WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinical patient care

  1. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Jill C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access health care in our urgent care clinic. The relevance of understanding the motivation driving this patient population is especially pertinent given recent trends towards universal healthcare and the unclear impact it may have on the demands of urgent care. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of patients seeking care at an urgent care clinic (UCC within a large acute care safety-net urban hospital over a six-week period. Survey data included demographics, social and economic information, reasons that patients chose a UCC, previous primary care exposure, reasons for delaying care, and preventive care needs. Results A total of 1, 006 patients were randomly surveyed. Twenty-five percent of patients identified Spanish as their preferred language. Fifty-four percent of patients reported choosing the UCC due to not having to make an appointment, 51.2% because it was convenient, 43.9% because of same day test results, 42.7% because of ability to get same-day medications and 15.1% because co-payment was not mandatory. Lack of a regular physician was reported by 67.9% of patients and 57.2% lacked a regular source of care. Patients reported delaying access to care for a variety of reasons. Conclusion Despite a common belief that patients seek care in the urgent care setting primarily for economic reasons, this study suggests that patients choose the urgent care setting based largely on convenience and more timely care. This information is especially applicable to

  2. Caring touch--patients' experiences in an anthroposophic clinical context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte; Hörberg, Ulrica; Dahlberg, Karin

    2015-12-01

    This study describes the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspective in an anthroposophic clinical context where caring touch is often used to promote health and alleviate suffering. The aim of the study was to explore and phenomenologically describe the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspectives. The study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach in order to understand and describe human existential phenomena. Ten female patients were interviewed in an anthroposophic clinic in Sweden. The findings show how caring touch has multifaceted meanings and makes the patients' feel present and anchored in a meaningful context. The patients' feel that they are seen, accepted and confirmed. Furthermore, touch creates a caring space where the patients become receptive for care and has the power to alleviate the patients' suffering, as well as to frighten and cause or worsen the suffering. In order to take advantage of the caring potential, the patient needs to be invited to a respectful and sensitive form of touch. An interpersonal flexible space is necessary where the touch can be effective, and where a dynamic interplay can develop. In conclusion, caring touch is an opportunity for carers to support well-being and health. The carers need to approach their patients in both a sensitive and reflective way. A caring science perspective can serve as a help to further understand touch as a unique caring act. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  3. Patient satisfaction with health care services provided at HIV clinics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Since the establishment of free HIV/AIDS care and treatment services in Tanzania a lot of research has been done to assess how health care providers discharge their duties in these clinics. Little research however has been done regarding satisfaction of HIV patients with free health care services provided.

  4. Complex Clinical Intersection: Palliative Care in Patients with Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ellen E; Chang, Beverly; Huege, Steven; Hirst, Jeremy

    2018-02-01

    Because of the rapidly growing older population and increases in longevity, rates of dementia have been rising. Clinical challenges of treating dementia include limited resources and lack of curative therapies. Palliative care approaches improve quality of life and alleviate suffering for dementia patients at the end of life, although implementation may be limited by societal acceptance and feasibility. This review examines the published literature on pain assessments, pain and behavior interventions, tools for advanced care planning, and clinical concerns in dementia patients. Ultimately, modification of the traditional palliative care model may improve outcomes and functioning for dementia patients at all stages of their illness. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Electronic Nursing Documentation: Patient Care Continuity Using the Clinical Care Classification System (CCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittenburg, Luann; Meetim, Aunchisa

    2016-01-01

    An innovative nursing documentation project conducted at Bumrungrad International Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand demonstrated patient care continuity between nursing patient assessments and nursing Plans of Care using the Clinical Care Classification System (CCC). The project developed a new generation of interactive nursing Plans of Care using the six steps of the American Nurses Association (ANA) Nursing process and the MEDCIN® clinical knowledgebase to present CCC coded concepts as a natural by-product of a nurse's documentation process. The MEDCIN® clinical knowledgebase is a standardized point-of-care terminology intended for use in electronic health record systems. The CCC is an ANA recognized nursing terminology.

  6. Randomised clinical trial of early specialist palliative care plus standard care versus standard care alone in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Damkier, Anette

    2017-01-01

    Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01348048) is a multicentre randomised clinical trial comparing early referral to a specialist palliative care team plus standard care versus standard care alone. The planned sample size was 300. At five oncology departments, consecutive patients...

  7. Patient engagement: an investigation at a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill PS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Preetinder Singh Gill College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USA Background: Engaged employees are an asset to any organization. They are instrumental in ensuring good commercial outcomes through continuous innovation and incremental improvement. A health care facility is similar to a regular work setting in many ways. A health care provider and a patient have roles akin to a team leader and a team member/stakeholder, respectively. Hence it can be argued that the concept of employee engagement can be applied to patients in health care settings in order to improve health outcomes. Methods: Patient engagement data were collected using a survey instrument from a primary care clinic in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Canonical correlation equations were formulated to identify combinations which were strongly related to each other. In addition, the cause-effect relationship between patient engagement and patient-perceived health outcomes was described using structural equation modeling. Results: Canonical correlation analysis showed that the first set of canonical variables had a fairly strong relationship, ie, a magnitude > 0.80 at the 95% confidence interval, for five dimensions of patient engagement. Structural equation modeling analysis yielded a β ≥ 0.10 and a Student's t statistic ≥ 2.96 for these five dimensions. The threshold Student's t statistic was 1.99. Hence it was found the β values were significant at the 95% confidence interval for all census regions. Conclusion: A scaled reliable survey instrument was developed to measured patient engagement. Better patient engagement is associated with better patient-perceived health outcomes. This study provides preliminary evidence that patient engagement has a causal relationship with patient-perceived health outcomes. Keywords: patient engagement, health outcomes, communication, provider effectiveness, patient incentive

  8. Patient engagement: an investigation at a primary care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Preetinder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Engaged employees are an asset to any organization. They are instrumental in ensuring good commercial outcomes through continuous innovation and incremental improvement. A health care facility is similar to a regular work setting in many ways. A health care provider and a patient have roles akin to a team leader and a team member/stakeholder, respectively. Hence it can be argued that the concept of employee engagement can be applied to patients in health care settings in order to improve health outcomes. Patient engagement data were collected using a survey instrument from a primary care clinic in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Canonical correlation equations were formulated to identify combinations which were strongly related to each other. In addition, the cause-effect relationship between patient engagement and patient-perceived health outcomes was described using structural equation modeling. Canonical correlation analysis showed that the first set of canonical variables had a fairly strong relationship, ie, a magnitude > 0.80 at the 95% confidence interval, for five dimensions of patient engagement. Structural equation modeling analysis yielded a β ≥ 0.10 and a Student's t statistic ≥ 2.96 for these five dimensions. The threshold Student's t statistic was 1.99. Hence it was found the β values were significant at the 95% confidence interval for all census regions. A scaled reliable survey instrument was developed to measured patient engagement. Better patient engagement is associated with better patient-perceived health outcomes. This study provides preliminary evidence that patient engagement has a causal relationship with patient-perceived health outcomes.

  9. Diabetic and Obese Patient Clinical Outcomes Improve During a Care Management Implementation in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Luo, Zhehui; Piatt, Gretchen; Green, Lee A; Chen, Qiaoling; Piette, John

    2017-10-01

    To address the increasing burden of chronic disease, many primary care practices are turning to care management and the hiring of care managers to help patients coordinate their care and self-manage their conditions. Care management is often, but not always, proving effective at improving patient outcomes, but more evidence is needed. In this pair-matched cluster randomized trial, 5 practices implemented care management and were compared with 5 comparison practices within the same practice organization. Targeted patients included diabetic patients with a hemoglobin A1c >9% and nondiabetic obese patients. Clinical values tracked were A1c, blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein, microalbumin, and weight. Clinically important improvements were demonstrated in the intervention versus comparison practices, with diabetic patients improving A1c control and obese patients experiencing weight loss. There was a 12% relative increase in the proportion of patients meeting the clinical target of A1c management practices lost 5% or more of their body weight as compared with 10% of comparison patients (adjusted relative improvement, 15%; CI, 2%-28%). These findings add to the growing evidence-base for the effectiveness of care management as an effective clinical practice with regard to improving diabetes- and obesity-related outcomes.

