WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinical practice diagnosis

  1. Hyponatraemia diagnosis and treatment clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasovski, Goce; Vanholder, Raymond; Allolio, Bruno; Annane, Djillali; Ball, Steve; Bichet, Daniel; Decaux, Guy; Fenske, Wiebke; Hoorn, Ewout J; Ichai, Carole; Joannidis, Michael; Soupart, Alain; Zietse, Robert; Haller, Maria; van der Veer, Sabine; van Biesen, Wim; Nagler, Evi; Gonzalez-Espinoza, Liliana; Ortiz, Alberto

    Hyponatremia, defined as a serum sodium concentration <135mmol/l, is the most common water-electrolyte imbalance encountered in clinical practice. It can lead to a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms, from mild to severe or even life threatening, and is associated with increased mortality, morbidity and length of hospital stay. Despite this, the management of hyponatremia patients remains problematic. The prevalence of hyponatremia in a wide variety of conditions and the fact that hyponatremia is managed by clinicians with a broad variety of backgrounds have fostered diverse institution- and specialty-based approaches to diagnosis and treatment. To obtain a common and holistic view, the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM), the European Society of Endocrinology (ESE) and the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA), represented by European Renal Best Practice (ERBP), have developed clinical practice guidelines on the diagnostic approach and treatment of hyponatremia as a joint venture of 3societies representing specialists with a natural interest in hyponatremia. In addition to a rigorous approach to the methodology and evaluation of the evidence, the document focuses on patient-positive outcomes and on providing a useful tool for clinicians involved in everyday practice. In this article, we present an abridged version of the recommendations and suggestions for the diagnosis and treatment of hyponatremia extracted from the full guide. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. A practical method for clinical diagnosis of oral mucosal melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Azañero, Wilson A; Mosqueda Taylor, Adalberto

    2003-01-01

    To present a practical and technically simple method for clinical diagnosis of oral melanomas that allows to differentiate this neoplasm from other pigmented lesions. Thirteen oral pigmented lesions with suspected diagnosis of mucosal melanomas were submitted to a test named "rubbing with a gauze" the surface of the lesion. The test was considered positive when the gauze stained dark brown or black due to the presence of melanin-laden cells on the epithelial surface. In all cases definite diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy. Positive results were obtained in 11 out of 13 cases (84.6%). Our results establish that the test "rubbing with gauze" the surface of oral pigmented lesions demonstrates a high sensitivity to anticipate clinically the diagnosis of mucosal melanomas. However, a negative result does not exclude this neoplasm, since there are some cases in which malignant cells have not invaded the superficial epithelial layers. In every case the final diagnosis must be established by histopathologic or immunohistochemical analysis.

  3. The role of fluorescence diagnosis in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieroń A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aleksander Sieroń,1 Karolina Sieroń-Stołtny,1 Aleksandra Kawczyk-Krupka,1 Wojciech Latos,1 Sebastian Kwiatek,1 Dariusz Straszak,1 Andrzej M Bugaj1,2 1Clinical Department of Internal Diseases, Angiology and Physical Medicine, Center for Laser Diagnostics and Therapy, Silesian Medical University, Bytom, 2College of Health, Beauty Care and Education, Poznan, Poland Abstract: Fluorescence diagnosis is a fast, easy, noninvasive, selective, and sensitive diagnostic tool for estimation of treatment results in oncology. In clinical practice the use of photodynamic diagnosis is focused on five targets: detection for prevention of malignant transformation precancerous changes, detection of neoplasmatic tissue in the early stages for fast removal, prevention of expansion and detection of recurrence of the cancer, monitoring therapy, and the possibility of excluding neoplasmatic disease. In this article, selected applications of fluorescence diagnosis at the Center for Laser Diagnostics and Therapy in Bytom, Poland, for each of these targets are presented. Keywords: autofluorescence, cancer, fluorescence, imaging, photodynamic diagnosis, photodynamic therapy 

  4. Accuracy for optical diagnosis of colorectal polyps in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sola-Vera

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Optical diagnostic involves predicting polyp histopathology from its endoscopic characteristics. It is only recommended for diminutive polyps (≤ 5 mm and for predictions made with high confidence. Objectives: To evaluate the accuracy of optical imaging in clinical practice and to assess if optical diagnosis is useful for predicting future colonoscopy surveillance intervals without waiting for histopathological analysis. Methods: consecutive > 18 years patients were enrolled in this prospective study. Colonoscopies were performed by five expert endoscopists who previously participated in an ex-vivo training. Colonoscopes CF-H180AL and CF-Q180AL were used together with Exera II (Olympus Medical System, Tokyo, Japan processors. Each polyp was characterized in real time using white light and Narrow Band Imaging. Accuracy of optical diagnosis (S, E, NPV, PPV and correlation between surveillance interval based on optical diagnosis and histopathological analysis were calculated. Results: 311 colon polyps < 10 mm (216 diminutive in 195 patients were analyzed. Accuracy of optical diagnostics for predictions made with high confidence: Diminutive polyps (sensitivity 0.59, specificity 0.92, NPV 0.48; polyps < 10 mm (sensitivity 0.73, specificity 0.88, NPV 0.50. An optical diagnosis based surveillance recommendation was given to 90 patients. Concordance with histopathology based recommendation was 92.2% according to the European guideline and 93.3% according to the ESGE guideline. Conclusions: Optical diagnostics can be used to predict future surveillance intervals immediately after colonoscopy. However, in this study, based on clinical practice, the accuracy of optical imaging is below the recommended standards.

  5. Ischemic colitis:Clinical practice in diagnosis and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Angeliki Theodoropoulou; Ioannis E Koutroubakis

    2008-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is the most common form of ischemic injury of the gastrointestinal tract and can present either as an occlusive or a non-occlusive form.It accounts for 1 in 1000 hospitalizations but its incidence is underestimated because it often has a mild and transient nature.The etiology of ischemic colitis is multifactorial and the clinical presentation variable.The diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical suspicion,radiographic,endoscopic and histological findings.Therapy and outcome depends on the severity of the disease.Most cases of the non-gangrenous form are transient and resolve spontaneously without complications.On the other hand,high morbidity and mortality and urgent operative intervention are the hallmarks of gangrenous ischemic colitis.

  6. Methods for diagnosis of bile acid malabsorption in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayvargiya, Priya; Camilleri, Michael; Shin, Andrea; Saenger, Amy

    2013-10-01

    Altered concentrations of bile acid (BA) in the colon can cause diarrhea or constipation. More than 25% of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea or chronic diarrhea in Western countries have BA malabsorption (BAM). As BAM is increasingly recognized, proper diagnostic methods are needed to help direct the most effective course of treatment for the chronic bowel dysfunction. We review the methodologies, advantages, and disadvantages of tools that directly measure BAM: the (14)C-glycocholate breath and stool test, the (75)selenium homotaurocholic acid test (SeHCAT), and measurements of 7 α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and fecal BAs. The (14)C-glycocholate test is laborious and no longer widely used. The (75)SeHCAT has been validated but is not available in the United States. Measurement of serum C4 is a simple and accurate method that can be used for most patients but requires further clinical validation. Assays to quantify fecal BA (total and individual levels) are technically cumbersome and not widely available. Regrettably, none of these tests are routinely available in the United States; assessment of the therapeutic effects of a BA binder is used as a surrogate for diagnosis of BAM. Recent data indicate the advantages to studying fecal excretion of individual BAs and their role in BAM; these could support the use of the fecal BA assay, compared with other tests. Measurement of fecal BA levels could become a routine addition to the measurement of fecal fat in patients with unexplained diarrhea. Availability ultimately determines whether the C4, SeHCAT, or fecal BA test is used; more widespread availability of such tests would enhance clinical management of these patients.

  7. Common recurrent microduplication syndromes: diagnosis and management in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Jonathan S; Potocki, Lorraine; Bacino, Carlos A

    2010-05-01

    Details on the phenotypic consequences of genomic microdeletions and microduplications are rapidly emerging in the wake of increased utilization of high-resolution methods for the detection of genomic copy number variants (CNVs). Due to their recent discovery, the complete phenotypic characterization of these syndromes is still in progress. For practicing clinicians, this unprecedented molecular diagnostic capability has in many cases outpaced our ability to convey conclusive information regarding these conditions to patients and family members. In particular, genomic microduplication syndromes are frequently associated with variable phenotypes and incomplete penetrance, leading to difficulty in counseling regarding the potential future consequences of a given microduplication. In this review, we have attempted to provide an initial set of recommendations for the management of patients with recurrent microduplication syndromes. We summarize the clinical information for microduplications of 14 different genomic regions and provide a framework for clinical evaluation and anticipatory guidance in these conditions. It is our expectation that these preliminary guidelines will be revised further for each microduplication syndrome as more information becomes available.

  8. Clinical practice. Diagnosis and treatment of cow's milk allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneepkens, C. M. Frank; Meijer, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Cow's milk allergy (CMA) is thought to affect 2-3% of infants. The signs and symptoms are nonspecific and may be difficult to objectify, and as the diagnosis requires cow's milk elimination followed by challenge, often, children are considered cow's milk allergic without proven diagnosi

  9. Clinical practice: the diagnosis of imported malaria in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltha, Jessica; Jacobs, Jan

    2011-07-01

    The present paper reviews the diagnosis of imported malaria in children. Malaria is caused by a parasite called Plasmodium and occurs in over 100 countries worldwide. Children account for 10-15% of all patients with imported malaria and are at risk to develop severe and life-threatening complications especially when infected with Plasmodium falciparum. Case-fatality ratios vary between 0.2% and 0.4%. Children visiting friends and relatives in malaria endemic areas and immigrants and refugees account for the vast majority of cases. Symptoms are non-specific and delayed infections (more than 3 months after return from an endemic country) may occur. Microscopic analysis of the thick blood film is the cornerstone of laboratory diagnosis. For pragmatic reasons, EDTA-anticoagulated blood is accepted, provided that slides are prepared within 1 h after collection. Information about the Plasmodium species (in particular P. falciparum versus the non-falciparum species) and the parasite density is essential for patient management. Molecular methods in reference settings are an adjunct for species differentiation. Signals generated by automated hematology analyzers may trigger the diagnosis of malaria in non-suspected cases. Malaria rapid diagnostic tests are reliable in the diagnosis of P. falciparum but not for the detection of the non-falciparum species. They do not provide information about parasite density and should be used as an adjunct (and not a substitute) to microscopy. In case of persistent suspicion and negative microscopy results, repeat testing every 8-12 h for at least three consecutive samplings is recommended. A high index of suspicion and a close interaction with the laboratory may assure timely diagnosis of imported malaria.

  10. Incorporating diagnosis and treatment of hyperhidrosis into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariser, David M

    2014-10-01

    Proper billing and coding are essential to document the diagnosis of hyperhidrosis and to assure proper reimbursement for treatment. Providers should become familiar with the payment policies of local health plans to streamline the preauthorization process that is often needed for many treatments commonly used for hyperhidrosis. Having a preprinted letter of medical necessity and patient intake forms that record the necessary historical information about the disease, previous treatments, and other pertinent information will help increase the speed of the office flow. This article presents algorithms for treatment of the various forms of primary focal hyperhidrosis.

  11. [Clinical practice guideline. Diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canalizo-Miranda, Elvia; Favela-Pérez, Eddie Alberto; Salas-Anaya, Javier Alejandro; Gómez-Díaz, Rita; Jara-Espino, Ricardo; Del Pilar Torres-Arreola, Laura; Viniegra-Osorio, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases are a public health problem in México. Coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus are the first and second cause of death in the country, followed by thrombotic cerebrovascular events. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death; one primary risk factor is hypercholesterolemia. The detection and treatment of lipid abnormalities is the key to the prevention and management of chronic non-communicable diseases. Two nationally representative surveys have shown that lipid abnormalities are the most common risk factors in Mexican adults. The purpose of this guide is to provide a basis for identifying dyslipidemia in a timely manner, and to systematize the criteria for diagnosis and treatment in the first and second level of care.

  12. Clinical practice guideline for diagnosis and management of urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Tuchinda, Papapit; Chularojanamontri, Leena; Chanyachailert, Pattriya; Korkij, Wiwat; Chunharas, Amornsri; Wananukul, Siriwan; Limpongsanurak, Wanida; Benjaponpitak, Suwat; Wisuthsarewong, Wanee; Aunhachoke, Kobkul; Wessagowit, Vesarat; Chatchatee, Pantipa; Wattanakrai, Penpun; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Noppakun, Nopadon; Vichyanond, Pakit; Suthipinittharm, Puan; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Singalavanija, Srisupalak; Ngamphaiboon, Jarungchit

    2016-09-01

    Urticaria is a common skin condition that can compromise quality of life and may affect individual performance at work or school. Remission is common in majority of patients with acute spontaneous urticaria (ASU); however, in chronic cases, less than 50% had remission. Angioedema either alone or with urticaria is associated with a much lower remission rate. Proper investigation and treatment is thus required. This guideline, a joint development of the Dermatological Society of Thailand, the Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Association of Thailand and the Pediatric Dermatological Society of Thailand, is graded and recommended based on published evidence and expert opinion. With simple algorithms, it is aimed to help guiding both adult and pediatric physicians to better managing patients who have urticaria with/without angioedema. Like other recent guideline, urticaria is classified into spontaneous versus inducible types. Patients present with angioedema or angioedema alone, drug association should be excluded, acetyl esterase inhibitors (ACEIs) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in particular. Routine laboratory investigation is not cost-effective in chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU), unless patients have clinical suggesting autoimmune diseases. Non-sedating H1-antihistamine is the first-line treatment for 2-4 weeks; if urticaria was not controlled, increasing the dose up to 4 times is recommended. Sedating first-generation antihistamines have not been proven more advantage than non-sedating antihistamines. The only strong evidence-based alternative regimen for CSU is an anti-IgE: omalizumab; due to very high cost it however might not be accessible in low-middle income countries. Non-pharmacotherapeutic means to minimize hyper-responsive skin are also important and recommended, such as prevention skin from drying, avoidance of hot shower, scrubbing, and excessive sun exposure.

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of nonorganic enuresis in children: Clinical practice guideline

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Guillermo Meave-Cueva; Rosalía Garza-Elizondo; Luisa Díaz-García

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bedwetting is an involuntary urination during sleep at the age of 5 years or older. Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) have been developed to improve decision-making strategies and standardize medical practice. The Ministry of health in Mexico developed the CPG diagnosis and treatment of non-organic enuresis at the first level of prevention in children. Its evidence is evaluated with the USPSTF (United States Preventive Services Task Force). Material and methods: Original articles...

  14. The trends of relevance about telling lung cancer diagnosis: social constraints, medical practice in several clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doruk, Sibel; Sevinç, Can; Sever, Fidan; Itil, Oya; Akkoçlu, Atila

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the opinions of relatives about telling the lung cancer diagnosis to the patient and evaluate the implementation in our hospital. A survey questionnaire was designed, and applied on nurses and physicians working in oncology care units, 4th-6th grade medical students, and relatives of cancer and non-cancer patients. Totally 347 (228 males, 119 females) participants (64 physicians, 100 nurses, 61 medical students, and 122 relatives of patients) with a mean age of 28 were enrolled in the study. 62.5% of doctors, 53.2% of nurses, 59.5% of medical students and 45.9% of relatives of lung cancer patients thought that the patient should be informed about his/her cancer diagnosis. 29.5% of the physicians told their patients about their diagnosis of cancer. Gender, age, abroad experience, academic career, speciality, and period of professional experience were not determined to have any impact on physician's opinion and clinical practices. It was determined that physicians care more about patients' right to be informed than other participating groups. Generally, although physicians agree that the diagnosis of cancer should be told to the patient, their routine clinical practices do not reflect this viewpoint.

  15. [Clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of pituitary apoplexy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Almudena; Lecumberri, Beatriz; Gálvez, María Ángeles

    2013-12-01

    Classic pituitary apoplexy (PA) is an acute, life-threatening clinical syndrome caused by acute hemorrhage and/or infarction of the pituitary gland. PA is considered a neuroendocrinological emergency. However, there is no consensus about the best options for PA diagnosis and management. To develop a clinical practice guideline with a number of recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of patients with PA based on the medical evidence available, in order to help clinicians involved in their care. The clinical guideline for diagnosis and treatment of pituitary apoplexy issued in 2006 by the Neuroendocrinology Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition (SEEN) and the British Clinical Practice Guideline published in 2011 were taken as the basis. The text has been adapted to the format used in most international medical journals. For this, after updated medical literature, the quality of evidence and the strength of the recommendations were evaluated using the system proposed by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR). Diagnosis of pituitary apoplexy should be considered in all patients with acute severe headache with or without neuro-ophthalmic signs. Patients with PA must undergo a complete history and physical examination. All patients with suspected pituitary apoplexy should have urgent blood samples drawn to test electrolytes, renal function, liver function, coagulation screen, complete blood count, and basal levels of pituitary and peripheral hormones, and to rule out adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency. Formal visual field assessment should be performed when the patient is clinically stable. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging test of choice to confirm diagnosis. Indications for empirical urgent corticosteroid therapy in patients with PA include hemodynamic instability, impaired consciousness, reduced visual acuity, and severe visual field defects. In patients with these severe neuro-ophthalmic signs

  16. Elevated serum creatine kinase levels in psychiatric practice: differential diagnosis and clinical significance: A brief, practical guideline for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voros, Viktor; Osvath, Peter; Fekete, Sandor; Tenyi, Tamas

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Elevated serum CK levels often occur in psychiatric in-patient practice. Although the majority of cases are benign and temporary, it is important to recognize and treat these conditions. Aims. To discuss the etiology, the clinical significance and the management of elevated creatine kinase levels in psychiatric in-patient practice, focusing on antipsychotic-induced rhabdomyolysis. To compare the pathogenesis and the clinical features of rhabdomyolysis and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Methods. Review of the literature. Results. A brief, practical guideline is introduced, which may help clinicians in the differential diagnosis and in the management of patients with elevated creatine kinase activity in emergent psychiatric practice. Conclusions. The most common etiologic factors (prescription drugs, alcohol, physical reasons, cardiac etiology) and clinical syndromes (rhabdomyolysis, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, acute coronary syndrome) should be considered, when elevated creatine kinase levels are encountered in psychiatric in-patients. Routine creatine kinase measurements in asymptomatic patients on antipsychotic medications are not recommended, but patients should be carefully followed for the development of rhabdomyolysis, when muscular symptoms arise. Careful monitoring of symptoms and potential complications is critical in order to avoid devastating clinical consequences. Cautiously challenging patients with another antipsychotic after an antipsychotic-induced rhabdomyolysis is recommended to decrease the possibility of recurrence.

  17. Scandinavian Clinical Practice Guidelines on the diagnosis, management and follow-up of anaphylaxis during anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroigaard, M; Garvey, L H; Gillberg, L

    2007-01-01

    advice concerning follow-up procedures is provided. In addition, an algorithm is included with advice on how to manage patients with previous suspected anaphylaxis during anaesthesia. Lastly, Appendix 2 provides an overview of the incidence, mechanisms and possibilities for follow-up for some common drug......The present approach to the diagnosis, management and follow-up of anaphylaxis during anaesthesia varies in the Scandinavian countries. The main purpose of these Scandinavian Clinical Practice Guidelines is to increase the awareness about anaphylaxis during anaesthesia amongst anaesthesiologists....... It is hoped that increased focus on the subject will lead to prompt diagnosis, rapid and correct treatment, and standardised management of patients with anaphylactic reactions during anaesthesia across Scandinavia. The recommendations are based on the best available evidence in the literature, which, owing...

  18. Introducing a Clinical Practice Guideline Using Early CT in the Diagnosis of Scaphoid and Other Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pincus, Steven

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We developed and implemented clinical practice guideline (CPG using computerized tomography (CT as the initial imaging method in the emergency department management of scaphoid fractures. We hypothesized that this CPG would decrease unnecessary immobilization and lead to earlier return to work.Methods: This observational study evaluated implementation of our CPG, which incorporated early wrist CT in patients with “clinical scaphoid fracture”: a mechanism of injury consistent with scaphoid fracture, anatomical snuff box tenderness, and normal initial plain x-rays. Outcome measures were the final diagnosis as determined by orthopaedic review of the clinical and imaging data. Patient outcomes included time to return to work and patient satisfaction as determined by telephone interview at ten days.Results: Eighty patients completed the study protocol in a regional emergency department.In this patient population CT detected 28 fractures in 25 patients, including six scaphoid fractures, five triquetral fractures, four radius fractures, and 13 other related fractures. Fifty-three patients had normal CT. Eight of these patients had significant ongoing pain at follow up and had an MRI, with only two bone bruises identified. The patients with normal CTs avoided prolonged immobilization (mean time in plaster 2.7 days and had no or minimal time off work (mean 1.6 days. Patient satisfaction was an average 4.2/5.Conclusion: This CPG resulted in rapid and accurate management of patients with suspected occult scaphoid injury, minimized unnecessary immobilization and was acceptable to patients.[WestJEM. 2009;10(4:227-232.

  19. Multiple sclerosis, from referral to confirmed diagnosis: an audit of clinical practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, S B

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines recommend a timeline of 6 weeks from referral to neurology consultation and then 6 weeks to a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVES: We audited the clinical management of all new outpatient referrals diagnosed with MS between January 2007 and May 2010. METHODS: We analysed the timelines from referral to first clinic visit, to MRI studies and lumbar puncture (LP) (if performed) and the overall interval from first visit to the time the diagnosis was given to the patient. RESULTS: Of the 119 diagnoses of MS\\/Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS), 93 (78%) were seen within 6 weeks of referral. MRI was performed before first visit in 61% and within 6 weeks in a further 27%. A lumbar puncture (LP) was performed in 83% of all patients and was done within 6 weeks in 78%. In total, 63 (53%) patients received their final diagnosis within 6 weeks of their first clinic visit, with 57 (48%) patients having their diagnosis delayed. The main rate-limiting steps were the availability of imaging and LP, and administrative issues. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that, even with careful scheduling, it is difficult for a specialist service to obtain MRI scans and LP results so as to fulfil NICE guidelines within the optimal six-week period. An improved service would require MRI scans to be arranged before the first clinic visit in all patients with suspected MS.

  20. Reconsideration of the diagnosis and treatment of childhood migraine: A practical review of clinical experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Yamanaka, Gaku; Shimomura, Hideki; Shiraishi, Kazuhiro; Nakazawa, Tomoyuki; Kato, Fumihide; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Sasaki, Masayuki; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2017-05-01

    To provide insight into the wide spectrum of migraine during childhood to establish practical and comprehensive treatment strategies. Although recent studies have confirmed the effect of anti-migraine agents in childhood headaches fulfilling the criteria of migraine without aura, there have been no studies regarding the efficacy of these drugs in childhood migraine without aura not filling the diagnostic criteria. In total, 154 patients with a clinical diagnosis of migraine, with onset of repetitive headaches at the age of ⩽15years, were retrospectively included from clinics in seven tertiary medical centers. Patients' diagnoses included migraine with aura (n=49), migraine without aura (n=65), clinical migraine without aura not fulfilling International Classification of Headache Disorders-3 beta criteria (suspected migraine without aura; n=38), and hemiplegic migraine (n=2). Abortive medicine was effective in 74 of 97 patients, and preventive medicine was effective in 61 of 84 patients. Drugs with high efficacy were acetaminophen and ibuprofen for abortive therapy and cyproheptadine, amitriptyline, and propranolol for preventive therapy. Psychosocial problems were less common, and abnormalities on electroencephalography were more common in the suspected migraine without aura group. Otherwise, clinical features and drug responsibility were comparable among the migraine with aura, migraine without aura, and suspected migraine without aura groups. Retrospectively, experts clinically diagnosed childhood migraine without aura when the headache met at least one of the three criteria B, C, and D in International Classification of Headache Disorders-3 beta in addition to A and E. Abortive and preventive medication including paroxetine (n=2) benefited 10 and 15 of the 33 patients with daily headache, respectively. Psychotherapy/counseling (n=4), treatment for orthostatic dysregulation (n=4), and elimination of stressors (n=3) markedly alleviated headache in this group

  1. Is diagnosis enough to guide interventions in mental health? Using case formulation in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macneil Craig A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While diagnosis has traditionally been viewed as an essential concept in medicine, particularly when selecting treatments, we suggest that the use of diagnosis alone may be limited, particularly within mental health. The concept of clinical case formulation advocates for collaboratively working with patients to identify idiosyncratic aspects of their presentation and select interventions on this basis. Identifying individualized contributing factors, and how these could influence the person's presentation, in addition to attending to personal strengths, may allow the clinician a deeper understanding of a patient, result in a more personalized treatment approach, and potentially provide a better clinical outcome.

  2. A systematic review of recent clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis, assessment and management of hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna A Al-Ansary

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs, optimal hypertension control is not achieved in many parts of the world; one of the challenges is the volume of guidelines on this topic and their variable quality. To systematically review the quality, methodology, and consistency of recommendations of recently-developed national CPGs on the diagnosis, assessment and the management of hypertension. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, guidelines' websites and Google were searched for CPGs written in English on the general management of hypertension in any clinical setting published between January 2006 and September 2011. Four raters independently appraised each CPG using the AGREE-II instrument and 2 reviewers independently extracted the data. Conflicts were resolved by discussion or the involvement of an additional reviewer. Eleven CPGs were identified. The overall quality ranged from 2.5 to 6 out of 7 on the AGREE-II tool. The highest scores were for "clarity of presentation" (44.4%-88.9% and the lowest were for "rigour of development" (8.3%-30% for 9 CGPs. None of them clearly reported being newly developed or adapted. Only one reported having a patient representative in its development team. Systematic reviews were not consistently used and only 2 up-to-date Cochrane reviews were cited. Two CPGs graded some recommendations and related that to levels (but not quality of evidence. The CPGs' recommendations on assessment and non-pharmacological management were fairly consistent. Guidelines varied in the selection of first-line treatment, adjustment of therapy and drug combinations. Important specific aspects of care (e.g. resistant hypertension were ignored by 6/11 CPGs. The CPGs varied in methodological quality, suggesting that their implementation might not result in less variation of care or in better health-related outcomes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: More efforts are needed to promote the realistic

  3. Clinical diagnosis of influenza virus infection : evaluation of diagnostic tools in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elden, LJR; van Essen, GA; Boucher, CAB; van Loon, AM; Nijhuis, M; Schipper, P; Verheij, TJM; Hoepelman, IM

    2001-01-01

    Background: With the development of new antiviral agents for influenza, the urge for rapid and reliable diagnosis of influenza becomes increasingly important. Respiratory virus infections are difficult to distinguish on clinical grounds General practitioners (GPs) however still depend on their clini

  4. Accuracy in Diagnosis of Celiac Disease Without Biopsies in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkstetter, Katharina Julia; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma Rita; Popp, Alina; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Salemme, Marianna; Heilig, Gabriele; Lillevang, Søren Thue; Mearin, Maria Luisa; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Thomas, Adrian; Troncone, Riccardo; Filipiak, Birgit; Mäki, Markku; Gyimesi, Judit; Najafi, Mehri; Dolinšek, Jernej; Dydensborg Sander, Stine; Auricchio, Renata; Papadopoulou, Alexandra; Vécsei, Andreas; Szitanyi, Peter; Donat, Ester; Nenna, Rafaella; Alliet, Philippe; Penagini, Francesca; Garnier-Lengliné, Hélène; Castillejo, Gemma; Kurppa, Kalle; Shamir, Raanan; Hauer, Almuthe Christine; Smets, Françoise; Corujeira, Susana; van Winckel, Myriam; Buderus, Stefan; Chong, Sonny; Husby, Steffen; Koletzko, Sibylle

    2017-10-01

    The guidelines of the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition allow for diagnosis of celiac disease without biopsies in children with symptoms and levels of immunoglobulin A against tissue-transglutaminase (TGA-IgA) 10-fold or more the upper limit of normal (ULN), confirmed by detection of endomysium antibodies (EMA) and positivity for HLA-DQ2/DQ8. We performed a large, international prospective study to validate this approach. We collected data from consecutive pediatric patients (18 years or younger) on a gluten-containing diet who tested positive for TGA-IgA from November 2011 through May 2014, seen at 33 pediatric gastroenterology units in 21 countries. Local centers recorded symptoms; measurements of total IgA, TGA, and EMA; and histopathology findings from duodenal biopsies. Children were considered to have malabsorption if they had chronic diarrhea, weight loss (or insufficient gain), growth failure, or anemia. We directly compared central findings from 16 antibody tests (8 for TGA-IgA, 1 for TGA-IgG, 6 for IgG against deamidated gliadin peptides, and 1 for EMA, from 5 different manufacturers), 2 HLA-DQ2/DQ8 tests from 2 manufacturers, and histopathology findings from the reference pathologist. Final diagnoses were based on local and central results. If all local and central results were concordant for celiac disease, cases were classified as proven celiac disease. Patients with only a low level of TGA-IgA (threefold or less the ULN) but no other results indicating celiac disease were classified as no celiac disease. Central histo-morphometry analyses were performed on all other biopsies and cases were carefully reviewed in a blinded manner. Inconclusive cases were regarded as not having celiac disease for calculation of diagnostic accuracy. The primary aim was to determine whether the nonbiopsy approach identifies children with celiac disease with a positive predictive value (PPV) above 99% in clinical practice. Secondary

  5. Lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: current methods and interpretation criteria in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarlovnik, Ajda; Hrastnik, Damjana; Fettich, Jure; Grmek, Marko

    2014-06-01

    In current clinical practice lung scintigraphy is mainly used to exclude pulmonary embolism (PE). Modified diagnostic criteria for planar lung scintigraphy are considered, as newer scitigraphic methods, especially single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are becoming more popular. Data of 98 outpatients who underwent planar ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy and 49 outpatients who underwent V/Q SPECT from the emergency department (ED) were retrospectively collected. Planar V/Q images were interpreted according to 0.5 segment mismatch criteria and revised PIOPED II criteria and perfusion scans according to PISA-PED criteria. V/Q SPECT images were interpreted according to the criteria suggested in EANM guidelines. Final diagnosis of PE was based on the clinical decision of an attending physician and evaluation of a 12 months follow-up period. Using 0.5 segment mismatch criteria and revised PIOPED II, planar V/Q scans were diagnostic in 93% and 84% of cases, respectively. Among the diagnostic planar scans readings specificity for 0.5 segment mismatch criteria was 98%, and 99% for revised PIOPED II criteria. V/Q SPECT showed a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98%, without any non-diagnostic cases. In patients with low pretest probability for PE, planar V/Q scans assessed by 0.5 segment mismatch criteria were diagnostic in 92%, and in 85% using revised PIOPED II criteria, while perfusion scintigraphy without ventilation scans was diagnostic in 80%. Lung scintigraphy yielded diagnostically definitive results and is reliable in ruling out PE in patients from ED. V/Q SPECT has excellent specificity and sensitivity without any non-diagnostic results. Percentage of non-diagnostic results in planar lung scintigraphy is considerably smaller when 0.5 segment mismatch criteria instead of revised PIOPED II criteria are used. Diagnostic value of perfusion scintigraphy according to PISA-PED criteria is inferior to combined V/Q scintigraphy; the difference is

  6. Significance of Plain Radiography of the Pelvis for the Diagnosis of Ankylosing Spondylitis in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.V. Smirnov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis is based on characteristic clinical picture of the disease and mandatory identification of sacroiliitis on pelvis X-ray. However, case reports of the radiographic stages of sacroiliac joint disorder available in literature are less informative and often lead to misinterpretation of radiographic changes. Based on many years of experience, the authors present the extended explanations of standard radiographic stages of sacroiliitis and other radiological signs that can facilitate diagnostic search in ankylosing spondylitis.

  7. [Clinical practice guideline for diagnosis and treatment of chronic hepatitis virus hepatitis B. Grupo Colaborativo en Hepatitis B].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This guide sets out the technical criteria for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic hepatitis secondary to viral hepatitis B. The guide intend to reduce the morbidity and mortality of this disease. The Guide give practical definitions to help understand the terminology, describe epidemiology, risk factors, and clinical aspects and the diagnosis of chronic hepatitis B. Finally the guide give recommendations for the management including special circumstances such as patients with cirrhosis, patients coinfected with HIV or coinfected with hepatitis C. The recommendations of the guide become the national guide for the management of chronic hepatitis B

  8. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association medical guidelines for clinical practice for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharib, H; Papini, E; Paschke, R;

    2010-01-01

    American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association medical guidelines for clinical practice for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules are systematically developed statements to assist health care professionals in medical...... decision making for specific clinical conditions. Most of the content herein is based on literature reviews. In areas of uncertainty, professional judgment was applied. These guidelines are a working document that reflects the state of the field at the time of publication. Because rapid changes...

  9. Prognostic characteristics of asthma diagnosis in early childhood in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever-Hess, J; Kouwenberg, JM; Duiverman, EJ; Hermans, J; Wever, AMJ

    A registration study from clinical practice was set up to assess the prognostic value of symptoms and laboratory data at first visit for doctor-diagnosed 'asthma' in early childhood. A total of 419 children aged 0-4 y, who were newly referred to the outpatient department of the Juliana Children's

  10. Prognostic characteristics of asthma diagnosis in early childhood in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever-Hess, J; Kouwenberg, JM; Duiverman, EJ; Hermans, J; Wever, AMJ

    1999-01-01

    A registration study from clinical practice was set up to assess the prognostic value of symptoms and laboratory data at first visit for doctor-diagnosed 'asthma' in early childhood. A total of 419 children aged 0-4 y, who were newly referred to the outpatient department of the Juliana Children's Ho

  11. A Diagnostic Model for Dementia in Clinical Practice-Case Methodology Assisting Dementia Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londos, Elisabet

    2015-04-02

    Dementia diagnosis is important for many different reasons. Firstly, to separate dementia, or major neurocognitive disorder, from MCI (mild cognitive impairment), mild neurocognitive disorder. Secondly, to define the specific underlying brain disorder to aid treatment, prognosis and decisions regarding care needs and assistance. The diagnostic method of dementias is a puzzle of different data pieces to be fitted together in the best possible way to reach a clinical diagnosis. Using a modified case methodology concept, risk factors affecting cognitive reserve and symptoms constituting the basis of the brain damage hypothesis, can be visualized, balanced and reflected against test results as well as structural and biochemical markers. The model's origin is the case method initially described in Harvard business school, here modified to serve dementia diagnostics.

  12. Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of acute otitis media (AOM) in children in Japan - 2013 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Ken; Iino, Yukiko; Kamide, Yosuke; Kudo, Fumiyo; Nakayama, Takeo; Suzuki, Kenji; Taiji, Hidenobu; Takahashi, Haruo; Yamanaka, Noboru; Uno, Yoshifumi

    2015-04-01

    To (1) indicate methods of diagnosis and testing for childhood (otitis media (AOM) and (2) recommend methods of treatment in accordance with the evidence-based consensus reached by the Subcommittee of Clinical Practice Guideline for Diagnosis and Management of AOM in Children (Subcommittee of Clinical Practice Guideline), in light of the causative bacteria and their drug sensitivity of AOM in Japan. We investigated the most recently detected bacteria causing childhood AOM in Japan as well as antibacterial sensitivity and the worldwide distinct progress of vaccination, produced Clinical Questions concerning the diagnosis, testing methods, and treatment of AOM, searched literature published during 2000-2004, and issued the 2006 Guidelines. In the 2009 and 2013 Guidelines, we performed the same investigation with the addition of literature, which were not included in the 2006 Guidelines and published during 2005-2008 and during 2009-2012, respectively. We categorized AOM as mild, moderate, or severe on the basis of tympanic membrane findings and clinical symptoms, and presented recommended treatment for each degree of severity. Accurate assessment of tympanic membrane findings is important for judging the degree of severity and selecting a method of treatment. Some of new antimicrobial agents and pneumococcal vaccination are recommended as new treatment options. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Saudi clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis of the first deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Al-Hameed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT may be challenging due to the inaccuracy of clinical assessment and diversity of diagnostic tests. On one hand, missed diagnosis may result in life-threatening conditions. On the other hand, unnecessary treatment may lead to serious complications. As a result of an initiative of the Ministry of Health of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA, an expert panel led by the Saudi Association for Venous Thrombo-Embolism (SAVTE; a subsidiary of the Saudi Thoracic Society with the methodological support of the McMaster University Working Group, produced this clinical practice guideline to assist healthcare providers in evidence-based clinical decision-making for the diagnosis of a suspected first DVT of the lower extremity. Twenty-four questions were identified and corresponding recommendations were made following the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE approach. These recommendations included assessing the clinical probability of DVT using Wells criteria before requesting any test and undergoing a sequential diagnostic evaluation, mainly using highly sensitive D-dimer by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and compression ultrasound. Although venography is the reference standard test for the diagnosis of DVT, its use was not recommended.

  14. Lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: current methods and interpretation criteria in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Skarlovnik, Ajda; Hrastnik, Damjana; Fettich, Jure; Grmek, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Background In current clinical practice lung scintigraphy is mainly used to exclude pulmonary embolism (PE). Modified diagnostic criteria for planar lung scintigraphy are considered, as newer scitigraphic methods, especially single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are becoming more popular. Patients and methods. Data of 98 outpatients who underwent planar ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy and 49 outpatients who underwent V/Q SPECT from the emergency department (ED) were retr...

  15. Prospective Evaluation of a Clinical Practice Guideline for Diagnosis of Appendicitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillanes, Genevieve; Simms, Sonia; Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Diament, Michael; Putnam, Brant; Renslo, Richard; Lee, Jumie; Tinger, Elga; Lewis, Roger J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective was to assess the performance of a clinical practice guideline for evaluation of possible appendicitis in children. The guideline incorporated risk stratification, staged imaging, and early surgical involvement in high-risk cases. Methods The authors prospectively evaluated the clinical guideline in one pediatric emergency department (ED) in a general teaching hospital. Patients were risk-stratified based on history, physical examination findings, and laboratory results. Imaging was ordered selectively based on risk category, with ultrasound (US) as the initial imaging modality. Computed tomography (CT) was ordered if the US was negative or indeterminate. Surgery was consulted before imaging in high-risk patients. Results A total of 475 patients were enrolled. Of those, 193 (41%) had appendicitis. No low-risk patient had appendicitis. Medium-risk patients had a 19% rate of appendicitis, and 83% of high-risk patients had appendicitis. Factors associated with an increased likelihood of appendicitis included decreased bowel sounds; rebound tenderness; and presence of psoas, obturator, or Rovsing’s signs. Of the 475 patients, 276 (58%) were managed without a CT scan. Seventy-one of the 193 (37%) patients with appendicitis went to the operating room without any imaging. The rate of missed appendicitis was 2%, and the rate of negative appendectomy was 1%. Conclusions The clinical practice guideline performed well in a general teaching hospital. Rates of negative appendectomy and missed appendicitis were low and 58% of patients were managed without a CT scan. PMID:22849662

  16. Diagnosis and Treatment of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legro, Richard S.; Arslanian, Silva A.; Ehrmann, David A.; Hoeger, Kathleen M.; Murad, M. Hassan; Pasquali, Renato; Welt, Corrine K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to formulate practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Participants: An Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer developed the guideline. Evidence: This evidence-based guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to describe both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Consensus Process: One group meeting, several conference calls, and e-mail communications enabled consensus. Committees and members of The Endocrine Society and the European Society of Endocrinology reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines. Two systematic reviews were conducted to summarize supporting evidence. Conclusions: We suggest using the Rotterdam criteria for diagnosing PCOS (presence of two of the following criteria: androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, or polycystic ovaries). Establishing a diagnosis of PCOS is problematic in adolescents and menopausal women. Hyperandrogenism is central to the presentation in adolescents, whereas there is no consistent phenotype in postmenopausal women. Evaluation of women with PCOS should exclude alternate androgen-excess disorders and risk factors for endometrial cancer, mood disorders, obstructive sleep apnea, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Hormonal contraceptives are the first-line management for menstrual abnormalities and hirsutism/acne in PCOS. Clomiphene is currently the first-line therapy for infertility; metformin is beneficial for metabolic/glycemic abnormalities and for improving menstrual irregularities, but it has limited or no benefit in treating hirsutism, acne, or infertility. Hormonal contraceptives and metformin are the treatment options in adolescents with PCOS. The role of weight loss in improving PCOS status per se is uncertain, but lifestyle intervention is beneficial in overweight

  17. Difficult diagnosis of gout: the benefit of dual energy computed tomography, initial experience in routine clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Löckmann

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gout, one of the most common inflammatory arthritides in humans, is still difficult to diagnose in challenging situations, when fluid for arthrocentesis or an apparent tophus are absent and, for example, an infection as differential diagnosis has to be ruled out. Dual energy computed tomography (DECT is an established tool for detection and characterisation of uric acid stones in the urinary tract and has recently been used to detect and display urate deposits. Our first experiences with DECT as a diagnostic tool in routine clinical practice show, that DECT is a promising imaging technique which allows the detection of monosodium urate deposits and benefits the routine diagnosis of tophaceous gout particularly in diffuse soft tissue swelling of the limbs, without the possibility of needle aspiration. However, DECT does not seem suitable to detect dissolved urate crystals, neither in vitro nor in vivo.

  18. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association Medical guidelines for clinical practice for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharib, Hossein; Papini, Enrico; Paschke, Ralf;

    2010-01-01

    American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice for the Diagnosis and Management of Thyroid Nodules are systematically developed statements to assist health care professionals in medical...... decision making for specific clinical conditions. Most of the content herein is based on literature reviews. In areas of uncertainty, professional judgment was applied.These guidelines are a working document that reflects the state of the field at the time of publication. Because rapid changes in this area...

  19. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice for the Diagnosis and Management of thyroid Nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharib, Hossein; Papini, Enrico; Paschke, Ralf;

    2010-01-01

    American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice for the Diagnosis and Management of Thyroid Nodules are systematically developed statements to assist health care professionals in medical...... decision making for specific clinical conditions. Most of the content herein is based on literature reviews. In areas of uncertainty, professional judgment was applied.These guidelines are a working document that reflects the state of the field at the time of publication. Because rapid changes in this area...

  20. Adult-onset hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia in clinical practice: diagnosis, aetiology and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin G Challis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In adults with hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (HH, in particular those with insulinoma, the optimal diagnostic and management strategies remain uncertain. Here, we sought to characterise the biochemical and radiological assessment, and clinical management of adults with HH at a tertiary centre over a thirteen-year period. Design: Clinical, biochemical, radiological and histological data were reviewed from all confirmed cases of adult-onset hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia at our centre between 2003 and 2016. In a subset of patients with stage I insulinoma, whole-exome sequencing of tumour DNA was performed. Results: Twenty-nine patients were identified (27 insulinoma, including 6 subjects with metastatic disease; 1 pro-insulin/GLP-1 co-secreting tumour; 1 activating glucokinase mutation. In all cases, hypoglycaemia (glucose ≤2.2 mmol/L was achieved within 48 h of a supervised fast. At fast termination, subjects with stage IV insulinoma had significantly higher insulin, C-peptide and pro-insulin compared to those with insulinoma staged I–IIIB. Preoperative localisation of insulinoma was most successfully achieved with EUS. In two patients with inoperable, metastatic insulinoma, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT with 177Lu-DOTATATE rapidly restored euglycaemia and lowered fasting insulin. Finally, in a subset of stage I insulinoma, whole-exome sequencing of tumour DNA identified the pathogenic Ying Yang-1 (YY1 somatic mutation (c.C1115G/p.T372R in one tumour, with all tumours exhibiting a low somatic mutation burden. Conclusion: Our study highlights, in particular, the utility of the 48-h fast in the diagnosis of insulinoma, EUS for tumour localisation and the value of PRRT therapy in the treatment of metastatic disease.

  1. Clinical utility of chromosomal microarray analysis in prenatal diagnosis: report of first 6 months in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klugman, Susan; Suskin, Barrie; Spencer, Brianna L; Dar, Pe'er; Bajaj, Komal; Powers, Judith; Reichling, Julie; Wasserman, David; Dolan, Siobhan M; Merkatz, Irwin R

    2014-09-01

    We studied the clinical utility of chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) in prenatal diagnosis in a clinical setting in New York City. Our center began offering CMA to pregnant women undergoing invasive diagnostic procedures for an abnormal structural finding on ultrasound, maternal age of 35 years or older, or elevated risk on aneuploidy screening, beginning March 2012. Our first six months experience is reported. Benign familial variants were the most common finding (16/22 fetuses). Variants of uncertain significance were frequent, especially when fathers were not available for testing (4/22 fetuses). Most patients undertook CMA as part of evaluation of an ultrasound anomaly (52%). One patient terminated a pregnancy based on an ultrasound finding in the setting of a benign familial variant on CMA, and a second terminated a pregnancy based on a copy number variant identified on CMA. For CMA to be maximally useful in prenatal diagnosis, parental DNA samples as well as robust datasets to provide predictive phenotypic information are required. The most common reason for undertaking CMA was to evaluate an ultrasound anomaly, and benign familial variants were a common finding. Genetic services are required to provide pre- and post-test genetic counseling and help families interpret results.

  2. The diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome: an Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline: commentary from a European perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laurence Guignat; Jérôme Bertherat

    2010-01-01

    .... Establishment of evidence-based recommendations is difficult. In 2008, several national and international consensus recommendations for the diagnosis or management of Cushing's syndrome were reported...

  3. A closer look at diagnosis in clinical dental practice: part 5. Emerging technologies for caries detection and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretty, Iain A; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2004-09-01

    Parts 5 and 6 of this series examine innovations in diagnostic and management procedures and assess their potential to become everyday tools of the dental clinician. This paper examines some of the diagnostic tools supporting a philosophical shift in mainstream dental practice from concern with extensively decayed teeth to a focus on detecting incipient demineralized tissues. With the latter approach, the incipient carious process can be reversed by promoting enamel remineralization and thus eliminating the need for restorative intervention. Numerous methods and devices have been developed to detect, diagnose and monitor such lesions, and several have been produced in versions that may appeal to dental practitioners. This paper considers 3 of these methods and devices: the DIAGNODent laser device, quantitative light-induced fluorescence and the Digital Imaging Fiber-Optic Transillumination device. Each technique is illustrated, the research on its effectiveness is assessed to determine usefulness to the practitioner, and the comparative advantages of the 3 adjunct tools are discussed.

  4. Induced Sputum for the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Is It Useful in Clinical Practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S-R Olsen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB is challenging in patients who are unable to spontaneously expectorate. Published evidence suggests that induced sputum (IS is the least invasive and most cost-effective method of diagnosis, and should be used before fibre-optic bronchoscopy (FOB.

  5. The clinical practice of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for children and young people with a diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Kate; Stallard, Paul; Kucia, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Children and young people diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome (AS) have significant social-communication difficulties and impaired empathy and theory of mind skills. These difficulties place them at risk of developing mental health problems, particularly anxiety, depression and obsessive compulsive disorder. Although Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is recognised as an effective intervention for these problems in both child and adult populations, little research has specifically looked at the use of CBT with children and young people with an AS diagnosis. However, limited evidence suggests that CBT, if suitably adapted, is a feasible and potentially helpful treatment option. This paper focuses on the clinical practice of CBT and explores how the underpinning therapeutic relationship can be modified to meet the cognitive needs of this particular group of young clients.

  6. Official American Thoracic Society/Japanese Respiratory Society Clinical Practice Guidelines: Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Francis X; Gupta, Nishant; Finlay, Geraldine R; Young, Lisa R; Taveira-DaSilva, Angelo M; Glasgow, Connie G; Steagall, Wendy K; Johnson, Simon R; Sahn, Steven A; Ryu, Jay H; Strange, Charlie; Seyama, Kuniaki; Sullivan, Eugene J; Kotloff, Robert M; Downey, Gregory P; Chapman, Jeffrey T; Han, MeiLan K; D'Armiento, Jeanine M; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Henske, Elizabeth P; Bissler, John J; Colby, Thomas V; Kinder, Brent W; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; Brown, Kevin K; Cordier, Jean F; Meyer, Cristopher; Cottin, Vincent; Brozek, Jan L; Smith, Karen; Wilson, Kevin C; Moss, Joel

    2016-09-15

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare cystic lung disease that primarily affects women. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of LAM. Systematic reviews were performed to summarize evidence pertinent to our questions. The evidence was summarized and discussed by a multidisciplinary panel. Evidence-based recommendations were then formulated, written, and graded using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. After considering the panel's confidence in the estimated effects, the balance of desirable (i.e., benefits) and undesirable (i.e., harms and burdens) consequences of treatment, patient values and preferences, cost, and feasibility, recommendations were formulated for or against specific interventions. These included recommendations for sirolimus treatment and vascular endothelial growth factor D testing and recommendations against doxycycline and hormonal therapy. Evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with LAM are provided. Frequent reassessment and updating will be needed.

  7. Molecular diagnosis of Huntington disease in Portugal : implications for genetic counselling and clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a eurodegenerative, autosomal dominant disorder of late-onset, caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat in the coding region of the gene. Ours is the reference laboratory for genetic testing in HD, in Portugal, since 1998; 90.1% of all 158 families known were identified for the first time, including patients with unusual presentation or without family history. A total of 338 genetic tests were performed: 234 for diagnosis, 96 for presymptomatic and four for prenat...

  8. A systematic review of clinical practice guidelines and best practice statements for the diagnosis and management of varicocele in children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Matheus; Esteves, Sandro C

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to identify and qualitatively analyze the methods as well as recommendations of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) and Best Practice Statements (BPS) concerning varicocele in the pediatric and adolescent population. An electronic search was performed with the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Direct, and Scielo databases, as well as guidelines’ Web sites until September 2015. Four guidelines were included in the qualitative synthesis. In general, the recommendations provided by the CPG/BPS were consistent despite the existence of some gaps across the studies. The guidelines issued by the American Urological Association (AUA) and American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) did not provide evidence-based levels for the recommendations given. Most of the recommendations given by the European Association of Urology (EAU) and European Society of Pediatric Urology (ESPU) were derived from nonrandomized clinical trials, retrospective studies, and expert opinion. Among all CPG/BPS, only one was specifically designed for the pediatric population. The studied guidelines did not undertake independent cost-effectiveness and risk-benefit analysis. The main objectives of these guidelines were to translate the best evidence into practice and provide a framework of standardized care while maintaining clinical autonomy and physician judgment. However, the limitations identified in the CPG/BPS for the diagnosis and management of varicocele in children and adolescents indicate ample opportunities for research and future incorporation of higher quality standards in patient care. PMID:26680032

  9. Clinical practice guideline for the prevention, early detection, diagnosis, management and follow up of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschner, Pablo M; Muñoz, Oscar Mauricio; Girón, Diana; García, Olga Milena; Fernández-Ávila, Daniel Gerardo; Casas, Luz Ángela; Bohórquez, Luisa Fernanda; Arango T, Clara María; Carvajal, Liliana; Ramírez, Doris Amanda; Sarmiento, Juan Guillermo; Colon, Cristian Alejandro; Correa G, Néstor Fabián; Alarcón R, Pilar; Bustamante S, Álvaro Andrés

    2016-06-30

    In Colombia, diabetes mellitus is a public health program for those responsible for creating and implementing strategies for prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up that are applicable at all care levels, with the objective of establishing early and sustained control of diabetes. A clinical practice guide has been developed following the broad outline of the methodological guide from the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, with the aim of systematically gathering scientific evidence and formulating recommendations using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology. The current document presents in summary form the results of this process, including the recommendations and the considerations taken into account in formulating them. In general terms, what is proposed here is a screening process using the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score questionnaire adapted to the Colombian population, which enables early diagnosis of the illness, and an algorithm for determining initial treatment that can be generalized to most patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and that is simple to apply in a primary care context. In addition, several recommendations have been made to scale up pharmacological treatment in those patients that do not achieve the objectives or fail to maintain them during initial treatment. These recommendations also take into account the evolution of weight and the individualization of glycemic control goals for special populations. Finally, recommendations have been made for opportune detection of micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes.

  10. Clinical practice guideline for the prevention, early detection, diagnosis, management and follow up of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Oscar Mauricio; Girón, Diana; García, Olga Milena; Fernández-Ávila, Daniel Gerardo; Casas, Luz Ángela; Bohórquez, Luisa Fernanda; Arango T, Clara María; Carvajal, Liliana; Ramírez, Doris Amanda; Sarmiento, Juan Guillermo; Colon, Cristian Alejandro; Correa G, Néstor Fabián; Alarcón R, Pilar; Bustamante S, Álvaro Andrés

    2016-01-01

    In Colombia, diabetes mellitus is a public health program for those responsible for creating and implementing strategies for prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up that are applicable at all care levels, with the objective of establishing early and sustained control of diabetes. A clinical practice guide has been developed following the broad outline of the methodological guide from the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, with the aim of systematically gathering scientific evidence and formulating recommendations using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology. The current document presents in summary form the results of this process, including the recommendations and the considerations taken into account in formulating them. In general terms, what is proposed here is a screening process using the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score questionnaire adapted to the Colombian population, which enables early diagnosis of the illness, and an algorithm for determining initial treatment that can be generalized to most patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and that is simple to apply in a primary care context. In addition, several recommendations have been made to scale up pharmacological treatment in those patients that do not achieve the objectives or fail to maintain them during initial treatment. These recommendations also take into account the evolution of weight and the individualization of glycemic control goals for special populations. Finally, recommendations have been made for opportune detection of micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes. PMID:27546934

  11. Accuracy in Diagnosis of Celiac Disease Without Biopsies in Clinical Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werkstetter, K J; Korponay-Szabó, I R; Popp, A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The guidelines of the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition allow for diagnosis of celiac disease without biopsies in children with symptoms and levels of immunoglobulin A against tissue-transglutaminase (TGA-IgA) 10-fold or more the upper...... manufacturers, and histopathology findings from the reference pathologist. Final diagnoses were based on local and central results. If all local and central results were concordant for celiac disease, cases were classified as proven celiac disease. Patients with only a low level of TGA-IgA (3-fold or less below...... the ULN) but no other results indicating celiac disease were classified as no celiac disease. Central histo-morphometry analyses were performed on all other biopsies and cases were carefully reviewed in a blinded manner. Inconclusive cases were regarded as not having celiac disease for calculation...

  12. Clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and management of acute bacterial sinusitis in children aged 1 to 18 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Ellen R; Applegate, Kimberly E; Bordley, Clay; Darrow, David H; Glode, Mary P; Marcy, S Michael; Nelson, Carrie E; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Shaikh, Nader; Smith, Michael J; Williams, Paul V; Weinberg, Stuart T

    2013-07-01

    To update the American Academy of Pediatrics clinical practice guideline regarding the diagnosis and management of acute bacterial sinusitis in children and adolescents. Analysis of the medical literature published since the last version of the guideline (2001). The diagnosis of acute bacterial sinusitis is made when a child with an acute upper respiratory tract infection (URI) presents with (1) persistent illness (nasal discharge [of any quality] or daytime cough or both lasting more than 10 days without improvement), (2) a worsening course (worsening or new onset of nasal discharge, daytime cough, or fever after initial improvement), or (3) severe onset (concurrent fever[temperature ≥39°C/102.2°F] and purulent nasal discharge for at least 3 consecutive days). Clinicians should not obtain imaging studies of any kind to distinguish acute bacterial sinusitis from viral URI, because they do not contribute to the diagnosis; however, a contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of the paranasal sinuses should be obtained whenever a child is suspected of having orbital or central nervous system complications. The clinician should prescribe antibiotic therapy for acute bacterial sinusitis in children with severe onset or worsening course. The clinician should either prescribe antibiotic therapy or offer additional observation for 3 days to children with persistent illness. Amoxicillin with or without clavulanate is the firstline treatment of acute bacterial sinusitis. Clinicians should reassess initial management if there is either a caregiver report of worsening(progression of initial signs/symptoms or appearance of new signs/symptoms) or failure to improve within 72 hours of initial management.If the diagnosis of acute bacterial sinusitis is confirmed in a child with worsening symptoms or failure to improve, then clinicians may change the antibiotic therapy for the child initially managed with antibiotic or initiate antibiotic treatment of the child initially

  13. EULAR recommendations for the use of imaging in the diagnosis and management of spondyloarthritis in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, P; Navarro-Compán, V; Terslev, L; Aegerter, P; van der Heijde, D; D'Agostino, M A; Baraliakos, X; Pedersen, S J; Jurik, A G; Naredo, E; Schueller-Weidekamm, C; Weber, U; Wick, M C; Bakker, P A C; Filippucci, E; Conaghan, P G; Rudwaleit, M; Schett, G; Sieper, J; Tarp, S; Marzo-Ortega, H; Østergaard, M

    2015-07-01

    A taskforce comprised of an expert group of 21 rheumatologists, radiologists and methodologists from 11 countries developed evidence-based recommendations on the use of imaging in the clinical management of both axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA). Twelve key questions on the role of imaging in SpA were generated using a process of discussion and consensus. Imaging modalities included conventional radiography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, dual-emission x-ray absorptiometry and scintigraphy. Experts applied research evidence obtained from systematic literature reviews using MEDLINE and EMBASE to develop a set of 10 recommendations. The strength of recommendations (SOR) was assessed by taskforce members using a visual analogue scale. A total of 7550 references were identified in the search process, from which 158 studies were included in the systematic review. Ten recommendations were produced using research-based evidence and expert opinion encompassing the role of imaging in making a diagnosis of axial SpA or peripheral SpA, monitoring inflammation and damage, predicting outcome, response to treatment, and detecting spinal fractures and osteoporosis. The SOR for each recommendation was generally very high (range 8.9-9.5). These are the first recommendations which encompass the entire spectrum of SpA and evaluate the full role of all commonly used imaging modalities. We aimed to produce recommendations that are practical and valuable in daily practice for rheumatologists, radiologists and general practitioners.

  14. Clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common physical disability in early childhood. The worldwide prevalence of CP is approximately 2–2.5 per 1,000 live births. It has been clinically defined as a group of motor, cognitive, and perceptive impairments secondary to a non-progressive defect or lesion of the developing brain. Children with CP can have swallowing problems with severe drooling as one of the consequences. Malnutrition and recurrent aspiration pneumonia can increase the risk of morbidity ...

