance medicine, there is a need for qualitative studies to better understand insurance physicians' perceptions of EBM. The present study was designed to identify the attitude of insurance physicians towards evidence-based medicine and clinical practice guidelines, and to determine their ability to access, retrieve and appraise the health evidence and the barriers for applying evidence to practice. Methods A cross-sectional survey study was carried out among all Dutch-speaking insurance physicians employed at one of the six Belgian social insurance sickness funds and at the National Institute of Disability and Health care Insurance (n = 224. Chi-square tests were used to compare nominal and ordinal variables. Student's t-tests, ANOVA, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis were used to compare means of continuous variables for different groups. Results The response rate was 48.7%. The majority of respondents were positive towards evidence-based medicine and clinical practice guidelines. Their knowledge of EBM was rather poor. Perceived barriers for applying evidence to practice were mainly time and lack of EBM skills. Conclusion Although the majority of physicians were positive towards EBM and welcomed more guidelines, the use of evidence and clinical practice guidelines in insurance medicine is low at present. It is in the first place important to eradicate the perceived inertia which limits the use of EBM and to further investigate the EBM principles in the context of insurance medicine. Available high

  13. Clinical usefulness of teleradiology in general dental practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to investigate the clinical usefulness of teleradiology in general dental practice. Two hundred and seventy five cases were submitted for inquiry to the case presentation board of the website of The Korean Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology for a 5 year periods. The diagnosis results of those cases were analyzed according to the disease classification, the correlation with the patient's chief complaint, the necessity of additional examinations or treatments, the image modalities, and the number of dentists inquiring. Differential diagnoses of normal anatomic structures were the most frequently submitted cases, covering 15.6% of all cases. Among 275 cases, 164 cases required no additional treatments or examinations. Panoramic radiographs were the most frequently submitted images, accounting for 248 inquiries. The 275 cases were submitted by 96 dentists. Fifty-two dentists wrote one inquiry, and 44 inquired 2 or more times. The average inquiry number of the latter group was 5.0 cases. A teleradiology system in general dental practice could be helpful in the differential diagnosis of common lesions and reduce unnecessary costs.

  14. Swiss clinical practice guidelines on field cancerization of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofbauer, Günther; Anliker, Mark; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Brand, Christoph; Braun, Ralph; Gaide, Olivier; Hafner, Jürg; Hunger, Robert; Itin, Peter; Kaeuper, Gina; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Mainetti, Carlo; Streit, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) affects millions of people worldwide, and its prevalence continues to increase. AK lesions are caused by chronic ultraviolet radiation exposure, and the presence of two or more AK lesions along with photodamage should raise the consideration of a diagnosis of field cancerization. Effective treatment of individual lesions as well as field cancerization is essential for good long-term outcomes. The Swiss Registry of Actinic Keratosis Treatment (REAKT) Working Group has developed clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of field cancerization in patients who present with AK. These guidelines are intended to serve as a resource for physicians as to the most appropriate treatment and management of AK and field cancerization based on current evidence and the combined practical experience of the authors. Treatment of AK and field cancerization should be driven by consideration of relevant patient, disease, and treatment factors, and appropriate treatment decisions will differ from patient to patient. Prevention measures and screening recommendations are discussed, and special considerations related to management of immunocompromised patients are provided. PMID:25539459

  15. International Brachytherapy Practice Patterns: A Survey of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine current practice patterns with regard to gynecologic high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy among international members of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) in Japan/Korea (Asia), Australia/New Zealand (ANZ), Europe (E), and North America (NAm). Methods and Materials: A 32-item survey was developed requesting information on brachytherapy practice patterns and standard management for Stage IB–IVA cervical cancer. The chair of each GCIG member cooperative group selected radiation oncology members to receive the survey. Results: A total of 72 responses were analyzed; 61 respondents (85%) used HDR. The three most common HDR brachytherapy fractionation regimens for Stage IB–IIA patients were 6 Gy for five fractions (18%), 6 Gy for four fractions (15%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (11%); for Stage IIB–IVA patients they were 6 Gy for five fractions (19%), 7 Gy for four fractions (8%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (8%). Overall, the mean combined external-beam and brachytherapy equivalent dose (EQD2) was 81.1 (standard deviation [SD] 10.16). The mean EQD2 recommended for Stage IB–IIA patients was 78.9 Gy (SD 10.7) and for Stage IIB–IVA was 83.3 Gy (SD 11.2) (p = 0.02). By region, the mean combined EQD2 was as follows: Asia, 71.2 Gy (SD 12.65); ANZ, 81.18 (SD 4.96); E, 83.24 (SD 10.75); and NAm, 81.66 (SD, 6.05; p = 0.02 for Asia vs. other regions).The ratio of brachytherapy to total prescribed dose was significantly higher for Japan (p = 0.0002). Conclusion: Although fractionation patterns may vary, the overall mean doses administered for cervical cancer are similar in Australia/New Zealand, Europe, and North America, with practitioners in Japan administering a significantly lower external-beam dose but higher brachytherapy dose to the cervix. Given common goals, standardization should be possible in future clinical trials.

  16. [Birth of clinical practice--in a historical perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, B

    1993-11-30

    Modern medicine is rooted in the science and the clinical practice of the 18th and 19th century. Here it finds its aims and methods, its view of life and death, and of health and disease. The french philosopher Michel Foucault has made an original contribution to the understanding of the social and cultural aspects of the development of medicine. He seeks its foundation in the classificatory medicine of the nosology of the 18th century. The diseases were then organized in a botanical model by their essence. The doctor revealed and confirmed the natural development of the diseases. He practised an art of medicine founded on local conditions. Following the social and political demands for regulation in the 18th century, the first grand hospitals were built. Here the doctors had the opportunity to study a large number of patients, and the statistical methods led to a bloom of clinical medicine. However, before medical science was able to use the microscope, before it could find the solution to life and disease in the obduced body, much had to change. Man had to alter his view of life and death, of subject and object, of doctor and patient. Only then was it possible to carry out pathological anatomy. Michel Foucault has presented a view of the history of medicine which counterbalances deterministic management of the Asclepian heritage by science.

  17. Common recurrent microduplication syndromes: diagnosis and management in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Jonathan S; Potocki, Lorraine; Bacino, Carlos A

    2010-05-01

    Details on the phenotypic consequences of genomic microdeletions and microduplications are rapidly emerging in the wake of increased utilization of high-resolution methods for the detection of genomic copy number variants (CNVs). Due to their recent discovery, the complete phenotypic characterization of these syndromes is still in progress. For practicing clinicians, this unprecedented molecular diagnostic capability has in many cases outpaced our ability to convey conclusive information regarding these conditions to patients and family members. In particular, genomic microduplication syndromes are frequently associated with variable phenotypes and incomplete penetrance, leading to difficulty in counseling regarding the potential future consequences of a given microduplication. In this review, we have attempted to provide an initial set of recommendations for the management of patients with recurrent microduplication syndromes. We summarize the clinical information for microduplications of 14 different genomic regions and provide a framework for clinical evaluation and anticipatory guidance in these conditions. It is our expectation that these preliminary guidelines will be revised further for each microduplication syndrome as more information becomes available.

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography: Clinical Applications in Medical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al-Mujaini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT is a success story of scientific and technological co-operation between a physicist and a clinician. The concept of cross-sectional imaging revolutionalized the applicability of OCT in the medical profession. OCT is a non-contact, topographic, biomicroscopic device that provides high resolution, cross-sectional digital images of live biological tissues in vivo and in real time. OCT is based on the property of tissues to reflect and backscatter light involving low-coherence interferometry. The spatial resolution of as little as 3 microns or even less has allowed us to study tissues almost at a cellular level. Overall, OCT is an invaluable adjunct in the diagnosis and follow up of many diseases of both anterior and posterior segments of the eye, primarily or secondary to systemic diseases. The digitalization and advanced software has made it possible to store and retrieve huge patient data for patient services, clinical applications and academic research. OCT has revolutionized the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, follow up and response to treatment in almost all fields of clinical practice involving primary ocular pathologies and secondary ocular manifestations in systemic diseases like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, vascular and neurological diseases, thus benefitting non-ophthalmologists as well. Systemically, OCT is proving to be a helpful tool in substantiating early diagnosis in diseases like multiple sclerosis and drug induced retinopathies by detecting early changes in morphology of the retinal nerve fiber layer.

  19. Usefulness of factor V Leiden mutation testing in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinkenberg, Ellen Ø; Kristoffersen, Ann-Helen; Sandberg, Sverre; Steen, Vidar M; Houge, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the clinical usefulness of the activated protein C resistance (APCR)/factor V Leiden mutation (FVL) test by sending out questionnaires to all Norwegian physicians who ordered these tests from our publicly funded service laboratory during a 3-month period, and of whom 70% (267/383) responded. Indications for testing, patient follow-up, the use of APCR versus FVL tests and differences in practice between hospital doctors and GPs were examined. We found that 46% of the tests were predictive, ordered for risk assessment in healthy individuals with no previous history of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Among these, 42% of the tests were taken on the initiative of the patient and 24% were screening tests before prescription of oral contraceptives. In total, 54% of the tests were classified as diagnostic, among which 42% were ordered owing to a previous history of VTE and 22% to a history of brain stroke or myocardial infarction. The prevalence of FVL heterozygotes was not significantly different between the predictive and diagnostic test groups, that is, 26 and 20%, respectively. Only the predictive tests influenced patient follow-up. Here, the physician's advice to patients depended on the test result. In general, the clinical usefulness of APCR/FVL testing was low. Many tests were performed on unsubstantiated or vague indications. Furthermore, normal test results led to unwarranted refrain from giving advice about antithrombotic measures, leading to potential harm to the patient. PMID:20332812

  20. The role of fluorescence diagnosis in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieroń A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aleksander Sieroń,1 Karolina Sieroń-Stołtny,1 Aleksandra Kawczyk-Krupka,1 Wojciech Latos,1 Sebastian Kwiatek,1 Dariusz Straszak,1 Andrzej M Bugaj1,2 1Clinical Department of Internal Diseases, Angiology and Physical Medicine, Center for Laser Diagnostics and Therapy, Silesian Medical University, Bytom, 2College of Health, Beauty Care and Education, Poznan, Poland Abstract: Fluorescence diagnosis is a fast, easy, noninvasive, selective, and sensitive diagnostic tool for estimation of treatment results in oncology. In clinical practice the use of photodynamic diagnosis is focused on five targets: detection for prevention of malignant transformation precancerous changes, detection of neoplasmatic tissue in the early stages for fast removal, prevention of expansion and detection of recurrence of the cancer, monitoring therapy, and the possibility of excluding neoplasmatic disease. In this article, selected applications of fluorescence diagnosis at the Center for Laser Diagnostics and Therapy in Bytom, Poland, for each of these targets are presented. Keywords: autofluorescence, cancer, fluorescence, imaging, photodynamic diagnosis, photodynamic therapy 

  1. MRI with cardiac pacing devices – Safety in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to introduce a single centre “real life” experience of performing MRI examinations in clinical practice on patients with cardiac pacemaker systems. Additionally, we aimed to evaluate the safety of using a dedicated safety protocol for these patients. Materials and methods: We used a 1.5 T MRI scanner to conduct 68 MRI scans of different body regions in patients with pacing systems. Of the cardiac devices, 32% were MR-conditional, whereas the remaining 68% were MR-unsafe. We recorded the functional parameters of the devices prior, immediately after, and approximately one month after the MRI scanning, and compared the device parameters to the baseline values. Results: All MRI examinations were completed safely, and each device could be interrogated normally following the MRI. We observed no changes in the programmed parameters of the devices. For most of the participants, the distributions of the immediate and one-month changes in the device parameters were within 20% of the baseline values, although some changes approached clinically important thresholds. Furthermore, we observed no differences in the variable changes between MR-conditional and MR-unsafe pacing systems, or between scans of the thorax area and other scanned areas. Conclusion: MRI in patients with MR-conditional pacing systems and selected MR-unsafe systems could be performed safely under strict conditions in this study

  2. Standardized clinical outcome rating scale for depression for use in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; Posternak, Michael A; Chelminski, Iwona; Friedman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The integration of research into clinical practice to conduct effectiveness studies faces multiple obstacles. One obstacle is the burden of completing research measures of outcome. A simple, reliable, and valid measure that could be rated at every visit, incorporated into a clinician's progress note, and reflect the DSM-IV definition of a major depressive episode (including partial and full remission from the episode) would enhance the ability to conduct effectiveness research. The goal of the present study was to examine the reliability and validity of such a measure. Three hundred and three psychiatric outpatients who were being treated for a DSM-IV major depressive episode were rated on the Standardized Clinical Outcome Rating for Depression (SCOR-D), 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, and the Global Assessment of Functioning. We examined the correlation between the SCOR-D and the other measures, and conducted an analyses of variance to compare mean values on these measures for each rating point on the SCOR-D. The inter-rater reliability of the SCOR-D dimensional ratings and categorical determination of remission were high. The SCOR-D was highly correlated with the other scales, and there were significant differences on the other measures of depression severity between each adjacent rating level of the SCOR-D. The SCOR-D is a brief standardized outcome measure linked to the DSM-IV approach toward defining remission that can be incorporated into routine clinical practice without adding undue burden to the treating clinician with some evidence of reliability and validity. This measure could make it more feasible to conduct effectiveness studies in clinical practice.

  3. Diagnostic Methods for Bile Acid Malabsorption in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayvargiya, Priya; Camilleri, Michael; Shin, Andrea; Saenger, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Altered bile acid (BA) concentrations in the colon may cause diarrhea or constipation. BA malabsorption (BAM) accounts for >25% of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea and chronic diarrhea in Western countries. As BAM is increasingly recognized, proper diagnostic methods are desired in clinical practice to help direct the most effective treatment course for the chronic bowel dysfunction. This review appraises the methodology, advantages and disadvantages of 4 tools that directly measure BAM: 14C-glycocholate breath and stool test, 75Selenium HomotauroCholic Acid Test (SeHCAT), 7 α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and fecal BAs. 14C-glycocholate is a laborious test no longer widely utilized. 75SeHCAT is validated, but not available in the United States. Serum C4 is a simple, accurate method that is applicable to a majority of patients, but requires further clinical validation. Fecal measurements to quantify total and individual fecal BAs are technically cumbersome and not widely available. Regrettably, none of these tests are routinely available in the U.S., and a therapeutic trial with a BA binder is used as a surrogate for diagnosis of BAM. Recent data suggest there is an advantage to studying fecal excretion of the individual BAs and their role in BAM; this may constitute a significant advantage of the fecal BA method over the other tests. Fecal BA test could become a routine addition to fecal fat measurement in patients with unexplained diarrhea. In summary, availability determines the choice of test among C4, SeHCAT and fecal BA; more widespread availability of such tests would enhance clinical management of these patients. PMID:23644387

  4. The chronic kidney disease outcomes and practice patterns study Brazil (CKDopps-Brazil: Design, data and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Bueno de Oliveira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The chronic kidney disease outcomes and practice patterns study (CKDopps is an international observational, prospective, cohort study involving patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD stages 3-5 [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2, with a major focus upon care during the advanced CKD period (eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m2]. During a 1-year enrollment period, each one of the 22 selected clinics will enroll up to 60 advanced CKD patients (eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m2 and not dialysis-dependent and 20 earlier stage CKD patients (eGFR between 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m2. Exclusion criteria: age < 18 years old, patients on chronic dialysis or prior kidney transplant. The study timeline include up to one year for enrollment of patients at each clinic starting in the end of 2013, followed by up to 2-3 years of patient follow-up with collection of detailed longitudinal patient-level data, annual clinic practice-level surveys, and patient surveys. Analyses will apply regression models to evaluate the contribution of patient-level and clinic practice-level factors to study outcomes, and utilize instrumental variable-type techniques when appropriate. Conclusion: Launching in 2013, CKDopps Brazil will study advanced CKD care in a random selection of nephrology clinics across Brazil to gain understanding of variation in care across the country, and as part of a multinational study to identify optimal treatment practices to slow kidney disease progression and improve outcomes during the transition period to end-stage kidney disease.

  5. Standardized Clinical Assessment And Management Plans (SCAMPs) Provide A Better Alternative To Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Michael; Jenkins, Kathy; Lock, James; Rathod, Rahul; Newburger, Jane; Bates, David W.; Safran, Dana G.; Friedman, Kevin; Greenberg, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Variability in medical practice in the United States leads to higher costs without achieving better patient outcomes. Clinical practice guidelines, which are intended to reduce variation and improve care, have several drawbacks that limit the extent of buy-in by clinicians. In contrast, standardized clinical assessment and management plans (SCAMPs) offer a clinician-designed approach to promoting care standardization that accommodates patients’ individual differences, respects providers’ clinical acumen, and keeps pace with the rapid growth of medical knowledge. Since early 2009 more than 12,000 patients have been enrolled in forty-nine SCAMPs in nine states and Washington, D.C. In one example, a SCAMP was credited with increasing clinicians’ rate of compliance with a recommended specialist referral for children from 19.6 percent to 75 percent. In another example, SCAMPs were associated with an 11–51 percent decrease in total medical expenses for six conditions when compared with a historical cohort. Innovative tools such as SCAMPs should be carefully examined by policy makers searching for methods to promote the delivery of high-quality, cost-effective care. PMID:23650325

  6. A framework for effective management of change in clinical practice: dissemination and implementation of clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulding, N T; Silagy, C A; Weller, D P

    1999-09-01

    Theories from social and behavioural science can make an important contribution to the process of developing a conceptual framework for improving use of clinical practice guidelines and clinician performance. A conceptual framework for guideline dissemination and implementation is presented which draws on relevant concepts from diffusion of innovation theory, the transtheoretical model of behaviour change, health education theory, social influence theory, and social ecology, as well as evidence from systematic literature reviews on the effectiveness of various behaviour change strategies. The framework emphasises the need for preimplementation assessment of (a) readiness of clinicians to adopt guidelines into practice, (b) barriers to change as experienced by clinicians, and (c) the level at which interventions should be targeted. It also incorporates the need for multifaceted interventions, identifies the type of barriers which will be addressed by each strategy, and develops the concept of progression through stages of guideline adoption by clinicians, with the use of appropriately targeted support strategies. The potential value of the model is that it may enable those involved in the process of guideline dissemination and implementation to direct strategies to target groups more effectively. Clearly, the effectiveness and utility of the model in facilitating guideline dissemination and implementation requires validation by further empirical research. Until such research is available, it provides a theoretical framework that may assist in the selection of appropriate guideline dissemination and implementation strategies. PMID:10847875

  7. Patterns of warfarin use and subsequent outcomes in atrial fibrillation in primary care practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewen E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Edward Ewen,1 Zugui Zhang,1 Teresa A Simon,2 Paul Kolm,1 Xianchen Liu,3,4 William S Weintraub11Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE, USA; 2Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, USA; 3Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 4Pfizer, Groton, CT, USABackground: Warfarin is recommended for stroke prevention in high-risk patients with atrial fibrillation. However, it is often underutilized and inadequately managed in actual clinical practice.Objectives: To examine the patterns of warfarin use and their relationship with stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation patients in community-based primary care practices.Design: Retrospective longitudinal cohort study.Participants: A total of 1141 atrial fibrillation patients were selected from 17 primary care practices with a shared electronic medical record and characterized by stroke risk, potential barriers to anticoagulation, and comorbid conditions.Main measures: Duration and number of warfarin exposures, interruptions in warfarin exposure > 45 days, stroke, and bleeding events.Results: Among 1141 patients with a mean age of 70 years (standard deviation 13.3 and mean follow-up of 3.4 years (standard deviation 3.0, 764 (67% were treated with warfarin. Warfarin was discontinued within 1 year in 194 (25.4%, and 349 (45.7% remained on warfarin at the end of follow-up. Interruptions in warfarin use were common, occurring in 32.6% (249 of 764 of patients. Those with two or more interruptions were younger and at lower baseline stroke risk when compared to those with no interruptions. There were 76 first strokes and 73 first-bleeding events in the follow-up period. When adjusted for baseline stroke risk, time to warfarin start, and total exposure time, two or more interruptions in warfarin use was associated with an increased risk of stroke (relative risk, 2.29; 95% confidence interval: 1.29–4.07. There was no significant association between warfarin interruptions and bleeding events