  10. Impact of patient satisfaction ratings on physicians and clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zgierska A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aleksandra Zgierska,1 David Rabago,1 Michael M Miller2–4 1Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, 2American Society of Addiction Medicine, Chevy Chase, MD, 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health, 4Herrington Recovery Center, Rogers Memorial Hospital, Oconomowoc, WI, USA Background: Although patient satisfaction ratings often drive positive changes, they may have unintended consequences. Objective: The study reported here aimed to evaluate the clinician-perceived effects of patient satisfaction ratings on job satisfaction and clinical care. Methods: A 26-item survey, developed by a state medical society in 2012 to assess the effects of patient satisfaction surveys, was administered online to physician members of a state-level medical society. Respondents remained anonymous. Results: One hundred fifty five physicians provided responses (3.9% of the estimated 4,000 physician members of the state-level medical society, or approximately 16% of the state's emergency department [ED] physicians. The respondents were predominantly male (85% and practicing in solo or private practice (45%, hospital (43%, or academia (15%. The majority were ED (57%, followed by primary care (16% physicians. Fifty-nine percent reported that their compensation was linked to patient satisfaction ratings. Seventy-eight percent reported that patient satisfaction surveys moderately or severely affected their job satisfaction; 28% had considered quitting their job or leaving the medical profession. Twenty percent reported their employment being threatened because of patient satisfaction data. Almost half believed that pressure to obtain better scores promoted inappropriate care, including unnecessary antibiotic and opioid prescriptions, tests, procedures, and hospital admissions. Among 52 qualitative responses, only three were positive. Conclusion

  11. The contribution of undergraduate palliative care education: does it influence the clinical patient's care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Carlos; Rodríguez-Núñez, Alfredo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this 2-year systematic review is to understand how learner assessment and curriculum evaluation of education in palliative care is being undertaken and to examine whether current undergraduate education influences the clinical patient's care. Almost half of the 30 studies reviewed used a qualitative approach to evaluate learning experiences. Only three of them were controlled studies and a further one was a cohort study.When students openly express themselves, they agree that there is 'something' deep as regards the core or the essence of medical practice or nursing. They feel that they become better professionals and better prepared for the patients, not only in terms of end of life care, but also as regards care, irrespective of the phase of the disease.The inclusion of palliative care in undergraduate education is a way of providing knowledge, skill, and competences about palliative care (especially communication) and also improving attitudes toward caring in advanced disease and at the end of life. Different methods of experiential learning, even brief experiences, which bring students into close contact with palliative care clinical cases or patients, are providing better results. From research studies, there is only indirect evidence that palliative care training at university leads to better clinical care of patients. In the future, long-term cohort or controlled studies might answer that question.

  12. CLINICAL AUDIT AND RECORD KEEPING GUIDE FOR IMPROVING PATIENT CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Motimath

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Maintaining records and documentation of all aspects of patient’s dental care is considered as the legal responsibility and professional duty of the dental surgeon. Complete dental records consist of documents pertaining to history of present illness, clinical examination, diagnosis, treatment plan, treatment provided and prognosis. Record maintenance helps in all the aspects of practice whether providing appropriate treatment or medicolegal defence. MATERIALS AND METHODS We conducted thorough research of documents pertaining to patients who reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, KLES V.K. Institute of Dental Sciences, Karnataka, India, between 2015-2016.Their records were maintained in the prescribed format followed by entry in a register about the records, diagnosis, treatment which was crosschecked by a consultant daily.The record consist of several different elements, which include written notes, radiographs, study models, referral letters, consultants reports, clinical photographs, results of special investigations, drug prescriptions, laboratory prescriptions, patient identification information and a comprehensive medical history. Timely auditing was done to evaluate the quality of care provided with constant refinement of the protocols RESULTS The audit of the records done in our department showed the common mistakes in recording history by the trainees. We recorded common postoperative complications seen with different procedures and treatment protocols.Wherever required protocols and follow ups were changed to minimise them. With the help of this audit, we were able to compare new treatment modalities and were able to provide best possible care which was also cost effective. CONCLUSION This article highlights the importance of dental records and how it helps in improving patient care, especially in developing countries where this habit is to be inculcated from roots now. It gives an insight into the

  13. Unlicensed pharmaceutical preparations for clinical patient care: Ensuring safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wilde, Sofieke; de Jong, Maria G H; Le Brun, Paul P H; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Schimmel, Kirsten J M

    2018-01-01

    Most medicinal products dispensed to patients have marketing authorization (MA) to ensure high quality of the product, safety, and efficacy. However, in daily practice, to treat patients adequately, there is a medical need for drugs that do not hold MA. To meet this medical need, medicinal products are used in clinical care without MA (unlicensed), such as products prepared by (local) pharmacies: the pharmaceutical preparations. Three types of pharmaceutical preparations are distinguished: (i) reconstitution in excess of summary of product characteristics; (ii) adaptation of a licensed medicinal product (outside its official labeling); (iii) medicinal products from an active pharmaceutical ingredient. Although unlicensed, patients may expect the same quality for these unlicensed pharmaceutical preparations as for the licensed medicinal products. To assure this quality, a proper risk-benefit assessment and proper documentation in (centralized) patient registries and linking to a national pharmacovigilance database should be in place. Based on a risk assessment matrix, requirements for quality assurance can be determined, which has impact on the level of documentation of a pharmaceutical preparation. In this paper, the approach for good documentation including quality assurance and benefit-risk assessment will be discussed and possibilities for patient registries are described to make these crucial preparations available for regular patient care. KEY POINTS Ensuring pharmaceutical quality and performing a proper benefit-risk assessment will guarantee safe use of pharmaceutical preparations. Good documentation of (ultra-)orphan treatments can be collected in centralized patient registries and should be combined with existing information in (inter)national databases and self-reflection of patients. Linking patient registries to a centralized database for adverse drug events is highly recommended as it increases safety control of the (ultra) orphan pharmaceutical

  14. Nurse-led outpatient clinics in oncology care - Patient satisfaction, information and continuity of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Catharina Bau; Gustafsson, Eva; Johansson, Hemming; Bergenmar, Mia

    2015-12-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate patients' satisfaction with nurse-led clinics, patients' perception of received information and associations between continuity of care and satisfaction with information. Questionnaires on patient satisfaction were sent to consecutive samples of patients after they attended a nurse-led clinic at the Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital in 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2013. Patients' perceptions of received information were evaluated in 2011 and 2013, by the EORTC QLQ-INFO25. Data on registered continuity of care were retrieved from the patients' medical record. A total of 962 patients responded (79%) to one of the four surveys. Patients' satisfaction with nurse-led clinics was stable over time. More than 90% rated nurses' interpersonal manners and the care at the clinic as "good", the waiting time as "acceptable", and the length of appointments as "sufficient". Over 90% responded that it was important to meet the same nurse and 62% reported they actually did so and 52% stated they were assigned a named nurse navigator. More than 75% rated the information at their latest visit at a nurse-led clinic as "completely" sufficient. However, 48% expressed wish for more information "during the current disease". No statistical significant associations were found between "satisfaction with information" and continuity of care. Patients' satisfaction with nurse-led clinics was stable over time with generally high figures with the exception for continuity of care and information, areas in which improvements are needed. The wide variety in information needs might require a person-centred approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Do Patients Who Access Clinical Information on Patient Internet Portals Have More Primary Care Visits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveille, Suzanne G; Mejilla, Roanne; Ngo, Long; Fossa, Alan; Elmore, Joann G; Darer, Jonathan; Ralston, James D; Delbanco, Tom; Walker, Jan