  15. [Alzheimer's disease cerebro-spinal fluid biomarkers: A clinical research tool sometimes useful in daily clinical practice of memory clinics for the diagnosis of complex cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnin, E; Dumurgier, J; Bouaziz-Amar, E; Bombois, S; Wallon, D; Gabelle, A; Lehmann, S; Blanc, F; Bousiges, O; Hannequin, D; Jung, B; Miguet-Alfonsi, C; Quillard, M; Pasquier, F; Peoc'h, K; Laplanche, J-L; Hugon, J; Paquet, C

    2017-04-01

    The role of biomarkers in clinical research was recently highlighted in the new criteria for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers (total Tau protein, threonine 181 phosphorylated Tau protein and amyloid Aβ1-42 peptide) are associated with cerebral neuropathological lesions observed in Alzheimer's disease (neuronal death, neurofibrillary tangle with abnormal Tau deposits and amyloid plaque). Aβ1-40 amyloid peptide dosage helps to interpret Aβ1-42 results. As suggested in the latest international criteria and the French HAS (Haute Autorité de santé) recommendations, using theses CSF biomarkers should not be systematic but sometimes could be performed to improve confidence about the diagnostic of Alzheimer's disease in young subjects or in complex clinical situations. Future biomarkers actually in development will additionally help in diagnostic process (differential diagnosis) and in prognostic evaluation of neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. [Dementia: clinic and diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estol, C J

    2001-12-01

    Decline of the cognitive functions necessary for activities of daily living results in a spectrum ranging from benign forgetfulness and minimal cognitive impairment to dementia. The latter is characterized by personality and behavioral changes. Alzheimer's disease is the most frequent cause of dementia affecting almost one of two people older than 80 years. Lewy body and cerebrovascular disease are also frequent causes of cognitive decline. Recent studies have revealed genetic aspects of Alzheimer's disease and the role of certain enzymes in the pathophysiology of fibrillary amyloid deposition. The aim in cognitive disease is an early diagnosis to initiate therapy and adapting measures in the patient's daily routines. The diagnosis is basically clinical with neuroimaging and neuropsychological tests' support. The EEG, SPECT, LP and other studies are only useful in a few specific scenarios. At present, a few promising therapies are being evaluated. Family support is of vital importance.

  17. EULAR-PReS points to consider for the use of imaging in the diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colebatch-Bourn, A N; Edwards, C J; Collado, P

    2015-01-01

    To develop evidence based points to consider the use of imaging in the diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in clinical practice. The task force comprised a group of paediatric rheumatologists, rheumatologists experienced in imaging, radiologists, methodologists and pat...

  18. [Clinical diagnosis of dyslexia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Hermosillo, A; Balderas Gil, A

    1980-01-01

    In 5 years of experience at the Instituto Nacional de la Comunicacion Humana, 302 clinical histories showed the diagnosis of dyslexia. The following parameters were studied: age, sex, heredofamilial history, gestation, psychomotor development, clinical picture, examination of the language (type, reading, spontaneous writing, dictation, mathematic concepts), laterality, scholarship, scholar failures, psychological study. The following results were obtained: Dyslexia was more important or frequent between 5 to 8.9 years of age. Males predominated 3:1. The heredofamilial history was important. Dyslexia prevailed in products of the first gestations. A high disturbance was found in the psychomotor development of a large percent of dyslexic patients. Examination of language was also important. Dyslexia was more frequent in right-handed patients. Scholar failures in one or more instances were found. The psychological study must be done. If dyslexia is diagnosed on time, it may be prevented and all unwanted sequelae may be avoided.

  19. The Impact on Clinical Practice of Endoscopic Ultrasonography Used for the Diagnosis and Staging of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queneau PE

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Endoscopic ultrasonography is considered a highly accurate procedure for diagnosing small pancreatic tumors and assessing their locoregional extension. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of endoscopic ultrasonography on the management of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in clinical practice. PATIENTS: Sixty-four consecutive patients (mean age 70.5 plus/minus 11.9 years hospitalized for staging or diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma were retrospectively (from January 1995 to November 1997 or prospectively studied (from December 1997 to August 1999. SETTING: Group 1 consisted of 52 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma which was discovered using computerized tomography scanning and/or ultrasound. Endoscopic ultrasonography was utilized for staging purposes only in patients who were considered to be operable and the tumor to be resectable based on computerized tomography scanning criteria. Group 2 consisted of 12 patients who were diagnosed as having a pancreatic adenocarcinoma using endoscopic ultrasonography whereas computerized tomography scanning and ultrasound was negative. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The impact of endoscopic ultrasonography was analyzed on the basis of the number of patients requiring endoscopic ultrasonography as a staging procedure (Group 1 and by evaluating the performance of endoscopic ultrasonography in determining resectability (Groups 1 and 2 based on the surgical and anatomopathological results. RESULTS: Endoscopic ultrasonography was performed in 20 out of 64 patients (31.3%: 8/52 in Group 1 (15.4% and all 12 patients of Group 2. Endoscopic ultrasonography correctly assessed an absolute contraindication to resection in 11 cases. Resection was confirmed in 8 of the 9 cases selected by endoscopic ultrasonography. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value and overall accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography for determining resection were 89%, 100%, and 95%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of

  20. Diagnosis of Upper-Quadrant Lymphedema Secondary to Cancer: Clinical Practice Guideline From the Oncology Section of APTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenhagen, Kimberly; Davies, Claire; Perdomo, Marisa; Ryans, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The Oncology Section of APTA developed a clinical practice guideline to aid the clinician in diagnosing secondary upper-quadrant cancer-related lymphedema. Methods: Following a systematic review of published studies and a structured appraisal process, recommendations were written to guide the physical therapist and other health care clinicians in their diagnostic process. Overall, clinical practice recommendations were formulated on the basis of the evidence for each diagnostic method and were assigned a grade based on the strength of the evidence for different patient presentations and clinical utility. Recommendations: In an effort to make these clinically applicable, recommendations were based on the characteristics as to the location and stage of a patient's upper-quadrant lymphedema. PMID:28748128

  1. A Computer-Interpretable Version of the AACE, AME, ETA Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice for the Diagnosis and Management of Thyroid Nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peleg, Mor; Fox, John; Patkar, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    .S. and European users for the purpose of diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules that is based on the "AACE, AME, ETA Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice for the Diagnosis and Management of Thyroid Nodules," a narrative, evidence-based CPG.Methods: We initially employed the guideline-modeling language...... with data that are not necessarily obtained in a rigid flowchart sequence. Tallis-a user-friendly web-based "enactment tool"- was then used as the "execution engine" (computer program). This tool records and displays tasks that are done and prompts users to perform the next indicated steps. The development...

  2. Current concepts in the diagnosis of blood stream infections. Are novel molecular methods useful in clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, Reetta; Syrjänen, Jaana; Vuento, Risto; Aittoniemi, Janne

    2013-11-01

    The decision on the right empirical treatment in bacteremia places particular demands on the clinician. As long as no microbiological diagnosis can be immediately drawn, the clinical diagnosis together with knowledge of local antimicrobial resistance must determine the antimicrobial choice. The use of several amplification, hybridization, and mass spectrometry methods has been studied in patient cohorts in comparison with blood culture-based conventional techniques. However, no clinical outcome trials have been conducted in which the use of these novel methods would guide antimicrobial therapy. Local differences in bacterial antimicrobial resistance cause differences in the regional need for molecular methods for the early detection of resistance mechanisms. The implementation of novel methods in clinical use requires active discussion between laboratory experts and clinicians. Providing rapid susceptibility results using conventional methods can lead to timely changes to appropriate antimicrobial therapy and the costs are lower than with the molecular methods. Gram-stain information in combination with clinical data is an underestimated, underused, rapid, and economical means of assessing the etiology of blood stream infection.

  3. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association medical guidelines for clinical practice for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules: Executive Summary of recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharib, H; Papini, E; Paschke, R;

    2010-01-01

    American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association medical guidelines for clinical practice for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules are systematically developed statements to assist health care professionals in medical...... decision making for specific clinical conditions. Most of the content herein is based on literature reviews. In areas of uncertainty, professional judgment was applied. These guidelines are a working document that reflects the state of the field at the time of publication. Because rapid changes...

  4. The utility of polysomnography for the diagnosis of NREM parasomnias: an observational study over 4 years of clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fois, Chiara; Wright, Mary-Anne S; Sechi, GianPietro; Walker, Matthew C; Eriksson, Sofia H

    2015-02-01

    Polysomnography (PSG) is considered the gold standard for diagnosis of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) parasomnias, however its diagnostic yield has been rarely reported. We aimed to assess the diagnostic value of polysomnography in different categories of patients with suspected NREM parasomnia and define variables that can affect the outcome. 124 adults referred for polysomnography for suspected NREM parasomnia were retrospectively identified and divided into clinical categories based on their history. Each polysomnography was analysed for features of NREM parasomnia or different sleep disorders and for presence of potential precipitants. The impact on the outcome of number of recording nights and concomitant consumption of benzodiazepines and antidepressants was assessed. Overall, PSG confirmed NREM parasomnias in 60.5 % patients and showed a different sleep disorder in another 16 %. Precipitants were found in 21 % of the 124 patients. However, PSG showed limited value when the NREM parasomnia was clinically uncomplicated, since it rarely revealed a different diagnosis or unsuspected precipitants (5 % respectively), but became essential for people with unusual features in the history where different or overlapping diagnoses (18 %) or unsuspected precipitants (24 %) were commonly identified. Taking benzodiazepines or antidepressants during the PSG reduced the diagnostic yield. PSG has a high diagnostic yield in patients with suspected NREM parasomnia, and can reveal a different diagnosis or precipitants in over 40 % of people with complicated or atypical presentation or those with a history of epilepsy. We suggest that PSG should be performed for one night in the first instance, with leg electrodes and respiratory measurements and after benzodiazepine and antidepressant withdrawal.

  5. Impact of implementing electronic clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis, control and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors: A pre-post controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comin, Eva; Catalan-Ramos, Arantxa; Iglesias-Rodal, Manuel; Grau, Maria; Del Val, Jose Luis; Consola, Alicia; Amado, Ester; Pons, Angels; Mata-Cases, Manel; Franzi, Alicia; Ciurana, Ramon; Frigola, Eva; Cos, Xavier; Davins, Josep; Verdu-Rotellar, Jose M

    To evaluate the impact of computerized clinical practice guidelines on the management, diagnosis, treatment, control, and follow-up of the main cardiovascular risk factors: hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pre-post controlled study. Catalonia, autonomous community located in north-eastern Spain. Individuals aged 35-74 years assigned to general practitioners of the Catalan Health Institute. The intervention group consisted of individuals whose general practitioners had accessed the computerized clinical practice guidelines at least twice a day, while the control group consisted of individuals whose general practitioner had never accessed the computerized clinical practice guidelines platform. The Chi-squared test was used to detect significant differences in the follow-up, control, and treatment variables for all three disorders (hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus) between individuals assigned to users and non-users of the computerized clinical practice guidelines, respectively. A total of 189,067 patients were included in this study, with a mean age of 56 years (standard deviation 12), and 55.5% of whom were women. Significant differences were observed in hypertension management, treatment and control; type 2 diabetes mellitus management, treatment and diagnoses, and the management and control of hypercholesterolaemia in both sexes. Computerized clinical practice guidelines are an effective tool for the control and follow-up of patients diagnosed with hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolaemia. The usefulness of computerized clinical practice guidelines to diagnose and adequately treat individuals with these disorders remains unclear. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis on the training effect of criteria and practical guidance for determination of brain death: clinical diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-ying SU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective Clinical diagnosis is the most predominant in the criteria for determination of brain death. This paper aims to analyze the training results of clinical diagnosis for brain death determination and to improve the training program. Methods A total of 461 trainees received theoretical training, simulation skills training, bedside skills training and test analysis. The composition of trainees was analyzed and the error rates of knowledge points were calculated. Univariate and multivariate backward Logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the influence of factors including sex, age, specialty, professional qualification and hospital level, on the error rates. Results Four hundred and sixty-one trainees came from 161 hospitals. Among them, trainees of 30-49 years old occupied 77.87% (359/461, and most of them came from third grade, grade A hospitals (88.29%, 407/461. There were 200 trainees (43.39% from Department of Neurology, 109 trainees (23.64% from Department of Neurosurgery, and 88 trainees (19.09% from Intensive Care Unit. Most of them (66.59%, 307/461 had senior certificate. Total error rate of 13 knowledge points was 5.81% (1054/18 128. The error rate of corneal reflex was the highest (24.64% , 104/422, followed by deep coma (11.59% , 365/3149, oculocephalogyric reflex (9.48%, 40/422, step and time of determination (7.48%, 138/1844, and pupillary light reflex (5.10% , 90/1766. Univariate and multivariate Logistic regression analyses showed that age (OR = 1.558, 95%CI: 1.435-1.693; P = 0.000, specialty (OR = 1.080, 95%CI: 1.021-1.143; P = 0.007 and hospital level (OR = 1.395, 95%CI: 1.174-1.659; P = 0.000 were independent risk factors associated with high error rates. Conclusions The training patterns and methods of clinical diagnosis for brain death determination should be further improved, especially the individual training, to rise the training quality. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.12.006

  7. [Guide to clinical practice for the diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of non-syndromic craniosynostosis on 3 levels of care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Coyotl, Dulce María; Rosas Huerta, Xanath Olivia; Sánchez Vázquez, José Juan; Díaz Sánchez, Margarita Isabel; Rodríguez Peralta, José Salvador; Tetitla Munive, Juan Manuel; Peralta Porras, María de Lourdes; Arellano Cruz, Alejandra Janeth; Sosa García, Jesús Ojino; Fareli González, Christian Javier

    2016-12-26

    Craniosynostosis is a congenital anomaly resulting from the premature fusion of the cranial sutures changing growth patterns of the skull. Focus, scope, target population and clinical questions to be solved were defined. A systematic search for evidence in different databases (Medline, Embase, KoreaMed, Cochrane Library and the website of the World Health Organization) in stages was performed: clinical practice guidelines; systematic reviews, and clinical trials and observational studies; using MeSH, Decs and corresponding free terms, unrestricted language or temporality. Risk of bias was evaluated using appropriate tools (AMSTAR, Risk of Bias or STROBE). The quality of evidence was graduated using the GRADE system. Modified Delphi Panel technique was used to assign the recommendation's strength and direction, as well as the degree of agreement with it, taking into account the quality of evidence, balance between risks and benefits of interventions, values and preferences of patients and availability of resources. There were 3,712 documents obtained by search algorithms; selecting 29 documents for inclusion in the qualitative synthesis. Due to heterogeneity between studies, it was not possible to perform meta-analysis. We issued 7 recommendations and 8 good practice points, which will serve as support for decision-making in the comprehensive care of patients with craniosynostosis. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Making a diagnosis of different lesions of vocal fold mucosa by contact endoscopy: The first usage in our clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Milan B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available During laryngomicroscopy, the superficial layers of vocal fold epithelium can be examined in vivo and in situ by contact endoscopy. Methylene blue is applied initially to stain the epihelial cells of the vocal folds. When in contact with mucosal tissue, this endoscope provides 60 and 150 times magnification and clear visualization of cellular patterns of the superficial epithelial layers. For the first time in our laryngological clinical practice, we confirmed a number of previously established parametars such as regularity and arrangement of the epithelium, nucleus contour, and nucleus-cytoplasm ratio, what all enable recognition and easy evaluation of different clinical conditions such as chronic laryngitis, Reinke.s edema, papiloma dyspiasia or vocal fold carcinoma. The advantage of con- tact endoscopy in vivo and in situ allows for detailed scan and mapping of all cell changes of the whole mucosa surface. All these features definitely classify the contact endoscopy into additional diagnostic methods in laryngology.

  9. [Suicide Risk Assessment in the Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Depression in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; Gil Lemus, Laura Marcela; Jaramillo, Luis Eduardo; García Valencia, Jenny; Bravo Narváez, Eliana; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Palacio, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the most serious complications of depression. It has high associated health costs and causes millions of deaths worldwide per year. Given its implications, it is important to know the factors that increase the risk of its occurrence and the most useful tools for addressing it. To identify the signs and symptoms that indicate an increased risk of suicide, and factors that increase the risk in patients diagnosed with depression. To establish the tools best fitted to identify suicide risk in people with depression. Clinical practice guidelines were developed, following those of the methodmethodological guidelines of the Ministry of Social Protection, to collect evidence and to adjust recommendations. Recommendations from the NICE90 and CANMAT guidelines were adopted and updated for questions found in these guidelines, while new recommendations were developed for questions not found in them. Basic points and recommendations are presented from a chapter of the clinical practice guidelines on depressive episodes and recurrent depressive disorder related to suicide risk assessment. Their corresponding recommendation levels are included. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Construction of an index of information from clinical practice in Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis based on text mining and thesaurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Barbosa Serapiao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct a Portuguese language index of information on the practice of diagnostic radiology in order to improve the standardization of the medical language and terminology. Materials and Methods A total of 61,461 definitive reports were collected from the database of the Radiology Information System at Hospital das Clínicas – Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto (RIS/HCFMRP as follows: 30,000 chest x-ray reports; 27,000 mammography reports; and 4,461 thyroid ultrasonography reports. The text mining technique was applied for the selection of terms, and the ANSI/NISO Z39.19-2005 standard was utilized to construct the index based on a thesaurus structure. The system was created in *html. Results The text mining resulted in a set of 358,236 (n = 100% words. Out of this total, 76,347 (n = 21% terms were selected to form the index. Such terms refer to anatomical pathology description, imaging techniques, equipment, type of study and some other composite terms. The index system was developed with 78,538 *html web pages. Conclusion The utilization of text mining on a radiological reports database has allowed the construction of a lexical system in Portuguese language consistent with the clinical practice in Radiology.

  11. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Prevention, Diagnosis and Management of Early and Delayed-onset Ocular Injuries Due to Mustard Gas Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajavi, Zhale; Safi, Sare; Javadi, Mohammad Ali; Jafarinasab, Mohammad Reza; Feizi, Sepehr; Moghadam, Mohammadreza Sedighi; Jadidi, Khosrow; Babaei, Mahmoud; Shirvani, Armin; Baradaran-Rafii, Alireza; Mohammad-Rabei, Hossein; Ziaei, Hossein; Ghassemi-Broumand, Mohammad; Baher, Siamak Delfaza; Naderi, Mostafa; Panahi-Bazaz, Mahmoodreza; Zarei-Ghanavati, Siamak; Hanjani, Shahriar; Ghasemi, Hassan; Salouti, Ramin; Pakbin, Mojgan; Kheiri, Bahareh

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To develop clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for prevention, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of ocular injuries caused by exposure to mustard gas. Methods: The clinical questions were designed by the guideline team. Websites and databases including National Guidelines Clearinghouse, National Institute for Clinical Excellence, Cochrane, and PubMed were searched to find related CPGs and explore possible answers to the clinical questions. Since there were no relevant CPGs in the literature, related articles in Persian and English languages were extracted. Each article along with its level of evidence was summarized. Additionally, hand search was performed by looking the reference list of each article. Consequently, recommendations were developed considering the clinical benefits and side effects of each therapeutic modality. The recommendations were re-evaluated in terms of customization criteria. All recommendations along with the related evidence were scored from 1 to 9 by experts from all medical universities of Iran. The level of agreement among the experts was evaluated by analyzing the given scores. Results: The agreement was achieved for all recommendations. The experts suggested a number of minor modifications which were applied to the recommendations. Finally, CPGs were developed with 98 recommendations under three major domains including prevention of injury, diagnosis and management of the acute and delayed-onset mustard gas ocular injuries. Conclusion: Considering the lack of CPGs for the prevention, diagnosis, and management of mustard gas-induced keratitis, these recommendations would be useful to prevent the serious ocular complications of mustard gas and standardize eye care services to the affected individuals.

  12. Consensus clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease during pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchietti, Daniel L; Hensley, Jennifer G; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn L; Lee, Kathryn A; Manconi, Mauro; McGregor, James A; Silver, Robert M; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Walters, Arthur S

    2015-08-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS)/Willis-Ekbom disease (WED) is common during pregnancy, affecting approximately one in five pregnant women in Western countries. Many report moderate or severe symptoms and negative impact on sleep. There is very little information in the medical literature for practitioners on the management of this condition during pregnancy. Accordingly, a task force was chosen by the International RLS Study Group (IRLSSG) to develop guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of RLS/WED during pregnancy and lactation. A committee of nine experts in RLS/WED and/or obstetrics developed a set of 12 consensus questions, conducted a literature search, and extensively discussed potential guidelines. Recommendations were approved by the IRLSSG executive committee, reviewed by IRLSSG membership, and approved by the WED Foundation Medical Advisory Board. These guidelines address diagnosis, differential diagnosis, clinical course, and severity assessment of RLS/WED during pregnancy and lactation. Nonpharmacologic approaches, including reassurance, exercise and avoidance of exacerbating factors, are outlined. A rationale for iron supplementation is presented. Medications for RLS/WED are risk/benefit rated for use during pregnancy and lactation. A few are rated "may be considered" when RLS/WED is refractory to more conservative approaches. An algorithm summarizes the recommendations. These guidelines are intended to improve clinical practice and promote further research. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Neurosarcoidosis: Clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Kenkichi; Judson, Marc A

    2012-06-01

    Sarcoidosis is an idiopathic granulomatous disease affecting multiple organs. Neurosarcoidosis, involving the central and/or peripheral nervous systems, is a relatively rare form of sarcoidosis. Its clinical manifestations include cranial neuropathies, meningitis, neuroendocrinological dysfunction, hydrocephalus, seizures, neuropsychiatric symptoms, myelopathy and neuropathies. The diagnosis is problematic, especially when occurring as an isolated form without other organ involvement. Distinguishing neurosarcoidosis from other granulomatous diseases and multiple sclerosis is especially important. Although biopsy of neural tissue is the gold standard for the diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis, this is often not practical and the diagnosis must be inferred though other tests, often coupled with biopsy of extraneural organs. Corticosteroids and other immuno-suppressants are frequently used for the treatment of neurosarcoidosis. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathology, clinical features, diagnosis, diagnostic tests, diagnostic criteria, and therapy of neurosarcoidosis.

  14. Clinical practice guidelines for the prevention, diagnosis, evaluation and treatment of mineral and bone disorders in chronic kidney disease (CKD-MBD) in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellorin-Font, Ezequiel; Ambrosoni, Pablo; Carlini, Raúl G; Carvalho, Aluizio B; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso; Jara, Aquiles; Jorgetti, Vanda; Negri, Armando L; Negri, Armando; Olaizola, Inés; Salusky, Isidro; Slatopolsky, Eduardo; Weisinger, José R

    2013-01-01

    The clinical practice guidelines for the prevention, diagnosis, evaluation and treatment of chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorders (CKD-BMD) in adults, of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Hypertension (SLANH) comprise a set of recommendations developed to support the doctor in the management of these abnormalities in adult patients with stages 3-5 kidney disease. This excludes changes associated with renal transplantation. The topics covered in the guidelines are divided into four chapters: 1) Evaluation of biochemical changes, 2) Evaluation of bone changes, 3) Evaluation of vascular calcifications, and 4) Treatment of CKD-MBD. The guidelines are based on the recommendations proposed and published by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) for the prevention, diagnosis, evaluation and treatment of CKD-MBD (KDIGO Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis, evaluation, prevention and treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral and Bone Disorder [CKD-MBD]), adapted to the conditions of patients, institutions and resources available in Latin America, with the support of KDIGO. In some cases, the guidelines correspond to management recommendations directly defined by the working group for their implementation in our region, based on the evidence available in the literature. Each chapter contains guidelines and their rationale, supported by numerous updated references. Unfortunately, there are few controlled studies with statistically sufficient weight in Latin America to support specific recommendations for the region, and as such, most of the references used correspond to studies carried out in other regions. This highlights the need to plan research studies designed to establish the current status of mineral and bone metabolism disorders in Latin America as well as defining the best treatment options for our population.

  15. Parents’ experiences of receiving their child’s genetic diagnosis: A qualitative study to inform clinical genetics practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtiani, Setareh; Makela, Nancy; Carrion, Prescilla; Austin, Jehannine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Little is currently known about how parents experience the medical genetics appointment at which their child receives a genetic diagnosis. Methods We conducted semi-structured in-person interviews with 13 parents of 10 index children to explore their experience in the medical genetics appointment in which they received their child’s genetic diagnosis. Guided by grounded theory, we used a constant comparative approach to data analysis, and the transcribed interviews were coded and sorted, and thematic categories identified. Results 61.5% of parents experienced the diagnosis session as negative, 23% felt the experience was positive, and 15.5% were ambivalent. Receiving emotional support, an outline of the follow-up plans, and messages of hope and perspective during the session seemed to positively influence parents’ experience, while feeling that their role was as a passive receiver of information and using difficult medical terminology negatively influenced parents’ overall experience. Parental preparedness for the information, and the parents’ emotional reaction to the diagnosis were also factors that influenced the parental experience. Few participants understood the role of the genetic counselor. Conclusion Our results provide in-depth insight into the parental experience of the pediatric medical genetics diagnosis session. We propose a mechanism through which parental experience shapes their perception of the medical genetics session. PMID:24706543

  16. The use and abuse of attachment theory in clinical practice with maltreated children, part I: diagnosis and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Debate has ensued regarding the appropriate assessment and diagnosis for school-age children who display severe behavioral problems as a result of previous abuse and neglect within the primary attachment relationship. The current nomenclature recognizes reactive attachment disorder and some clinicians have suggested broader categories of attachment disorder. These attempts at classification are often criticized on empirical grounds; however, often lost in these criticisms is the fact that that these diagnostic approaches often misapply attachment theory and research. This article summarizes the original contributions of John Bowlby and other attachment researchers to our understanding of child development, examines misguided attempts to apply attachment theory to the diagnosis and assessment of maltreated children, and offers a diagnostic conceptualization and assessment recommendations consistent with the available attachment research.

  17. Clinical Practice Experiences in Diagnosis and Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury in Children: A Survey among Clinicians at 9 Large Hospitals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Fei; Gao, Qi; Xiang, Joe; Zhang, Di; Shi, Xiuquan; Yan, Xueqiang; Zhu, Huiping

    2015-01-01

    Proper diagnosis and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children is becoming an increasingly problematic issue in China. This study investigated Chinese clinicians to provide information about their knowledge and experiences in diagnosis and treatment of pediatric TBI. We conducted a questionnaire survey among clinicians in the emergency departments and neurosurgery departments at 9 major hospitals in China. The questionnaire included demographic information, and knowledge and experiences regarding the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric TBI. A total of 235 clinicians completed questionnaires. 43.8% of the surveyed clinicians reported children with only scalp hematoma without any other signs and symptoms of concussion as TBI cases. Most clinicians (85.1%) reported no existing uniform diagnostic criteria for children with TBI in China. The majority of clinicians (91.9%) reported that CT scans were performed in all patients with suspected head injury as a routine procedure in their hospitals. Only 20.9% of clinicians believed that radiation from CT scanning may increase cancer risk in children. About 33.6% of the clinicians reported that they ordered CT scans to investigate suspected head injury due to the poor doctor-patient relationship in China, and to protect themselves against any medical lawsuits in the future. About 80% of the clinicians reported that there are no existing pediatric TBI treatment guidelines in China. Instead a senior doctor's advice is the most reported guidelines regarding treating pediatric TBI (66.0%). All of the surveyed clinicians reported that the lack of diagnosis and/or treatment standard is the biggest problem in effectively diagnosing and treating pediatric TBI in China. Developing guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of children with TBI is a high priority in China. The extremely high usage of CT for pediatric TBI in China suggests that it is important to establish evidence-based clinical decision rules to help

  18. [Clinical practice guidelines: Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and functional constipation in adults: Concept, diagnosis, and healthcare continuity. (Part 1 of 2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, F; Ciriza, C; Mínguez, M; Rey, E; Mascort, J J; Peña, E; Cañones, P; Júdez, J

    2017-01-01

    In this Clinical practice guide, an analysis is made of the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with constipation and abdominal discomfort, under the spectrum of irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation. These have an important personal, health and social impact, affecting the quality of life of these patients. In irritable bowel syndrome with a predominance of constipation, this is the predominant change in bowel movements, with recurrent abdominal pain, bloating and frequent abdominal distension. Constipation is characterised by infrequent or difficulty in bowel movements, associated with excessive straining during bowel movement or sensation of incomplete evacuation. There is often no underling cause, with an intestinal functional disorder being considered. They have many clinical and pathophysiological similarities, with a similar response of the constipation to common drugs. The fundamental difference is the presence or absence of pain, but not in a way evaluable way; "all or nothing". The severity depends on the intensity of bowel symptoms and other factors, a combination of gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms, level of involvement, forms of perception, and behaviour. The Rome criteria diagnose functional bowel disorders. This guide is adapted to the Rome criteria IV (May 2016) and in this first part an analysis is made of the alarm criteria, diagnostic tests, and the criteria for referral between Primary Care and Digestive Disease specialists. In the second part, a review will be made of the therapeutic alternatives available (exercise, diet, drug therapies, neurostimulation of sacral roots, or surgery), making practical recommendations for each one of them.

  19. Plague: Clinics, Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Vladimir V; Gao, He; Zhou, Lei; Anisimov, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Plague still poses a significant threat to human health and as a reemerging infection is unfamiliar to the majority of the modern medical doctors. In this chapter, the plague is described according to Dr. Nikiforov's experiences in the diagnosis and treatment of patients, and also a review of the relevant literature on this subject is provided. The main modern methods and criteria for laboratory diagnosis of plague are briefly described. The clinical presentations include the bubonic and pneumonic form, septicemia, rarely pharyngitis, and meningitis. Early diagnosis and the prompt initiation of treatment reduce the mortality rate associated with bubonic plague and septicemic plague to 5-50 %; although a delay of more than 24 h in the administration of antibiotics and antishock treatment can be fatal for plague patients. Most human cases can successfully be treated with antibiotics.

  20. [Practice guideline 'Prostate cancer: diagnosis and treatment'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijke, T.M. de; Battermann, J.J.; Moorselaar, R.J.A. van; Jong, IJ de; Visser, A.P.; Burgers, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    --A national, multidisciplinary practice guideline was developed concerning diagnosis and treatment of patients with prostate cancer. Because of the lack of sufficient scientific evidence at this moment no practice guideline on screening is included. --The diagnosis of prostate cancer is made by tra

  1. EULAR recommendations for the use of imaging in the diagnosis and management of spondyloarthritis in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandl, P; Navarro-Compán, V; Terslev, L

    2015-01-01

    A taskforce comprised of an expert group of 21 rheumatologists, radiologists and methodologists from 11 countries developed evidence-based recommendations on the use of imaging in the clinical management of both axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA). Twelve key questions on the role of ima...

  2. Computerizing clinical practice guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie

    It is well described that hospitals have problems with sustaining high quality of care and expedient introduction of new medical knowledge. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been promoted as a remedy to deal with these problems. It is, however, also well described that application and comp......It is well described that hospitals have problems with sustaining high quality of care and expedient introduction of new medical knowledge. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been promoted as a remedy to deal with these problems. It is, however, also well described that application...... and compliance with CPGs in most areas of clinical practice are deficient. Computerization of CPGs has been brought forward as a method to disseminate and to support application of CPGs. Until now, CPG-computerization has focused on development of formal expressions of CPGs. The developed systems have, however......, not gained any extensive application in clinical practice. The basic assumption in this thesis is that the scanty penetration is due to an inappropriate design process when designing computerized CPGs for clinical work practice. This thesis examines the application of guidance within areas where CPG...

  3. Computerizing clinical practice guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie

    . The analysis focuses on the emergence of general clinical work practice demands on guidance • An analysis of guidance demands from clinical work practice and business strategy, focusing on implications for the design of computerised CPGs. In my research, I have applied observation studies, interviews...... is comprised by fieldwork in three oncology departments and a case study of advanced life support. Although close to all patients within oncology are treated according to a CPG, I found limited application of physical CPGs and web-based CPG portals. However, I found comprehensive application of activity...... feasible • Designed in a way that provides room for local adaptations of guidance • Designed with focus on specific business strategic aims Further, based on my findings, I will suggest that design of computerized CPGs should be based on: 1) scrutinization of the clinical work practice, 2) articulation...

  4. Comparative Analysis of Russian and Foreign Systems for The Neuropsychological Diagnosis of Children From the Standpoint of the Psychometric Approach and its Limitations When Used in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A. Berebin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern approaches to the psychological diagnostics of children are based onneed analysis and the systematization of existing trends in domestic and foreignchildren’s neuropsychological diagnoses. This article highlights the strengths andweaknesses of each approach, as well as identifying possible areas of integration.One of the most acute problems is the development of experimental psychologicalmethods to determine the quantitative and expressed characteristics of themental development of children by flexibly combining qualitative and quantitativeapproaches, with a view to putting into practice foreign neuroscience principlesand standards of evidence. An analysis of contemporary publications onneuropsychological diagnosis reveals the need to consider the standardization ofneuropsychological research in the context of current approaches, requirements,and psychodiagnostic criteria. In the domestic neuropsychological literature, theseissues are need attention: standardized procedures for presenting stimuli are not,as a rule, described; basic psychometric assessment of the results of the tests islacking; no investigation of their clinical and psychometric validity is carried out.An analysis was made of the nature of the psychometric approach in foreign childneuropsychology, which relies on mathematical procedures of processing qualitative(ordinal data converted into quantitative indicators. We examined separatelythe mathematical software for clinical trials (based on the principles of «evidencebasedmedicine», which relies on the «abnormal» nature of the distribution ofclinical phenomena.

  5. Difficulties in clinical diagnosis of peripartum cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi B. Channaiah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is a disorder which describes initial left ventricular dysfunction and symptoms of cardiac failure between the late stages of pregnancy and the first five months after delivery. PPCM is a difficult diagnosis to make because it resembles common cardiac issues that are normally experienced during pregnancy. Clinical presentation is representative of cardiac failure and is commonly misdiagnosed until further progression. This disorder is commonly seen in some regions of the world and rare in others. Proper evaluation and rapid treatment are crucial for an effective recovery. Subsequent pregnancies should be evaluated before pursuing. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the difficulties in clinical diagnosis and provide a concise and practical approach to treatment of suspected PPCM. [J Exp Integr Med 2015; 5(2.000: 69-74

  6. An official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice guideline: the diagnosis of intensive care unit-acquired weakness in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Eddy; Cheek, Fern; Chlan, Linda; Gosselink, Rik; Hart, Nicholas; Herridge, Margaret S; Hopkins, Ramona O; Hough, Catherine L; Kress, John P; Latronico, Nicola; Moss, Marc; Needham, Dale M; Rich, Mark M; Stevens, Robert D; Wilson, Kevin C; Winkelman, Chris; Zochodne, Doug W; Ali, Naeem A

    2014-12-15

    Profound muscle weakness during and after critical illness is termed intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). To develop diagnostic recommendations for ICUAW. A multidisciplinary expert committee generated diagnostic questions. A systematic review was performed, and recommendations were developed using the Grading, Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Severe sepsis, difficult ventilator liberation, and prolonged mechanical ventilation are associated with ICUAW. Physical rehabilitation improves outcomes in heterogeneous populations of ICU patients. Because it may not be feasible to provide universal physical rehabilitation, an alternative approach is to identify patients most likely to benefit. Patients with ICUAW may be such a group. Our review identified only one case series of patients with ICUAW who received physical therapy. When compared with a case series of patients with ICUAW who did not receive structured physical therapy, evidence suggested those who receive physical rehabilitation were more frequently discharged home rather than to a rehabilitative facility, although confidence intervals included no difference. Other interventions show promise, but fewer data proving patient benefit existed, thus precluding specific comment. Additionally, prior comorbidity was insufficiently defined to determine its influence on outcome, treatment response, or patient preferences for diagnostic efforts. We recommend controlled clinical trials in patients with ICUAW that compare physical rehabilitation with usual care and further research in understanding risk and patient preferences. Research that identifies treatments that benefit patients with ICUAW is necessary to determine whether the benefits of diagnostic testing for ICUAW outweigh its burdens.

  7. An official American Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline: diagnosis, risk stratification, and management of pulmonary hypertension of sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klings, Elizabeth S; Machado, Roberto F; Barst, Robyn J; Morris, Claudia R; Mubarak, Kamal K; Gordeuk, Victor R; Kato, Gregory J; Ataga, Kenneth I; Gibbs, J Simon; Castro, Oswaldo; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Sood, Namita; Hsu, Lewis; Wilson, Kevin C; Telen, Marilyn J; Decastro, Laura M; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Steinberg, Martin H; Badesch, David B; Gladwin, Mark T

    2014-03-15

    In adults with sickle cell disease (SCD), an increased tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) measured by Doppler echocardiography, an increased serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) level, and pulmonary hypertension (PH) diagnosed by right heart catheterization (RHC) are independent risk factors for mortality. A multidisciplinary committee was formed by clinician-investigators experienced in the management of patients with PH and/or SCD. Clinically important questions were posed, related evidence was appraised, and questions were answered with evidence-based recommendations. Target audiences include all clinicians who take care of patients with SCD. Mortality risk stratification guides decision making. An increased risk for mortality is defined as a TRV equal to or greater than 2.5 m/second, an NT-pro-BNP level equal to or greater than 160 pg/ml, or RHC-confirmed PH. For patients identified as having increased mortality risk, we make a strong recommendation for hydroxyurea as first-line therapy and a weak recommendation for chronic transfusions as an alternative therapy. For all patients with SCD with elevated TRV alone or elevated NT-pro-BNP alone, and for patients with SCD with RHC-confirmed PH with elevated pulmonary artery wedge pressure and low pulmonary vascular resistance, we make a strong recommendation against PAH-specific therapy. However, for select patients with SCD with RHC-confirmed PH who have elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, we make a weak recommendation for either prostacyclin agonist or endothelin receptor antagonist therapy and a strong recommendation against phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy. Evidence-based recommendations for the management of patients with SCD with increased mortality risk are provided, but will require frequent reassessment and updating.

  8. Impact of implementing electronic clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis, control and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors: A pre-post controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Comin

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: Computerized clinical practice guidelines are an effective tool for the control and follow-up of patients diagnosed with hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolaemia. The usefulness of computerized clinical practice guidelines to diagnose and adequately treat individuals with these disorders remains unclear.

  9. Audit in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modayil, Prince Cheriyan; Panchikkeel, Ragesh Kuyyattil; Alex, Nisha

    2009-06-01

    Audit dates back to as early as 1750 BC when king Hammurabi of Babylon instigated audit for clinicians with regard to outcome. Clinical audit is a way of fi nding out whether we are doing what we should be doing. It also verifi es whether we are applying the best practice. An audit cycle involves setting-up of standards, measuring current practice, comparing results with standards (criteria), changing practice and re-auditing to make sure practice has improved A 'clinical audit' is a quality improvement process that seeks to improve patient care and clinical outcomes through a systematic review of care against explicit criteria, and the implementation of change. Changes are implemented at an individual, team or service level and a subsequent re-audit is done to confi rm improvement in health care delivery. The importance of audit in healthcare sector needs to be appreciated by the relevant authorities. The most frequently cited barrier to successful audit is the failure of organizations to provide suffi cient fund and protected time for healthcare teams.

  10. Diagnosis and Management of Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease : A Clinical Practice Guideline Update from the American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qaseem, Amir; Wilt, Timothy J.; Weinberger, Steven E.; Hanania, Nicola A.; Criner, Gerard; van der Molen, Thys; Marciniuk, Darcy D.; Denberg, Tom; Schuenemann, Holger; Wedzicha, Wisia; MacDonald, Roderick; Shekelle, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Description: This guideline is an official statement of the American College of Physicians (ACP), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS). It represents an update of the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and

  11. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiogenic Shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arelys Falcón Hernández

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiogenic Shock. It has been defined as the persistence of tissue hypoperfusion, usually associated to blood hypotension as the result of heart pumping failure. This document includes a review of the main aspects as concepts, aetiology, diagnosis and treatment. It includes the concept, risk factors, clinical presentations, diagnosis, and therapy based on the possibilities of our environment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  12. Clinical presentations and diagnosis of brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulu-Kilic, Aysegul; Metan, Gökhan; Alp, Emine

    2013-04-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Brucella species. The disease remains a significant economic and public health problem particularly in the Mediterranean countries. Clinical manifestations of brucellosis are variable and often nonspecific, simulating infectious and noninfectious diseases. Osteoarticular involvement is the most common focal complication of brucellosis and morbidity. Mortality rate due to brucellosis is low, mostly secondary to endocarditis and central nerve involvement of disease. The diagnosis of brucellosis depends on the clinical presentations and laboratory tests. Detection of Brucella species by culture method is sometimes unsuccessful; therefore, serological tests are preferred. These tests are easy to perform, and results can be obtained within a short span of time. Several serologic tests have been developed for the diagnosis of human brucellosis, including the standard agglutination tube (SAT) test, anti-human globulin (Coombs) test, indirect fluorescence antibody (IFA) test, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). SAT is the primary test used in many clinical laboratories. IFA and ELISA are simple and reliable for the detection of immunoglobulin classes especially in complicated cases. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique is highly sensitive and specific for the determination of Brucella spp. from peripheral blood and other tissues. Recent patents are especially based on molecular assays in the diagnosis of brucellosis. However, PCR is still expensive and may not be appropriate for daily practice.

  13. [Consensus clinical practice guidelines of the Sociedad Andaluza de Epilepsia for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with their first epileptic seizure in emergencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Castro, P J; Sánchez-Alvarez, J C; Cañadillas-Hidalgo, F M; Galán-Barranco, J M; Moreno-Alegre, V; Mercadé-Cerdá, J M

    Epileptic seizures are the cause of between 0.3 and 1.2% of all visits to hospital emergency departments. Twenty-five per cent of patients visit after having their first seizure. Such an impact seems to justify the development of a health care protocol. Our proposal is to draw up a set of implicit evidence-based consensus practice guidelines, to use Liberati's nomenclature, concerning aspects related to the diagnostic procedure and recommended therapeutic management of patients with a first seizure who are being attended in an emergency department. A selective search was conducted on PubMed-Medline for quality scientific information on the subject using scientific evidence filters. This search was completed in other scientific evidence search engines, such as Tripdatabase, Biblioteca Cochrane Plus or DARE. The selected references were analysed and discussed by the authors, and the available evidence and any recommendations that could be drawn from it were collected. A total of 47 primary documents and 10 practice guidelines or protocols related with the proposed topic were identified. The recommendations were inserted in the text explicitly. The diagnostic and therapeutic protocol for all paroxysmal phenomena in emergencies consists of three successive phases: diagnosis of the cause of the epilepsy, integration of the significance of the seizure within the clinical context, and designing the therapeutic scheme. Each phase will depend on the outcomes of the previous one as a decision algorithm. The fundamental tools in each phase are: patient record and examination (phase 1), and complementary tests (phase 2). They are then used to produce a therapeutic decision scheme.

  14. [Guidelines for clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vleugels, A M

    1997-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are systematically developed statements that are intended to support medical decision making in well-defined clinical situations. Essentially, their object is to reduce the variability in medical practice, to improve quality, and to make appropriated control of the financial resources possible. Internationally, ever more organisations, associations, and institutions are concerned with the development of guidelines in many different areas of care. Making implicit knowledge explicit is one of the associated advantages of guidelines: they have a potential utility in training, in process evaluation, and in the reevaluation of outcome studies. In liability issues, their existence has a double effect: they can be used to justify medical behaviour, and they constitute a generally accepted reference point. A derivative problem is the legal liability of the compilers of the guidelines. The principle of the guideline approach can be challenged academically: science cannot give a definition of optimal care with absolute certainty. What is called objectivity often rests on methodologically disputable analyses; also the opinion of opinion leaders is not always a guarantee for scientific soundness. Moreover, patients are not all identical: biological variability, situational factors, patient expectations, and other elements play a role in this differentiation. Clinicians are often hesitant with respect to clinical guidelines: they are afraid of cookbook medicine and curtailment of their professional autonomy. Patients fear reduction of individualization of care and the use of guidelines as a rationing instrument. The effects of the introduction of clinical practice guidelines on medical practice, on the results and on the cost of care vary but are generally considered to be favourable. The choice of appropriate strategies in development, dissemination, and implementation turns out to be of critical importance. The article ends with concrete

  15. [Neuroethics in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, H

    2009-08-01

    In recent years the ability of neuroscience to identify and intervene in mental functions has progressed immensely, which raises several anthropologic and ethical questions. Meanwhile neuroethics arose as a new interdisciplinary field for critical analysis of neuroscientific actions and ethical reflection on the increasing knowledge of the human brain, with regard to society and politics. This article provides a survey of neuroethical implications for clinical practice.

  16. A new, practical, low-dose {sup 14}C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection: clinical validation and comparison with the standard method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeztuerk, Emel; Ilgan, Seyfettin; Arslan, Nuri; Oezgueven, Mehmet [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Guelhane Military Medical Academy and Medical School, 06018, Etlik, Ankara (Turkey); Yesilova, Zeki; Erdil, Ahmet; Dagalp, Kemal [Department of Gastroenterology, Guelhane Military Medical Academy and Medical School, Etlik, Ankara (Turkey); Celasun, Buelent [Department of Pathology, Guelhane Military Medical Academy and Medical School, Etlik, Ankara (Turkey); Ovali, Oender [Department of Internal Medicine, Guelhane Military Medical Academy and Medical School, Etlik, Ankara (Turkey); Bayhan, Hikmet [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Acbadem Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2003-11-01

    -negative patients (sensitivity 81%, specificity 75%, PPV 86%, NPV 66%, accuracy 79%). With the Heliprobe method, all of the positive results were grade 2, and all of the negative results were grade 0. No patients were defined as having grade 1 results. Counts allowed clear discrimination of HP-positive and -negative patients with both methods, the difference being statistically significant in each case (P<0.001). A significant correlation was found between HCPM and SDPM (r 0.863, P<0.001). According to the ROC analysis, the area under the curve was nearly the same with HCPM (AUC, 0.888; 95% CI, 0.785-0.992) and SDPM (AUC, 0.898; 95% CI, 0.802-0.994). In conclusion, the new {sup 14}C-UBT system is a highly accurate method for the diagnosis of HP infection. It is rapid and practical, and therefore suitable for clinical and office practice. (orig.)

  17. Clinical Practice Guidelines for intestinal occlusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudis Miguel Monzón Rodríguez

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for intestinal occlusion. This document includes the main aspects related with classification, physiopathology, clinical diagnosis, complementary examinations and therapy aimed at the post-operatory treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  18. Acromegaly: clinical features at diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Lucio; Vilar, Clarice Freitas; Lyra, Ruy; Lyra, Raissa; Naves, Luciana A

    2017-02-01

    Acromegaly is a rare and underdiagnosed disorder caused, in more than 95% of cases, by a growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary adenoma. The GH hypersecretion leads to overproduction of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) which results in a multisystem disease characterized by somatic overgrowth, multiple comorbidities, physical disfigurement, and increased mortality. This article aims to review the clinical features of acromegaly at diagnosis. Acromegaly affects both males and females equally and the average age at diagnosis ranges from 40 to 50 years (up to 5% of cases acromegaly is often diagnosed five to more than ten years after its onset. The typical coarsening of facial features include furrowing of fronthead, pronounced brow protrusion, enlargement of the nose and the ears, thickening of the lips, skin wrinkles and nasolabial folds, as well as mandibular prognathism that leads to dental malocclusion and increased interdental spacing. Excessive growth of hands and feet (predominantly due to soft tissue swelling) is present in the vast majority of acromegalic patients. Gigantism accounts for up to 5% of cases and occurs when the excess of GH becomes manifest in the young, before the epiphyseal fusion. The disease also has rheumatologic, cardiovascular, respiratory, neoplastic, neurological, and metabolic manifestations which negatively impact its prognosis and patients quality of life. Less than 15% of acromegalic patients actively seek medical attention for change in appearance or enlargement of the extremities. The presentation of acromegaly is more often related to its systemic comorbidities or to local tumor effects.

  19. [Disseminated intravascular coagulation: clinical and biological diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touaoussa, Aziz; El Youssi, Hind; El Hassani, Imane; Hanouf, Daham; El Bergui, Imane; Zoulati, Ghizlane; Amrani Hassani, Moncef

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a syndrome characterized by the systemic activation of blood coagulation. Its pathophysiological mechanisms are complex and dependent on the underlying pathology, making the clinical and biological expression of quite variable DIC. Among the various biological parameters disrupted, most are not specific, and none of them allows in itself to make the diagnosis. All this does not facilitate the task of the practitioner for diagnosis of overt DIC, much less that of the non-overt DIC, early stage whose treatment would improve the prognosis. These considerations have led to develop scores, combining several parameters depending on their availability in daily practice, as well as their diagnostic relevance. Of all the scores, the ISTH (International society of thrombosis and hemostasis) remains the most used.

  20. Revisiting Narcolepsy: The Practical Diagnosis and Mythology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon M Neppe

    2016-02-01

    : This might deprive many in the narcolepsy population of their essential life-sustaining treatment, even though they might have definite clinical features plus the gene expression, and often, already, response to wakefulness drugs. c Third, clinical evaluations must be standardized. At this stage, we, at the PNI b2 apply modifications of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale in conjunction with the Fatigue Severity Scale, and the Neppe Narcolepsy Questionnaire, as fundamental ways to evaluate narcolepsy clinically. These historical rankings and screens combined with proper HLA screening may be adequate for more than 90% of diagnoses. d Fourth, the comorbidities of narcolepsy might include psychosis, anxiety, depression, impaired functioning, and seizure phenomena. These may reflect multifactorial etiologies: some of these may be linked with narcolepsy, and others unassociated. I suggest a new model of hypocretin deficiency being slightly down-stream from the actual cause of narcolepsycataplexy. This accentuates the need for proposing two new terms, namely “primary narcolepsy” for the most common narcolepsy condition that appears to be hypothalamically linked to an auto-immune process involving hypocretin, and “symptomatic narcolepsy” due to infectious or tumor or trauma events involving the hypocretin / reticular activating system/ hypothalamus. On the others hand, some b “PNI” refers to the Pacific Neuropsychiatric Institute in Seattle, WA. “We” is used here to include application at the PNI; “we” is also used generically, for example, in broader recognitions of symptoms by researchers. Revisiting Narcolepsy: The Practical Diagnosis and Mythology 2/30 Copyright: ©2016 Neppe Citation: Neppe VM (2016 Revisiting Narcolepsy: The Practical Diagnosis and Mythology. J Psychol Clin Psychiatry 5(3: 00287. DOI: 10.15406/ jpcpy.2016.05.00287 old classifications have used the previous terms “Type 1 Narcolepsy” for narcolepsy with cataplexy, and “Type 2

  1. Diagnosis of hyperandrogenism: clinical criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Bulent O

    2006-06-01

    Hyperandrogenism or androgen excess is a common endocrine disorder of women of reproductive-age, with a prevalence of 5-10%. The majority of patients with hyperandrogenism will have polycystic ovary syndrome. Hyperandrogenism presents a complex diagnostic challenge for both the practicing physician and the clinical investigator. Clinical manifestations of hyperandrogenism include hirsutism, acne, androgenic alopecia, and virilization. Hirsutism, defined as excessive growth of terminal hair in women in a male-like pattern, is the most commonly used clinical diagnostic criterion of hyperandrogenism. The presence of hirsutism is usually determined by using a standardized scoring system of hair growth. Depending on the definition, hirsutism is present in up to 80% of patients with hyperandrogenism. Acne and androgenic alopecia are other common androgenic skin changes, and might be observed without hirsutism in some hyperandrogenic women. However, isolated presence of any of these manifestations is not used as a diagnostic criterion for hyperandrogenism. Virilization is a relatively uncommon feature of hyperandrogenism, and its presence often suggests an androgen-producing tumor. A thorough history and a focused clinical examination are extremely helpful in diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected hyperandrogenism.

  2. How can students' diagnostic competence benefit most from practice with clinical cases? the effects of structured reflection on future diagnosis of the same and novel diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mamede, Sílvia; Van Gog, Tamara; Sampaio, Alexandre Moura; De Faria, Rosa Malena Delbone; Maria, José Peixoto; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop diagnostic competence, students should practice with many examples of clinical problems to build rich mental representations of diseases. How to enhance learning from practice remains unknown. This study investigated the effects of reflection on cases compared with generating a

  3. How can students' diagnostic competence benefit most from practice with clinical cases? the effects of structured reflection on future diagnosis of the same and novel diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mamede, Sílvia; Van Gog, Tamara; Sampaio, Alexandre Moura; De Faria, Rosa Malena Delbone; Maria, José Peixoto; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop diagnostic competence, students should practice with many examples of clinical problems to build rich mental representations of diseases. How to enhance learning from practice remains unknown. This study investigated the effects of reflection on cases compared with generating a s

  4. Myocarditis in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinagra, Gianfranco; Anzini, Marco; Pereira, Naveen L; Bussani, Rossana; Finocchiaro, Gherardo; Bartunek, Jozef; Merlo, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Myocarditis is a polymorphic disease characterized by great variability in clinical presentation and evolution. Patients presenting with severe left ventricular dysfunction and life-threatening arrhythmias represent a demanding challenge for the clinician. Modern techniques of cardiovascular imaging and the exhaustive molecular evaluation of the myocardium with endomyocardial biopsy have provided valuable insight into the pathophysiology of this disease, and several clinical registries have unraveled the disease's long-term evolution and prognosis. However, uncertainties persist in crucial practical issues in the management of patients. This article critically reviews current information for evidence-based management, offering a rational and practical approach to patients with myocarditis. For this review, we searched the PubMed and MEDLINE databases for articles published from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2015, using the following terms: myocarditis, inflammatory cardiomyopathy, and endomyocardial biopsy. Articles were selected for inclusion if they represented primary data or were review articles published in high-impact journals. In particular, a risk-oriented approach is proposed. The different patterns of presentation of myocarditis are classified as low-, intermediate-, and high-risk syndromes according to the most recent evidence on prognosis, clinical findings, and both invasive and noninvasive testing, and appropriate management strategies are proposed for each risk class.

  5. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebral Abscess Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Barrueta Reyes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebral Abscess Treatment. It has been defined as a festering process caused by any germ and placed inside the cerebral parenchyma; this is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for surgeons and general doctors since the clinical and radiological manifestations are often imprecise. This document describes its etiological agents, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  6. Clinical and Laboratory Diagnosis of Intestinal Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Chun Shi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: ITB is difficult to diagnose even with modern medical techniques due to its nonspecific clinical and laboratory features. At present, combination of clinical, endoscopic, radiological, and pathological features continues to be the key to the diagnosis of ITB.

  7. Supernumerary teeth in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Szkaradkiewicz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyperdontia is the condition of having supernumerary teeth, or teeth which appear in addition to the regular number of teeth. The prevalence rates of supernumerary teeth in the permanent dentition amounts 0.1-6.9%, and in deciduous dentition 0.4-0.8%. The presence of supernumerary teeth can be found in everyday dental practice.Case presentation: We describe 3 cases of patients with supernumerary teeth. First patient had supernumerary lateral incisor 12s, second - premolar fused, multicuspid, supernumerary deciduous tooth 64s of having several interconnected roots, and third - erupted odontoma between teeth 13 and 14. In all cases treatment involved the removal of the supernumerary tooth.Conclusions: The decision on proceeding with the supernumerary teeth should be based on the full clinical picture and interview. Early diagnosis and removal of supernumerary teeth allow to avoid or reduce possible complications.

  8. Official American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Practice Guidelines: Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in Adults and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinsohn, David M; Leonard, Michael K; LoBue, Philip A; Cohn, David L; Daley, Charles L; Desmond, Ed; Keane, Joseph; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Loeffler, Ann M; Mazurek, Gerald H; O'Brien, Richard J; Pai, Madhukar; Richeldi, Luca; Salfinger, Max; Shinnick, Thomas M; Sterling, Timothy R; Warshauer, David M; Woods, Gail L

    2017-01-15

    Individuals infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) may develop symptoms and signs of disease (tuberculosis disease) or may have no clinical evidence of disease (latent tuberculosis infection [LTBI]). Tuberculosis disease is a leading cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet many questions related to its diagnosis remain. A task force supported by the American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America searched, selected, and synthesized relevant evidence. The evidence was then used as the basis for recommendations about the diagnosis of tuberculosis disease and LTBI in adults and children. The recommendations were formulated, written, and graded using the Grading, Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Twenty-three evidence-based recommendations about diagnostic testing for latent tuberculosis infection, pulmonary tuberculosis, and extrapulmonary tuberculosis are provided. Six of the recommendations are strong, whereas the remaining 17 are conditional. These guidelines are not intended to impose a standard of care. They provide the basis for rational decisions in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in the context of the existing evidence. No guidelines can take into account all of the often compelling unique individual clinical circumstances. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Clinical Practice Guidelines for cranioencephalic trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencio Pons Moscoso

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for cranioencephalic trauma. It has been defined as the lesion received in the cranium, its covers and the encephalic content as a result of the action of external forces. This document includes a review of the classification, clinical presentation and methods used in the diagnosis and main treatment alternatives, stressing the neuro-monitoring. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  10. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Acute Pulmonary Edema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Rodríguez Díaz

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Acute Pulmonary Edema. It has been defined as an abrupt and severe failure of the left ventricular function which causes pulmonary edema or cardiac origin interfering with the normal oxygen exchange at pulmonary level. This document includes a review and update of the main clinical aspects allowing the early diagnosis and immediate therapeutic treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  11. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Exogenous Poisoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Díaz Mesa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Exogenous Poisoning. Medical emergencies determined by the exposure to different substances (drugs, medicines, physical or chemical corrosive agents, etc. It includes the classification of toxic substances, clinical diagnosis (main syndromes, and description of therapeutic variations (vital support, antidotes, absorption measurements and increase of elimination and depuration of the toxic substance. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  12. [Hydration in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maristany, Cleofé Pérez-Portabella; Segurola Gurruchaga, Hegoi

    2011-01-01

    Water is an essential foundation for life, having both a regulatory and structural function. The former results from active and passive participation in all metabolic reactions, and its role in conserving and maintaining body temperature. Structurally speaking it is the major contributer to tissue mass, accounting for 60% of the basis of blood plasma, intracellular and intersticial fluid. Water is also part of the primary structures of life such as genetic material or proteins. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse makes an early assessment of patients water needs to detect if there are signs of electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration can be a very serious problem, especially in children and the elderly. Dehydrations treatment with oral rehydration solution decreases the risk of developing hydration disorders, but even so, it is recommended to follow preventive measures to reduce the incidence and severity of dehydration. The key to having a proper hydration is prevention. Artificial nutrition encompasses the need for precise calculation of water needs in enteral nutrition as parenteral, so the nurse should be part of this process and use the tools for calculating the patient's requirements. All this helps to ensure an optimal nutritional status in patients at risk. Ethical dilemmas are becoming increasingly common in clinical practice. On the subject of artificial nutrition and hydration, there isn't yet any unanimous agreement regarding hydration as a basic care. It is necessary to take decisions in consensus with the health team, always thinking of the best interests of the patient.

  13. Contemporary management of pericardial effusion: practical aspects for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazio, Massimo; Gaido, Luca; Battaglia, Alberto; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2017-03-01

    A pericardial effusion (PE) is a relatively common finding in clinical practice. It may be either isolated or associated with pericarditis with or without an underlying disease. The aetiology is varied and may be either infectious (especially tuberculosis as the most common cause in developing countries) or non-infectious (cancer, systemic inflammatory diseases). The management is essentially guided by the hemodynamic effect (presence or absence of cardiac tamponade), the presence of concomitant pericarditis or underlying disease, and its size and duration. The present paper reviews the current knowledge on the aetiology, classification, diagnosis, management, therapy, and prognosis of PE in clinical practice.