  8. Genomic Testing and Therapies for Breast Cancer in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jennifer S.; Phillips, Kathryn A.; Liang, Su-Ying; Hassett, Michael J.; Keohane, Carol; Elkin, Elena B.; Armstrong, Joanne; Toscano, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Given the likely proliferation of targeted testing and treatment strategies for cancer, a better understanding of the utilization patterns of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing and trastuzumab and newer gene expression profiling (GEP) for risk stratification and chemotherapy decision making are important. Study Design: Cross-sectional. Methods: We performed a medical record review of women age 35 to 65 years diagnosed between 2006 and 2007 with invasive localized breast cancer, identified using claims from a large national health plan (N = 775). Results: Almost all women received HER2 testing (96.9%), and 24.9% of women with an accepted indication received GEP. Unexplained socioeconomic differences in GEP use were apparent after adjusting for age and clinical characteristics; specifically, GEP use increased with income. For example, those in the lowest income category (< $40,000) were less likely than those with an income of $125,000 or more to receive GEP (odds ratio, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.16 to 0.73). A majority of women (57.7%) with HER2-positive disease received trastuzumab; among these women, differences in age and clinical characteristics were not apparent, although surprisingly, those in the lowest income category were more likely than those in the high-income category to receive trastuzumab (P = .02). Among women who did not have a positive HER2 test, 3.9% still received trastuzumab. Receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy increased as GEP score indicated greater risk of recurrence. Conclusion: Identifying and eliminating unnecessary variation in the use of these expensive tests and treatments should be part of quality improvement and efficiency programs. PMID:21886507

  9. Designing an automated clinical decision support system to match clinical practice guidelines for opioid therapy for chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Michael E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid prescribing for chronic pain is common and controversial, but recommended clinical practices are followed inconsistently in many clinical settings. Strategies for increasing adherence to clinical practice guideline recommendations are needed to increase effectiveness and reduce negative consequences of opioid prescribing in chronic pain patients. Methods Here we describe the process and outcomes of a project to operationalize the 2003 VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline for Opioid Therapy for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain into a computerized decision support system (DSS to encourage good opioid prescribing practices during primary care visits. We based the DSS on the existing ATHENA-DSS. We used an iterative process of design, testing, and revision of the DSS by a diverse team including guideline authors, medical informatics experts, clinical content experts, and end-users to convert the written clinical practice guideline into a computable algorithm to generate patient-specific recommendations for care based upon existing information in the electronic medical record (EMR, and a set of clinical tools. Results The iterative revision process identified numerous and varied problems with the initially designed system despite diverse expert participation in the design process. The process of operationalizing the guideline identified areas in which the guideline was vague, left decisions to clinical judgment, or required clarification of detail to insure safe clinical implementation. The revisions led to workable solutions to problems, defined the limits of the DSS and its utility in clinical practice, improved integration into clinical workflow, and improved the clarity and accuracy of system recommendations and tools. Conclusions Use of this iterative process led to development of a multifunctional DSS that met the approval of the clinical practice guideline authors, content experts, and clinicians involved in testing. The

  10. Prioritization strategies in clinical practice guidelines development: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres Marcela

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Few methodological studies address the prioritization of clinical topics for the development of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs. The aim of this study was to validate a methodology for Priority Determination of Topics (PDT of CPGs. Methods and results Firstly, we developed an instrument for PDT with 41 criteria that were grouped under 10 domains, based on a comprehensive systematic search. Secondly, we performed a survey of stakeholders involved in CPGs development, and end users of guidelines, using the instrument. Thirdly, a pilot testing of the PDT procedure was performed in order to choose 10 guideline topics among 34 proposed projects; using a multi-criteria analysis approach, we validated a mechanism that followed five stages: determination of the composition of groups, item/domain scoring, weights determination, quality of the information used to support judgments, and finally, topic selection. Participants first scored the importance of each domain, after which four different weighting procedures were calculated (including the survey results. The process of weighting was determined by correlating the data between them. We also reported the quality of evidence used for PDT. Finally, we provided a qualitative analysis of the process. The main domains used to support judgement, having higher quality scores and weightings, were feasibility, disease burden, implementation and information needs. Other important domains such as user preferences, adverse events, potential for health promotion, social effects, and economic impact had lower relevance for clinicians. Criteria for prioritization were mainly judged through professional experience, while good quality information was only used in 15% of cases. Conclusion The main advantages of the proposed methodology are supported by the use of a systematic approach to identify, score and weight guideline topics selection, limiting or exposing the influence of personal biases

  11. Radiological and clinical pattern of pulmonary Tuberculosis in selected TB clinics in Khartoum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    160 adult tuberculous patients were selected randomly from Al shaab and Abu Anja hospital, to (1) study the clino-radiological pattern of the disease, (2) to determine the percentage of radiologically-positive patients and (3) to study the frequency of the initial presenting symptoms and to correlate them with their x-ray findings. A flow-sheet was filled and proper clinical examination was conducted for each patient. Tuberclin test, 3 sputa examinations, ESR and chest x-ray were done for every patient. Three quarters of the patients were males in the young age group and most of the patients were of low socioeconomic status. The main presenting symptoms were productive cough, chest pain, dysnoea, fever, weight loss and malaise. Patients presented rather late, with a mean period of four months. 57 % of patients were sputum positive, 80% Tuberclin-positive and 98% had a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). 15% of patients had radiological features of primary diseases of which hilar lymph-adenopathy was the commonest, while consolidation was the commonest parenchymal lesion. In post-primary disease fibrocavitory type was the commonest and together with exudative lesions constituted 98% of parenchymal lesions. 90% of patients had typical upper or middle zone infiltrates and 10% had lower lung field tuberculosis. 14% of patients had pleural effusion. 60% of patients had moderate disease extent in the chest, 30% far-advanced and 10% minimal lesions in their chest x-ray.(Author)

  12. [Three-dimensional cephalometry: applications in clinical practice and research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Jacques; Oueiss, Arlette; Marchal-Sixou, Christine; Braga, José; Treil, Jacques

    2008-03-01

    A 3D cephalometric analysis method from scanner acquisition has been developed thanks to a long collaboration between Dr Treil and the Department of Orthodontics in Toulouse III University. It allows a perfect knowledge of maxillo-facial architecture using fourteen landmarks related to the neuromatricial axis of facial growth. These landmarks can be identified without ambiguity. The marking of each tooth relative to dental arches (gravity centre coordinates and torque and tipping of each tooth), and the location of arches relative to maxillo-facial frame are given by the analysis. Description and reconstruction of dental and maxillo-facial anatomy are possible with three levels: maxillo-facial frame, maxillar and mandibular bases and dentoalveolar level. The method not only gives more precise information than conventional cephalometrics in anteroposterior and vertical directions, but it allows transversal analysis and asymmetry measurement. Applications are numerous in research as well as in clinical medicine: analyses of cases border line surgery, surgical set-up, facial asymmetry, analysis of dentoalveolar compensations, definition of therapeutic aims, occlusal analysis and set-up, study of evolution in anthropology-primatology, study of growth etc. This method of description using a pattern of landmarks is perfectly adapted to the last developments of modern research techniques: morphometric geometry with Procustes superimpositions, EDMA, TPS, FEM. PMID:18364213

  13. How to calibrate Grenz-beams in clinical practice?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeken, B. [Algemeen Ziekenhius Middelheim, Antwerp (Belgium); Bressers, E. [Virga jesse Ziekenhius, Hasselt (Belgium)

    1995-12-01

    In recent years, considerable efforts have been spent improving the precision and consistency in the whole process of calibration of high energy photon and electron beams (national protocols, primary calibration facilities ....). The reading in air of 5 different ionisation chambers (NE2532, NE2536, NE2571, PTWM23342, Markus) in an X-ray beam (RT50, HVL=0.35 mm Al) has been compared. Ali NE chambers were provided with a calibration factor Nk, the PTW chamber was directly calibrated in dose water ND,W. The polarisation and recombination effects were measured. In our reference field (ssd=4cm, field diameter 40 mm), the readings in air for the dedicated plan parallel chambers deviated by not more than 8%. The measurements with the NE2571 chamber did not correspond very well with the other measurements. For the equipment in our hospital, the dose rate in air for the reference field was measured from 1971 on and found to be very stable: 17.36 Gy/min (0.48) (1sd). An attempt was made to measure the BSF for the field defining cones used in clinical practice using a Markus plane parallel chamber, but the resulting BSF did not correspond to those reported in BJR/suppl. 17. Special attention has been be paid to the calibration of beams with field size comparable to the dimension of the chamber window- chamber body.

  14. Korean clinical practice guidelines: otitis media in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Su-Kyoung; Choi, Kyu Young; Park, Su Eun; Chun, Young Myung; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Park, Shi-Nae; Cho, Yang-Sun; Kim, Young-Jae; Kim, Hyung-Jong; Korean Otologic Society

    2012-08-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) and otitis media with effusion (OME) are common infections in children, and their diagnosis and treatment have significant impacts on the health of children and the costs of providing national medical care. In 2009, the Korean Otologic Society organized a committee composed of experts in the field of otolaryngology, pediatrics, and family medicine to develop Korean clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for otitis media in children with the goal of meeting regional medical and social needs in Korea. For this purpose, the committee adapted existing guidelines. A comprehensive literature review was carried out primarily from 2004 to 2009 using medical search engines including data from Korea. A draft was written after a national questionnaire survey and several public audits, and it was editorially supervised by senior advisors before publication of the final report. These evidence-based guidelines for the management of otitis media in children provide recommendations to primary practitioners for the diagnosis and treatment of children younger than 15 yr old with uncomplicated AOM and OME. The guidelines include recommendations regarding diagnosis, treatment options, prevention and parent education, medical records, referral, and complementary/alternative medicine for treating pediatric otitis media.

  15. Clinical applications of laser therapy on the dental practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2004-09-01

    Dental practice consists of a series of laboring procedures which demands the use of several types of equipment and materials. Usually patient"s fears brings additional burden to the Dentists. The use of Lasers for treating and diagnosis in Dentistry is quite new comparing to other medical areas. Initially Laser technology was used as an alternative method for treating dental caries in order to substitute the use of the drill. Lately surgical Lasers have shown themselves very useful for treating several pathologies and began to be used as a powerful tool on the treatment of several conditions affecting the maxillofacial complex and later on, the era of the use of Laser therapy began. The advent of the diode Lasers made possible the introduction of small units at the dental office and Laser therapy was used to improve healing and later included also caries diagnosis. This paper discuss the use of Laser therapy on Restorative Dentistry, Periodondology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oral implantology and other. Clinical and laboratorial experience has demonstrated that Laser therapy does improve the healing of both mineralized and soft tissues, reduces pain and inflammation, and also reduces both cost and length of the dental treatment.

  16. [Use of antihistamines in a physician's clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luss, L V

    2014-01-01

    Histamine that belongs to one of the most important mediators involved in the regulation of the body's vital functions plays a great role in the pathogenesis of different diseases. Histamine is released during inflammatory and allergic reactions, anaphylactic and anaphylactoid shock, pseudoallergic reactions, and others. Acting through histamine receptors, it leads to increased intracellular concentration of cyclic guanosine monophosphate, enhanced chemotaxis of eosinophils and neutrophils, production of prostaglandins and thromboxane B, suppressed synthesis of lymphokines, etc. and causes contraction of smooth muscles of particularly the bronchi and intestine, dilation of vessels and their increased permeability, mucus hypersecretion in the upper airways, lower blood pressure, angioedema and itch, etc. In this connection, antihistamines that block histamine-induced reactions in various ways: by inhibiting its biosynthesis, enhancing its neutralization, blocking the access to receptors, and suppressing the release from mast cells, occupy a prominent place in clinical practice. The review covers the classification, main mechanisms of pharmacological action, and indications for the use of antihistamines that not only have the well-known antihistamine properties, but have also a broad spectrum of anti-inflammatory activity. There are data on the benefits of a group of antihistamines, the quinuclidine derivatives (quifenadine, sequifenadine) that were designed by Academician M.D. Mashkovsky and are one of the first examples of designing new classes of multifunctional non-sedating antihistamines, which combines a high selective activity to block histamine type 1 receptors and an ability to block serotonin and to break down histamine directly in tissues. PMID:25306755

  17. Spinal manipulation in physical therapist professional degree education: A model for teaching and integration into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Timothy W; Wainner, Robert S; Fritz, Julie M

    2006-08-01

    Spinal manipulation for low back complaints is an intervention supported by randomized clinical trials and its use recommended by clinical practice guidelines. Physical therapists in this country and internationally have used thrust spinal manipulation at much lower-than-expected rates, despite evidence supporting its efficacy for the treatment of acute low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this clinical commentary is to describe a physical therapist professional degree curriculum in thrust spinal manipulation and outline a method of monitoring ongoing student performance during the clinical education experience. Increased emphasis on evidence-based decision making and on the psychomotor skills of thrust spinal manipulation was introduced into a physical therapist professional degree curriculum. As part of ongoing student performance monitoring, physical therapy students on their first full-time (8-week) clinical education experience, collected practice pattern and outcome data on individuals with low back complaints. Eight of 18 first-year students were in outpatient musculoskeletal clinical settings and managed 61 individuals with low back complaints. Patients were seen for an average (+/-SD) of 6.2 +/- 4.0 visits. Upon initial visit the student therapists employed spinal manipulation at a rate of 36.2% and spinal mobilization at 58.6%. At the final visit, utilization of manipulation and mobilization decreased (13% and 37.8%, respectively), while the utilization of exercise interventions increased, with 75% of patients receiving some form of lumbar stabilization training. Physical therapist students used thrust spinal manipulation at rates that are more consistent with clinical practice guidelines and substantially higher then previously reported by practicing physical therapists. Education within an evidence-based framework is thought to contribute to practice behaviors and outcomes that are more consistent with best practice guidelines. PMID:16915979

  18. Conceptual framework for facilitating reflective practice by nurses in the clinical setting

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia Nelumbu; Louise Pretorius

    2015-01-01

    Problems or incidents occurring in clinical settings are often seen as indicators of poor nursing care and even indicators of a lack of reflective practice skills. This paper presents the description of the conceptual framework to facilitate reflective practice for registered nurses in clinical settings. It focuses on the characteristics of the agent (lecturer as a facilitator) and recipients (registered nurses), the context of the clinical practice, the procedures for the facilitation of ref...

  19. Are personality patterns and clinical syndromes associated with patients' motives and percieved outcome of othognathic surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jesper Øland; Jensen, J.; Melsen, Birte;

    2010-01-01

    A study of surgical-orthodontic patients was performed to assess whether signs of personality patterns and psychologically defined clinical syndromes influenced patients' motives for treatment, perceived oral function, self-concept, social interaction, and overall satisfaction with treatment....

  20. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Prevalence, hypertrophy patterns, and their clinical and ECG findings in a hospital at Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif M Helmy

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of HCM in our population group is 0.13% with a male predominance (12:1. There was a diversity of clinical presentation, ECG abnormalities and patterns of LV hypertrophy among HCM patients.

  1. Clinical patterns of speech-language disorders in thalamic aphasias

    OpenAIRE

    Kuljić-Obradović Dragana; Ocić Gordana G.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristic symptom cluster and the course of aphasia in 12 patients with single left thalamic lesion verified by CAT scan. The testing of language disorder was performed by standard linguistic tests for aphasia in the acute stage and one month after the insult. Although this clinical syndrome varied greatly it was possible to point out some common characteristics. Spontaneous speech was fluent, easily articulated, grammatically correct, with pr...

  2. Ovarian tumors: pathogenia, clinical pattern, echographic and histopathological diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two case reports of young patients, who were treated in the Otolaryngology Department from 'Dr. Joaquin Castillo Duany' Teaching Clinical Surgical Hospital in Santiago de Cuba are presented. One of the cases presented nasal obstruction, rhinorrhoea and facial pain, for 7 months; the other one presented an increase of volume in the right ocular globe. In both, the results of the biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of differentiated nasosinusal epidermoid carcinoma

  3. The basics of coding a rehabilitation diagnosis in clinical practice for the physical therapist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanyshyn M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Directions of the use international classification of functioning are considered, limitations of vital functions and health in clinical activity of physical physical therapist. Bases for the construction of rehabilitation diagnosis in clinical practice are shown. The analysis of publications of Worldwide organization of health protection and World confederation of physical therapy is presented. The necessity of the use of foregoing classification for clinical practice of physical therapist is set. The constituents of clinical activity of physical therapist are selected.

  4. Anthropogenic soils in central Amazonia: farmers’ practices, agrobiodiversity and land-use patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Braga Junqueira, A.

    2015-01-01

    Keywords: Terra Preta; Amazonian Dark Earths; Shifting cultivation; Homegardens; Intensification; Diversification; Smallholder farming. André Braga Junqueira (2015). Anthropogenic soils in central Amazonia: farmers’ practices, agrobiodiversity and land-use patterns. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, The Netherlands, with summary in English, 163 pp. Rural Amazonia is increasingly experiencing environmental and socio-economic changes that directly affect smallholder farmers, with ...

  5. Marriage and Family Therapists and Psychotropic Medications: Practice Patterns from a National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Barbara Couden; Doherty, William J.

    2005-01-01

    A national sample of marriage and family therapists (MFTs) was used to describe practice patterns of MFTs whose clients use psychotropics and to compare medicated and nonmedicated clients. Marriage and Family Therapists (n = 283) reported on 195 medicated and 483 nonmedicated adult clients. Clients (n = 375) rated their improvement and…

  6. Allowing Learners to Choose: Self-Controlled Practice Schedules for Learning Multiple Movement Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Will F. W.; Magill, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    For this study, we investigated the effects of self-controlled practice on learning multiple motor skills. Thirty participants were randomly assigned to self-control or yoked conditions. Participants learned a three-keystroke pattern with three different relative time structures. Those in the self-control group chose one of three relative time…

  7. Cerebral aneurysm treatment in India: Results of a national survey regarding practice patterns in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheer Ambekar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study demonstrates the prevailing practice patterns in the management of IAs in India. Surgical clipping is the preferred treatment of choice for anterior circulation aneurysms and EVT for aneurysms along the posterior circulation. Corticosteroids and prophylactic "triple-H" therapy are still used by a large proportion of physicians.

  8. Cancer-related fatigue. Clinical practice guidelines in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    These guidelines propose a treatment algorithm in which patients are evaluated regularly for fatigue using a brief screening instrument, and are treated as indicated by their fatigue level. The algorithm's goal is to identify and treat all patients with fatigue that causes distress or interferes with their daily activities or functioning. Management of fatigue begins with primary oncology team members who perform the initial screening and either provide basic education and counseling or expand the initial screening to a more focused evaluation for moderate or higher levels of fatigue. At this point the patient is assessed for current disease and treatment status, a review of body systems, and an in-depth fatigue evaluation. In addition, the patient is assessed for the presence of seven treatable factors known to contribute to fatigue: pain, emotional distress, sleep disturbance, anemia, alterations in nutrition, deconditioning, and comorbidities. If any of these conditions are present, they should be treated according to practice guidelines, with referral to other care professionals as appropriate, and the patient's fatigue should be reevaluated regularly. If none of the seven factors are present or the fatigue is unresolved, selection of appropriate fatigue management and treatment strategies is considered within the context of the patient's clinical status: receiving active cancer treatment, receiving disease-free long-term follow-up, or receiving care at the end of life. Management of fatigue is cause-specific when conditions known to cause fatigue can be identified and treated. When specific causes, such as infection, fluid and electrolyte imbalances, or cardiac dysfunction, cannot be identified and corrected, nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment of the fatigue should be considered. Nonpharmacologic interventions may include a moderate exercise program to improve functional capacity and activity tolerance, psychosocial programs to manage stress and

  9. Enhancing medical-surgical nursing practice: using practice tests and clinical examples to promote active learning and program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuHamel, Martha B; Hirnle, Constance; Karvonen, Colleen; Sayre, Cindy; Wyant, Sheryl; Colobong Smith, Nancy; Keener, Sheila; Barrett, Shannon; Whitney, Joanne D

    2011-10-01

    In a 14-week medical-surgical nursing review course, two teaching strategies are used to promote active learning and assess the transfer of knowledge to nursing practice. Practice tests and clinical examples provide opportunities for participants to engage in self-assessment and reflective learning and enhance their nursing knowledge, skills, and practice. These strategies also contribute to program evaluation and are adaptable to a variety of course formats, including traditional classroom, web conference, and online self-study.