    2016-01-01

    As health care costs alarm the nation and the debate increases about the impact of health information technologies, patients are reviewing their medical records increasingly through secure Internet portals. Important questions remain about the impact of portal use on office visits. To evaluate whether use of patient Internet portals to access records is associated with increased primary care utilization. A prospective cohort study. Primary care patients registered on patient Internet portals, within an integrated health system serving rural Pennsylvania and an academic medical center in Boston. Frequency of "clinical portal use" (days/2 mo intervals over 2 y) included secure messaging about clinical issues and viewing laboratory and radiology findings. In year 2, a subset of patients also gained access to their primary care doctor's visit notes. The main outcome was number of primary care office visits. In the first 2 months of the 2-year period, 14% of 44,951 primary care patients engaged in clinical portal use 2 or more days per month, 31% did so 1 day per month, and the remainder had no clinical portal use. Overall, adjusted for age, sex, and chronic conditions, clinical portal use was not associated with subsequent office visits. Fewer than 0.1% of patients engaged in high levels of clinical portal use (31 or more login days in 2 mo) that were associated with 1 or more additional visits in the subsequent 2 months (months 3 and 4). However, the reverse was true: office visits led to subsequent clinical portal use. Similar trends were observed among patients with or without access to visit notes. Patients turn to their portals following visits, but clinical portal use does not contribute to an increase in primary care visits.

  16. CLINICAL FEATURES OF ACUTE FEBRILE THROMBOCYTOPAENIA AMONG PATIENTS ATTENDING PRIMARY CARE CLINICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairani Omar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Identifying clinical features that differentiate acute febrile thrombocytopaenia from acute febrile illness without thrombocytopaenia can help primary care physician to decide whether to order a full blood count (FBC. This is important because thrombocytopaenia in viral fever may signify more serious underlying aetiology like dengue infection.Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the clinical features of acute febrile patients with thrombocytopaenia and acute febrile patients without thrombocytopaenia.Methodology: This was a clinic-based cross-sectional study from May to November 2003. Consecutive patients presenting with undifferentiated fever of less than two weeks were selected from the Primary Care Centre of Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia and Batu 9 Cheras Health Clinic. Clinical features of these patients were recorded and FBC examination was done for all patients. Thrombocytopaenia was defined as platelet count <150X109/L. The odds ratio of thrombocytopaenia for each presenting symptoms was calculated.Result: Seventy-three patients participated in this study. Among them, 45.2% had thrombocytopaenia. Myalgia and headache were common among all patients. However, nausea and vomiting occurred significantly more often among patients with thrombocytopaenia than in patients with normal platelet count (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.5.Conclusion: Acute non-specific febrile patients presenting with symptoms of nausea and vomiting may have higher risk of thrombocytopaenia and should be seriously considered for FBC.

  17. Factors Influencing Patients' Sleep in the Intensive Care Unit: Perceptions of Patients and Clinical Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qinglan; Redeker, Nancy S; Pisani, Margaret A; Yaggi, Henry K; Knauert, Melissa P

    2017-07-01

    Multiple factors are believed to contribute to disruption of patients' sleep and negatively affect clinical outcomes in the intensive care unit. Achieving restorative sleep for critically ill patients remains a challenge. To explore the perceptions and beliefs of staff, patients, and surrogates regarding the environmental and nonenvironmental factors in the medical intensive care unit that affect patients' sleep. This qualitative study included 24 medical intensive care unit staff (7 physicians, 5 respiratory therapists, 10 nurses, and 2 patient-care assistants), 8 patients, and 6 patient surrogates. Semistructured interviews were conducted, and qualitative analysis of content was used to code, categorize, and identify interview themes. Interview responses revealed 4 themes with related subthemes: (1) The overnight medical intensive care unit environment does affect sleep, (2) nonenvironmental factors such as difficult emotions and anxiety also affect sleep, (3) respondents' perceptions about sleep quality in the medical intensive care unit were highly variable, and (4) suggestions for sleep improvement included reassuring patients and care-clustering strategies. Results of this study suggest that environment is not the only factor influencing patients' sleep. Decreases in environmental sources of disturbance are necessary but not sufficient for sleep improvement. Guideline-recommended clustered care is needed to provide adequate sleep opportunity, but patients' emotions and anxiety also must be addressed. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  18. Clinical survey of lens care in contact lens patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ky, W; Scherick, K; Stenson, S

    1998-10-01

    Overall, contact lenses provide a safe and effective modality for vision correction. However, problems do occasionally arise. Up to 80% of contact lens complications can be traced to poor patient compliance with recommended lens care guidelines. We conducted a survey to evaluate the level of patient compliance in specific areas of lens care and maintenance and to assess patient knowledge of basic contact lens information. Patients were asked to complete an anonymous 15 question survey that focused on lens care--specifically the use of contact lens cleaners, methods of disinfection, enzyme treatments, use of rewetting drops, and the frequency of follow-up exams. In addition, the survey included six true/false questions relating to contact lens care and safety. There were a total of 103 participants in the study. Approximately 24% of patients stated they never cleaned their lenses prior to disinfection, and 5% used saline solutions as their primary mode of disinfection. A sizable portion of those surveyed (43% of soft lens wearers and 71% of rigid gas permeable lens wearers) either never used enzyme cleaners or used them less than once a month. Seventy percent of patients either never used rewetting drops or used them less than once a day. Twenty-nine percent of patients consulted their eye care professionals every 2 years and 6% less often than every two years. Six questions assessed patient knowledge of contact lens care safety. Of a possible six out of six correct answers, the mean number of correct responses was 3.74. A sizable proportion of contact lens wearers do not adequately adhere to recommended contact lens care, and many have an inadequate understanding of contact lens care guidelines. Therefore, it is important that practitioners place more emphasis on patient education at the time of initial contact lens fitting and reinforce such instruction during follow-up visits.

  19. Missing Clinical Information in NHS hospital outpatient clinics: prevalence, causes and effects on patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorthy Krishna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Britain over 39,000 reports were received by the National Patient Safety Agency relating to failures in documentation in 2007 and the UK Health Services Journal estimated in 2008 that over a million hospital outpatient visits each year might take place without the full record available. Despite these high numbers, the impact of missing clinical information has not been investigated for hospital outpatients in the UK. Studies in primary care in the USA have found 13.6% of patient consultations have missing clinical information, with this adversely affecting care in about half of cases, and in Australia 1.8% of medical errors were found to be due to the unavailability of clinical information. Our objectives were to assess the frequency, nature and potential impact on patient care of missing clinical information in NHS hospital outpatients and to assess the principal causes. This is the first study to present such figures for the UK and the first to look at how clinicians respond, including the associated impact on patient care. Methods Prospective descriptive study of missing information reported by surgeons, supplemented by interviews on the causes. Data were collected by surgeons in general, gastrointestinal, colorectal and vascular surgical clinics in three teaching hospitals across the UK for over a thousand outpatient appointments. Fifteen interviews were conducted with those involved in collating clinical information for these clinics. The study had ethics approval (Hammersmith and Queen Charlotte's & Chelsea Research Ethics Committee, reference number (09/H0707/27. Participants involved in the interviews signed a consent form and were offered the opportunity to review and agree the transcript of their interview before analysis. No patients were involved in this research. Results In 15% of outpatient consultations key items of clinical information were missing. Of these patients, 32% experienced a delay or disruption