  14. OPTIMIZATION OF X-RAY DIAGNOSIS OF ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE: IMPORTANCE OF A PLAIN X-RAY FILM OF THE PELVIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Smirnov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a disease whose main clinical manifestation  is an inflammatory lesion in the axial skeleton with its gradual ankylosing. The peak incidence of AS occurs at a young age; and, if there is no timely adequate therapy, its disability rates are virtually as high as 50% ten years after disease onset, which determines the social importance of this disease The diagnosis of AS is based on its characteristic  clinical presentation  and the compulsory detection  of sacroiliitis on pelvic radiography. However, the existing reports of the X-ray stages of sacroiliac joint injuries in the literature provide little evidence and frequently misinterpret  radiographic changes. Based on their long-term  experience, the authors give expanded explanations of the standard X-ray stages of sacroiliitis and other radiographic signs that can make a diagnostic search in AS easier.

  15. Modular sensor architecture for unobtrusive routine clinical diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Storz, Oliver; Friday, Adrian; Crowe, J; Hayes-Gill, B; Sumner, M.; Barratt, C; Palethorpe, B.; Greenhalgh, C.; Humble, Jan; Setchell, Chris; Randell, Cliff; Muller, Henk; EPSRC

    2004-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of pathological conditions is accomplished regularly via the recording and subsequent analysis of a physiological variable from a subject. Problems with current common practice centre around the obtrusive and rigid nature of this process. These include the length, timing and location of the diagnostic recording session, transfer of data to clinical staff, liaison between clinical staff and subjects and the integration of such diagnostic check-ups into the overall health car...

  16. Lambliasis in Children. Epidemiology, Clinical Picture, Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Konyushevskaya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the lambliasis — one of most common protozoan diseases in children. This article gives a review of literature on epidemiology, clinical picture and diagnosis of lambliasis in children as well as own observations.

  17. Evaluation of Practical Clinical Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrong, Joseph M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The effectiveness of practical examinations in assessing the clinical competence of dental students is discussed. A grading system that derives a significant portion of the senior student's grade from this type of examination is described. The impact of practical clinical examinations on two consecutive graduating classes was analyzed. (Author/MLW)

  18. Pharmacogenetics in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derijks, Luc J. J.; Derijks, H. Jeroen; Touw, Daan J.; Conemans, Jean M. H.; Egberts, Antoine C. G.

    2008-01-01

    The availability of data from pharmacogenetic studies is reflected in therapeutic practice, and pharmacogenetics is slowly entering the medical arena. Preconditions for the utilisation of pharmacogenetic knowledge are that: 1) genetic variation and prevalence are known 2) pharmacological consequence

  19. Photodynamic therapy in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Filonenko; L. G. Serova

    2016-01-01

    The review is on opportunities and possibilities of application of photodynamic therapy in clinical practice. The advantages of this method are the targeting of effect on tumor foci and high efficiency along with low systemic toxicity. The results of the set of recent Russian and foreign clinical trials are represented in the review. The method is successfully used in clinical practice with both radical (for early vulvar, cervical cancer and pre-cancer, central early lung cancer, esophageal a...

  20. Ultrasound transducer selection in clinical imaging practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Thomas L; Lewin, Peter A

    2013-04-01

    Many types of medical ultrasound transducers are used in clinical practice. They operate at different center frequencies, have different physical dimensions, footprints, and shapes, and provide different image formats. However, little information is available about which transducers are most appropriate for a given application, and the purpose of this article is to address this deficiency. Specifically, the relationship between the transducer, imaging format, and clinical applications is discussed, and systematic selection criteria that allow matching of transducers to specific clinical needs are presented. These criteria include access to and coverage of the region of interest, maximum scan depth, and coverage of essential diagnostic modes required to optimize a patient's diagnosis. Three comprehensive figures organize and summarize the imaging planes, scanning modes, and types of diagnostic transducers to facilitate their selection in clinical diagnosis.

  1. Diagnostic discrepancies in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Victor Sarli; Dinardi, Layara Fernanda Lipari; Pereira, Thiago Vicente; de Almeida, Lyna Kyria Rodrigues; Barbosa, Thaisa Silveira; Benvenutti, Luiz Alberto; Ayub-Ferreira, Silvia Moreira; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Autopsies are the gold standard for diagnostic accuracy; however, no recent study has analyzed autopsies in heart failure (HF). We reviewed 1241 autopsies (January 2000–May 2005) and selected 232 patients with HF. Clinical and autopsy diagnoses were analyzed and discrepancies categorized according to their importance regarding therapy and prognosis. Mean age was 63.3 ± 15.9 years; 154 (66.4%) patients were male. The causes of death at autopsy were end-stage HF (40.9%), acute myocardial infarction (17.2%), infection (15.9), and pulmonary embolism 36 (15.5). Diagnostic discrepancies occurred in 191 (82.3%) cases; in 56 (24.1%), discrepancies were related to major diagnoses with potential influence on survival or treatment; pulmonary embolism was the cause of death for 24 (42.9%) of these patients. In 35 (15.1%), discrepancies were related to a major diagnosis with equivocal influence on survival or treatment; in 100 (43.1%), discrepancies did not influence survival or treatment. In multivariate analysis, age (OR: 1.03, 95% CI: 1.008–1.052, P = 0.007) and presence of diabetes mellitus (OR: 0.359, 95% CI: 0.168–0.767, P = 0.008) influenced the occurrence discrepancies. Diagnostic discrepancies with a potential impact on prognosis are frequent in HF. These findings warrant reconsideration in diagnostic and therapeutic practices with HF patients. PMID:28121951

  2. Clinical Practice in Portuguese Sexology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcão, Violeta; Ribeiro, Sofia; Almeida, Joana; Giami, Alain

    2016-12-02

    Few studies explore the clinicians' knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding sexuality, despite their role in the sexual-health socialization process. This study focuses on Portuguese sexologists engaged in clinical practice. It aims to characterize sexologists' sex education and training and their clinical practices, including diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. This research followed the methodology of an European survey on sexology as a profession (Euro-Sexo). From the 91 respondents who completed questionnaires, 51 (56%) were active in clinical practice. Results indicate that the Portuguese clinical sexologist is significantly older, predominantly male, has had training in sexology, performs more scientific research, and is more engaged in teaching activities when compared to nonclinical working sexologists. This article describes the main sexual problems presented by patients to Portuguese clinical sexologists and highlights differences in the professional groups and approaches toward treating these problems by medical doctors and nonmedical professionals. Results reinforce the idea that there are intra-European differences in the educational background of sexologists and reveal important variations in Portuguese sexologists' education, training, and clinical practice. The representations and practices of the sexologists in Portugal, as in other European countries, are embedded in cultural scenarios and sexual cultures, with implications for the clinical practice.

  3. Diagnosis and Management of Low-Grade Dysplasia in Barrett's Esophagus: Expert Review From the Clinical Practice Updates Committee of the American Gastroenterological Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Sachin; Rubenstein, Joel H; Vieth, Michael; Bergman, Jacques

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this clinical practice update expert review is to define the key principles in the diagnosis and management of low-grade dysplasia (LGD) in Barrett's esophagus patients. The best practices outlined in this review are based on relevant publications, including systematic reviews and expert opinion (when applicable). Practice Advice 1: The extent of Barrett's esophagus should be defined using a standardized grading system documenting the circumferential and maximal extent of the columnar lined esophagus (Prague classification) with a clear description of landmarks and visible lesions (nodularity, ulceration) when present. Practice Advice 2: Given the significant interobserver variability among pathologists, the diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus with LGD should be confirmed by an expert gastrointestinal pathologist (defined as a pathologist with a special interest in Barrett's esophagus-related neoplasia who is recognized as an expert in this field by his/her peers). Practice Advice 3: Expert pathologists should report audits of their diagnosed cases of LGD, such as the frequency of LGD diagnosed among surveillance patients and/or the difference in incidence of neoplastic progression among patients diagnosed with LGD vs nondysplastic Barrett's esophagus. Practice Advice 4: Patients in whom the diagnosis of LGD is downgraded to nondysplastic Barrett's esophagus should be managed as nondysplastic Barrett's esophagus. Practice Advice 5: In Barrett's esophagus patients with confirmed LGD (based on expert gastrointestinal pathology review), repeat upper endoscopy using high-definition/high-resolution white-light endoscopy should be performed under maximal acid suppression (twice daily dosing of proton pump inhibitor therapy) in 8-12 weeks. Practice Advice 6: Under ideal circumstances, surveillance biopsies should not be performed in the presence of active inflammation (erosive esophagitis, Los Angeles grade C and D). Pathologists should be informed if biopsies

  4. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Bacterial Meningoencephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkys Rodríguez Llerena

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Bacterial Meningoencephalitis. It has been defined as an acute inflammatory process caused by bacteria, often purulent, which involves the meninges, subarachnoid space around the brain, spinal cord and usually includes the ventricles. It is caused in the 80% of the patients by three bacteria: Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides and Streptococcus pneumonia. Concepts, classification, diagnosis and treatment were reviewed. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  5. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Hypovolemic Shock.

    OpenAIRE

    Alba Enseñat Álvarez; Omar Bárbaro Rojas Santana; Alexis Díaz Mesa; Ariamna Fleites Gómez

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Hypovolemic Shock. It has been defined as the persistence of tissue hypoperfusion, usually associated to blood hypotension as the result of body fluids loss. This document includes a description of the concept and different stages of the disease, aetiological classification and comments about the main elements related with diagnosis and treatment, stressing volemic restoration. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accom...

  6. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Hypovolemic Shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Enseñat Álvarez

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Hypovolemic Shock. It has been defined as the persistence of tissue hypoperfusion, usually associated to blood hypotension as the result of body fluids loss. This document includes a description of the concept and different stages of the disease, aetiological classification and comments about the main elements related with diagnosis and treatment, stressing volemic restoration. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  7. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Convulsive Condition Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Rene Navarro Machado

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Convulsive Condition Management. It has been redefined as the occurrence of two or more successive convulsions without conscience recuperation between them; or the occurrence of convulsive uninterrupted activity for more than 5 minutes, including focal crisis. This document includes a review and update of conceptual, etiological and classification aspects for diagnosis and treatment, stressing the various therapy trends. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  8. [Clinical or radiological diagnosis of impingement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloth, J K; Zeifang, F; Weber, M-A

    2015-03-01

    Shoulder impingement syndrome is a clinically common entity involving trapping of tendons or bursa with typical clinical findings. Important radiological procedures are ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography. Projection radiography and computed tomography (CT) are ideal to identify bony changes and CT arthrography also serves as an alternative method in cases of contraindications for MRI. These modalities support the clinically suspected diagnosis of impingement syndrome and may identify its cause in primary diagnosis. In addition, effects of impingement are determined by imaging. Therapy decisions are based on a synopsis of radiological and clinical findings. The sensitivity and specificity of these imaging modalities with regard to the diagnostics of a clinically evident impingement syndrome are given in this review article. Orthopedic and trauma surgeons express the suspicion of an impingement syndrome based on patient history and physical examination and radiologists confirm structural changes and damage of intra-articular structures using dedicated imaging techniques.

  9. [Topical issues of food allergy diagnosis in pediatric practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, S G; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Vishneva, E A; Gevorkyan, A K; Alekseeva, A A; Petrovskaya, M I

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy (FA) in children, especially in infancy, is still a significant public health problem. The severity and prognosis of disease progression associated with FA considerably depends on the correct and early diagnostics of this pathology, as well as on the following management of a child. At the same time delayed elimination diet administration, unreasonable or overlong dietary intervention might have become abuse management of a patient and have a negative impact on the development of a child and reduce the quality of life. The article summarizes the current practical approaches to the diagnosis of FA based on evidence-based medicine and adopted European and Russian national consensus documents, as well as on our own experience of management of patients with this pathology. FA diagnosis in a child usually includes clinical laboratory tests and clarification of clinical and anamnestic data. Unfortunately, it is a fact that preference is given to laboratory methods for diagnosis based on specific IgE determination or skin samples. However, the basis for cause-significant allergen identifying is detecting detailed medical history and clinical picture of a disease which still appears to be the most reliable tool for FA diagnosis.

  10. Practical Aspects Regarding the Histopathological Diagnosis of Early Mycosis Fungoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tebeică T.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycosis fungoides is the most common primary T-cell lymphoma of skin. The disease has a protean clinical and histological presentation in its early patch and plaque stages, when distinction from mimicking inflammatory dermatoses is difficult. Since no single criterion is specific enough, a reliable diagnosis in early stages requires integration of clinical, histopathological and molecular findings. In skin biopsies, the most helpful histologic features are the detection of atypical lymphocytes in the epidermis with minimal epidermal changes, basal alignment of lymphocytes along dermal-epidermal junction and formation of Pautrier microabscesses. An aberrant immunophenotype of T cells and molecular detection of a clonal T-cell population are factors that could allow a more specific diagnosis. This work recapitulates and discusses these features from a practical perspective.

  11. Clinical Assessment And Diagnosis Of Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is characterized by progressive decline in an alert individual, leading to loss of independence in day-to-day functioning. It is a generic term for a condition that has various causes and hence myriad clinical presentations. It has to be distinguished from age-related cognitive decline, depression and delirium all of which are common in the elderly population. Detailed history and mental status examination are necessary to identify dementia, fit it into one of the various bedside classifications and pursue the differential diagnosis. This teaching review summarizes current information on definition, differential diagnosis and classification of dementia and presents a brief elaboration of bedside cognitive testing pertaining to dementia. A bird′s eye view of the profiles of various dementia subtypes is also provided so that after reading this article the reader will able to recognize dementia, conduct clinical examination to identify the characteristic cognitive profile and formulate the differential diagnosis with confidence.

  12. Development of clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Steven D; Areán, Patricia A; Craske, Michelle G; Crawford, Kermit A; Kivlahan, Daniel R; Magnavita, Jeffrey J; Ollendick, Thomas H; Sexton, Thomas L; Spring, Bonnie; Bufka, Lynn F; Galper, Daniel I; Kurtzman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are intended to improve mental, behavioral, and physical health by promoting clinical practices that are based on the best available evidence. The American Psychological Association (APA) is committed to generating patient-focused CPGs that are scientifically sound, clinically useful, and informative for psychologists, other health professionals, training programs, policy makers, and the public. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2011 standards for generating CPGs represent current best practices in the field. These standards involve multidisciplinary guideline development panels charged with generating recommendations based on comprehensive systematic reviews of the evidence. The IOM standards will guide the APA as it generates CPGs that can be used to inform the general public and the practice community regarding the benefits and harms of various treatment options. CPG recommendations are advisory rather than compulsory. When used appropriately, high-quality guidelines can facilitate shared decision making and identify gaps in knowledge.

  13. Leptospirosis: epidemiology, clinical aspects and diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.A. Goris (Marga)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractLeptospirosis is among the most widespread zoonotic diseases in the world. The clinical manifestations of the disease are not specific, can vary widely and therefore are consistent with many other diseases. A diagnosis can only be confirmed with certainty by laboratory tests. Infecti

  14. Leptospirosis: epidemiology, clinical aspects and diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.A. Goris (Marga)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractLeptospirosis is among the most widespread zoonotic diseases in the world. The clinical manifestations of the disease are not specific, can vary widely and therefore are consistent with many other diseases. A diagnosis can only be confirmed with certainty by laboratory tests.

  15. Catamenial migraine: epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Gromova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a review of the literature, the authors consider the pathogenesis, diagnosis, epidemiology, and clinical features of catamenial migraine. The view that catamenial migraine attacks are severest receives more and more support. The criteria that may be used to predict a severer course of catamenial migraine attacks in a specific patient are to be further defined.

  16. Clinical Practice. Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Dennis M; Rosen, Clifford J

    2016-01-21

    Key Clinical Points Postmenopausal Osteoporosis Fractures and osteoporosis are common, particularly among older women, and hip fractures can be devastating. Treatment is generally recommended in postmenopausal women who have a bone mineral density T score of -2.5 or less, a history of spine or hip fracture, or a Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) score indicating increased fracture risk. Bisphosphonates (generic) and denosumab reduce the risk of hip, nonvertebral, and vertebral fractures; bisphosphonates are commonly used as first-line treatment in women who do not have contraindications. Teriparatide reduces the risk of nonvertebral and vertebral fractures. Osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures have been reported with treatment but are rare. The benefit-to-risk ratio for osteoporosis treatment is strongly positive for most women with osteoporosis. Because benefits are retained after discontinuation of alendronate or zoledronic acid, drug holidays after 5 years of alendronate therapy or 3 years of zoledronic acid therapy may be considered for patients at lower risk for fracture.

  17. 临床诊断思维%Clinical diagnosis thinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘祥林; 王涓冬; 赵华

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the level and the ability of clinical physician′s diagnosis thinking,in this paper, the concept and importance of clinical diagnosis thinking, the basic conditions of diagnosis thinking,and the main methods of clinical diagnosis thinking are expounded.The relationship of clinical medical practice and improving the level and the ability of clinical thinking is reiterated.Several conditions of evaluating the level and the ability of clinical thinking are put forward.%为提高临床医师诊断思维水平与能力。本文阐述了临床诊断思维的概念与重要性;进行诊断思维应具备的基本条件;临床诊断思维常用的几种方法;重申了临床医疗实践与提高临床思维水平和能力的关系;初步提出了评价临床思维水平和能力的几个条件。

  18. Diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a clinical practice guideline update from the American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Wilt, Timothy J; Weinberger, Steven E; Hanania, Nicola A; Criner, Gerard; van der Molen, Thys; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Denberg, Tom; Schünemann, Holger; Wedzicha, Wisia; MacDonald, Roderick; Shekelle, Paul

    2011-08-02

    This guideline is an official statement of the American College of Physicians (ACP), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS). It represents an update of the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is intended for clinicians who manage patients with COPD. This guideline addresses the value of history and physical examination for predicting airflow obstruction; the value of spirometry for screening or diagnosis of COPD; and COPD management strategies, specifically evaluation of various inhaled therapies (anticholinergics, long-acting β-agonists, and corticosteroids), pulmonary rehabilitation programs, and supplemental oxygen therapy. This guideline is based on a targeted literature update from March 2007 to December 2009 to evaluate the evidence and update the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable COPD. RECOMMENDATION 1: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that spirometry should be obtained to diagnose airflow obstruction in patients with respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). Spirometry should not be used to screen for airflow obstruction in individuals without respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 2: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) between 60% and 80% predicted, ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS suggest that treatment with inhaled bronchodilators may be used (Grade: weak recommendation, low-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 3: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) 50% predicted. (Grade: weak recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 7: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that clinicians should prescribe continuous oxygen therapy in patients with COPD who have severe resting hypoxemia (Pao(2) ≤55 mm Hg or Spo(2)

  19. Parasomnias: Diagnosis, Classification and Clinical Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Ozlem Orhan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Parasomnias, as described in the recent second edition of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, are “undesirable physical events or experiences” occurring during sleep transition, during arousal from sleep, or within the sleep period. These events encompass abnormal sleep related movements, behaviors, emotions, perceptions, dreaming, and autonomic nervous system functioning. Parasomnias are classified as: 1 disorders of arousal (from non-rapid eye movement, or NREM, sleep; 2 parasomnias usually associated with REM (rapid eye movement sleep; and 3 other parasomnias. This sleep disorders in childhood are common, and often more frequent than in adults. Clinicians should be aware that many pediatric parasomnias have benign and self-limited nature. Most of the parasomnias may not persist into late childhood or adolescence. Parasomnias in adults often differ in type from childhood parasomnias and may portend significant psychiatric disturbances or neurodegenerative disorders. A reliable diagnosis can often be made from a detailed history from the patient and, if possible, the parents or bed partner. Detailed overnight investigations of parasomnias are usually not required. The non-REM parasomnias are more common in community although REM parasomnias are more likely to be seen in general neurological practice. Sleep related eating disorder, sleep related dissociative disorders and sleep related sexual behavior and sleep related violence are novel and rarely reported sleep disorders. REM sleep behavior disorder is common and should be sought in all neurodegenerative diseases. They are included among clinical disorders due to the resulting injuries, and adverse health and psychosocial effects, which may affect the bed partner as well as the patient. Finally, parasomnias are common disturbances of sleep that may significantly affect the patient’s quality of life and that of the bed partner. Therefore, appropriate diagnostic and

  20. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  1. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bong; Sik; Matthew; Kim; Bob; T; Li; Alexander; Engel; Jaswinder; S; Samra; Stephen; Clarke; Ian; D; Norton; Angela; E; Li

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is notapparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians.

  2. Preventive psychiatry in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Sood

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last two and a half decades, there have been series of global burden of disease studies which have highlighted significant disability attributable to mental and behavioral disorders with a huge treatment gap. Integration of the preventive strategies in the clinical practice has the potential to reduce the disability due to mental illnesses. The patients come to the clinic with an intention to get treated and investigated for the symptoms they have. At this point, they may also be amenable to the advice related to prevention. Therefore, the clinical encounter can be seen as an opportunity to implement preventive strategies. Preventive efforts in clinical practice must be guided by knowledge about the epidemiological data related to specific mental illnesses and about the evidence-based preventive strategies available for specific mental illnesses. These should be directed toward all those persons (patients, caregivers accompanying and at home, teachers, employers, etc. who are present and also toward those who are not present during the clinical encounter and must be age, gender, and culture sensitive. Sociodemographic characteristics of a person seeking relief from a problem in the clinical encounter help in directing the preventive efforts. The preventive efforts are also driven by the fact that the patient has the first episode or established or treatment refractory mental illness and the short or long duration of illness. For prevention-minded clinical practice, it helps to have a template so that the assessments and interventions relevant for prevention can be carried out as per that scheme; it also helps in orienting the practicing mental health professionals. While making various assessments, making a list of the likely issues to be addressed by preventive efforts during clinical encounter ( first and subsequent is also helpful.

  3. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnosis of Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Lugo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Acromegaly is a disabling disease that is associated with increased morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features and confirmed by measuring GH levels after oral glucose loading and the estimation of IGF-I. It has been suggested that the rate of mortality in patients with acromegaly is correlated with the degree of control of GH. Adequately treated, the relative mortality risk can be markedly reduced towards normal.

  4. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Gloria; Pena, Lara; Cordido, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Acromegaly is a disabling disease that is associated with increased morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features and confirmed by measuring GH levels after oral glucose loading and the estimation of IGF-I. It has been suggested that the rate of mortality in patients with acromegaly is correlated with the degree of control of GH. Adequately treated, the relative mortality risk can be markedly reduced towards normal.

  5. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnosis of Acromegaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Gloria; Pena, Lara; Cordido, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Acromegaly is a disabling disease that is associated with increased morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features and confirmed by measuring GH levels after oral glucose loading and the estimation of IGF-I. It has been suggested that the rate of mortality in patients with acromegaly is correlated with the degree of control of GH. Adequately treated, the relative mortality risk can be markedly reduced towards normal. PMID:22518126

  6. On information field of clinical diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹茂开

    2003-01-01

    "Field" is a universal phenomenon existing in both nature and society,and determines the existence and significance of all materials or information.The man being has always been generating and carrying a large quantity of life information in his whole life.Each piece of life information has an independent information field.The life information field includes such three subfields as bioinformation field,psychoinformation field and psycho-bioinformation field.The clinical diagnosis information field which is a specific information field within the information field of human activities consists of all information concerning man's health.Only after we have cognized and ascertained the clinic diagnosis information field,can we accurately utilize its function to serve the human being.

  7. Clinical practice guidelines for prevention, diagnosis and management of early and delayed-onset ocular injuries due to mustard gas exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhale Rajavi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Considering the lack of CPGs for the prevention, diagnosis, and management of mustard gas-induced keratitis, these recommendations would be useful to prevent the serious ocular complications of mustard gas and standardize eye care services to the affected individuals.

  8. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnosis of Acromegaly

    OpenAIRE

    Gloria Lugo; Lara Pena; Fernando Cordido

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Ac...

  9. Venous malformations: clinical diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behravesh, Sasan; Yakes, Wayne; Gupta, Nikhil; Naidu, Sailendra; Chong, Brian W; Khademhosseini, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi

    2016-12-01

    Venous malformation (VM) is the most common type of congenital vascular malformation (CVM). They are present at birth and are often symptomatic, causing morbidity and pain. VMs can be challenging to diagnose and are often confused with hemangioma in terminology as well as with imaging. An accurate clinical history and cross-sectional imaging are critical for diagnosis and for devising management. This manuscript will review imaging approaches to diagnosing VMs and current treatment strategies.

  10. [Clinical guideline for detection and diagnosis of hypertensive pregnancy disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunes-Espinosa, Alma Luisa; Ríos-Castillo, Brenda; Peralta-Pedrero, María Luisa; del Rocío Cruz-Cruz, Polita; Sánchez-Ambríz, Slivia; Sánchez-Santana, Joaquín Renato; Ramírez-Mota, Carolina; Zavaleta-Vargas, Norma Octavia; López-Cisneros, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy (HDP) are the main complication and cause of maternal and perinatal death. Pre-eclampsia represents a 34%, according to the Secretaría de Salud de México. To offer the family physicians tools for the opportune detection and diagnosis of HDP a clinical guideline was developmented. Clinical questions were formulated and structured. A standardized sequence to search for Practice Guidelines, based on the key words: hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, pre-eclampsia. Tripdatabase, MDConsult, National Guideline Clearinghouse, Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence were used. In addition, Cochrane Library Plus, Science Direct and OVID were used. Most of the recommendations were taken from guidelines selected and supplemented with the remaining material. The information is expressed in levels of evidence and grade of recommendation according to the characteristics of the study design and type of publications. To reduce morbidity and mortality from HDP health professionals should identify risk factors; conduct a close monitoring and early diagnosis. It is essential to provide information to the pregnant patient on alarm data and behavior to follow. This clinical practice guide offers current evidence for screening and diagnosis of HDP in primary care.

  11. Dual diagnosis among physicians: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braquehais, María Dolores; Lusilla, Pilar; Bel, Miquel Jordi; Navarro, María Cecilia; Nasillo, Viviana; Díaz, Albert; Valero, Sergi; Padrós, Jaume; Bruguera, Eugeni; Casas, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    Co-occurrence of mental disorders and substance use disorders (dual diagnosis) among doctors is a cause of serious concern due to its negative personal, professional, and social consequences. This work provides an overview of the prevalence of dual diagnosis among physicians, suggests a clinical etiological model to explain the development of dual diagnosis in doctors, and recommends some treatment strategies specifically for doctors. The most common presentation of dual diagnosis among doctors is the combination of alcohol use disorders and affective disorders. There are also high rates of self-medication with benzodiazepines, legal opiates, and amphetamines compared to the general population, and cannabis use disorders are increasing, mainly in young doctors. The prevalence of nicotine dependence varies from one country to another depending on the nature of public health policies. Emergency medicine physicians, psychiatrists, and anaesthesiologists are at higher risk for developing a substance use disorder compared with other doctors, perhaps because of their knowledge of and access to certain legal drugs. Two main pathways may lead doctors toward dual diagnosis: (a) the use of substances (often alcohol or self-prescribed drugs) as an unhealthy strategy to cope with their emotional or mental distress and (b) the use of substances for recreational or other purposes. In both cases, doctors tend to delay seeking help once a problem has been established, often for many years. Denial, minimization, and rationalization are common defense mechanisms, maybe because of the social stigma associated with mental or substance use disorders, the risk of losing employment/medical license, and a professional culture of perfectionism and denial of emotional needs or failures. Personal vulnerability interacts with these factors to increase the risk of a dual diagnosis developing in some individuals. When doctors with substance use disorders accept treatment in programs

  12. Clinical Practice Guidelines and Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai R. Singh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this section we shall see what Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs should be and what they are, the recent case of Xigris and a thriller-like manipulation by the concerned company to enter a performance 'bundle', CPG effectiveness/cost effectiveness and other considerations, how they serve Industry needs, and what methods can possibly assist them actualise their enormous potential.Introduction From the early nineties, a number of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs have been created and published by many different associations and organizations at considerable expense. CPGs are supposed to serve an important purpose. They offer objective consensus of expert opinion on treatment and hence are trusted by hospitals and practicing physicians alike. They can reduce the possibility of inappropriate care being delivered, while helping introduce new knowledge into clinical practice (Grimshaw and Russell, 1993; Merritt et al. , 1997; Woolf et al. , 1999. They are a distillate of biomedical wisdom at a certain point of time applied to better and more efficient patient care. Hence, rigorously developed guidelines can translate complicated research findings into actionable recommendations of clinical care (Shiffman et al. , 2003; Haines and Jones, 1994. Clinical practice guidelines have generally been accepted as an objective consensus on evidence (Baird, 2003. Practice guidelines approved by expert panels are intended to standardize care in such a way as to improve health outcomes (Eichacker et al. , 2006. Major hospitals and knowledge updated physicians feel reassured they are doing the very best by following CPGs. State of the art, and such other fancy labels, can be justifiably applied to them.McMaster et al., (2007 have talked recently of getting guidelines to work in practice. In an effort to make CPGs more effective, developers of such guidelines have started grouping evidence-based interventions into what are called 'bundles'. The justification for

  13. Pediatric insomnia: clinical, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miano, Silvia; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric insomnia is an extrinsic sleep disorder subdivided into two categories: behavioral insomnia and insomnia related to medical, neurological, and psychiatric diseases. This review will cover several types of insomnia, comorbidities and specific pediatric therapies according to clinical characteristics and age. Behavioral insomnia should be differentiated from pediatric insomnia due to medical conditions, mostly occurring during the first year of life. Multiple night awakenings and diurnal hypersomnolence are strong indicators of insomnia due to medical conditions. Insomnia during adolescence and pediatric insomnia associated with psychiatric comorbidity, cognitive disabilities and epilepsy, will be discussed in terms of diagnosis, clinical features and implications for treatment.

  14. Clinical practice guideline: screening and diagnosing autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, J

    2001-12-01

    The clinical practice guideline (CPG) reviewed in this month's column concerns the screening and diagnosis of autism. Autism is the third most common developmental disability and affects more than 1 in 500 children, or nearly 400,000 people in the United States, in some form. Primary care providers of children, including pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) and family nurse practitioners (FNPs), should reasonably expect to care for at least one child with autism (CWA). The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) has therefore developed guidelines to help healthcare providers facilitate the early identification of children with autism.

  15. Current practice for diagnosis and management of silent atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobreanu, Dan; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Lewalter, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Although it is well known that silent atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with morbidity and mortality rates similar to those of symptomatic AF, no specific strategy for screening and management of this form of AF has been advocated. The purpose of this survey was to identify current practices...... for the diagnosis and management of silent AF. This survey is based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the European Heart Rhythm Association Research Network partners. Responses were received from 33 centres in 16 countries. The preferred screening methods for silent AF in patients with rhythm control...... episode of silent AF was documented, without recommending further investigations. The results of this survey have confirmed that there is currently no consensus regarding the screening and management of patients with silent AF and that clinical practice is not always consistent with the few existing...

  16. Vertebral osteomyelitis: clinical features and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren Gök, S; Kaptanoğlu, E; Celikbaş, A; Ergönül, O; Baykam, N; Eroğlu, M; Dokuzoğuz, B

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to describe clinical and diagnostic features of vertebral osteomyelitis for differential diagnosis and treatment. This is a prospective observational study performed between 2002 and 2012 in Ankara Numune Education and Research Hospital in Ankara, Turkey. All the patients with vertebral osteomyelitis were followed for from 6 months to 3 years. In total, 214 patients were included in the study, 113 out of 214 (53%) were female. Out of 214 patients, 96 (45%) had brucellar vertebral osteomyelitis (BVO), 63 (29%) had tuberculous vertebral osteomyelitis (TVO), and 55 (26%) had pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis (PVO). Mean number of days between onset of symptoms and establishment of diagnosis was greater with the patients with TVO (266 days) than BVO (115 days) or PVO (151 days, p 15 mm, sensitivity was 0.66, specificity was 0.97, positive predictive value was 0.89, negative predictive value was 0.88, and receiver operating characteristics area was 0.8. Tuberculous and brucellar vertebral osteomyelitis remained the leading causes of vertebral osteomyelitis with delayed diagnosis. In differential diagnosis of vertebral osteomyelitis, consumption of unpasteurized cheese, dealing with husbandry, sweating, arthralgia, hepatomegaly, elevated alanine transaminase, and lumbar involvement in magnetic resonance imaging were found to be predictors of BVO, thoracic involvement in magnetic resonance imaging and tuberculin skin test > 15 mm were found to be predictors of TVO, and history of spinal surgery and leucocytosis were found to be predictors of PVO.

  17. Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya de Azambuja Berti-Couto

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical criteria for the diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A clinical study was carried out on 145 subjects (48 males; 97 females; aged 20 to 90 years. Each subject was clinically examined, in the morning and in the afternoon, along 1 day. A focused anamnesis allowed identifying symptoms of hyposalivation, like xerostomia complaints (considered as a reference symptom, chewing difficulty, dysphagia and increased frequency of liquid intake. Afterwards, dryness of the mucosa of the cheecks and floor of the mouth, as well as salivary secretion during parotid gland stimulation were assessed during oral examination. RESULTS: Results obtained with Chi-square tests showed that 71 patients (48.9% presented xerostomia complaints, with a significant correlation with all hyposalivation symptoms (p <0.05. Furthermore, xerostomia was also significantly correlated with all data obtained during oral examination in both periods of evaluation (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients is feasible and can provide an immediate and appropriate therapy avoiding further problems and improving their quality of life.

  18. The practical use of cytology for diagnosis in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, E; Brunetti, G; Del Vecchio, M; Ruocco, V

    2011-02-01

    Exfoliative cytology for diagnostic purposes is rarely used in Dermatology despite the rapid and reliable results which this procedure can offer in many clinical conditions. This simple procedure may prove advantageous in a wide range of skin diseases, including genodermatoses (Hailey-Hailey disease), infections (mainly herpetic infections, molluscum contagiosum, leishmaniasis), immune disorders (early oral pemphigus) and tumours (basal and squamous cell carcinomas, Paget disease, erythroplasia of Queyrat, and others). The specific circumstances where cytological examination provides a very helpful and practical aid to confirmation or exclusion of a clinically suspected diagnosis are briefly reviewed. Cytological patterns, along with some technical hints on how to take and stain Tzanck smears correctly, are described in connection with the diseases considered.

  19. Clinical diagnosis of tamponade in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, A; Hamilton, W

    1990-07-01

    A consecutive series of 25 Malawian patients with tamponade secondary to tuberculosis were compared to 25 patients with congestive cardiac failure, without pericardial effusion in a retrospective study. More patients with tamponade had an impalpable apex beat (21/1), pulsus paradoxus (13/0), soft heart sounds (13/2), paradoxical rise in jugular venous pressure (6/0), and fewer had a murmur (1/14). All these results are significant (p less than 0.05) by the chi 2 test with Yates' correction. The presence of two or more of these discriminating physical signs has a positive predictive value of 75 per cent, and a negative predictive value of 99.5 per cent for the diagnosis of tamponade. Clinical diagnosis of tamponade by primary health care personnel in Malawi should be possible, and lead to earlier treatment.

  20. Cugini's syndrome: its clinical history and diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gasbarrone

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This article deals with the description and diagnosis of a new nosographic syndrome, which received the eponym of "Cugini's syndrome" by the name of the Author who discovered its clinical picture. This syndrome is characterized by the binomial: "minimal target organ damage associated to monitoring prehypertension". CLINICAL HISTORY AND DIAGNOSIS: Between the years 1997 and 2002, the Author published a series of investigations regarding some office normotensives who inexplicably showed incipient signs of target organ damage (TOD. Investigated via ambulatory (A blood (B pressure (P monitoring (M, these subjects were surprisingly found not to be hypertensive. Neverthless, the office normotensives with TOD exibited the daily mean level of their systolic (S and diastolic (D BP (DML SBP/DBP significantly more elevated as compared to true normotensives. Because of these ABPM findings, the Author realized that the investigated subjects were false normotensives whose TOD was associated with a monitoring prehypertension (ABPM-diagnosable prehypertension alias monitoring prehypertension alias masked prehypertension. The year after the last Cugini's investigation, the INC-7 Reports introduced the term: "prehypertension" in its classification of arterial hypertension, as an office sphygmomanometric condition in between office normotension and office hypertension. The ABPM cut-off upper limits for a differential diagnosis between monitoring normotension, prehypertension and hypertension are reported, as calculated by the Author in its collection of ABPMs. The eponym of "Cugini's syndrome" was assigned in 2007 and confirmed in 2009. CONCLUSIVE REMARKS: The monitoring prehypertension is a further condition of discrepancy between office sphygmomanometry and ABPM, as per a masked prehypertension, whose diagnosis has to be immediately diagnosed, for preventing the onset of a TOD. There are reported the present investigations dealing with the possible

  1. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  2. Probabilistic and fuzzy logic in clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, G

    2007-06-01

    In this study I have compared classic and fuzzy logic and their usefulness in clinical diagnosis. The theory of probability is often considered a device to protect the classical two-valued logic from the evidence of its inadequacy to understand and show the complexity of world [1]. This can be true, but it is not possible to discard the theory of probability. I will argue that the problems and the application fields of the theory of probability are very different from those of fuzzy logic. After the introduction on the theoretical bases of fuzzy approach to logic, I have reported some diagnostic argumentations employing fuzzy logic. The state of normality and the state of disease often fight their battle on scalar quantities of biological values and it is not hard to establish a correspondence between the biological values and the percent values of fuzzy logic. Accordingly, I have suggested some applications of fuzzy logic in clinical diagnosis and in particular I have utilised a fuzzy curve to recognise subjects with diabetes mellitus, renal failure and liver disease. The comparison between classic and fuzzy logic findings seems to indicate that fuzzy logic is more adequate to study the development of biological events. In fact, fuzzy logic is useful when we have a lot of pieces of information and when we dispose to scalar quantities. In conclusion, increasingly the development of technology offers new instruments to measure pathological parameters through scalar quantities, thus it is reasonable to think that in the future fuzzy logic will be employed more in clinical diagnosis.

  3. The diagnosis, treatment and prevention of gout: The 2014 international clinical guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. T. Vatutin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The given description of the 2014 new international guidelines prepared by the International Panel of Rheumatologists in the 3e Initiative reflects the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of gout, which are adapted for clinical practice.

  4. European audit of current practice in diagnosis and treatment of childhood growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Bernasconi, Sergio; Clayton, Peter E

    2002-01-01

    The present survey among members of the ESPE on current practice in diagnosis and treatment of growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) is of great clinical relevance and importance in the light of the recently published guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of GHD by the Growth Hormone Research...... Society. We have found much conformity but also numerous discrepancies between the recommendations of the Growth Hormone Research Society and the current practice in Europe....

  5. [Optic neuritis: diagnosis, treatment and clinical implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Heimo; Tabibian, David

    2015-12-16

    Optic neuritis is one of the most important causes of visual loss in young and middle aged adults. The prognosis in terms of functional outcome is good. The diagnosis of optic neuritis is a clinical one. Steroids can shorten the recovery time but do not change the long term functional outcome. The MRI is the most important investiga- tion to assess an associated risk of multiple sclerosis. Optic cohe- rence tomography (OCT) contribute additional details to course and functional outcome of optic neuritis. In the future the OCT may additionally contribute to the relationship between optic neuritis and possible associated multiple sclerosis.

  6. Clinical diagnosis of dental caries: a European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, N B

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a broad international perspective on aspects of the RTI/UNC systematic review, to introduce relevant literature not cited, and to make recommendations for clinical practice education and research suggested by the evidence. Clinical caries diagnosis represents the foundation on which the answers to most of the consensus questions will be based. This paper highlights needs for being clear about definitions and nomenclature; understanding the importance of the concepts underlying the D1 and D3 diagnostic thresholds used widely within the RTI/UNC Review; and appreciating that the diagnostic challenge now faced by clinicians is significant and is becoming more complex as the presentation and distribution of the disease changes over time and the range of preventive and operative treatment options expands. A series of recommendations informed by the evidence are made, including a rather contentious issue for many clinicians concerning the lack of evidence supporting the continued use of a sharp explorer as a diagnostic tool for primary caries diagnosis. This practice should be discontinued as it may cause some harm to the patient and yet fails to provide a significant balancing diagnostic benefit. Finally, it is suggested that dentistry should learn from the developing evidence base in medicine on how best to disseminate the findings of reviews and promote appropriate changes in clinical practice.

  7. [Genetic and clinical diagnosis of Angelman syndrome. Case Reviews].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Ramírez, M; Csanyi, B; Martínez Antón, J; Delgado Marqués, M; Bauzano Poley, E

    2008-09-01

    Angelman syndrome is characterised by mental retardation, epilepsy, speech impairment, facial dysmorphism and a characteristic behavioural phenotype. Diagnostic clinical criteria have been defined by consensus since 1995. It is caused by deficiency or inactivation of the UB3A gene. There is a percentage of cases which satisfy these clinical features but have negative genetic testing. We consider it necessary to analyse the patient characteristics and possible phenotype-genotype correlations. All cases which were treated between 1981 and 2007 in a neurology unit and fulfilled the clinical criteria were included. Genetic diagnosis was made by methylation testing and fluorescent in situ hybridization. Thirteen patients were studied, nine with positive genetic testing and four with negative testing who completed the clinical criteria. The average age at diagnosis was 37 months. Eleven cases showed acquired microcephaly. Flat occiput, mouth and maxillary malformations, hypopigmentation, a happy appearance and hyperactivity were practically constant characteristics. Speech and walking ability were the areas which showed most deficit. Twelve cases had epilepsy. Three of the cases with normal genetic testing showed less microcephaly and better psychomotor development, particularly in walking ability. The phenotypical characteristics of the syndrome should be known before requesting specific genetic testing and to make a diagnosis even in cases with negative genetic. The phenotype characteristics that describe Angelman syndrome were verified. Deletion cases had a worse outcome.

  8. Molecular biology of lung cancer: Diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nana-Sinkam, Serge Patrick; Powell, Charles A

    2013-05-01

    Based on recent bench and clinical research, the treatment of lung cancer has been refined, with treatments allocated according to histology and specific molecular features. For example, targeting mutations such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with tyrosine kinase inhibitors has been particularly successful as a treatment modality, demonstrating response rates in selected patients with adenocarcinoma tumors harboring EGFR mutations that are significantly higher than those for conventional chemotherapy. However, the development of new targeted therapies is, in part, highly dependent on an improved understanding of the molecular underpinnings of tumor initiation and progression, knowledge of the role of molecular aberrations in disease progression, and the development of highly reproducible platforms for high-throughput biomarker discovery and testing. In this article, we review clinically relevant research directed toward understanding the biology of lung cancer. The clinical purposes of this research are (1) to identify susceptibility variants and field molecular alterations that will promote the early detection of tumors and (2) to identify tumor molecular alterations that serve as therapeutic targets, prognostic biomarkers, or predictors of tumor response. We focus on research developments in the understanding of lung cancer somatic DNA mutations, chromosomal aberrations, epigenetics, and the tumor microenvironment, and how they can advance diagnostics and therapeutics.

  9. Biosensors in Clinical Practice: Focus on Oncohematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Cortelezzi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are devices that are capable of detecting specific biological analytes and converting their presence or concentration into some electrical, thermal, optical or other signal that can be easily analysed. The first biosensor was designed by Clark and Lyons in 1962 as a means of measuring glucose. Since then, much progress has been made and the applications of biosensors are today potentially boundless. This review is limited to their clinical applications, particularly in the field of oncohematology. Biosensors have recently been developed in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by hematological malignancies, such as the biosensor for assessing the in vitro pre-treatment efficacy of cytarabine in acute myeloid leukemia, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor for assessing the efficacy of imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia. The review also considers the challenges and future perspectives of biosensors in clinical practice.

  10. Pyogenic sacroiliitis: diagnosis, management and clinical outcome

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    Kucera, Tomas; Sponer, Pavel [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Brtkova, Jindra [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Ryskova, Lenka [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Popper, Eduard [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Rehabilitation, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Frank, Martin [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Surgery, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Kucerova, Marie [Regional Hospital in Pardubice, Department of Neurosurgery, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the role of diagnostic tools and management options for patients with pyogenic sacroiliitis, including potential complications. This retrospective study included 16 patients with pyogenic sacroiliitis who were admitted to a single orthopaedic centre between 2007 and 2012. The following data were collected: demographics, history, radiography, magnetic resonance images (MRI), biological data, type of pathogenic agent, abscess formation, type of management, and clinical outcome. Our study demonstrated that only one-fifth of the patients with lumbogluteal or hip pain had established diagnoses of suspected pyogenic sacroiliitis upon admission. MRIs confirmed this diagnosis in all cases. MRI examinations revealed joint fluid in the sacroiliac joint and significant oedema of the adjacent bone and soft tissues. In 12 of the 16 cases, erosions of the subchondral bone were encountered. Contrast-enhanced MRI revealed that 9 patients had abscesses. All patients received antibiotic therapy. Antibiotic treatment was only successful in 9 cases. The other 7 patients underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided abscess drainage. Drainage was sufficient for 4 patients, but 3 patients required open surgery. One patient required sacroiliac arthrodesis. The clinical outcomes included minimal disability (n = 10), moderate disability (n = 5), and full disability (n = 1) of the spine. Contrast-enhanced MRI is mandatory for a reliable diagnosis. Abscess formation was observed in approximately half of the MRI-diagnosed sacroiliitis cases and required minimally invasive drainage under CT guidance or frequently open surgery. (orig.)

  11. Photodynamic therapy in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Filonenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is on opportunities and possibilities of application of photodynamic therapy in clinical practice. The advantages of this method are the targeting of effect on tumor foci and high efficiency along with low systemic toxicity. The results of the set of recent Russian and foreign clinical trials are represented in the review. The method is successfully used in clinical practice with both radical (for early vulvar, cervical cancer and pre-cancer, central early lung cancer, esophageal and gastric cancer, bladder cancer and other types of malignant tumors, and palliative care (including tumor pleuritis, gastrointestinal tumors and others. Photodynamic therapy delivers results which are not available for other methods of cancer therapy. Thus, photodynamic therapy allows to avoid gross scars (that is very important, for example, in gynecology for treatment of patients of reproductive age with cervical and vulvar cancer, delivers good cosmetic effect for skin tumors, allows minimal trauma for intact tissue surrounding tumor. Photodynamic therapy is also used in other fields of medicine, such as otorhinolaryngology, dermatology, ophthalmology, orthopaedics, for treatment of papilloma virus infection and purulent wounds as antibacterial therapy.

  12. Are clinical practice guidelines impartial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    In A Theory of Justice, John Rawls demands from citizens who decide upon principles of justice and the rules derived from such principles that they abstract from all particularities that constitute their identity as unique individuals. This demand is unrealistic in policy settings where actual policy-makers convene to provide guidance, establish rules regarding public good, and enact legislation. In practice, I argue, policy-makers, legislators, and others involved in developing social rules that pertain to distributive justice formulate such rules as reasonably partial spectators. To illustrate, I show how clinical practice guidelines are established and mediated by a reasonably partial expert panel whose partial action is publicly justifiable, yet whose claims to impartiality are not.

  13. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  14. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Liu; Joe Y. Chang

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy.

  15. [Clinical research II. Studying the process (the diagnosis test)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, Juan O; Wacher-Rodarte, Niels H; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    A diagnosis test is carried out to establish the presence of health or illness. In the latter it could grade the severity. Due to its importance in clinical decisions, the diagnosis test is evaluated by mathematical strategies. We estimate the sensitivity and specificity once we know the existence or not of the disease, but we act in the reverse direction; with the presence "X" test positive or negative we estimate the presence of the disease, therefore, we use the positive and negative predictive values. Mathematical strategy allow us to quantify the observation, but it requires judgment to determine the quality making use of a minimum of features: a) selection under the same criteria for cases and controls; b) the inclusion of the full spectrum of disease severity (from mild to the most serious, ensuring that all levels have an enough number of subjects); c) the interpretation of both, the gold standard and the new tool of diagnosis, it must be blind and conducted by experts; d) the interpretation of results should show us what is their application in everyday clinical practice; e) the reproducibility must be checked. Do not forget that usually, we treat only one patient at once, what enforce us to have full knowledge of the performance of the diagnostic test, and to consider all clinical aspects for its proper implementation.

  16. Clinical and Laboratory Diagnosis of Intestinal Tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Chun Shi; Li-Fan Zhang; Yue-Qiu Zhang; Xiao-Qing Liu; Gui-Jun Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background:Tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide problem.Intestinal TB (ITB) constitutes a major public health problem in developing countries and has been associated with significant morbidity and mortality.The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical,radiological,endoscopic,and pathological features of ITB and to define the strategy for establishing the diagnosis.Methods:A retrospective study (from January 2000 to June 2015) was carried out in Peking Union Medical College Hospital and all hospitalized cases were diagnosed as ITB during the study period were included.The relevant clinical information,laboratory results,microbiological,and radiological investigations were recorded.Results:Of the 85 cases,61 cases (71.8%) were ranged from 20 to 50 years.The ileocecal region was involved in about 83.5% (71/85) of patients.About 41.2% (35/85) of patients had co-existing extra ITB,especially active pulmonary TB.Abdominal pain (82.4%) was the most common presenting symptom followed by weight loss (72.9%) and fever (64.7%).Both T-cell spot of TB test (T-SPOT.TB) and purified protein derivatives (PPD) tests were performed in 26 patients:20 (76.9%) positive T-SPOT.TB and 13 (50.0%) positive PPD were detected,with a statistical significant difference (P =0.046).Twenty cases (23.5%) were histopathology and/or pathogen confirmed TB;27 cases (31.8%) were diagnosed by clinical manifestation consistent with ITB and evidence of active extra ITB;38 cases (44.7%) were diagnosed by good response to diagnostic anti-TB therapy.Conclusions:ITB is difficult to diagnose even with modem medical techniques due to its nonspecific clinical and laboratory features.At present,combination of clinical,endoscopic,radiological,and pathological features continues to be the key to the diagnosis of ITB.

  17. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's Palsy executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell's Palsy. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 11 recommendations developed encourage accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment and, when applicable, facilitate patient follow-up to address the management of long-term sequelae or evaluation of new or worsening symptoms not indicative of Bell's palsy. There are myriad treatment options for Bell's palsy; some controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of several of these options, and there are consequent variations in care. In addition, there are numerous diagnostic tests available that are used in the evaluation of patients with Bell's palsy. Many of these tests are of questionable benefit in Bell's palsy. Furthermore, while patients with Bell's palsy enter the health care system with facial paresis/paralysis as a primary complaint, not all patients with facial paresis/paralysis have Bell's palsy. It is a concern that patients with alternative underlying etiologies may be misdiagnosed or have an unnecessary delay in diagnosis. All of these quality concerns provide an important opportunity for improvement in the diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy.

  18. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in outpatient practice: Diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Bestuzheva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dizziness is one of the common reasons for visits to physicians of various specialties; the data of foreign investigations show that benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is most frequently encountered.Objective: to study the causes of dizziness, to analyze the frequency of BPPV and the efficiency of its treatment in outpatient practice.Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 80 patients, including 55 (68.7% women and 25 (31.3% men, aged 18 to 75 years (mean age 53.8±12.8 years, who complained of dizziness and sought for medical advice in the Therapeutic-and-Diagnostic Unit, A.Ya. Kozhevnikov Clinic of Nervous System Diseases, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University.Results. The most common causes of dizziness in outpatient practice were BPPV (46.2% and postural phobic vertigo (35%. The diagnosis of VPPV, if special positional testing (Dix-Hallpike and McClure-Pagnini tests was carried out, was shown to create no significant difficulties. The diagnosis was not established in the majority (97.5% of the patients; effective treatment was performed in one of the patients. Combined treatment, by performing the positional tests and using betaserc for 2 months, led to complete resolution of positional vertigo in most (97.3% patients.Discussion. The findings indicate the efficiency of examining patients with complaints of dizziness, by using the special otoneurological tests to detect BPPV. The purposeful questioning of patients with BPPV can suspect this disease in the majority of cases. Our investigation shows the high efficiency of rehabilitation maneuvers for BPPV, which agrees well with the data of other authors. Physicians’ poor awareness of BPPV among physicians and the high efficiency of its treatment in outpatient practice are noted.

  19. [Diagnosis and Clinical Examination of Autoinflammatory Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Hiroaki

    2015-05-01

    Autoinflammatory syndrome is characterized by: 1) episodes of seemingly unprovoked inflammation, 2) the absence of a high titer of autoantibodies or auto-reactive T cells, and 3) an inborn error of innate immunity. In this decade, many autoinflammatory syndromes have been reported in Japan, and so many Japanese physicians have become aware of this syndrome. Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes present with excessive systemic inflammation including fever, rashes, arthritis, and organ-specific inflammation and are caused by defects in single genes encoding proteins that regulate innate inflammatory pathways. The main monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes are familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), Blau syndrome, and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome. We diagnosed these syndromes as clinical manifestations and performed genetic screening. Many serum cytokines are elevated in patients with autoinflammatory syndrome, but this is not disease-specific. The pathogeneses of many autoinflammatory syndromes are known to be related to inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that serve as a platform for caspase 1 activation and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 muturation. Especially, NLRP3 inflammasomes may play a crucial role in the intiation and progression of FMF and CAPS. In the future, we hope to discover new clinical examinations which can provide evidence of inflammasome activation independent of genetic screening. In this issue, I introduce autoinflammatory syndromes and discuss the diagnosis and clinical examination of these syndromes.

  20. Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Julio

    2011-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most frequent parasitic disease of the human brain. Modern imaging studies, CT and MRI, have defined the diagnosis and characterization of the disease. Through these studies the therapeutic approach for each case may be individualized with the aid of antihelmintics, steroids, symptomatic medicines, or surgery. The use of one or various therapeutic measures largely depends on the peculiar combination of number, location, and biological stage of lesions as well as the degree of inflammatory response to the parasites. Although there is not a typical clinical picture of NCC, epilepsy is the most frequent manifestation of parenchymal NCC, whereas hydrocephalus is the most frequent manifestation of meningeal NCC. Eradication of cysticercosis is an attainable goal by public education and sanitary improvement in endemic areas.

  1. [Cardiac metastases. Clinical arguments of the diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirinelli, A; Le Guludec, D; Sicre, P; Davy, J M; Motté, G

    1987-05-01

    The case reported here concerns an 80-year old man without history of coronary disease whose electrocardiogram showed localized and stable repolarization disorders, viz. elevated ST segment with isoelectric point J and negative T wave. This pattern suggested cardiac metastasis after chest examination had revealed a bronchial epidermoid carcinoma. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed that the lateral wall of the left ventricle was thickened, hyperechogenic and akinetic. The secondary cardiac lesions were confirmed at pathological examination. This case has prompted us to discuss the frequency of such secondary tumours of the heart, their mode of dissemination to the myocardium and their clinical and electrocardiographic aspects. It underlines the usefulness of echocardiography for the diagnosis of cardiac tumours.

  2. Autoimmune encephalitis: Clinical diagnosis versus antibody confirmation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Caroline Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Autoimmune encephalitis is a heterogeneous disorder which is being diagnosed with increasing frequency. The diagnosis of these disorders is based on the detection of autoantibodies and characteristic clinical profiles. Aims: We aimed to study the antibody profile in encephalitis patients with suspected autoimmune etiology presenting to a tertiary care center. Settings and Design: The subjects were selected by screening all patients with clinical profile suggesting autoimmune encephalitis admitted in the neuromedical intensive care unit (ICU of a tertiary care center in South India. Materials and Methods: Patients who fulfilled modified Zuliani et al.′s, criteria for autoimmune encephalitis were identified during the period December 2009-June 2013. Blood samples from these subjects were screened for six neuronal antibodies. Statistical analysis used: Chi-square test was applied to compare the antibody positive and negative patients. Results: Out of 1,227 patients screened, 39 subjects (14 males: 25 females were identified with a mean age of 15.95 years and 19 cases were assessed in the acute and 20 in the convalescent phase of the illness. Seizure (87.8 % was the most common presenting symptom; status epilepticus occurred in 23 (60.5% patients during the course of the illness. Fourteen (35.9% patients were N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR antibody-positive and all were negative for the other antibodies tested. Conclusions: One-third of patients presenting with acute noninfective encephalitis would be positive for NMDAR antibodies with the remaining two-thirds with clinically suspected autoimmune encephalitis being antibody-negative. There are few markers in the clinical and investigative profiles to distinguish antibody-positive and -negative patients.

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of mast cell disorders: practical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandes, Alex Freire; Medeiros, Raphael Salles Scortegagna; Rizzatti, Edgar Gil

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE The term mastocytosis covers a group of rare disorders characterized by neoplastic proliferation and accumulation of clonal mast cells in one or more organs. The aim of this study was to assess the principal elements for diagnosing and treating these disorders. DESIGN AND SETTING Narrative review of the literature conducted at Grupo Fleury, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS This study reviewed the scientific papers published in the PubMed, Embase (Excerpta Medica Database), Lilacs (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde) and Cochrane Library databases that were identified using the search term "mastocytosis." RESULTS The clinical presentation of mastocytosis is remarkably heterogeneous and ranges from skin lesions that may regress spontaneously to aggressive forms associated with organ failure and short survival. Currently, seven subtypes of mastocytosis are recognized through the World Health Organization classification system for hematopoietic tumors. These disorders are diagnosed based on clinical manifestations and on identification of neoplastic mast cells using morphological, immunophenotypic, genetic and molecular methods. Abnormal mast cells display atypical and frequently spindle-shaped morphology, and aberrant expression of the CD25 and CD2 antigens. Elevation of serum tryptase is a common finding in some subtypes, and more than 90% of the patients present the D816V KIT mutation in mast cells. CONCLUSION Here, we described the most common signs and symptoms among patients with mastocytosis and suggested a practical approach for the diagnosis, classification and initial clinical treatment of mastocytosis.

  4. [Toxoplasmosis in pregnancy - questions in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geleneky, Markéta

    2013-06-01

    Toxoplasmosis acquired during pregnancy is a serious disease that may significantly affect fetal development and cause irreversible or therapeutically hardly influenced damage to the newborn. Early and correct diagnosis of the disease in the mother is essential for determining prognosis and further diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The case study combines a number of factors to be encountered in clinical practice which may complicate diagnostic considerations. One of them is the existence of a rare phenomenon of reinfection - its possible effects on prenatal screening and other interpretations of such findings. Another problem is the evaluation of the origin of sonographically confirmed fetopathy in relation to Toxoplasma etiology and the choice of next steps that should follow in this situation. Finally, the text discusses the selection of postnatal examinations so that they sufficiently contribute to decision-making about the newborn's treatment initiation.