  10. Teaching Reflective Practice in Practice Settings: Students' Perceptions of Their Clinical Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trede, Franziska; Smith, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Reflective practice in practice settings can enhance practice knowledge, self-assessment and lifelong learning, develop future practice capability and professional identity, and critically appraise practice traditions rather than reproduce them. The inherent power imbalance between student and educator runs the risk for the reflective practice…

  11. Patterns, Movement and Clinical Diagnosis of Abdominal Adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Benjamin; Fenner, John; Gillott, Richard; Spencer, Paul; Lawford, Patricia; Bardhan, Karna Dev

    Patterns in normal abdominal movement captured with medical imaging can be recognised by a trained radiologist but the process is time consuming. Abdominal adhesions present a diagnostic problem in which the radiologist is asked to detect abnormal movement that may be indicative of pathology. This paper postulates that the use of image analysis can augment the diagnostic abilities of the radiologist in respect of adhesions. Proof of concept experiments were conducted in-silico to explore the effectiveness of the technique. The results indicate that trained participants are accurate in their assessment of abnormalities when supplied with additional information from image analysis techniques. However without the additional information, participants made incorrect diagnoses on many occasions. ROC methods were used to quantify the outcomes of the in-silico experiment.

  12. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005

  13. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavayssiere, Robert [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France)], E-mail: cab.lav@wanadoo.fr; Cabee, Anne-Elizabeth [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); Centre RMX, 80, avenue Felix Faure, 75105 Paris (France); Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel [Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); American Hospital of Paris, Nuclear Medicine, 63, boulevard Victor Hugo - BP 109, 92202 Neuilly sur Seine Cedex (France)

    2009-01-15

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005].

  14. Building the Clinical Bridge to Advance Education, Research, and Practice Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn Svejda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The University of Michigan School of Nursing and the Health System partnered to develop an undergraduate clinical education model as part of a larger project to advance clinical education, practice, and scholarship with education serving as the clinical bridge that anchors all three areas. The clinical model includes clusters of clinical units as the clinical home for four years of a student's education, clinical instruction through team mentorship, clinical immersion, special skills preparation, and student portfolio. The model was examined during a one-year pilot with junior students. Stakeholders were largely positive. Findings showed that Clinical Faculty engaged in more role modeling of teaching strategies as Mentors assumed more direct teaching used more clinical reasoning strategies. Students reported increased confidence and competence in clinical care by being integrated into the team and the Mentor's assignment. Two new full time faculty roles in the Health System support education, practice, and research.

  15. Is there a role for clinical practice guidelines in multidisciplinary tumor board meetings? A descriptive study of knowledge transfer between research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostaras, Xanthoula; Shea-Budgell, Melissa A; Malcolm, Emily; Easaw, Jacob C; Roa, Wilson; Hagen, Neil A

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize practice patterns and decision-making processes of healthcare providers attending weekly neuro-oncology tumor board meetings, and to assess their familiarity with clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in neuro-oncology. Members of the Neuro-Oncology Tumor Team at two tertiary cancer centers completed a web-based questionnaire assessing characteristics of weekly tumor board meetings and perceptions of CPGs. Twenty-three (66%) tumor team members responded. Diagnostic imaging results and interpretation, medical, surgical, and/or radiation treatment planning, and pathology results and interpretation were the most commonly identified aspects of patient care discussed at tumor board meetings, and almost all respondents indicated that these meetings were "very beneficial" to their own practice. When deciding on a treatment plan, respondents rely most on the clinical expertise of colleagues, medical literature, personal experience, active clinical trial protocols, and published CPGs. Opinions of the local CPGs varied considerably, and while 56% of respondents supported regular discussion of them during meetings, only 32% indicated that they were routinely reviewed. Updating the literature more frequently, implementing a formal grading system for the evidence, and incorporating clinical care pathways were the most frequently cited methods to improve the CPGs. Tumor board meetings are beneficial to the treatment planning process for neuro-oncology patients.

  16. Fuzzy Logic in Clinical Practice Decision Support Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warren, Jim; Beliakov, Gleb; Zwaag, van der Berend

    2000-01-01

    Computerized clinical guidelines can provide significant benefits to health outcomes and costs, however, their effective implementation presents significant problems. Vagueness and ambiguity inherent in natural (textual) clinical guidelines is not readily amenable to formulating automated alerts or

  17. Epidemiological and clinical pattern of dermatomycoses in rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Lakshmanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Superficial fungal infections are most common in tropical and subtropical countries. In this study, 297 suspected superficial fungal infection cases were identified among 15,950 patients screened. The collected samples (skin, nail, and hair were subjected to direct microscopy with potassium hydroxide and cultured on Sabourauds dextrose agar to identify the fungal species. The prevalence of superficial fungal infection was 27.6% (82/297, dermatophytosis was 75.6% (62/82, and non-dermatophytosis was 24.4% (20/82. Among the isolated dermatophytes, Trichophyton rubrum was the commonest species (79% and Candida (60% the commonest non-dermatophytic species. Tinea corporis was the commonest (78% clinical presentation.

  18. Changing Pattern of Clinical Epidemiology on Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehui Yan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The changing pattern of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection could have a significant impact on future medical prevention practices and therapies.Objectives: The purpose of this study was to describe the changing pattern of HCV infection in southwest China using clinical epidemiology, and to assess the association between the genotypes distribution and certain potential risk factors.Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis which included 1 208 subjects with chronic HCV registered at the Southwest Hospital (Chongqing, Southwest China was performed. The information was reviewed and the data collected from clinical records and short telephone interviews when necessary. HCV genotypes were determined by nucleotide sequencing of the CE1 regions followed by phylogenic analysis with the published HCV genotype. HCV genotype distribution was analyzed according to the patients' age, gender, risk exposure, and the initial risk exposure.Results: Among the 1 208 patients, the HCV subtype 1b was the most prevalent (32.9%, followed by subtype 3b (18.9%, 6a (18.0%, 3a (12.8% and 2a (10.4%, while subtypes 1a and 6k accounted for cases of HCV infection in only 9 and 3 cases respectively. Individuals older than 40 years were mainly infected with subtypes 1b and 2a, whereas younger patients were predominantly infected with genotypes 3 and 6. Subtypes 1b and 2a were observed more frequently among 44.4% and 16.0% patients respectively, with a history of invasive operations. Subtypes 3b and 6a constituted the majority of HCV infections among intravenous drug users (IDUs (28.7% and 34.9%, respectively. A significant difference (P < 0.001 was observed between the HCV genotype distributions, according to the potential route of infection.Conclusion: In southwest China, the most common remaining subtype is the 1b genotype, but this has declined significantly among young patients. This is followed by subtype 3b and 6a which has increased significantly

  19. In-Training Practice Patterns of Combined Emergency Medicine/Internal Medicine Residents, 2003-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd A Templeman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study seeks to evaluate the practice patterns of current combined emergency medicine/internal medicine (EM/IM residents during their training and compare them to the typical practice patterns of EM/IM graduates. We further seek to characterize how these current residents perceive the EM/IM physician’s niche. Methods: This is a multi-institution, cross-sectional, survey-based cohort study. Between June 2008 and July 2008, all 112 residents of the 11 EM/IM programs listed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education were contacted and asked to complete a survey concerning plans for certification, fellowship, and practice setting. Results: The adjusted response rate was 71%. All respondents anticipated certifying in both specialties, with 47% intending to pursue fellowships. Most residents (97% allotted time to both EM and IM, with a median time of 70% and 30%, respectively. Concerning academic medicine, 81% indicated intent to practice academic medicine, and 96% planned to allocate at least 10% of their future time to a university/academic setting. In evaluating satisfaction, 94% were (1 satisfied with their residency choice, (2 believed that a combined residency will advance their career, and (3 would repeat a combined residency if given the opportunity. Conclusion: Current EM/IM residents were very content with their training and the overwhelming majority of residents plan to devote time to the practice of academic medicine. Relative to the practice patterns previously observed in EM/IM graduates, the current residents are more inclined toward pursuing fellowships and practicing both specialties. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:530–536.

  20. Common clinical practice versus new PRIM score in predicting coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schnohr, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    To compare the new Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) Score and common clinical practice with the Framingham Point Score for classification of individuals with respect to coronary heart disease (CHD) risk.......To compare the new Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) Score and common clinical practice with the Framingham Point Score for classification of individuals with respect to coronary heart disease (CHD) risk....

  1. Placebo Analgesia — Understanding the Mechanisms and Implications for Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Finniss, Damien G; Nicholas, Michael K.; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    There are neurobiological, cognitive and conditioning processes involved in placebo mechanismsMechanisms research has demonstrated that there is not one placebo effect, but manyPlacebo effects are an inherent element in routine clinical practiceModulation of placebo mechanisms in routine practice could provide an opportunity for improving clinical care.

  2. Knowledge Systems, Health Care Teams, and Clinical Practice: A Study of Successful Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Curtis A.; Tooman, Tricia R.; Alvarado, Carla J.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical teams are of growing importance to healthcare delivery, but little is known about how teams learn and change their clinical practice. We examined how teams in three US hospitals succeeded in making significant practice improvements in the area of antimicrobial resistance. This was a qualitative cross-case study employing Soft Knowledge…

  3. Implications of Variability in Clinical Bedside Swallowing Assessment Practices by Speech Language Pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Sue; Kruger, Samantha; Doeltgen, Sebastian; Tyler-Boltrek, Emma

    2016-10-01

    Speech language pathology (SLP) clinical bedside swallowing assessments (CBSA) are a cornerstone of quality care for patients in acute hospitals who have dysphagia. The CBSA informs clinical diagnosis and decisions regarding further instrumental assessment, and is used to develop a management plan and monitor progress. However, self-report and retrospective research shows that SLPs are highly variable in their use of assessment components considered by experts to be important for quality CBSA, casting doubt on the validity and reliability of CBSA. This prospective study describes the components included by SLPs when designing a standardised evidence based dysphagia assessment protocol for acute care patients and observed patterns of component use. The findings confirm that SLPs use the CBSA for multiple purposes beyond diagnosis of aspiration risk and dysphagia presence/severity. They are highly variable in their use of certain components, but also demonstrate consistent use of a core set. It is apparent that SLPs prioritise the application of clinical reasoning to tailor their CBSA to the patient over following a highly structured item-based protocol. The variability in component use likely reflects a complex clinical reasoning process that draws on a wide variety of information combined with expert knowledge as is also observed in many other medical specialties. Rather than promoting the standardisation of CBSA protocols that constrain SLP practice to strict item-based assessment protocols, consideration should be given to promoting the value and facilitating the clinical reasoning process that supports the utility of the CBSA for diagnosis, patient centred management and treatment planning. PMID:27405423

  4. Peer influence in clinical workplace learning : A study of medical students’ use of social comparison in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raat, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate students in clinical workplace frequently compare their own experiences with those of peers. The research reported in this thesis shows that these so called social comparisons are vital to the process of learning in clinical practice. The first study confirms students’ tendency to comp

  5. National survey on prophylactic cranial irradiation: differences in practice patterns between medical and radiation oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in the treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients remains controversial in the oncology community because of its potential for long-term toxicity and unproven survival benefit in randomized trials. A national survey of 9176 oncologists was conducted to characterize the use of PCI with regard to physician demographics, patient characteristics, and oncologists' beliefs. Methods: Data was collected via a questionnaire letter survey. Biographical data, treatment patterns, and clinical impressions were analyzed by the generalized linear model and generalized estimating equations method. Results: There were 1231 responders overall (13.4% of those surveyed), including 628 (51%) radiation oncologists (RO), 587 (48%) medical oncologists (MO), 8 (0.6%) surgical oncologists, and 8 (0.6%) from other oncology subspecialties. Of respondents, 74% overall recommend PCI in limited-stage patients, including 65% of MO and 82% RO (p = 0.001). Of responders who recommend PCI in limited-stage patients, 67% do so only after complete response to initial therapy. Only 30% of respondents recommend PCI for extensive-stage SCLC patients (p = 0.001), and 94% of these recommend PCI only when those patients have a complete response after initial therapy. Interestingly, 38% of responding MO feel that PCI improves survival of limited-stage patients, but only 11% believe PCI improves quality of life. Of the RO, 48% believe PCI improves survival in limited-stage SCLC, and 36% feel PCI improves quality of life (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). MO responders believe PCI causes late neurological sequelae more often than do RO responders (95% vs. 84%, p < 0.05), with impaired memory (37%), chronic fatigue (19%), and loss of motivation (13%) as most commonly seen side effects. Only 1.5% overall, however, routinely obtain neuropsychiatric testing in PCI patients, and 42% overall never obtain them. Conclusion: Results confirm that oncologic

  6. Designing Social Interfaces Principles, Patterns, and Practices for Improving the User Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Crumlish, Christian

    2009-01-01

    From the creators of Yahoo!'s Design Pattern Library, Designing Social Interfaces provides you with more than 100 patterns, principles, and best practices, along with salient advice for many of the common challenges you'll face when starting a social website. Designing sites that foster user interaction and community-building is a valuable skill for web developers and designers today, but it's not that easy to understand the nuances of the social web. Now you have help. Christian Crumlish and Erin Malone share hard-won insights into what works, what doesn't, and why. You'll learn how to bala

  7. An Assessment of the Breastfeeding Practices and Infant Feeding Pattern among Mothers in Mauritius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashmika Motee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper breastfeeding practices are effective ways for reducing childhood morbidity and mortality. While many mothers understand the importance of breastfeeding, others are less knowledgeable on the benefits of breastfeeding and weaning. The aim in here is to assess breastfeeding pattern, infant formula feeding pattern, and weaning introduction in Mauritius and to investigate the factors that influence infant nutrition. 500 mothers were interviewed using a questionnaire which was designed to elicit information on infant feeding practices. Statistical analyses were done using SPSS (version 13.0, whereby chi-square tests were used to evaluate relationships between different selected variables. The prevalence of breastfeeding practice in Mauritius has risen from 72% in 1991 to 93.4% as found in this study, while only 17.9% breastfed their children exclusively for the first 6 months, and the mean duration of EBF (exclusive breastfeeding is 2.10 months. Complementary feeding was more commonly initiated around 4–6 months (75.2%. Despite the fact that 60.6% of mothers initiate breastfeeding and 26.1% of mothers are found to breastfeed up to 2 years, the practice of EBF for the first 6 months is low (17.9%. Factors found to influence infant feeding practices are type of delivery, parity, alcohol consumption, occupation, education, and breast problems.

  8. An exploration of the role of pharmacists within general practice clinics: the protocol for the pharmacists in practice study (PIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Edwin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication-related problems are a serious concern in Australian primary care. Pharmacist interventions have been shown to be effective in identifying and resolving these problems. Collaborative general practitioner-pharmacist services currently available in Australia are limited and underused. Limitations include geographical isolation of pharmacists and lack of communication and access to patient information. Co-location of pharmacists within the general practice clinics is a possible solution. There have been no studies in the Australian setting exploring the role of pharmacists within general practice clinics. The aim of this study is to develop and test a multifaceted practice pharmacist role in primary care practices to improve the quality use of medicines by patients and clinic staff. Methods/design This is a multi-centre, prospective intervention study with a pre-post design and a qualitative component. A practice pharmacist will be located in each of two clinics and provide short and long patient consultations, drug information services and quality assurance activities. Patients receiving long consultation with a pharmacist will be followed up at 3 and 6 months. Based on sample size calculations, at least 50 patients will be recruited for long patient consultations across both sites. Outcome measures include the number, type and severity of medication-related problems identified and resolved; medication adherence; and patient satisfaction. Brief structured interviews will be conducted with patients participating in the study to evaluate their experiences with the service. Staff collaboration and satisfaction with the service will be assessed. Discussion This intervention has the potential to optimise medication use in primary care clinics leading to better health outcomes. This study will provide data about the effectiveness of the proposed model for pharmacist involvement in Australian general practice clinics

  9. A study on the perception of students in the radiologic technology study on the clinical practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Ryul; Kim, Hyun Gil; Yoon, Myeong Kwan; Lee, Gi Jong; Cha, Sang Young [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Inha University Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Cheong Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    The clinical practices provide the students with a good opportunity to study the practical experiences in their field through the clinical training education in hospital. Now, in this study, comparing the perceptions of the clinic teachers with those of students at the clinical site. The study was conducted to the students attending universities located in Seoul and who finished the clinical practices in 2013. The questionnaires were distributed to the student and collected from them. The study were conducted to 275 questionnaires with frequency analysis, crosstabs, chi-square test and McNemar test. The major motivation was of the select radiography course was high employment rate(44.0%) and the satisfaction of radiography course was general(53.1%). 51.3% of the study answered 8 weeks current duration of clinical practices is proper. The 3-year course students answered that the period of clinical practices would be proper if it is performed in the winter vacation in their second year in college(47.3%). The 4-year course students answered that the first semester in their third years is proper for clinical practices(27.7%). The students answered that they felt the lack in their knowledge on the professional field(32.4%) during the clinical practices and some of the practical training is different from the education performed at school(68.4%). Most of answered that they were satisfied with the clinical practices and among them they recognized the importance of the clinical practices (3.94 ± 0.89). After the clinical practices, their desire for getting job as a radiography has changed from 84.1% to 82.9%. The reason why they want the job related to the radiation is because the job is stable (changed from 49.0% to 46.0% after the clinical practice) while the reason why they do not want be a radigrapher because that job is not proper for them (changed from 37.0% to 40.7% after the clinical practice) The effort should be made to enhance the position of radiation

  10. A study on the perception of students in the radiologic technology study on the clinical practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical practices provide the students with a good opportunity to study the practical experiences in their field through the clinical training education in hospital. Now, in this study, comparing the perceptions of the clinic teachers with those of students at the clinical site. The study was conducted to the students attending universities located in Seoul and who finished the clinical practices in 2013. The questionnaires were distributed to the student and collected from them. The study were conducted to 275 questionnaires with frequency analysis, crosstabs, chi-square test and McNemar test. The major motivation was of the select radiography course was high employment rate(44.0%) and the satisfaction of radiography course was general(53.1%). 51.3% of the study answered 8 weeks current duration of clinical practices is proper. The 3-year course students answered that the period of clinical practices would be proper if it is performed in the winter vacation in their second year in college(47.3%). The 4-year course students answered that the first semester in their third years is proper for clinical practices(27.7%). The students answered that they felt the lack in their knowledge on the professional field(32.4%) during the clinical practices and some of the practical training is different from the education performed at school(68.4%). Most of answered that they were satisfied with the clinical practices and among them they recognized the importance of the clinical practices (3.94 ± 0.89). After the clinical practices, their desire for getting job as a radiography has changed from 84.1% to 82.9%. The reason why they want the job related to the radiation is because the job is stable (changed from 49.0% to 46.0% after the clinical practice) while the reason why they do not want be a radigrapher because that job is not proper for them (changed from 37.0% to 40.7% after the clinical practice) The effort should be made to enhance the position of radiation

  11. Foot care and footwear practices among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica

    OpenAIRE

    Gayle, Krystal A.T.; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K.; Younger, Novie O; Francis, Damian K.; Shelly R. McFarlane; Wright-Pascoe, Rosemarie A.; Boyne, Michael S.; Wilks, Rainford J; Ferguson, Trevor S

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic who engage in recommended foot care and footwear practices. Seventy-two participants from the UHWI Diabetes Clinic completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants were a subset of a sex-stratified random sample of clinic attendees and were interviewed in 2010. Data analysis included frequency estimates ...

  12. Clinical practice guidelines for translating pharmacogenomic knowledge to bedside. Focus on anticancer drugs.

    OpenAIRE

    Agúndez, José A. G.; Gara eEsguevillas; Gemma eAmo; Elena eGarcía-Martín

    2014-01-01

    The development of clinical practice recommendations or guidelines for the clinical use of pharmacogenomics data is an essential issue for improving drug therapy, particularly for drugs with high toxicity and/or narrow therapeutic index such as anticancer drugs. Although pharmacogenomic-based recommendations have been formulated for over 40 anticancer drugs, the number of clinical practice guidelines available is very low. The guidelines already published indicate that pharmacogenomic testing...

  13. Clinical practice guidelines for translating pharmacogenomic knowledge to bedside. Focus on anticancer drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Agúndez, José A. G.; Esguevillas, Gara; Amo, Gemma; García-Martín, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The development of clinical practice recommendations or guidelines for the clinical use of pharmacogenomics data is an essential issue for improving drug therapy, particularly for drugs with high toxicity and/or narrow therapeutic index such as anticancer drugs. Although pharmacogenomic-based recommendations have been formulated for over 40 anticancer drugs, the number of clinical practice guidelines available is very low. The guidelines already published indicate that pharmacogenomic testing...