  20. Patient-Centered Care in Breast Cancer Genetic Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Brédart

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available With advances in breast cancer (BC gene panel testing, risk counseling has become increasingly complex, potentially leading to unmet psychosocial needs. We assessed psychosocial needs and correlates in women initiating testing for high genetic BC risk in clinics in France and Germany, and compared these results with data from a literature review. Among the 442 counselees consecutively approached, 212 (83% in France and 180 (97% in Germany, mostly BC patients (81% and 92%, respectively, returned the ‘Psychosocial Assessment in Hereditary Cancer’ questionnaire. Based on the Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm (BOADICEA BC risk estimation model, the mean BC lifetime risk estimates were 19% and 18% in France and Germany, respectively. In both countries, the most prevalent needs clustered around the “living with cancer” and “children-related issues” domains. In multivariate analyses, a higher number of psychosocial needs were significantly associated with younger age (b = −0.05, higher anxiety (b = 0.78, and having children (b = 1.51, but not with country, educational level, marital status, depression, or loss of a family member due to hereditary cancer. These results are in line with the literature review data. However, this review identified only seven studies that quantitatively addressed psychosocial needs in the BC genetic counseling setting. Current data lack understandings of how cancer risk counseling affects psychosocial needs, and improves patient-centered care in that setting.

  1. Patient-Centered Care in Breast Cancer Genetic Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, Anne; Anota, Amélie; Dick, Julia; Kuboth, Violetta; Lareyre, Olivier; De Pauw, Antoine; Cano, Alejandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Schmutzler, Rita; Dolbeault, Sylvie; Kop, Jean-Luc

    2018-02-12

    With advances in breast cancer (BC) gene panel testing, risk counseling has become increasingly complex, potentially leading to unmet psychosocial needs. We assessed psychosocial needs and correlates in women initiating testing for high genetic BC risk in clinics in France and Germany, and compared these results with data from a literature review. Among the 442 counselees consecutively approached, 212 (83%) in France and 180 (97%) in Germany, mostly BC patients (81% and 92%, respectively), returned the 'Psychosocial Assessment in Hereditary Cancer' questionnaire. Based on the Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm (BOADICEA) BC risk estimation model, the mean BC lifetime risk estimates were 19% and 18% in France and Germany, respectively. In both countries, the most prevalent needs clustered around the "living with cancer" and "children-related issues" domains. In multivariate analyses, a higher number of psychosocial needs were significantly associated with younger age (b = -0.05), higher anxiety (b = 0.78), and having children (b = 1.51), but not with country, educational level, marital status, depression, or loss of a family member due to hereditary cancer. These results are in line with the literature review data. However, this review identified only seven studies that quantitatively addressed psychosocial needs in the BC genetic counseling setting. Current data lack understandings of how cancer risk counseling affects psychosocial needs, and improves patient-centered care in that setting.

  2. Improving Tracheostomy Care Delivery: Instituting Clinical Care Pathways and Nursing Education to Improve Patient Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colandrea, Maria; Eckardt, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The complication rates for tracheostomy patients could be serious and life threatening. As a result, length of stay (LOS) increases and patient outcomes can be negatively impacted. Examples of complications include accidental decannulation, bleeding and total occlusion. Studies suggest there is an inconsistency in tracheostomy care among providers and institutions. Other studies suggest stronger patient outcomes can result from improved staff training and appropriate protocols. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a clinical care pathway (CCP) and nursing education program to improve tracheostomy patient outcomes. The use of a CCP and nursing education program at a tertiary VA Medical Center will: decrease length of stay (LOS). decrease 30 day tracheostomy readmissions. increase patient's readiness for discharge. increase nurses' comfort level with performing tracheostomy care. increase nurses' overall competence with performing tracheostomy care. A quasi-experimental pilot study examining the effect of a CCP compared LOS and complication rates of tracheostomy patients from admission to discharge. The population included veterans from a mid-Atlantic VA Medical Center. This study involved three phases. Phase 1: Administer the Readiness for Hospital Discharge Scale (RHDS) to tracheostomy patients' preintervention. Phase 2: Provide nurses with an educational program pre and post test assessment. Phase 3: Implement the CCP and evaluate patients' readiness for discharge. Comparing the pre-intervention sample of veterans (n = 10) to the post-intervention sample (n = 6), there was an increase in LOS by 1 day. There was a 15 point increase in RHDS from 165 (SD 25.8) to 180 (SD 14.42). This pilot was underpowered with an n = 6, so there was no significant difference in LOS and 30 day readmission rates. Bootstrapping of sample resulted in RHDS p = . 039 and readmission p = .007. A paired-samples t-test was conducted to assess nurses' competence in performing

  3. [Clinical characteristics and indicators of care of dialysis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolko, A; Hannedouche, T; Couchoud, C

    2013-09-01

    This chapter provides a set of indicators on patients treated by dialysis at December the 31th 2011. Even if ESRD is found in all classes of age, elders account for the great majority of the patients undergoing dialysis (median age: 70.4 years). These patients present a high rate of comorbidity especially diabetes (37% of patients) and cardiovascular comorbidities (59% of patients) that increases with the patient's age. Considering indicators of care, the main dialysis technique was hemodialysis (93.3% of patients). Even if an important inter-region variability remains considering the choices of treatment, more than 50% of the patients are undergoing hemodialysis in a hospital-based in-center unit, and we noticed an increase in hemodialysis in a medical satellite unit with time whereas the rate of self-care hemodialysis decreases. The rate of peritoneal dialysis remains stable. When comparing guidelines to real-life treatments, 77.5% of patients receive adequate dose of treatment (12H/week, KT/V>1.2), the rate of patients with a hemoglobin blood-level lower than 10 g/dl and without erythropoietin treatment is 1.3%, which confirmed a good management of anemia. On the contrary, 34% of patients have a BMI lower than 23 kg/m(2) and only 23% have an albumin blood-level over 40 g/l, which underlines that nutritional management of ESRD patients can be improved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Evidence-Based Clinical Decision: Key to Improved Patients Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... materials remain limited to mostly developed countries. There is need to adopt measures to further facilitate dissemination of current information of effective health to care providers and policymakers in resource-poor countries. This review is aimed at re-enforcing the need for applying best-evidence into clinical practice

  5. Just-in-time patient scheduling in an eye care clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, J.; Campbell, Matthew; Vanberkel, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    The IWK’s division of Ophthalmology currently provides clinical service to over 8000 patients per year. Eye Care Centre patients were experiencing long waits between registration and their ophthalmologist appointment. This paper details the development of a patient scheduling methodology that utilizes “just-in-time��? philosophy to reduce the wait time experienced by Eye Care Centre patients.