  5. [Asthma clinical practice guidelines: advantages and pitfalls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Vicente; Bellido-Casado, Jesús; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Rodrigo, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    The Clinical Practice Guidelines on asthma have contributed towards unifying concepts and reaching a consensus on performances between different professional groups. However, they have failed in the overall improvement in the management of asthma, the final objective that they are meant to achieve. Today, almost 20 years after they appeared, the majority of asthmatic patients are still inadequately controlled, partly due to lack of follow up by doctors and the rest of health care staff who have to look after them. This lack of follow up of these recommendations is probably associated with a lack of well structured planning in their circulation and implementation. Also, although the recommendations of these guidelines agree in what is essential, they differ in other aspects, which in turn could be determining factors in clinical practice. The purpose of this article has been to establish the main differences in the recommendations that the principal clinical practice guidelines on the disease propose on the diagnosis, classification and treatment of asthma. To do this we have compared, The British Guideline on the Management of Asthma 2007, The Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention/Global Initiative for Asthma 2006 (GINA), the National Prevention program for Education on Asthma (Programa Nacional de Prevención para la Educación del Asma) (NAEPP), the Spanish Guide for the Management of Asthma (Guía Española para el Manejo del Asma 2003) (GEMA) and the ALAT y SEPAR guides, Latin-America and Spain. Recommendations for the Prevention and Treatment of Asthma Exacerbation (América Latina y España. Recomendaciones para la Prevención y el Tratamiento de la Exacerbación Asmática 2008) (ALERTA).

  6. PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: CLASSIFICATION, CLINICAL PRESENTATION, DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Korotaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture gives basic information about psoriatic arthritis (PsA, a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, spine, and enthesises from a group of spondyloarthritis. It describes the epidemiology of the disease and considers current ideas on its pathogenesis and factors influencing the development of PsA in psoriatic patients. The classification and clinical forms of PsA are presented. The major clinical manifestations of the disease are indicated to include peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis. The diagnosis of the disease is noted to be established on the basis of its detected typical clinical and radiological signs, by applying the CASPAR criteria. A dermatologist, rheumatologist, and general practitioner screen PsA, by actively detecting complaints, characteristic clinical and radiological signs of damage to the joints, and/or spine, and/or enthesises and by using screening questionnaires. There are data that patients with PsA are observed to be at higher risk for a number of diseases type 2 diabetes mellitus hypertension, coronary heart disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases, etc. The aim of current pharmacotherapy for PsA is to achieve remission or minimal activity of clinical manifestations of the disease, to delay or prevent its X-ray progression, to increase survival, to improve quality of life in patients, and to reduce the risk of comorbidities. The paper considers groups of medicines used to treat the disease, among other issues, information about biological agents (BA registered in the Russian Federation for the treatment of PsA. Most patients are mentioned to show a good response to this therapy option just 3–6 months after treatment initiation; however, some of them develop primary inefficiency. In this case, switching one BA to another is recommended. Some patients using a BA develop secondary treatment inefficiency, which is firstly due to the appearance of

  7. Clinical practice on the horizon: personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwell, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of the human genome project, we have never known so much about the uniqueness of individuals. Personalized medicine is poised to use this genetic and genomic information along with the impact of environment and clinical presentation to provide healthcare from an individual perspective. This offers the opportunity to improve our ability to diagnose and predict disease, provide earlier intervention, identify new treatment regimens, and address the safety and efficacy of drug use. The impact of personalized medicine to our current model of healthcare delivery is tremendous, and although strides have been made, there are still challenges and barriers to overcome before personalized medicine can be fully implemented. Advanced practice nurses may not be fully aware of the personalized medicine initiative or may not be well versed on genetic and genomic content, which is a key concept of personalized medicine. The role of advanced practice nurses is an integral part of the healthcare system, and as such, they are poised to be key providers and contributors to personalized medicine. The personalized medicine initiative is discussed along with examples of genetic and genomic information that lend to our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, as well as the role and responsibilities of advanced practice nurses. Resources for personalized medicine and genetic and genomic content are provided.

  8. A novel method of tumor diagnosis with thermal tomography and its clinical practice%一种新的热层析肿瘤诊断方法及其临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶福丽; 李凯扬; 史贵连

    2016-01-01

    There exists close connections between the physiological heat and the pathological changes in biological body.When there exists diseases or functional changes in certain part of the human body, the blood flow and cell metabolism speed will change correspondingly, which will lead to the temperature variation in this area.Based on the temperature distribution of body surface acquired with thermal infrared imager, a novel tumor diagnosis method according to the q-r characteristic curve is presented in this paper. The q-r characteristic curve expresses the relation of heat intensity changing with depth on the disease focus.Based on a large number of clinical cases and statistics, a diagnostic criteria judging diseases by q-r characteristic curve is proposed ( only for female breast at present) .Based on the distribution area and trend of q-r curve, the diagnosis range of diseases is divided into 4 kinds: malignancy, benign tumor, inflammation and hyperplasia or normality.To prove the validity of this method, several clinical practices are carried and the diagnosis results are compared with those of molybdenum target ( MT) X ray and B-ultrasonic images.It is a radiation-free green method with rapid diagnostic procedure and accurate diagnosis result.%采用红外热像仪提取体表的温度信息,通过一种新的热层析方法求得病灶部位的热源强度值随层析深度变化的q-r特性曲线,并结合大量临床病例统计,规范出一套通过q-r特性曲线来判断疾病性质的诊断标准(目前只针对人体乳腺)。根据q-r曲线分布区域及其走向,把疾病诊断范围分为4类:恶性肿瘤、良性肿瘤、炎症、增生或正常。临床实验中,挑选4类疾病中的典型性病例进行q-r曲线分析。实验结果表明,q-r曲线诊断结果与组织活检结果具有高度的一致性,并把实验诊断结果与钼靶、B超结果进行对比分析。作为一种新的医学诊断方法,其诊断过程

  9. Body composition in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Angela; Garaci, Francesco; Cafarelli, Francesco Pio; Guglielmi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Nutritional status is the results of nutrients intake, absorption and utilization, able to influence physiological and pathological conditions. Nutritional status can be measured for individuals with different techniques, such as CT Body Composition, quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Ultrasound, Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry and Bioimpendance. Because obesity is becoming a worldwide epidemic, there is an increasing interest in the study of body composition to monitor conditions and delay in development of obesity-related diseases. The emergence of these evidence demonstrates the need of standard assessment of nutritional status based on body weight changes, playing an important role in several clinical setting, such as in quantitative measurement of tissues and their fluctuations in body composition, in survival rate, in pathologic condition and illnesses. Since body mass index has been shown to be an imprecise measurement of fat-free and fat mass, body cell mass and fluids, providing no information if weight changes, consequently there is the need to find a better way to evaluate body composition, in order to assess fat-free and fat mass with weight gain and loss, and during ageing. Monitoring body composition can be very useful for nutritional and medical interventional. This review is focused on the use of Body Composition in Clinical Practice.

  10. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Transfusion of Patients in Critical Condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Alejandro Gómez Baute

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Transfusion of Patients in Critical Condition. We stress transfusion criteria (blood cells, platelets, granulocyte concentrations, plasma and cryoprecipitate, doses, diagnosis and treatment of post-transfusion reactions. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  11. The role of MRI in musculoskeletal practice: a clinical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean Deyle, Gail

    2011-01-01

    This clinical perspective presents an overview of current and potential uses for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in musculoskeletal practice. Clinical practice guidelines and current evidence for improved outcomes will help providers determine the situations when an MRI is indicated. The advanced competency standard of examination used by physical therapists will be helpful to prevent overuse of musculoskeletal imaging, reduce diagnostic errors, and provide the appropriate clinical context to pathology revealed on MRI. Physical therapists are diagnostically accurate and appropriately conservative in their use of MRI consistent with evidence-based principles of diagnosis and screening. PMID:22851878

  12. Narcolepsy: etiology, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta B. Zawilska

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available [u][/u] Narcolepsy is a chronic hypersomnia characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS and manifestations of disrupted rapid eye movement sleep stage (cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations. Mechanisms underlying narcolepsy are not fully understood. Experimental data indicate that the disease is caused by a loss of hypocretin neurons in the hypothalamus, likely due to an autoimmune process triggered by environmental factors in susceptible individuals. Most patients with narcolepsy and cataplexy have very low hypocretin-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. An appropriate clinical history, polysomnogram, and multiple sleep latency test are necessary for diagnosis of the disease. Additionally, two biological markers, i.e., cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels and expression of the DQB1*0602 gene, are used. The treatment of narcolepsy is aimed at the different symptoms that the patient manifests. Excessive daytime sleepiness is treated with psychostimulants (amphetamine-like, modafinil and armodafinil. Cataplexy is treated with sodium oxybate (GHB, tricyclic antidepressants, or selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors. Sleep paralysis, hallucinations, and fragmented sleep may be treated with sodium oxybate. Patients with narcolepsy should follow proper sleep hygiene and avoid strong emotions.

  13. Research and clinical practice relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashammakhi N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To The Editor: I highly value and greet the authors for their editorial. Many important issues related to medical education and its future in Libya have been discussed in this paper [1]. One important point that has been addressed and I feel deserves attention is the “abnormal” relationship between clinical practice and research in Libya. From discussions with colleagues, this problem somehow has evolved from a misconception about educational and training systems that may have occurred in the past. It may also be related to the lack of attention to research that has long existed in Libya [2,3]. The other aspect, shared with many other developing countries, is the misconception of research as unimportant or a luxury aspect of medicine. When it comes to understanding how a system (including healthcare can be updated and developed, the answer is vague! One important reason is a lack of understanding of the impact that research has on developing methods. In developed countries, research is the main academic distinction that leads to appointments for coveted positions in the system and is an important factor for academic promotion. In Libya, there remain arguments about who will be awarded Chair of university clinical departments. Such a post should no doubt be given to those with established academic achievements. When highly qualified persons are at the top of the pyramid this leads to further progress and enhanced research and advancement. The authors have discussed the point of having proper search committees for leadership and faculty positions. I believe that it will help eliminate the current stagnation and help to create innovative solutions. This should lead to improved medical education, health services, and ultimately impact the quality of life of all Libyan citizens.

  14. How GPs implement clinical guidelines in everyday clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbæk Le, Jette; Hansen, Helle P; Riisgaard, Helle

    2015-01-01

    . OBJECTIVE: To investigate how GPs implement clinical guidelines in everyday clinical practice and how implementation approaches differ between practices. METHODS: Individual semi-structured open-ended interviews with seven GPs who were purposefully sampled with regard to gender, age and practice form...

  15. Oral candidiasis: pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalla, Rajesh V; Patton, Lauren L; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Oral candidiasis is a clinical fungal infection that is the most common opportunistic infection affecting the human oral cavity. This article reviews the pathogenesis, clinical presentations, diagnosis and treatmentstrategies for oral candidiasis.

  16. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary and Cerebral Resuscitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Rene Navarro Machado

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary and Cerebral Resuscitation. It is the group of procedures that should be accomplished to restore circulation and ventilation in a patient with cardiac arrest, including actions to reintegrate upper neurological functions after restoring cardiac function. This document includes a review of concepts, aetiology and updates the main clinical aspects related with diagnosis and treatment aimed at the post-resuscitation syndrome. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  17. Integrating research, clinical practice and translation: the Singapore experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang; Wong, Damon Wing Kee; Zhang, Zhuo; Lee, Beng-Hai; Gao, Xinting; Yin, Fengshou; Zhang, Jielin; Htoo, Min Thet

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the experiences of the Singapore ocular imaging team, iMED, in integrating image processing and computer-aided diagnosis research with clinical practice and knowledge, towards the development of ocular image processing technologies for clinical usage with potential impact. In this paper, we outline key areas of research with their corresponding image modalities, as well as providing a systematic introduction of the datasets used for validation.

  18. Practices and ethical concerns regarding preimplantation diagnosis. Who regulates preimplantation genetic diagnosis in Brazil?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B. Damian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD was originally developed to diagnose embryo-related genetic abnormalities for couples who present a high risk of a specific inherited disorder. Because this technology involves embryo selection, the medical, bioethical, and legal implications of the technique have been debated, particularly when it is used to select features that are not related to serious diseases. Although several initiatives have attempted to achieve regulatory harmonization, the diversity of healthcare services available and the presence of cultural differences have hampered attempts to achieve this goal. Thus, in different countries, the provision of PGD and regulatory frameworks reflect the perceptions of scientific groups, legislators, and society regarding this technology. In Brazil, several texts have been analyzed by the National Congress to regulate the use of assisted reproduction technologies. Legislative debates, however, are not conclusive, and limited information has been published on how PGD is specifically regulated. The country requires the development of new regulatory standards to ensure adequate access to this technology and to guarantee its safe practice. This study examined official documents published on PGD regulation in Brazil and demonstrated how little direct oversight of PGD currently exists. It provides relevant information to encourage reflection on a particular regulation model in a Brazilian context, and should serve as part of the basis to enable further reform of the clinical practice of PGD in the country.

  19. Clinical application of noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Chuanlong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic fibrosis is the common outcome of chronic liver diseases of various causes. At present, liver biopsy is the “gold standard” for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis, but it has limitations and is invasive, which leads to the development of noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis. The article mainly introduces the technology and application of noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis from the aspects of clinical manifestation, serology, and radiology. It has pointed out the clinical value of these noninvasive diagnosis techniques, and it discusses the progress in clinical research and its limitations for noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis.

  20. A Critical Approach to Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Marshall

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of publication of clinical practice guidelines for the management of common medical illnesses continues to accelerate. The appropriate dissemination and uptake of high quality practice guidelines can synthesize evidence, improve patient outcomes and enhance the efficiency of health care delivery. However, the methodological rigour and relevance of the growing number of publications labelled ’clinical practice guidelines’ vary widely. Health care payers, providers and advocates must learn to appraise and interpret guideline recommendations critically. A simple and practical nine-question approach to evaluating the quality, relevance and effectiveness of clinical practice guidelines is presented.

  1. Clinical practice guidelines in patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts have always been made to evolve certain prin-ciples to reduce the variability in the management of patients and make medical care more appropriate. These efforts have become almost a movement since 1980s as evidenced in the development of clinical practice guide-lines in all medical disciplines. This article describes the need for clinical practice guidelines and their de-velopment methods and qualities. Advantages and limi-tations of clinical practice guidelines are enumerated. The salient features of various available clinical prac-tice guidelines in urology are also described.

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of dizziness in outpatient practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Antonenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the causes of dizziness and instability in patients during an outpatient specialized appointment and to analyze and improve typical management tactics for these patients. Patients and methods. In 2009 to 2014, neurologists, dizziness specialists, examined 300 patients (122 men and 178 women aged 18 to 85 years, who complained of dizziness and instability. Prior to the examination, the patients had been diagnosed as having dyscirculatory encephalopathy (46%, vertebrobasilar insufficiency (30%, cervical osteochondrosis (12%, and vegetative dystonia (7%. Results and discussion. The examination established the causes of dizziness: benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV (34%, phobic postural instability (22%, multiple sensory insufficiency (15%, Meniere's disease (7%, migraine-associated vertigo (5%, vestibular neuronitis (4%, acute cerebrovascular accident (4%, and other diseases (9%. In accordance with the established diagnosis, adequate treatment which could completely eliminate or substantially reduce the magnitude of dizziness in the majority of cases was performed. The paper describes two clinical cases (BPPV and Meniere's disease. Betahistine dihydrochloride (vesticap, betaserc were most commonly used in a dose of 48 mg/day to treat vestibular vertigo. It gives the results of comparative treatment (with vesticap or betaserc for vestibular vertigo in 62 patients. The authors note the low level of diagnosis and effective treatment in patients with dizziness in outpatient practice. They show the expediency of a specialized examination, the efficiency and safety of current treatments, including medication therapy with betahistine dihydrochloride (betaserc and vesticap and rehabilitation on a stabiligraphic platform with biofeedback, for vestibular vertigo. 

  3. Diagnosis and treatmendt of non-organic cenuresis in children: Clínical Practice Guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Meave Cueva Luis Guillermo; Díaz García Luisa; Garza Elizondo Rosalía

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bedwetting is an involuntary urination during sleep at the age of 5 years or older. Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) have been developed to improve decision-making strategies and standardize medical practice. The Ministry of health in Mexico developed the CPG diagnosis and treatment of non- organic enuresis at the first level of prevention in children. Its evidence is evaluated with the USPSTF (United States Preventive Services Task Force). Material and methods: Original arti...

  4. [Clinical aspects and diagnosis of pleural fibromas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smati, B; Djilani, H; Boudaya, M S; Ghrib, B S; Mestiri, T; Mezni, F; Bouacha, H; Kilani, T

    2005-12-01

    Pleural fibromas are rare malignant or benign tumors requiring pathology study for certain diagnosis. From January 1985 to January 2001, 7 patients underwent surgery in our unit for pleural fibroma: 4 females and 3 males, mean age 60 years. The inaugural symptoms were chest pain (3 patients), dyspnea (2 patients), joint pain in a patient with Pierre-Marie pneumonic hypertrophic osteo-arthropathy, and acute hypoglycemia. Radiological investigations were decisive in orienting the diagnosis (chest X-ray, ultrasound, computed tomography and MRI). Surgical resection and pathological study of the surgical specimen is required to confirm the diagnosis. Patients should be carefully followed due to the risk of malignant recurrence.

  5. Molecular pathology of solid tumours: some practical suggestions for translating research into clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Tomlinson, I P M; Ilyas, M

    2001-01-01

    “Molecular pathology” can be broadly defined as the use of genetic data, in addition to the standard pathological parameters, to optimise diagnosis and to indicate treatment and prognosis. The benefit to be gained from the exploitation of molecular techniques to provide additional information to aid patient management is potentially vast. Currently, molecular pathology is rarely used in clinical practice, although it is anticipated that it will eventually become a part of routine practice. Ho...

  6. Femoral hernia; Clinical significance of radiologic diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergenfeldt, M.; Lasson, A. (Lund University (Sweden). Department of Surgery Malmo General Hospital (Sweden)); Ekberg, O.; Kesek, P. (Lund University (Sweden). Department of Radiology Malmo General Hospital (Sweden))

    A retrospective study of 18 patients with femoral hernia assessed by herniography is presented. Although a palpable lump was present in 11 patients (61%), the diagnosis of a femoral hernia was not made before herniography. Surgical exploration was performed in 12 patients and a femoral hernia was found and repaired with beneficial outcome in 9 of them. In conclusion: herniography is of value for the diagnosis of a femoral hernia in patients with obscure groin pain. (author). 14 refs.; 2 figs.

  7. Huntington's disease - clinical signs, symptoms, presymptomatic diagnosis, and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Kathleen M

    2011-01-01

    HD is a complex illness, with a broad clinical picture that begins years before clear motor onset and evolves over decades to a terminal state of extreme disability. It challenges the resources of families and communities and the skills of medical and ancillary health care providers. A broader understanding of the phenotypes, progression, and genetic basis of HD may elevate the standard of care for these deserving patients.

  8. Prenatal Depression: Best Practice Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Laura H.; Gintner, Gary G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide counselors with an overview of best practices for the treatment of women who experience prenatal depression (PND). The authors first discuss issues in the screening and diagnosis of PND. Next, the 2 most common treatments, antidepressants and psychotherapy, are reviewed and discussed in relation to current…

  9. Diagnosis and Treatment: Contemporary Practices in Special Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Herbert G.

    The author reviews current practices in the educational diagnosis of exceptional children and proposes a model for more effective identification, screening, and evaluation of students with special needs. Problems and benefits of models in current use (multidisciplinary team approach, the training based model, and the psychometric approach) are…

  10. Prenatal Depression: Best Practice Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Laura H.; Gintner, Gary G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide counselors with an overview of best practices for the treatment of women who experience prenatal depression (PND). The authors first discuss issues in the screening and diagnosis of PND. Next, the 2 most common treatments, antidepressants and psychotherapy, are reviewed and discussed in relation to current…

  11. Dementia with Parkinson's disease: Clinical diagnosis, neuropsychological aspects and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Lorenzo Otero

    Full Text Available Abstract Dementia with Parkinson's disease represents a controversial issue in the complex group of alpha-synucleinopathies. The author acknowledges the concept of a "continuum" between Parkinson disease's (PD, Lewy body dementia (LBD, and dementia in Parkinson's disease (PDD. However, the practicing neurologist needs to identify the phenotypic signs of each dementia. The treatment and prognosis are different in spite of the overlaps between them. The main aim of this review was to characterize the clinical diagnoses of dementia associated with Parkinson's disease (PDD. Secondarily, the review discussed some epidemiological and neuropsychological issues. Selection of articles was not systematic and reflects the author's opinion, where the main text selected was the recommendations from the Movement Disorder Society Task Force for PDD diagnosis. The Pub Med, OVID, and Proquest data bases were used for the search.

  12. SLAP lesions: Anatomy, clinical presentation, MR imaging diagnosis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Debra [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 W. Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States); MedRay Imaging and Fraser Health Authority, Vancouver, BC (Canada)], E-mail: cbchung@ucsd.edu; Mohana-Borges, Aurea; Borso, Maya; Chung, Christine B. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 W. Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    ABSTRACT: Superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) tears are an abnormality of the superior labrum usually centered on the attachment of the long head of the biceps tendon. Tears are commonly caused by repetitive overhead motion or fall on an outstretched arm. SLAP lesions can lead to shoulder pain and instability. Clinical diagnosis is difficult thus imaging plays a key diagnostic role. The normal anatomic variability of the capsulolabral complex can make SLAP lesions a diagnostic challenge. Concurrent shoulder injuries are often present including rotator cuff tears, cystic changes or marrow edema in the humeral head, capsular laxity, Hill-Sachs or Bankart lesion. The relevant anatomy, capsulolabral anatomic variants, primary and secondary findings of SLAP tears including MR arthrography findings, types of SLAP lesions and a practical approach to labral lesions are reviewed.

  13. School Refusal: Clinical Features, Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayhan Bahali

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Children regularly and voluntarily go to school in order to fulfill the expectations of society from them to continue their education or schooling. School continuation has been made compulsory by laws. Nonetheless, contrary to popular belief, for some children it is distressing to go to school. These children have difficulty continuing school and/or refuse to go to school. Today school refusal is defined as a child’s inability to continue school for reasons, such as anxiety and depression. The prevalence of school refusal has been reported to be approximately 1% in school-age children and 5% in child psychiatry samples. The prevalence of school refusal is similar among boys and girls. School refusal can occur at any time throughout the child’s academic life and at all socio-economic levels. School refusal is considered a symptom rather than a clinical diagnosis and can manifest itself as a sign of many psychiatric disorders, with anxiety disorders predominant. Separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, and adjustment disorder with anxiety symptoms are the most common disorders co-occurring with school refusal. While separation anxiety disorder is associated with school refusal in younger children, other anxiety disorders, especially phobias, are associated with school refusal in adolescents. Children who have parents with psychiatric disorders have a higher incidence of school refusal, and psychiatric disorders are more frequently seen in adult relatives of children with school refusal, which supports a significant role of genetic and environmental factors in th etiology of school refusal. School refusal is a emergency state for child mental health. As it leads to detrimental effects in the short term and the long term, it should be regarded as a serious problem. The long-lasting follow-up studies of school refusing children have revealed that these children have a higher incidence of

  14. Adherence to the Clinical Good Practical Guide of Bronchial Asthma in the Allergy Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    Marisela Pérez Pacaréu; Rafael Zamora Puerta; Magalys Olivares Elegia; Rosa Naranjo Revollido

    2007-01-01

    Background: Bronchial asthma constitutes a high prevalence disease which gets the 10 % of our milieu. That’s why it is very important to assess its clinical management. The clinical good practice guide constitutes a group of orientations which outline the medical assistance based on what is considered as the best options for treatment and diagnosis. Objective: to determine the adherence of the medical personnel specialized on the clinical good practical guide in the diagnosis and treatment of...

  15. Personalized Clinical Diagnosis in Data Bases for Treatment Support in Phthisiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugovkina, T K; Skornyakov, S N; Golubev, D N; Egorov, E A; Medvinsky, I D

    2016-01-01

    The decision-making is a key event in the clinical practice. The program products with clinical decision support models in electronic data-base as well as with fixed decision moments of the real clinical practice and treatment results are very actual instruments for improving phthisiological practice and may be useful in the severe cases caused by the resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The methodology for gathering and structuring of useful information (critical clinical signals for decisions) is described. Additional coding of clinical diagnosis characteristics was implemented for numeric reflection of the personal situations. The created methodology for systematization and coding Clinical Events allowed to improve the clinical decision models for better clinical results.

  16. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may be...

  17. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for cholelithiasis 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazuma, Susumu; Unno, Michiaki; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Inui, Kazuo; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa; Kai, Masahiro; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Mori, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Koji; Ryozawa, Shomei; Nimura, Yuji; Fujita, Naotaka; Kubota, Keiichi; Shoda, Junichi; Tabata, Masami; Mine, Tetsuya; Sugano, Kentaro; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2017-03-01

    Cholelithiasis is one of the commonest diseases in gastroenterology. Remarkable improvements in therapeutic modalities for cholelithiasis and its complications are evident. The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology has revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for cholelithiasis. Forty-three clinical questions, for four categories-epidemiology and pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatments, and prognosis and complications-were selected, and a literature search was performed for the clinical questions with use of the MEDLINE, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases for the period between 1983 and June 2012. The guidelines were developed with use of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. This article preferentially describes the clinical management of cholelithiasis and its complications. Following description of the diagnosis performed stepwise through imaging modalities, treatments of cholecystolithiasis, choledocholithiasis, and hepatolithiasis are introduced along with a flowchart. Since there have been remarkable improvements in endoscopic treatments and surgical techniques, the guidelines ensure flexibility in choices according to the actual clinical environment. The revised clinical practice guidelines are appropriate for use by clinicians in their daily practice.

  18. Clinical (non-histological) diagnosis of advanced prostate cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-08-03

    Aug 3, 2014 ... patients often have to travel long distances to a referral centre where prostate ... value (PPV) of 90% for a biopsy diagnosis of ACP, while a level of. >60 ng/ml had a .... and the time to PSA relapse significantly shorter, in the clinical diagnosis .... transrectal prostate biopsy and leads to substantial cost savings.

  19. Developing an advanced practice nurse-led liver clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Jean L

    2012-01-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is a leading cause of digestive disease deaths in the United States and continues to increase exponentially every year. Best practice does not currently recognize or utilize a clinic practice model for ESLD management. Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) can impact ESLD disease management by implementing an outpatient clinic care model to focus on treatment compliance, patient education, improvement of patient outcomes, and reduction in hospital admission rates for ESLD patients. A review of 15 research articles was completed to determine the impact APRNs can make on chronic care of ESLD patients. Results from the review support APRN analysis, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, intervention, and evaluation of ESLD patients. The literature reviewed also demonstrates that ESLD patients have improved symptom management when maintained in an outpatient setting, allowing for decreased hospital and insurance expenditures. Following evaluation of the evidence, it was concluded that an APRN-led ESLD clinic merits further study.

  20. Endodontic diagnosis: evaluation between clinical and histological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Souza Gonçalves

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, the aim was to analyze the histologic alterations in thirty dental pulps and correlate them with the clinical findings to verify agreement between the clinical and histopathologic diagnosis and contribute to knowledge about endodontic diagnosis. Methods: Using the methodology of Oliveira4, the pulpal conditions were clinically classified as normal, reversible pulpitis, pulpitis at the stage of transition, irreversible pulpitis and necrosis. Results: Lack of correlation was observed between the clinical and histopathologic diagnoses in the cases classified as reversible and at the stage of transition, which histologically consisted of irreversible lesions or degenerative alterations. All the cases clinically classified as irreversible corresponded to the histologic diagnoses. Conclusion: It was concluded that the correlation between clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of dental pulp was shown to be controversial, even though the semiotechnique used had been imperative for guidance about the irreversibility of pulpal lesion.

  1. Current approach to masked hypertension: From diagnosis to clinical management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dolan, Eamon

    2013-11-28

    The term masked hypertension phenomenon was first described by the late Professor Thomas Pickering and is commonly defined as having a normal clinic blood pressure (BP) but an elevated "out of office" reading. In the main these elevated readings have been provided through ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) but sometimes home BP monitoring is used. It is now largely accepted that ABPM gives a better classification of risk than clinic BP. Thus the elevated ABPM levels should relate to higher cardiovascular risk and it follows that these people might be regarded as being genuinely hypertensive and at higher cardiovascular risk. The problem for clinical practice is how to identify and manage these subjects. The phenomenon should be suspected in subjects who have had an elevated clinic BP at some time, in young subjects with normal or normal-high clinic BP who have early left ventricular hypertrophy, in subjects with a family history of hypertension in both parents, patients with multiple risks for cardiovascular disease and perhaps diabetic patients. It appears to be more prevalent in subjects of male gender, with younger age, higher heart rate, obesity or high cholesterol levels and in smokers. Those with masked hypertension are at higher risk of events such as stroke and have a higher prevalence of target organ damage, for example, nephropathy. In conclusion most of the debate around this topic relates to its reliable identification. Given the higher ambulatory readings there is an increases cardiovascular risk making this diagnosis important. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. A new generation of reliable clinical practice guidelines through MAGIC

    OpenAIRE

    Olav Vandvik, Per; Department of Medicine, Innnandet Hospital Trust, Gjøvik, Noruega. Norwegian Knowledge Centre for Health Services, Oslo, Noruega. Institute for Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo. Noruega. Médico. Ph.D.; Fog Heen, Anja; Department of Medicine, Innnandet Hospital Trust, Gjøvik, Noruega. Médico. Ph.D.; Brandt, Linn; Department of Medicine, Innnandet Hospital Trust, Gjøvik, Noruega. Institute for Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo. Noruega. Médico.

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective disease diagnosis and treatment requires that health personnel can access the best evidence, preferably through reliable clinical practice guidelines. Most guidelines have methodological weaknesses, suboptimal reporting formats, and frequently fail to update content. New standards developed by the US Institute of Medicine and the Guidelines International Network and Systems for Trustworthy Guidelines offer better opportunities for success in the development of guidelines, b...

  3. Nerve biopsy findings contribute to diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy: 78% of findings support clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Shuang; Sun, A-Ping; Chen, Lu; Dong, Rong-Fang; Zhong, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Multiple mononeuropathy is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy involving two or more nerve trunks. It is a syndrome with many different causes. We reviewed the clinical, electrophysiological and nerve biopsy findings of 14 patients who suffered from multiple mononeuropathy in our clinic between January 2009 and June 2013. Patients were diagnosed with vasculitic neuropathy (n = 6), perineuritis (n = 2), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (n = 2) or Lewis-Sumner syndrome (n = 1) on the basis of clinical features, laboratory data, electrophysiological investigations and nerve biopsies. Two patients who were clinically diagnosed with vasculitic neuropathy and one patient who was clinically diagnosed with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy were not confirmed by nerve biopsy. Nerve biopsies confirmed clinical diagnosis in 78.6% of the patients (11/14). Nerve biopsy pathological diagnosis is crucial to the etiological diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy.

  4. Nerve biopsy findings contribute to diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy: 78% of findings support clinical diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-shuang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple mononeuropathy is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy involving two or more nerve trunks. It is a syndrome with many different causes. We reviewed the clinical, electrophysiological and nerve biopsy findings of 14 patients who suffered from multiple mononeuropathy in our clinic between January 2009 and June 2013. Patients were diagnosed with vasculitic neuropathy (n = 6, perineuritis (n = 2, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (n = 2 or Lewis-Sumner syndrome (n = 1 on the basis of clinical features, laboratory data, electrophysiological investigations and nerve biopsies. Two patients who were clinically diagnosed with vasculitic neuropathy and one patient who was clinically diagnosed with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy were not confirmed by nerve biopsy. Nerve biopsies confirmed clinical diagnosis in 78.6% of the patients (11/14. Nerve biopsy pathological diagnosis is crucial to the etiological diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy.

  5. Nerve biopsy ifndings contribute to diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy:78% of ifndings support clinical diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-shuang Zhang; A-ping Sun; Lu Chen; Rong-fang Dong; Yan-feng Zhong; Jun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Multiple mononeuropathy is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy involving two or more nerve trunks. It is a syndrome with many different causes. We reviewed the clinical, electrophysi-ological and nerve biopsy ifndings of 14 patients who suffered from multiple mononeuropathy in our clinic between January 2009 and June 2013. Patients were diagnosed with vasculitic neurop-athy (n = 6), perineuritis (n = 2), chronic inlfammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (n = 2) or Lewis-Sumner syndrome (n = 1) on the basis of clinical features, laboratory data, elec-trophysiological investigations and nerve biopsies. Two patients who were clinically diagnosed with vasculitic neuropathy and one patient who was clinically diagnosed with chronic inlfamma-tory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy were not conifrmed by nerve biopsy. Nerve biopsies conifrmed clinical diagnosis in 78.6% of the patients (11/14). Nerve biopsy pathological diagno-sis is crucial to the etiological diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy.

  6. Canine Leishmaniosis: tools for diagnosis in veterinary practice in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Acero P

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to perform a critical analysis and guide veterinarians in the management of canine Leishmaniosis. A systematic literature review was performed between 2005 and 2014 including scientific papers which take into account experiences and reports of: pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical presentation, treatment, vaccination, prevention and control strategies. We discuss the different aspects of VL management and aspects that should be taken into account depending on the country, after a patient is suspected or confirmed as positive, including the possibility of euthanasia. We describe the different clinical manifestations of the disease, diagnosis, signs and treatment of canine leishmaniosis. Canine leishmaniosis is present in different parts of the country, therefore it must be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in the veterinary clinic, in patients with dermatological and systemic signs that are compatible with various diseases. In Colombia, the patients diagnosed with cutaneous leishmaniasis could be treated and have a favorable prognosis, whereas in canines with diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis euthanasia should be considered because of the public health implications.

  7. An adaptive online learning framework for practical breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tianshu; Wang, Jie; Chen, Jiayu

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an adaptive online learning (OL) framework for supporting clinical breast cancer (BC) diagnosis. Unlike traditional data mining, which trains a particular model from a fixed set of medical data, our framework offers robust OL models that can be updated adaptively according to new data sequences and newly discovered features. As a result, our framework can naturally learn to perform BC diagnosis using experts' opinions on sequential patient cases with cumulative clinical measurements. The framework integrates both supervised learning (SL) models for BC risk assessment and reinforcement learning (RL) models for decision-making of clinical measurements. In other words, online SL and RL interact with one another, and under a doctor's supervision, push the patient's diagnosis further. Furthermore, our framework can quickly update relevant model parameters based on current diagnosis information during the training process. Additionally, it can build flexible fitted models by integrating different model structures and plugging in the corresponding parameters during the prediction (or decision-making) process. Even when the feature space is extended, it can initialize the corresponding parameters and extend the existing model structure without loss of the cumulative knowledge. We evaluate the OL framework on real datasets from BCSC and WBC, and demonstrate that our SL models achieve accurate BC risk assessment from sequential data and incremental features. We also verify that the well-trained RL models provide promising measurement suggestions.

  8. Comparison of the Distribution of Morphological Disorganization of Pigmented Lesions in a Community-based Practice versus a University-based Clinical Setting as Measured by a Multispectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis Device: Impact on Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Richard R; Nikolaidis, Gregory; Rigel, Darrell S; Tucker, Natalie; Speck, Laura

    2015-02-01

    To observe how a multispectral digital skin lesion analysis device was used by dermatologists in a community-based clinical setting and determine differences from a university-based environment. Use of multispectral digital skin lesion analysis was incorporated into a community-based practice by 12 dermatologists across six clinics over seven consecutive days with the data provided by the device integrated as an adjuvant to their clinical evaluation for their pigmented lesion management decisions. Multispectral digital skin lesion analysis results were collected electronically for lesions prior to biopsy, and histopathological evaluation was performed for the biopsied lesions. Multispectral digital skin lesion analysis and pathology results were then compared to assess the degree of morphological disorganization. Study of 160 consecutive patients in community-based clinical setting. Proportion of "low" and "high" disorganization lesions identified by multispectral digital skin lesion analysis. Of the 344 pigmented skin lesions analyzed by multispectral digital skin lesion analysis, 255 were high disorganization, 113 of which were biopsied. Of the 89 lesions evaluated by multispectral digital skin lesion analysis to be low disorganization, seven were biopsied and all pathology was benign. Data demonstrate a higher rate of multispectral digital skin lesion analysis low disorganization readings for pigmented skin lesions (32% for single use per patient lesions, plesions, plesions clinics providing data for the university-based clinical study (10%). Multispectral digital skin lesion analysis in the community-based clinical setting may outperform specificity results from the university-based clinical trial study, perhaps because of a higher proportion of subtle lesions encountered at high-risk pigmented lesion clinics of participating major academic centers as compared with those in a community-based practice setting.

  9. Positron emission tomography clinical practice

    CERN Document Server

    Valk, Peter E; Bailey, Dale L; Townsend, David W; Maisey, Michael N

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a contemporary reference to the science, technology and clinical applications of PET and PET/CT. The opening chapters summarize the scientific aspects of PET and PET/CT including physics, instrumentation, radiation dosimetry and radiation protection. A chapter on normal variants in FDG PET imaging serves as an introduction to the clinical chapters, which cover oncology applications and have been updated to include the impact of FDG PET/CT imaging in oncology. The book concludes with chapters on the use of PET and PET/CT in cardiology and neurology and PET imaging of infectio

  10. Digital clinical photography: Practical tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Mutalik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Photographs are the most preferred and easiest way of documentation of patient visual features. In aesthetic and cutaneous surgery, there is an increased need for proper photographic documentation, from a medicolegal view point. This article discusses the basic aspects of camera and photography which a dermatologist should be aware before he/she starts with clinical photography.

  11. Granulomatous Amoebic Encephalitis: Clinical Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed A. Khan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE is a serious human disease with fatal consequences. With the mortality rate of more than 90%, it is not surprising that the majority of GAE infections are identified at the post-mortem stage. The most distressing aspect is that the high level of mortality is attributed to lack of awareness. Early diagnosis with aggressive treatment can lead to successful prognosis for the patient. Here, we describe a brief overview of the current understanding of the pathophysiology of GAE, available diagnostic methods, possible therapeutic interventions and the causative agents.

  12. Impella ventricular support in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burzotta, Francesco; Trani, Carlo; Doshi, Sagar N;

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support represents an evolving field of clinical research and practice. Currently, several cardiac assist devices have been developed but, among different institutions and countries, a large variation in indications for use and device selection exists. The Impella platform ...

  13. CT colonography. A guide for clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mang, Thomas [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiology; Schima, Wolfgang [Krankenhaus Goettlicher Heiland, Wien (Austria). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Wien (Austria); Sankt-Josef-Krankenhaus, Wien (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    The book on CT colonography - a guide for clinical practice - covers the following issues: indications and contraindications, examination; Image interpretation; findings at CT colonography, how to generate a useful report, screening, how to train for CT colonography.

  14. Etiology, diagnosis, and clinical management of vulvodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadownik LA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Leslie A Sadownik University of British Columbia, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vancouver, BC, Canada Abstract: Chronic vulvar pain or discomfort for which no obvious etiology can be found, ie, vulvodynia, can affect up to 16% of women. It may affect girls and women across all age groups and ethnicities. Vulvodynia is a significant burden to society, the health care system, the affected woman, and her intimate partner. The etiology is multifactorial and may involve local injury or inflammation, and peripheral and or central sensitization of the nervous system. An approach to the diagnosis and management of a woman presenting with chronic vulvar pain should address the biological, psychological, and social/interpersonal factors that contribute to her illness. The gynecologist has a key role in excluding other causes for vulvar pain, screening for psychosexual and pelvic floor dysfunction, and collaborating with other health care providers to manage a woman's pain. An important component of treatment is patient education regarding the pathogenesis of the pain and the negative impact of experiencing pain on a woman's overall quality of life. An individualized, holistic, and often multidisciplinary approach is needed to effectively manage the woman's pain and pain-related distress. Keywords: vulvodynia, diagnosis, treatment, etiology, sexual pain disorder, dyspareunia, vestibulodynia, assessment, treatment, multidisciplinary

  15. [Clinical importance and diagnosis of halitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akos, Nagy; Zsolt, Brugoviczky; Péter, Novák; Gábor, Nagy

    2012-09-01

    The origin of halitosis comes from the Latin word "halitus" meaning 'breath, exhaled air', and in the Hungarian terminology it means bad and smelly breath. The human body emits a number of volatile molecules, which have a peculiar odour. Their presence is influenced by several factors, such as genetic, nutritional and psychological factors. Since bad breath belongs to taboo subjects, halitosis can often lead to social isolation. To determine the incidence of halitosis, an exact diagnosis is needed which sometimes predestinates the possible treatment as well. Investigators estimate the incidence about 50% in the whole population. The male/female ratio is the same and the incidence is growing with age. The diagnosis can be genuine halitosis, pseudo halitosis and halitophobia. We can divide the genuine type into physiological and pathophysiological subtypes. The cause of the halitosis usually can be found in the oral cavity. The volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) produced by some of the oral bacteria are responsible for its development. Only 10% of the causes are extraoral, mostly inflammation of airways or gastrointestinal disorders. The judgment of halitosis is based on three objective methods: the organoleptic, the sulphide monitoring and the gas cromatography methods. Since the origin of the halitosis is mainly the oral cavity, dentists should treat them. Beyond the dental treatments the enhancement of the oral hygiene, the continuous motivation and monitoring are also very important, such as the use of tongue cleansing and special anti-malodour rinses.

  16. Challenge in Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment of Leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora I. Ríos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Introduction: Leptospirosis is an acute febrile disease caused by the leptospira. It is considered a zoonosis that affects a variety of animals, both wild and domestic (mainly rodents. Humans become infected accidentally by contact with urine or tissues from infected animals. This pathology has variable clinical manifestations, ranging from inapparent infections and aseptic meningitis, to severe forms such as the Weil syndrome. Development: We present the case of a young patient of 22 years old with fever quantified peaks of 40° C, chills, profuse sweating, headache, muscle and joint pain in knees and malleoli, retroorbital and retrosternal pain; and appetite loss. The symptoms occurred after 20 days of having practiced extreme water sports. Conclusion: The late diagnosis of the patient and hospital readmission are the result of several factors; First, the homology with other infectious diseases that present acute febrile illness with similar symptoms as dengue , malaria, influenza , yellow fever , brucellosis; and secondly the lack of expertise and poor contact with patients who present this disease by the medical staff. Correct antibiotic treatment and proper support reduce morbidity and mortality. The objective of this article is to describe a case of human leptospirosis and make a review of the literature in order to analyze the epidemiological characteristics and relevant clinical manifestations.

  17. Deterministic versus evidence-based attitude towards clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Akbar; Moayyeri, Alireza

    2007-08-01

    Generally, two basic classes have been proposed for scientific explanation of events. Deductive reasoning emphasizes on reaching conclusions about a hypothesis based on verification of universal laws pertinent to that hypothesis, while inductive or probabilistic reasoning explains an event by calculation of some probabilities for that event to be related to a given hypothesis. Although both types of reasoning are used in clinical practice, evidence-based medicine stresses on the advantages of the second approach for most instances in medical decision making. While 'probabilistic or evidence-based' reasoning seems to involve more mathematical formulas at the first look, this attitude is more dynamic and less imprisoned by the rigidity of mathematics comparing with 'deterministic or mathematical attitude'. In the field of medical diagnosis, appreciation of uncertainty in clinical encounters and utilization of likelihood ratio as measure of accuracy seem to be the most important characteristics of evidence-based doctors. Other characteristics include use of series of tests for refining probability, changing diagnostic thresholds considering external evidences and nature of the disease, and attention to confidence intervals to estimate uncertainty of research-derived parameters.

  18. Social media in clinical practice

    CERN Document Server

    Meskó, Bertalan

    2013-01-01

    The number of patients using social media and the number of applications and solutions used by medical professionals online have been sky-rocketing in the past few years, therefore the rational behind creating a well-designed, clear and tight handbook of practical examples and case studies with simple pieces of suggestions about different social media platforms is evident. While the number of e-patients is rising, the number of web-savvy doctors who can meet the expectations of these new generations of patients is not, this huge gap can only be closed by providing medical professionals with ea

  19. Loop Diuretics in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Won; Han, Sang Youb

    2015-06-01

    Diuretics are commonly used to control edema across various clinical fields. Diuretics inhibit sodium reabsorption in specific renal tubules, resulting in increased urinary sodium and water excretion. Loop diuretics are the most potent diuretics. In this article, we review five important aspects of loop diuretics, in particular furosemide, which must be considered when prescribing this medicine: (1) oral versus intravenous treatment, (2) dosage, (3) continuous versus bolus infusion, (4) application in chronic kidney disease patients, and (5) side effects. The bioavailability of furosemide differs between oral and intravenous therapy. Additionally, the threshold and ceiling doses of furosemide differ according to the particular clinical condition of the patient, for example in patients with severe edema or chronic kidney disease. To maximize the efficiency of furosemide, a clear understanding of how the mode of delivery will impact bioavailability and the required dosage is necessary.

  20. Computer-aided Diagnosis: How to Move from the Laboratory to the Clinic.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginneken, B. van; Schaefer-Prokop, C.M.; Prokop, M.

    2011-01-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), encompassing computer-aided detection and quantification, is an established and rapidly growing field of research. In daily practice, however, most radiologists do not yet use CAD routinely. This article discusses how to move CAD from the laboratory to the clinic. The

  1. DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING CLINICAL PRACTICES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PREDICTING MEDICAL DECISIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHEN, JONATHAN H; GOLDSTEIN, MARY K; ASCH, STEVEN M; ALTMAN, RUSS B

    2015-01-01

    Automatically data-mining clinical practice patterns from electronic health records (EHR) can enable prediction of future practices as a form of clinical decision support (CDS). Our objective is to determine the stability of learned clinical practice patterns over time and what implication this has when using varying longitudinal historical data sources towards predicting future decisions. We trained an association rule engine for clinical orders (e.g., labs, imaging, medications) using structured inpatient data from a tertiary academic hospital. Comparing top order associations per admission diagnosis from training data in 2009 vs. 2012, we find practice variability from unstable diagnoses with rank biased overlap (RBO)0.6. Predicting admission orders for future (2013) patients with associations trained on recent (2012) vs. older (2009) data improved accuracy evaluated by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) 0.89 to 0.92, precision at ten (positive predictive value of the top ten predictions against actual orders) 30% to 37%, and weighted recall (sensitivity) at ten 2.4% to 13%, (P<10−10). Training with more longitudinal data (2009-2012) was no better than only using recent (2012) data. Secular trends in practice patterns likely explain why smaller but more recent training data is more accurate at predicting future practices. PMID:26776186

  2. Impella ventricular support in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burzotta, Francesco; Trani, Carlo; Doshi, Sagar N

    2015-01-01

    and the operative protocols, this working group attempted to establish the best clinical practice with the technology. The present paper reviews the main theoretical principles of Impella and provides an up-to-date summary of the best practical aspects of device use which may help others gain the maximal advantage...

  3. Traditional Chinese Medicine Diagnosis and Evaluation of the Clinical Effect in Post-hepatitic Cirrhosis based on Fuzzy Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hao-wei; ZHU Xun-sheng

    2008-01-01

    In view of the problem of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) diagnosis, fuzzy comprehensive evaluation is introduced to the diagnosis and evaluation of the clinical effect of hepatitis. A new diagnosis and evaluation model of the TCM clinical effect standard was presented. The old disputed evaluation model by subjective analysis can be displaced by this objective method in its evaluation system. The foundation of this method is the fuzzy diagnosis model. This method has been realized to diagnose hepatitis and its values in practice has been validated through examples of clinical syndromes of post-hepatitic cirrhosis.

  4. Lactose intolerance: diagnosis, genetic, and clinical factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattar R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Rejane Mattar, Daniel Ferraz de Campos Mazo, Flair José CarrilhoDepartment of Gastroenterology, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately 75% of the world's population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. This review discusses the lactase-persistence alleles that have arisen in different populations around the world, diagnosis of lactose intolerance, and its symptomatology and management.Keywords: hypolactasia, lactase persistence, lactase non-persistence, lactose, LCT gene, MCM6 gene

  5. Emphysematous pyelonephritis. Clinical findings and radiological diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomiie, Fumitaka; Okuyama, Chio; Kizu, Osamu [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a rare, life-threatening necrotizing renal infection characterized by the production of intrarenal and perirenal gas. Seven patients with emphysematous pyelonephritis were reviewed. Six patients were associated with diabetes mellitus and one with obstructive nephrouropathy. Bilateral emphysematous involvement was seen in two and unilateral involvement in five patients. Bilateral disease was accompanied by thoracic lesions such as mediastinitis and/or pleuritis. In two of three patients with medical management alone, multiple organ failure secondary to sepsis was a cause of death. CT provided information indispensable to a correct diagnosis and was useful in evaluating the extension of the disease process. In patients with bilateral disease or unilateral involvement with a prolonged history, CT scan of the thorax is recommended for the survey of mediastinal and/or pleural involvement. (author).

  6. Neuropsychiatric Lupus in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Alessi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease involving multiple organs, characterized by the production of autoantibodies and the development of tissue injury. The etiology of SLE is partially known, involving multiple genetic and environmental factors. As many as 50% of patients with SLE have neurological involvement during the course of their disease. Neurological manifestations are associated with impaired quality of life, and high morbidity and mortality rates. Nineteen neuropsychiatric syndromes have been identified associated with SLE, and can be divided into central and peripheral manifestations. This article reviews major neuropsychiatric manifestations in patients with SLE and discusses their clinical features, radiological findings and treatment options.

  7. Diagnosis and Management of Systemic Sclerosis: A Practical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason J; Pope, Janet E

    2016-02-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a devastating multisystem rheumatologic condition that is characterized by autoimmunity, tissue fibrosis, obliterative vasculopathy and inflammation. Clinical presentation and course of the condition vary greatly, which complicates both diagnosis and corresponding treatment. In this regard, recent advances in disease understanding, both clinically and biochemically, have led to newer classification criteria for systemic sclerosis that are more inclusive than ever before. Still, significant disease modifying therapies do not yet exist for most patients. Therefore, organ-based management strategies are employed and research has been directed within this paradigm focusing on either the most debilitating symptoms, such as Raynaud's phenomenon, digital ulcers and cutaneous sclerosis, or life-threatening organ involvement such as interstitial lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The current trends in systemic sclerosis diagnosis, evidence-based treatment recommendations and potential future directions in systemic sclerosis treatment are discussed.

  8. clinical versus molecular diagnosis of heterozygous familial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    on clinical findings and elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. The rare ... to the high death rate from coronary heart disease (CHD) in ... population whose chance before cholesterol testing may be only 1 in 500 0 in 70 ..... The likelihood of apo E allelic status as a contributing factor. December 2001, Vol.

  9. Vertigo in neurological practice (common problems of diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Kosivtsova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most patients with vertigo seek neurological advice. In spite of the availability of current examination techniques, a differential diagnosis of vertigo is not frequently made. The paper discusses the terminology and classification of vertigo and clinical methods for diagnosing central and peripheral vestibulopathies. It considers the common problems of management of patients with diseases of the central and peripheral vestibular systems, the use of piracetam and other drugs to stimulate rehabilitation.

  10. Comparison between National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for the diagnosis and management of stable angina: implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archbold, R Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Cardiologists in the UK use clinical practice guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and from the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) to aid clinical decision-making. This review compares their recommendations regarding stable angina. NICE's diagnostic algorithm changed clinical practice in the UK, with most cardiologists moving from the exercise ECG towards newer, more accurate imaging modalities such as CT and MRI for diagnostic testing in patients with a low or medium probability of coronary artery disease (CAD), and directly to invasive coronary angiography in patients with a high probability of CAD. ESC guidelines are based around stress imaging for most patient groups. Both guidelines stress the importance of optimal medical therapy for patients with stable angina. NICE recommends coronary artery bypass graft surgery to improve prognosis for patients with left main stem and/or proximal 3-vessel disease, whereas the ESC also includes proximal left anterior descending artery disease among its indications for revascularisation to improve prognosis, particularly if there is evidence of myocardial ischaemia. The relation between disease complexity and 5-year clinical outcomes after revascularisation in patients with left main stem and/or 3-vessel CAD has been integrated into ESC guidance through the use of the SYNTAX score to aid treatment selection in this group of patients. Patients with stable angina who have disease involving the proximal left anterior descending artery are less likely to undergo myocardial revascularisation if they are managed according to NICE's guidance compared with the ESC's guidance.

  11. Clinical practice guideline: acute otitis externa executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Richard M; Schwartz, Seth R; Cannon, C Ron; Roland, Peter S; Simon, Geoffrey R; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Huang, William W; Haskell, Helen W; Robertson, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the updated Clinical Practice Guideline: Acute Otitis Externa, as a supplement to Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 8 recommendations developed address appropriate diagnosis of acute otitis externa (AOE) and the use of oral and topical antimicrobials and highlight the need for adequate pain relief. An updated guideline is needed due to new clinical trials, new systematic reviews, and the lack of consumer participation in the initial guideline development group.

  12. Clinical symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Hector H; Nash, Theodore E; Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2014-12-01

    The infection of the nervous system by the cystic larvae of Taenia solium (neurocysticercosis) is a frequent cause of seizure disorders. Neurocysticercosis is endemic or presumed to be endemic in many low-income countries. The lifecycle of the worm and the clinical manifestations of neurocysticercosis are well established, and CT and MRI have substantially improved knowledge of the disease course. Improvements in immunodiagnosis have further advanced comprehension of the pathophysiology of this disease. This knowledge has led to individualised treatment approaches that account for the involvement of parenchymal or extraparenchymal spaces, the number and form of parasites, and the extent of degeneration and associated inflammation. Clinical investigations are focused on development of effective treatments and reduction of side-effects induced by treatment, such as seizures, hydrocephalus, infarcts, and neuroinjury.

  13. Clostridium difficile: clinical disease and diagnosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Knoop, F C; Owens, M.; Crocker, I C

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a spectrum of disease ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis. Although the disease was first described in 1893, the etiologic agent was not isolated and identified until 1978. Since clinical and pathological features of C. difficile-associated disease are not easily distinguished from those of other gastrointestinal diseases, including ulcerative colitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, and Cro...

  14. Clinical guidelines: their implementation in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    M Conroy; Shannon, W

    1995-01-01

    In recent years the development of clinical guidelines has received increasing attention from medical educators and those involved in standard setting, and has been initiated at both central and local levels. This review article outlines the current state of knowledge with regard to clinical guideline implementation in medical practice. It deals with the main aspects of the current guideline debate, such as, clinical freedom and doctor autonomy, the importance of ownership in guideline implem...

  15. Delusional Parasitosis: Clinical Features, Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Karakus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Delusional parasitosis is a delusional disorder in which the patient has the false and persistent belief that he is infested by some type of parasite or small living creatures. The disease has been called under different names such as “Ekbom syndrome” or psychogenic parasitosis in the last century. Delusional parasitosis is divided into primary, secondary functional and secondary organic groups. The female-to-male ratio in delusional parasitosis is approximately 2:1.Delusional parasitosis is associated in 5-15% of shared psychotic disorder and can run within a family (folie a familie. The diagnosis is one of exclusion, and other diseases that can also cause a sensation of itching should be considered, investigated, and treated if present. Lack of treatment might cause delusional symptoms to gain chronicity, and might further complicate treatment response. Antipsychotics, antidepressants, electroconvulsive therapy, and in the presence of dermatological lesions some topical dermatological agents and antihistaminics are used in the treatment of this disorder.

  16. Thrombophilia: clinical-practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    No consensus exists as to who should be tested for thrombophilia, mainly due to the lack of good quality clinical outcome data in relationship to presence or absence of a given thrombophilia. Testing may be considered if (a) finding a thrombophilia predicts recurrent thrombosis and, thus, influences length of anticoagulation treatment decisions; (b) identifying a thrombophilia has implications on management of asymptomatic family members who are carriers of the detected thrombophilia; (c) a patient wishes to better understand why a thrombotic event occurred. Testing may be helpful in patients with venous thromboembolism at intermediate risk of recurrence in whom the finding of a strong thrombophilia can be one of the arguments for long-term anticoagulation--the "risk-of-recurrence-triangle" may be a useful aid in this decision process. Patients whose venous thromboembolism was provoked by a major transient risk factor should not be tested for thrombophilia. Thrombophilia tests should only be ordered by health care professionals who can provide the "4P": (a) appropriately select which patient to test, (b) provide pre-test counseling, (c) properly interpret the test results, and (d) provide education and advice to the patient. If testing is embarked on in patients with venous thromboembolism, it is advisable to be done at the time of decision making whether to stop or continue anticoagulation, i.e. typically after 3 months of anticoagulant therapy. Thrombophilia testing is best not done at the time of an acute thrombotic event and while a patient is on an anticoagulant.

  17. Clinical Practice Update: Pediculosis Capitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Brittany; Evetts, Jessica; McClain, Kymberli; Rosenauer, Amanda; Stellitano, Emily

    2015-01-01

    A review of the current evidence on primary treatment modalities of head lice demonstrates increasing resistance to current regimens. New and alternative therapies are now available. A treatment algorithm was created to address safety and efficacy of treatments, as well as to guide clinicians through navigation of the regimens. Through an online journal search, 59 articles were selected for the review. Literature searches were performed through PubMed, Medline, Ebsco Host, and CINAHL, with key search words of "Pediculosis capitis" and "head lice" in the title, abstract, and index. Meta-analyses and controlled clinical trials were viewed with greater weight if they had a large sample size, were statistically significant, and did not allude to bias. When resistant infestations are well-documented in a locality, changes to the treatment regimen are indicated, and alternative treatments should be considered. Recent studies and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approvals have changed the available treatment options for Pediculosis capitis, including benzyl alcohol, topical ivermectin, spinosad, and the LouseBuster. Further, environmental management and prevention measures should be taken to avoid reinfestation and to prevent the spread of head lice. Continued study is recommended to establish long-term safety of new and alternative agents.

  18. How successful is the dual diagnosis good practice guide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laker, Caroline

    Evidence from the US shows that integrated treatment programmes for dually diagnosed patients are more successful than parallel treatment programmes. In the UK the Dual Diagnosis Good Practice Guide (DDGPG, 2002a), advocates a move towards an integrated system of care delivery. However, the paucity of evidence in the UK and the entrenched nature of the established mental health and addictions services means that current policy is derived from limited information and is struggling to address the process of change. By definition, dual diagnosis is a complex interaction between a range of mental health and substance misuse problems leading to difficulties in allocating appropriate skill mixes to teams. Ethical and legal issues in the mental health services cause conflict with the treatment concepts for substance misuse. The advent of the DDGPG is positive, but there is a clear need for further work in this area.