  14. A model of hygiene practices and consumption patterns in the consumer phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjarke Bak; Rosenquist, Hanne; Sommer, Helle Mølgaard;

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented, which addresses individual hygiene practices during food preparation and consumption patterns in private homes. Further, the model links food preparers and consumers based on their relationship to household types. For different age and gender groups, the model...... was highest for young males (aged 18-29 years) and lowest for the elderly above 60 years of age. Children aged 0-4 years had a higher probability of ingesting a risk meal than children aged 5-17 years. This difference between age and gender groups was ascribed to the variations in the hygiene levels of food....... The simulated results show that the probability of ingesting a chicken risk meal at home does not only depend on the hygiene practices of the persons preparing the food, but also on the consumption patterns of consumers, and the relationship between people preparing and ingesting food. This finding supports...

  15. Prevalence and Pattern of Self-medication Practices in Urban area of Southern Rajasthan

    OpenAIRE

    Manish Jain, Rahul Prakash, Dhriti Bapna, Rohit Jain

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-medications is widely practiced in both developed and developing countries. Inappropriate self-medication results in increases resistance of pathogens, wastage of resources, and serious health hazards. Objectives: Present study was conducted to determine the prevalence, pattern and factors associated with self-medication among general population of an urban area of Sothern Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional community based study was conducted among general po...

  16. Open source identity management patterns and practices using OpenAM 10.x

    CERN Document Server

    Kenning, Waylon

    2013-01-01

    This is a Packt Mini in a tutorial format that provides multiple examples on Identity Management using OpenAM 10.x.Open Source Identity Management Patterns and Practices Using OpenAM 10.x is great for developers and architects who are new to Identity Management, and who want a brief overview of what's possible and how to quickly implement a prototype. It's assumed that you've had experience with web applications and some knowledge of Apache and Tomcat.

  17. Practice patterns of physiotherapists in neonatal intensive care units: A national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Chokshi, Tejas; Alaparthi, Gopala Krishna; Krishnan, Shyam; Vaishali, K; Zulfeequer, C.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine practice pattern of physiotherapists in the neonatal intensive care units (ICUs) in India with regards to cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular physiotherapy. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted across India, in which 285 questionnaires were sent via e-mail to physiotherapists working in neonatal intensive care units. Results: A total of 139 completed questionnaires were returned with a response rate of 48.7%, with a majority of responses from Kar...

  18. Urologist's Practice Patterns Including Surgical Treatment in the Management of Premature Ejaculation: A Korean Nationwide Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Dae Yul; Ko, Kyungtae; Lee, Won Ki; Park, Hyun Jun; Lee, Sung Won; Moon, Ki Hak; Kim, Sae Woong; Kim, Soo Woong; Cho, Kang Su; Moon, Du Geon; Min, Kweonsik; Yang, Sang Kuk; Son, Hwancheol; Park, Kwangsung

    2013-01-01

    Purpose According to previous studies, the prevalence of premature ejaculation (PE) in Korea ranges from 11.3% to 33%. However, the actual practice patterns in managing patients with PE is not well known. In this study, we have endeavored to determine how contemporary urologists in Korea manage patients with PE. Materials and Methods The e-mailing list was obtained from the Korean Urological Association Registry of Physicians. A specifically designed questionnaire was e-mailed to the 2,421 ur...

  19. Landscaping practices, land use patterns and stormwater quantity and quality in urban watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, B.; Band, L. E.

    2011-12-01

    Increasing quantity and decreasing quality of urban stormwater threatens biodiversity in local streams and reservoirs, jeopardizes water supplies, and ultimately contributes to estuarine eutrophication. To estimate the effects that present and alternative landscaping practices and land use patterns may have on urban stormwater quantity and quality, simulations of existing land use/land cover using the Regional Hydro-Ecologic Simulation System (RHESSys), a process-based surface hydrology and biogeochemistry model, were developed for watersheds in Baltimore, MD (as part of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES) NSF Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site) and Durham, NC (as part of the NSF Urban Long-Term Research Area (ULTRA) program). The influence of land use patterns and landscaping practices on nutrient export in urban watersheds has been explored as part of the BES; this work has focused on improving our understanding of how residential landscaping practices (i.e. lawn fertilization rates) vary across land use and socioeconomic gradients. Elsewhere, others have explored the political ecology of residential landscaping practices - seeking to understand the economic, political, and cultural influences on the practice of high-input residential turf-grass management. Going forward, my research will synthesize and extend this prior work. Rather than pre-supposing predominant residential land use patterns and landscaping practices (i.e. lower-density periphery development incorporating high-input turf landscapes) alternate land use and landscaping scenarios (e.g. higher-density/transit-oriented development, rain gardens, vegetable gardens, native plant/xeriscaping) will be developed through interviews/focus groups with stakeholders (citizens, public officials, developers, non-profits). These scenarios will then be applied to the RHESSys models already developed for catchments in Baltimore and Durham. The modeled scenario results will be used to identify alternate land

  20. Allergen immunotherapy: clinical and practical education of Italian trainees in allergy and clinical immunology schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolo, E; Incorvaia, C; Senna, G E; Montagni, M; Olivieri, E; Canonica, G W

    2013-01-01

    We performed a survey, based on a questionnaire including 20 items, submitted anonymously to Italian trainees in Allergology and Clinical Immunology, in order to obtain information about their specific allergen immunotherapy (AIT) practices. The questionnaire was sent to 40 trainees, who had attended the last two years of the training course. Thirty-four subjects (mean age: 27 years, 65% females) adequately completed the survey. The answers to the questionnaire showed that only 60% of the training programs included lectures on AIT. Among the trainees using AIT, only 40% declared being able to prescribe it independently, while 60% were guided by a tutor. Of the trainees who were able to prescribe AIT autonomously, 60% were familiar with both routes of administration, i.e. subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), while 25% of these used only SLIT. In 80% of the training institutions involved, the trainees could attend a dedicated AIT outpatient ward for SCIT administration; only 40% administered AIT personally, and in half of these cases, they were guided by a tutor. Only 70% of trainees had experience in the follow-up of patients still under treatment and of patients who had completed treatment. Analysis of the answers obtained for questions on venom immunotherapy (VIT) showed that, in 90% of cases, the trainees attended a dedicated outpatients ward where VIT is administered, but with a role limited to observation/cooperation. Only 30% were involved in the follow-up of patients who were under treatment or who had completed VIT. Only 20% of the trainees felt confident enough about VIT to prescribe this treatment independently, 80% knew there were several administration protocols, and the majority prescribed products from three different manufacturers. These findings suggest that there is significant room for improving the instructions provided regarding allergology and clinical immunology to trainees in Italy with respect to AIT.

  1. Compliance of psychotropic drug prescription with clinical practice guidelines in older inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchepare, Fanny; Pambrun, Elodie; Bégaud, Bernard; Verdoux, Hélène; Tournier, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Several practice guidelines were published by French regulatory agencies between 2006 and 2009 to improve psychotropic drug use in older patients. The objectives of the study were to assess compliance with these guidelines in older patients hospitalized in psychiatric units and to identify characteristics associated with compliance. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 117 patients aged 65 years and older hospitalized in two psychiatric departments of a public hospital, at three dates randomly chosen between January and May 2014. Medical and sociodemographic characteristics were collected from electronic medical records. In all, 8% of psychotropic prescriptions were compliant with guidelines. A total of 98% of antidepressant prescriptions complied with guidelines for product selection (no tricyclics) and 72% for initial dosage (half of that recommended for younger adults). Regarding benzodiazepines, short half-life drugs were chosen in 73% of treatments, low maintenance dosage was found in 64% of treatments, and a discontinuous administration rhythm was noted in 33% of treatments. Regarding antipsychotics, initial dosage was a quarter of the allowed initial dosage for younger adults in 39% of prescriptions and metabolic blood testing was performed in 17% of prescriptions. Neurological and cognitive tolerance was monitored in 41% and 61% of prescriptions, respectively. Few clinical factors were found to be associated with compliance or noncompliance with guidelines in older psychiatric inpatients. Practice guidelines on psychotropic drug prescription were partially respected in older inpatients. Practitioners should take into account the risks associated with non-recommended patterns of psychotropic drug use in this vulnerable population. PMID:26555674

  2. Practice of clinical forensic medicine in Sri Lanka: does it need a new era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodikara, Sarathchandra

    2012-07-01

    Clinical forensic medicine is a sub-specialty of forensic medicine and is intimately associated with the justice system of a country. Practice of clinical forensic medicine is evolving, but deviates from one jurisdiction to another. Most English-speaking countries practice clinical forensic medicine and forensic pathology separately while most non-English-speaking countries practice forensic medicine which includes clinical forensic medicine and forensic pathology. Unlike the practice of forensic pathology, several countries have informal arrangements to deal with forensic patients and there are no international standards of practice or training in this discipline. Besides, this is rarely a topic of discussion. In the adversarial justice system in Sri Lanka, the designated Government Medical Officers practice both clinical forensic medicine and forensic pathology. Practice of clinical forensic medicine, and its teaching and training in Sri Lanka depicts unique features. However, this system has not undergone a significant revision for many decades. In this communication, the existing legal framework, current procedure of practice, examination for drunkenness, investigations, structure of referrals, reports, subsequent legal procedures, undergraduate, in-service, and postgraduate training are discussed with suggestions for reforms.

  3. Useful Tests for Hepatic Encephalopathy in Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Nabi, Eiman; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a serious complication of liver disease and portosystemic shunting that represents a continuum of neuropsychiatric changes and altered consciousness. It is classified as overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) when clinically apparent or as covert hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) in its mildest form. Progression of CHE to OHE and its impact of quality of life make its early diagnosis imperative. Several diagnostic techniques ranging from simple clinical scales to sophist...

  4. Turning guidelines into clinical practice : Findings from an implementation study

    OpenAIRE

    Forsner, Tord

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The general aim of this thesis is to describe factors of importance when implementing clinical guidelines in psychiatry, and more specifically contribute to a better understanding of the implementation process. The specific aims are: Study I, to investigate a tailored implementation programme for implementing clinical guidelines for depression and suicidal patients, and to evaluate the compliance to guidelines after 6 months. In Study II, to further investigate complian...

  5. Likelihood ratios: Clinical application in day-to-day practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikh Rajul

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we provide an introduction to the use of likelihood ratios in clinical ophthalmology. Likelihood ratios permit the best use of clinical test results to establish diagnoses for the individual patient. Examples and step-by-step calculations demonstrate the estimation of pretest probability, pretest odds, and calculation of posttest odds and posttest probability using likelihood ratios. The benefits and limitations of this approach are discussed.

  6. Computer-Assisted Interpretation of the EEG Background Pattern: A Clinical Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Lodder, Shaun S.; Jessica Askamp; Michel J A M van Putten

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Interpretation of the EEG background pattern in routine recordings is an important part of clinical reviews. We evaluated the feasibility of an automated analysis system to assist reviewers with evaluation of the general properties in the EEG background pattern. METHODS: Quantitative eeg methods were used to describe the following five background properties: posterior dominant rhythm frequency and reactivity, anterior-posterior gradients, presence of diffuse slow-wave activity and ...

  7. Evaluation of Clinical Outcome after Laparoscopic Antireflux Surgery in Clinical Practice: Still a Controversial Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Contini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Laparoscopic antireflux surgery has shown to be effective in controlling gastroesophageal reflux (GERD. Yet, a universally accepted definition and evaluation for treatment success/failure in GERD is still controversial. The purpose of this paper is to assess if and how the outcome variables used in the different studies could possibly lead to an homogeneous appraisal of the limits and indications of LARS. Methods. We analyzed papers focusing on the efficacy and outcome of LARS and published in English literature over the last 10 years. Results. Symptoms scores and outcome variables reported are dissimilar and not uniform. The most consistent parameter was patient's satisfaction (mean satisfaction rate: 88.9%. Antireflux medications are not a trustworthy outcome index. Endoscopy and esophageal manometry do not appear very helpful. Twenty-four hours pH metry is recommended in patients difficult to manage for recurrent typical symptoms. Conclusions. More uniform symptoms scales and quality of life tools are needed for assessing the clinical outcome after laparoscopic antireflux surgery. In an era of cost containment, objective evaluation tests should be more specifically addressed. Relying on patient's satisfaction may be ambiguous, yet from this study it can be considered a practical and simple tool.

  8. Justification and Optimization in Clinical Practice. Chapter 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All medical exposures must be subject to the principles of justification and optimization of radiological protection, which are common to all practices dealing with potential exposures of humans to ionizing radiation. Justification of medical exposures requires that all medical imaging exposures must show a sufficient net benefit when balanced against possible detriment that the examination might cause. For patients undergoing medical diagnosis or treatment, there are different levels of justification (see Section 23.2). The practice involving exposure to radiation must be justified in principle through the endorsement of relevant professional societies, as matters of effective medical practice will be central to this judgement. Also, each procedure should be subject to a further, case by case, justification by both the referring clinician who is responsible for the management of the patient and the radiologist who selects the most appropriate imaging examination to answer the referrer’s question

  9. PATONGO: Patterns and Tools for Non-Profit Organizations—a pattern-based approach for helping volunteers to identify and share good practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schümmer, Till; Haake, Jörg M.

    2010-04-01

    Identification and sharing of good practice is an essential ingredient for collaborative voluntary action in non-profit organizations. While current approaches for sharing good practice focus on adopting and describing good practice individually, they fail to address collaborative detection, description, and appropriation of good practice in organizations. We propose a pattern-based approach, which facilitates collaborative creation, improvement, and sharing of good practice via Web 2.0 concepts. First experiences with the approach are presented including a field experiment where the approach was implemented in the Evangelic Church of Germany.

  10. Clinical practice guidelines and consensus statements in oncology--an assessment of their methodological quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmel Jacobs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines are widely available for enhancing the care of cancer patients. Despite subtle differences in their definition and purpose, these terms are often used interchangeably. We systematically assessed the methodological quality of consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published in three commonly read, geographically diverse, cancer-specific journals. Methods Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published between January 2005 and September 2013 in Current Oncology, European Journal of Cancer and Journal of Clinical Oncology were evaluated. Each publication was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II rigour of development and editorial independence domains. For assessment of transparency of document development, 7 additional items were taken from the Institute of Medicine's standards for practice guidelines and the Journal of Clinical Oncology guidelines for authors of guidance documents. METHODS: Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published between January 2005 and September 2013 in Current Oncology, European Journal of Cancer and Journal of Clinical Oncology were evaluated. Each publication was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II rigour of development and editorial independence domains. For assessment of transparency of document development, 7 additional items were taken from the Institute of Medicine's standards for practice guidelines and the Journal of Clinical Oncology guidelines for authors of guidance documents. FINDINGS: Thirty-four consensus statements and 67 clinical practice guidelines were evaluated. The rigour of development score for consensus statements over the three journals was 32% lower than that of clinical practice guidelines. The editorial independence score was 15% lower for consensus statements than clinical practice

  11. Quantification of HBsAg: Basic virology for clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jung Min Lee; Sang Hoon Ahn

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is produced and secreted through a complex mechanism that is still not fully understood. In clinical fields, HBsAg has longserved as a qualitative diagnostic marker for hepatitis B virus infection. Notably, advances have been made in the development of quantitative HBsAg assays, whichhave allowed viral replication monitoring, and there is an opportunity to make maximal use of quantitative HBsAg to elucidate its role in clinical fields. Yet, it needs to be underscored that a further understanding of HBsAg, not only from clinical point of view but also from a virologic point of view, would enable us to deepen our insights, so that we could more widely expand and applyits utility. It is also important to be familiar with HBsAg variants and their clinical consequences in terms of immune escape mutants, issues resulting from overlap with corresponding mutation in the P gene, and detection problems for the HBsAg variants. In this article, we review current concepts and issues on the quantificationof HBsAg titers with respect to their biologic nature, method principles, and clinically relevant topics.

  12. Stem cells in clinical practice: applications and warnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmieri Beniamino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cells are a relevant source of information about cellular differentiation, molecular processes and tissue homeostasis, but also one of the most putative biological tools to treat degenerative diseases. This review focuses on human stem cells clinical and experimental applications. Our aim is to take a correct view of the available stem cell subtypes and their rational use in the medical area, with a specific focus on their therapeutic benefits and side effects. We have reviewed the main clinical trials dividing them basing on their clinical applications, and taking into account the ethical issue associated with the stem cell therapy. Methods We have searched Pubmed/Medline for clinical trials, involving the use of human stem cells, using the key words "stem cells" combined with the key words "transplantation", "pathology", "guidelines", "properties" and "risks". All the relevant clinical trials have been included. The results have been divided into different categories, basing on the way stem cells have been employed in different pathological conditions.

  13. 77 FR 13513 - Modernizing the Regulation of Clinical Trials and Approaches to Good Clinical Practice; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... the conduct of clinical trials of FDA-regulated products. Clinical trials are a critical source of... the conduct of clinical trials may result in inefficiencies or increased cost and may not facilitate... is involved in an effort to modernize the regulatory framework that governs clinical trials...

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility and clarithromycin resistance patterns of Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Camelia; Pham, Son T; Tran, Kieu T; Pham, Binh T; Huynh, Loc V; Luu, Ngan B L; Le, Thao K T; Quek, Kelly; Pham, Van H

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gastric pathogen that causes several gastroduodenal disorders such as peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer.  Eradication efforts of H. pylori are often hampered by antimicrobial resistance in many countries, including Vietnam.  Here, the study aimed to investigate the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance among H. pylori clinical isolates across 13 hospitals in Vietnam.  The study further evaluated the clarithromycin resistance patterns of H. pylori strains.  In order to address the study interests, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, epsilometer test and PCR-based sequencing were performed on a total of 193 strains isolated from patients, including 136 children (3-15 years of age) and 57 adults (19-69 years of age).  Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that the overall resistance to amoxicillin, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, metronidazole, and tetracycline was 10.4%, 85.5%, 24.4%, 37.8%, and 23.8% respectively.  The distribution of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of clarithromycin-resistant strains was 85.5% with MIC >0.5 μg/mL.  The majority of the clarithromycin resistant isolates (135 of 165 subjects) have MICs ranging from 2 μg/mL to 16 μg/mL.  Furthermore, sequencing detection of mutations in 23S rRNA gene revealed that strains resistant and susceptible to clarithromycin contained both A2143G and T2182C mutations.  Of all isolates, eight clarithromycin-resistant isolates (MIC >0.5 μg/mL) had no mutations in the 23S rRNA gene.  Collectively, these results demonstrated that a proportion of clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori strains, which are not related to the 23S rRNA gene mutations, could be potentially related to other mechanisms such as the presence of an efflux pump or polymorphisms in the CYP2C19 gene.  Therefore, the present study suggests that providing susceptibility testing prior to treatment or alternative screening strategies for antimicrobial resistance is important for future clinical

  15. Typologies of Cohabitation: Implications for Clinical Practice and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    This article will explore the current evolution in the practice of cohabitation. The intent of this literature- and web-based article is to acquaint counselors with three typologies of cohabitation. These categories can be utilized in the development of psychoeducational and remedial interventions and in the identification of areas of future…

  16. Patterns of warfarin use and subsequent outcomes in atrial fibrillation in primary care practices

    OpenAIRE

    Ewen E; Zhang Z; Simon TA; Kolm P; Liu X; Weintraub WS

    2012-01-01

    Edward Ewen,1 Zugui Zhang,1 Teresa A Simon,2 Paul Kolm,1 Xianchen Liu,3,4 William S Weintraub11Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE, USA; 2Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, USA; 3Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 4Pfizer, Groton, CT, USABackground: Warfarin is recommended for stroke prevention in high-risk patients with atrial fibrillation. However, it is often underutilized and inadequately managed in actual clinical practice.Objectives: To examine the pat...

  17. Risk Management in Clinical Laboratory: from Theory to Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Eliza David Remona; Minodora Dobreanu

    2015-01-01

    Clinical laboratory tests ensure approximately 70% of the medical decisions, so that the time until the release of the results and its accuracy are critical for the diagnosis and the efficiency of the treatment [1]. Risk management involves both the anticipation of what could happen erroneous and the assessment of errors’ frequency as well as the consequences or the severity of the effects caused by it, and finally to decide what can be done in order to reduce the risk to an acceptable clinic...

  18. [Feedback in relation to training of practical clinical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C.S.; Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    Feedback has been identified as an essential component of motor learning. However, feedback principles derived from motor learning theories cannot uncritically be applied to clinical skills training because this knowledge is based primarily on the study of very simple motor skills. Research into...... feedback in relation to clinical skills training is currently limited. Theories on motor learning can serve as the basis for designing research in this domain, especially the importance of including retention tests when measuring permanent learning outcomes Udgivelsesdato: 2008/10/27...