  6. Restorative care for palliative patients: a retrospective clinical audit of outcomes for patients admitted to an inpatient palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runacres, Fiona; Gregory, Heidi; Ugalde, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Restorative care in palliative care is a subset of rehabilitation that aims to improve quality of life through restoration or maintenance of physical functions. Outcomes for restorative care programmes delivered by palliative care units have not adequately been assessed. The objectives are to examine the outcomes of a restorative care programme in an inpatient palliative care unit, including discharge destination, performance status changes and length of stay. Retrospective clinical audit of consecutive patients admitted to Calvary Health Care Bethlehem in Melbourne, Australia, principally for restorative care from July 2010 to December 2011. 79 admissions met inclusion criteria. Mean age was 76.5 years (SD=11.14) and 43 (54%) were men. 75 (95%) patients had a malignant diagnosis; of these, the majority had lung cancer (24%). 16 patients (20%) were discharged home, 51 (65%) died and 12 (15%) were transferred. Of the patients discharged home, only 6 (38% of those discharged home) improved their performance status. Those discharged home had a significantly shorter length of stay (17 days compared to 39 days; prestorative care died during admission, with only a minority discharged home. Patients discharged most commonly experienced maintenance and not improvement in performance status. A successful discharge home following restorative care was associated with a shorter length of stay. Implications and recommendations for successful restorative care will be discussed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Patient satisfaction with chronic HIV care provided through an innovative pharmacist/nurse-managed clinic and a multidisciplinary clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielly, Jason; Kelly, Deborah V.; Asghari, Shabnam; Burt, Kim; Biggin, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pharmacist/nurse-led clinics are an established model for many chronic diseases but not yet for HIV. At our centre, patients with HIV are seen by a multidisciplinary team (physician, nurse, pharmacist, social worker) at least yearly. Some attend an HIV-specialist pharmacist/nurse clinic (or “nonphysician clinic,” NPC) for alternate biannual visits. Our objective was to assess patient satisfaction with care received through both clinics. Methods: The Patient Satisfaction Survey for HIV Ambulatory Care (assesses satisfaction with access to care, clinic visits and quality of care) was administered by telephone to adults who attended either clinic between January and July 2014. Descriptive statistics described patient characteristics and satisfaction scores. Fisher’s exact test compared satisfaction scores between the NPC and multidisciplinary clinic (MDC). Multivariate logistic regression examined associations between overall satisfaction with care and clinic type and patient characteristics (e.g., age, disease duration). Results: Respondents were very satisfied with the overall quality of HIV care in both the NPC and MDC (89% vs 93%, respectively, p = 0.6). Patients from both clinics expressed satisfaction with access to care, treatment plan input, their provider’s knowledge of the newest developments in HIV care and explanation of medication side effects, with no significant differences noted. Significantly more MDC patients reported being asked about housing/finances, alcohol/drug use and whether they needed help disclosing their status. Patient characteristics were not significantly associated with satisfaction with overall quality of care. Conclusion: Patients are satisfied with both clinics, supporting NPC as an innovative model for chronic HIV care. Comparison of outcomes between clinics is needed to ensure high-quality care. PMID:29123599

  8. Quality of Care for Patients With Diabetes and Mulitmorbidity Registered at Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heale, Roberta; Wenghofer, Elizabeth; James, Susan; Garceau, Marie-Luce

    2018-03-01

    Background Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics are a new model of primary healthcare in Ontario. Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics are distinctive in that nurse practitioners are the primary care providers working with an interprofessional team. There have been no evaluations of the quality of care within the Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic model. Purpose Evaluation of the Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic model, specifically for complex clinical presentations, will provide insights that may be used to inform improvements to the delivery of care in the Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent to which diabetes care was complete and to determine the impact of organizational tools, including electronic medical record tracking, diabetes care template, and referral to community programs, on the completeness of care for patients with diabetes and multimorbidity at Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics. Methods An audit of 30 charts was conducted at five different Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics (n = 150) for patients with diabetes and at least one other chronic condition. Indicators included patient and organizational characteristics as well as diabetes care items taken from diabetes clinical guidelines. Results Overall, care for patients with diabetes and multimorbidity in Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics was complete. However, there were no significant associations between patient or organizational characteristics and the extent to which diabetes care was complete.

  9. Vascular care in patients with Alzheimer's disease with cerebrovascular lesions-a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, Edo; Kuiper, Roy; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; van Gool, Willem A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether vascular care slows dementia progression in patients with Alzheimer's disease with cerebrovascular lesions on neuroimaging. DESIGN: Multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial with 2-year follow-up. SETTING: Neurological and geriatric outpatient clinics in 10

  10. The need for hospital care of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by noncurative intent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Friis, S; Juel, K

    2000-01-01

    We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy.......We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy....

  11. Improving health care, Part 3: Clinical benchmarking for best patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, J J; Mahoney, C C; Nelson, E C; Batalden, P B; Plume, S K

    1996-09-01

    Benchmarking, which shows that a much better way of doing something may be possible, stimulates local interest in changing and in making changes previously thought not possible. The Worksheet has five basic steps: Identify measures, determine resources needed to find the "best of the best," design a data collection method and gather data, measure the best against own performance to determine gap, and identify the best practices producing best-in-class results. CASE EXAMPLE--BOWEL SURGERY: The Accelerating Clinical Improvement Bowel Surgery Team at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (Lebanon, NH) was formed in November 1994 to improve the care of patients with diagnosis-related group (DRG) 148 or 149. Consulting two large, administrative databases and the medical literature, the team found that a substantial gap existed between the bowel surgery delivery process and the best results, as far as they were known, among comparable organizations. After flowcharting the delivery process, the team identified the high-leverage steps: same-day services, general surgery clinic, and routine care. The team then planned three successive PDCA (plan-do-check-act) cycles: utilization of same-day services for all elective surgery patients, establishment of a standardized preoperative bowel preparation, and utilization of pre- and postoperative routine care orders. These improvement cycles resulted in a reduction in length of stay from 9.66 to 8.29 days. Implementation of a critical pathway resulted in a further reduction to 5.04 days. Benchmarking can play an integral role in clinical improvement work and can stimulate wise clinical changes and promote measured improvements in quality and value.

  12. Optimal use of MRI in clinical trials, clinical care and clinical registries of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Møller-Bisgaard, Signe

    2014-01-01

    the benefits of including MRI in treat-to-target strategies. The benefits of incorporating MRI into clinical registries are not yet known, but may include improved knowledge about the real-life advantages of MRI, as well as opportunities to develop better clinical and laboratory composite measures to monitor......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly is more sensitive than clinical examination and conventional radiography (x-ray) for detection of inflammation (synovitis, bone marrow oedema (osteitis) and tenosynovitis) and damage (bone erosion and cartilage loss/joint space narrowing) in patients...... with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The question is when and how MRI should be used. The present article reviews our knowledge about, and provides suggestions for, the use of MRI in clinical trials, clinical care and clinical registries. In clinical trials, the OMERACT RA MRI scoring system (RAMRIS) is a thoroughly...

  13. Sleeping on a problem: the impact of sleep disturbance on intensive care patients - a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Lori J; Van Haren, Frank; Lopez, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is commonly encountered amongst intensive care patients and has significant psychophysiological effects, which protract recovery and increases mortality. Bio-physiological monitoring of intensive care patients reveal alterations in sleep architecture, with reduced sleep quality and continuity. The etiological causes of sleep disturbance are considered to be multifactorial, although environmental stressors namely, noise, light and clinical care interactions have been frequently cited in both subjective and objective studies. As a result, interventions are targeted towards modifiable factors to ameliorate their impact. This paper reviews normal sleep physiology and the impact that sleep disturbance has on patient psychophysiological recovery, and the contribution that the clinical environment has on intensive care patients' sleep.