  19. Clinical and CT Histological Diagnosis of Orbital Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yanhua; WANG Jie; XIAO Shiyi

    2000-01-01

    The clinical manifestation and characteristics of CT image of 117 cases of orbital tumors in our hospital were investigated. The hemangioma had the highest incidence, and the less common tumors were, in sequence of incidence, pseudotumor, dermoid cysts, neurilemmoma, polymorphous adenoma and meningioma. The sensitivity in diagnosis of orbital tumor by CT was 93.3%. The coincidence of CT histological diagnosis with pathology were 83.3 %, 82.6 % and 71.4% for dermoid.cysts, hemangioma, and pseudotumor respectively, but the general coincidence of CT histological diagnosis with pathology was only 67.8 %. When CT was combined with ultrasound, cytological examination and clinical manifestations, the accuracy of histological diagnosis could be improved to 83.3 %.

  20. Air Embolism: Diagnosis, Clinical Management and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J. McCarthy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Air embolism is a rare but potentially fatal complication of surgical procedures. Rapid recognition and intervention is critical for reducing morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively characterized our experience with air embolism during medical procedures at a tertiary medical center. Electronic medical records were searched for all cases of air embolism over a 25-year period; relevant medical and imaging records were reviewed. Sixty-seven air embolism cases were identified; the mean age was 59 years (range, 3–89 years. Ninety-four percent occurred in-hospital, of which 77.8% were during an operation/invasive procedure. Vascular access-related procedures (33% were the most commonly associated with air embolism. Clinical signs and symptoms were related to the location the air embolus; 36 cases to the right heart/pulmonary artery, 21 to the cerebrum, and 10 were attributed to patent foramen ovale (PFO. Twenty-one percent of patients underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT, 7.5% aspiration of the air, and 63% had no sequelae. Mortality rate was 21%; 69% died within 48 hours. Thirteen patients had immediate cardiac arrest where mortality rate was 53.8%, compared to 13.5% (p = 0.0035 in those without. Air emboli were mainly iatrogenic, primarily associated with endovascular procedures. High clinical suspicion and early treatment are critical for survival.

  1. Diagnosis and clinical implications of pancreatobiliary reflux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Terumi Kamisawa; Hajime Anjiki; Naoto Egawa; Masanao Kurata; Goro Honda; Kouji Tsuruta

    2008-01-01

    The sphincter of Oddi is located at the distal end of the pancreatic and bile ducts and regulates the outflow of bile and pancreatic juice.A common channel can be so long that the junction of the pancreatic and bile ducts is located outside of the duodenal wall,as occurs in pancreaticobiliary maljunction (PBM);in such cases,sphincter action does not functionally affect the junction.As the hydropressure within the pancreatic duct is usually greater than in the bile duct,pancreatic juice frequently refluxes into the biliary duct (pancreatobiliary reflux) in PBM,resulting in carcinogenetic conditions in the biliary tract.Pancreatobiliary reflux can be diagnosed from elevated amylase level in the bile,secretinstimulated dynamic magnetic resonance cholangiop ancreatography,and pancreatography via the minor duodenal papilla.Recently,it has become obvious that pancreatobiliary reflux can occur in individuals without PBM.Pancreatobiliary reflux might be related to biliary carcinogenesis even in some individuals without PBM.Since few systemic studies exist with respect to clinical relevance and implications of the pancreatobiliary reflux in individuals with normal pancreaticobiliary junction,further prospective clinical studies including appropriate management should be performed.

  2. Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Practice Guidelines: Customized for Iranian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajavi, Zhale; Safi, Sare; Javadi, Mohammad Ali; Azarmina, Mohsen; Moradian, Siamak; Entezari, Morteza; Nourinia, Ramin; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Shirvani, Armin; Shahraz, Saeid; Ramezani, Alireza; Dehghan, Mohammad Hossein; Shahsavari, Mohsen; Soheilian, Masoud; Nikkhah, Homayoun; Ziaei, Hossein; Behboudi, Hasan; Farrahi, Fereydoun; Falavarjani, Khalil Ghasemi; Parvaresh, Mohammad Mehdi; Fesharaki, Hamid; Abrishami, Majid; Shoeibi, Nasser; Rahimi, Mansour; Javadzadeh, Alireza; Karkhaneh, Reza; Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad; Manaviat, Masoud Reza; Maleki, Alireza; Kheiri, Bahareh; Golbafian, Faegheh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To customize clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for management of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in the Iranian population. Methods: Three DR CPGs (The Royal College of Ophthalmologists 2013, American Academy of Ophthalmology [Preferred Practice Pattern 2012], and Australian Diabetes Society 2008) were selected from the literature using the AGREE tool. Clinical questions were designed and summarized into four tables by the customization team. The components of the clinical questions along with pertinent recommendations extracted from the above-mentioned CPGs; details of the supporting articles and their levels of evidence; clinical recommendations considering clinical benefits, cost and side effects; and revised recommendations based on customization capability (applicability, acceptability, external validity) were recorded in 4 tables, respectively. Customized recommendations were sent to the faculty members of all universities across the country to score the recommendations from 1 to 9. Results: Agreed recommendations were accepted as the final recommendations while the non-agreed ones were approved after revision. Eventually, 29 customized recommendations under three major categories consisting of screening, diagnosis and treatment of DR were developed along with their sources and levels of evidence. Conclusion: This customized CPGs for management of DR can be used to standardize the referral pathway, diagnosis and treatment of patients with diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27994809

  3. 1.2.Clinical laboratory diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930212 Enzymatic analysis of serum total bileacids and clinical evaluation.WEI Youren (魏有仁),et al.Sino—Japan Friendship Hosp,Bei-jing,100029.CHin J Med Lab Technol 1993;16(1):11—14.An enzymatic colorimetric assay of serum to-tal bile acids (TBA) was reported for the firsttime in China.3 α-hydroxysteroid dehydroge-nase (3α-HSD) had been purified from pseu-domonas testosteroni in the sventies,and hadbeen used as a main enzyme reagent in the enzy-matic analysis of TBA.In this paper,the au-thors introduced a rapid,sensitive colorimetricassay using 3α-HSD,and a couple enzyme 5β-steroid Δ~4 dehydrogenase to imcrease the con-

  4. Male breast cancer: clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotko, Y S

    2013-12-01

    Despite male breast cancer is rare in occurrence, it is a serious problem. In 2012, 130 men in Ukraine got breast cancer that constituted 0.74% from all patients with mentioned pathology detected in the course of year. Every year in Ukraine approximately 100 men die from breast cancer. Still many aspects of male breast cancer remain unstudied. It occurs since information about mentioned disease is mainly based on retrospective analysis of small groups. Treatment of men, who got breast cancer, is based on knowledge, which has been obtained in treatment of women with this pathology. This article is based on the results of analysis of 168 cases of breast cancer in men, who have been examined and treated in the period from 1956 to 2012. In paper the peculiarities of clinical manifestations of male breast cancer have been determined, the optimal volume of diagnostic procedures in men with suspicion of breast cancer has been established, the mammographic signs have been detected and the possible histological variants of disease have been determined, clinical course peculiarities of male breast cancer have been defined, the most essential factors of prognosis of the disease have been fixed. Furthermore, in article optimal volume of surgical treatment of male breast cancer has been substantiated, the role and place of radiotherapy in treatment of this pathology has been determined. It has been proved that adjuvant polychemotherapy should be applied to the patients with male breast cancer independently from stage of process. Also optimal schemes of this kind of treatment have been determined. The efficacy of hormonal therapy with antiestrogen in patients with positive receptors of steroid hormones and at presence of unfavorable prognostic factors of disease has been demonstrated. The inefficiency of orchiectomy as one of the widespread kinds of hormonal therapy of male breast cancer has been defined.

  5. A practical approach to the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luca Frulloni; Antonio Amodio; Anna Maria Katsotourchi; Italo Vantini

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a disease characterized by specific pathological features, different from those of other forms of pancreatitis, that responds dramatically to steroid therapy. The pancreatic parenchyma may be diffusely or focally involved with the possibility of a low-density mass being present at imaging, mimicking pancreatic cancer. Clinically, the most relevant problems lie in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and in distinguishing autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreatic cancer. Since in the presence of a pancreatic mass the probability of tumour is much higher than that of pancre-atitis, the physician should be aware that in focal autoimmune pancreatitis the first step before using steroids is to exclude pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we briefly analyse the strategies to be followed for a correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  6. Motor neurone disease: a practical update on diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood-Allum, Clare; Shaw, Pamela J

    2010-06-01

    Motor neurone disease (MND) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease which leads inexorably via weakness of limb, bulbar and respiratory muscles to death from respiratory failure three to five years later. Most MND is sporadic but approximately 10% is inherited. In exciting recent breakthroughs two new MND genes have been identified. Diagnosis is clinical and sometimes difficult--treatable mimics must be excluded before the diagnosis is ascribed. Riluzole prolongs life by only three to four months and is only available for the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) form of MND. Management therefore properly focuses on symptom relief and the preservation of independence and quality of life. Malnutrition is a poor prognostic factor. In appropriate patients enteral feeding is recommended although its use has yet to be shown to improve survival. In ALS patients with respiratory failure and good or only moderately impaired bulbar function non-invasive positive pressure ventilation prolongs life and improves quality of life.

  7. Clinical Engineering: Experiences of assisted professional practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langone, Luis; Vanetta, Marcos; Vazquez, Marcelo; Rotger, Viviana; Olivera, Juan Manuel

    2007-11-01

    In the curricula of the Biomedical Engineering career of the Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología of the Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, Argenitna, there are the Assisted Professional Practices. Within this framework, the students have the possibility of performing practices in the clinic Sanatorio 9 de Julio. One of the objectives of these practices is to apply the concepts, methods and procedures studied along the career in the field work under real work conditions. From the point of view of the host institution, the objective is to improve the performance of the different services and areas applying the tools of Biomedical Engineering. The present work shows an example of such practices where an equipment preliminary analysis was made, its use and maintenance corresponding to the surgical unit of the clinic.

  8. Clinical Engineering: Experiences of assisted professional practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langone, Luis [Departamento de BioingenierIa, FACET-UNT, INSIBIO-CONICET (Argentina); Vanetta, Marcos [Departamento de BioingenierIa, FACET-UNT, INSIBIO-CONICET (Argentina); Vazquez, Marcelo [Sanatorio 9 de Julio SA PO Box 327, Zip Code (4000), Tucuman (Argentina); Rotger, Viviana I [Departamento de BioingenierIa, FACET-UNT, INSIBIO-CONICET (Argentina); Olivera, Juan Manuel [Departamento de BioingenierIa, FACET-UNT, INSIBIO-CONICET (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    In the curricula of the Biomedical Engineering career of the Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y TecnologIa of the Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Argenitna, there are the Assisted Professional Practices. Within this framework, the students have the possibility of performing practices in the clinic Sanatorio 9 de Julio. One of the objectives of these practices is to apply the concepts, methods and procedures studied along the career in the field work under real work conditions. From the point of view of the host institution, the objective is to improve the performance of the different services and areas applying the tools of Biomedical Engineering. The present work shows an example of such practices where an equipment preliminary analysis was made, its use and maintenance corresponding to the surgical unit of the clinic.

  9. The diagnosis and clinical significance of polyautoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are chronic and heterogeneous conditions that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. The chronic nature of these diseases places a significant burden on the utilization of medical care, direct and indirect economic costs, and quality of life. ADs are observed in genetically susceptible individuals in whom their clinical expression is modified by permissive and protective environments occurring over time. These are complex traits, meaning that their inheritance does not follow a single-gene dominant or single-gene recessive Mendelian law, and thus that they are polygenic. ADs are often diagnosed according to classification criteria, however they share similar subphenotypes including signs and symptoms, non-specific autoantibodies and other immune changes, which are prone to taxonomic problems. Polyautoimmunity is defined as the presence of more than one AD in a single patient. When three or more ADs coexist, this condition is called multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS), which represents the best example of polyautoimmunity as well as the effect of a single genotype on diverse autoimmune phenotypes. Its study will provide important clues to elucidate the common mechanisms of ADs (i.e., the autoimmune tautology).

  10. Regulating the placebo effect in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tracey E

    2015-01-01

    Recent research and ethical analysis have forced a clinical and ethical reappraisal of the utility of placebos in medical practice. The main concern of ethics and law is that using placebos in health care involves deception, which is antithetical to patient autonomy and trust in the physician-patient relationship. This article reviews the various, more nuanced scientific conceptions of the placebo effect, and evaluates the ethical and legal objections to deploying placebos in clinical practice. It argues that the placebo effect may be legitimately accommodated on the basis that it does not engage the requirement for material or quasi-fiduciary disclosures of information, and may also be justified by therapeutic privilege. In addition, this reconceptualisation of the placebo effect offers a new justification for therapeutic privilege in these contexts. Notwithstanding this, using the placebo effect in clinical practice raises regulatory issues that will require special regulatory supervision.

  11. Implementing human factors in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Stephen; Baxendale, Bryn; Buttery, Andrew; Miles, Giulia; Roe, Bridget; Browes, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To understand whether aviation-derived human factors training is acceptable and useful to healthcare professionals. To understand whether and how healthcare professionals have been able to implement human factors approaches to patient safety in their own area of clinical practice. Methods Qualitative, longitudinal study using semi-structured interviews and focus groups, of a multiprofessional group of UK NHS staff (from the emergency department and operating theatres) who have received aviation-derived human factors training. Results The human factors training was evaluated positively, and thought to be both acceptable and relevant to practice. However, the staff found it harder to implement what they had learned in their own clinical areas, and this was principally attributed to features of the informal organisational cultures. Conclusions In order to successfully apply human factors approaches in hospital, careful consideration needs to be given to the local context and informal culture of clinical practice. PMID:24631959

  12. Introducing clinical audit into veterinary practice.

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This project has been designed to increase our understanding of the clinical audit process, as it applies to veterinary practice in the UK, and to facilitate its introduction in a manner that brings maximum benefit to all stakeholders. It examines the medical scenario to define the process and glean any relevant information. It then takes the form of an action research project that examines in depth the introduction of the audit process into a small animal practice in outer NW London, in...

  13. Intensive care practices in brain death diagnosis and organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, D; Valentín, M O; Escalante, J L; Sanmartín, A; Perez-Basterrechea, M; de Gea, J; Martín, M; Velasco, J; Pont, T; Masnou, N; de la Calle, B; Marcelo, B; Lebrón, M; Pérez, J M; Burgos, M; Gimeno, R; Kot, P; Yus, S; Sancho, I; Zabalegui, A; Arroyo, M; Miñambres, E; Elizalde, J; Montejo, J C; Domínguez-Gil, B; Matesanz, R

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a multicentre study of 1844 patients from 42 Spanish intensive care units, and analysed the clinical characteristics of brain death, the use of ancillary testing, and the clinical decisions taken after the diagnosis of brain death. The main cause of brain death was intracerebral haemorrhage (769/1844, 42%), followed by traumatic brain injury (343/1844, 19%) and subarachnoid haemorrhage (257/1844, 14%). The diagnosis of brain death was made rapidly (50% in the first 24 h). Of those patients who went on to die, the Glasgow Coma Scale on admission was ≤ 8/15 in 1146/1261 (91%) of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage, traumatic brain injury or anoxic encephalopathy; the Hunt and Hess Scale was 4-5 in 207/251 (83%) of patients following subarachnoid haemorrhage; and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was ≥ 15 in 114/129 (89%) of patients with strokes. Brain death was diagnosed exclusively by clinical examination in 92/1844 (5%) of cases. Electroencephalography was the most frequently used ancillary test (1303/1752, 70.7%), followed by transcranial Doppler (652/1752, 37%). Organ donation took place in 70% of patients (1291/1844), with medical unsuitability (267/553, 48%) and family refusal (244/553, 13%) the main reasons for loss of potential donors. All life-sustaining measures were withdrawn in 413/553 of non-donors (75%).

  14. EVALUATION OF THE PRECISION OF CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS IN PULPOPATHIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Mihaela Rosca

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Most clinicians universally acknowledge the difficulty of establishing a precise clinical diagnosis of the pathological status of the pulpal-dentinary organ, considering both the diversity of the etiological factors and especially the different histopatological forms that may characterize the same lesion. The aim of the present investigation is to identify and quantify the precision of the presumtive diagnosis established on the basis of clinical data and of paraclinical exams, comparatively with the results of the morphopathological work, which establishes the final diagnosis. There have been analyzed 45 teeth, 43 of which with various inflammatory pulpal problems, and 2 clinically-healthy teeth, extracted from orthodontic reasons. Taking advantage of the fact that, along with the development of the treatment, the dental pulp was also available, after its taking over, the surgical piece was prepared and microscopically examined, which permitted an undisputable morphopathological dignosis. To attain scientifically valid results, both the clinically and the morphopathologically obtained results were statistically interpreted by the non-parametric Wilcoxon test. If, from a clinical perspective, most of the cases were classified as mild hyperemia and partially serous acute pulpitis, the morphopathological examination viewed them as irreversible pulpitis, with major supurative and necrotic modifications. The actual diagnosis means cannot establish whether the pulpitis is a serous, a purulent or a combined manifestation in the various pulp sections.

  15. George Engel's Epistemology of Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraga, Michael; Fuks, Abraham; Boudreau, J Donald

    2014-01-01

    George Engel's (1913-1999) biopsychosocial model, one of the most significant proposals for the renewal of medicine in the latter half of the 20th century, has been understood primarily as a multi-factorial approach to the etiology of disease and as a call to re-humanize clinical practice. This common reading of Engel's model misses the central aspect of his proposal, that the biopsychosocial model is an epistemology for clinical work. By stating the simple fact that the clinician is not dealing directly with a body, but first, and inevitably, with a person, Engel challenged the epistemology implicit in the classical clinical method-a method predicated on the possibility of direct access to the body. Framed in epistemological terms, the issue at stake is not the need to complement medical science with humane virtues, but rather to acknowledge that the object of clinical practice is not the body but the patient.

  16. Clinical Diagnosis as a Dynamic Cognitive Process: Application of Bloom’s Taxonomy for Educational Objectives in the Cognitive Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Nkanginieme, Kanu E.O.

    1997-01-01

    Making a diagnosis is the pivotal cognitive activity of a practicing physician. Correct diagnosis usually leads to appropriate treatment. Clinical diagnosis a very dynamic cognitive process. It has tended to remain a sub-conscious activity and has been studied mostly as a complex categorization task, from fixed points of view. Bloom’s taxonomy of the cognitive domain classifies the cognitive process into six dynamic levels of increasing complexity, from knowledge as the baseline, through comp...

  17. Clinical Practice Guidelines Infective Endocarditis Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro de la Cruz Avilés

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Infective Endocarditis Treatment. Infectious disease affecting the endocardium produces vegetations and could also affect the septum, the chordae tendinae or mural endocardium. It includes concept, risk factors, classification (and special groups and an update and review of the main clinical aspects, complications and treatment stressing the antibiotic therapy. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  18. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Potential Donors Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roque Nodal Arruebarrena

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Potential Donors Management. It has been defined as the patient in Glasgow coma with scale higher or equal to 8 who doesn´t present contradictions for transplant (possible donor and who has been diagnosed of encephalic death. This document reviews and updates concepts, lists indications and contraindications for different organs donation, clinical assessment of the donor and its treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  19. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS Cancer is a common, serious disease and early diagnosis is a cornerstone in the effort to improve the outcome from cancer disease. The general practitioner (GP) plays a crucial role in achieving this goal. Little is known about GPs’ suspicion of cancer and the activities the GPs...... institute in relation to such suspicion. Knowledge is also sparse on any effects of different diagnostic activities in general practice. The overall aims of this thesis were therefore: -to describe how often Danish GPs suspected cancer or other serious diseases and how they acted on the suspicion......, and to analyse how a suspicion influenced the demand for health care services and predicted a future diagnosis of serious disease - to investigate whether variation in GPs’ diagnostic activity influences cancer patients’ prognosis in relation to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and prostate cancer...

  20. Best practices for clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jamie K; Hall, Robert L; O'Brien, Peter; Strauss, Volker; Vahle, John L

    2011-02-01

    The Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) and American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASCVP) convened a Clinical Pathology in Carcinogenicity Studies Working Group to recommend best practices for inclusion of clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies. Regulatory guidance documents and literature were reviewed, and veterinary pathologists from North America, Japan, and Europe were surveyed regarding current practices, perceived value, and recommendations for clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies. For two-year rodent carcinogenicity studies, the Working Group recommends that clinical pathology testing be limited to collection of blood smears at scheduled and unscheduled sacrifices to be examined only if indicated to aid in the diagnosis of possible hematopoietic neoplasia following histopathologic evaluation. Additional clinical pathology testing is most appropriately used to address specific issues from prior toxicity studies or known test article-related class effects. Inadequate data were available to make a recommendation concerning clinical pathology testing for alternative six-month carcinogenicity assays using genetically modified mice, although the Working Group suggests that it may be appropriate to use the same approach as for two-year carcinogenicity studies since the study goal is the same.

  1. [Minimal hepatic encephalopathy: characteristics, diagnosis and clinical implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre Delgadillo, Aldo; Guerrero-Hernández, Ignacio; Uribe, Misael

    2006-01-01

    The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to the subtle changes in cognitive function, electrophysiological parameters, cerebral neurochemical/neurotransmitter homeostasis, cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and fluid homeostasis that can be observed in patients with cirrhosis who have no clinical evidence of hepatic encephalopathy; the prevalence is as high as 84% in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. This cirrhosis complication is generally not perceived by physician, and diagnosis can only be made by neuropsychological tests and other especial measurements like evoked potentials and image studies like positron emission tomography. Diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy may have prognostic and therapeutic implications in cirrhotic patients. The present review pretends to explore the clinic, therapeutic, diagnosis and prognostic aspects of this complication.

  2. A cascade classifier for diagnosis of melanoma in clinical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabouri, P; GholamHosseini, H; Larsson, T; Collins, J

    2014-01-01

    Computer aided diagnosis of medical images can help physicians in better detecting and early diagnosis of many symptoms and therefore reducing the mortality rate. Realization of an efficient mobile device for semi-automatic diagnosis of melanoma would greatly enhance the applicability of medical image classification scheme and make it useful in clinical contexts. In this paper, interactive object recognition methodology is adopted for border segmentation of clinical skin lesion images. In addition, performance of five classifiers, KNN, Naïve Bayes, multi-layer perceptron, random forest and SVM are compared based on color and texture features for discriminating melanoma from benign nevus. The results show that a sensitivity of 82.6% and specificity of 83% can be achieved using a single SVM classifier. However, a better classification performance was achieved using a proposed cascade classifier with the sensitivity of 83.06% and specificity of 90.05% when performing ten-fold cross validation.

  3. [Clinical Practice Guide for Early Detection, Diagnosis and Treatment of the Acute Intoxication Phase in Patients with Alcohol Abuse or Dependence: Part I: Screening, Early Detection and Risk Factors in Patients with Alcohol Abuse or Dependence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Espriella Guerrero, Ricardo; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Zárate, Alina Uribe-Holguín; Menéndez, Miguel Cote; Barré, Michelle Cortés; Rentería, Ana María Cano; Hernández, Delia Cristina

    2012-12-01

    Worldwide, alcohol is the second most-used psychotropic substance and the third risk factor for early death and disability. Its noxious use is a world public health problem given its personal, labor, family, economic and social impact. 70 % of people under risk of having alcohol problems go undetected in medical practice, a fact that underlines the need for specific screening measures allowing early detection leading to timely treatment. This article presents evidence gathered by alcohol abuse and dependence screening as well as by risk factor identification and screening. It also presents evidence concerning withdrawal symptoms, delirium tremens and Wernicke's encephalopathy in order to promote early detection and timely treatment. Systematic revision of the evidence available together with an evaluation of pertinent guidelines found in literature so as to decide whether to adopt or adapt the existing recommendation for each question or to develop de novo recommendations. For de novo recommendations as well as those adapted, it was carried out an evidence synthesis, together with evidence tables and formulation of recommendations based on the evidence. Evidence was found and recommendations were made for the pertinent screening and search of risk factors, in order to perform a diagnosis and carry out a timely management of alcohol abuse, dependence and ensuing complications: withdrawal syndrome, delirium tremens and Wernicke's encephalopathy. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Opportunities for tuberculosis diagnosis and prevention among persons living with HIV: a cross-sectional study of policies and practices at four large Ryan White Program-Funded HIV clinics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Pascopella

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We describe the frequency and attributes of tuberculosis testing and treatment at four publicly-funded HIV clinics. METHODS: We abstracted medical records from a random sample of 600 HIV-infected patients having at least one clinic visit in 2009 at four clinics in New York and Los Angeles Metropolitan Statistical areas. We described testing and treatment for tuberculosis infection (TBI, 2008-2010, and estimated adjusted odds ratios (aORs. We interviewed key informants and described clinic policies and practices. RESULTS: Of 600 patients, 500 were eligible for testing, and 393 (79% were tested 2008-2010; 107 (21% did not receive at least one tuberculin skin test or interferon gamma release assay. Results were positive in 20 (5% patients, negative in 357 (91%, and unknown in 16 (4%. Fourteen (70% of 20 patients with TBI initiated treatment at the clinics; only three were documented to have completed treatment. Three hundred twenty three (54% patients had chest radiography, 346 (58% had tuberculosis symptom screening, and three had tuberculosis disease (117 per 100,000 person-years, 95% confidence interval (CI = 101-165. Adjusting for site, non-Hispanic ethnicity (aOR = 4.9, 95% CI = 2.6-9.5, and employment (aOR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0-3.4 were associated with TBI testing; female gender (aOR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.4-3.3, non-black race (aOR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.3-2.5, and unemployment (aOR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-2.1 were associated with chest radiography. Clinics evaluated TBI testing performance annually and identified challenges to TB prevention. CONCLUSIONS: Study clinics routinely tested patients for TBI, but did not always document treatment. In a population with a high TB rate, ensuring treatment of TBI may enhance TB prevention.

  5. Integrating Preclinical and Clinical Oral Diagnosis and Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodus, Nelson L.; Brand, John W.

    1988-01-01

    A program providing second-year dental students with early experience in direct patient contact in an oral diagnosis/oral radiology clinic was well received by both students and faculty and was found to develop desirable skills and qualities in the students participating. (MSE)

  6. Hopelessness, Depression, Suicidal Ideation, and Clinical Diagnosis of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Aaron T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined relevance of clinical diagnosis of depression for explaining discrepant relationships of hopelessness and depression with suicidal ideation. Administered Beck Depression Inventory, Hopelessness Scale, and Scale for Suicide Ideation to 1,306 patients with mood disorder and 488 patients without mood disorder. Found that hopelessness was 1.3…

  7. Rules for clinical diagnosis in babies with ambiguous genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Y; Hutson, J M

    2003-08-01

    Intersex disorders are rare and complex; yet, in each case of genital ambiguity, accurate and expeditious management is required of the clinician. This article reviews the embryology of sexual differentiation, from which some 'rules' of diagnosis are derived. A simplified approach to the interpretation of clinical signs in ambiguous genitalia is presented and discussed.

  8. Integrating Preclinical and Clinical Oral Diagnosis and Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodus, Nelson L.; Brand, John W.

    1988-01-01

    A program providing second-year dental students with early experience in direct patient contact in an oral diagnosis/oral radiology clinic was well received by both students and faculty and was found to develop desirable skills and qualities in the students participating. (MSE)

  9. Hip osteoarthrosis: clinical presentation, diagnosis, approaches to treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Stanislavovna Svetlova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper characterizes the specific features of the anatomy and physiology of the hip joint, the clinical presentation of coxarthrosis and presents current methods for the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. It gives the results of a trial evaluating the impact of long-term (one-year theraflex therapy on the symptoms of hip osteoarthrosis.

  10. Clinical Practice Guidelines for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

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    Brandy Viera Valdés

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. These are arrhythmias in which structures placed above the bifurcation of the bundle of His are involved; characterized by tachycardia with abrupt starting and ending. We comment its classification, common characteristics, general treatment and specific conduct for its different variables. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  11. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Critical Patients’ Nutrition.

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    Marta Patricia Casanova González

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Critical Patients’ Nutrition. This document includes a review and update of aspects related with nutritional assessment of patients in critical condition; indications, contraindications and procedures for enteral and parenteral nutrition and its follow up. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  12. Introduction: Applying Clinical Psychological Science to Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Christine B; DiVasto, Katherine A

    2017-02-10

    Mental illness is a prevalent and extraordinarily complex phenomenon. Psychologists have developed distinct approaches toward understanding and treating mental illness, rooted in divergent epistemology. This introduction to the Special Issue on Clinical Psychological Science and Practice provides a brief overview of the scientist-practitioner gap, and explores one step (of many) toward bridging this divide. Seven compelling case illustrations featured in this Special Issue apply empirical findings to case formulation, treatment selection, and assessment across complex and varied clinical presentations. This issue thereby demonstrates the feasibility of integrating research and clinical expertise in mental healthcare.

  13. The practice of clinical neuropsychology in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, Jennie

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the development and practice of clinical neuropsychology in Australia. Clinical Neuropsychology has shown rapid growth in Australia over the past three decades. Comprehensive and specialized training programs are producing high quality graduates who are employed in a broad range of settings or private practice. Australia now has a substantial number of clinical neuropsychologists with specialist training. Whilst the majority of Australian clinical neuropsychologists still undertake assessment predominantly, there are growing opportunities for clinical neuropsychologists in rehabilitation and in a broad range of research contexts. Cultural issues relating to the assessment of Indigenous Australians and immigrants from many countries present significant challenges. Some major contributions have been made in the realms of test development and validation across various age groups. Australian clinical neuropsychologists are also contributing significantly to research in the fields of traumatic brain injury, aging and dementias, epilepsy, memory assessment, rehabilitation, substance abuse, and other psychiatric disorders. Expansion of roles of clinical neuropsychologists, in domains such as rehabilitation and research is seen as essential to underpin continuing growth of employment opportunities for the profession.

  14. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Bugaj, T. J.; Nikendei, C.

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or “skills labs”, i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that al...

  15. Under-diagnosis of alcohol-related problems and depression in a family practice in Japan

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    Yamada Kenshi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim The aim of this survey was to assess the accuracy of a family physician's diagnosis of depression and alcoholism. Methods Consecutive new adult patients attending a family practice in Japan between April 2004 and August 2006 were enrolled. Excluded were those with dementia or visual disturbance, and emergency cases. Participants completed a questionnaire regarding their complaints and socio-demographics. A research nurse conducted the Japanese version of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (J-MINI in the interview room. The doctor independently performed usual practice and recorded his own clinical diagnoses. A researcher listed the clinical diagnoses and complaints, including J-MINI or clinically-diagnosed alcoholism and depression, using the International Classifications for Primary Care, Second Edition (ICPC-2 and calculated kappa statistics between the J-MINI and clinical diagnoses. Results Of the 120 adult first-visit patients attending the clinics, 112 patients consented to participate in the survey and were enrolled. Fifty-one subjects were male and 61 female, and the average age was 40.7 ± 13.2 years. Eight alcohol-related disorders and five major depressions were diagnosed using the J-MINI, whereas no cases of alcoholism and eight depressions were diagnosed by the physician. Clinically overlooked patients tended to have acute illnesses like a common cold. Concordance between the clinical and research diagnosis was achieved only for three episodes of Major depression, resulting in a kappa statistic of 0.43. Conclusion Although almost half of the major depressions were identified, all alcoholism was missed. A mental health screening instrument might be beneficial in family practice, especially to detect alcoholism.

  16. Suicidality in clinical practice: anxieties and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, M David

    2006-02-01

    This issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session is devoted to suicidality in clinical practice, with coverage of a broad range of topics. After summarizing some of the problems and recent advances in clinical suicidology, I provide a brief overview of the articles. Included are the more broadly defined issues of risk management and psychotherapy with suicidal individuals, along with more specific topics such as risk assessment, no-suicide contracts, and the risk of suicide with the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) by children and adolescents. Most of the articles feature case vignettes and provide practitioners with clinical recommendations, and all of the articles have clear and important clinical implications. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Good clinical practices in phase I studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decousus, H; Perpoint, B; Mismetti, P; Ollagnier, M; Queneau, P

    1990-01-01

    In France, official guidelines for good clinical practices in clinical trials were issued in 1987. In December 1988, a law was passed that fixed the requirements for carrying out experiments in healthy subjects. It will be completed by official guidelines for the structures in which experiments on healthy subjects (and patients as well, when the investigation would not benefit the health of the patients) may be conducted. Hence a battery of recent legal instructions precisely state what good clinical practices are in the setting of phase I studies. Of particular importance are: subject recruitment and selection methods and procedures; specific competence of the investigator, in particular to interpret the pre-trial data; necessary and sufficient facilities to guarantee the subjects' safety; careful quality control to check all laboratory procedures; necessity of written standard operating procedures.

  18. [Clinical Practice Guide for Early Detection, Diagnosis and Treatment of the Acute Intoxication Phase in Patients with Alcohol Abuse or Dependence: Part II: Evaluation and Management of Patients with Acute Alcohol Intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Espriella Guerrero, Ricardo; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Zárate, Alina Uribe-Holguín; Lee, Patricia Rodríguez; Menéndez, Miguel Cote; Rentería, Ana María Cano; Hernández, Delia Cristina; Cardeño, Carlos; Barré, Michelle Cortés; Kunzel, Gabriel Hernández; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-12-01

    Worldwide, alcohol is the second most-used psychotropic substance and the third risk factor for early death and disability. Its noxious use is a world public health problem given its personal, labor, family, economic and social impact. The identification of acute alcohol intoxication is extremely important, as well as the alcohol withdrawal syndrome and its complications, such as delirium tremens and Wernicke's encephalopathy in order to grant a timely treatment for those patients. This article introduces the evidence found so as to face and treat these clinic manifestations. Systematic revision of the evidence available together with an evaluation of pertinent guidelines found in literature so as to decide whether to adopt or adapt the existing recommendation for each question or to develop de novo recommendations. For de novo recommendations as well as those adapted, it was carried out an evidence synthesis, together with evidence tables and formulation of recommendations based on the evidence. Evidence was found and recommendations were made for the diagnosis and treatment of acute alcohol intoxication, withdrawal syndrome, delirium tremens and Wernicke's encephalopathy. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. [Practical guidelines for diagnosis and therapy of restless legs syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenzer, M; Oertel, W; Trenkwalder, C

    2014-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is the most common neurological sleep disorder affecting 10 % of the Caucasian population. The disorder is characterized by painful sensations in the lower limbs, especially during the evening, at night and during rest, resulting in an urge to move the legs and insomnia. As a result the quality of life is significantly reduced. Dopaminergic agents, opioids and anticonvulsants have proven to be effective for RLS with only the former being currently licensed; however, affected patients have to be identified, which is not always the case, especially in outpatient settings. Possible impediments to the adequate management of patients with RLS may include a lack of awareness, comorbidities and other medical conditions mimicking RLS. To overcome some of these difficulties practical guidelines for the diagnosis and therapy of RLS are provided.

  20. [Lactose intolerance: pathophysiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutyra, Tomasz; Iwańczak, Barbara

    2009-02-01

    Lactose malabsorption and milk products intolerance symptoms are the most common alimentary tract disorders. Lactose intolerance is a result of lactase deficiency or lack of lactase and lactose malabsorption. Three types of lactase deficiency were distinguished: congenital, late-onset lactase deficiency and secondary lactase deficiency. Lactose intolerance means the appearance of clinical gastrointestinal symptoms after ingestion of lactose. To the clinical symptoms of lactose intolerance belongs: nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, cramps, flatulence, flatus, diarrhea and abdominal pain. The diagnosis of lactose intolerance is based on the breath hydrogen test and analysis of lactase activity in the small intestine mucosa. Dietary treatment eliminates clinical symptoms.

  1. Clinical and Laboratory Diagnosis of Dengue Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, David A; Depelsenaire, Alexandra C I; Young, Paul R

    2017-03-01

    Infection with any of the 4 dengue virus serotypes results in a diverse range of symptoms, from mild undifferentiated fever to life-threatening hemorrhagic fever and shock. Given that dengue virus infection elicits such a broad range of clinical symptoms, early and accurate laboratory diagnosis is essential for appropriate patient management. Virus detection and serological conversion have been the main targets of diagnostic assessment for many years, however cross-reactivity of antibody responses among the flaviviruses has been a confounding issue in providing a differential diagnosis. Furthermore, there is no single, definitive diagnostic biomarker that is present across the entire period of patient presentation, particularly in those experiencing a secondary dengue infection. Nevertheless, the development and commercialization of point-of-care combination tests capable of detecting markers of infection present during different stages of infection (viral nonstructural protein 1 and immunoglobulin M) has greatly simplified laboratory-based dengue diagnosis. Despite these advances, significant challenges remain in the clinical management of dengue-infected patients, especially in the absence of reliable biomarkers that provide an effective prognostic indicator of severe disease progression. This review briefly summarizes some of the complexities and issues surrounding clinical dengue diagnosis and the laboratory diagnostic options currently available. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Clinical criteria for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, Heinz

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) follows the UK Brain Bank Criteria, which demands bradykinesia and one additional symptom, i.e. rigidity, resting tremor or postural instability. The latter is not a useful sign for the early diagnosis of PD, because it does not appear before Hoehn and Yahr stage 3. Early symptoms of PD which precede the onset of motor symptoms are hyposmia, REM sleep behavioral disorder, constipation, and depression. In addition, an increasing number of patients whose PD is related to a genetic defect are being described. Thus, genetic testing may eventually develop into a tool to identify at-risk patients. The clinical diagnosis of PD can be supported by levodopa or apomorphine tests. Imaging studies such as cranial CT or MRI are helpful to distinguish idiopathic PD from atypical or secondary PD. SPECT and PET methods are valuable to distinguish PD tremor from essential tremor if this is clinically not possible. Using all of these methods, we may soon be able to make a premotor diagnosis of PD, which will raise the question whether early treatment is possible and ethically and clinically advisable. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Clinical guideline for diagnosis and management of melioidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inglis Timothy J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is an emerging infection in Brazil and neighbouring South American countries. The wide range of clinical presentations include severe community-acquired pneumonia, septicaemia, central nervous system infection and less severe soft tissue infection. Diagnosis depends heavily on the clinical microbiology laboratory for culture. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the bacterial cause of melioidosis, is easily cultured from blood, sputum and other clinical samples. However, B. pseudomallei can be difficult to identify reliably, and can be confused with closely related bacteria, some of which may be dismissed as insignificant culture contaminants. Serological tests can help to support a diagnosis of melioidosis, but by themselves do not provide a definitive diagnosis. The use of a laboratory discovery pathway can help reduce the risk of missing atypical B. pseudomallei isolates. Recommended antibiotic treatment for severe infection is either intravenous Ceftazidime or Meropenem for several weeks, followed by up to 20 weeks oral treatment with a combination of trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole and doxycycline. Consistent use of diagnostic microbiology to confirm the diagnosis, and rigorous treatment of severe infection with the correct antibiotics in two stages; acute and eradication, will contribute to a reduction in mortality from melioidosis.

  4. The Bobath concept in contemporary clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Julie Vaughan; Eustace, Catherine; Brock, Kim; Swain, Elizabeth; Irwin-Carruthers, Sheena

    2009-01-01

    Future development in neurorehabilitation depends upon bringing together the endeavors of basic science and clinical practice. The Bobath concept is widely utilized in rehabilitation following stroke and other neurological conditions. This concept was first developed in the 1950s, based on the neuroscience knowledge of those times. The theoretical basis of the Bobath concept is redefined based on contemporary neuroscience and rehabilitation science. The framework utilized in the Bobath concept for the analysis of movement and movement dysfunction is described. This framework focuses on postural control for task performance, the ability to move selectively, the ability to produce coordinated sequences of movement and vary movement patterns to fit a task, and the role of sensory input in motor behaviour and learning. The article describes aspects of clinical practice that differentiate this approach from other models of practice. Contemporary practice in the Bobath concept utilizes a problem-solving approach to the individual's clinical presentation and personal goals. Treatment is focused toward remediation, where possible, and guiding the individual towards efficient movement strategies for task performance. The aim of this article is to provide a theoretical framework on which future research into the Bobath concept can be based.

  5. Practice guidelines for tumor marker use in the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Catharine

    2002-08-01

    Increasing interest in implementing the practice of evidence-based medicine in oncology has encouraged the development of clinical guidelines, many of which include recommendations about the appropriate use of serum tumor markers. Recent national and international guidelines relating to the use of tumor markers in germ cell, colorectal, breast, ovarian, prostate, lung, neuroendocrine, and thyroid cancers were identified from the scientific literature and other sources and tabulated. Guideline recommendations developed by national and international groups and relating to the use of tumor markers for specific cancers are reviewed and compared, considering the recommendations made for their use in screening, diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of therapy. Potential advantages and disadvantages of clinical guidelines, how best to implement them, and means of auditing their effectiveness are also considered. Excellent clinical guidelines, including recommendations for the most appropriate use of tumor markers, are already available for many cancers. Many questions relating to optimal use of these important tests remain to be answered, but current guidelines already contain much valuable information and advice. Further dissemination and implementation of the guidelines should encourage better use of tumor markers in clinical practice. Careful audit studies are also required to establish the impact of these guidelines on the practice of evidence-based medicine.

  6. ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME: DIAGNOSIS AND CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS (A LECTURE

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    Tat’yana M Reshetnyak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture provides information about the etiology and pathogenesis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS and genetic susceptibility to its development. The most recent international diagnostic criteria for APS and its variants have been reported. This syndrome can affect multiple organ systems depending on localization of thrombosis; therefore, nowadays the problem of APS is multidisciplinary. Clinical manifestations of APS are rather general (thrombosis of different localization; thus, the diagnosis can be verified only in the case of presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. The differential diagnosis of APS is discussed.

  7. Serum amyloid a in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Dijana B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum amyloid A (SAA is an acute phase first class protein discovered a quarter of the century ago. Its concentration depends on clinical findings of the patient, illness activity and the therapy applied. SAA increases moderately to markedly (100-1000 mg/l in bacterial and fungal infections, invasive malignant diseases, tissue injuries in the acute myocardial infarction and autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and vasculitis. Mild elevation (10-100 mg/l is often seen in viral infections, systemic lupus erythematosus and localized inflammation or tissue injuries in cystitis and cerebral infarction. SAA as sensitive, non-invasive parameter is used in organ transplantation where early and correct diagnosis is needed as well as where prompt therapy is required. Besides acute kidney allograft rejection, SAA is used in the diagnosis of rejection after liver transplantation, simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation and also in bone marrow transplantation (acute „graft vs. host disease". Simultaneous determination of C-reactive protein (CRP and SAA may point to acute kidney allograft rejection. Standard immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine A and prednisolone significantly suppresses the acute phase CRP reaction both in operation itself and acute rejection, but not in infection. On the other hand, SAA rejection in operation, acute allograft rejection and infection is present in spite of cyclosporine A and steroids therapy. Different reaction of SAA and CRP in transplant patients to cyclosporine A therapy helps in differentiation between the infection and rejection. Although CRP and SAA are sensitive and acute phase reactants, their serum concentrations cannot be valued as prognostic and diagnostic criteria without creatinine serum concentration and clinical findings. In addition, they offer important information for clinical diagnosis as well as the kind of therapy.

  8. How to develop guidelines for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeschke, R; Jankowski, M; Brozek, J; Antonelli, M

    2009-09-01

    Recent decades have seen an explosion of clinical practice guidelines documents developed to inform clinicians about the best options for managing treatment, with the explicit intent to influence behaviour. As our exposure to guidelines has increased it has become clear that the process of guideline development should follow specific rules in order to avoid disagreement, misunderstanding, misleading recommendations, and confusion. In this article, we review the approach to developing clinical practice guidelines suggested by an international Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) workgroup. This approach suggests several steps for guideline development: 1. determine the purpose, scope, and intended audience; 2. select the panel of guideline authors; 3. specify the main focused clinical questions that the recommendations will address; 4. decide on the relative importance of outcomes; 5. find and summarize the evidence supporting each recommendation; 6. determine the quality of the available evidence; 7. evaluate the balance of desirable and undesirable consequences for a particular course of action; 8. formulate recommendations, including their strenght; and 9. consider a system for subsequent guideline implementation and evaluation. We aim to help the readers of practice guidelines asses those guidelines' quality and validity, as well as to assist the authors of future guidelines in systematically generating clinical recommendations.

  9. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: The challenging diagnosis in clinical routine

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    Eglė Kazakauskaitė

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is rapidly reversible heart failure syndrome that usually mimics the symptoms of acute myocardial infarction with the characteristic regional wall-motion abnormalities (classically with a virtual apical ballooning caused by hypokinetic or akinetic apical or midventricular myocardium and hypercontraction of the basal segments and absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. TC is usually associated with identifiable emotional, psychological or physical stress event and most commonly appears in postmenopausal women. The certain pathophysiological mechanism remains unknown. However, the central hypothesis is supported by the excess of catecholamines and hyperactivity of nervous system. In the last decades the frequency of the TC diagnosis is increasing rapidly but at the initial presentation the diagnosis remains challenging due to the close similarities between TC and ST elevation myocardial infarction clinical presentations that consider TC as an important part of differential diagnosis in acute coronary syndrome.

  10. Clinical scientists improving clinical practices: in thoughts and actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Kenn

    2014-04-01

    In this article, the author comments on aspects of Kamhi's (2014) article, which caused the author to think more deeply about definitions of language, theories of learning, and how these two core components of intervention prepare clinical scientists as they search the literature for new knowledge. Interprofessional collaborative practice as a model for team-based intervention in school settings is also discussed. The article addresses aspects of Kamhi's article that aligned or did not align with the author's definition of language and theory of learning and explains why considering these alignments is important for clinical scientists. Two challenges to staying current with the research base are also described, and suggestions are offered for addressing these challenges. Finally, the article provides an overview of interprofessional collaborative practice. Clinical scientists should continue to strive to use their knowledge of what language is and how it is learned, combined with the best available scientific information, to best serve their clients. Combining their thoughts and actions, they undoubtedly will continuously improve their clinical practices.

  11. Clinical Decision Support Systems: A Useful Tool in Clinical Practice

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    Kolostoumpis G.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of supporting in decision – making shows an increase in recent years. Based on mathematic simulation tools, knowledge databases, processing methods, medical data and methods, artificial intelligence for coding of the available knowledge and for resolving complex problems arising into clinical practice. Aim: the aim of this review is to present the development of new methods and modern services, in clinical practice and the emergence in their implementation. Data and methods: the methodology that was followed included research of articles that referred to health sector and modern technologies, at the electronic data bases “pubmed” and “medline”. Results: Is a useful tool for medical experts using characteristics and medical data used by the doctors. Constitute innovation for the medical community, and ensure the support of clinical decisions with an overall way by providing a comprehensive solution in the light of the integration of computational decision support systems into clinical practice. Conclusions: Decision Support Systems contribute to improving the quality of health services with simultaneous impoundment of costs (i.e. avoid medical errors

  12. Clinical photography in the dermatology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witmer, William K; Lebovitz, Peter J

    2012-09-01

    Photography has been accepted for decades as a standard means for documenting dermatologic conditions and as an adjunct to their treatment, in both medical practice and research. The emergence of low-cost easy-to-use digital imaging systems has made good-quality photography more accessible to practitioners, while providing improved functionality in the clinical environment. Primary concerns are controlling lighting and positioning to provide a clear record of the patients skin condition and maintaining consistency over time to assure meaningful comparison of clinical end points.

  13. Evaluating clinical dermatology practice in medical undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, J M; Sanmartín, V; Martí, R M; Morales, J L; Soler, J; Purroy, F; Pujol, R

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of competences (the set of knowledge, skills and attitudes required to perform a job to a professional level) is considered a fundamental part of medical training. Dermatology competences should include, in addition to effective clinical interviewing and detailed descriptions of skin lesions, appropriate management (diagnosis, differentiation, and treatment) of common skin disorders and tumors. Such competences can only be acquired during hospital clerkships. As a way of certifying these competences, we propose evaluating the different components as follows: knowledge, via clinical examinations or critical incident discussions; communication and certain instrumental skills, via structured workplace observation and scoring using a set of indicators; and attitudes, via joint evaluation by staff familiar with the student. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  14. Medical Ethics in Contemporary Clinical Practice

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    John R. Williams

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This review article describes and analyzes ethical issues in medical practice, particularly those issues encountered by physicians in their relationships with their patients. These relationships often involve ethical conflicts between 2 or more interests, which physicians need to recognize and resolve. The article deals with 4 topics in clinical practice in which ethical conflicts occur: physicians' duty of confidentiality in a digital environment, their responsibilities for dealing with abuses of the human rights of patients, their role in clinical research, and their relationships with commercial enterprises. The ethical policies of the World Medical Association provide the basis for determining appropriate physician conduct on these matters. The article concludes with reflections on the need for international standards of medical ethics.

  15. Application of The APA Practice Guidelines on Suicide to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Douglas G; Brewer, Margaret L

    2006-06-01

    This article presents charts from The American Psychiatric Association Practice Guideline for the Assessment and Treatment of Patients with Suicidal Behaviors, part of the Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders Compendium, and a summary of the assessment information in a format that can be used in routine clinical practice. Four steps in the assessment process are presented: the use of a thorough psychiatric examination to obtain information about the patient's current presentation, history, diagnosis, and to recognize suicide risk factors therein; the necessity of asking very specific questions about suicidal ideation, intent, plans, and attempts; the process of making an estimation of the patient's level of suicide risk is explained; and the use of modifiable risk and protective factors as the basis for treatment planning is demonstrated. Case reports are used to clarify use of each step in this process.

  16. Doing diagnosis: whether and how clinicians use a diagnostic tool of uncertain clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Natalie; Hilton, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Diagnosis is fundamental to the practice of medicine and mastery of it is central to the process of both becoming and practicing as a doctor. We focus on diagnosis as a process, in particular from the perspective of clinicians performing it. We explore how UK clinicians exercise discretion about whether and how to use a diagnostic tool (invasive urodynamic tests - IUT) for which there is, currently, no clear, high-quality evidence. Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 18 clinicians who had previously completed a survey on their use of IUT. Analysis was based on the constant comparative method. Participants tended to be polarised in their view of IUT. While many regarded it as a valuable diagnostic tool that they used frequently and thought was important, others reported using it only infrequently, and some were sceptical of its value in the diagnostic process even if they commonly used it. In addition to the anticipated clinical functions (e.g. adding to understanding of the condition, helping determine best treatment) there were additional, more social, functions that IUT could serve, including fitting in with local practice and helping to defend against possible future litigation. We discern two distinct approaches to the practice of diagnosis: one approach means 'leaving no stone unturned' and seeking all available evidence, proven or otherwise; while a second means using clinical judgement to say 'enough is enough' and thereby avoid exposing patients to possibly unnecessary tests and potentially wasting scarce healthcare resources.

  17. NEUROSYPHILIS IN THERAPEUTIC PRACTICE: CLINICAL OBSERVATION

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    N. A. Shostak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe a clinical case of neurosyphilis diagnosed in a therapeutic inpatient facility.Materials and methods. Female patient T., 61, was hospitalized in the therapeutic department of a general hospital with referral diagnosis of “Stage II hypertensive heart disease, risk 4. Hypertensive crisis of 03.12.2015” with complaints of general fatigue, episodes of transient memory loss with full recovery, unstable blood pressure level. The patient was examined: She underwent treponemal and nontreponemal serological tests for antibodies against Treponema рallidum, hepatitis, human immunodeficiency virus; electrocardiogram; angiography of carotid and vertebral arteries; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI  of the brain with contrast; serological and microscopic examinations of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF.Results. The patient»s medical history described episodes of transient global amnesia with full memory recovery, more frequent in the last year; arterial hypertension; chronic urinary tract infection; and chronic cholecystitis with frequent courses of antibacterial therapy (ceftriaxone. Since 1986, a positive serological reaction for syphilis was observed (Wassermann reaction (WR +++ due to a history of primary syphilis. Considering reliable history of syphilis, positive serum confirmation tests for syphilis (nontreponemal: rapid plasma reagin test 3+; treponemal: passive hemagglutination reaction 4+, antibodies against T. pallidum (total – present, history of neuropsychological symptoms (transient amnesia and acute neurological symptoms before hospitalization (transient ischemic attack, brain MRI data (2 lesions of cerebral circulation disorders of ischemic type in the cortical branches of left and right mesencephalic arteries, a diagnosis of neurosyphilis was proposed, and lumbar puncture was performed for confirmation. Inflammatory characteristics of the CSF (cytosis 19/3, neutrophilia up to 12 cells, insignificant lymphocytosis up

  18. Clinical findings in 16 patients with tomographic diagnosis of schizencephaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Maria do Carmo de Souza [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Cassiano Antonio Moraes]. E-mail: rodriguesmcs@yahoo.com.br; Monteiro, Alexandra Maria Vieira [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas; Llerena Junior, Juan Clinton [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Fernandes Figueira. Centro de Genetica Medica; Fernandes, Alexandre Ribeiro [Universidade Gama Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Pediatria

    2006-09-15

    Objective: to establish a correlation between clinical features in a group of children with tomographic diagnosis of schizencephaly and clefts extent and localization. Materials and methods: retrospective study of dossiers from the archives of Neurology and Medical Genetics Services at Instituto Fernandes Figueira/FIOCRUZ and Hospital Municipal Jesus, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil, in the period between 2000 and 2003. The study included 16 patients, nine female and seven male, with tomographic diagnosis of schizencephaly investigated for clinical findings, psychomotor development, motor/cognitive deficits and epilepsy. Results: predominance of bilateral clefts in 10:16 patients, open-lip schizencephaly type in 23:27 patients, and small lips in 11:27 patients. As regards anomalies associated with schizencephaly, pellucid septum absence was the most frequent one (10:16 patients). As regards clinical findings, 15 patients presented with developmental delay and motor deficit, six patients with cognitive deficit and ten with epilepsy. In three patients, we observed discordant clinical findings and cleft sizes, although the clefts were small, the clinical features severity was high because of other cerebral anomalies. Conclusion: the clinical features of schizencephaly are related to the size of the clefts, regardless laterality, presenting higher severity when associated with other cerebral anomalies. (author)

  19. Clinical decision making in veterinary practice

    OpenAIRE

    Everitt, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to develop an understanding of the factors which influence veterinary surgeons’ clinical decision making during routine consultations. Methods The research takes a qualitative approach using video-cued interviews, in which one of the veterinary surgeon’s own consultations is used as the basis of a semi-structured interview exploring decision making in real cases. The research focuses primarily on small animal consultations in first opinion practice, how...

  20. Review of clinical medicine and religious practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, William C; Adams, Michelle P; Stewart, Jeanette A; Nelson, Lindsay A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose was to evaluate faith-based studies within the medical literature to determine whether there are ways to help physicians understand how religion affects patients’ lives and diseases. We reviewed articles that assessed the influence of religious practices on medicine as a primary or secondary variable in clinical practice. This review evaluated 49 articles and found that religious faith is important to many patients, particularly those with serious disease, and patients depend on it as a positive coping mechanism. The findings of this review can suggest that patients frequently practice religion and interact with God about their disease state. This spiritual interaction may benefit the patient by providing comfort, increasing knowledge about their disease, greater treatment adherence, and quality of life. The results of prayer on specific disease states appear inconsistent with cardiovascular disease but stronger in other disease states.

  1. Binge eating disorder: from clinical research to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goracci, Arianna; Casamassima, Francesco; Iovieno, Nadia; di Volo, Silvia; Benbow, Jim; Bolognesi, Simone; Fagiolini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the clinical course of a young woman suffering from binge eating disorder (BED) associated with obesity. It illustrates the efficacy of different medications in the treatment of BED and related conditions and is followed by the comments and clinical observations of 2 practicing psychiatrists. The issues described in this paper have important clinical implications and are topical, given that BED is now recognized as a specific disorder in the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition classification system, but neither the US Food and Drug Administration nor any other regulatory agency has yet approved a drug for treatment of this disease, despite its very prevalent and disabling nature. Growing evidence from the fields of psychopathology and neurobiology, including preclinical and clinical studies, converges to support the idea that "overeating" has much in common with other behavioral addictions, and substance abuse treatment agents may show promise for the treatment of BED.

  2. Clinical neuropsychology practice and training in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Laura A; Guger, Sharon

    2016-11-01

    This invited paper provides information about professional neuropsychology issues in Canada and is part of a special issue addressing international perspectives on education, training, and practice in clinical neuropsychology. Information was gathered from literature searches and personal communication with other neuropsychologists in Canada. Canada has a rich neuropsychological history. Neuropsychologists typically have doctoral-level education including relevant coursework and supervised practical experience. Licensure requirements vary across the 10 provinces and there are regional differences in salary. While training at the graduate and internship level mirrors that of our American colleagues, completion of a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in neuropsychology is not required to obtain employment in many settings and there are few postdoctoral training programs in this country. The majority of neuropsychologists are employed in institutional settings (e.g. hospitals, universities, rehabilitation facilities), with a growing number entering private practice or other settings. There are challenges in providing neuropsychological services to the diverse Canadian population and a need for assessment measures and normative data in multiple languages. Canadian neuropsychologists face important challenges in defining ourselves as distinct from other professions and other psychologists, in maintaining funding for high-quality training and research, in establishing neuropsychology-specific training and practice standards at the provincial or national level, and ensuring the clinical care that we provide is efficient and effective in meeting the needs of our patient populations and consumers, both within and outside of the publically funded health care system.

  3. Caring during clinical practice: Midwives’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmajapi E. Chokwe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring forms the core of nursing and midwifery. Despite caring being an important emotional aspect of midwifery and nursing, there are general public complaints about uncaring behaviour in midwifery. Therefore, there is a need to explore caring from midwives’ point of view with the hope of identifying solutions and recommendations for midwifery practice. Furthermore, the study aimed to stimulate debate and discussion about the caring behaviour of midwives.Objective: To explore caring during clinical practice as perceived and experienced by midwives.Method: The study was contextual, exploratory and qualitative. The participants were midwives working in state and private hospitals in Tshwane,South Africa where BTech II and III midwifery learners were allocated for work integrated learning (WIL. Data collection was carried out through self-report using a questionnaire and focus group. Questionnaires were distributed to 40 midwives at private and state hospitals in Tshwane. This was followed by two focus group sessions to ensure that data is enriched. The hermeneutic interpretive approach was used to analyse data, and analysis continued until saturation.Results: Themes of caring and uncaring related to patient care and midwives emerged. Thefindings illustrated that the midwives had excellent theoretical knowledge of caring, but someof them did not display caring behaviour during clinical practice.Conclusion: Some of the midwives did not display caring behaviour. Implication for practicewas provided based on the research findings. Recommendations included measures of improving caring behaviours during midwifery practice.

  4. Clinical practice: between Aristotle and Cochrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugelli, P

    1998-02-07

    Health and disease consist of amino acids and self image, cell membranes and human ideals, muscles and politics. Only to a limited extent can clinical practice be based on science. It can never be carried on in isolation from political, and cultural forces that influence patients' health behaviour. Evidence-based medicine is essential but not sufficient. A continuous relationship with patients is a conditio sine qua non for general practice. The general practitioner must be a master of pragmatic medicine. Rationality, the dominant modern trend, may be dangerous for patients and doctors: (1) advances in technology can give patients and doctors the illusion of mastering the universe; (2) patients complain of being treated like biomachines, without human touch. Another symptom of modernity is the decline of religion. But patients and doctors are by no means rational beings. God, destiny and hope are replaced by modern medico-scientific megalomania. Modern medicine is also strongly influenced by commercialization and invasion by bureaucrats. Instead of becoming a biomedical robot, the general practitioner must learn to value the Aristotelian concept of phronesis. It means practical wisdom and can only be gained by personal experience; a form of learning by doing. Good clinical practice cannot come from science alone, or from personal experience alone. It is an amalgam of scientia and phronesis.