  19. Dextrocardia: practical clinical points and comments on terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William N; Acherman, Ruben J; Collazos, Juan C; Castillo, William J; Rollins, Robert C; Kip, Katrinka T; Restrepo, Humberto

    2010-01-01

    Dextrocardia is defined by the authors as a right-sided heart with a base-apex axis directed rightward, resulting from a variation in cardiac development, and not used as a general term indicating any heart in the right chest. Dextrocardia occurs in approximately 0.01% of live births and can be discovered in various clinical settings and at various patient ages. The authors review their experience with dextrocardia, discuss useful clinical points that aid in evaluating complex anatomy, recount the history of dextrocardia terminology, and note the current inconsistent nomenclature.

  20. Best practices in nursing homes. Clinical supervision, management, and human resource practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2008-07-01

    Human resource practices including supervision and management are associated with organizational performance. Evidence supportive of such an association in nursing homes is found in the results of numerous research studies conducted during the past 17 years. In this article, best practices related to this topic have been culled from descriptive, explanatory, and intervention studies in a range of interdisciplinary research journals published between 1990 and 2007. Identified best practices include implementation of training programs on supervision and management for licensed nurses, certified nursing assistant job enrichment programs, implementation of consistent nursing assignments, and the use of electronic documentation. Organizational barriers and facilitators of these best practices are described. PMID:20077964

  1. Clinical Education, the lessons learned from practical applications - Albanian issues, East Europe and the advanced international practices on Clinical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban Koci

    2015-01-01

    In legal clinics, students perform various tasks just as an attorney would do in the same job position, such as doing legal research, drafting briefs and other legal documents, and interviewing clients. Many jurisdictions even allow students to appear in court on behalf of clients, even in criminal defense. Legal clinics is part of the academic law program in the most of the law faculties all over the world and it has a great impact in the community’s life. Throughout legal clinics students not only get the opportunity to be part of an important experience, but also they can be effective and help the people in need with their work. This paper aims to bring attention to the importance of clinical education in the formation of young lawyers and how one can learn from experience. There will be discussed important issues about legal clinic, the objectives and its mission, how to apply it and the benefits legal clinic brings not only for the academic area but also for the society.

  2. Third universal definition of myocardial infarction. Implications for clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In general, the conceptual meaning of the term myocardial infarction has not changed, although have developed new sensitive diagnostic methods. In this way the clinical diagnosis is based on patient symptoms, electrocardiogram's (ECG) changes and sensitive biochemical markers, as well as the information obtained from various imaging techniques

  3. Underreporting of conflicts of interest in clinical practice guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindslev, Julie Bolette Brix; Schroll, Jeppe; Gøtzsche, Peter C;

    2013-01-01

    Conflicts of interest affect recommendations in clinical guidelines and disclosure of such conflicts is important. However, not all conflicts of interest are disclosed. Using a public available disclosure list we determined the prevalence and underreporting of conflicts of interest among authors...

  4. Risk Management in Clinical Laboratory: from Theory to Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza David Remona

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical laboratory tests ensure approximately 70% of the medical decisions, so that the time until the release of the results and its accuracy are critical for the diagnosis and the efficiency of the treatment [1]. Risk management involves both the anticipation of what could happen erroneous and the assessment of errors’ frequency as well as the consequences or the severity of the effects caused by it, and finally to decide what can be done in order to reduce the risk to an acceptable clinical level. For this reason, organizations should not see the risk management as a compliance issue, but as an integral part of the decision-making process. EP23-A is a guideline of CLSI that introduces the risk management principles in the clinical laboratory and encourages the laboratories to develop plans of risk management which are addressed to the risks of each laboratory. EP18-A2 proposes 2 techniques for identifying and controlling the errors in the laboratory: FMEA (Failure Mode and Effects Analysis and FRACAS (Failure Reporting, Analysis and Corrective Action System. The European Committee of Experts and Management of Safety and Quality in Health Care proposed to use the quality indicators to identify the critical stages of each process, thus being possible to assess continuously the medical processes with the aim of identifying the errors when they occur. This review summarizes the principles of the risk management in the clinical laboratory, thus it can achieve its aims to report valid, accurate and reliable test results

  5. Smartphone Applications for the Clinical Oncologist in UK Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozati, Hamoun; Shah, Sonya Pratik; Shah, Neha

    2015-06-01

    A number of medical smartphone applications have been developed to assist clinical oncology specialists. Concerns have arisen that the information provided may not be under sufficient scrutiny. This study aims to analyse the current applications available for clinical oncologists in the UK. Applications aimed specifically at physician clinical oncologists were searched for on the major smartphone operating systems: Apple iOS; Google Android; Microsoft Windows OS; and Blackberry OS. All applications were installed and analysed. The applications were scrutinised to assess the following information: cost; whether the information included was referenced; when the information was last updated; and whether they made any reference to UK guidelines. A novel rating score based on these criteria was applied to each application. Fifty applications were identified: 24 for Apple's iOS; 23 for Google's Android; 2 for Blackberry OS; and 1 for Windows OS. The categories of applications available were: drug reference; journal reference; learning; clinical calculators; decision support; guidelines; and dictionaries. Journal reference and guideline applications scored highly on our rating system. Drug reference application costs were prohibitive. Learning tools were poorly referenced and not up-to-date. Smartphones provide easy access to information. There are numerous applications devoted to oncology physicians, many of which are free and contain referenced, up-to-date data. The cost and quality of drug reference and learning applications have significant scope for improvement. A regulatory body is needed to ensure the presence of peer-reviewed, validated applications to ensure their reliability. PMID:24903139

  6. Culturally Sensitive Dementia Caregiving Models and Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daire, Andrew P.; Mitcham-Smith, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Family caregiving for individuals with dementia is an increasingly complex issue that affects the caregivers' and care recipients' physical, mental, and emotional health. This article presents 3 key culturally sensitive caregiver models along with clinical interventions relevant for mental health counseling professionals.

  7. Recent NIMH Clinical Trials and Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, Benedetto; Kratochvil, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    Optimal treatment of adolescent depression requires the use of antidepressants such as fluoxetine, and the addition of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) offers better potential. Second-step pharmacological treatment of the disorder offers a success rate of around 50%. Clinical trial for the use of sertraline and CBT in treating…

  8. Addiction and psychopathology: a multidimensional approach to clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Hendriks (Vincent)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe etiology of addiction has a long history of clinical and scientific interest, which is characterized by differences in conceptual approach, conflicting data and public controversy. There have been numerous attempts to describe the antecedents and consequences of addiction in theoreti

  9. Maternal Dietary Patterns and Practices and Birth Weight in Northern Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Background Adequate maternal nutrition is a key factor for achieving good pregnancy outcomes. Moreover, inadequate dietary intake during pregnancy is considered an important contributor to maternal malnutrition in developing countries. Although some studies have examined the effect of the entire diet on birth outcome, most studies have been very narrow because they considered the effect of single nutrient. The single nutrient approach is a major setback because usually several nutrient deficiencies are more likely to occur than single deficiencies especially in low-income settings. Objectives The main aim of this study was to investigate the association between maternal dietary patterns, and practices and birth weight in Northern Ghana. Participant Settings A facility-based cross-sectional survey was performed in two districts in the Northern Region of Ghana. The selected districts were the Tamale Metropolis and Savelugu-Nanton District. These districts were purposively sampled to represent a mix of urban, peri-urban and rural populations, therefore ensuring that the distribution in social groups of the study population was similar to the entire population of the region. In all, 578 mothers who were drawing antenatal and postnatal care services were interviewed using a questionnaire, which asked the mothers about their frequency of consumption of individual foods per week since they became pregnant or when they were pregnant. Statistical Analysis We determined dietary patterns by applying a factor analysis with a varimax rotation using STATA. Multivariate analysis was used to establish association between maternal factors and dietary patterns. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between dietary practices and patterns and birth weight. Results Women who ate outside the home twice a week (OR = 1.6 & 95% CI; 1.1–2.45, P; 0.017) and those who practiced ‘pica’ (OR = 1.7 & 95% CI; 1.16–2.75, P; 0.008) had increased odds for low birth. Two

  10. Psoriasis: severity assessment in clinical practice. Conclusions from workshop discussions and a prospective multicentre survey of psoriasis severity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Kragballe, K.; Austad, J.; Berth-Jones, J.; Cambazard, F.; Brassinne, M. de la; Ljungberg, A.; Murphy, G.; Papp, K.; Wozel, G.

    2006-01-01

    Psoriasis treatment is highly individualized. Although a standardized assessment of psoriasis severity for clinical practice may be theoretically advantageous for the purposes of determining treatment, the relevance of currently available research tools in clinical practice is uncertain. Our objecti

  11. Careful science? Bodywork and care practices in randomised clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Bønnelycke, Julie; Eriksen, Hanne Hellerup

    2013-01-01

    Concern about obesity has prompted numerous public health campaigns that urge people to be more physically active. The campaigns often include normative statements and attempt to impose restrictions on individuals' lives without considering the complexities of daily life. We suggest that broadening...... the focus to reflect everyday practices would foster better targeted public health campaigns. This article is based on our participation in FINE, a multidisciplinary Danish research project. The core methodology of FINE was a randomised controlled trial in which 61 moderately overweight men were put...... into different exercise groups. In this article we analyse the scientific work of the trial as representing entangled processes of bodywork, where data are extracted and objectified bodies are manipulated and care practices address the emotional, social and mundane aspects of the participants' everyday lives...

  12. Discovery of clinical pathway patterns from event logs using probabilistic topic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhengxing; Dong, Wei; Ji, Lei; Gan, Chenxi; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong

    2014-02-01

    Discovery of clinical pathway (CP) patterns has experienced increased attention over the years due to its importance for revealing the structure, semantics and dynamics of CPs, and to its usefulness for providing clinicians with explicit knowledge which can be directly used to guide treatment activities of individual patients. Generally, discovery of CP patterns is a challenging task as treatment behaviors in CPs often have a large variability depending on factors such as time, location and patient individual. Based on the assumption that CP patterns can be derived from clinical event logs which usually record various treatment activities in CP executions, this study proposes a novel approach to CP pattern discovery by modeling CPs using mixtures of an extension to the Latent Dirichlet Allocation family that jointly models various treatment activities and their occurring time stamps in CPs. Clinical case studies are performed to evaluate the proposed approach via real-world data sets recording typical treatment behaviors in patient careflow. The obtained results demonstrate the suitability of the proposed approach for CP pattern discovery, and indicate the promise in research efforts related to CP analysis and optimization. PMID:24076435

  13. Clinical patterns and characteristics of uveitis in a tertiary center for uveitis in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, P.; Zhang, Z.; Zhou, H.; Li, B.; Huang, X.; Gao, Y.; Zhu, L.; Ren, Y.; Klooster, J.; Kijlstra, A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To address the clinical pattern and characteristics of uveitis in a tertiary center for uveitis in China and compare the similarity and difference in the distribution of uveitis entities between China and other countries. Methods: A retrospective study was performed on the patients with uve

  14. Student Pharmacists’ Clinical Interventions in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences at a Community Nonteaching Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Shogbon, Angela O.; Lundquist, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess student pharmacists’ clinical interventions in advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) at a community nonteaching hospital and evaluate completed interventions based on the type of documentation method used.

  15. International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment and prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farge, D.; Debourdeau, P.; Beckers, M.; Baglin, C.; Bauersachs, R. M.; Brenner, B.; Brilhante, D.; Falanga, A.; Gerotzafias, G. T.; Haim, N.; Kakkar, A. K.; Khorana, A. A.; Lecumberri, R.; Mandala, M.; Marty, M.; Monreal, M.; Mousa, S. A.; Noble, S.; Pabinger, I.; Prandoni, P.; Prins, M. H.; Qari, M. H.; Streiff, M. B.; Syrigos, K.; Bounameaux, H.; Buller, H. R.

    2013-01-01

    . Background: Guidelines addressing the management of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients are heterogeneous and their implementation has been suboptimal worldwide. Objectives: To establish a common international consensus addressing practical, clinically relevant questions in this settin

  16. ILAE official report: a practical clinical definition of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert S; Acevedo, Carlos; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Bogacz, Alicia; Cross, J Helen; Elger, Christian E; Engel, Jerome; Forsgren, Lars; French, Jacqueline A; Glynn, Mike; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Lee, B I; Mathern, Gary W; Moshé, Solomon L; Perucca, Emilio; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Tomson, Torbjörn; Watanabe, Masako; Wiebe, Samuel

    2014-04-01

    Epilepsy was defined conceptually in 2005 as a disorder of the brain characterized by an enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures. This definition is usually practically applied as having two unprovoked seizures >24 h apart. The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) accepted recommendations of a task force altering the practical definition for special circumstances that do not meet the two unprovoked seizures criteria. The task force proposed that epilepsy be considered to be a disease of the brain defined by any of the following conditions: (1) At least two unprovoked (or reflex) seizures occurring >24 h apart; (2) one unprovoked (or reflex) seizure and a probability of further seizures similar to the general recurrence risk (at least 60%) after two unprovoked seizures, occurring over the next 10 years; (3) diagnosis of an epilepsy syndrome. Epilepsy is considered to be resolved for individuals who either had an age-dependent epilepsy syndrome but are now past the applicable age or who have remained seizure-free for the last 10 years and off antiseizure medicines for at least the last 5 years. "Resolved" is not necessarily identical to the conventional view of "remission or "cure." Different practical definitions may be formed and used for various specific purposes. This revised definition of epilepsy brings the term in concordance with common use. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here.

  17. Innovations in American Society of Clinical Oncology Practice Guideline Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerfield, Mark R; Bohlke, Kari; Browman, George P; Denduluri, Neelima; Einhaus, Kaitlin; Hayes, Daniel F; Khorana, Alok A; Miller, Robert S; Mohile, Supriya G; Oliver, Thomas K; Ortiz, Eduardo; Lyman, Gary H

    2016-09-10

    Since the beginning of its guidelines program in 1993, ASCO has continually sought ways to produce a greater number of guidelines while maintaining its commitment to using the rigorous development methods that minimize the biases that threaten the validity of practice recommendations. ASCO is implementing a range of guideline development and implementation innovations. In this article, we describe innovations that are designed to (1) integrate consideration of multiple chronic conditions into practice guidelines; (2) keep more of its guidelines current by applying evolving signals or (more) rapid, for-cause updating approaches; (3) increase the number of high-quality guidelines available to its membership through endorsement and adaptation of other groups' products; (4) improve coverage of its members' guideline needs through a new topic nomination process; and (5) enhance dissemination and promote implementation of ASCO guidelines in the oncology practice community through a network of volunteer ambassadors. We close with a summary of ASCO's plans to facilitate the integration of data from its rapid learning system, CancerLinQ, into ASCO guidelines and to develop tactics through which guideline recommendations can be embedded in clinicians' workflow in digital form. We highlight the challenges inherent in reconciling the need to provide clinicians with more interactive, point-of-care guidance with ASCO's abiding commitment to methodologic rigor in guideline development.

  18. Peer influence in clinical workplace learning: A study of medical students’ use of social comparison in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Raat, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate students in clinical workplace frequently compare their own experiences with those of peers. The research reported in this thesis shows that these so called social comparisons are vital to the process of learning in clinical practice. The first study confirms students’ tendency to compare themselves with peers and shows that their responses to the comparisons are more often stimulating for learning than discouraging. After that, an experimental study demonstrates how students’ e...

  19. A preliminary survey of the practice patterns of United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais PractitionersCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchanan Patricia A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Feldenkrais Method® of somatic education purports to guide people of varying ages and abilities to improve function. Many people choose this method to aid with recovery from injury, manage chronic conditions, or enhance performance even though limited research supporting its safety and effectiveness exists to guide decisions about use and referral. Very little information about practitioner characteristics and practice patterns is publicly available to assist researchers in the design of appropriate safety and effectiveness studies. The purpose of this study was to obtain an initial overview of the characteristics of United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais PractitionersCM. Methods Of 1300 certified Feldenkrais® practitioners at the time of the study, there were 1193 practitioners with email accounts who were sent invitations to complete a web-based survey. The survey inquired about practice locations, additional credentials, service patterns and workloads during the previous 3 months. Response rate and descriptive statistics were calculated. Results The survey had a 32.3% (385/1193 response rate. The top states in which responders practiced were California (n = 92 and New York (n = 44. Most responders did not hold other credentials as traditional health care providers or as complementary and alternative medicine providers. Among those who did, the most common credentials were physical therapist (n = 83 and massage therapist (n = 38. Just over a third of traditional health care providers only provided Feldenkrais lessons, compared to 59.3% of complementary and alternative providers. On average, responders saw 7.6 ± 8.1 (median = 5 clients per week for individual lessons, 8.4 ± 11.5 (median = 5 clients per week for group lessons, and 2.9 ± 3.9 (median = 2 new clients per month for individual lessons. Conclusions This preliminary survey of United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais Practitioners indicated that most

  20. Mining disease risk patterns from nationwide clinical databases for the assessment of early rheumatoid arthritis risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chu Yu; Weng, Meng Yu; Lin, Tzu Chieh; Cheng, Shyr Yuan; Yang, Yea Huei Kao; Tseng, Vincent S

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune rheumatic disease that can cause painful swelling in the joint lining, morning stiffness, and joint deformation/destruction. These symptoms decrease both quality of life and life expectancy. However, if RA can be diagnosed in the early stages, it can be controlled with pharmacotherapy. Although many studies have examined the possibility of early assessment and diagnosis, few have considered the relationship between significant risk factors and the early assessment of RA. In this paper, we present a novel framework for early RA assessment that utilizes data preprocessing, risk pattern mining, validation, and analysis. Under our proposed framework, two risk patterns can be discovered. Type I refers to well-known risk patterns that have been identified by existing studies, whereas Type II denotes unknown relationship risk patterns that have rarely or never been reported in the literature. These Type II patterns are very valuable in supporting novel hypotheses in clinical trials of RA, and constitute the main contribution of this work. To ensure the robustness of our experimental evaluation, we use a nationwide clinical database containing information on 1,314 RA-diagnosed patients over a 12-year follow-up period (1997-2008) and 965,279 non-RA patients. Our proposed framework is employed on this large-scale population-based dataset, and is shown to effectively discover rich RA risk patterns. These patterns may assist physicians in patient assessment, and enhance opportunities for early detection of RA. The proposed framework is broadly applicable to the mining of risk patterns for major disease assessments. This enables the identification of early risk patterns that are significantly associated with a target disease.

  1. Best Clinical Practices for Male Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse: “Do No Harm”

    OpenAIRE

    Gallo-Silver, Les; Anderson, Christopher M; Romo, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The health care literature describes treatment challenges and recommended alterations in practice procedures for female survivors of childhood sexual abuse, a subtype of adverse childhood experiences. Currently, there are no concomitant recommendations for best clinical practices for male survivors of childhood sexual abuse or other adverse clinical experiences. Anecdotal information suggests ways physicians can address the needs of adult male survivors of childhood sexual abuse by changes in...

  2. Identifying low-value clinical practices in critical care medicine: protocol for a scoping review

    OpenAIRE

    Niven, Daniel J; McCormick, T Jared; Straus, Sharon E; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Jeffs, Lianne P.; Stelfox, Henry T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Reducing unnecessary, low-value clinical practice (ie, de-adoption) is key to improving value for money in healthcare, especially among patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) where resource consumption exceeds other medical and surgical populations. Research suggests that low-value clinical practices are common in medicine, however systematically and objectively identifying them is a widely cited barrier to de-adoption. We will conduct a scoping review to identify low-v...

  3. THE USE OF AMIODARONE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE: THE PROBLEM OF SIDE EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Gaisenok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of amiodarone in clinical practice are focused on. Amiodarone pharmacological mode of action and its pro-arrhythmic effect is presented. As well as various side effects that can happen in clinical practice. Special attention is paid to the problem of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis, its classification, diagnosis and treatment. Prospects of new anti-arrhythmic drugs class III, in particular dronedaron are also discussed.

  4. The Objective structured clinical examination for general practice: design, validity and reliability

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, Donald M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses an experimental clinical examination for general practice. Differences in the results obtained by fourth year students, fifth year students and trainee general practitioners highlight some of the dilemmas of medical education. It is concluded that examinations which include clinical tests can increase the credibility of general practice examinations, can be reliably applied to small groups of candidates and therefore have considerable potential for formative ...