  14. Patients with genetic cancer undergoing surveillance at a specialized clinic rate the quality of their care better than patients at non-specialized clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritzell, Kaisa; Eriksson, Lars E.; Björk, Jan; Sprangers, Mirjam; Wettergren, Lena

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To compare ratings of quality of care between patients with genetic cancer who receive specialized care with patients who receive non-specialized care while controlling for socio-demographic and clinical variables; Material and methods. All patients in a national cohort of adult patients

  15. Team dynamics, clinical work satisfaction, and patient care coordination between primary care providers: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hummy; Ryan, Molly; Tendulkar, Shalini; Fisher, Josephine; Martin, Julia; Peters, Antoinette S; Frolkis, Joseph P; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Chien, Alyna T; Singer, Sara J

    Team-based care is essential for delivering high-quality, comprehensive, and coordinated care. Despite considerable research about the effects of team-based care on patient outcomes, few studies have examined how team dynamics relate to provider outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine relationships among team dynamics, primary care provider (PCP) clinical work satisfaction, and patient care coordination between PCPs in 18 Harvard-affiliated primary care practices participating in Harvard's Academic Innovations Collaborative. First, we administered a cross-sectional survey to all 548 PCPs (267 attending clinicians, 281 resident physicians) working at participating practices; 65% responded. We assessed the relationship of team dynamics with PCPs' clinical work satisfaction and perception of patient care coordination between PCPs, respectively, and the potential mediating effect of patient care coordination on the relationship between team dynamics and work satisfaction. In addition, we embedded a qualitative evaluation within the quantitative evaluation to achieve a convergent mixed methods design to help us better understand our findings and illuminate relationships among key variables. Better team dynamics were positively associated with clinical work satisfaction and quality of patient care coordination between PCPs. Coordination partially mediated the relationship between team dynamics and satisfaction for attending clinicians, suggesting that higher satisfaction depends, in part, on better teamwork, yielding more coordinated patient care. We found no mediating effects for resident physicians. Qualitative results suggest that sources of satisfaction from positive team dynamics for PCPs may be most relevant to attending clinicians. Improving primary care team dynamics could improve clinical work satisfaction among PCPs and patient care coordination between PCPs. In addition to improving outcomes that directly concern health care providers, efforts to

  16. Radiographer's impact on improving clinical decision-making, patient care and patient diagnosis: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Daniel; Egan, Ingrid; Baird, Marilyn

    2004-01-01

    This pilot study attempts to quantify the benefits of a documented radiographic clinical history through the use of the clinical history template form designed by Egan and Baird. Six radiographers completed the clinical history template for 40 patients and four radiologists included the recorded information as part of their reporting process. A focus discussion group was held between the radiographers to ascertain the level of satisfaction and benefits encountered with the use of the template form. A questionnaire was designed for the radiologists to complete regarding the usefulness of the template form with respect to the radiological reporting process. Results/Discussion: 15 cases for which the form was used demonstrated a direct benefit in respect to improved radiographic clinical decision-making. Radiographers agreed the template form aided the establishment of a stronger radiographer-patient relationship during the radiographic examination. Two radiologists agreed the form aided in establishing a radiological diagnosis and suggested the form be implemented as part of the standard departmental protocol. Despite the small sample size, there is evidence the form aided radiographic decision-making and assisted in the establishment of an accurate radiological diagnosis. The overall consensus amongst radiographers was that it enhanced radiographer-patient communication and improved the level of patient care. Copyright (2004) Australian Institute of Radiography

  17. The proportion of clinically relevant alarms decreases as patient clinical severity decreases in intensive care units: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Inokuchi, Ryota; Sato, Hajime; Nanjo, Yuko; Echigo, Masahiro; Tanaka, Aoi; Ishii, Takeshi; Matsubara, Takehiro; Doi, Kent; Gunshin, Masataka; Hiruma, Takahiro; Nakamura, Kensuke; Shinohara, Kazuaki; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu; Umezu, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine (1) the proportion and number of clinically relevant alarms based on the type of monitoring device; (2) whether patient clinical severity, based on the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score, affects the proportion of clinically relevant alarms and to suggest; (3) methods for reducing clinically irrelevant alarms in an intensive care unit (ICU). Design A prospective, observational clinical study. Setting A medical ICU at the University of Tokyo Hospital in To...

  18. An interdisciplinary clinical advancement program within a patient-centered care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Avirro, J; Dotson, T; LaPierre, B; Marshall, W; Mishler, M B; Tanger, J L

    1996-01-01

    Restructuring in health care does not have to compromise the pursuit of clinical excellence and quality patient care. The clinical advancement program (CAP) at the Hospital for Special Care is a newly developed multidisciplinary reward and recognition program for clinical staff. The program is integrated into the hospital's structure of service line management and, unlike traditional advancement programs, is open to all levels of care providers: professional personnel, technical staff, and aides. This article describes the basic features of the CAP model and how its was developed by a multidisciplinary task force.

  19. Separate and unequal: clinics where minority and nonminority patients receive primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varkey, Anita B; Manwell, Linda Baier; Williams, Eric S; Ibrahim, Said A; Brown, Roger L; Bobula, James A; Horner-Ibler, Barbara A; Schwartz, Mark D; Konrad, Thomas R; Wiltshire, Jacqueline C; Linzer, Mark

    2009-02-09

    Few studies have examined the influence of physician workplace conditions on health care disparities. We compared 96 primary care clinics in New York, New York, and in the upper Midwest serving various proportions of minority patients to determine differences in workplace organizational characteristics. Cross-sectional data are from surveys of 96 clinic managers, 388 primary care physicians, and 1701 of their adult patients with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or congestive heart failure participating in the Minimizing Error, Maximizing Outcome (MEMO) study. Data from 27 clinics with at least 30% minority patients were contrasted with data from 69 clinics with less than 30% minority patients. Compared with clinics serving less than 30% minority patients, clinics serving at least 30% minority patients have less access to medical supplies (2.7 vs 3.4, P clinics serving higher proportions of minority populations perceive their patients as frequently speaking little or no English (27.1% vs 3.4%, P =.004), having more chronic pain (24.1% vs 12.9%, P analyses, clinics with at least 30% minority patients are more likely to have chaotic work environments (odds ratio, 4.0; P =.003) and to have fewer physicians reporting high work control (0.2; P =.003) or high job satisfaction (0.4; P =.01). Clinics serving higher proportions of minority patients have more challenging workplace and organizational characteristics.

  20. Clinical pharmacology and general patient care in two teaching hospitals1

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Susan M; Turner, Paul; Vere, Duncan

    1980-01-01

    The clinical responsibilities and activities over 12-month periods of the Departments of Clinical Pharmacology of two London teaching hospitals have been analysed. The results suggest that clinical pharmacology should not be regarded only as an academic specialty but that it has an important role in patient care.

  1. Improving the quality of nurse clinical documentation for chronic patients at primary care clinics: A multifaceted intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozayr H. Mahomed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deficiencies in record keeping practices have been reported at primary care level in the public health sector in South Africa. These deficiencies have the potential to negatively impact patient health outcomes as the break in information may hinder continuity of care. This disruption in information management has particular relevance for patients with chronic diseases. Objectives: The aim of this study was to establish if the implementation of a structured clinical record (SCR as an adjunct tool to the algorithmic guidelines for chronic disease management improved the quality of clinical records at primary care level. Method: A quasi-experimental study (before and after study with a comparison group was conducted across 30 primary health care clinics (PHCs located in three districts in South Africa. Twenty PHCs that received the intervention were selected as intervention clinics and 10 facilities were selected as comparison facilities. The lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS method was used to determine the number of records required to be reviewed per diagnostic condition per facility. Results: There was a a statistically significant increase in the percentage of clinical records achieving compliance to the minimum criteria from the baseline to six months post-intervention for both HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment and patients with non-communicable diseases (hypertension and diabetes. Conclusions: A multifaceted intervention using a SCR to supplement the educational outreach component (PC 101 training has demonstrated the potential for improving the quality of clinical records for patients with chronic diseases at primary care clinics in South Africa.