  5. Optical Coherence Tomography: Clinical Applications in Medical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al-Mujaini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT is a success story of scientific and technological co-operation between a physicist and a clinician. The concept of cross-sectional imaging revolutionalized the applicability of OCT in the medical profession. OCT is a non-contact, topographic, biomicroscopic device that provides high resolution, cross-sectional digital images of live biological tissues in vivo and in real time. OCT is based on the property of tissues to reflect and backscatter light involving low-coherence interferometry. The spatial resolution of as little as 3 microns or even less has allowed us to study tissues almost at a cellular level. Overall, OCT is an invaluable adjunct in the diagnosis and follow up of many diseases of both anterior and posterior segments of the eye, primarily or secondary to systemic diseases. The digitalization and advanced software has made it possible to store and retrieve huge patient data for patient services, clinical applications and academic research. OCT has revolutionized the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, follow up and response to treatment in almost all fields of clinical practice involving primary ocular pathologies and secondary ocular manifestations in systemic diseases like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, vascular and neurological diseases, thus benefitting non-ophthalmologists as well. Systemically, OCT is proving to be a helpful tool in substantiating early diagnosis in diseases like multiple sclerosis and drug induced retinopathies by detecting early changes in morphology of the retinal nerve fiber layer.

  6. Alopecia areata: Clinical presentation, diagnosis, and unusual cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finner, Andreas M

    2011-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a nonscarring hair loss disorder with a 2% lifetime risk. Most patients are below 30 years old. Clinical types include patchy AA, AA reticularis, diffuse AA, AA ophiasis, AA sisiapho, and perinevoid AA. Besides scalp and body hair, the eyebrows, eyelashes, and nails can be affected. The disorder may be circumscribed, total (scalp hair loss), and universal (loss of all hairs). Atopy, autoimmune thyroid disease, and vitiligo are more commonly associated. The course of the disease is unpredictable. However, early, long-lasting, and severe cases have a less favorable prognosis. The clinical diagnosis is made by the aspect of hairless patches with a normal skin and preserved follicular ostia. Exclamations mark hairs and a positive pull test signal activity. Dermoscopy may reveal yellow dots. White hairs may be spared; initial regrowth may also be nonpigmented. The differential diagnosis includes trichotillomania, scarring alopecia, and other nonscarring hair loss disorders such as tinea capitis and syphilis.

  7. [Clinical symptomps, diagnosis and therapy of feline allergic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favrot, C; Rostaher, A; Fischer, N

    2014-07-01

    Allergies are often suspected in cats and they are mainly hypersensitivity reactions against insect bites, food- or environmental allergens. Cats, with non flea induced atopic dermatitis, normally present with one oft he following reaction patterns: miliary dermatitis, eosinophilic dermatitis, selfinduced alopecia or head and neck excoriations. None of these reaction patterns is nevertheless pathognomonic for allergic dermatitis, therefore the diagnosis is based on the one hand on the exclusion of similar diseases on the other hand on the successful response on a certain therapy. Recently a study on the clinical presentation of cats with non flea induced atopic dermatitis was published. In this study certain criteria for diagnosing atopy in cats were proposed. For therapy of allergic cats cyclosporin, glucocorticoids, antihistamines, hypoallergenic diets and allergen specific immunotherapy are used. This article should provide a recent overview on the clinical symptoms, diagnosis and therapy of feline allergic dermatitis.

  8. Clinical aspects of personality disorder diagnosis in the DSM-5

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Modica

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Personality disorders represent psychopathological conditions hard to be diagnosed. The Author highlights the clinical aspects of personality disorder diagnosis according to the criteria of the DSM-5. In this study, some of the numerous definitions of personality are mentioned; afterwards, some of the theories on the development of personality shall be. Later on, concepts of temperament, character and personality get analysed. Then, the current approach to personality disorders acco...

  9. [Informed consent in clinical practice: persistent doubts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottow, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    Informed consent is the core aspect of the patient-physician relationship. Since its beginnings, clinical bioethics was opposed to the authoritarian paternalism characteristic of medicine since the 19th century. The informed consent was developed to provide patients with sufficient information to allow autonomous decisions when faced with medical diagnostic and therapeutic alternatives. In spite of bioethics’ effort to perfect informed consent, the discipline has been unable to avoid informed consent from becoming an impersonal and administrative procedure. Even though the major goal of this procedure is to provide sufficient information to allow patients an objective weighting of benefits and risks of medical practice, the uncertainties of medicine make full disclosure unattainable. Collecting more information finally leads to indecision and ultimate trust in medical advice. The clinical encounter is fundamentally a fiduciary relationship, and bioethics ought to accept that its main objective is to strengthen the trust bond that is essential to the clinical encounter. This goal may become incompatible with the quest for unlimited autonomy. Patients often will only require information as long as they distrust that medical institutions and their professionals are considering their interests and needs. The main proposal of this article is to temper bioethics’ insistence on autonomy, and accept that patients essentially seek to be protected and cared for. Informed consent ought to relent its efforts at full autonomy to the benefit of trustworthiness in medicine, and trust in clinical practice.

  10. [Artificial intelligence to assist clinical diagnosis in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo-Reyes, Saúl Oswaldo; Maldonado-Colín, Guadalupe; Murata, Chiharu

    2014-01-01

    Medicine is one of the fields of knowledge that would most benefit from a closer interaction with Computer studies and Mathematics by optimizing complex, imperfect processes such as differential diagnosis; this is the domain of Machine Learning, a branch of Artificial Intelligence that builds and studies systems capable of learning from a set of training data, in order to optimize classification and prediction processes. In Mexico during the last few years, progress has been made on the implementation of electronic clinical records, so that the National Institutes of Health already have accumulated a wealth of stored data. For those data to become knowledge, they need to be processed and analyzed through complex statistical methods, as it is already being done in other countries, employing: case-based reasoning, artificial neural networks, Bayesian classifiers, multivariate logistic regression, or support vector machines, among other methodologies; to assist the clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis, breast cancer and chronic liver disease, among a wide array of maladies. In this review we shift through concepts, antecedents, current examples and methodologies of machine learning-assisted clinical diagnosis.

  11. Piriformis syndrome in fibromyalgia: clinical diagnosis and successful treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiq, Md Abu Bakar; Khasru, Moshiur Rahman; Rasker, Johannes J

    2014-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an underdiagnosed extraspinal association of sciatica. Patients usually complain of deep seated gluteal pain. In severe cases the clinical features of piriformis syndrome are primarily due to spasm of the piriformis muscle and irritation of the underlying sciatic nerve but this mysterious clinical scenario is also described in lumbar spinal canal stenosis, leg length discrepancy, piriformis myofascial pain syndrome, following vaginal delivery, and anomalous piriformis muscle or sciatic nerve. In this paper, we describe piriformis and fibromyalgia syndrome in a 30-year-old young lady, an often missed diagnosis. We also focus on management of the piriformis syndrome.

  12. [Juvenil idiopathic arthritis. Part 1: diagnosis, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espada, Graciela

    2009-10-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is not a single disease and constitutes an heterogeneous group of illnesses or inflammatory disorders. This new nomenclature encompasses different disease categories, each of which has different presentation, clinical signs, symptoms, and outcome. The cause of the disease is still unknown but both environmental and genetic factors seem to be related to its pathogenesis. Is the most common chronic rheumatic disease in children and an important cause of short-term and long-term disability. In this article, clinical manifestation, new classification and approach to diagnosis are reviewed.

  13. Piriformis Syndrome in Fibromyalgia: Clinical Diagnosis and Successful Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Abu Bakar Siddiq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Piriformis syndrome is an underdiagnosed extraspinal association of sciatica. Patients usually complain of deep seated gluteal pain. In severe cases the clinical features of piriformis syndrome are primarily due to spasm of the piriformis muscle and irritation of the underlying sciatic nerve but this mysterious clinical scenario is also described in lumbar spinal canal stenosis, leg length discrepancy, piriformis myofascial pain syndrome, following vaginal delivery, and anomalous piriformis muscle or sciatic nerve. In this paper, we describe piriformis and fibromyalgia syndrome in a 30-year-old young lady, an often missed diagnosis. We also focus on management of the piriformis syndrome.

  14. Preoperative diagnosis of pelvic actinomycosis by clinical cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuda K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Katsuya Matsuda,1 Hisayoshi Nakajima,2 Khaleque N Khan,1 Terumi Tanigawa,1 Daisuke Hamaguchi,1 Michio Kitajima,1 Koichi Hiraki,1 Shingo Moriyama,3 Hideaki Masuzaki11Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 2Department of Health Sciences, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 3Shimabara Maternity Clinic, Nagasaki, JapanBackground: The purpose of this work was to investigate whether clinical cytology could be useful in the preoperative diagnosis of pelvic actinomycosis.Methods: This study involved the prospective collection of samples derived from the endometrium and the uterine cervix, and retrospective data analysis. Nine patients with clinically diagnosed pelvic actinomycosis were enrolled. The clinical and hematological characteristics of patients were recorded, and detection of actinomyces was performed by cytology, pathology, and bacteriological culture of samples and by imprint intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD cytology.Results: The detection rate of actinomyces was 77.7% by combined cervical and endometrial cytology, 50.0% by pathology, and 11.1% by bacterial culture.Conclusion: The higher detection rate of actinomyces by cytology than by pathology or bacteriology suggests that careful cytological examination may be clinically useful in the preoperative diagnosis of pelvic actinomycosis.Keywords: actinomycosis, cytology, pathology, intrauterine contraceptive device, pelvic inflammatory disease

  15. Role of clinical judgment and tissue harmonic imaging ultrasonography in diagnosis of paediatric acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Ossama

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency in children; yet, diagnosis of equivocal presentations continues to challenge clinicians. Aim The objective of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the use of a modified clinical practice and harmonic ultrasonographic grading scores (MCPGS may improve the accuracy in diagnosing acute appendicitis in the pediatric population. Patients & Methods Main outcome measures Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the modified scoring system. Five hundred and thirty patients presented with suspected diagnosis of acute appendicitis during the period from December 2000 to December 2009 were enrolled in this study. Children's data that have already been published of those who presented with suspected diagnosis of acute appendicitis- to whom a special clinical practice grading scores (CPGS incorporating clinical judgment and results of gray scale ultrasonography (US was applied- were reviewed and compared to the data of 265 pediatric patients with equivocal diagnosis of acute appendicitis (AA, to whom a modified clinical practice grading scores (MCPGS was applied. Statistical analyses were carried out using Z test for comparing 2 sample proportions and student's t-test to compare the quantitative data in both groups. Sensitivity and specificity for the 2 scoring systems were calculated using Epi-Info software. Results The Number of appendectomies declined from 200 (75.5% in our previous CPGS to 187 (70.6% in the MCPGS (P > 0.05. Specificity was significantly higher when applying MCPGS (90.7% in this study compared to 70.47% in our previous work when CPGS was applied (P P Conclusions MCPGS tends to help in reduce the numbers of avoidable and unnecessary appendectomies in suspected cases of pediatric acute appendicitis that may help in saving hospital resources.

  16. Introduction of the 2012 Infectious Disease Society of America "clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot infections"%美国感染性疾病学会2012年《糖尿病足溃疡合并感染的临床诊治指南》介绍

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许樟荣; 王玉珍

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic foot disease with infection is a severe challenge for the multi-disciplinary medical specialists," 2012 clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot infections" was published by the Infectious Disease Society of America.This guideline listed the common and the key problems in the clinical practice of diabetic foot infection and suggested what the clinicians should to do and how to do based on the evidence medicine and the global experts views.The guideline is very important and practical tor all the clinicians who deal with diabetic foot disease.%糖尿病足溃疡合并感染是涉及多学科的临床诊治难题.美国感染性疾病学会发布了2012年《糖尿病足溃疡合并感染的临床诊治指南》.该指南列入了糖尿病足溃疡合并感染中常见问题和有争议的问题,采用问答的形式,从专家的角度,在循证医学的基础上,提出意见和建议,从而使得该指南更富有实践性,更能被临床医务人员所操作.

  17. Integrative Medicine in Clinical Practice:From Pattern Differentiation in Traditional Chinese Medicine to Disease Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕爱平; 陈可冀

    2009-01-01

    Pattern(syndrome) differentiation is the key theory in traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) and the important diagnostic principle for TCM therapy.More and more medical researchers recognize that the combination of disease diagnosis in biomedicine and pattern differentiation in TCM is essential for the clinical practice, and it has been a common practice model in China since it will produce better clinical effects.

  18. The clinical method as a diagnosis method. A critique to a standing conception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Corona Martínez

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the clinical method in the assistance practice is out of question. In this article, through a systemic point of view and from the medical assistance perspective, it is analyzed how, historically conditioned, the clinical method has been considered up to this moment as a method for medical diagnosis, which limits the fulfillment of the general objective of the medical attention process. That’s why we consider the actual theory an insufficiently developed model for, as a teaching content in the Medicine career; contribute to the learning of the medical attention process.

  19. Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R N Beth

    2009-01-01

    Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice is the focus of this paper. The phenomenological research study reported involved a group of 8 nurses identified by their colleagues as exemplary. The major theme revealed in this study was that these exemplary nurses were also excellent role models in the clinical setting. This paper details approaches used by these nurses that made them excellent role models. Specifically, the themes of attending to the little things, making connections, maintaining a light-hearted attitude, modeling, and affirming others are presented. These themes are discussed within the framework of Watson [Watson, J., 1989. Human caring and suffering: a subjective model for health services. In: Watson, J., Taylor, R. (Eds.), They Shall Not Hurt: Human Suffering and Human Caring. Colorado University, Boulder, CO] "transpersonal caring" and [Bandura, A., 1997. Social Learning Theory. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ] "Social Learning Theory." Particular emphasis in the discussion is on how positive role modeling by exemplary practitioners can contribute to the education of clinical nurses in the practice setting.

  20. Good manufacturing practices and clinical supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchuk, J W

    1991-01-01

    Quality characteristics must be assured through adherence to good manufacturing practices in the production, control, and testing of drug products intended for investigational as well as commercial use. A draft guideline on the preparation of investigational new drug products, soon to be available in final form, addresses questions that have been raised regarding acceptable practices and procedures to facilitate compliance with the CGMP regulations as applied to clinical supplies. Inspections of sterile clinical supplies production can be expected to include the areas most likely to influence product safety, quality, and uniformity in the same manner as would be expected regarding the manufacture of commercial batches. Some areas of particular significance in the manufacture of parenteral clinical supplies include validation of terminal sterilization, aseptic processing, and oxygen exclusion. The validation of the aseptic handling during lyophilization requires special attention. Other CGMP concerns include the provision of a quality control unit, avoiding packaging mixups, and being prepared for an amendment to the CGMP regulations regarding terminal sterilization.

  1. Clinical practice: Obstructive renal candidiasis in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Veena; Voort, Judith VanDer

    2011-10-01

    Renal candidiasis is an increasingly common condition affecting predominantly premature infants receiving neonatal intensive care or term infants with urogenital tract anomalies. Multiple risk factors are usually present. Although rare, some infants develop an obstructive uropathy due to fungal balls, and this requires prompt detection and intervention to preserve kidney function. The management of obstructive renal bezoars is challenging and not well summarised in the past. This is mainly due to scarce literature confined to case reports or case series only. This review clarifies various definitions used in relation to renal candidiasis and identifies infants particularly at risk of obstruction. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and the role of imaging are discussed. A summary of the recent literature is provided to outline the range of existing treatment options available with published drug dosages and mode of delivery used. No single approach is successful in all cases and clinicians need to be aware of the different options available: apart from adequate urinary drainage and use of systemic +/- local antifungal agents, additional treatment with fibrinolytic agents and/or endoscopic or open surgical removal may be required. A new simplified algorithm for use in management is proposed. We hope this review will help clinicians in their management of patients presenting with this complex and challenging diagnosis.

  2. The balance beam metaphor: a perspective on clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Robert M; Beasley, William Howard

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the impact of clinical findings in discriminating between possible causes of a patient's presentation is essential in clinical judgment. A balance beam is a natural physical analogue that can accurately represent the combination of several pieces of evidence with varying ability to discriminate between disease hypotheses. Calculation of Bayes' theorem using log(posterior odds) as a function of log(prior odds) and the logarithms of the evidence's likelihood ratios maps onto the physical forces affecting objects placed on a balance beam. We describe the rules governing the functioning of tokens representing clinical findings in the comparison of 2 competing diseases. The likelihood ratios corresponding to positive (LR+) or negative (LR-) observations for each symptom determine the lateral position at which the symptom's token is placed on the beam, using a weight if the finding is present and a helium balloon if it is absent. We discuss how a balance beam could represent concepts of dynamic specificity (due to changes in competitor diseases' probabilities) and dynamic sensitivity (due to class-conditional independence). Utility-based thresholds for acting on a diagnosis could be represented by moving the balance beam's fulcrum. It is suggested that a balance beam can be a useful aid for students learning clinical diagnosis, allowing them to build on existing intuitive understanding to develop an appreciation of how evidence combines to influence degree of belief. The balance beam could also facilitate exploration of the potential impact of available questions or investigations.

  3. Best Practices in Clinical Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Phansalkar, Shobha; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Jenders, Robert A.; Bobb, Anne M.; Halamka, John D.; Kuperman, Gilad; Payne, Thomas H.; Teasdale, S.; Vaida, A. J.; Bates, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence demonstrates that clinical decision support (CDS) is a powerful tool for improving healthcare quality and ensuring patient safety. However, implementing and maintaining effective decision support interventions presents multiple technical and organizational challenges. Purpose To identify best practices for CDS, using the domain of preventive care reminders as an example. Methods We assembled a panel of experts in CDS and held a series of facilitated online and inperson discussions. We analyzed the results of these discussions using a grounded theory method to elicit themes and best practices. Results Eight best practice themes were identified as important: deliver CDS in the most appropriate ways, develop effective governance structures, consider use of incentives, be aware of workflow, keep content current, monitor and evaluate impact, maintain high quality data, and consider sharing content. Keys themes within each of these areas were also described. Conclusion Successful implementation of CDS requires consideration of both technical and socio-technical factors. The themes identified in this study provide guidance on crucial factors that need consideration when CDS is implemented across healthcare settings. These best practice themes may be useful for developers, implementers, and users of decision support. PMID:21991299

  4. Applying HIV testing guidelines in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Megan R; Fogler, Jess; Weber, Shannon; Goldschmidt, Ronald H

    2009-12-15

    An estimated one fourth of persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are not aware they are infected. Early diagnosis of HIV has the potential to ensure optimal outcomes for infected persons and to limit the spread of the virus. Important barriers to testing among physicians include insufficient time, reimbursement issues, and lack of patient acceptance. Current HIV testing guidelines address many of these barriers by making the testing process more streamlined and less stigmatizing. The opt-out consent process has been shown to improve test acceptance. Formal pretest counseling and written consent are no longer recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nevertheless, pretest discussions provide an opportunity to give information about HIV, address fears of discrimination, and identify ongoing high-risk activities. With increased HIV screening in the primary care setting, more persons with HIV could be identified earlier, receive timely and appropriate care, and get treatment to prevent clinical progression and transmission.

  5. [Clinical presentation of tuberculosis in routine practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinser, R; Frerix, M; Müller-Ladner, U

    2012-10-01

    Since the beginning of the biologics era tuberculosis is known to be a potential life-threatening complication during treatment of patients with rheumatic diseases. National and international societies have developed recommendations for tuberculosis screening and treatment of patients at risk for development of tuberculosis. Owing to the relative rareness of overt tuberculosis in patients with rheumatic diseases, the experience of individual rheumatologists with this complication is limited. Therefore, we have analyzed the tuberculosis cases from 2006-2011 in our rheumatology referral center (treating more than 1,500 inpatient and 8,000 outpatient cases every year) to obtain a real-life picture more than 10 years after initiation of the first application of biologics outside of controlled clinical trials. We identified 4 cases that illustrate the difficulties of diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome in clinical practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugarinović Snežana M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Topic: Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome is a rare but specific lethal reaction to neuroleptics / antipsychotics.It occurs in 0.02% to 3.3% of patients in the treatment applying conventional neuroleptic drugs. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is associated with highly potent antipsychotic drugs. However, it can occur more frequently in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics such as clozapine. Topic position in medical public: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is critical medical condition, potentially threatening complication associated with side effects of neuroleptic drugs. High levels of creatine kinase (CK and leukocytosis are associated with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Future action: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome as a psychiatric entity requires permanent research, early diagnosis, adequate therapy, exchange of clinical experiences, and what's of particular importance, rational antipsychotic administration.

  7. An Interactive Diagnosis Approach for Supporting Clinical Nursing Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chun-Wang; Lin, Yi-Chun; Lin, Yen-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Clinical resources in nursing schools are always insufficient for satisfying the practice requirements of each student at the same time during a formal course session. Although several studies have applied information and communication technology to develop computer-based learning tools for addressing this problem, most of these developments lack…

  8. An Interactive Diagnosis Approach for Supporting Clinical Nursing Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chun-Wang; Lin, Yi-Chun; Lin, Yen-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Clinical resources in nursing schools are always insufficient for satisfying the practice requirements of each student at the same time during a formal course session. Although several studies have applied information and communication technology to develop computer-based learning tools for addressing this problem, most of these developments lack…

  9. Clinical relevance of molecular diagnosis in pet allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriarte, S A; Sastre, J

    2016-07-01

    We describe the pattern of sensitisation to pet IgE components and its association with clinical symptoms. Hundred and fifty nine consecutive patients with rhinitis/asthma sensitised to dog, cat, and horse were recruited. Specific IgE to whole extracts and to pet recombinant allergens were performed. Only 5% of patients were monosensitised to animal allergens. Specific IgE to Can f 1 was significantly associated with persistent rhinitis, Can f 2 with asthma diagnosis, Can f 3 with moderate/severe rhinitis (M/S-R) and asthma diagnosis (AD), and Can f 5 with persistent and M/S-R. Positive IgE to Fel d 2 was significantly associated with M/S-R and AD, Equ c 1 with M/S-R and Equ c 3 with persistent rhinitis, AD and severe asthma. Sensitisation to ≥2 molecules or to pet albumins was associated with more severe respiratory symptoms. Molecular diagnosis in patients with pet allergy may also help clinicians to predict clinical symptoms and their severity.

  10. [Diagnosis of healthcare issues in clinics and hospital of Barranquilla].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Barrios, Miguel Á; Felizzola-Jiménez, Heriberto A

    2016-08-01

    Objective To identify and assess the main healthcare issues found in clinics and hospitals in Barranquilla. Methods Descriptive study applied on two populations: clinics [23] and hospitals [5]. A confidence level of 95 % and the alpha level of 5 % and p=0.5 were used in the study. The resulting sample size for clinics and hospitals was 18 and 4, respectively. Clinics and hospitals were randomly and a 21-question survey was designed to find out the status of the different healthcare processes in the Health Care Sector. The results were processed by using Microsoft Excel 2010 software. Results On one hand, 50 % of the hospitals expressed having problems in outpatient, hospitalization and statistical departments. On the other hand, 61.1 % of the clinics have difficulties in Emergency rooms, 50 % in Surgical Services, 50% in Hospitalization and 38.9 % in Outpatient Department. Conclusions The diagnosis regarding healthcare issues in clinics and hospitals of Barranquilla determines that although the Hospitalization process is a common point for potential improvement in both hospitals and clinics of the city, the greatest priority should be given to Surgical Services, Emergency Department and Statistical Department, due to their average intervention priority.

  11. To evaluate the efficacy of ultrasonography compared to clinical diagnosis, radiography and histopathological findings in the diagnosis of maxillofacial swellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallagatti, Shambulingappa, E-mail: dr.shambulingappa@gmail.com [Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, M.M. College of Dental Sciences and Research, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana (India); Sheikh, Soheyl; Puri, Nidhi; Mittal, Amit; Singh, Balwinder [Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, M.M. College of Dental Sciences and Research, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana (India)

    2012-08-15

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of Ultrasonography compared to clinical diagnosis, radiography and histopathological findings in the diagnosis of maxillofacial swellings. Material and methods: The study was conducted on forty-five patients with maxillofacial swellings. The clinical diagnosis, radiographic diagnosis and ultrasonographic diagnosis were made which was compared to the histopathological diagnosis. The maxillofacial swellings included cystic lesions, benign swellings, malignant swellings, lymphadenopathies and abscesses and space infections. Results: The diagnostic accuracy and contingency coefficient was evaluated considering histopathology as gold standard. The diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound was found to be 92.30% in the diagnosis of cystic lesions, 87.5% in benign tumors, 81.8% in malignant tumors, 100% in lymphadenopathies and 90% in space infections and abscesses. The contingency coefficient of 0.934 was obtained when ultrasonography was compared to the histopathology, which was highly significant. Similar significant results were obtained comparing ultrasonography with clinical diagnosis (0.895) and radiographic diagnosis (0.889). Conclusion: Ultrasonography provides accurate imaging of the head and neck region and provides information about the nature of the lesion, its extent, and relationship with the surrounding structures. As the conventional and digital radiography enable the diagnosis of the presence of the disease, but do not give any indication of its nature. So, together with clinical and histopathological examinations, real time ultrasound imaging works out as a valuable adjunct in the diagnosis of orofacial swellings.

  12. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Severe Asthma Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Pereira Valdes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Severe Asthma Treatment. This disease is characterized by an overreaction of the tracheobronchial tree with hyperactivity after certain stimulus consisting of a diffuse narrowing of the respiratory ways related with an excessive contraction of the bronchial smooth muscle, hyper-secretion of mucus and mucosa edema. It is spontaneously reversible or reversible after treatment. We include a review of its definition, classification and development, stressing those elements related with ventilation. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  13. The Sherlock Holmes method in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopeña, B

    2014-04-01

    This article lists the integral elements of the Sherlock Holmes method, which is based on the intelligent collection of information through detailed observation, careful listening and thorough examination. The information thus obtained is analyzed to develop the main and alternative hypotheses, which are shaped during the deductive process until the key leading to the solution is revealed. The Holmes investigative method applied to clinical practice highlights the advisability of having physicians reason through and seek out the causes of the disease with the data obtained from acute observation, a detailed review of the medical history and careful physical examination.

  14. [Familial Mediterranean fever - clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallos, Tomáš; Ilenčíková, Denisa; Kovács, László

    2014-01-01

    Familial mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most prevalent genetically determined autoinflammatory disease. FMF significantly decreases the quality of life and limits life expectancy due to the development of amyloidosis in affected individuals. Prevalence of FMF is highest in the south-eastern Mediterraneans. In other parts of the world, its occurance is often restricted to high-risk ethnic goups. In Central Europe, experience with FMF is scarse. As for Slovakia, we have reported the first cases of FMF in ethnic Slovaks only recently. Along with their complicated fates, this has lead us to compile a comprehensive overview of the clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment of this elusive disease. Hereby we hope to be able to promote the awareness about this disease and possibly aid the diagnosis in new patients.

  15. Clinical aspects of personality disorder diagnosis in the DSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Modica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Personality disorders represent psychopathological conditions hard to be diagnosed. The Author highlights the clinical aspects of personality disorder diagnosis according to the criteria of the DSM-5. In this study, some of the numerous definitions of personality are mentioned; afterwards, some of the theories on the development of personality shall be. Later on, concepts of temperament, character and personality get analysed. Then, the current approach to personality disorders according to the two models of DSM-5 is reported. The first model is included in the Section II of DSM-5; while in the Section III there exists a proposal for a so-called alternate model. The first one suggests a qualitative or categorical kind of approach to personality disorders, whereas the alternate model proposes a dimensional or quantitative kind of approach and aims to formulate, as well as a diagnosis for general alterations of the personological functioning, even a trait-based personality disorder diagnosis, which can be formulated when a personality disorder is there but doesn't fit criteria for a specific disorder. Ultimately, it can be so claimed: 1 diagnostic criteria of the first model are similar to those of DSM-IV with its respective strenghts and weaknesses, and namely high probability in diagnosis, where  there, of personality disorder, yet insufficient sensitivity in the specification of the disorder; 2 the alternate model, despite criticism, thanks to the possibility of delivering a trait-based personality disorder diagnosis, seems to be more equipped both in the identification of the personality disorder and further specifications.

  16. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugaj, T. J.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Today, skills laboratories or “skills labs”, i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills.In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II an outline of the underlying idea and (III an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV the training method’s effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training.

  17. Korean Clinical Practice Guidelines: Otitis Media in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Su-Kyoung; Choi, Kyu Young; Park, Su Eun; Chun, Young Myung; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Park, Shi-Nae; Cho, Yang-Sun; Kim, Young-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) and otitis media with effusion (OME) are common infections in children, and their diagnosis and treatment have significant impacts on the health of children and the costs of providing national medical care. In 2009, the Korean Otologic Society organized a committee composed of experts in the field of otolaryngology, pediatrics, and family medicine to develop Korean clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for otitis media in children with the goal of meeting regional medical and social needs in Korea. For this purpose, the committee adapted existing guidelines. A comprehensive literature review was carried out primarily from 2004 to 2009 using medical search engines including data from Korea. A draft was written after a national questionnaire survey and several public audits, and it was editorially supervised by senior advisors before publication of the final report. These evidence-based guidelines for the management of otitis media in children provide recommendations to primary practitioners for the diagnosis and treatment of children younger than 15 yr old with uncomplicated AOM and OME. The guidelines include recommendations regarding diagnosis, treatment options, prevention and parent education, medical records, referral, and complementary/alternative medicine for treating pediatric otitis media. PMID:22876048

  18. Korean clinical practice guidelines: otitis media in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Su-Kyoung; Choi, Kyu Young; Park, Su Eun; Chun, Young Myung; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Park, Shi-Nae; Cho, Yang-Sun; Kim, Young-Jae; Kim, Hyung-Jong; Korean Otologic Society

    2012-08-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) and otitis media with effusion (OME) are common infections in children, and their diagnosis and treatment have significant impacts on the health of children and the costs of providing national medical care. In 2009, the Korean Otologic Society organized a committee composed of experts in the field of otolaryngology, pediatrics, and family medicine to develop Korean clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for otitis media in children with the goal of meeting regional medical and social needs in Korea. For this purpose, the committee adapted existing guidelines. A comprehensive literature review was carried out primarily from 2004 to 2009 using medical search engines including data from Korea. A draft was written after a national questionnaire survey and several public audits, and it was editorially supervised by senior advisors before publication of the final report. These evidence-based guidelines for the management of otitis media in children provide recommendations to primary practitioners for the diagnosis and treatment of children younger than 15 yr old with uncomplicated AOM and OME. The guidelines include recommendations regarding diagnosis, treatment options, prevention and parent education, medical records, referral, and complementary/alternative medicine for treating pediatric otitis media.

  19. Pertussis: clinical and bacteriological diagnosis of six cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arellano Penagos Mario

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available ertussis is an endemic disease in our population. Every 3 to 4 years, pertussis has an epidemic pattern even in countries with good health conditions. Antipertussis vaccine first dose is adminis- tered at the age of 2 months; a second and third dose are given at 4 and 6 months of age. This vaccine has an 8 to 10 year protective effect, for which reason it is suggested that pregnant women in the third trimester should be vaccinated in order to prevent pertussis in newborns. It should also be administered to older people to avoid turning them into asymptomatic carriers. Clinic manifestations are easily identifiable due to respiratory symptoms, especially to the particular characteristics of the cough. The diagnosis is supported by the presence of leukocytosis (predominantly lymphocytes and by certain thoracic radiologic findings. The diagnosis is confirmed with a positive culture for Bordetella pertussis or with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR. In a non complicated clinic course macrolides are still the best therapeutic choice. Nonetheless clinic observation is highly recom- mended in order to avoid complications. Redefinition of vaccine programs against Bordetella pertussis in Mexican population is recommended and also to notify the presence of the disease to the corresponding health authorities.

  20. Infantile Pompe disease: Clinical picture, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Kotlukova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is a rare inherited disease that belongs to lysosomal accumulation diseases and can be considered as cardiac glycogenosistype II, as well as a severe neuromuscular disease or metabolic myopathy. Physicians of different specialties very rarely identify this pathology, which is due to both its rarity and clinical and genetic polymorphism. Infantile Pompe disease is the severest form. It is characterized by a progressive pattern and a fatal outcome during the first year of life. The possibility of performing enzyme replacement therapy for this disease, which can improve the prognosis and quality of life of patients, makes the early diagnosis of Pompe disease urgent. The paper describes the clinical presentation of infantile Pompe disease and current methods for its diagnosis and treatment. The authors give their experience in diagnosing and treating infantile Pompe disease, by demonstrating 3 cases of the disease. The characteristics of each infant, which confirm the clinical and genetic variety of this pathology, are discussed.

  1. Spectral biopsy for skin cancer diagnosis: initial clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Austin J.; Feng, Xu; Nguyen, Hieu T. M.; Zhang, Yao; Sebastian, Katherine R.; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2017-02-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States and is a recognized public health issue. Diagnosis of skin cancer involves biopsy of the suspicious lesion followed by histopathology. Biopsies, which involve excision of the lesion, are invasive, at times unnecessary, and are costly procedures ( $2.8B/year in the US). An unmet critical need exists to develop a non-invasive and inexpensive screening method that can eliminate the need for unnecessary biopsies. To address this need, our group has reported on the continued development of a noninvasive method that utilizes multimodal spectroscopy towards the goal of a "spectral biopsy" of skin. Our approach combines Raman spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to collect comprehensive optical property information from suspicious skin lesions. We previously described an updated spectral biopsy system that allows acquisition of all three forms of spectroscopy through a single fiber optic probe and is composed of off-the-shelf OEM components that are smaller, cheaper, and enable a more clinic-friendly system. We present initial patient data acquired with the spectral biopsy system, the first from an extensive clinical study (n = 250) to characterize its performance in identifying skin cancers (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma). We also present our first attempts at analyzing this initial set of clinical data using statistical-based models, and with models currently being developed to extract biophysical information from the collected spectra, all towards the goal of noninvasive skin cancer diagnosis.

  2. Systematic Approach toward the Clinical Diagnosis of Functional Dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Paré

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional dyspepsia (FD is the most common condition in patients consulting with upper gastrointestinal tract symptoms, resulting in up to 5% of visits to family physicians. By definition, patients with FD have no clinical, biochemical or endoscopic evidence of an organic disease that is likely to explain their symptoms. The process to be used in a structured interview for establishing a clinical diagnosis of FD is presented. The steps are as follows: determine the duration and the course of the disease; characterize the current syndrome and review the alarm symptoms; elicit the patient-perceived dominant symptom and/or condition; and identify the patient’s reason for consulting and address the psychosocial factors. According to the clinical characteristics of the three most frequent causes of dyspepsia (peptic ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux and FD and acknowledging that these conditions may coexist rather than overlap in some patients, an algorithm is suggested for establishing a working diagnosis of FD and indications for investigation, and initiating a management strategy.

  3. Taking PDT into mainstream clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bown, Stephen G.

    2009-06-01

    Many individuals in the field are frustrated by the slow progress getting PDT established in mainstream clinical practice. The five key reasons are: 1. Lack of adequate evidence of safety and efficacy and optimization of dosimetry. These are fundamental. The number of randomized controlled studies is still small. For some cancer applications, it is difficult to get patients to agree to be randomised, so different approaches must be taken. Anecdotal results are not acceptable to sceptics and regulators. 2. The regulatory processes. The rules get more complex every day, but there is no choice, they must be met. The full bureaucratic strength of the pharmaceutical industry is needed to address these issues. 3. Conservatism of the medical profession. Established physicians are reluctant to change practice, especially if it means referring patients to different specialists. 4. Lack of education. It is amazing how few physicians have even heard of PDT and many that have, are sceptical. The profile of PDT to both the medical profession and the general public needs to be raised dramatically. Patient demand works wonders! 5. Money. Major investment is required to run clinical trials. Pharmaceutical companies may see PDT as a threat (eg reduced market for chemotherapy agents). Licensed photosensitisers are expensive. Why not reduce the price initially, to get the technique established and stimulate demand? PDT has the potential for enormous cost savings for health service providers. With appropriate motivation and resources these problems can be addressed. Possible routes forward will be suggested.

  4. Review of clinical presentation and diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksz, C J; Harmatz, P; Beck, M; Jones, S; Wood, T; Lachman, R; Gravance, C G; Orii, T; Tomatsu, S

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA) was described in 1929 by Luis Morquio from Uruguay and James Brailsford from England, and was later found as an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease. MPS IVA is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Reduced GALNS activity results in impaired catabolism of two glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S) and keratan sulfate (KS). Clinical presentations of MPS IVA reflect a spectrum of progression from a severe "classical" phenotype to a mild "attenuated" phenotype. More than 180 different mutations have been identified in the GALNS gene, which likely explains the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder. Accumulation of C6S and KS manifests predominantly as short stature and skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex), including atlantoaxial instability and cervical cord compression. However, abnormalities in the visual, auditory, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems can also affect individuals with MPS IVA. Diagnosis is typically based on clinical examination, skeletal radiographs, urinary GAG, and enzymatic activity of GALNS in blood cells or fibroblasts. Deficiency of GALNS activity is a common assessment for the laboratory diagnosis of MPS IVA; however, with recently increased availability, gene sequencing for MPS IVA is often used to confirm enzyme results. As multiple clinical presentations are observed, diagnosis of MPS IVA may require multi-system considerations. This review provides a history of defining MPS IVA and how the understanding of the disease manifestations has changed over time. A summary of the accumulated knowledge is presented, including information from the International Morquio Registry. The classical phenotype is contrasted with attenuated cases, which are now being recognized and diagnosed more frequently. Laboratory based diagnoses of MPS IVA are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Systematic unenhanced CT for acute abdominal symptoms in the elderly patients improves both emergency department diagnosis and prompt clinical management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millet, Ingrid; Pages-Bouic, Emma; Curros-Doyon, Fernanda; Taourel, Patrice [CHU Lapeyronie, Department of Medical Imaging, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Sebbane, Mustapha [Department of Emergency Medicine, CHU Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France); Molinari, Nicolas [Department of Medical Information and Statistics, CHU Montpellier (France); Riou, Bruno [GH Pitie-Salpetriere, APHP, Department of Emergency Medicine and Surgery, Paris (France)

    2017-02-15

    To assess the added-value of systematic unenhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) on emergency department (ED) diagnosis and management accuracy compared to current practice, in elderly patients with non-traumatic acute abdominal symptoms. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. This prospective study included 401 consecutive patients 75 years of age or older, admitted to the ED with acute abdominal symptoms, and investigated by early systematic unenhanced abdominal CT scan. ED diagnosis and intended management before CT, after unenhanced CT, and after contrast CT if requested, were recorded. Diagnosis and management accuracies were evaluated and compared before CT (clinical strategy) and for two conditional strategies (current practice and systematic unenhanced CT). An expert clinical panel assigned a final diagnosis and management after a 3-month follow-up. Systematic unenhanced CT significantly improved the accurate diagnosis (76.8% to 85%, p=1.1 x 10{sup -6}) and management (88.5% to 95.8%, p=2.6 x 10{sup -6}) rates compared to current practice. It allowed diagnosing 30.3% of acute unsuspected pathologies, 3.4% of which were unexpected surgical procedure requirement. Systematic unenhanced abdominal CT improves ED diagnosis accuracy and appropriate management in elderly patients presenting with acute abdominal symptoms compared to current practice. (orig.)

  6. Diagnosis of stable ischemic heart disease: summary of a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association/American Association for Thoracic Surgery/Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association/Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Fihn, Stephan D; Williams, Sankey; Dallas, Paul; Owens, Douglas K; Shekelle, Paul

    2012-11-20

    The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), American Heart Association (AHA), American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to help clinicians diagnose known or suspected stable ischemic heart disease. Literature on this topic published before November 2011 was identified by using MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO, AMED, and SCOPUS. Searches were limited to human studies published in English. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations according to a translation of the ACCF/AHA grading system into ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. This guideline includes 28 recommendations that address the following issues: the initial diagnosis of the patient who might have stable ischemic heart disease, cardiac stress testing to assess the risk for death or myocardial infarction in patients diagnosed with stable ischemic heart disease, and coronary angiography for risk assessment.

  7. A Review of the Multi-Authored Monograph “The Medical (Clinical Psychology Diagnosis: Current State and Prospects”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vachkov I.V.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The monograph presents a number of articles written by leading domestic clinical psychologists on various issues connected with psychological diagnosis. The multi-authored monograph was written for the international research-to-practice conference “The medical (clinical psychology diagnosis: tradition and prospects”. The conference took place in Moscow on November 29-30, 2016. The book consists of the following sections: "Research methodology in clinical psychology", “The development of endogenous mental pathology diagnosis current trends”, “The development of clinical psychology diagnostics current trends: age aspects”, “The main problems of clinical-psychological prevention and rehabilitation”. The materials of the monograph may be interesting and useful for scientists, psychology lecturers, students and post-graduate students, as well as for specialists working in the field of public health, education and social support for the population.

  8. Functional speech disorders: clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, J R

    2016-01-01

    Acquired psychogenic or functional speech disorders are a subtype of functional neurologic disorders. They can mimic organic speech disorders and, although any aspect of speech production can be affected, they manifest most often as dysphonia, stuttering, or prosodic abnormalities. This chapter reviews the prevalence of functional speech disorders, the spectrum of their primary clinical characteristics, and the clues that help distinguish them from organic neurologic diseases affecting the sensorimotor networks involved in speech production. Diagnosis of a speech disorder as functional can be supported by sometimes rapidly achieved positive outcomes of symptomatic speech therapy. The general principles of such therapy are reviewed. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Gingival overgrowth: Part 1: aetiology and clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, J; Chesterman, J; Kellett, M; Durey, K

    2017-01-27

    Most commonly, gingival overgrowth is a plaque-induced inflammatory process, which can be modified by systemic disease or medications. However, rare genetic conditions can result in gingival overgrowth with non-plaque-induced aetiology. It is also important to appreciate the potential differential diagnoses of other presentations of enlarged gingival tissues; some may be secondary to localised trauma or non-plaque-induced inflammation and, albeit rarely, others may be manifestations of more sinister diseases or lesions. A definitive diagnosis will then enable an appropriate management strategy. This paper aims to discuss clinical features and diagnoses for conditions presenting with gingival overgrowth and other enlargements of gingival tissues.

  10. Clinical evaluation of cytological diagnosis of nasopharyngeal malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, R; Pilotti, S; Rilke, F

    1978-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1975 cytological examination was applied to the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal malignancies in a series of 216 consecutive patients who had either a tumour in the nasopharynx or clinical signs of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, or who were locally asymptomatic but had enlarged cervical lymph nodes. Smears were taken by introducing a small rough pad of compressed gauze through the mouth into the nasopharynx with an upward-angled forceps. In each case the cytological smear was taken immediately before biopsy; often, a lymph node was removed subsequently. When morphological diagnoses were doubtful and histological findings were at variance with positive cytological findings, the patients were reexamined clinically, and diagnosis was postponed. The case material was made up of 90 nasopharyngeal carcinomas, 24 lymphomas, one malignant melanoma, one adenoid cystic carcinoma and 100 patients without malignancies. Cytological findings from the first smear were positive in 77.8% of nasopharyngeal carcinomas, in 66.6% of lymphomas and in the cases of melanoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma. There were no false-positive results. When the nasopharyngeal carcinomas were subdivided into undifferentiated carcinomas of the nasopharyngeal type and squamous-cell carcinomas, cytological findings were positive in ,0% and 73%, respectively. Positivity of histological findings was distributed as follows: 91.7% for malignant lymphomas, 86.6% for undifferentiated carcinomas and 86.6% for squamous-cell carcinomas. With respect to clinical suspicion of malignancy, positive cytological findings were obtained in 50% of clinically occult cases and in 84.6% of patients with obvious malignancies; intermediate figures were found for clinically doubtful (64.3%) and for highly suspicious (77.8%) cases. Cyto-histological concordance was shown in 70% of cases; false-negative histological results were obtained in 7.8% and false-negative cytological results in 16.6% of cases. Combined cyto

  11. How to critically appraise a clinical practice guideline

    OpenAIRE

    Clubb, Adrian B.; Dahm, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical practice guidelines play a critical role in guiding the evidence-based clinical practice of urology. We describe a systematic approach to critical appraisal of urology guidelines. Materials and Methods: Based on a focused clinical question derived from a clinical scenario, we identified a relevant clinical practice guideline that we critically appraised using the Users’ Guide to the Medical Literature framework as to whether the results are valid, what are the results, and c...

  12. [Clinical Pathological Diagnosis, and Treatment for Pleural Mesothelioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Takumi; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Nishi, Hideyuki

    2016-05-01

    For the differential diagnosis between fibrous pleuritis and other malignancies such as lung cancer, multiple immunostaining is essential to diagnose pleural mesothelioma. For cytological diagnosis of pleural effusions, differentiation between mesothelioma cells and reactive mesothelial cells is very difficult. Therefore, histological diagnoses of tumor tissues obtained via biopsy are essential. To diagnose epthelioid mesothelioma, more than 2 positive and negative markers must be consistent with those known for mesothelioma. To diagnose sarcomatoid mesothelioma, keratin is usually positive, differentiating the diagnosis from that for real sarcoma. For surgical treatment for pleural mesothelioma, extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and pleurectomy/decortication (P/D) are usually performed. The proportion of P/D increases because of the low death rates with surgery and similar survivals. However, a trimodal approach, such as EPP with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, is best for longer survival and expected to be curative. For chemotherapy, only cisplatin (CDDP) combined with pemetrexed (PEM) is effective, and no other agents have been identified for this disease. Nowadays, clinical immunotherapy trials start with phase II study.

  13. Hand kinematics: Application in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Rath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathological conditions of the hand consequent to injuries, paralysis, disease, arthritis and congenital difference results in loss or limitation of function, deformities, stiffness, inadequate power and poor position for pinch. The pathogenesis of deformities is influenced by bio-mechanical principles of joints and muscle function. The crippling impact of secondary changes due to edema, soft tissue contractures, muscle shortening and functional adaptations also have a mechanical basis. For clinicians and hand therapists, it is necessary to understand these fundamental principles of biomechanics to plan treatment modalities. Interpretation of mechanics of hand deformities in rheumatoid arthritis and paralysis will enable the treating team to identify the appropriate interventions of splinting, therapy and surgical procedures. Basic knowledge of the principles of hand clinical bio-mechanics will help the beginner to sail through the multitude of tendon transfers described in the text books of hand surgery and find the best solution for a particular clinical presentation. Similarly, knowledge of bio-mechanics will provide solutions to an experienced surgeon to plan treatment protocols for complex situations. The article presents a concise summary of the basic principles of hand bio-mechanics for common hand conditions seen in clinical practice. Understanding and applying these principles will help clinicians in planning and devising treatment options for common and complex hand conditions.

  14. Glucose: archetypal biomarker in diabetes diagnosis, clinical management and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krentz, Andrew J; Hompesch, Marcus

    2016-10-13

    The clinical utility of diabetes biomarkers can be considered in terms of diagnosis, management and prediction of long-term vascular complications. Glucose satisfies all of these requirements. Thresholds of hyperglycemia diagnostic of diabetes reflect inflections that confer a risk of developing long-term microvascular complications. Degrees of hyperglycemia (impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance) that lie below the diagnostic threshold for diabetes identify individuals at risk of progression to diabetes and/or development of atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease. Self-measured glucose levels usefully complement hemoglobin A1c levels to guide daily management decisions. Continuous glucose monitoring provides detailed real-time data that is of value in clinical decision making, assessing response to new diabetes drugs and the development of closed-loop artificial pancreas technology.

  15. Progress in clinical diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Qiong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease, mainly involving the pyramidal tract, brain stem and spinal cord anterior horn cells, manifests as progressive muscle atrophy, weakness and cramps, as well as cognitive impairment, and may overlap with frontotemporal dementia. ALS is familial in 5% of cases, whose clinical manifestations are similar to sporadic. The diagnosis is made mainly based on clinical manifestations, using internationally recognized consensus standard, after rule out conditions that can mimic ALS. Genetic testing provides a new way to accelerate the diagnostic process for early intervention. Part of the gene mutations are associated with specific phenotypes. According to this, prognosis assessment and genetic counseling are able to carry out.

  16. Role of organic volatile profiles in clinical diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlatkis, A. (Univ. of Houston, TX); Brazell, R.S.; Poole, C.F.

    1981-06-01

    The organic volatile constituents of biological fluids contain clinically useful diagnostic information for the recognition of metabolic disorders in man. To gain access to this information, it was necessary to develop the methodology for reproducibly stripping the trace concentrations of volatiles from biological fluids (dynamic headspace, gas phase-stripping, solvent extraction, and the transevaporator technique), to separate the complex extracts by high-resolution capillary column gas chromatography, and to develop computer-aided data-handling and pattern-recognition techniques for analyzing the immense amount of information generated. The normal and pathological organic volatiles identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in urine, serum, and breast milk are tabulated. Clinical applications of the above techniques to the study and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, respiratory virus infection, renal insufficiency, and cancer are described.

  17. Zika virus infection: epidemiology, clinical manifestations and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Guilherme Amaral; Santos, Flavia Barreto Dos; Sequeira, Patricia Carvalho

    2016-10-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus previously believed to cause only a mild and self-limiting illness. Recently, it has emerged as a new public health threat that caused a large outbreak in French Polynesia in 2013-2014 and since 2015 an explosive outbreak in Brazil, with an increase in severe congenital malformations (microcephaly) and neurological complications, mainly Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Since then, it has spread through the Americas. On 1 February 2016, the WHO declared the ZIKV epidemic in Brazil a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. We reviewed the epidemiology of ZIKV infection, clinical presentations and diagnosis. We highlighted the clinical features and nonvector borne transmission of the virus. Association between ZIKV infection and severe foetal outcomes, including microcephaly and other birth defects; increased rate of GBS and other neurological complications due to the ongoing ZIKV outbreak; increased evidence to date of ZIKV being the only arbovirus linked to sexual transmission; the challenge of ZIKV diagnosis; and the need for a specific point-of care test in epidemic scenarios. The findings illustrate the emergence of a viral disease with the identification of new associated disorders, new modes of transmission, including maternal-foetal and sexual transmission.

  18. Diagnosis and clinical features of trigemino-autonomic headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Arne

    2013-10-01

    Although severe short-lasting headaches are rare, they can be considered disabling conditions with a major impact on the quality of life of patients. These headaches can divided broadly in to those associated with autonomic symptoms, so called trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs), and those with few or no autonomic symptoms. The TACs include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicranias, hemicrania continua, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic symptoms as well as short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing syndrome. In all of these syndromes, half-sided head pain and ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms such as lacrimation or rhinorrhea are prominent. The paroxysmal hemicranias have, unlike cluster headaches, a very robust response to indomethacin, leading to a notion of indomethacin-sensitive headaches. The diagnosis of TACs is exclusively a clinical task. Because of the fact that cluster headache is strictly half-sided, typically involves the region around the eye and temple and often starts in the upper jaw, most patients first consult a dentist or ophthalmologist. No single instrumental examination has yet been able to define, or ensure, the correct diagnosis, or differentiate idiopathic headache syndromes. It is crucial that a trained neurologist sees these patients early so that management can be optimized and unnecessary procedures can be avoided. Although TACS are, in comparison to migraine, quite rare, they are nevertheless clinically very important for the neurologist to consider as they are easy to diagnose and the treatment is very effective in most patients.

  19. Small Renal Masses: Incidental Diagnosis, Clinical Symptoms, and Prognostic Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. Sánchez-Martín

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The small renal masses (SRMs have increased over the past two decades due to more liberal use of imaging techniques. SRMs have allowed discussions regarding their prognostic, diagnosis, and therapeutic approach. Materials and methods. Clinical presentation, incidental diagnosis, and prognosis factors of SRMs are discussed in this review. Results. SRMs are defined as lesions less than 4 cm in diameter. SRM could be benign, and most malignant SMRs are low stage and low grade. Clinical symptoms like hematuria are very rare, being diagnosed by chance (incidental in most cases. Size, stage, and grade are still the most consistent prognosis factors in (RCC. An enhanced contrast SRM that grows during active surveillance is clearly malignant, and its aggressive potential increases in those greater than 3 cm. Clear cell carcinoma is the most frequent cellular type of malign SRM. Conclusions. Only some SRMs are benign. The great majority of malign SRMs have good prognosis (low stage and grade, no metastasis with open or laparoscopic surgical treatment (nephron sparing techniques. Active surveillance is an accepted attitude in selected cases.

  20. Diagnosis and clinical features of common optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biousse, Valérie; Newman, Nancy J

    2016-12-01

    Disorders of the optic nerves (optic neuropathies) are some of the most common causes of visual loss, and can present in isolation or with associated neurological or systemic symptoms and signs. Several optic neuropathies-especially inflammatory optic neuropathies-are associated with neurological disorders and thus are often diagnosed and treated by neurologists. The mechanisms underlying optic neuropathies are diverse and typically manifest with decreased visual acuity, altered colour vision, and abnormal visual field in the affected eye. Diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical history and clinical examination, of which several aspects are particularly important, including the mode of onset of visual loss, the presence of pain with eye movements, the visual acuity, and the retention of colour vision. Advances in optic nerve imaging-particularly retinal digital photography, optical coherence tomography, and MRI techniques-have revolutionised the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with an optic neuropathy. Furthermore, improvement and generalisation of some ancillary tests, such as diagnostic antibodies for neuromyelitis optica, allows better phenotyping of the heterogeneous inflammatory optic neuropathies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ebola in children: epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olupot-Olupot, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Ebola virus disease is caused by a highly contagious and pathogenic threadlike RNA virus of the Filoviridae family. The index human case is usually a zoonosis that launches human-to-human transmission interface with varying levels of sustainability of the epidemic depending on the level of public health preparedness of the affected country and the Ebola virus strain. The disease affects all age groups in the population. Clinical diagnosis is challenging in index cases especially in the early stages of the disease when the presenting features are usually nonspecific and only similar to a flu-like illness. However, in the agonal stages, hemorrhage frequently occurs in a high proportion of cases. The diagnostic gold standard is by detecting the antigen using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Mortality rates in the past 28 outbreaks since 1976 have ranged from 30% to 100% in different settings among adults, but lower mortality rates have been documented in children. This review aims to describe Ebola virus infection, clinical presentation, diagnosis and outcomes in children.

  2. Clinical Relevance of the Advanced Microbiologic and Biochemical Investigations in Periodontal Diagnosis: A Critical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishakha Grover

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New approaches to periodontal diagnosis, including advanced microbiologic, biochemical, and genetic tests, have been shown to provide the clinician with the information not available by traditional means. The purpose of a diagnostic test is to confirm, exclude, classify, or monitor disease to guide treatment. Their clinical value depends on whether the information they provide leads to improved patient outcomes. This can be assessed by randomized trials, which compare patient outcomes from the new diagnostic test versus the old test strategy. Being nonmandatory for marketing approval, such trials are not always feasible because of large sample sizes requirements. So, many diagnostic tests enter the practice without being critically analysed for any additional benefits. Effective diagnosis is just as essential as the selection of effective treatments for the success of periodontal therapy. So, the current paper aims to focus on the practical utility of this rapidly emerging plethora of periodontal diagnostic tools, emphasizing the critical issues surrounding the clinical application of microbiologic and biochemical investigations, employed for periodontal diagnosis.

  3. Clinical application of fluorescence in situ hybridization for prenatal diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-fang JIANG

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish and optimize the procedures of fluorescence in situ hybridization(FISH), and evaluate its clinical value in rapid prenatal diagnosis of fetal numerical abnormality of chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X, Y. Methods Amniotic fluid or fetal blood was sampled by routine invasive procedures. After the amniotic fluid cells or fetal blood cells were separated and sequentially processed with hypotonic solution, fixation solution, smear and high temperature, they were hybridized in situ with two panels of specific fluorescence probes to detect numerical abnormality of chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X, Y. All the samples were also cultured and analyzed for their karyotype by conventional methods. Results When it was used as a diagnostic criterion of chromosomal number that the fluorescence signals were observed in ≥90% cells, GLP 13/GLP 21 probe panel showed 2 green/2 red fluorescence signals and CSP18/CSP X/CSP Y probe panel showed 2 blue/2 yellow (female or 2 blue/1 yellow/1 red fluorescence signals (male under normal condition. The test reports of all 196 cases were sent out in 72-96 hours, and 7 cases of Down syndrome, 2 cases of trisomy 18 and 1 case of sex chromosomal numerical abnormality were detected, which were accordant with karyotype analysis results reported one month later. Conclusions FISH has potential for clinical application, and is applicable to rapid prenatal diagnosis of fetal numerical abnormality of chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X, Y. The rapid FISH, together with conventional karyotyping, offer a valuable means for prenatal diagnosis of fetal aneuploidies.

  4. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenta, Gabriela; Vaisman, Mario; Sgarbi, José Augusto; Bergoglio, Liliana Maria; Andrada, Nathalia Carvalho de; Bravo, Pedro Pineda; Orlandi, Ana Maria; Graf, Hans

    2013-06-01

    Hypothyroidism has long been known for its effects on different organ systems, leading to hypometabolism. However, subclinical hypothyroidism, its most prevalent form, has been recently related to cardiovascular risk and also to maternal-fetal complications in pregnant women. In these clinical practice guidelines, several aspects of this field have been discussed with the clear objectives of helping physicians treat patients with hypothyroidism, and of sharing some of our Latin American-based clinical experience. The Latin American Thyroid Society commissioned a Task Force on Hypothyroidism to develop evidence-based clinical guidelines on hypothyroidism. A systematic review of the available literature, focused on the primary databases of MedLine/PubMed and Lilacs/SciELO was performed. Filters to assess methodological quality were applied to select the best quality studies. The strength of recommendation on a scale from A-D was based on the Oxford Centre for Evidence--based Medicine, Levels of Evidence 2009, allowing an unbiased opinion devoid of subjective viewpoints. The areas of interest for the studies comprised diagnosis, screening, treatment and a special section for hypothyroidism in pregnancy. Several questions based on diagnosis, screening, treatment of hypothyroidism in adult population and specifically in pregnant women were posed. Twenty six recommendations were created based on the answers to these questions. Despite the fact that evidence in some areas of hypothyroidism, such as therapy, is lacking, out of 279 references, 73% were Grade A and B, 8% Grade C and 19% Grade D. These evidence-based clinical guidelines on hypothyroidism will provide unified criteria for management of hypothyroidism throughout Latin America. Although most of the studies referred to are from all over the world, the point of view of thyroidologists from Latin America is also given.