  5. General practice-based clinical trials in Germany - a problem analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummers-Pradier Eva

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Germany, clinical trials and comparative effectiveness studies in primary care are still very rare, while their usefulness has been recognised in many other countries. A network of researchers from German academic general practice has explored the reasons for this discrepancy. Methods Based on a comprehensive literature review and expert group discussions, problem analyses as well as structural and procedural prerequisites for a better implementation of clinical trials in German primary care are presented. Results In Germany, basic biomedical science and technology is more reputed than clinical or health services research. Clinical trials are funded by industry or a single national programme, which is highly competitive, specialist-dominated, exclusive of pilot studies, and usually favours innovation rather than comparative effectiveness studies. Academic general practice is still not fully implemented, and existing departments are small. Most general practitioners (GPs work in a market-based, competitive setting of small private practices, with a high case load. They have no protected time or funding for research, and mostly no research training or experience. Good Clinical Practice (GCP training is compulsory for participation in clinical trials. The group defined three work packages to be addressed regarding clinical trials in German general practice: (1 problem analysis, and definition of (2 structural prerequisites and (3 procedural prerequisites. Structural prerequisites comprise specific support facilities for general practice-based research networks that could provide practices with a point of contact. Procedural prerequisites consist, for example, of a summary of specific relevant key measures, for example on a web platform. The platform should contain standard operating procedures (SOPs, templates, checklists and other supporting materials for researchers. Conclusion All in all, our problem analyses revealed that

  6. Knowledge systems, health care teams, and clinical practice: a study of successful change

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Curtis A.; Tooman, Tricia R.; Alvarado, Carla J.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical teams are of growing importance to healthcare delivery, but little is known about how teams learn and change their clinical practice. We examined how teams in three US hospitals succeeded in making significant practice improvements in the area of antimicrobial resistance. This was a qualitative cross-case study employing Soft Knowledge Systems as a conceptual framework. The purpose was to describe how teams produced, obtained, and used knowledge and information to bring about success...

  7. Relationship between practice counselling and referral to outpatient psychiatry and clinical psychology.

    OpenAIRE

    Cape, J; Parham, A.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although reduction in the use of secondary care mental health services is a suggested benefit of counselling in general practice, there has been little empirical investigation of this relationship. AIM: To investigate the relationship between the provision of counselling in general practice and the use of outpatient psychiatry and clinical psychology services across a geographical area. METHOD: Information on referrals to outpatient psychiatry and clinical psychology from all gene...

  8. Clinical Management of Two Root Resorption Cases in Endodontic Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mincik, Jozef; Urban, Daniel; Timkova, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Root resorption is a pathological process involving loss of hard dental tissues. It may occur as a consequence of dental trauma, orthodontic treatment, and bleaching, and occasionally it accompanies periodontal disease. Although the mechanism of resorption process is examined in detail, its etiology is not fully understood. Wide open apical foramen is more difficult to manage and the root canal may often overfill. In this report we present two cases of root resorption and describe means for its clinical management. We conclude that useful measure of a success or failure in managing root resorption is the persistence of the resorption process. It is a clear sign of an active ongoing inflammatory process and shows the clinical need for retreatment. PMID:27648314

  9. Spirulina in Clinical Practice: Evidence-Based Human Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Karkos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spirulina or Arthrospira is a blue-green alga that became famous after it was successfully used by NASA as a dietary supplement for astronauts on space missions. It has the ability to modulate immune functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting the release of histamine by mast cells. Multiple studies investigating the efficacy and the potential clinical applications of Spirulina in treating several diseases have been performed and a few randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews suggest that this alga may improve several symptoms and may even have an anticancer, antiviral and antiallergic effects. Current and potential clinical applications, issues of safety, indications, side-effects and levels of evidence are addressed in this review. Areas of ongoing and future research are also discussed.

  10. Clinical Management of Two Root Resorption Cases in Endodontic Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Root resorption is a pathological process involving loss of hard dental tissues. It may occur as a consequence of dental trauma, orthodontic treatment, and bleaching, and occasionally it accompanies periodontal disease. Although the mechanism of resorption process is examined in detail, its etiology is not fully understood. Wide open apical foramen is more difficult to manage and the root canal may often overfill. In this report we present two cases of root resorption and describe means for its clinical management. We conclude that useful measure of a success or failure in managing root resorption is the persistence of the resorption process. It is a clear sign of an active ongoing inflammatory process and shows the clinical need for retreatment.

  11. Applications of PET CT in clinical practice: Present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Durval Campos

    2007-02-01

    Radionuclide imaging and specially positron emission tomography (PET) has already demonstrated its benefits in three major medical subjects, i.e. neurology, cardiology and particularly clinical oncology. More recently the combination of PET and X-ray computed tomography (CT) as PET-CT led to a significant increment of the already large number of clinical applications of this imaging modality. This "anatomy-metabolic fusion" also known as Metabolic Imaging has its future assured if we can: (1) improve resolution reducing partial volume effect, (2) achieve very fast whole body imaging, (3) obtain accurate quantification of specific functions with higher contrast resolution and, if possible, (4) reduce exposure rates due to the unavoidable use of ionizing radiation.

  12. Useful tests for hepatic encephalopathy in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Eiman; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a serious complication of liver disease and portosystemic shunting that represents a continuum of neuropsychiatric changes and altered consciousness. It is classified as overt HE (OHE) when clinically apparent or as covert HE (CHE) in its mildest form. Progression of CHE to OHE and its impact of quality of life make its early diagnosis imperative. Several diagnostic techniques ranging from simple clinical scales to sophisticated computerized tests exist, yet diagnosis remains a challenge, due to the time, cost, and personnel involved. Psychometric tests appear promising due to their high sensitivity and low cost, but results are variable depending on age and education. The pros and cons of current diagnostic methods for OHE and CHE are reviewed, along with strategy for CHE testing. PMID:24357348

  13. Violence Experienced By Nursing Students in Clinical Practice Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem KÜRTÜNCÜ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was made to determine violence experienced by nurse students in clinical settings. It was applied to the School of Health Nursing Student of a university during a week in June, 2010. There were 360 students, 53 of whom were senior, 60 of whom were thirdyear, 114 of whom were sophomore, 79 of whom were first-year and 102 of whom were prep-school students, at the school. Students in preparatory classes were not included in the scope of the study since they didn't take applied courses. 70,58% of the students were reached. It was determined that the students were often exposed to verbal abuse and sexism in clinical setting and the abuse was performed by their colleagues.

  14. Clinical Management of Two Root Resorption Cases in Endodontic Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Mincik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Root resorption is a pathological process involving loss of hard dental tissues. It may occur as a consequence of dental trauma, orthodontic treatment, and bleaching, and occasionally it accompanies periodontal disease. Although the mechanism of resorption process is examined in detail, its etiology is not fully understood. Wide open apical foramen is more difficult to manage and the root canal may often overfill. In this report we present two cases of root resorption and describe means for its clinical management. We conclude that useful measure of a success or failure in managing root resorption is the persistence of the resorption process. It is a clear sign of an active ongoing inflammatory process and shows the clinical need for retreatment.

  15. Nanotechnology: A new frontier in virus detection in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers are expanding the applications of nanotechnology in the field of medicine since mid-2000. These technologies include nanoarrays, protein arrays, nanopore technology, nanoparticles as a contrivance in immunoassays and nanosensors, among others. Nanobiotechnologies are clinically applicable and possess the potential to be useful in laboratory diagnosis of infections in general and viral infections in particular. Nanotechnology is a significant advance in molecular diagnostics. The technology strengthens and expands the DNA and protein microarray methods. In particular, the waveguide technology is an emergent area with many diagnostic applications. Nanosensors are the new contrivance for detection of bioterrorism agents. All these new technologies would have to be evaluated in clinical settings before their full import is appreciated and accepted.

  16. Ischemic colitis:Clinical practice in diagnosis and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Angeliki Theodoropoulou; Ioannis E Koutroubakis

    2008-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is the most common form of ischemic injury of the gastrointestinal tract and can present either as an occlusive or a non-occlusive form.It accounts for 1 in 1000 hospitalizations but its incidence is underestimated because it often has a mild and transient nature.The etiology of ischemic colitis is multifactorial and the clinical presentation variable.The diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical suspicion,radiographic,endoscopic and histological findings.Therapy and outcome depends on the severity of the disease.Most cases of the non-gangrenous form are transient and resolve spontaneously without complications.On the other hand,high morbidity and mortality and urgent operative intervention are the hallmarks of gangrenous ischemic colitis.

  17. Clinical Practice Guideline of Acupuncture for Bell's Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Wu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgroud: Acupuncture is common used for Bell's palsy in clinic, however, recent systematic reviews all shows that there is no sufficient evidence to support the effectiveness of acupuncture for Bell's palsy because ofthe poor quality and heterogeneity. It's urgently necessary to develop a guideline of acupuncture for Bell's palsy based on principles of evidence-based medicine to optimize acupuncture treating, standardize outcomes evaluating and to improve the quality of acupuncture for patients with Bell's palsy under general circumstances.

  18. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Lad, Pritam P; Kamath, Maya; Tarale, Kavita; Kusugal, Preethi B

    2014-01-01

    The longevity of fixed partial denture depends on the type of luting cement used with tooth preparation. The clinician’s understating of various cements, their advantages and disadvantages is of utmost importance. In recent years, many luting agents cements have been introduced claiming clinically better performance than existing materials due to improved characteristics. Both conventional and contemporary dental luting cements are discussed here. The various agents discussed are: Zinc pho...

  19. The First Experience of Clinical Practice on Psychology Students’ Imaginary

    OpenAIRE

    Sueli Regina Gallo-Belluzzo; Elisa Corbett; Tania Maria Jose Aiello-Vaisberg

    2013-01-01

    Considering the academic development of the psychologist as a complex process which articulates the transmission of scientific knowledge and changes in imaginative activity, we psychoanalytically investigate the collective imaginary of Psychology students regarding the first clinical consultation. We conducted a group interview with 52 undergraduate students, using the Thematic Story-Drawing Procedure as a way to open a dialogical field. The material obtained, through the psychoanalytical met...

  20. Introducing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Janevik-Ivanovska, Emilija; Avmedovski, Fatmir; Yamamoto, Mayumi; Bhonsle, Uday

    2009-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a major diagnostic imaging technique predominantly used in determining the presence and severity of cancers, neurological conditions, and cardiovascular diseases. It is currently the most effective way to check for cancer recurrences and it offers significant advantages over other forms of imaging such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in detecting disease in many patients. In the USA, an estimated 1 129 900 clinical PE...

  1. Setting priorities and selecting topics for clinical practice guidelines.

    OpenAIRE

    Battista, R N; Hodge, M J

    1995-01-01

    Setting priorities and selecting topics are important steps in guidelines development, but they have received relatively little attention to date. Responses from a survey of guidelines stakeholders in Canada suggest that the health burden of a clinical condition on the population is an important factor in priority setting. Economic considerations, cast as either costs of treatment to the health care system or the economic burden of illness to society, are given varying importance by different...

  2. Clinical Microbiology in Pharmacy Education: A Practice-based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Olla Wasfi; Mary Power; Slavcev, Roderick A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing incidence of multi-drug resistant pathogenic bacteria, alongside viral and fungal human pathogens, supports the argument that skills in microbiology and infectious disease diagnosis, treatment and prevention are of growing global importance to be held among primary care clinicians.In Canada, inevitable future astronomical health care costs largely due to an aging population, have forced eyes upon pharmacists as one of (if not) the primary clinical professions to accommodate the...

  3. Hypovitaminosis D among rheumatology outpatients in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Mouyis, M.; Ostor, A. J. K.; Crisp, A J; Ginawi, A.; Halsall, D J; Shenker, N.; Poole, K. E. S.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. A role for vitamin D in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases is emerging. We undertook an audit of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) investigation and treatment in rheumatology outpatients. Methods. Serum 25OHD requests were matched to electronic medical records from rheumatology and metabolic bone clinics (April 2006–March 2007). Data were analysed separately for two groups, ‘Documented osteoporosis/osteopaenia’ (Group 1) and ‘General rheumatology outpatients’ (Grou...

  4. Application of radiovisiography (digital radiology) in dental clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Ilić Dragan V.; Stojanović Ljiljana S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Radiovisiography (RVG) as the latest imaging technique in dentistry with the minimal radiation exposure of the patient and numerous possibilities to process the images has many advantages over classic radiography. Case report. We presented an interesting clinical endodontic case of primary posted diagnosis of traumatic periodontitis of upper right canine upon orthodontics treatment. As the patient previously had been exposed to alleged high dose of radiation the patient ag...

  5. Best practices for veterinary toxicologic clinical pathology, with emphasis on the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Lindsay; Boone, Laura I; Ramaiah, Lila; Penraat, Kelley A; von Beust, Barbara R; Ameri, Mehrdad; Poitout-Belissent, Florence M; Weingand, Kurt; Workman, Heather C; Aulbach, Adam D; Meyer, Dennis J; Brown, Diane E; MacNeill, Amy L; Bolliger, Anne Provencher; Bounous, Denise I

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this paper by the Regulatory Affairs Committee (RAC) of the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) is to review the current regulatory guidances (eg, guidelines) and published recommendations for best practices in veterinary toxicologic clinical pathology, particularly in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, and to utilize the combined experience of ASVCP RAC to provide updated recommendations. Discussion points include (1) instrumentation, validation, and sample collection, (2) routine laboratory variables, (3) cytologic laboratory variables, (4) data interpretation and reporting (including peer review, reference intervals and statistics), and (5) roles and responsibilities of clinical pathologists and laboratory personnel. Revision and improvement of current practices should be in alignment with evolving regulatory guidance documents, new technology, and expanding understanding and utility of clinical pathology. These recommendations provide a contemporary guide for the refinement of veterinary toxicologic clinical pathology best practices.

  6. Mexican use of lead in the treatment of empacho: community, clinic, and longitudinal patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, R D; Garcia de Alba, J; Leal, R M; Plascencia Campos, A R; Goslin, N

    1998-11-01

    This paper discusses research designed to investigate community, clinic, and longitudinal patterns in use of lead as a treatment for empacho, a folk illness manifest by gastrointestinal symptoms. The same questionnaire used in a clinic-based study seven years previously in Guadalajara, Mexico, was used to interview a randomly selected community sample: in addition, the study was repeated at the same clinic sites that had been studied previously. The goals were to investigate: (1) What are community wide prevalences of empacho and use of lead based remedies? (2) To what extent are current patterns of use of lead for treatment of empacho in clinic-based samples similar to those seven years ago. The attributable risk to the population as a whole from use of lead based remedies was found to be 11% of the households of Guadalajara. Essentially this same estimate was seen for the 1987 and 1994 clinic populations. Interestingly, while percentages of lead users have declined since 1987, twice as great a percentage of informants reported treating empacho. Other patterns originally identified in 1987 persisted in 1994; lead use continues to be associated with lower levels of parental education and income.

  7. Diabetes-Specific Antibodies and Their use in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpil Salman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractType 1A diabetes results from the destruction of the insulin-secreting islet b-cells by an immune-mediated process. In the majority of patients, the clinical course is typical and there is no doubt about the diagnosis. However, the measurement of autoimmune diabetes markers is very useful in some situations such as differential diagnosis of type 1A diabetes and early-onset type 2 diabetes, as well as in the detection of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA cases. Moreover, in the type 1A diabetes prevention studies, autoimmune markers are needed for detection of individuals under risk and for their follow-up. The autoantibodies widely used in clinical course are: ICAs, IAA, GADA and IA-2 / IA-2b. Recently, a novel marker, ZnT8A, is described as a b-cell-specific antibody. In the present paper, the assay and clinical use of diabetes-specific autoantibodies are reviewed. Turk Jem 2011; 15: 8-12

  8. Silybin and the liver: From basic research to clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carmela Loguercio; Davide Festi

    2011-01-01

    Herbal products are increasingly used, mainly in chronic liver disease. Extracts of milk thistle, Silymarin and silybin, are the most prescribed natural compounds,with different indications, but with no definitive results in terms of clinical efficacy. This review analyzes the available studies on the effects of the purified product silybin, both as a free and a conjugated molecule, on liver cells or on experimentally induced liver damage,and in patients with liver disease. We searched PUBMED for articles pertaining to the in vitro and in vivo effects of silybin, its antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties, as well as its metabolic effects,combined with the authors' own knowledge of the literature. Results indicate that the bioavailability of silybin phytosome is higher than that of silymarin and is less influenced by liver damage; silybin does not show significant interactions with other drugs and at doses < 10 g/d has no significant side effects. Experimental studies have clearly demonstrated the antifibrotic, antioxidant and metabolic effects of silybin; previous human studies were insufficient for confirming the clinical efficacy in chronic liver disease, while ongoing clinical trials are promising. On the basis of literature data, silybin seems a promising drug for chronic liver disease.

  9. Focus on PCSK9 Inhibitors: From Genetics to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatine, Marc S; Underberg, James A; Koren, Michael; Baum, Seth J

    2016-10-01

    Elevation of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is an important cause of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Over the years, clinical outcome studies with LDL-C lowering agents have revealed that reducing LCL-C levels is effective in reducing rates of major ASCVD events. Although secondary factors play a role in clinical expression, severe lipid disorders often have a strong genetic component. Genetic revelations have provided novel targets for improving LDL-C management in high-risk individuals. Most recently, researchers have explored how the inhibition of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) alters LDL metabolism and lowers LDL-C levels to achieve lipid goals and potentially reduce ASCVD risk in patients with severe lipid disorders, including familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). This CMHC Spotlight article summarizes the clinical evidence demonstrating the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of PCSK9 inhibitors in lowering LDL-C levels. Reductions in LDL-C levels by PCSK9 inhibitors alone in patients who are statin intolerant or combined with maximally tolerated statins in patients with severe lipid disorders demonstrate the potential for reduced morbidity and mortality associated with ASCVD. PMID:27422124

  10. Rural nurse specialists: clinical practice and the politics of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    2008-01-01

    Doctor flight from rural areas is an international phenomenon that places great pressure on primary health care delivery. In New Zealand, the response to these empty doctors' surgeries has been the introduction of nurse-led rural health clinics that have attracted controversy both in the media and from urban-based doctors over whether such nurse-led care is a direct substitution of medical care. This article analyzes the reflections of nurses working in some of these clinics who suggest that their situation is more complex than a direct substitution of labor. Although the nurses indicate some significant pressures moving them closer to the work of doctoring, they actively police this cross-boundary work and labor simultaneously to shore up their nursing identities. My own conclusions support their assertions. I argue that it is the maintenance of a holistic professional habitus that best secures their professional identity as nurses while they undertake the cross-boundary tasks of primary rural health care. There are clear professional benefits and disadvantages for the nurses in these situations, which make the positions highly politicized. These recurring divisions of labor within medical care giving and the elaboration of new types of care worker form an appropriate although neglected topic of study for anthropologists. The study of the social organization of clinical medicine is much enriched by paying closer attention to its interaction with allied health professions and their associated understandings of "good" care. PMID:18663640

  11. Problems and opportunity of personality inventories in clinical - psychological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Benedik

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with possibilities and problems of usage of personality inventories in psychological diagnostic of persons with "heavy pathology", from aspect of validity and applicability in the first place. Personality inventories are usually designed for health population. By their usage in clinical psychology we often meet problems like specific tendencies when answering defined questions. This could be the result of situational factors but also the impact of their disorders and personality. The possibilities of classical interpretation of results are in this way limited. Do we have the opportunity of development of the diagnostic instruments that we could, not only recognise, but use such deformations (which represent cognitive style or defence of person in diagnostic purpose? The MMPI-2, most famous inventory in this field, offer us great aid, especially because its items are selected empirically. By the analysis of its items from aspect of sensing and localisation of subjects problems, we found differences between clinical scales which represent patients of different clinical groups. These differences are in accordance with psychoanalytical assumptions about characteristics of sensing self and other people.

  12. Clinical Nursing Instructor Perception of the Influence of Engagement in Bedside Nursing Practice on Clinical Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Jodi L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical experiences are an integral component of nursing education. Because the amount of time that a student spends in clinical experiences can be as many as twelve to sixteen hours per week, the clinical instructor plays a significant role in the nursing student's development of nursing knowledge. Many nurse educators attempt to balance dual…

  13. Several practical issues toward implementing myoelectric pattern recognition for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Ping

    2014-06-01

    High density surface electromyogram (sEMG) recording and pattern recognition techniques have demonstrated that substantial motor control information can be extracted from neurologically impaired muscles. In this study, a series of pattern recognition parameters were investigated in classification of 20 different movements involving the affected limb of 12 chronic stroke subjects. The experimental results showed that classification performance could be improved with spatial filtering and be maintained with a limited number of electrodes. It was also found that appropriate adjustment of analysis window length, sampling rate, and high-pass cut-off frequency in sEMG conditioning and processing would be potentially useful in reducing computational cost and meanwhile ensuring classification performance. The quantitative analyses are useful for practical myoelectric control toward improved stroke rehabilitation.