  2. Patient perspectives of maintaining dignity in Indonesian clinical care settings: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmaningrum, Nurfika; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2018-03-01

    To gain an understanding towards the perspectives of hospitalized inpatients in Indonesia regarding maintaining dignity during clinical care. Dignity is a basic human right that is crucial for an individual's well-being. Respect for a person as a valuable human is a concept that is comparable to treating a person with dignity. Maintaining patient's dignity is an ethical goal of nursing care. Nevertheless, the concept is highly dependent on cultural context. This issue has not been well studied in Indonesia. This study used a qualitative descriptive design. Thirty-five participants were recruited by purposive sampling from medical to surgical wards of six public hospitals in Eastern Java, Indonesia. Data were collected in 2016 through individual face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Inductive content analysis was applied to the data. Four major categories which described qualities of nursing care essential for maintaining a patient's dignity in clinical care settings were revealed: (1) responsiveness; (2) respectful nurse-patient relationships; (3) caring characteristics and (4) personalized service. Our findings provide a cultural viewpoint of dignity for care recipients in Indonesia. The findings provide empirical support for linking dignified care and person-centred care principles with regards to cultural sensitivity. Nurses must not only be clinically competent but also culturally competent. The ability to provide culturally competent care is important for nurses as a strategy to maintain patient dignity during hospitalized care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Just-in-time patient scheduling in an eye care clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blake, J.; Campbell, Matthew; Vanberkel, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    The IWK’s division of Ophthalmology currently provides clinical service to over 8000 patients per year. Eye Care Centre patients were experiencing long waits between registration and their ophthalmologist appointment. This paper details the development of a patient scheduling methodology that

  4. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients With Cellulitis Requiring Intensive Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cranendonk, Duncan R.; van Vught, Lonneke A.; Wiewel, Maryse A.; Cremer, Olaf L.; Horn, Janneke; Bonten, Marc J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; van der Poll, Tom; Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2017-01-01

    Cellulitis is a commonly occurring skin and soft tissue infection and one of the most frequently seen dermatological diseases in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, clinical characteristics of patients with cellulitis requiring intensive care treatment are poorly defined. Necrotizing fasciitis

  5. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients With Cellulitis Requiring Intensive Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cranendonk, Duncan R; van Vught, Lonneke A; Wiewel, Maryse A; Cremer, Olaf L; Horn, Janneke; Bonten, Marc J; Schultz, Marcus J; van der Poll, Tom; Wiersinga, W Joost

    Importance: Cellulitis is a commonly occurring skin and soft tissue infection and one of the most frequently seen dermatological diseases in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, clinical characteristics of patients with cellulitis requiring intensive care treatment are poorly defined. Necrotizing

  6. Clinical nurses' attitudes towards death and caring for dying patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Li, Chaxiang; Zhang, Qiongling; Li, YaJie

    2018-01-02

    To examine Chinese clinical nurses' attitudes towards death and caring for dying patients, and to examine the relationships between clinical nurses' attitudes towards death and caring for dying patients. A convenience sample of 770 clinical nurses from 15 hospitals in China. All participants completed the Chinese version of the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale, Form B (FATCOD-B-C), the Chinese version of the Death Attitude Profile-Revised (DAP-R-C), and a demographic questionnaire. The mean score of the FATCOD-B-C items was 95.62 (SD = 7.45). The majority of Chinese clinical nurses were likely to provide care for the dying person's family (mean = 3.77), but did not have a positive attitude towards communication with the dying person(mean = 2.62). The majority of Chinese clinical nurses showed low scores on death avoidance (mean=1.96) and natural acceptance (mean = 1.61), and most of them viewed death as a passageway to a happy afterlife (mean = 4.33). Attitudes towards caring for dying patients were significantly negatively correlated with fear of death (r = -0.120) and positively correlated with approach acceptance (r = 0.127) and natural acceptance (r = 0.117). Factors that predicted clinical nurses' attitudes towards the care of dying patients included education level, fear of death, approach acceptance, religious beliefs, previous education on death and dying, natural acceptance, professional title, and experience with death or dying patients, which accounted for 18.7% of the variance. Nurses' personal attitudes towards death were associated with their attitudes towards the care of dying patients. Training and educational programmes for clinical nurses should take into consideration nurses' personal attitudes towards death as well as their cultural backgrounds and religious beliefs.

  7. Patient satisfaction with TB care clinical consultations in Kampala: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the personal manner (courtesy, respect, sensitivity, friend- liness) of the person he/she saw and the overall satisfac- tion with the consultation visit. Patients were told to rate each variable as good, fair, or poor. Data analysis: Raw data was reviewed by the quality as- surance officer of the study and all inconsistencies were.

  8. Clinical predictors of anticipatory emesis in patients treated with chemotherapy at a tertiary care cancer hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Fawad; Shafi, Azhar; Ali, Sheeraz; Siddiqui, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical predictors of anticipatory emesis in patients treated with chemotherapy at a tertiary care cancer hospital. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 200 patients undergoing first line chemotherapy with minimum of two cycles at inpatient department and chemotherapy bay of Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre Pakistan. Anticipatory nausea and vomiting develops before administration of chemotherapy. Clinical signs and symp...

  9. Patient quality of life in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions program: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faucher J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Joshua Faucher,1 Jordan Rosedahl,2 Dawn Finnie,3 Amy Glasgow,3 Paul Takahashi4 1Mayo Medical School, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 2Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Science Research, Mayo Clinic, 3Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, 4Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Background: Transitional care programs are common interventions aimed at reducing medical complications and associated readmissions for patients recently discharged from the hospital. While organizations strive to reduce readmissions, another important related metric is patient quality of life (QoL. Aims: To compare the relationship between QoL in patients enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions (MCCT program versus usual care, and to determine if QoL changed in MCCT participants between baseline and 1-year follow-up. Methods: A baseline survey was mailed to MCCT enrollees in March 2013. Those who completed a baseline survey were sent a follow-up survey 1 year later. A cross-sectional survey of usual care participants was mailed in November 2013. We included in our analysis 199 participants (83 in the MCCT and 116 in usual care aged over 60 years with multiple comorbidities and receiving primary care. Primary outcomes were self-rated QoL; secondary outcomes included self-reported general, physical, and mental health. Intra- and intergroup comparisons of patients were evaluated using Pearson’s chi-squared analysis. Results: MCCT participants had more comorbidities and higher elder risk assessment scores than those receiving usual care. At baseline, 74% of MCCT participants reported responses of good-to-excellent QoL compared to 64% after 1 year (P=0.16. Between MCCT and usual care, there was no significant difference in self-reported QoL (P=0.21. Between baseline and follow-up in MCCT patients, and compared to usual care, there were no significant

  10. Comparison of patient perceived primary care quality in public clinics, public hospitals and private clinics in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenhua; Maitland, Elizabeth; Nicholas, Stephen; Loban, Ekaterina; Haggerty, Jeannie

    2017-10-03

    In rural China, patients have free choice of health facilities for outpatient services. Comparison studies exploring the attributes of different health facilities can help identify optimal primary care service models. Using a representative sample of Chinese provinces, this study aimed to compare patients' rating of three primary care service models used by rural residents (public clinics, public hospitals and private clinics) on a range of health care attributes related to responsiveness. This was a secondary analysis using the household survey data from World Health Organization (WHO) Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE). Using a multistage cluster sampling strategy, eight provinces were selected and finally 3435 overall respondents reporting they had visited public clinics, public hospitals or private clinics during the last year, were included in our analysis. Five items were used to measure patient perceived quality in five domains including prompt attention, communication and autonomy, dignity and confidentiality. ANOVA and Turkey's post hoc tests were used to conduct comparative analysis of five domains. Separate multivariate linear regression models were estimated to examine the association of primary care service models with each domain after controlling for patient characteristics. The distribution of last health facilities visited was: 29.5% public clinics; 31.2% public hospitals and; 39.3% private clinics. Public clinics perform best in all five domains: prompt attention (4.15), dignity (4.17), communication (4.07), autonomy (4.05) and confidentiality (4.02). Public hospitals perform better than private clinics in dignity (4.03 vs 3.94), communication (3.97 vs 3.82), autonomy (3.92 vs 3.74) and confidentiality (3.94 vs 3.73), but equivalently in prompt attention (3.92 vs 3.93). Rural residents who are older, wealthier, and with higher self-rated health status have significantly higher patient perceived quality of care in all domains. Rural

  11. Effect of crew resource management on diabetes care and patient outcomes in an inner-city primary care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cathy R; Hepworth, Joseph T; Buerhaus, Peter I; Dittus, Robert; Speroff, Theodore

    2007-08-01

    Diabetes care in our inner-city primary care clinic was suboptimal, despite provider education and performance feedback targeting improved adherence to evidence-based clinical guidelines. A crew resource management (CRM) intervention (communication and teamwork, process and workflow organisation, and standardised information debriefings) was implemented to improve diabetes care and patient outcomes. To assess the effect of the CRM intervention on adherence to evidence-based diabetes care standards, work processes, standardised clinical communication and patient outcomes. Time-series analysis was used to assess the effect on the delivery of standard diabetes services and patient outcomes among medically indigent adults (n = 619). The CRM principles were translated into useful process redesign and standardised care approaches. Significant improvements in microalbumin testing and associated patient outcome measures were attributed to the intervention. The CRM approach provided tools for management that, in the short term, enabled reorganisation and prevention of service omissions and, in the long term, can produce change in the organisational culture for continuous improvement.