  5. Management of sepsis: from evidence to clinical practice

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    Riccardo Gerloni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in hospitalized patients and its management involves a lot of specialist. Internist is required to demonstrate his competence since the beginning when the diagnosis is not so easy to be clarified. A rapid clinical suspicion permits a prompt management of the patient that means important mortality reduction. However, it is essential to understand the source of infection and echography represents a rapid, economic, useful and widespread tool with whom Internist should become more and more confident. The following review is a practical guide to manage septic patients according to the most recent literature, underlining aspects of antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic stabilization and supportive therapy. To limit sepsis mortality, a valid Internist should be culturally prepared and especially able to cooperate with other specialists, because a strong enemy requires a strong team.

  6. Self-compassion in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germer, Christopher K; Neff, Kristin D

    2013-08-01

    Self-compassion is conceptualized as containing 3 core components: self-kindness versus self-judgment, common humanity versus isolation, and mindfulness versus overidentification, when relating to painful experiences. Research evidence demonstrates that self-compassion is related to psychological flourishing and reduced psychopathology. Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) is an 8-week training program, meeting 2.5 hours each week, designed to help participants cultivate self-compassion. MSC contains a variety of meditations (e.g., loving-kindness, affectionate breathing) as well as informal practices for use in daily life (e.g., soothing touch, self-compassionate letter writing). A detailed clinical case illustrates the journey of a client through the 8 weeks of MSC training, describing the key features of each session and the client's response.

  7. Nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Ella; Tabak, Nili

    2012-12-01

    Using Ajzen and Madden's Theory of Planned Behavior, this study investigates factors which influence nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines in their daily ward work. A convenience sample of 91 nurses in internal medicine wards in three Israeli hospitals answered four questionnaires. Data were processed by Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate regression. The main findings were that burnout was negatively correlated with the intention to work according to guidelines and that professionalism (in the sense of a tendency to follow taught procedure rather than personal judgment) was positively correlated with it. Furthermore, nurses who perceive their behavioral control and subjective norms to be positive will be the most determined to work according to guidelines, provided they personally command the necessary resources to do so.

  8. A Protocol for Diagnosis and Management of Cerebrospinal Shunt Infections and other Infectious Conditions in Neurosurgical Practice

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    Amani Alnimr

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Infections of the cerebrospinal shunts and other neurosurgical structures are not uncommon in the clinical practice. These infections are mostly clinical emergencies carrying negative prognostic impacts on the patients as well as consuming healthcare resources. The low pathogenicity nature of some implicated pathogens results in minimal physical signs that may complicate the diagnosis and mislead the practitioner. Furthermore, little good prospective data exists in the field of neurosurgical infections and most available evidence is derived from retrospective nonrandomized studies. This protocol is meant to utilize the available evidence-based best practice to provide a guide for diagnosing and managing common neurosurgical infections including those associated with cerebrospinal shunts. The effective management of these neurosurgical infections requires a good collaboration between the clinical team, clinical pharmacist and clinical microbiologist.

  9. Chromoblastomycosis: an overview of clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz-Telles, Flavio; Esterre, Phillippe; Perez-Blanco, Maigualida; Vitale, Roxana G; Salgado, Claudio Guedes; Bonifaz, Alexandro

    2009-02-01

    Chromoblastomycosis is one of the most frequent infections caused by melanized fungi. It is a subcutaneous fungal infection, usually an occupational related disease, mainly affecting individuals in tropical and temperate regions. Although several species are etiologic agents, Fonsecaea pedrosoi and Cladophialophora carrionii are prevalent in the endemic areas. Chromoblastomycosis lesions are polymorphic and must be differentiated from those associated with many clinical conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed by the observation of muriform cells in tissue and the isolation and the identification of the causal agent in culture. Chromoblastomycosis still is a therapeutic challenge for clinicians due to the recalcitrant nature of the disease, especially in the severe clinical forms. There are three treatment modalities, i.e., physical treatment, chemotherapy and combination therapy but their success is related to the causative agent, the clinical form and severity of the chromoblastomycosis lesions. There is no treatment of choice for this neglected mycosis, but rather several treatment options. Most of the patients can be treated with itraconazole, terbinafine or a combination of both. It is also important to evaluate the patient's individual tolerance of the drugs and whether the antifungal will be provided for free or purchased, since antifungal therapy must be maintained in long-term regimens. In general, treatment should be guided according to clinical, mycological and histopathological criteria.

  10. Clinical Practice Guidelines: Whose Practice Are We Guiding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Morgan; Bowe, Sarah N; Laury, Adrienne M

    2016-09-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has just released an update to the clinical practice guideline (CPG) on otitis media with effusion. This common condition is frequently managed by primary care providers; however, their awareness and utilization of the AAO-HNSF CPGs are unknown. We performed a cross-sectional survey to assess familiarity with otologic diagnoses, evaluation skills, and guidelines. Only 38.5% of respondents use pneumatic otoscopy, and roughly 50% utilize a CPG for management of otitis media or for referral for tympanostomy tube insertion. Providers predominantly use the acute otitis media guideline from the American Academy of Pediatrics. In this single-institution study, providers are largely unaware of the AAO-HNSF CPGs and could benefit from additional training, including workshops taught by otolaryngologists within individual health care systems or development of a national otolaryngology medical student curriculum. A more immediate option includes referencing our CPGs on specialty societies' websites or newsletters.

  11. British Society for Medical Mycology best practice recommendations for the diagnosis of serious fungal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelenz, Silke; Barnes, Rosemary A; Barton, Richard C; Cleverley, Joanne R; Lucas, Sebastian B; Kibbler, Christopher C; Denning, David W

    2015-04-01

    Invasive fungal diseases are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in a wide range of patients, and early diagnosis and management are a challenge. We therefore did a review of the scientific literature to generate a series of key recommendations for the appropriate use of microbiological, histological, and radiological diagnostic methods for diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases. The recommendations emphasise the role of microscopy in rapid diagnosis and identification of clinically significant isolates to species level, and the need for susceptibility testing of all Aspergillus spp, if treatment is to be given. In this Review, we provide information to improve understanding of the importance of antigen detection for cryptococcal disease and invasive aspergillosis, the use of molecular (PCR) diagnostics for aspergillosis, and the crucial role of antibody detection for chronic and allergic aspergillosis. Furthermore, we consider the importance of histopathology reporting with a panel of special stains, and emphasise the need for urgent (<48 hours) and optimised imaging for patients with suspected invasive fungal infection. All 43 recommendations are auditable and should be used to ensure best diagnostic practice and improved outcomes for patients.

  12. Neuroimaging in Parkinson disease: from research setting to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politis, Marios

    2014-12-01

    Over the past three decades, neuroimaging studies-including structural, functional and molecular modalities-have provided invaluable insights into the mechanisms underlying Parkinson disease (PD). Observations from multimodal neuroimaging techniques have indicated changes in brain structure and metabolic activity, and an array of neurochemical changes that affect receptor sites and neurotransmitter systems. Characterization of the neurobiological alterations that lead to phenotypic heterogeneity in patients with PD has considerably aided the in vivo investigation of aetiology and pathophysiology, and the identification of novel targets for pharmacological or surgical treatments, including cell therapy. Although PD is now considered to be very complex, no neuroimaging modalities are specifically recommended for routine use in clinical practice. However, conventional MRI and dopamine transporter imaging are commonly used as adjuvant tools in the differential diagnosis between PD and nondegenerative causes of parkinsonism. First-line neuroimaging tools that could have an impact on patient prognosis and treatment strategies remain elusive. This Review discusses the lessons learnt from decades of neuroimaging research in PD, and the promising new approaches with potential applicability to clinical practice.

  13. Multi-centre retrospective analysis of clinical diagnosis and treatment for chronic cough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-ming CHENG

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the clinical characteristics and the present status of diagnosis and treatment of chronic cough.Methods The clinical data of 238 in-patients and out-patients of Departments of Respiratory Diseases from 4 teaching hospitals of Chongqing Municipality were collected from Oct.2008 to Dec.2009,and their clinical characteristics,diagnosis and therapeutic effects were retrospectively analyzed.Results A total of 238 patients were enrolled,most of them complained of dry cough and night cough.Throat symptoms were most common,including itching or foreign body sensation,throat discomfort and gastro-oesophageal reflux.Congestion of pharynx and cobblestone like changes in posterior pharyngeal wall were the most common signs in patients with chronic cough.Among all the supplementary examinations,bronchial provocation test resulted in highest positive rate.Etiological diagnosis was done in a total of 254 case-times for diseases leading to chronic cough,among them upper airway cough syndrome(UACS was suspected in 115 case-times.cough variant asthma(CVA in 42 case-times,and cough due to gastroesophageal reflux(GERC in 53 case-times.After the specific treatment targeting UACS,CVA and GERC,in 152 case-times improvement was found after follow-up,including 56,27 and 21 case-times,respectively,with an effective rate of 68.4%(104/152.The final diagnosis for the other 44 case-times with chronic cough was chronic tonsillitis,chronic bronchitis,eosinophilic bronchitis and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor(ACEI induced cough.A definite diagnosis was finally made in 148 out of a total of 254 casses,with a diagnostic rate of 58.3%(148/254.Conclusion The final diagnostic rate in etiology of chronic cough is still poor nowadays in our country,and empirical treatment is still the main practice for chronic cough.

  14. SMARTWheel: From concept to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Rory A

    2009-09-01

    Wheelchair prescription is complex with thousands of choices and options. Theoretically, a higher quality or innovative wheelchair that is appropriately matched to the user and their unique needs will increase participation. It is well accepted that there is an alarmingly high incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome, and rotator cuff injuries among manual wheelchair users. Since the initial conceptualization, the SMART(Wheel) was intended to better understand the physiological and physical effects of wheelchair propulsion on the body. Initially, little was known about wheelchair propulsion and the SMART(Wheel) transformed the nascent field of wheelchair propulsion biomechanics. Although still an important area of clinical research, the SMART(Wheel) has been critical to the study of the relationship between the type of wheelchair, set-up, activity, technique, anatomy, and physiology and repetitive strain injury. There has been growing evidence that the wheelchair-user interaction explains a substantial portion of the risk of developing a degenerative injury and on community participation. A noteworthy contribution of this work was the release of the clinical practice guideline, entitled, Preservation of Upper Limb Function Following Spinal Cord Injury in 2005. The SMART(Wheel) has been used by other scientists in areas that were not originally envisioned to be applications. It has been used to support the design of tools for developing a trail mapping rating and description system. It has also supported the design of accessible pedestrian walkways standards, accessible playground surfaces, and to evaluate carpets for wheelchair accessibility. It is likely that there are more new areas of exploration to emerge. This article describes the evolution of the SMART(Wheel) as new technologies became available and its applications in the field of wheelchair biomechanics and clinical service delivery.

  15. Infantile nystagmus syndrome: clinical characteristics, current theories of pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Michael D; Wong, Agnes

    2015-12-01

    Infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) is an important clinical diagnosis because it is a common presenting sign of many ocular, neurologic, and systemic diseases. Although INS has been studied for more than a century, its diagnosis and treatment remains a challenge to clinicians because of its varied manifestations and multiple associations, and its pathogenesis continues to rouse considerable scientific debate. Fueled by these challenges, recent basic research and clinical investigations have provided new insights into INS. New genetic discoveries and technological advances in ocular imaging have refined our understanding of INS subtypes and offer new diagnostic possibilities. Unexpected surgical outcomes have led to new understanding of its pathogenesis based on novel hypothesized pathways of ocular motor control. Comparative studies on nonhuman visual systems have also informed models of the neural substrate of INS in humans. This review brings together the classic profile of this disorder with recent research to provide an update on the clinical features of INS, an overview of the current theories on how and why INS develops, and a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of INS.

  16. An international effort towards developing standards for best practices in analysis, interpretation and reporting of clinical genome sequencing results in the CLARITY Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brownstein, Catherine A; Beggs, Alan H; Homer, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Background : There is tremendous potential for genome sequencing to improve clinical diagnosis and care once it becomes routinely accessible, but this will require formalizing research methods into clinical best practices in the areas of sequence data generation, analysis, interpretation...

  17. Mobile Clinical Decision Support System for Acid-base Balance Diagnosis and Treatment Recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandzuka, Mensur; Begic, Edin; Boskovic, Dusanka; Begic, Zijo; Masic, Izet

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents mobile application implementing a decision support system for acid-base disorder diagnosis and treatment recommendation. The application was developed using the official integrated development environment for the Android platform (to maximize availability and minimize investments in specialized hardware) called Android Studio. The application identifies disorder, based on the blood gas analysis, evaluates whether the disorder has been compensated, and based on additional input related to electrolyte imbalance, provides recommendations for treatment. The application is a tool in the hands of the user, which provides assistance during acid-base disorders treatment. The application will assist the physician in clinical practice and is focused on the treatment in intensive care.

  18. Clinical diagnosis versus autopsy findings in polytrauma fatalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakler Johannes K

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives The aim of the study was to determine if differences in clinical diagnosis versus autopsy findings concerning the cause of death in polytrauma fatalities would be detected in 19 cases of fatal polytrauma from a Level 1 trauma centre. Methods Clinical diagnoses determining the cause of death in 19 cases of fatal polytrauma (2007 - 2008 from a Level 1 trauma centre were correlated with autopsy findings. Results In 13 cases (68%, the clinical cause of death and the cause of death as determined by autopsy were congruent. Marginal differences occurred in three (16% patients while obvious differences in interpreting the cause of death were found in another three (16% cases. Five fatalities (three with obvious differences and two with marginal differences were remarked as early death (1-4 h after trauma and one fatality with marginal differences as late death (>1 week after trauma. Obvious and marginal discrepancies mostly occurred in the early phase of treatment, especially when severely injured patients were admitted to the emergency room undergoing continued cardiopulmonary resuscitation, i. e. limiting diagnostic procedures, and thus the clinical cause of death was essentially determined by basic emergency diagnostics. Conclusions Autopsy as golden standard to define the cause of death in fatal polytrauma varies from the clinical point of view, depending on the patient's pre-existing condition, mechanism of polytrauma, necessity of traumatic cardiopulmonary resuscitation, survival time, and thus the possibility to perform emergency diagnostics. An autopsy should be performed at least in cases of early fatal polytrauma to help establishing the definite cause of death. Moreover, autopsy data should be included in trauma registries as a quality assessment tool.

  19. Prevalence, clinical presentation and differential diagnosis of pediatric bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Benjamin I; Birmaher, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the evidence regarding pediatric bipolar disorder (BP) has increased substantially. As a result, recent concerns have focused primarily on prevalence and differential diagnosis. Selective review of the literature. BP as defined by rigorously applying diagnostic criteria has been observed among children and especially adolescents in numerous countries. In contrast to increasing diagnoses in clinical settings, prevalence in epidemiologic studies has not recently changed. BPspectrum conditions among youth are highly impairing and confer high risk for conversion to BP-I and BP-II. Compared to adults, youth with BP have more mixed symptoms, more changes in mood polarity, are more often symptomatic and seem to have worse prognosis. The course, clinical characteristics, and comorbidities of BP among children and adolescents are in many ways otherwise similar to those of adults with BP. Nonetheless, many youth with BP receive no treatment and most do not receive BP-specific treatment. Despite increased evidence supporting the validity of pediatric BP, discrepancies between clinical and epidemiologic findings suggest that diagnostic misapplication may be common. Simultaneously, low rates of treatment of youth with BP suggest that withholding of BP diagnoses may also be common. Clinicians should apply diagnostic criteria rigorously in order to optimize diagnostic accuracy and ensure appropriate treatment.

  20. Prevalence, Clinical Presentation, and Differential Diagnosis of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Birmaher, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the past 20 years, the evidence regarding pediatric bipolar disorder (BP) has increased substantially. As a result, recent concerns have focused primarily on prevalence and differential diagnosis. Method Selective review of the literature. Results BP as defined by rigorously applying diagnostic criteria has been observed among children and especially adolescents in numerous countries. In contrast to increasing diagnoses in clinical settings, prevalence in epidemiologic studies has not recently changed. BP-spectrum conditions among youth are highly impairing and confer high risk for conversion to BP-I and BP-II. Compared to adults, youth with BP have more mixed symptoms, more changes in mood polarity, are more often symptomatic and seem to have worse prognosis. The course, clinical characteristics, and comorbidities of BP among children and adolescents are in many ways otherwise similar to those of adults with BP. Nonetheless, many youth with BP receive no treatment and most do not receive BP-specific treatment. Conclusion Despite increased evidence supporting the validity of pediatric BP, discrepancies between clinical and epidemiologic findings suggest that diagnostic misapplication may be common. Simultaneously, low rates of treatment of youth with BP suggest that withholding of BP diagnoses may also be common. Clinicians should apply diagnostic criteria rigorously in order to optimize diagnostic accuracy and ensure appropriate treatment. PMID:22652925

  1. Clinical diagnosis and management in early Huntington's disease: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiefer J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Johannes Schiefer,1,* Cornelius J Werner,1,* Kathrin Reetz1,2 1Euregional Huntington Center, 2Jülich Aachen Research Alliance (JARA – Translational Brain Medicine, Department of Neurology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: This review focuses on clinical diagnosis and both pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapeutic options in early stages of the autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD. The available literature has been reviewed for motor, cognitive, and psychiatric alterations, which are the three major symptom domains of this devastating progressive disease. From a clinical point of view, one has to be aware that the HD phenotype can vary highly across individuals and during the course of the disease. Also, symptoms in juvenile HD can differ substantially from those with adult-onset of HD. Although there is no cure of HD and management is limited, motor and psychiatric symptoms often respond to pharmacotherapy, and nonpharmacological approaches as well as supportive care are essential. International treatment recommendations based on study results, critical statements, and expert opinions have been included. This review is restricted to symptomatic and supportive approaches since all attempts to establish a cure for the disease or modifying therapies have failed so far. Keywords: Neurodegeneration, clinical picture, early symptoms, therapy, treatment

  2. An innovative clinical practicum to teach evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancato, Vera C

    2006-01-01

    A clinical practicum was successfully implemented for RN to BSN students to apply evidence-based practice to actual clinical problems affecting nursing practice. The author describes how this practicum was implemented and the requisite resources and support systems. This senior-level capstone course enabled students to understand and value a lifelong learning approach to evidence-based practice.

  3. The importance of practice guidelines in clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarra, Erica

    2012-01-01

    This position paper is a brief review of the importance of practice guidelines in clinical use. Emphasis is placed on evidence-based practice guidelines and research. This position paper attests to the importance of the use of guidelines that direct clinical nursing practice.

  4. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE: CLINICAL GUIDELINES AND REAL CLINICAL PRACTICE

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    E. K. Shavarova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Expert assessment of real clinical practice compliance with national guidelines on management of patients with chronic heart failure (HF before the opening of the Expert Center of HF treatment.Material and methods. All patients admitted to 2 city clinical hospitals of Moscow with HF were included into the register. Clinical, demographic, laboratory and instrumental characteristics and medical treatment before and during hospitalization were evaluated, as well as recommendations contained in the discharge summary.Results. 300 patients with HF were included into the register. The mean age was 75 years (39, 95; the proportion of men – 44%. 95% of patients had HF IIIV (NYHA, among them 24% HF II, 61% HF III, 15% HF IV (NYHA. HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF was found in 45% of patients. 22% of the patients did not receive medical treatment before admission. 34% of patients with HFrEF received ACE inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, of which only 23% in effective dose. β-blockers were prescribed in 41% of HFeEF patients, of which 22% in the target dose. A third of patients needed in mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRA received spironolactone. During hospitalization 81% of HFrEF patients received ACEI therapy, 12% – ARBs, 91% – β-blockers, 90% – MRA, 81% – loop diuretics and 13% – thiazide diuretics. According to the discharge summary 5% of patients did not receive post-discharge blocker of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system without explanation in the medical documentation. β-blocker with proven efficacy was prescribed to 70% of HFrEF patients. Spironolactone was recommended after discharge in 89% of HFrEF patients.Conclusion. Implementation of register of hospitalized patients with HF gives an opportunity to identify shortcomings in the provision of medical care both in outpatient and inpatient stages. 

  5. Application of a diagnosis-based clinical decision guide in patients with low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Donald R

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain (LBP is common and costly. Development of accurate and efficacious methods of diagnosis and treatment has been identified as a research priority. A diagnosis-based clinical decision guide (DBCDG; previously referred to as a diagnosis-based clinical decision rule has been proposed which attempts to provide the clinician with a systematic, evidence-based means to apply the biopsychosocial model of care. The approach is based on three questions of diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to present the prevalence of findings using the DBCDG in consecutive patients with LBP. Methods Demographic, diagnostic and baseline outcome measure data were gathered on a cohort of LBP patients examined by one of three examiners trained in the application of the DBCDG. Results Data were gathered on 264 patients. Signs of visceral disease or potentially serious illness were found in 2.7%. Centralization signs were found in 41%, lumbar and sacroiliac segmental signs in 23% and 27%, respectively and radicular signs were found in 24%. Clinically relevant myofascial signs were diagnosed in 10%. Dynamic instability was diagnosed in 63%, fear beliefs in 40%, central pain hypersensitivity in 5%, passive coping in 3% and depression in 3%. Conclusion The DBCDG can be applied in a busy private practice environment. Further studies are needed to investigate clinically relevant means to identify central pain hypersensitivity, poor coping and depression, correlations and patterns among the diagnostic components of the DBCDG as well as inter-examiner reliability and efficacy of treatment based on the DBCDG.

  6. Integrating feedback from a clinical data warehouse into practice organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Andrew; Moshyk, Andriy; Diab, Hassan; Caron, Philippe; de Lorenzi, Fabien; Bisson, Guy; Menard, Line; Lefebvre, Richard; Gauthier, Patricia; Grondin, Richard; Desautels, Michel

    2006-01-01

    A patient oriented hospital information system (ARIANE) was inaugurated at the Sherbrooke University hospital (CHUS) in 1990 and a clinical data warehouse (CDW) completed 2004. The CDW is updated from ARIANE every 24h and includes ICD discharge diagnosis data, visit DRG and SNOMED encoding. The data is encrypted on storage. Data is accessed according to institutional approval. To facilitate data access two levels of tool have been made accessible using a web-browser. The first level consists of a 'dashboard' that has a defined design and enables a set of pre-determined dynamic queries about a patient population. This level can be operated with minimal training. The second level uses a convivial database query tool, which requires some prior training. Two prototype dashboards have been designed and evaluated for acceptability. The first for the emergency department enables analysis of patient occupancy. The second for the biochemistry department enables quality assurance evaluation. In most cases worldwide the clinical data warehouse is only beginning to be exploited, often impeded by lack of connection between different enterprise databases. Our CDW is expected rapidly to create a culture change so that clinical practice can be continuously evaluated using compiled data readily available from the electronic health record/hospital information system.

  7. Changes in levels of haemoglobin A1c during the first 6 years after diagnosis of clinical type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Siersma, V.; Hansen, Lars Jørgen;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the variability in levels of glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) during the first six years after diagnosis of clinical type 2 diabetes in relation to possible predictors. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data were from a population-based sample from general practice of 581 newly diagnosed...... the first 6 years after the diagnosis of clinical type 2 diabetes, changes in levels of HbA(1c) show considerable inter-individual variability with age as the only long-term predictor. The results indicate that it is important to monitor changes in HbA(1c) more closely and intensify treatment of those often...

  8. Surface Plasmon Resonance for Cell-Based Clinical Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhki Yanase

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive real-time observations and the evaluation of living cell conditions and functions are increasingly demanded in life sciences. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors detect the refractive index (RI changes on the surface of sensor chips in label-free and on a real-time basis. Using SPR sensors, we and other groups have developed techniques to evaluate living cells’ reactions in response to stimuli without any labeling in a real-time manner. The SPR imaging (SPRI system for living cells may visualize single cell reactions and has the potential to expand application of SPR cell sensing for clinical diagnosis, such as multi-array cell diagnostic systems and detection of malignant cells among normal cells in combination with rapid cell isolation techniques.

  9. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinically relevant imaging in diagnosis and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southwood, Tauny [Birmingham Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Rheumatology, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    The role of plain radiographs in monitoring the disease process in JIA is being increasingly superseded by MRI. The use of ultrasound by clinicians is contentious, but has the potential to corroborate and supplement the clinical impression of individual joint inflammation and it can be very useful for localising intra-articular treatment at the bedside. There are exciting developments in MRS technology which may eventually allow in vivo evaluation of the acute inflammatory process, measurement of early responses to treatment and detection of residual inflammation. The aim of this article is to describe a clinician's view of the current role of imaging in the diagnosis and monitoring of JIA. (orig.)

  10. Diagnosis of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis “Pragmatic Challenges in Clinical Practice”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilios Tzilas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The past few years have signaled a major breakthrough on the management of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. Finally, we have drugs in our arsenal able to slow down the inexorable disease natural course. On the other hand, the latter evidence has increased the responsibility for a timely and accurate diagnosis. Establishment of IPF diagnosis directly affects the choice of appropriate treatment. The current diagnostic guidelines represent a major step forward providing an evidence-based road map; yet, clinicians are encountering major diagnostic dilemmas that inevitably affect therapeutic decisions. This review article aims to summarize the current state of knowledge on the diagnostic procedure of IPF based on the current guidelines and discuss pragmatic difficulties and challenges encountered by clinicians with regards to their applicability in the everyday clinical practice.

  11. Clinical applications of laser therapy on the dental practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2004-09-01

    Dental practice consists of a series of laboring procedures which demands the use of several types of equipment and materials. Usually patient"s fears brings additional burden to the Dentists. The use of Lasers for treating and diagnosis in Dentistry is quite new comparing to other medical areas. Initially Laser technology was used as an alternative method for treating dental caries in order to substitute the use of the drill. Lately surgical Lasers have shown themselves very useful for treating several pathologies and began to be used as a powerful tool on the treatment of several conditions affecting the maxillofacial complex and later on, the era of the use of Laser therapy began. The advent of the diode Lasers made possible the introduction of small units at the dental office and Laser therapy was used to improve healing and later included also caries diagnosis. This paper discuss the use of Laser therapy on Restorative Dentistry, Periodondology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oral implantology and other. Clinical and laboratorial experience has demonstrated that Laser therapy does improve the healing of both mineralized and soft tissues, reduces pain and inflammation, and also reduces both cost and length of the dental treatment.

  12. PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF APIXABAN USE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE: VIEW POINT OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Sychev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Apixaban is a "new" oral anticoagulant, direct Xa factor inhibitor with a good evidence base of the efficacy in the prevention of ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. The article is devoted to apixaban use in clinical practice: examination before apixaban administration, clinical situation when laboratory control and monitoring are needed, drugs interactions (at the level of CYP3A4, P-gp, management of patients with bleeding because of apixaban therapy (including antidotes application, perioperative management of patients receiving apixaban.

  13. PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF APIXABAN USE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE: VIEW POINT OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Sychev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apixaban is a "new" oral anticoagulant, direct Xa factor inhibitor with a good evidence base of the efficacy in the prevention of ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. The article is devoted to apixaban use in clinical practice: examination before apixaban administration, clinical situation when laboratory control and monitoring are needed, drugs interactions (at the level of CYP3A4, P-gp, management of patients with bleeding because of apixaban therapy (including antidotes application, perioperative management of patients receiving apixaban.

  14. Meralgia paresthetica: clinical and electrophysiological diagnosis in 120 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seror, P; Seror, R

    2006-05-01

    We report the results of clinical and electrophysiological examinations in 131 cases of meralgia paresthetica (MP) among 120 unselected patients, 69 men and 51 women, aged 15-81 years. All patients experienced permanent or intermittent pain, and all but one had permanent sensory impairment of the thigh. The lateral aspect of the thigh was solely involved in 88 cases and the anterior aspect was also or exclusively involved in 32 cases. The right thigh was involved 62 times and the left 58 times. Symptom duration varied from 2 weeks to 20 years. The initial diagnosis was meralgia paresthetica in 47 cases (39%), root disease in 35 cases, and osteoarthritis in 6 cases; no diagnosis was proposed in the 32 remaining cases. Two cases had undergone previous spine surgery for disk herniation, with no benefit. A precise cause could explain the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) lesion in 46 cases, the other 74 cases being considered idiopathic (25% of patients were obese). Only one case required surgery to relieve symptoms. LFCN conduction was studied orthodromically, distally from the anterior superior iliac spine. The side-to-side amplitude ratio (ssRatio) was greater than 2.3 in 118 of 120 patients (98.3%) and was a better index to confirm a lesion of the LFCN than SNAP amplitude, which was abnormal (less than 3 microV) in 88 cases (73.3%). Only two of the 11 bilateral cases had an ssRatio lower than 2.3 (they were both 2.0). An ssRatio of 2.3 or more and a SNAP amplitude lower than 3 microV provided a specificity of 98.75% or more. The mean axonal loss was 88%. These clinical and electrophysiological data highlight the central role the neurophysiologist should play in diagnosing MP by means of an LFCN conduction study.

  15. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF ORGANIC ACIDEMIA: CLINICAL AND NEUROIMAGING FINDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Reza ASHRAFI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical differential DiagnosisThe organic acidemias are important in the differential diagnosis of metabolic and neurologic derangement in the neonate and of new-onset neurologic signs in the older child.A-Organic aciduriaSeveral disorders, not classified as primary disorders of organic acid metabolism, have a characteristic urinary organic acid profile that suggests the appropriate diagnosis.• Mevalonicaciduria, a disorder of cholesterol biosynthesis, shows mevalonic acid in the urine.• Glutaricacidemia type II, a disorder of fatty acid oxidation, has multiple organic acids in abnormal concentration in urine. These organic acids include ethylmalonic acid, glutaric acid, dicarboxylic acids, and glycine conjugates of medium chain dicarboxylic acids.• The fatty acylCoA-glycine conjugates that signal incomplete fatty acid oxidation and serves as signals to the diagnosis of MCAD defeciency and other disorders of fatty acid oxidation and transport.• Biotinidase deficiency, a disorder of biotin recycling, results in the urinary excretion of several unusual organic acids, including 3-hydroxy-isovaleric, 3-hydroxypropionic, 3-hydroxybutyric acids, and acetoacetate. Propionyl glycine may also be seen.• Mitochondrial diseases with disordered oxidative phosphorylation often demonstrate the presence of abnormal organic acids in the urine.B-AcidosisNon-genetic conditions, such as shock, sepsis, DKA, liver and kidney failure, thiamine deficiency, RTA, some drug intoxication cause acidosis- genetic conditions are include: inherited metabolic disorders of lactate and pyruvate metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation, disorders of the Krebs cycle such as fumarase deficiency.C-HyperammonemiaDisorders of the urea cycle and the hyperammonemia-hypoglycemia syndrome.Neuroimaging• A variety of MRI abnormalities have been described in the organic academia, including distinctive basal ganglia lesions in glutaricacidemia type I (GA I, white matter changes in

  16. Clinical Practice Patterns of Canadian Couple/Marital/Family Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, John; Dienhart, Anna; Schmidt, Jonathan; Turner, Jean

    2009-01-01

    This clinical practice pattern survey had two unique aspects. It was a national survey of American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) members in Canada that included all AAMFT membership categories, including student, affiliate, associate, clinical, and supervisor. It compared practice pattern data for clinical members from Canada…

  17. Diagnosis of brain death: confirmatory tests after clinical test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Yingying; Yang Qinglin; Liu Gang; Zhang Yan; Ye Hong; Gao Daiquan; Zhang Yunzhou

    2014-01-01

    Background The brain death confirmation tests occupy a different position in each country's diagnostic criteria (or guideline); the choices of tests are also different.China brain death criteria include clinical judgment and confirmation tests.This study aimed to confirm the preferred confirmatory test and complementary confirmatory tests.Methods We did a clinical brain death determination on deep coma patients,and then divided them into brain death group and non-brain death group.According to the Chinese standards for determining brain death,both the groups accepted confirmatory tests including electroencephalograph (EEG),somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP),and transcranial Doppler (TCD).The sensitivity,specificity,false positive rate,and false negative rate were calculated to evaluate the accuracy of the confirmatory tests.Results Among the 131 cases of patients,103 patients met the clinical criteria of brain death.Respiratory arrest provocation test was performed on 44 cases and 32 cases (73%) successfully completed and confirmed that they have no spontaneous breathing.Of the three confirmation tests,EEG had the highest completion rate (98%) and good sensitivity (83%) and specificity (97%); TCD had followed completion rate (54%) and not good sensitivity (73%) and specificity (75%); SEP had the lowest completion rate (49%),good sensitivity (100%),and not good specificity (78%).After the combination of SEP or TCD with EEG,the specificity can increase to 100%.Conclusions The completion rate of respiratory arrest provocation test remains a problem in the clinical diagnosis of brain death.If the test cannot be completed,whether to increase a confirmatory test is debatable.SEP had an ideal sensitivity,and the specificity will reach 100% after combining with TCD or EEG.When a confirmed test was uncertain,we suggest increasing another confirmatory test.

  18. Clinical anatomy as practiced by ancient Egyptians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Marios; Hanna, Michael; Alsaiegh, Nada; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2011-05-01

    Egypt is famously known for its Nile and pyramids, yet not many people know that Egypt made possible the origin of the anatomical sciences. Several ancient papyri guide us through the Egyptians' exploration of the human body and how they applied anatomical knowledge to clinical medicine to the best of their knowledge. It is through records, such as the Edwin Smith, Ebers, and Kahun papyri and other literature detailing the work of the Egyptian embalmers, physicians, and Greek anatomists, that we are able to take a glimpse into the evolution of the anatomical sciences from 3000 B.C. to 250 B.C. It is through the Egyptian embalmer that we were able to learn of some of the first interactions with human organs and their detailed observation. The Egyptian physician's knowledge, being transcribed into the Ebers and Edwin Smith papyri, enabled future physicians to seek reference to common ailments for diagnosing and treating a variety of conditions ranging from head injuries to procedures, such as trans-sphenoidal surgery. In Alexandria, Herophilus, and Erasistratus made substantial contributions to the anatomical sciences by beginning the practice of human dissection. For instance, Herophilus described the anatomy of the heart valves along with Erasistratus who demonstrated how blood was prevented from flowing retrograde under normal conditions. Hence, from various records, we are able to unravel how Egypt paved the road for study of the anatomical sciences.

  19. [Surgical clinical studies and their practical realization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, W; Wente, M N; Büchler, M W

    2000-06-01

    The employment of the optimal therapeutic option according to the best current knowledge is called evidence-based medicine (EBM). Moreover, considering the cost explosion in public health systems, EBM should contribute towards economical and targeted use of the restricted resources and towards quality assurance in medicine. Obviously, this is applicable to the operative specialties and can be termed as evidence-based surgery. Surgeons have to do their "homework" about this subject and to perform randomized controlled trials (the gold standard with the greatest evidence) on a large scale, in order to come up to this expectation in future. Evidence-based therapy is essential for the preservation and especially for the further development and evolution of high-quality surgery with, at the same time, quality assurance in the new millenium. This article presents the definition of EBM and its implication in the operative fields. Fundamental principles for the practical conduct of clinical randomized controlled trials are defined and the specific problems in surgery are discussed.

  20. The research and practice based on the full-time visitation model in clinical medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the higher medical colleges and universities teaching hospital carry certain clinical teaching tasks, but the traditional teaching pattern of "two stage", including the early stage of the theory of teaching, the late arrangement of clinical practice, had some drawbacks such as practice time is too concentrated and the chasm between students' theory and practice. It is suggested that students contact clinical diagnosis and treatment earlier, visit more patients and increase the ratio of visitation and course. But as more and more students flood into university, clinical visitation has turned into a difficulty to improve students’ ability. To resolve this problem, we have made some efficient practice and exploration in Rizhao City People's Hospital from September 2005 to July 2014. The students were divided into full-time visitation model group and “two stage” pattern group randomly. The single factors are of great difference between the two groups. The full-time visitation model in clinical medical education builds a new mode of practice of clinical practice teaching in the medical stuents' concept of doctor-patient communication, humanistic care to patients, basic theoretical knowledge, clinical practice skills and graduate admission rate increased significantly. Continuous improvement of OSCE exam is needed to make evaluation more scientific, objective and fair.

  1. Adherence to EBM guidelines in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khafizianova, R Kh; Burykin, I M

    2015-01-01

    Adequate and rational pharmacotherapy is an important element of rehabilitation of patients with myocardial infarction. Orders of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, domestic and international guidelines, and scientific publications - all contain a complete algorithm for rational pharmacotherapy [1, 2]. These documents are based on the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM) and help practicing physicians to carry out individualized and rational pharmacotherapy. However, clinical studies have shown low adherence of physicians to clinical guidelines. In the Russian Federation the death rate from cardiovascular diseases is higher than in developed countries. Thus, studies of the causes of high cardiovascular mortality are needed. To assess adherence of practicing physicians to principles of evidence-based medicine in treating patients after myocardial infarction at the stage of rehabilitation. A retrospective analysis of 157 cases of patients in rehabilitation after myocardial infarction for the years 2006 and 2009 was undertaken.We analyzed the list of drugs, prescribed to patients during the period of rehabilitation, drug combinations, regimens and pharmacoepidemiological parameters. We used the following rehabilitation criteria: blood pressure control, smoking cessation, and weight control. Recommendations of controlled physical activities have also been studied. Patient care was compared with the guideline recommendations. Statistical analysis was performed using the OLAP system. 65 patients with myocardial infarction received rehabilitation therapy in 2006, and 92 - in 2009. It was found, that in 2006 physicians prescribed an average of 4.5 drugs per patient, and in 2009 - 4.6 drugs per patient. The average number of cardiovascular drugs (category C of ATC classification) per patient was 2.9 in 2006, and 2.6 - in 2009. Polypharmacy was found in half of the patients.In terms of evidence-based medicine, an important element in the rehabilitation

  2. Concordance between 11C-PIB-PET and clinical diagnosis in a memory clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricio, Chrem Mendez; Gabriela, Cohen; Julieta, Russo Maria; Marcos, Fernandez Suarez; Federico, Nahas; Griselda, Russo; Claudio, Wierszylo; Santiago, Paz; Leonardo, Tabaschi; Jorge, Campos; Alejandra, Amengual; Janus, Kremer; Salvador, Guinjoan; Ramon, Leiguarda; Gustavo, Sevlever; Silvia, Vázquez; Ricardo, Allegri

    2015-09-01

    Today, ligands that bind to fibrillar β-amyloid are detectable by Positron Emission Tomography (PET) allowing for in vivo visualization for Abeta burden. However, amyloid plaques detection per se does not establish Alzheimer's Disease diagnosis. In this sense, the utility of amyloid imaging to improve clinical diagnosis was settled only for specific clinical scenarios and few studies have assessed amyloid molecular neuroimaging in a broader clinical setting. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of PiB amyloid findings in different diagnostic syndromes grouped into high and low probability pre- test categories, taking into account pre-test clinical assumption of the presence of AD related pathology. 144 patients were assigned into categories of high or low pretest probability according to clinical suspicion of AD pathology. The high probability group included: amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), amnestic and other domains MCI, Dementia of Alzheimer's Type (DAT), Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA), logopenic Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA), Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy and mixed dementia. The low assumption group included: normal controls, non-amnestic MCI, non-logopenic PPA and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD). Only normal controls and DAT patients (typical and atypical presentation) were the most consistent across clinical and molecular diagnostics. MCI, non-logopenic PPA and FTD were the syndromic diagnoses that most discrepancies were found. This study demonstrates that detecting in vivo amyloid plaques by molecular imaging is considerably frequent in most of the dementia syndromes and shows that there are frequent discordance between molecular diagnosis and clinical assumption. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Impact of cerebro-spinal fluid biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease in clinical practice: a multicentric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton-Liger, François; Wallon, David; Troussière, Anne-Cécile; Yatimi, Rachida; Dumurgier, Julien; Magnin, Eloi; de la Sayette, Vincent; Duron, Emannuelle; Philippi, Nathalie; Beaufils, Emilie; Gabelle, Audrey; Croisile, Bernard; Robert, Philippe; Pasquier, Florence; Hannequin, Didier; Hugon, Jacques; Paquet, Claire

    2014-01-01

    CSF biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease are well validated in clinical research; however, their pragmatic utility in daily practice is still unappreciated. These biomarkers are used in routine practice according to Health Authority Recommendations. In 604 consecutive patients explored for cognitive disorders, questionnaires were prospectively proposed and filled. Before and after CSF biomarker results, clinicians provided a diagnosis and an estimate of their diagnostic confidence. Analysis has compared the frequency of diagnosis before and after CSF biomarker results using the net reclassification improvement (NRI) method. We have evaluated external validity comparing with data of French Bank National of AD (BNA). A total of 561 patients [Alzheimer's disease (AD), n = 253; non-AD, n = 308] were included (mean age, 68.6 years; women, 52 %). Clinically suspected diagnosis and CSF results were concordant in 65.2 % of cases. When clinical hypothesis and biological results were discordant, a reclassification occurred in favour of CSF biomarkers results in 76.9 %. The NRI was 39.5 %. In addition, the results show a statistically significant improvement in clinician confidence for their diagnosis. In comparison with BNA data, patients were younger and more frequently diagnosed with AD. Clinicians tend to heavily rely on the CSF AD biomarkers results and are more confident in their diagnoses using CSF AD biomarkers. Thus, these biomarkers appear as a key tool in clinical practice.

  4. [Pathologic diagnosis and clinical analysis of chronic extrinsic allergic alveolitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Xiao-li; Jin, Mu-lan; Dai, Hua-ping; Li, Xue; Wei, Ping; Zhang, Yun-gang

    2011-11-01

    To study the clinicopathologic features and diagnostic approach of chronic extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA). Seven cases of chronic EAA diagnosed by open lung biopsy or lung transplant were enrolled into the study. The clinical and pathologic features were analyzed and the literature was reviewed. There were altogether 4 men and 3 women. The age of the patients ranged from 30 to 65 years (mean = 48 years). All cases represented chronic form and five cases diagnosed by open lung biopsy also showed features of recent aggravation, leading to hospitalization. Four cases had known history of exposure to inciting gases, pollens and pets, and only 2 cases were positive for allergens. High-resolution CT scan showed ground-glass attenuation and reticular pattern that often had a patchy distribution and central predominance. Bronchoalveolar lavage analysis showed marked lymphocytosis, with CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio less than 1. Lung function test demonstrated a restrictive ventilatory defect, with decreased compliance, reduced diffusion capacity and high airway obstruction. Five cases had open lung biopsy performed and two cases had undergone lung transplantation. Pathologic examination showed bronchiolocentric cellular interstitial pneumonia, interstitial fibrosis, non-caseating epithelioid granulomas, epithelioid histiocytic infiltrate in the respiratory bronchioles and intraluminal budding fibrosis. The five cases with open lung biopsy performed also showed neutrophilic infiltrate in the alveoli. The two lung transplant cases were complicated by severe fibrotic changes. Chronic EAA demonstrates characteristic pathologic features. Definitive diagnosis requires correlation with clinical and radiologic findings due to possible morphologic mimicry of other diffuse parenchymal lung diseases.

  5. Restless Legs Syndrome: From Pathophysiology to Clinical Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyi Guo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS, a common neurological sensorimotor disorder in western countries, has gained more and more attention in Asian countries. The prevalence of RLS is higher in older people and females. RLS is most commonly related to iron deficiency, pregnancy and uremia. The RLS symptoms show a significant circadian rhythm and a close relationship to periodic limb movements (PLMs in clinical observations, while the pathophysiological pathways are still unknown. The diagnostic criteria have been revised in 2012 to improve the validity of RLS diagnosis. Recent studies have suggested an important role of iron decrease of brain in RLS pathophysiology. Dopaminergic (DA system dysfunction in A11 cell groups has been recognized long ago from clinical treatment and autopsy. Nowadays, it is believed that iron dysfunction can affect DA system from different pathways and opioids have a protective effect on DA system. Several susceptible single nucleotide polymorphisms such as BTBD9 and MEIS1, which are thought to be involved in embryonic neuronal development, have been reported to be associated with RLS. Several pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment are discussed in this review. First-line treatments of RLS include DA agents and α2δ agonists. Augmentation is very common in long-term treatment of RLS which makes prevention and management of augmentation very important for RLS patients. A combination of different types of medication is effective in preventing and treating augmentation. The knowledge on RLS is still limited, the pathophysiology and better management of RLS remain to be discovered.

  6. Restless Legs Syndrome: From Pathophysiology to Clinical Diagnosis and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shiyi; Huang, Jinsha; Jiang, Haiyang; Han, Chao; Li, Jie; Xu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Guoxin; Lin, Zhicheng; Xiong, Nian; Wang, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS), a common neurological sensorimotor disorder in western countries, has gained more and more attention in Asian countries. The prevalence of RLS is higher in older people and females. RLS is most commonly related to iron deficiency, pregnancy and uremia. The RLS symptoms show a significant circadian rhythm and a close relationship to periodic limb movements (PLMs) in clinical observations, while the pathophysiological pathways are still unknown. The diagnostic criteria have been revised in 2012 to improve the validity of RLS diagnosis. Recent studies have suggested an important role of iron decrease of brain in RLS pathophysiology. Dopaminergic (DA) system dysfunction in A11 cell groups has been recognized long ago from clinical treatment and autopsy. Nowadays, it is believed that iron dysfunction can affect DA system from different pathways and opioids have a protective effect on DA system. Several susceptible single nucleotide polymorphisms such as BTBD9 and MEIS1, which are thought to be involved in embryonic neuronal development, have been reported to be associated with RLS. Several pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment are discussed in this review. First-line treatments of RLS include DA agents and α2δ agonists. Augmentation is very common in long-term treatment of RLS which makes prevention and management of augmentation very important for RLS patients. A combination of different types of medication is effective in preventing and treating augmentation. The knowledge on RLS is still limited, the pathophysiology and better management of RLS remain to be discovered. PMID:28626420

  7. Clinical symptoms and diagnosis of encephalitozoonosis in pet rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künzel, Frank; Gruber, Andrea; Tichy, Alexander; Edelhofer, Renate; Nell, Barbara; Hassan, Jasmin; Leschnik, Michael; Thalhammer, Johann G; Joachim, Anja

    2008-02-14

    Infections with Encephalitozoon cuniculi in rabbits are observed at increasing frequency and are known as opportunistic infections in immunocompromised humans. 191 pet rabbits with suspected encephalitozoonosis, presented at the Animal Hospital of the Veterinary University of Vienna (Austria), were included in this study. Rabbits were serologically examined for antibodies against E. cuniculi (144 positive out of 184 rabbits with suspected encephalitozoonosis compared to 14 positive out of 40 clinically healthy rabbits tested as part of a standard health check) and Toxoplasma gondii (8 positive out of 157). Of the 144 seropositive rabbits with clinical signs, 75% showed neurological symptoms, 14.6% demonstrated phacoclastic uveitis and 3.5% suffered from renal failure. 6.9% of the animals had combined symptoms. Vestibular disease dominated within the rabbits that showed neurological symptoms. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) could not detect parasite DNA in urine or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), but did so in 4 out of 5 samples of liquefied lens material in cases with phacoclastic uveitis due to lens capsule rupture. Additionally further diagnostic procedures, such as inspection of the external ear canal (N=69), radiography of the tympanic bullae (N=65) were performed to rule out differential diagnosis. 54.2% of the patients exhibiting neurological symptoms recovered within a few days, while 87.5% of the rabbits suffering from renal failure died or had to be euthanized.

  8. Clinical and laboratory diagnosis of dengue fever in travelers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Khokhlova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of clinical and laboratory symptoms in 35 adult patients with denger fever, Novosibirsk residents, which travelled in endemic countries, mostly Tailand. The classic form of the disease was determined in all cases. The moderate form was in 71,5% patients, the severe form was in the rest ones. The diagnosis of dengue was verified by detection of specific immunoglobulin M and in some cases immunoglobulin G and also virus dengue NS1 antigen by immunochromatography. The dominant clinical symptoms in observed patients were fever for 3–8 days (100%, mostly high one (71,4%, asthenia (97,1%, anorexia (100%, myalgia or/and arthralgia (77,1%, exantema (60%, hepatomegaly (62,8%. The gematologic indicators were represented with thrombocytopenia in 91,4% patients (from 167 to 20×109/l и leucopenia in 85,7% patients (from 3,9 to 1,1×109/l. The cytolitic syndrom was revealed in 80% patients with predominance of aspartate aminotransferase activity in early period of the disease. 

  9. Conceptualizing clinical nurse leader practice: an interpretive synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Institute of Medicine's Future of Nursing report identifies the clinical nurse leader as an innovative new role for meeting higher health-care quality standards. However, specific clinical nurse leader practices influencing documented quality outcomes remain unclear. Lack of practice clarity limits the ability to articulate, implement and measure clinical nurse leader-specific practice and quality outcomes. PURPOSE AND METHODS: Interpretive synthesis design and grounded theory...

  10. Differential diagnosis of dyscirculatory encephalopathy in outpatient practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D V Neverovsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The differential diagnosis of dyscirculatory encephalopathy is one of the topical problems in Russian neurology. Forty-seven patients diagnosed with dyscirculatory encephalopathy and followed up in the polyclinic were examined. Only in 9 (19.2% of them, the diagnosis was confirmed. Most patients were established to have other diseases, among which there were primary depressive and/or anxiety disorders (34%, primary headache (23.4, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV (8.5%, and Alzheimer’s disease (10.6%. The paper describes patients with migraine and BPPV, in whom the detection and treatment of these diseases have yielded a positive effect. The examination of patients diagnosed with dyscirculatory encephalopathy with investigations of their cognitive and emotional functions, otoneurological examination, and psychiatric consultation (if indicated makes it possible to identify other diseases presenting with the symptoms similar to dyscirculatory encephalopathy and to prescribe effective treatments.

  11. Molecular diagnosis in clinical parasitology: when and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Samson S Y; Fung, Kitty S C; Chau, Sandy; Poon, Rosana W S; Wong, Sally C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-11-01

    Microscopic detection and morphological identification of parasites from clinical specimens are the gold standards for the laboratory diagnosis of parasitic infections. The limitations of such diagnostic assays include insufficient sensitivity and operator dependence. Immunoassays for parasitic antigens are not available for most parasitic infections and have not significantly improved the sensitivity of laboratory detection. Advances in molecular detection by nucleic acid amplification may improve the detection in asymptomatic infections with low parasitic burden. Rapidly accumulating genomic data on parasites allow the design of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers directed towards multi-copy gene targets, such as the ribosomal and mitochondrial genes, which further improve the sensitivity. Parasitic cell or its free circulating parasitic DNA can be shed from parasites into blood and excreta which may allow its detection without the whole parasite being present within the portion of clinical sample used for DNA extraction. Multiplex nucleic acid amplification technology allows the simultaneous detection of many parasitic species within a single clinical specimen. In addition to improved sensitivity, nucleic acid amplification with sequencing can help to differentiate different parasitic species at different stages with similar morphology, detect and speciate parasites from fixed histopathological sections and identify anti-parasitic drug resistance. The use of consensus primer and PCR sequencing may even help to identify novel parasitic species. The key limitation of molecular detection is the technological expertise and expense which are usually lacking in the field setting at highly endemic areas. However, such tests can be useful for screening important parasitic infections in asymptomatic patients, donors or recipients coming from endemic areas in the settings of transfusion service or tertiary institutions with transplantation service. Such tests can also

  12. Methods for staging non-small cell lung cancer: Diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Gerard A; Gonzalez, Anne V; Jantz, Michael A; Margolis, Mitchell L; Gould, Michael K; Tanoue, Lynn T; Harris, Loren J; Detterbeck, Frank C

    2013-05-01

    Correctly staging lung cancer is important because the treatment options and prognosis differ significantly by stage. Several noninvasive imaging studies and invasive tests are available. Understanding the accuracy, advantages, and disadvantages of the available methods for staging non-small cell lung cancer is critical to decision-making. Test accuracies for the available staging studies were updated from the second iteration of the American College of Chest Physicians Lung Cancer Guidelines. Systematic searches of the MEDLINE database were performed up to June 2012 with the inclusion of selected meta-analyses, practice guidelines, and reviews. Study designs and results are summarized in evidence tables. The sensitivity and specificity of CT scanning for identifying mediastinal lymph node metastasis were approximately 55% and 81%, respectively, confirming that CT scanning has limited ability either to rule in or exclude mediastinal metastasis. For PET scanning, estimates of sensitivity and specificity for identifying mediastinal metastasis were approximately 77% and 86%, respectively. These findings demonstrate that PET scanning is more accurate than CT scanning, but tissue biopsy is still required to confirm PET scan findings. The needle techniques endobronchial ultrasound-needle aspiration, endoscopic ultrasound-needle aspiration, and combined endobronchial ultrasound/endoscopic ultrasound-needle aspiration have sensitivities of approximately 89%, 89%, and 91%, respectively. In direct comparison with surgical staging, needle techniques have emerged as the best first diagnostic tools to obtain tissue. Based on randomized controlled trials, PET or PET-CT scanning is recommended for staging and to detect unsuspected metastatic disease and avoid noncurative resections. Since the last iteration of the staging guidelines, PET scanning has assumed a more prominent role both in its use prior to surgery and when evaluating for metastatic disease. Minimally invasive

  13. The practice-unit centered clinical database--the implementation.

    OpenAIRE

    Bryner, U. M.

    1991-01-01

    A clinical database system under the name ClinTrac has been developed for the purpose of acquiring, processing, storing, analyzing, and communicating clinical information. The core of this system consists of a practice-unit centered database.

  14. [Zhu Lian's characteristics and experiences in clinical practice of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li fu; Pan, Xiaoria; Liu, Bing; Yue, Jin; Zhang, Lijian

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at discussing the clinical characteristics and experiences of ZHU Lian, the renowned contemporary acupuncture master from the following three aspects: "characteristics of clinical manipulations and techniques", "thoughts on diagnosis and treatment" and "examples of clinical cases". The study has shown that ZHU Lian invented the slow insertion technique by rotating needle and the embedding needle technique, improved moxibustion technique with moxa roll and proposed the three keys on the treatment with acupuncture and moxibustion, as well as discovered new acupoints for treatment. The pioneering and distinguished achievements she con tributed play the great demonstrating and driving role in the development of clinical study and practice of acupuncture and moxibustion.

  15. [Piriformis muscle syndrome: etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2013-01-01

    variations of PM and SN. In 5-6% of patients with low back pain and/or unilateral sciatica, the pain is caused by PM disorders. PS diagnosis can be made on the basis of anamnesis, clinical picture, clinical examination, EMNG, perisciatic anesthetic block of PM and radiological exams (pelvis/PM MRI; MR neurography of LS plexus and SN). PS therapy includes medicamentous therapy, physical therapy, kynesitherapy, acupuncture, therapeutic perisciatic blocks, botulinum toxin injections and surgical treatment (tenotomy of PM, neurolysis of SN).

  16. [Clinical characteristics and diagnosis of acute pandysautonomia in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chang-hong; Wang, Xiao-hui; Zou, Li-ping; Lü, Jun-lan; Wu, Hu-sheng; Wu, Yun; Wang, Hong-mei

    2010-06-01

    To summarize the clinical characteristics of acute pandysautonomia in childhood, to gain better understanding of the diagnosis and differential diagnosis. The clinical data of 6 children with acute pandysautonomia were analyzed and followed-up. All the 6 patients had routine blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), electrocardiography (ECG), electromyography (EMG), cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and autonomic nerve function tests (head upright tilt test, dermatography test, and thermal/sympathetic sweat response). Other laboratory examinations such as immunologic markers of CSF, electroencephalography (EEG), spinal cord MRI and somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) were also performed in some patients. Of the 6 patients, 1 was male, and 5 were female. The age of onset was from 2.3 to 14.5 years (average 8.2 years). The initial symptoms were gastrointestinal dysfunction in 3 patients and somatic motor dysfunction as their initial symptoms, one had irritability in 1 case, pain in 1 and dysphagia in 1, respectively. Autonomic nerve signs and symptoms: (1) Skin and mucosa are rough and dry, there was no or little perspiration, alacrimia or little tear in all patients. (2) Vision problem appeared in 1 patient, blepharoptosis in 3 patients, pupillary abnormality existed in all patients. (3) Gastrointestinal symptoms were present in all patients. Vomiting and constipation were present in 4 patients, diarrhea and constipation were alternatively present in 1 patient, abdominal distention and abdominal pain were present in 2 patients. (4) Cardiovascular system manifestations included postural dizziness or syncope in 3 patients, tightness and palpitation in 2 patients. (5) Urinary dysfunction was present in 4 patients. In addition, mild to moderate somatic motor dysfunction was present in 5 patients, sensory dysfunction in 3 patients. Autonomic nerve function tests were abnormal in all patients. Laboratory findings included serum IgM antibody to herpes simplex virus and

  17. The comparison of current and previous (2002) editions of American clinical practice guideline: diagnosis and management of childhood obstructive sleep apnea syndrome%美国新版《儿童睡眠呼吸暂停综合征诊治指南》与2002版指南的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓力; 印根权

    2013-01-01

    2012年8月27日,美国儿科学会杂志在线发布了新版,意在指导初级保健医师对儿童青少年OSAS的诊断与治疗.自从前一版 (2002版) 指南发表后,有关OSAS研究的文献质量有明显提高.新版指南是在参考1999至2010年间发表的3 166篇文献中的350篇文献相关数据基础上所制定的.本文主要比较新版指南与2002版的不同,以及十年间对儿童OSAS认识的变化.%The current clinical practice guideline, diagnosis and management of childhood obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), was issued in Pediatrics on line by American academy of pediatrics on August 27th, 2012. This revised guideline, intended for use by primary earc clinicians, provides recommesdations for the diagnosis and management of OSAS in children and adolescents. Since the previous guideline (version 2002) was published, studies of OSAS have bees improved significantly. The current guideline was formulated according to the relevant data from 350 of 3166 articles published from 1999 to 2010. What are the differences between the two guidelines? What are the greatest changes in cbildhood OSAS in the past 10 years? This article will focus on the comparison between these two guidelines.