  14. Models of clinical expertise in American nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, D R

    1986-01-01

    This paper analyzes nursing job descriptions that compose a career ladder. These job descriptions, an ethnomodel of expertise, are compared to the Dreyfus model that describes five stages of skill acquisition. While the Dreyfus model posits the replacement of analytic reasoning with intuitive response as the characteristic of expert practice, the ideal posited in the nursing model places theoretical knowledge at the apex. Nursing job descriptions can best be understood in the context of this profession's search for greater power and legitimacy. PMID:3738566

  15. Translating guidelines into practice: a systematic review of theoretic concepts, practical experience and research evidence in the adoption of clinical practice guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, D A; Taylor-Vaisey, A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To recommend effective strategies for implementing clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). DATA SOURCES: The Research and Development Resource Base in Continuing Medical Education, maintained by the University of Toronto, was searched, as was MEDLINE from January 1990 to June 1996, inclusive, with the use of the MeSH heading "practice guidelines" and relevant text words. STUDY SELECTION: Studies of CPG implementation strategies and reviews of such studies were selected. Randomized con...

  16. Teaching to Transform? Addressing Race and Racism in the Teaching of Clinical Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Rani

    2016-01-01

    Faculty members are key stakeholders to support social work students' learning about race and racism in practice and to promote the professional standards established by the field. This qualitative study examines how 15 clinical social work faculty members teaching advanced practice in the Northeast conceptualize and incorporate their…

  17. Promoting Assessment Efficacy through an Integrated System for Online Clinical Assessment of Practical Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Peter J.; Engstrom, Craig; Green, Anita; Friis, Peter; Dickens, Sue; Macdonald, Doune

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents evaluation outcomes from an externally funded research project involving the online clinical assessment of practical skills (eCAPS) using web-based video technologies within a university medical programme. eCAPS was implemented to trial this web-based approach for promoting the efficacy of "practical" skills assessment in knee…

  18. Factors Influencing Electronic Clinical Information Exchange in Small Medical Group Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralewski, John E.; Zink, Therese; Boyle, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the organizational factors that influence electronic health information exchange (HIE) by medical group practices in rural areas. Methods: A purposive sample of 8 small medical group practices in 3 experimental HIE regions were interviewed to determine the extent of clinical information exchange…

  19. Towards a more rational use of psychoactive substances in clinical practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hyfte, D. van; Vries Robbé, P.F. de; Tjandra-Maga, T.B.; Maas, A.A.F. van der; Zitman, F.G.

    2001-01-01

    Complex knowledge and data intensive nature of the psychoactive drug selection and prescription process often makes for irrational and inconsistent use of psychoactive drugs in clinical practice. After describing the state of the art with respect to psychoactive drug prescription practices and selec

  20. Nursing students’ stressors and anxiety in their first clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Cobo Cuenca

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Nursery practices are crucial for the subsequent professional development of the nurse, but because of her contact with suffering, death and in general the human aspects of health care, mean a stressful moment for nursing students.Objectives: know the levels of anxiety and condition, as well to determine the stressors that have influence in such anxiety in the students of Nursing Schools of the University of Castilla la ManchaMethodology: A observational, longitudinal and prospective study. The Stai-R and Stai-E questionnaires will be used to know the anxiety trait and state and the Kezkak questionnaire, validated by Zupiria, will be used to know the most frequent stressors that appear in the population subject of this survey.The population is limited to the students registered for the Introductory Practicum subject, that mean the first practices and therefore the student’s first contact with the reality of the nursery care.The analysis of information will be realized by statistical package SPSS V15.0.

  1. What supports physiotherapists’ use of research in clinical practice? A qualitative study in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Dannapfel, Petra; Peolsson, Anneli; Nilsen, Per

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence-based practice has increasingly been recognized as a priority by professional physiotherapy organizations and influential researchers and clinicians in the field. Numerous studies in the past decade have documented that physiotherapists hold generally favorable attitudes to evidence-based practice and recognize the importance of using research to guide their clinical practice. Research has predominantly investigated barriers to research use. Less is known about the circums...

  2. Utility of strain-echocardiography in current clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohi, Kaoru; Sugiura, Emiyo; Ito, Masaaki

    2016-06-01

    Myocardial strain measurement with two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography (2D-STE) is of paramount importance in the early detection of subclinical left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction and the prediction of patient outcomes in various types of heart disease, especially when assessed with global longitudinal strain (GLS). The routine application of myocardial strain parameters requires the definition of normal values and an understanding of their reliabilities. One of the most important potential limitations to widespread clinical application of this technique is inter-vendor differences in normal strain values. Recent clinical reports indicate that the smallest differences were noted in GLS measurements among three orthogonal directions. Because the contribution of circumferential fibers to LV myocardial thickening is greater than that of longitudinal fibers, patients who have a reduced LV ejection fraction can have impaired global circumferential strain (GCS), which reflects more advanced intrinsic myocardial systolic dysfunction and is thus closely related to a poor prognosis. Since STE-derived strain analysis allows us to define the timing of the regional myocardial peak systolic deformation, it permits the assessment of LV mechanical dyssynchrony. The severity of LV mechanical dyssynchrony in the short axis plane, i.e., radial and/or circumferential strain imaging, is favorable for predicting the clinical response to cardiac resynchronization therapy. GLS in the right ventricular (RV) four-chamber view has recently been used as a surrogate for global RV function because longitudinal shortening is the major contributor to overall RV performance. Finally, 2D-STE can be used to quantify and characterize RV mechanical dyssynchrony in various diseases including acute pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26936263

  3. Coenzyme Q10 therapy in current clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Soni

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is a naturally occurring, lipid soluble, essential compound and is also known as ubiquinone. CoQ10 acts as an intermediate of the electron transport chain situated in membrane of mitochondria and vital for ATP production and cellular respiration. CoQ10 also serves as an intercellular antioxidant. All the clinical use of CoQ10 are based upon these two functions. CoQ10 levels are altered in a number of oncological as well as non-oncological diseases. Furthermore, recent data indicate that CoQ10 has an impact on the expression of many genes involved in metabolism, cellular transport, transcription control, and cell signaling, making CoQ10 a potent gene regulator. CoQ10 supplementation is useful in diseases associated with CoQ10 deficiency which includes primary and secondary CoQ10 deficiencies, fibromyalgia, diabetes mellitus, mitochondrial diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular disease, cancer, male infertility and periodontal disease. Clinical presentations of severe CoQ10 deficiency include severe infantile multisystemic disease, encephalomyopathy, isolated myopathy cerebellar ataxia and Leigh syndrome with growth retardation. Oral CoQ10 administration can correct CoQ10 deficiency since it increases CoQ10 tissue levels. CoQ10 therapy has no serious side effects in humans and new formulations have been developed that increase CoQ10 absorption and tissue distribution. Future trends involving CoQ10 in many diseases needs more clinical trials for better understanding of CoQ10 efficacy. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(4.000: 817-825

  4. The concept of control of COPD in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soler-Cataluña JJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Juan José Soler-Cataluña,1,2 Bernardino Alcázar-Navarrete,3 Marc Miravitlles2,4 1Pneumology Department, Hospital Arnau de Vilanova, Valencia, Spain; 2CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES, 3Respiratory Department, Hospital de Alta Resolucion, Granada, Spain; 4Pneumology Department, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD requires a personalized approach according to the clinical characteristics of the patients, the level of severity, and the response to the different therapies. Furthermore, patients with the same level of severity measured by the degree of airflow obstruction or even with multidimensional indices may have very different symptoms and limitations for daily activities. The concept of control has been extensively developed in asthma but has not been defined in COPD. Here, we propose a definition of COPD control based on the concepts of impact and stability. Impact is a cross-sectional concept that can be measured by questionnaires such as the COPD Assessment Test or the Clinical COPD Questionnaire. Alternatively, impact can be assessed by the degree of dyspnea, the use of rescue medication, the level of physical activity, and sputum color. Stability is a longitudinal concept that requires the absence of exacerbations and deterioration in the aforementioned variables or in the COPD Assessment Test or Clinical COPD Questionnaire scores. Control is defined by low impact (adjusted for severity and stability. The concept of control in COPD can be useful in the decision making regarding an increase or decrease in medication in the stable state. Keywords: COPD, control, CAT, CCQ, exacerbations, prognosis

  5. Coenzyme Q10 therapy in current clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Abhishek Soni; Monica Verma; Vivek Kaushal; Ghalaut, Veena S.

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a naturally occurring, lipid soluble, essential compound and is also known as ubiquinone. CoQ10 acts as an intermediate of the electron transport chain situated in membrane of mitochondria and vital for ATP production and cellular respiration. CoQ10 also serves as an intercellular antioxidant. All the clinical use of CoQ10 are based upon these two functions. CoQ10 levels are altered in a number of oncological as well as non-oncological diseases. Furthermore, recent dat...

  6. Accuracy - a market in radiotherapy. Reasons, requirements, clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accuracy requirements are specified in accordance with survival curves drawn up on the basis of clinical experience and data. Sigmoidal dose-response curves are established with the aid of the survival curves, giving information on tumour decline and the radiation effects induced in patients. In accordance with the ICRU report of 1984, Quality Assurance of External Beam Therapy, accuracy verification takes into account the two different criteria of tolerance level and action level. The dosimetric overall uncertainty is to be kept below 8 p.c. (DG)

  7. Patterns and Determinants of Essential Newborn Care Practices in Rural Areas of Northern Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahama Saaka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was designed to understand the patterns and determinants of three essential newborn care practices: safe cord care, optimal thermal care, and neonatal feeding practices. Methods. A community-based cross-sectional study was carried out on a sample of 404 lactating mothers who have delivered a live baby at home within the past one year prior to the study. Results. Overall, the prevalence of essential newborn practices on safe cord care and optimal thermal care was exceptionally low. Of the 404 newborns, only 0.2% (1 had safe cord care, 5.2% (21 optimal thermal care, and 50.2% (203 were considered to have had adequate neonatal feeding. In logistic regression analysis, the main predictors of good neonatal feeding were maternal age, timing of the first antenatal care (ANC, and maternal knowledge of newborn danger signs. Women who could mention at least 4 danger signs of the neonate were 4 times more likely to give good neonatal feeding to their babies (AOR = 4.7, Cl: 2.43–9.28, P<0.001. Conclusion. Evidence from this study strongly suggests that the expected essential newborn care practices are not available to a substantial number of the newborns. Efforts should therefore be made by the Ghana Health Service (GHS to expand essential newborn care interventions beyond institutional level into the communities.

  8. Prevalence and Pattern of Self-medication Practices in Urban area of Southern Rajasthan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Jain, Rahul Prakash, Dhriti Bapna, Rohit Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-medications is widely practiced in both developed and developing countries. Inappropriate self-medication results in increases resistance of pathogens, wastage of resources, and serious health hazards. Objectives: Present study was conducted to determine the prevalence, pattern and factors associated with self-medication among general population of an urban area of Sothern Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional community based study was conducted among general population in urban field practice area of Department of community medicine, RNT Medical College, Udaipur, Rajasthan from May 2015 to August 2015. Individuals aged 18 years and above were included as study participants using Simple random method of sampling. Results: Out of total 440 study participants, 324 (73.6% had used self-medication within last three months recall period. The practice of self-medication was more common among younger age groups, male gender and higher levels of education. Paracetamol (73.77% and other analgesics (41.98% were most commonly used drugs. Most common symptoms warranting self-medication were fever (75.31% and headache (62.04%. Conclusion: Rising prevalence of self-medication is a matter of serious concern. IEC activities should be strengthened among general population to minimize the practice of self-medication.

  9. Transforming Teacher Education through Clinical Practice: A National Strategy to Prepare Effective Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The education of teachers in the United States needs to be turned upside down. Teacher education must shift away from emphasizing academic preparation and course work loosely linked to school-based experiences to programs fully grounded in clinical practice and interwoven with academic content and professional courses. This clinically based…

  10. Evaluation and treatment of hypertriglyceridemia: an endocrine society clinical practice guideline.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berglund, L.; Brunzell, J.D.; Goldberg, A.C.; Goldberg, I.J.; Sacks, F.; Murad, M.H.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to develop clinical practice guidelines on hypertriglyceridemia. Participants: The Task Force included a chair selected by The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS), five additional experts in the field, and a methodologist. The authors received no corporate

  11. Clinical and Research Perspectives on Nonspeech Oral Motor Treatments and Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttiah, Nimisha; Georges, Katie; Brackenbury, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence-based practice (EBP) involves the incorporation of research evidence, clinical expertise, and client values in clinical decision making. One case in which these factors conflict is the use of nonspeech oral motor treatments (NSOMTs) for children with developmental speech sound disorders. Critical reviews of the research evidence…

  12. The Cardiology Audit and Registration Data Standards (CARDS), European data standards for clinical cardiology practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.R. Flynn (Rachel); C. Barrett (Conor); F.G. Cosio (Francisco); A.K. Gitt (Anselm); L.C. Wallentin (Lars); P. Kearney (Peter); M. Lonergan (Moira); E. Shelley (Emer); M.L. Simoons (Maarten)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: Systematic registration of data from clinical practice is important for clinical care, local, national and international registries, and audit. Data to be collected for these different purposes should be harmonized. Therefore, during Ireland's Presidency of the European Union (EU)

  13. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in stroke: Ready for clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marie-Claire; Stinear, Cathy M

    2016-09-01

    The use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in stroke research has increased dramatically over the last decade with two emerging and potentially useful functions identified. Firstly, the use of single pulse TMS as a tool for predicting recovery of motor function after stroke, and secondly, the use of repetitive TMS (rTMS) as a treatment adjunct aimed at modifying the excitability of the motor cortex in preparation for rehabilitation. This review discusses recent advances in the use of TMS in both prediction and treatment after stroke. Prediction of recovery after stroke is a complex process and the use of TMS alone is not sufficient to provide accurate prediction for an individual after stroke. However, when applied in conjunction with other tools such as clinical assessment and MRI, accuracy of prediction using TMS is increased. rTMS temporarily modulates cortical excitability after stroke. Very few rTMS studies are completed in the acute or sub-acute stages after stroke and the translation of altered cortical excitability into gains in motor function are modest, with little evidence of long term effects. Although gains have been made in both of these areas, further investigation is needed before these techniques can be applied in routine clinical care. PMID:27394378

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in stroke: Ready for clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marie-Claire; Stinear, Cathy M

    2016-09-01

    The use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in stroke research has increased dramatically over the last decade with two emerging and potentially useful functions identified. Firstly, the use of single pulse TMS as a tool for predicting recovery of motor function after stroke, and secondly, the use of repetitive TMS (rTMS) as a treatment adjunct aimed at modifying the excitability of the motor cortex in preparation for rehabilitation. This review discusses recent advances in the use of TMS in both prediction and treatment after stroke. Prediction of recovery after stroke is a complex process and the use of TMS alone is not sufficient to provide accurate prediction for an individual after stroke. However, when applied in conjunction with other tools such as clinical assessment and MRI, accuracy of prediction using TMS is increased. rTMS temporarily modulates cortical excitability after stroke. Very few rTMS studies are completed in the acute or sub-acute stages after stroke and the translation of altered cortical excitability into gains in motor function are modest, with little evidence of long term effects. Although gains have been made in both of these areas, further investigation is needed before these techniques can be applied in routine clinical care.

  15. Anesthesia Practice and Clinical Trends in Interventional Radiology: A European Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine current European practice in interventional radiology regarding nursing care, anesthesia, and clinical care trends.Methods: A survey was sent to 977 European interventional radiologists to assess the use of sedoanalgesia, nursing care, monitoring equipment, pre- and postprocedural care, and clinical trends in interventional radiology. Patterns of sedoanalgesia were recorded for both vascular and visceral interventional procedures. Responders rated their preferred level of sedoanalgesia for each procedure as follows: (a) awake/alert, (b) drowsy/arousable, (c) asleep/arousable, (d) deep sedation, and (e) general anesthesia. Sedoanalgesic drugs and patient care trends were also recorded. A comparison was performed with data derived from a similar survey of interventional practice in the United States.Results: Two hundred and forty-three of 977 radiologists responded (25%). The total number of procedures analyzed was 210,194. The majority (56%) of diagnostic and therapeutic vascular procedures were performed at the awake/alert level of sedation, 32% were performed at the drowsy/arousable level, and 12% at deeper levels of sedation. The majority of visceral interventional procedures were performed at the drowsy/arousable level of sedation (41%), 29% were performed at deeper levels of sedation, and 30% at the awake/alert level. In general, more sedoanalgesia is used in the United States. Eighty-three percent of respondents reported the use of a full-time radiology nurse, 67% used routine blood pressure/pulse oximetry monitoring, and 46% reported the presence of a dedicated recovery area. Forty-nine percent reported daily patient rounds, 30% had inpatient hospital beds, and 51% had day case beds.Conclusion: This survey shows clear differences in the use of sedation for vascular and visceral interventional procedures. Many, often complex, procedures are performed at the awake/alert level of sedation in Europe, whereas deeper levels of sedation are

  16. Understanding facilitators and barriers to reengineering the clinical research enterprise in community-based practice settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukafka, Rita; Allegrante, John P; Khan, Sharib; Bigger, J Thomas; Johnson, Stephen B

    2013-09-01

    Solutions are employed to support clinical research trial tasks in community-based practice settings. Using the IT Implementation Framework (ITIF), an integrative framework intended to guide the synthesis of theoretical perspectives for planning multi-level interventions to enhance IT use, we sought to understand the barriers and facilitators to clinical research in community-based practice settings preliminary to implementing new informatics solutions for improving clinical research infrastructure. The studies were conducted in practices within the Columbia University Clinical Trials Network. A mixed-method approach, including surveys, interviews, time-motion studies, and observations was used. The data collected, which incorporates predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing factors in IT use, were analyzed according to each phase of ITIF. Themes identified in the first phase of ITIF were 1) processes and tools to support clinical trial research and 2) clinical research peripheral to patient care processes. Not all of the problems under these themes were found to be amenable to IT solutions. Using the multi-level orientation of the ITIF, we set forth strategies beyond IT solutions that can have an impact on reengineering clinical research tasks in practice-based settings. Developing strategies to target enabling and reinforcing factors, which focus on organizational factors, and the motivation of the practice at large to use IT solutions to integrate clinical research tasks with patient care processes, is most challenging. The ITIF should be used to consider both IT and non-IT solutions concurrently for reengineering of clinical research in community-based practice settings. PMID:23806363

  17. Personalized medicine. Closing the gap between knowledge and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Duarte-Rey, Carolina; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan C; Bardey, David; Castiblanco, John; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    Personalized medicine encompasses a broad and evolving field informed by a patient distinctive information and biomarker profile. Although terminology is evolving and some semantic interpretations exist (e.g., personalized, individualized, precision), in a broad sense personalized medicine can be coined as: "To practice medicine as it once used to be in the past using the current biotechnological tools." A humanized approach to personalized medicine would offer the possibility of exploiting systems biology and its concept of P5 medicine, where predictive factors for developing a disease should be examined within populations in order to establish preventive measures on at-risk individuals, for whom healthcare should be personalized and participatory. Herein, the process of personalized medicine is presented together with the options that can be offered in health care systems with limited resources for diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes.

  18. CPI (clinical practice improvement): improving quality and decreasing cost in managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, S D

    1995-07-01

    The focus on quality has never been greater. As a result, a new concept, clinical practice improvement (CPI), is emerging. Clinical practice improvement is the application of the scientific method to the day-to-day practice of medicine and can be employed in all health care settings: inpatient or ambulatory, large or small. According to the author, CPI has proved to be effective in reducing costs and improving outcomes because it requires the committed support of clinicians who are involved directly in the process of designing studies, analyzing data, and developing more efficient forms of treatment in their own organizations. PMID:10143825

  19. Chronic Hepatitis C in Western Canada: A Survey of Practice Patterns among Gastroenterologists in Alberta and British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Pai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To survey gastroenterologists in British Columbia and Alberta with regard to awareness of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV management and practice patterns among physicians who treat and do not treat HCV-infected patients.