  18. Evaluation of Pulmonary Nodules: Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines for Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chunxue; Choi, Chang-Min; Chu, Chung Ming; Anantham, Devanand; Chung-Man Ho, James; Khan, Ali Zamir; Lee, Jang-Ming; Li, Shi Yue; Saenghirunvattana, Sawang; Yim, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) clinical practice guidelines on the evaluation of pulmonary nodules may have low adoption among clinicians in Asian countries. Unique patient characteristics of Asian patients affect the diagnostic evaluation of pulmonary nodules. The objective of these clinical practice guidelines was to adapt those of CHEST to provide consensus-based recommendations relevant to practitioners in Asia. A modified ADAPTE process was used by a multidisciplinary group of pulmonologists and thoracic surgeons in Asia. An initial panel meeting analyzed all CHEST recommendations to achieve consensus on recommendations and identify areas that required further investigation before consensus could be achieved. Revised recommendations were circulated to panel members for iterative review and redrafting to develop the final guidelines. Evaluation of pulmonary nodules in Asia broadly follows those of the CHEST guidelines with important caveats. Practitioners should be aware of the risk of lung cancer caused by high levels of indoor and outdoor air pollution, as well as the high incidence of adenocarcinoma in female nonsmokers. Furthermore, the high prevalence of granulomatous disease and other infectious causes of pulmonary nodules need to be considered. Therefore, diagnostic risk calculators developed in non-Asian patients may not be applicable. Overall, longer surveillance of nodules than those recommended by CHEST should be considered. TB in Asia favors lesser reliance on PET scanning and greater use of nonsurgical biopsy over surgical diagnosis or surveillance. Practitioners in Asia are encouraged to use these adapted consensus guidelines to facilitate consistent evaluation of pulmonary nodules. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Suspected pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis: A comprehensive MDCT diagnosis in the acute clinical setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvolini, Luca [Radiology Department, ' Umberto I' Hospital - Ospedali Riuniti - ' Politecnica delle Marche' University, Via Conca, 60020 Ancona (Italy)], E-mail: lucasalvolini@alice.it; Scaglione, Mariano [Emergency and Trauma CT Section, Department of Radiology, Cardarelli Hospital, Via G. Merliani 31, 80127 Naples (Italy); Giuseppetti, Gian Marco; Giovagnoni, Andrea [Radiology Department, ' Umberto I' Hospital - Ospedali Riuniti - ' Politecnica delle Marche' University, Via Conca, 60020 Ancona (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    Both pulmonary arterial and peripheral venous sides of venous thromboembolism (VTE) can now be efficiently and safely investigated by multi-detector CT (MDCT) at the same time by a combined CT angiography/CT venography protocol. In the emergency setting, the use of such a single test for patients suspected of suffering from VTE on a clinical grounds may considerably shorten and simplify diagnostic algorithms. The selection of patients to be submitted to MDCT must follow well-established clinical prediction rules in order to avoid generalized referral to CT on a generic clinical suspicion basis and excessive population exposure to increased ionizing radiation dose, especially in young patients. Clinical and anatomical wide-panoramic capabilities of MDCT allow identification of underlying disease that may explain patients' symptoms in a large number of cases in which VTE is not manifest. The analysis of MDCT additional findings on cardiopulmonary status and total thrombus burden can lead to better prognostic stratification of patients and influence therapeutic options. Some controversial points such as optimal examination parameters, clinical significance of subsegmentary emboli, CT pitfalls and/or possible falsely positive diagnoses, and outcome of untreated patients in which VTE has been excluded by MDCT without additional testing, must of course be taken into careful consideration before the definite role of comprehensive MDCT VTE 'one-stop-shop' diagnosis in everyday clinical practice can be ascertained.

  20. Clinical applicability of D-dimer assay in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism reduces with aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite modern algorithms have been proposed for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE, it remains understimed and often missed in clinical practice, especially in elderly patients, resulting in high morbidity and mortality when early and correctly untreated. One of the main controversial issue is represented by the role and applicability of D-dimer in the diagnostic work up of geriatric patients. Most recent guidelines in young-adult patients suggest to perform D-dimer assay by ELISA or immunoturbidimetric methods only in non high pre-test clinical probability (PTP patients; in these patients negative D-dimer can safely rule out the diagnosis of PE. This strategy is safe also in elderly patients; however the percentage of patients with non high PTP and negative D-dimer reduces progressively with age, making difficult its clinical applicability. The Authors, starting from two case reports, up date the diagnostic management of PE underling the limitations of D-dimer assay in elderly patients.

  1. Current practices in the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes mellitus in India (WINGS-5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalakshmi, Manni Mohanraj; Bhavadharini, Balaji; Maheswari, Kumar; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Jebarani, Saravanan; Ninov, Lyudmil; Kayal, Arivudainambi; Malanda, Belma; Belton, Anne; Uma, Ram; Mohan, Viswanathan; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To obtain information on existing practices in the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and obstetricians/gynecologists (OB/GYNs) in India. Methods: Details regarding diagnostic criteria used, screening methods, management strategies, and the postpartum follow-up of GDM were obtained from physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs across 24 states of India using online/in-person surveys using a structured questionnaire. Results: A total of 3841 doctors participated in the survey of whom 68.6% worked in private clinics. Majority of OB/GYNs (84.9%) preferred universal screening for GDM, and screening in the first trimester was performed by 67% of them. Among the OB/GYNs, 600 (36.7%) reported using the nonfasting 2 h criteria for diagnosing GDM whereas 560 (29.4%) of the diabetologists/endocrinologists reported using the same. However, further questioning on the type of blood sample collected and the glucose load used revealed that, in reality, only 208 (12.7%) and 72 (3.8%), respectively, used these criteria properly. The survey also revealed that the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria was followed properly by 299 (18.3%) of OB/GYNs and 376 (19.7%) of physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists. Postpartum oral glucose tolerance testing was advised by 56% of diabetologists and 71.6% of OB/GYNs. Conclusion: More than half of the physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs in India do not follow any of the recommended guidelines for the diagnosis of GDM. This emphasizes the need for increased awareness about screening and diagnosis of GDM both among physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs in India. PMID:27186555

  2. Current practices in the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes mellitus in India (WINGS-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manni Mohanraj Mahalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To obtain information on existing practices in the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM among physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and obstetricians/gynecologists (OB/GYNs in India. Methods: Details regarding diagnostic criteria used, screening methods, management strategies, and the postpartum follow-up of GDM were obtained from physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs across 24 states of India using online/in-person surveys using a structured questionnaire. Results: A total of 3841 doctors participated in the survey of whom 68.6% worked in private clinics. Majority of OB/GYNs (84.9% preferred universal screening for GDM, and screening in the first trimester was performed by 67% of them. Among the OB/GYNs, 600 (36.7% reported using the nonfasting 2 h criteria for diagnosing GDM whereas 560 (29.4% of the diabetologists/endocrinologists reported using the same. However, further questioning on the type of blood sample collected and the glucose load used revealed that, in reality, only 208 (12.7% and 72 (3.8%, respectively, used these criteria properly. The survey also revealed that the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria was followed properly by 299 (18.3% of OB/GYNs and 376 (19.7% of physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists. Postpartum oral glucose tolerance testing was advised by 56% of diabetologists and 71.6% of OB/GYNs. Conclusion: More than half of the physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs in India do not follow any of the recommended guidelines for the diagnosis of GDM. This emphasizes the need for increased awareness about screening and diagnosis of GDM both among physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs in India.

  3. Librarian contributions to clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse, Peggy; Protzko, Shandra

    2014-01-01

    Librarians have become more involved in developing high quality systematic reviews. Evidence-based practice guidelines are an extension of systematic reviews and offer another significant area for librarian involvement. This column highlights opportunities and challenges for the librarian working on guideline panels and provides practical considerations for meaningful contributions to the guideline creation process.

  4. Giant cell arteritis. Part I. Terminology, classification, clinical manifestations, diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Makhmudovich Satybaldyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is a vasculitis affecting mainly large and medium-sized arteries, which the classification of systemic vasculitides refers to as those mainly involving the large vessels. GCA is typified by the involvement of extracranial aortic branches and intracranial vessels, the aorta and its large vessels are being affected most frequently. The paper considers the terminology, classification, prevalence, major pathogenic mechanisms, and morphology of GCA. A broad spectrum of its clinical subtypes is due to target vessel stenosis caused by intimal hyperplasia. In 40% of cases, GCA is shown to be accompanied by polymyalgia rheumatica that may either precede or manifest simultaneously with GCA, or follow this disease. The menacing complications of GCA may be visual loss or ischemic strokes at various sites depending on the location of the occluded vessel. Along with the gold standard verification of the diagnosis of GCA, namely temporal artery biopsy, the author indicates other (noninvasive methods for detection of vascular lesions: color Doppler ultrasonography of the temporal arteries, fluorescein angiography of the retina, mag-netic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography to rule out aortic aneurysm. Dynamic 18F positron emission tomography is demonstrated to play a role in the evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness.

  5. Cerebral venous thrombosis: Update on clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leys Didier

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT has a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that may mimic many other neurological disorders and lead to misdiagnoses. Headache is the most common symptom and may be associated with other symptoms or remain isolated. The other frequent manifestations are focal neurological deficits and diffuse encephalopathies with seizures. The key to the diagnosis is the imaging of the occluded vessel or of the intravascular thrombus, by a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance venography (MRV. Causes and risk factors include medical, surgical and obstetrical causes of deep vein thrombosis, genetic and acquired prothrombotic disorders, cancer and hematological disorders, inflammatory systemic disorders, pregnancy and puerperium, infections and local causes such as tumors, arteriovenous malformations, trauma, central nervous system infections and local infections. The breakdown of causes differs in different parts of the world. A meta-analysis of the most recent prospectively collected series showed an overall 15% case-fatality or dependency rate. Heparin therapy is the standard therapy at the acute stage, followed by 3-6 months of oral anticoagulation. Patients with isolated intracranial hypertension may require a lumbar puncture to remove cerebrospinal fluid before starting heparin when they develop a papilloedema that may threaten the visual acuity or decompressive hemicraniectomy. Patients who develop seizures should receive antiepileptic drugs. Cerebral venous thrombosis - even pregnancy-related - should not contraindicate future pregnancies. The efficacy and safety of local thrombolysis and decompressive hemicraniectomy should be tested

  6. Current Evidence on Atypical Odontalgia: Diagnosis and Clinical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Abiko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with atypical odontalgia (AO complain of medically unexplained toothache. No evidence-based diagnostic criteria or treatment guidelines are yet available. The present paper addresses seven clinical questions about AO based on current knowledge in the literature and discusses diagnostic criteria and guidelines for treatment and management. The questions are (i What is the prevalence of AO in the community?\t(ii What psychological problems are experienced by patients with AO? (iii Are there any comorbidities of AO? (iv Is local anesthesia effective for the relief of pain in AO? (v Are there any characteristic symptoms of AO other than spontaneous pain? (vi Are antidepressants effective for treatment of AO? (vii Are anticonvulsants effective for treatment of AO? Our literature search provided answers for these questions; however, there is insufficient evidence-based data to establish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of AO. Overall, some diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain and persistent dentoalveolar pain disorder may be applied to AO patients. The patient's psychogenic background should always be considered in the treatment and/or management of AO. The clinicians may need to treat AO patients using Patient-Oriented Evidence that Matters approach.

  7. Current Evidence on Atypical Odontalgia: Diagnosis and Clinical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiko, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Hirofumi; Chiba, Itsuo; Toyofuku, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) complain of medically unexplained toothache. No evidence-based diagnostic criteria or treatment guidelines are yet available. The present paper addresses seven clinical questions about AO based on current knowledge in the literature and discusses diagnostic criteria and guidelines for treatment and management. The questions are (i) What is the prevalence of AO in the community? (ii) What psychological problems are experienced by patients with AO? (iii) Are there any comorbidities of AO? (iv) Is local anesthesia effective for the relief of pain in AO? (v) Are there any characteristic symptoms of AO other than spontaneous pain? (vi) Are antidepressants effective for treatment of AO? (vii) Are anticonvulsants effective for treatment of AO? Our literature search provided answers for these questions; however, there is insufficient evidence-based data to establish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of AO. Overall, some diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain and persistent dentoalveolar pain disorder may be applied to AO patients. The patient's psychogenic background should always be considered in the treatment and/or management of AO. The clinicians may need to treat AO patients using Patient-Oriented Evidence that Matters approach. PMID:22844283

  8. How well do final year undergraduate medical students master practical clinical skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Störmann, Sylvère; Stankiewicz, Melanie; Raes, Patricia; Berchtold, Christina; Kosanke, Yvonne; Illes, Gabrielle; Loose, Peter; Angstwurm, Matthias W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical examination and other practical clinical skills are fundamental to guide diagnosis and therapy. The teaching of such practical skills has gained significance through legislative changes and adjustments of the curricula of medical schools in Germany. We sought to find out how well final year undergraduate medical students master practical clinical skills. Methods: We conducted a formative 4-station objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) focused on practical clinical skills during the final year of undergraduate medical education. Participation was voluntary. Besides the examination of heart, lungs, abdomen, vascular system, lymphatic system as well as the neurological, endocrinological or orthopaedic examination we assessed other basic clinical skills (e.g. interpretation of an ECG, reading a chest X-ray). Participants filled-out a questionnaire prior to the exam, inter alia to give an estimate of their performance. Results: 214 final year students participated in our study and achieved a mean score of 72.8% of the total score obtainable. 9.3% of participants (n=20) scored insufficiently (clinical skills in the context of a formative assessment. Half of the students over-estimate their own performance. We recommend an institutionalised and frequent assessment of practical clinical skills during undergraduate medical education, especially in the final year. PMID:27579358

  9. Narcissistic interpersonal problems in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kealy, David; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2011-01-01

    Pathological narcissism is associated with significant interpersonal problems, which are unlikely to be acknowledged by narcissistic patients as clinical issues. Although a substantial clinical and theoretical literature deals with narcissism, a succinct overview of core narcissistic interpersonal problems is lacking, particularly in terms of their presentation in clinical settings. This article provides a descriptive overview of the major types of interpersonal problems associated with pathological narcissism: dominance, vindictiveness, and intrusiveness. We outline how these problems can manifest in patients' relations with others and in treatment situations. Clinical vignettes are provided to highlight the presentation of narcissistic interpersonal dysfunction in various types of clinical encounters, and to facilitate discussion of treatment implications.

  10. IT support for administrative planning of clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, Jan; Joustra-Enquist, Ingrid; Hedberg, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The administration of clinical practice placements for nursing students is a highly complex and information driven task. This demonstration is intended to give insight into the web based system KliPP (a Swedish acronym for Clinical Practice Planning) and to discuss the possibilities for further development and use.

  11. Trancranial Doppler: value in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, O; Benedetti-Valentini, F

    2009-08-01

    The value of TCD in clinical practice is well established since it can be used to measure cerebral vasomotor reactivity and to detect and grade vasospasm (VSP) following subarachnoid haemorrhage and cerebral blood perfusion consequences of extracranial ICA stenosis or occlusion. Intracranial steno-occlusive disease can be detected more reliably by transcranial color-coded imaging (TCCI) that provides a two-dimensional imaging of parenchymal and vascular anatomy of brain too. In patients with suspected brain TCD diagnostic criteria for brain death have a sensitivity of 91 to 100% and specificity of 97 to 100% and they are particularly useful when clinical and EEG evaluations are difficult. TCD is a sensitive technique for real time detection of microembolic signals (MES) from prosthetic cardiac valves, myocardial infarction site, atrial fibrillation, aortic arch atheroma and this suggests the use of TCD for monitoring response to antithrombotic therapy. There is also a high correlation between contrast-enhanced TCD and trans-esophageal echocardiography for detecting paradoxical embolism through right-to-left cardiac or pulmonary shunts. Microembolization detected by TCD monitoring may confirm features of unstable carotid artery plaques as imaged by Duplex scanning and there is an increasing evidence that asymptomatic MES from unstable carotid plaques are an independent factor for ischemic stroke. TCD can be used as a monitoring tool during cardiac surgery and cerebrovascular operations to determine critical hemodynamic changes in cerebral arteries and to identify high-intensity transients referred to air or particulate emboli. Several research studies of the past 10 years have shown that MES may be detected by TCD during all phases of CEA and CAS and that sustained microembolism after carotid flow restoration is an indication of impending postoperative or post-procedural occlusion. Our series showed a clear difference between the number of patients with MES and the

  12. Biochemical Benefits, Diagnosis, and Clinical Risks Evaluation of Kratom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimy Fluyau

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundKratom (Mitragyna speciosa is a tropical tree with a long history of traditional use in parts of Africa and Southeast Asia. Kratom is also known as Thom, Thang, and Biak. Its leaves and the teas brewed from them have long been used by people in that region to manage pain and opioid withdrawal and to stave off fatigue. Kratom is actually consumed throughout the world for its stimulant effects and as an opioid substitute (in form of tea, chewed, smoked, or ingested in capsules. Some case reports have associated kratom exposure with psychosis, seizures, intrahepatic cholestasis, other medical conditions, and deaths. The clinical manifestations of kratom effects are not well defined and the clinical studies are limited. Data research suggest that both stimulant and sedative dose-dependent effects do exist, in addition to antinociceptive, antidepressant activity, anxiolytic-like effects, and anorectic effects, but a growing concern for the drug’s effects and safety of use has resulted in national and international attention primarily due to an increase in hospital visits and deaths in several countries that are believed to have been caused by extracts of the plant. There is a dearth of double blind controlled studies. In this study, we aim to use existing literature to clarify both benefits and risks of kratom as well as its diagnosis evaluation as kratom misuse is an emerging trend in the Western world.MethodsLiterature review using databases such as Embase, Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Mendeley from 2007 to 2017 were evaluated by all authors to analyze current state on benefits, risks, and diagnosis evaluation of kratom (M. speciosa.ResultsData analysis suggested that kratom possesses some benefits such as stimulant and sedative effects as wells as antinociceptive effects. It seems to inhibit pro-inflammatory mediator release and vascular permeability and can enhance immunity. In addition, it may be an antidepressant and

  13. Biochemical Benefits, Diagnosis, and Clinical Risks Evaluation of Kratom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluyau, Dimy; Revadigar, Neelambika

    2017-01-01

    Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a tropical tree with a long history of traditional use in parts of Africa and Southeast Asia. Kratom is also known as Thom, Thang, and Biak. Its leaves and the teas brewed from them have long been used by people in that region to manage pain and opioid withdrawal and to stave off fatigue. Kratom is actually consumed throughout the world for its stimulant effects and as an opioid substitute (in form of tea, chewed, smoked, or ingested in capsules). Some case reports have associated kratom exposure with psychosis, seizures, intrahepatic cholestasis, other medical conditions, and deaths. The clinical manifestations of kratom effects are not well defined and the clinical studies are limited. Data research suggest that both stimulant and sedative dose-dependent effects do exist, in addition to antinociceptive, antidepressant activity, anxiolytic-like effects, and anorectic effects, but a growing concern for the drug's effects and safety of use has resulted in national and international attention primarily due to an increase in hospital visits and deaths in several countries that are believed to have been caused by extracts of the plant. There is a dearth of double blind controlled studies. In this study, we aim to use existing literature to clarify both benefits and risks of kratom as well as its diagnosis evaluation as kratom misuse is an emerging trend in the Western world. Literature review using databases such as Embase, Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Mendeley from 2007 to 2017 were evaluated by all authors to analyze current state on benefits, risks, and diagnosis evaluation of kratom (M. speciosa). Data analysis suggested that kratom possesses some benefits such as stimulant and sedative effects as wells as antinociceptive effects. It seems to inhibit pro-inflammatory mediator release and vascular permeability and can enhance immunity. In addition, it may be an antidepressant and anorectic. However, kratom can cause

  14. The early clinical features of dengue in adults: challenges for early clinical diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny G H Low

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The emergence of dengue throughout the tropical world is affecting an increasing proportion of adult cases. The clinical features of dengue in different age groups have not been well examined, especially in the context of early clinical diagnosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We structured a prospective study of adults (≥ 18 years of age presenting with acute febrile illness within 72 hours from illness onset upon informed consent. Patients were followed up over a 3-4 week period to determine the clinical outcome. A total of 2,129 adults were enrolled in the study, of which 250 (11.7% had dengue. Differences in the rates of dengue-associated symptoms resulted in high sensitivities when the WHO 1997 or 2009 classification schemes for probable dengue fever were applied to the cohort. However, when the cases were stratified into age groups, fewer older adults reported symptoms such as myalgia, arthralgia, retro-orbital pain and mucosal bleeding, resulting in reduced sensitivity of the WHO classification schemes. On the other hand, the risks of severe dengue and hospitalization were not diminished in older adults, indicating that this group of patients can benefit from early diagnosis, especially when an antiviral drug becomes available. Our data also suggests that older adults who present with fever and leukopenia should be tested for dengue, even in the absence of other symptoms. CONCLUSION: Early clinical diagnosis based on previously defined symptoms that are associated with dengue, even when used in the schematics of both the WHO 1997 and 2009 classifications, is difficult in older adults.

  15. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital fetal heart abnormalities and clinical analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; WEI Jun; MA Ying; SHANG Tao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of detecting fetal congenital heart disease (CHD) using the five transverse planes technique of fetal echocardiography. Methods: Nine hundred and eighty-two high-risk pregnancies for fetal CHD were included in this study, the fetal heart was scanned with the five transverse planes technique of fetal echocardiography described by yagel, autopsy was conducted when pregnancy was terminated. Blood from fetal heart was collected for fetal chromosome analysis. A close follow-up was given for normal fetal heart pregnancies and neconatal echocardiography was performed to check the accuracy of prenatal diagnosis. Results: (1) Forty-six cases(4.68%) were found to have fetal heart abnormalities in this study, 69.56% of them were diagnosed by single four-chamber view, another 30.43% fetal CHD were found by combining other views; (2) Fotry-one parents of prenatal fetuses with CHD chose to terminate pregnancy, thirty-two of them gave consent to conduct autopsy, 93.75% of which yielded unanimous conclusion between prenatal fetal echocardiography and autopsy; (3) Thirty-two of 46 cases underwent fetal chromosome analysis, 8 cases (25%) were found to have abnormal chromosome; (4) Five cases were found to have right ventricle and atrium a little bigger than those on the left side, with the unequal condition being the same after birth, but there were no clinical manifestations and they are healthy for the time being; (5) Nine hundred and thirty-six cases were not found with abnormality in this study, but one case was diagnosed with ventricular septal defect after birth, one case was diagnosed with patent ductus arteriosus, one case had atrial septal defect after birth. Conclusions: (1) The detected CHD rate was 4.68% by screening fetal heart with five transverse planes according to Yagel's description of high risk population basis for CHD. The coinciding rate of prenatal diagnosis and autopsy was 93.75%; (2) The sensitivity of detecting fetal heart

  16. Actinomycosis: etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valour F

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Florent Valour,1–3 Agathe Sénéchal,1,2 Céline Dupieux,2–4 Judith Karsenty,1,2 Sébastien Lustig,2,5 Pierre Breton,2,6 Arnaud Gleizal,2,7 Loïc Boussel,2,8,9 Frédéric Laurent,2–4 Evelyne Braun,1 Christian Chidiac,1–3 Florence Ader,1–3 Tristan Ferry1–3 1Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Groupement Hospitalier Nord, Lyon, France; 2Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France; 3Centre International de Recherche en Infectiologie, CIRI, INSERM U1111, CNRS UMR5308, ENS de Lyon, UCBL1, Lyon, France; 4Laboratoire de Bactériologie, Centre de Biologie du Nord, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Groupement Hospitalier Nord, Lyon, France; 5Chirurgie Orthopédique, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Groupement Hospitalier Nord, Lyon, France; 6Stomatologie et Chirurgie Maxillo-faciale, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Groupement Hospitalier Sud, Lyon, France; 7Chirurgie Maxillo-faciale, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Groupement Hospitalier Nord, Lyon, France; 8Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Groupement Hospitalier Nord, Lyon, France; 9Creatis, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, Université Lyon 1, INSA Lyon, Lyon, France Abstract: Actinomycosis is a rare chronic disease caused by Actinomyces spp., anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria that normally colonize the human mouth and digestive and genital tracts. Physicians must be aware of typical clinical presentations (such as cervicofacial actinomycosis following dental focus of infection, pelvic actinomycosis in women with an intrauterine device, and pulmonary actinomycosis in smokers with poor dental hygiene, but also that actinomycosis may mimic the malignancy process in various anatomical sites. Bacterial cultures and pathology are the cornerstone of diagnosis, but particular conditions are required in order to get the correct diagnosis. Prolonged bacterial cultures in anaerobic conditions are necessary to identify the bacterium and typical microscopic findings include necrosis with

  17. Recognising Kawasaki disease in UK primary care: a descriptive study using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Abigail; Harnden, Anthony; Mayon-White, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Kawasaki disease is a rare childhood illness that can present non-specifically, making it a diagnostic challenge. The clinical presentation of Kawasaki disease has not been previously described in primary care. To describe how children with an eventual diagnosis of Kawasaki disease initially present to primary care in the UK. The Clinical Practice Research Datalink was used to find cases coded as Kawasaki disease. Hospital Episode Statistics, hospital admissions, and hospital outpatient attendances were used to identify the children with a convincing diagnosis of Kawasaki disease. Questionnaires and a request for copies of relevant hospital summaries, discharge letters, and reports were sent to GPs of the 104 children with a diagnosis of Kawasaki disease between 2007 and 2011. Most children presented with few clinical features typical of Kawasaki disease. Of those with just one feature, a fever or a polymorphous rash were the most common. By the time that most children were admitted to hospital they had a more recognisable syndrome, with three or more clinical features diagnostic of Kawasaki disease. Most GPs did not consider Kawasaki disease among their differential diagnoses, but some GPs did suspect that the child's illness was unusual. The study highlighted the difficulty of early diagnosis, with most children having a non-specific presentation to primary care. GPs are encouraged to implement good safety netting, and to keep Kawasaki disease in mind when children present with fever and rashes. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  18. Clinical practice Diagnosis and treatment of functional constipation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabbers, Merit M.; Boluyt, Nicole; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    Childhood functional constipation has an estimated prevalence of 3% in the Western world and is probably the most common gastrointestinal complaint in children. It is characterized by infrequent painful defecation, faecal incontinence and abdominal pain. Only less than 5% of children with constipati

  19. Clinical practice. Diagnosis and treatment of functional constipation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabbers, M.M.; Boluyt, N.; Berger, M.Y.; Benninga, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Childhood functional constipation has an estimated prevalence of 3% in the Western world and is probably the most common gastrointestinal complaint in children. It is characterized by infrequent painful defecation, faecal incontinence and abdominal pain. Only less than 5% of children with constipati

  20. Diagnostic Methods for Bile Acid Malabsorption in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayvargiya, Priya; Camilleri, Michael; Shin, Andrea; Saenger, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Altered bile acid (BA) concentrations in the colon may cause diarrhea or constipation. BA malabsorption (BAM) accounts for >25% of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea and chronic diarrhea in Western countries. As BAM is increasingly recognized, proper diagnostic methods are desired in clinical practice to help direct the most effective treatment course for the chronic bowel dysfunction. This review appraises the methodology, advantages and disadvantages of 4 tools that directly measure BAM: 14C-glycocholate breath and stool test, 75Selenium HomotauroCholic Acid Test (SeHCAT), 7 α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and fecal BAs. 14C-glycocholate is a laborious test no longer widely utilized. 75SeHCAT is validated, but not available in the United States. Serum C4 is a simple, accurate method that is applicable to a majority of patients, but requires further clinical validation. Fecal measurements to quantify total and individual fecal BAs are technically cumbersome and not widely available. Regrettably, none of these tests are routinely available in the U.S., and a therapeutic trial with a BA binder is used as a surrogate for diagnosis of BAM. Recent data suggest there is an advantage to studying fecal excretion of the individual BAs and their role in BAM; this may constitute a significant advantage of the fecal BA method over the other tests. Fecal BA test could become a routine addition to fecal fat measurement in patients with unexplained diarrhea. In summary, availability determines the choice of test among C4, SeHCAT and fecal BA; more widespread availability of such tests would enhance clinical management of these patients. PMID:23644387

  1. Differential diagnosis of plasma cell dyscrasias in rheumatological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V I Vasilyev

    2010-12-01

    Conclusion. Many clinical and laboratory manifestations of primary PCD and RD are similar and only the absence of classical laboratory markers of autoimmune disease, as well as the presence of serum monoclonal immunoglobulins and urinary Bence Jones protein suggest the presence of PCD, both primary PCDs and those with RD.

  2. Differential diagnosis of plasma cell dyscrasias in rheumatological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V I Vasilyev

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. Many clinical and laboratory manifestations of primary PCD and RD are similar and only the absence of classical laboratory markers of autoimmune disease, as well as the presence of serum monoclonal immunoglobulins and urinary Bence Jones protein suggest the presence of PCD, both primary PCDs and those with RD.

  3. District nurse clinics: accountability and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2013-02-01

    The numbers of district nurse clinics are continuing to grow in primary care and they provide timely and more cost effective intervention for patients. The clinics provide exciting opportunities for district nurses but also carry an increased risk of exposure to liability. This article discusses some of the key areas of accountability underpinning the duty of care of district nurses working in nurse-led clinics.

  4. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF ROSACEA AND SKIN TUBERCULOSIS AS AN EXAMPLE OF A CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Aripova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper for a clinical observation of a patient with rosacea, and patients with a flat form of lupus tuberculosis presented a differential clinical diagnosis of tuberculosis of the skin.

  5. Ambulatory and home blood pressure monitoring: gaps between clinical guidelines and clinical practice in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Sajita; Subramaniam, Kannan; Teo, Boon Wee; Tay, Jam Chin

    2017-01-01

    Out-of-office blood pressure (BP) measurements (home blood pressure monitoring [HBPM] and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring [ABPM]) provide important additional information for effective hypertension detection and management decisions. Therefore, out-of-office BP measurement is now recommended by several international guidelines. This study evaluated the practice and uptake of HBPM and ABPM among physicians from Singapore. A sample of physicians from Singapore was surveyed between 8 September and 5 October 2016. Those included were in public or private practice had been practicing for ≥3 years, directly cared for patients ≥70% of the time, and treated ≥30 patients for hypertension per month. The questionnaire covered six main categories: general BP management, BP variability (BPV) awareness/diagnosis, HBPM, ABPM, BPV management, and associated training needs. Sixty physicians (30 general practitioners, 20 cardiologists, and 10 nephrologists) were included (77% male, 85% aged 31-60 years, and mean 22-year practice). Physicians recommended HBPM and ABPM to 81% and 27% of hypertensive patients, respectively. HBPM was most often used to monitor antihypertensive therapy (88% of physicians) and 97% thought that ABPM was useful for providing information on BPV. HBPM instructions often differed from current guideline recommendations in terms of frequency, number of measurements, and timing. The proportion of consultation time devoted to discussing HBPM and BPV was one-quarter or less for 73% of physicians, and only 55% said that they had the ability to provide education on HBPM and BPV. Patient inertia, poor patient compliance, lack of medical consultation time, and poor patient access to a BP machine were the most common challenges for implementing out-of-office BP monitoring. Although physicians from Singapore do recommend out-of-office BP measurement to patients with hypertension, this survey identified several important gaps in knowledge and clinical practice.

  6. Diagnosis and management of familial Mediterranean fever: integrating medical genetics in a dedicated interdisciplinary clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadeh, Neda; Getzug, Terri; Grody, Wayne W

    2011-03-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by recurrent febrile polyserositis, especially prevalent in individuals of Mediterranean descent. Familial Mediterranean fever can have nonspecific manifestations that mimic many common acquired disorders such as infections, acute appendicitis, cholecystitis, and arthritis, which can delay diagnosis for many years and subject patients to extensive evaluations and even unnecessary surgery. Untreated familial Mediterranean fever can result in serious complications such as end-stage renal disease and malabsorption secondary to amyloid deposition in the kidneys and digestive tract, male and female infertility, and growth retardation in children. These significant sequelae, along with the episodic acute attacks, are readily preventable by treatment with oral colchicine and underscore the necessity of early detection and treatment from a medical, psychosocial, and economic standpoint. We describe our comprehensive approach to the accurate diagnosis and effective management of this disorder by means of a dedicated familial Mediterranean fever clinic that incorporates medical genetics on equal footing with general medicine. In addition to providing the clinician with the presenting features of familial Mediterranean fever, methods of diagnosis including molecular testing, and current management based on our extensive experience with hundreds of affected individuals, we also advance this approach as a model for the incorporation of medical genetics practice into the more traditional domains of general medicine.

  7. Best practice in clinical facilitation of undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Judith; McMurray, Anne; Shaban, Ramon Z

    2016-09-01

    Clinical facilitation is critical to successful student clinical experience. The research reported in this paper used an interpretive case study to explore perspectives of clinical facilitators on what constitutes best practice in clinical facilitation of undergraduate nursing students. Eleven clinical facilitators from South East Queensland, Australia, participated in focus groups, interviews and a concept mapping exercise to gather their perspectives on best practice. The data gathered information regarding their prior and current experiences as registered nurses and facilitators, considering reasons they became clinical facilitators, their educational background and self-perceived adequacy of their knowledge for clinical facilitation. Analysis was through constant comparison. Findings of the study provided in-depth insight into the role of clinical facilitators, with best practice conceptualised via three main themes; 'assessing', 'learning to facilitate' and 'facilitating effectively'. While they felt there was some autonomy in the role, the clinical facilitators sought a closer liaison with academic staff and feedback about their performance, in particular their assessment of the students. Key strategies identified for improving best practice included educational support for the clinical facilitators, networking, and mentoring from more experienced clinical facilitators. When implemented, these strategies will help develop the clinical facilitators' skills and ensure quality clinical experiences for undergraduate nursing students.

  8. The Clinical Use of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis: The Italian Selfie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancesario, Giulia M; Toniolo, Sofia; Chiasserini, Davide; Di Santo, Simona G; Zegeer, Josh; Bernardi, Gaetano; Musicco, Massimo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Parnetti, Lucilla; Bernardini, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Although the use of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid β1-42 (Aβ42), tau (T-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau181) gives added diagnostic and prognostic values, the diffusion is still limited in clinical practice and only a restricted number of patients receive an integrated clinico-biological diagnosis. By a survey, we aimed to do a "selfie" of the use and diffusion of CSF biomarkers of dementia in Italy, the standardization of pre-analytical procedures, the harmonization of ranges, and the participation to Quality Control programs. An online questionnaire was sent to the members of SIBioC and SINdem-ITALPLANED and to main neurological clinics all over Italy. In Italy, 25 laboratories provide biomarkers analysis in addition to a network of 15 neighboring hospitals. In sum, 40 neurological centers require CSF analyses. 7/20 regions (35%) lack CSF laboratories. Standardization of pre-analytical procedures is present in 62.02% of the laboratories; only 56.00% of the laboratories participate in International Quality Control. There is no harmonization of cut-offs. In Italy, the use of CSF biomarkers is still limited in clinical practice. Standardization and harmonization of normal ranges are needed. To optimize and expand the use of CSF biomarkers, a cost-benefit analysis should be promoted by scientific societies and national health services.

  9. Vagus nerve stimulation in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Albu-Soda, Ahmed; Aziz, Qasim

    2016-11-02

    The diverse array of end organ innervations of the vagus nerve, coupled with increased basic science evidence, has led to vagus nerve stimulation becoming a management option in a number of clinical disorders. This review discusses methods of electrically stimulating the vagus nerve and its current and potential clinical uses.

  10. Best practice in the diagnosis and management of urogenital tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulchavenya, Ekaterina

    2013-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a current public health problem, remaining the most common worldwide cause of mortality from infectious diseases. Urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB) is the second most common form of extrapulmonary TB in countries with severe epidemic situations and the third most common form in regions with a low incidence of TB. In this article we present the terminology, epidemiology and classification of UGTB, as well as describing the laboratory findings and clinical features and approaches to chemotherapy as well as surgery.

  11. Best practice in the diagnosis and management of urogenital tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kulchavenya, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a current public health problem, remaining the most common worldwide cause of mortality from infectious diseases. Urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB) is the second most common form of extrapulmonary TB in countries with severe epidemic situations and the third most common form in regions with a low incidence of TB. In this article we present the terminology, epidemiology and classification of UGTB, as well as describing the laboratory findings and clinical features and approac...

  12. Accuracy of clinical tests in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injury: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.S. Swain (Michael S.); N. Henschke (Nicholas); S.J. Kamper (Steven); A.S. Downie (Aron S.); B.W. Koes (Bart); C. Maher (Chris)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Numerous clinical tests are used in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury but their accuracy is unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical tests for the diagnosis of ACL injury.Methods: Study Design: Systematic rev

  13. Early Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder: Stability and Change in Clinical Diagnosis and Symptom Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Whitney; Swineford, Lauren B.; Nottke, Charly; Wetherby, Amy M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) appears to be stable in children as young as age three, few studies have explored stability of a diagnosis in younger children. Predictive value of diagnostic tools for toddlers and patterns of symptom change are important considerations for clinicians making early diagnoses. Most…

  14. Early Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder: Stability and Change in Clinical Diagnosis and Symptom Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Whitney; Swineford, Lauren B.; Nottke, Charly; Wetherby, Amy M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) appears to be stable in children as young as age three, few studies have explored stability of a diagnosis in younger children. Predictive value of diagnostic tools for toddlers and patterns of symptom change are important considerations for clinicians making early diagnoses. Most…

  15. General practitioners' knowledge, practices, and obstacles in the diagnosis and management of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Krishna P; Montgomery, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    To identify general practitioners' (GPs) knowledge, practices, and obstacles with regard to the diagnosis and management of dementia. Standardized questionnaires covering knowledge, practices, and obstacles were distributed among a purposive sample of GPs in Kathmandu, Nepal. Three hundred and eighty GPs responded (response rate = 89%). Knowledge of practitioners' with regard to the diagnosis and management of dementia was unsatisfactory (management barriers are presented with regard to GP, patient, and carer factors. Specifically, the results address the following issues: communicating the diagnosis, negative views of dementia, difficulty diagnosing early-stage dementia, acceptability of specialists, responsibility for extra issues, knowledge of dementia and aging, less awareness of declining abilities, diminished resources to handle care, lack of specific guidelines, and poor awareness of epidemiology. Demographic changes mean that dementia will represent a significant problem in the future. The following paper outlines the problems and solutions that the Nepalese medical community needs to adopt to deal effectively with diagnosis, care, and management of dementia.

  16. Clinical Validation of a Test for the Diagnosis of Vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaydos, Charlotte A; Beqaj, Sajo; Schwebke, Jane R; Lebed, Joel; Smith, Bonnie; Davis, Thomas E; Fife, Kenneth H; Nyirjesy, Paul; Spurrell, Timothy; Furgerson, Dorothy; Coleman, Jenell; Paradis, Sonia; Cooper, Charles K

    2017-07-01

    Vaginitis may be diagnosed as bacterial vaginosis, vulvovaginal candidiasis, trichomoniasis, or coinfection. A new molecular test assays the vaginal microbiome and organisms that cause three common infections. The objective of the trial was to evaluate the clinical accuracy of the investigational test for vaginal swabs collected by patients (self) or clinicians. The primary and secondary outcomes were to compare the investigational test with reference methods for the three most common causes of vaginitis and compare clinician-collected with self-collected swabs. We conducted a cross-sectional study in which women with symptoms of vaginitis were recruited at ten clinical centers and consented to the investigation between May and September 2015. The woman collected a vaginal swab, sheathed, and then handed it to the clinician. These swabs were to evaluate how self-collected swabs compared with clinician-collected swabs. The clinician collected an investigational test swab and reference test swabs. From 1,740 symptomatic patients, clinician-collected and self-collected vaginal swabs were evaluated by the molecular test and six tests. The reference methods for bacterial vaginosis were Nugent's score and Amsel's criteria for intermediate Nugent results. The reference methods for Candida infection were isolation of any potential Candida microorganisms from inoculation of two culture media: chromogenic and Sabouraud agar and sequencing. The reference methods for trichomoniasis were wet mount and culture. For clinician-collected swabs, by reference methods, bacterial vaginosis was diagnosed in 56.5%, vaginal candidiasis in 32.8%, trichomoniasis in 8%, and none of the three infections in 24% with a coinfection rate of 20%. The investigational test sensitivity was 90.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 88.3-92.2%) and specificity was 85.8% (95% CI 83.0-88.3%) for bacterial vaginosis. The investigational test sensitivity was 90.9% (95% CI 88.1-93.1%) and specificity was 94

  17. In Defense of Clinical Autopsy and Its Practice in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Brito, Alfredo D; de Mendoza-Amat, José Hurtado

    2017-01-01

    There has been a notable decrease in the global practice of clinical autopsy; the rate has fallen to below 10%, even in high-income countries. This is attributed to several causes, including increased costs, overreliance on modern diagnostic techniques, cultural and religious factors, the emergence of new infectious diseases and negative attitudes on the part of doctors, even pathologists. Alternative methods to autopsy in postmortem studies have been developed based on imaging, endoscopy and biopsy (all quite expensive). These methods have been used in developed countries but never as effectively as the classic autopsy for identifying cause of death and potential medical errors. Although Cuba has also seen a decrease in its autopsy rates, they remain comparatively high. Between 1996 and 2015, there were 687,689 hospital deaths in Cuba and 381,193 autopsies, 55.4% of the total. These autopsies have positively affected medical care, training, research, innovation, management and society as a whole. Autopsies are an important tool in the National Health System's quest for safe, quality patient care based on the lessons learned from studying the deceased. KEYWORDS Autopsy, postmortem examination, postmortem diagnosis, quality of care, patient safety, medical error, Cuba.

  18. Good clinical practice : Historical background and key aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otte, Andreas; Maier-Lenz, Herbert; Dierckx, Rudi A.

    Clinical research trials (both academic and industry sponsored) are increasingly playing a role in various medical disciplines, including younger fields of clinical trial interest, such as nuclear medicine research. Knowledge for and compliance with good clinical practice (GCP) is essential for

  19. Good clinical practice: Historical background and key aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otte, A.; Maier-Lenz, H.; Dierckx, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    Clinical research trials (both academic and industry sponsored) are increasingly playing a role in various medical disciplines, including younger fields of clinical trial interest, such as nuclear medicine research. Knowledge for and compliance with good clinical practice (GCP) is essential for anyo

  20. Good clinical practice : Historical background and key aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otte, A; Maier-Lenz, H; Dierckx, RA

    2005-01-01

    Clinical research trials (both academic and industry sponsored) are increasingly playing a role in various medical disciplines, including younger fields of clinical trial interest, such as nuclear medicine research. Knowledge for and compliance with good clinical practice (GCP) is essential for anyo

  1. Q-r curve of thermal tomography and its clinical application on breast tumor diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guilian; Han, Fei; Wang, Lin; Liang, Chengwen; Li, Kaiyang

    2015-04-01

    Heat is the product following the metabolism of cells, and the metabolism is closely related with the pathological information of living organism. So, there are strong ties between the heat distribution and the pathological state in living organism. In this paper, the mathematical function δ is introduced in the classical Pennes bio-heat transfer equation as the point heat source. By simplifying the boundary conditions, a novel bio-heat transfer model is established and solved in a spherical coordinate system. Based on the temperature distribution of human body surface, the information of heat source is mined layer by layer, and the corresponding q-r curve of heat intensity varying with depth is acquired combining the fitting method of Lorentz curve. According to a large number of clinical confirmed cases and statistics, the diagnostic criteria judging diseases by q-r curve are proposed. Five typical clinical practices are performed and four of the diagnosis results are very consistent with those of molybdenum target (MT) X-ray, B-ultrasonic images and pathological examination, one gives the result of early stage malignant tumor that MT X-ray and B-ultrasonic can't check out. It is a radiation-free green method with noninvasive diagnostic procedure and accurate diagnosis result.

  2. Monitoring clinical trials: a practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Síle F; Henley, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the processes and procedures involved in planning, conducting and reporting monitoring activities for large Clinical Trials of Investigational Medicinal Products (CTIMPs), focusing on those conducted in resource-limited settings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Clinical evidence for Japanese population based on prospective studies--linking clinical trials and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hisao; Kojima, Sunao

    2009-10-01

    "Evidence-based medicine (EBM)" implies effective and high quality practice for patients based on well-grounded medical science. The success of clinical trials in Japan is essential to build original evidence specific for Japanese patients. Based on this concept, we have performed several large-scale clinical trials to provide EBM, including the Japanese Antiplatelets Myocardial Infarction Study [JAMIS; clinical improvement in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients with antiplatelet therapy], the Japanese beta-Blockers and Calcium Antagonists Myocardial Infarction (JBCMI; comparison of the effects of beta-blockers and calcium antagonists on cardiovascular events in post-AMI patients), a multicenter study for aggressive lipid-lowering strategy by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors in patients with AMI (MUSASHI; effects of statin therapy on cardiovascular events in patients with AMI), and the Japanese Primary Prevention of Atherosclerosis with Aspirin for Diabetes (JPAD trial; efficacy of low-dose aspirin therapy for primary prevention of atherosclerotic events in type 2 diabetic patients). The results of these prospective studies were directly linked with clinical practice. We have acquired the know-how of large-scale clinical trials; an important point is to have passion for "buildup evidence specific for the Japanese" and to recruit subjects for enrollment after explaining the significance of "clinical trials for the Japanese".

  4. Concordance between clinical diagnosis and autopsy findings in two periods in the Hospital Universitario del Valle, Cali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortés Armando

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Context: Autopsy rates have declined all over the world recently. Clinical autopsy is considered to be an essential element for medical auditing and teaching and a useful tool for the evaluation of accuracy of the clinical diagnoses. Objetive: We describe the concordance between clinical diagnoses and autopsy findings in a tertiary care center. Materials and methods: We compared the diagnosis recorded on medical charts with reports of 100 autopsies performed between 1970 and 1975, and in 100 autopsies performed between 1990 and 1995 in the department of pathology of a terciary care hospital. The autopsy diagnoses were used as the “gold standard”. Results: The higher sensivity for diagnosis was observed for neoplasic disease in both period and for hemodinamics disorders, thrombosis and shock in 1970. The clinical diagnosis of the basic cause of death was confirmed at autopsy in 73% and 64% of cases in period 1970 and 1990 respectively. The percent confirmation fell when the immediate terminal cause of death was considered, and in 36.5% of cases, the terminal cause was only diagnosed at autopsy. Of 200 adults patients, 62 (31% had an infectious disease at autopsy. In 25 (40.3% of 62 patients, the infectious disease diagnoses were unknown clinically. There are substantial discrepancies between clinical and autopsy diagnoses of infectious disease. The bronchopneumonia is the infectious disease most often missed clinically (24.5% of the cases, similar in both periods. The discrepancies between clinical and autopsy diagnosis were even larger for secondary diagnoses: 63% of them were not suspected upon clinical diagnosis. The most frequently omitted diagnosis was bronchopneumonia. Iatrogenic injuries were very frequent, and approximately 28% of them were not described in clinical reports. Conclusions: Our results suggest that highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tests are necessary but cannot substitute the clinical practice for the elaboration

  5. Focused cardiac ultrasound is feasible in the general practice setting and alters diagnosis and management of cardiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Yates

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ultrasound-assisted examination of the cardiovascular system with focused cardiac ultrasound by the treating physician is non-invasive and changes diagnosis and management of patient’s with suspected cardiac disease. This has not been reported in a general practice setting. Aim: To determine whether focused cardiac ultrasound performed on patients aged over 50 years changes the diagnosis and management of cardiac disease by a general practitioner. Design and setting: A prospective observational study of 80 patients aged over 50 years and who had not received echocardiography or chest CT within 12 months presenting to a general practice. Method: Clinical assessment and management of significant cardiac disorders in patients presenting to general practitioners were recorded before and after focused cardiac ultrasound. Echocardiography was performed by a medical student with sufficient training, which was verified by an expert. Differences in diagnosis and management between conventional and ultrasound-assisted assessment were recorded. Results and conclusion: Echocardiography and interpretation were acceptable in all patients. Significant cardiac disease was detected in 16 (20% patients, including aortic stenosis in 9 (11% and cardiac failure in 7 (9%, which were missed by clinical examination in 10 (62.5% of these patients. Changes in management occurred in 12 patients (15% overall and 75% of those found to have significant cardiac disease including referral for diagnostic echocardiography in 8 (10%, commencement of heart failure treatment in 3 (4% and referral to a cardiologist in 1 patient (1%. Routine focused cardiac ultrasound is feasible and frequently alters the diagnosis and management of cardiac disease in patients aged over 50 years presenting to a general practice.

  6. Testicular biopsy: clinical practice and interpretation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gert R Dohle; Saad Elzanaty; Niels J van Casteren

    2012-01-01

    Testicular biopsy was considered the cornerstone of male infertility diagnosis for many years in men with unexplained infertility and azoospermia.Recent guidelines for male infertility have limited the indications for a diagnostic testicular biopsy to the confirmation ofobstructive azoospermia in men with normal size testes and normal reproductive hormones.Nowadays,testicular biopsies are mainly performed for sperm harvesting in men with non-obstructive azoospermia,to be used for intracytoplasmic sperm injection.Testicular biopsy is also performed in men with risk factors for testicular malignancy.In a subgroup of infertile men,there is an increased risk for carcinoma in situ of the testis,especially in men with a history of cryptorchidism and testicular malignancy and in men with testicular atrophy.Ultrasonographic abnormalities,such as testicular microlithiasis,inhomogeneous parenchyma and lesions of the testes,further increase the risk of carcinoma in situ (CIS) in these men.For an accurate histological classification,proper tissue handling,fixation,preparation of the specimen and evaluation are needed.A standardized approach to testicular biopsy is recommended.In addition,approaches to the detection of CIS of the testis testicular immunohistochemistry are mandatory.In this mini-review,we describe the current indications for testicular biopsies in the diagnosis and management of male infertility.

  7. Conceptual models used in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, M G; Mandle, C L

    1989-02-01

    Nurses' difficulties in articulation of conceptual models may be due to several factors--not the least of which are the existence of discrete theories for each area of nursing specialization, dissociation in curricula of theory from practice, a holistic conceptual framework that may be inadequately defined at the process level, and an impulse toward idealism on the part of the nurses themselves. These observations challenge both the theorists and the practitioners of modern nursing to describe more clearly the definition of quality for the science and art of nursing. Nurses are beginning to grasp the idea of holism. It is not the summation of parts to make a whole. Holism is the identification of life patterns, which are reflective of the whole. Nurses in practice and research are starting to create methods of inquiry that portray the wholeness of the autonomous person in continual, dynamic change and exchange with a changing universe. These initial explorations are leading to the evolution of the concepts of person, environment, and health into a distinctive theoretical base for nursing practice. In practice, research, and education, nurses must be committed to excellent, current descriptions of these human life patterns.

  8. Clinical Practice Realities: World and African Perspectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and challenges in nursing and midwifery practice are explored. These are ... teaching the highest provision of patient care. Seek- ... One of the strategies put in place by the ... ment of the e-learning program, a three year program after which ...

  9. Neurobiology of Addictions: Implications for Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Richard T., Ed.; DiNitto, Diana M., Ed.; Straussner, Shulamith Lala Ashenberg, Ed.

    This book offers helping professionals an introduction to the neurobiological aspects of substance abuse. It presents the basic information on the subject, including the various neurobiological theories of addiction, and places them in a psychosocial context. In addition to connecting the theoretical information with practical applications, the…

  10. General practice consultations, diagnostic investigations, and prescriptions in the year preceding a lung cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Louise M; Møller, Henrik; Jakobsen, Erik;

    2017-01-01

    Patterns of general practice utilization in the period before lung cancer (LC) diagnosis may provide new knowledge to ensure timelier and earlier diagnosis of LC. This study aimed to explore the prediagnostic activity in general practice in the year preceding LC diagnosis. The activity was compared...... = 340,170). During months 12 to 1 prior to diagnosis, 92.6% of LC patients and 88.4% of comparison subjects had one or more contacts with general practice. 13.0% of LC patients and 3.3% of comparison subjects had two or more X-rays. 20.8% of LC patients and 8.5% of comparison subjects had two or more...... than COPD patients without lung cancer, but not as pronounced as compared to patients without COPD. There was a significant increase in healthcare seeking and diagnostic activity in the year prior to a LC diagnosis, regardless of stage at diagnosis. COPD may mask the symptoms of LC. This indicates...

  11. Nonspecific low back pain: Causes, clinical picture, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Isaikin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current biopsychosocial model of back pain, there are biological (anatomic sources of pain, psychological and social components that promote its occurrence and maintenance. Nonspecific (musculoskeletal, mechanical pain that is diagnosed, with a serious disease and radicular symptoms being ruled out, is encountered most commonly (in 85% of cases in clinical practice. A group of patients with nonspecific back pain is very heterogeneous and needs differential treatment. The most common sources of back pain are abnormally changed discs, facet and sacroiliac joints, and muscles; however, it is often difficult to determine the main source of pain. International guidelines for the management of acute and chronic back pain have been elaborated, which assign an important role to the clarification of the benign pattern of pain to patients; their training; and recommendations for the maintenance of day-to-day activity. Medical treatment involves both nonselective and selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and myorelaxants as the drugs of choice. Non-drug treatments are actively used; these are manual therapy for acute pain, cognitive behavioral therapy, manual therapy, therapeutic exercises, reflex therapy, and yoga exercises for subacute and chronic pain. Whether blockades, ablations, minimally invasive neurosurgery, which are aimed at eliminating the main source of pain, is discussed if the treatment is ineffective.

  12. Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Empirical Treatments for Catatonia

    OpenAIRE

    Bhati, Mahendra T.; Datto, Catherine J; O'Reardon, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Review the medical literature on the history and clinical features of catatonia so as to provide a contemporary clinical guide for successfully diagnosing and treating the various clinical forms of catatonia.

  13. Inflammatory myopathy: diagnosis and clinical course, specific clinical scenarios and new complementary tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva-O'Callaghan, Albert; Trallero-Araguás, Ernesto; Martínez, Maria Angeles; Labrador-Horrillo, Moises; Pinal-Fernández, Iago; Grau-Junyent, Josep Maria; Juárez, Candido

    2015-06-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group of rare autoimmune diseases characterized by symmetric proximal muscle weakness and inflammatory infiltrates on muscle biopsy. A meticulously collected combination of clinical, serological, and pathological data is essential to correctly diagnose and classify myositis patients, often a considerable challenge for clinicians. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the most useful tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with myositis. Capillaroscopy, serological biomarkers (particularly the autoantibody profile) and imaging techniques, such as muscle magnetic resonance and chest ultrasound, are of great aid in diagnosing, classifying and managing these patients. Relevant clinical scenarios, such as interstitial lung disease, associated cancer and pregnancy are also addressed in this review. Myositis registries, identification of new autoantibodies, and genetic studies will enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of these conditions and help to define new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  14. [Evidence-based clinical guidelines in dental practice 6. Guidelines for clinical practice in dental education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sanden, W J M; Gorter, R; Tams, J

    2015-09-01

    In response to the initiatives of the Kennisinstituut Mondzorg (Institute for Knowledge Translation in Oral Care), the importance of effective education in the area of guidelines is increasing. Future dentists will, after all, be confronted with new guidelines and need to be able to integrate them in their daily practice. Various guidelines and protocols have been established within the 3 dental schools. For students and instructors, however, the motivation for these guidelines and protocols is not always sufficiently clear. In addition, the terms guideline, clinical practice guideline and protocol are used interchangeably, resulting in terminological confusion. Embedding within and coordination with theoretical education is also still limited in all programmes and it is proposed that the 3 dental schools collaborate on this issue. Finally, it is advised to replace the term 'evidence-based' with 'evidence-informed' because this indicates more clearly that other factors (patients opinion, available financial means, etc.) play a role in the final choice of treatment in a specific situation.

  15. Molecular detection of intestinal parasites for clinical diagnosis and epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, Robert Jan ten

    2009-01-01

    The detection of intestinal parasitic infections for routine diagnosis and for epidemiological research still depends mainly on microscopical examination of stool samples for the identification of helminth eggs and protozoan trophozoites and cysts. Because microscopy has several limitations,

  16. Molecular detection of intestinal parasites for clinical diagnosis and epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, Robert Jan ten

    2009-01-01

    The detection of intestinal parasitic infections for routine diagnosis and for epidemiological research still depends mainly on microscopical examination of stool samples for the identification of helminth eggs and protozoan trophozoites and cysts. Because microscopy has several limitations, additio

  17. Tuberculosis diagnosis in resource-limited settings: Clinical use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    In resource-limited settings, GeneXpert has been used ... had several visits to various lower level health centres and two admissions in a tertiary care hospital; however, the diagnosis .... point of view, implementation of GeneXpert testing.

  18. Change in stated clinical practice associated with participation in the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Richman, Joshua S; Qvist, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Clinical researchers have attempted many methods to translate scientific evidence into routine clinical practice, with varying success. Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide an important, practitioner-friendly venue to test these methods. Dentist practitioner-investigators from the Den...

  19. [Diagnosis and therapy of depression in family practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torzsa, Péter; Szeifert, Lilla; Dunai, Klaudia; Kalabay, László; Novák, Márta

    2009-09-06

    Depression is one of the most prevalent mental disorders, according to Hungarian and international data. In Western- Europe, lifetime prevalence of major depression is 13%, while one-year prevalence is 4%. The prevalence of severe depressive symptoms is similar in Hungary: approximately 5 to 8% of all patients seen by primary care physicians suffer from some kind of depressive disorders. Depression is more prevalent in women and in the elderly. According to the World Health Organization, depression is the third most common disabling disorder. Patients with depression experience impaired quality of life, anxiety, sleep disturbances, alcohol and drug abuse, and different somatic disorders. Furthermore, depression is the most important risk factor for suicide. Primary care physicians have a crucial role in the screening and diagnosing of depressive disorders. Depressive disorders can exist not only in patients complaining about depressed mood, but also in patients with "medically unexplained symptoms" (headache, fatigue, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal symptoms, weight change). Primary care physicians should have appropriate knowledge about the different therapeutic options (including various psychotherapies, antidepressant medications and other treatment options) to be able to treat their patients properly. We review the literature about the significance and epidemiology of depression and summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic options of depressive disorders in primary care practice.

  20. Variability of CSF Alzheimer's disease biomarkers: implications for clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J B Vos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers are increasingly being used for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the influence of CSF intralaboratory and interlaboratory variability on diagnostic CSF-based AD classification of subjects and identified causes of this variation. METHODS: We measured CSF amyloid-β (Aβ 1-42, total tau (t-tau, and phosphorylated tau (p-tau by INNOTEST enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays (ELISA in a memory clinic population (n = 126. Samples were measured twice in a single or two laboratories that served as reference labs for CSF analyses in the Netherlands. Predefined cut-offs were used to classify CSF biomarkers as normal or abnormal/AD pattern. RESULTS: CSF intralaboratory variability was higher for Aβ1-42 than for t-tau and p-tau. Reanalysis led to a change in biomarker classification (normal vs. abnormal of 26% of the subjects based on Aβ1-42, 10% based on t-tau, and 29% based on p-tau. The changes in absolute biomarker concentrations were paralleled by a similar change in levels of internal control samples between different assay lots. CSF interlaboratory variability was higher for p-tau than for Aβ1-42 and t-tau, and reanalysis led to a change in biomarker classification of 12% of the subjects based on Aβ1-42, 1% based on t-tau, and 22% based on p-tau. CONCLUSIONS: Intralaboratory and interlaboratory CSF variability frequently led to change in diagnostic CSF-based AD classification for Aβ1-42 and p-tau. Lot-to-lot variation was a major cause of intralaboratory variability. This will have implications for the use of these biomarkers in clinical practice.