  20. Investigation of Data Representation Issues in Computerizing Clinical Practice Guidelines in China

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Danhong; Ye, Qing; Yang, Zhe; Yang, Peng; Xu, Yongyong; Su, Jingkuan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives From the point of view of clinical data representation, this study attempted to identify obstacles in translating clinical narrative guidelines into computer interpretable format and integrating the guidelines with data in Electronic Health Records in China. Methods Based on SAGE and K4CARE formulism, a Chinese clinical practice guideline for hypertension was modeled in Protégé by building an ontology that had three components: flowchart, node, and vMR. Meanwhile, data items impera...

  1. Molecular Biology of Pancreatic Cancer: How Useful Is It in Clinical Practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Sakorafas, George H; Vasileios Smyrniotis

    2012-01-01

    Context During the recent two decades dramatic advances of molecular biology allowed an in-depth understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis. It is currently accepted that pancreatic cancer has a genetic component. The real challenge is now how these impressive advances could be used in clinical practice. Objective To critically present currently available data regarding clinical application of molecular biology in pancreatic cancer. Methods Reports about clinical implications of molecular bio...

  2. Clinical practice guideline: tonsillitis I. Diagnostics and nonsurgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windfuhr, Jochen P; Toepfner, Nicole; Steffen, Gregor; Waldfahrer, Frank; Berner, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    More than 120,000 patients are treated annually in Germany to resolve repeated episodes of acute tonsillitis. Therapy is aiming at symptom regression, avoidance of complications, reduction in the number of disease-related absences in school or at work, increased cost-effectiveness and improved quality of life. The purpose of this part of the guideline is to provide clinicians in any setting with a clinically focused multi-disciplinary guidance through different conservative treatment options in order to reduce inappropriate variation in clinical care, improve clinical outcome and reduce harm. Surgical management in terms of intracapsular as well as extracapsular tonsillectomy (i.e. tonsillotomy) is the subject of part II of this guideline. To estimate the probability of tonsillitis caused by β-hemolytic streptococci, a diagnostic scoring system according to Centor or McIsaac is suggested. If therapy is considered, a positive score of ≥3 should lead to pharyngeal swab or rapid test or culture in order to identify β-hemolytic streptococci. Routinely performed blood tests for acute tonsillitis are not indicated. After acute streptococcal tonsillitis, there is no need to repeat a pharyngeal swab or any other routine blood tests, urine examinations or cardiological diagnostics such as ECG. The determination of the antistreptolysin O-titer (ASLO titer) and other antistreptococcal antibody titers do not have any value in relation to acute tonsillitis with or without pharyngitis and should not be performed. First-line therapy of β-hemolytic streptococci consists of oral penicillin. Instead of phenoxymethylpenicillin-potassium (penicillin V potassium), also phenoxymethlpenicillin-benzathine with a clearly longer half-life can be used. Oral intake for 7 days of one of both the drugs is recommended. Alternative treatment with oral cephalosporins (e.g. cefadroxil, cefalexin) is indicated only in cases of penicillin failure, frequent recurrences, and whenever a more

  3. Differences in stress and challenge in clinical practice among ADN and BSN students in varying clinical courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, M H; Standfest, K M

    1997-05-01

    There is limited research on student perceptions of their clinical experiences particularly in different clinical courses and settings. The purpose of this study was to examine the degree of stress, challenge, and threat associated with clinical practice experiences among ADN and BSN nursing students enrolled in various clinical courses and settings. The Pagana Clinical Stress Questionnaire was used to assess the clinical experiences of 416 undergraduate nursing students from 10 randomly selected associate degree (ADN) and baccalaureate (BSN) programs in the midwest. Significant differences were found across clinical courses (F[5,399] = 9.58, p < .0001) and settings (F[2,386] = 4.63, p = .01) in terms of students' stress. Stress was highest for students enrolled in pediatric nursing courses. ANOVA indicated significant differences across clinical courses in the degree of challenge and threat experienced by students. There were no differences in any of the variables studied when students had faculty from the nursing program or preceptors from the clinical setting as their teachers.

  4. Therapeutic songwriting in music therapy, Part II: Comparing the literature with practice across diverse clinical populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Felicity; Wigram, Tony; Stott, Dave;

    2009-01-01

      A growing body of literature on therapeutic songwriting with diverse clinical populations indicates that clinicians employ a wide range of approaches. The purpose of this research was to establish trends in the clinical practice of songwriting as implemented across a range of clinical populations......, and the types of allied health professionals involved in the songwriting interventions. There is a distinct absence of songwriting literature as applied in developmental disability, autism spectrum disorder, and aged care contexts so the resulting practice trends offered here contribute to the increasing body...

  5. A model for faculty practice teaching clinics developed at the Oregon Health Sciences University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hollaren, M T; Romm, C L; Cooney, T G; Bardana, E J; Walker, J; Martin, C

    1992-01-01

    In 1988 the Oregon Health Sciences University established its first faculty practice teaching clinic wherein physicians in training were incorporated into a faculty private practice clinic; this pilot project proved very successful and has been subsequently adopted as the model for essentially all outpatient clinics (both medical and surgery) in the university system. The model encourages efficiency, overhead control, and appropriate staffing; it also compensates faculty members for their additional time spent teaching. The authors conclude this model may help other academic training centers adapt to the changing demands of medical education. PMID:1729995

  6. A commentary on the 2015 Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines in glutamine supplementation to parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leguina-Ruzzi, Alberto

    2016-01-08

    Glutamine is one of the conditionally essential free amino acids with multiple biological functions. Its supplementation to parenteral nutrition has been widely used for the management of complications in intensive care. However, controversial clinical reports have generated reluctance in the use of this pharmaco-nutrient. In this commentary, we address the impact of four studies that influenced the recommendations on glutamine supplementation by the Canadian Clinical Practice Guide 2015. Because of the importance of this guideline in clinical practice, we strongly believe that a more rigorous and critical evaluation is required to support recommendations in future guidelines.

  7. Clinical Photography for Periorbital and Facial Aesthetic Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Santhanam, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    External cutaneous photography involves photographic documentation, which helps in treatment planning, documentation of facial features, teaching, publishing and pre- and post-procedural comparisons. The key is not simply documenting, but documenting it the right way and ensuring that photography is standardised and reproducible. In this review, basic photography techniques, standardised and reproducible angles such as frontal, oblique and lateral views and specific photographic angles for conditions such as facial rejuvenation are discussed. Use of photography accessories and a few tips on how to click good photographs in the examination room and how to achieve consistency in standardised photography are also presented. External photography in ophthalmic and facial plastic surgery like any other speciality too has standardised guidelines. Even small variations cause a drastic change in the photos and it's clinical and research value. Unless stringent criteria are met, the photographs lose their relevance and impact.

  8. Rotational radiotherapy for prostate cancer in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Marianne; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Logadottir, Ashildur;

    2010-01-01

    at risk, requiring less than 2min of beam-on time per treatment fraction. Materials and methods We report herein our experience from the first 46 patients treated for prostate cancer, clinical stage T1–3 with rotational therapy (“RapidArc®”, Varian Medical systems) (RA). This patient group is compared...... to a group of 50 patients treated with a 5-field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) technique over the same period. The comparison parameters include target coverage, dose to OAR, treatment time and number of monitor units. Daily-IGRT using implanted gold markers is used before and after treatment......Background and purpose Radiotherapy is the standard treatment in locally advanced prostate cancer. The latest technological improvement is modulated rotational radiotherapy, where one single rotation of the treatment machine is used to conform the dose delivery to the target and spare organs...

  9. Holter Monitoring and Loop Recorders: From Research to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Alessio; Ambrosini, Francesco; Lombardi, Federico

    2016-08-01

    Holter monitors are tools of proven efficacy in diagnosing and monitoring cardiac arrhythmias. Despite the fact their use is widely prescribed by general practitioners, little is known about their evolving role in the management of patients with cryptogenic stroke, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, unexplained recurrent syncope and risk stratification in implantable cardioverter defibrillator or pacemaker candidates. New Holter monitoring technologies and loop recorders allow prolonged monitoring of heart rhythm for periods from a few days to several months, making it possible to detect infrequent arrhythmias in patients of all ages. This review discusses the advances in this area of arrhythmology and how Holter monitors have improved the clinical management of patients with suspected cardiac rhythm diseases.

  10. Ancillary Care: From Theory to Practice in International Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Bridget; Zion, Deborah; Lwin, Khin Maung; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Nosten, Francois; Loff, Bebe

    2013-07-01

    How international research might contribute to justice in global health has not been substantively addressed by bioethics. This article describes how the provision of ancillary care can link international clinical research to the reduction of global health disparities. It identifies the ancillary care obligations supported by a theory of global justice, showing that Jennifer Ruger's health capability paradigm requires the delivery of ancillary care to trial participants for a limited subset of conditions that cause severe morbidity and mortality. Empirical research on the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit's (SMRU) vivax malaria treatment trial was then undertaken to demonstrate whether and how these obligations might be upheld in a resource-poor setting. Our findings show that fulfilment of the ancillary care obligations is feasible where there is commitment from chief investigators and funders and is strongly facilitated by SMRU's dual role as a research unit and medical non-governmental organization. PMID:23864908

  11. Treatment of invasive candidiasis: between guidelines and daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliaferri, Enrico; Menichetti, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Invasive candidiasis, including candidemia (IC/C), is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients. While incidence is higher in intensive care units, the majority of cases of candidemia are documented in medical wards. Although Candida albicans is still the most frequently isolated species, IC/C due to non-albicans species, usually less susceptible to fluconazole, is increasing. Early identification of patients at risk, knowledge of local epidemiology and prompt efforts to define etiologic diagnosis play a pivotal role for appropriateness. Starting therapy with an echinocandin, switching then to fluconazole when possible, seems to represent a potentially useful strategy for the management of IC/C. The choice between the three echinocandins should be based on the specific indications, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile, clinical experience and relative cost. PMID:25818660

  12. Silicone-based stoma accessories in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Elaine

    Advanced silicone technology has transformed the treatment of wounds and peri-wound skin. Recently, there has been interest in the use of silicone-based products in stoma care. Peristomal skin issues are a common problem, and can have a negative impact on the patient's quality of life, so helping the ostomate maintain good skin health is crucial. The author, a stoma care nurse, regularly sees 3-4 patients each week in her stoma care clinic with damaged or broken peristomal skin. This article explores the 'Trio' range of silicone-based accessories, discussing how these products compare with the traditional hydrocolloid, how they are applied and used. A series of case studies illustrates the circumstances in which these products may be applied. PMID:26973010

  13. Burst-suppression pattern in the electroencephalogram of newborns and infants. Its clinical expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervantes Blanco Jorge Mauricio

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Burst-suppression pattern in the electroencephalogram (EEG is associated with severe brain damage and has a bad prognosis in 85% of the cases. Objectives. To identify the prevalence of the EEG burst-suppression pattern (BSP in fullterm newborns and infants, determine its etiol- ogy, clinical features and course. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted. Between January 2008 and December 2012, 4,891 EEGs were reviewed. The EEGs of newborns and infants (< 3 months of age with BSP were selected. Results. 11 cases identified with burst suppression pattern. The overall prevalence of which was 3.5%; 8.1% among the newborns and 1.2% among infants. Seizures were the main reason for doing an EEG in the newborn period in 7 patients and after day 28 in three. The clinical manifestations were abnormal level of consciousness (n=8, hypotonia (n=2, and spasticity (n=6. The main causes were hypoxic ischemic injury, stroke and kernicterus. There were two cases of early infantile epileptic encephalopathy. Two patients died before the third month of age; 8 survived an average of 13 months. All had epilepsy, neurologic retardation and disability. Two patients had persistent EEG burst-suppression pattern; 1 and 3 months after the neonatal period respectively; 7 had focal spikes and an asymmetric pattern. Conclusions. Electroencephalographic burst-suppression pat- tern predicts a severe neurologic injury in fullterm newborns and infants.

  14. Methods for diagnosis of bile acid malabsorption in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayvargiya, Priya; Camilleri, Michael; Shin, Andrea; Saenger, Amy

    2013-10-01

    Altered concentrations of bile acid (BA) in the colon can cause diarrhea or constipation. More than 25% of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea or chronic diarrhea in Western countries have BA malabsorption (BAM). As BAM is increasingly recognized, proper diagnostic methods are needed to help direct the most effective course of treatment for the chronic bowel dysfunction. We review the methodologies, advantages, and disadvantages of tools that directly measure BAM: the (14)C-glycocholate breath and stool test, the (75)selenium homotaurocholic acid test (SeHCAT), and measurements of 7 α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and fecal BAs. The (14)C-glycocholate test is laborious and no longer widely used. The (75)SeHCAT has been validated but is not available in the United States. Measurement of serum C4 is a simple and accurate method that can be used for most patients but requires further clinical validation. Assays to quantify fecal BA (total and individual levels) are technically cumbersome and not widely available. Regrettably, none of these tests are routinely available in the United States; assessment of the therapeutic effects of a BA binder is used as a surrogate for diagnosis of BAM. Recent data indicate the advantages to studying fecal excretion of individual BAs and their role in BAM; these could support the use of the fecal BA assay, compared with other tests. Measurement of fecal BA levels could become a routine addition to the measurement of fecal fat in patients with unexplained diarrhea. Availability ultimately determines whether the C4, SeHCAT, or fecal BA test is used; more widespread availability of such tests would enhance clinical management of these patients.

  15. [International clinical practice guidelines and management of rheumatology in Madagascar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralandison, S; Rafalimanana, E; Rakotonirainy, H; Rabenja, R

    2012-02-01

    Developed countries issue recommendations regarding healthcare that aren't constantly appropriate for emergent countries. We suggest some remarks concerning rheumatology in Madagascar, taking account of scientific data, medical ethics, equality and equity. We have studied the minimal cost of care of medical conditions found in our hospital department if we were to follow international recommendations for their management. Then, we have estimated treatment expenses as a percentage of the SMIC (Malagasy minimum monthly salary). Out of 517 patients examined yearly, we have found 62.8% osteoarthritis cases, 6.3% rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 4,2% septic arthritis. Therefore, the first month of treatment for an arthritis of the knee would absorb 147.3% of the SMIC; diagnosis and treatment of a case of septic arthritis would take up 1762.8% of the minimum wage, and a case of RA without biotherapy would require 175%. According to the American College of Rheumatology criteria which are used as a reference, the treatment of an arthritis of the knee would take only 23% of the SMIC. Caring for septic arthritis would demand 57.5% of the SMIC and while it would yield more arguments for diagnosis such as clinical examination, CRP, and Gram coloration on joint liquid aspiration. We can proceed to RA diagnosis with an acceptable security through precise clinical examination, blood cell count, ESR, CRP, rheumatoid factor and radiography. This means 56% of the SMIC. From this 517 patients, our suggestions would reduce the expense by 35,850% of the SMIC per year. The allocation of such funds onto the treatment of complicated forms of rheumatism would be fair. By refining and evaluating these suggestions, we would come up with appropriate recommendations for emergent countries.

  16. [Polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Part II: application in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, D; Fulín, P; Slouf, M; Jahoda, D; Landor, I; Sosna, A

    2010-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is one of the up-to-date organic polymer thermoplastics with applications in orthopaedics and trauma medicine. This study presents a detailed analysis of its tests and applications in clinical medicine. A wide range of PEEK modifications and composites are commercially available, e.g., PEEK-Classix, PEEK-Optima, Endolign and Motis. They differ in their physical properties, which makes them suitable for different applications. Other forms, so-called PEEK bioactive composites, contain beta-tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite. Research in this field is also concerned with the surface finish of this polymer thermoplastic and involves macroporous titanium and hydroxyapatite layers, or treatment with laser for an exactly defined surface structure. The clinical applications of PEEK and its composites include, in addition to components for spinal surgery, osteosynthesis plates, screws, intramedullary nails or external fixators, which are implants still at the stage of prototypes. In this review, attention is paid to the use of PEEK thermoplastics for joint replacement. Mid-term studies involving hundreds of patients have shown that, for instance, the VerSys Epoch Fullcoat Hip System (Zimmer) has a markedly lower stress-shielding effect. Carbon fibre-reinforced (CFR-PEEK) composites are used to make articulating components for total hip replacement. Their convenient properties allow for production of much thinner liners and an enlargement of the femoral head diameter, thus reducing the wear of joint implants. CFR-PEEK composites are particularly effective for hip resurfacing in which the Mitch PCR (Stryker) acetabular component has been used with good results. The MOTIS polymer acetabular cup (Invibio Ltd.) is another example. Further PEEK applications include the construction of finger-joint prostheses (Mathys AG), suture anchors (Stryker) and various kinds of augmentations (Medin). Based on the information obtained, the authors suggest

  17. A neuroradiologist's guide to arterial spin labeling MRI in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grade, M. [Queen Square, UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Hernandez Tamames, J.A. [Rey Juan Carlos University, Medical Image Analysis and Biometry Laboratory, Madrid (Spain); Erasmus MC - University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pizzini, F.B. [Queen Square, UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Verona University Hospital, Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostics and Pathology, Verona (Italy); Achten, E. [Ghent University Hospital, Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Golay, X. [Queen Square, UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Smits, M. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-12-15

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a non-invasive MRI technique to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). This review provides a practical guide and overview of the clinical applications of ASL of the brain, as well its potential pitfalls. The technical and physiological background is also addressed. At present, main areas of interest are cerebrovascular disease, dementia and neuro-oncology. In cerebrovascular disease, ASL is of particular interest owing to its quantitative nature and its capability to determine cerebral arterial territories. In acute stroke, the source of the collateral blood supply in the penumbra may be visualised. In chronic cerebrovascular disease, the extent and severity of compromised cerebral perfusion can be visualised, which may be used to guide therapeutic or preventative intervention. ASL has potential for the detection and follow-up of arteriovenous malformations. In the workup of dementia patients, ASL is proposed as a diagnostic alternative to PET. It can easily be added to the routinely performed structural MRI examination. In patients with established Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia, hypoperfusion patterns are seen that are similar to hypometabolism patterns seen with PET. Studies on ASL in brain tumour imaging indicate a high correlation between areas of increased CBF as measured with ASL and increased cerebral blood volume as measured with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging. Major advantages of ASL for brain tumour imaging are the fact that CBF measurements are not influenced by breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, as well as its quantitative nature, facilitating multicentre and longitudinal studies. (orig.)

  18. Patterns of Practice of Palliative Radiotherapy in Africa, Part 1: Bone and Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide data on the pattern of practice of palliative radiotherapy (RT) on the African continent. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire was distributed to participants in a regional training course of the International Atomic Energy Agency in palliative cancer care and sent by e-mail to other institutions in Africa. Requested information included both infrastructure and human resources available and the pattern of RT practice for metastatic and locally advanced cancers. Results: Of 35 centers contacted, 24 (68%) completed the questionnaire. Although RT is used by most centers for most metastatic cancers, liver and lung metastases are treated with chemotherapy. Of 23 centers, 14 (61%) had a single RT regimen as an institutional policy for treating painful bone metastases, but only 5 centers (23%) of 23 used 8 Gy in 1 fraction. Brain metastases were being treated by RT to the whole brain to 30 Gy in 10 fractions, either exclusively (n = 13, 56%) or in addition to the use of 20 Gy in 5 fractions (n = 3, 14%). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a major component of treatment of cancer patients in African countries. There is consensus among few centers for treatment schedules for almost all sites regarding time and dose-fractionation characteristics of RT regimens used and/or indications for the use of RT in this setting

  19. Pattern of mental illness among women attending an infertility clinic in Southern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    J O Omoaregba; O Morakinyo; James, O B; A O Lawani

    2011-01-01

    Background: Female infertility is highly co-morbid with mental illness. In Nigeria, very few studies have been conducted to determine the pattern of mental illness among women with infertility. We aimed to determine the pattern of mental illness in a sample of women with female infertility as well as its associated correlates.Patients and Methods: A cross sectional two-stage survey of women (n=100) attending an infertility clinic was conducted in a teaching hospital in Nigeria. A 30-item GHQ ...

  20. Perioperative Nursing Leaders Implement Clinical Practice Guidelines Using the Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Shawna; Spruce, Lisa

    2015-07-01

    Many health care organizations, nursing leaders, and individual clinicians are not providing care consistently based on evidence and many are not aware of the evidence that is available. Preventable complications have an adverse effect on hospital reimbursement and the burden is placed on hospital personnel and nursing leaders to use current evidence to improve care and prevent complications, such as surgical site infections. Using AORN resources, leadership involvement and ownership, and implementing a theoretical model will contribute to implementing daily evidence-based practice and help to decrease the chasm between research and practice. PMID:26119609