  12. Change in Residents' Experience in Continuity Clinic After Patient-Focused Primary Care Redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Benjamin N; Warrick, Stephen; Finkelstein, Jonathan A; Klein, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of efforts to redesign primary care has primarily focused on clinical services, with limited assessment of the effect on learners. This study evaluated the change in pediatric residents' perception of training, teamwork, and patient care in 2 different continuity clinic settings that were implementing patient-focused primary care redesign. Continuity clinic residents at 2 large urban pediatric training programs completed a survey, developed de novo, before and after primary care redesign. Differences in the proportion of positive (≥4 of 5) ratings before and after redesign were compared using chi-squared tests in 2 practice sites, each of which focused on improving specific aspects of their practice. The response rate was >70% in both sites and in both years. Residents in the site focused on teamwork and continuity were more likely to report improved teamwork training (64% vs 83%; P care in clinic also improved (47% vs 68%; P continuity clinic. Future redesign efforts deliberately involving residents might further enhance continuity clinic training. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Development and psychometric evaluation of a questionnaire on nurses' clinical competence eye care in intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Abbas; Saeid, Yaser; Ashrafi, Shahrbanoo; Taheri-Kharameh, Zahra

    2017-05-01

    Given the high prevalence of eye disorders in intensive care units, evaluating critical care nurses' competence in providing standard eye care is a matter of utmost importance. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no valid questionnaire for measuring nurses' competence to undertake eye care. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of a questionnaire on nurses' clinical competence in providing eye care to patients hospitalized in intensive care units. This was a psychometric study. We initially performed a literature review and developed a 38-item questionnaire consisting of knowledge, attitude and practice domains. We invited a panel of experts and a group of critical care nurses to assess the content and face validity of the questionnaire. Thereafter, we evaluated its construct validity by using the exploratory factor analysis and the known-groups comparison technique. Moreover, the test-retest and the internal consistency evaluation techniques were used for assessing the reliability of the questionnaire. Totally, 35 items remained in the final version of the questionnaire. Based on the results of the exploratory factor analysis, we categorized the items of the questionnaire into three factors. The Cronbach's alpha for the attitude and the practice domains as well as the Kuder-Richardson 20 for the knowledge domain showed satisfactory internal consistency. The Cronbach's alpha for the whole questionnaire also was 0·83. The results of this study suggest that the nurses' clinical competence in eye care questionnaire has a good factor structure and an acceptable reliability. A complication of sedation and coma is that some patients are unable to maintain effective eyelid closure. These patients present a higher risk of eye complications. Development of tools for evaluating nurses' competence in providing standard eye care is a fundamental prerequisite for improving the quality of eye care. © 2015 British Association

  14. The critically ill patient with tuberculosis in intensive care: Clinical presentations, management and infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otu, Akaninyene; Hashmi, Madiha; Mukhtar, Ahmed M; Kwizera, Arthur; Tiberi, Simon; Macrae, Bruce; Zumla, Alimudin; Dünser, Martin W; Mer, Mervyn

    2018-03-13

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the top ten causes of death worldwide. In 2016, there were 490,000 cases of multi-drug resistant TB globally. Over 2 billion people have asymptomatic latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. TB represents an important, but neglected management issue in patients presenting to intensive care units. Tuberculosis in intensive care settings may present as the primary diagnosis (active drug sensitive or resistant TB disease). In other patients TB may be an incidental co-morbid finding as previously undiagnosed sub-clinical or latent TB which may re-activate under conditions of stress and immunosuppression. In Sub-Saharan Africa, where co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus and other communicable diseases is highly prevalent, TB is one of the most frequent clinical management issues in all healthcare settings. Acute respiratory failure, septic shock and multi-organ dysfunction are the most common reasons for intensive care unit admission of patients with pulmonary or extrapulmonary TB. Poor absorption of anti-TB drugs occurs in critically ill patients and worsens survival. The mortality of patients requiring intensive care is high. The majority of early TB deaths result from acute cardiorespiratory failure or septic shock. Important clinical presentations, management and infection control issues regarding TB in intensive care settings are reviewed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Assessing barriers to adherence in routine clinical care for pediatric kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnell, Charles D; Rich, Kristin L; Nichols, Melissa; Dahale, Devesh; Goebel, Jens W; Pai, Ahna L H; Hooper, David K; Modi, Avani C

    2017-11-01

    Patient-identified barriers to immunosuppressive medications are associated with poor adherence and negative clinical outcomes in transplant patients. Assessment of adherence barriers is not part of routine post-transplant care, and studies regarding implementing such a process in a reliable way are lacking. Using the Model for Improvement and PDSA cycles, we implemented a system to identify adherence barriers, including patient-centered design of a barriers assessment tool, identification of eligible patients, clear roles for clinic staff, and creating a culture of non-judgmental discussion around adherence. We performed time-series analysis of our process measure. Secondary analyses examined the endorsement and concordance of adherence barriers between patient-caregiver dyads. After three methods of testing, the most reliable delivery system was an EHR-integrated tablet that alerted staff of patient eligibility for assessment. Barriers were endorsed by 35% of caregivers (n=85) and 43% of patients (n=60). The most frequently patient-endorsed barriers were forgetting, poor taste, and side effects. Caregivers endorsed forgetting and side effects. Concordance between patient-caregiver dyads was fair (k=0.299). Standardized adherence barriers assessment is feasible in the clinical care of pediatric kidney transplant patients. Features necessary for success included automation, redundant systems with designated staff to identify and mitigate failures, aligned reporting structures, and reliable measurement approaches. Future studies will examine whether barriers predict clinical outcomes (eg, organ rejection, graft loss). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Linking Nurses' Clinical Leadership to Patient Care Quality: The Role of Transformational Leadership and Workplace Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boamah, Sheila

    2018-03-01

    Background While improving patient safety requires strong nursing leadership, there has been little empirical research that has examined the mechanisms by which leadership influences patient safety outcomes. Aim To test a model examining relationships among transformational leadership, structural empowerment, staff nurse clinical leadership, and nurse-assessed adverse patient outcomes. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted with a randomly selected sample of 378 registered nurses working in direct patient care in acute care hospitals across Ontario, Canada. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized model. Results The model had an acceptable fit, and all paths were significant. Transformational leadership was significantly associated with decreased adverse patient outcomes through structural empowerment and staff nurse clinical leadership. Discussion This study highlights the importance of transformational leadership in creating empowering practice environments that foster high-quality care. The findings indicate that a more complete understanding of what drives desired patient outcomes warrants the need to focus on how to empower nurses and foster clinical leadership practices at the point of care. Conclusion In planning safety strategies, managers must demonstrate transformational leadership behaviors in order to modify the work environment to create better defenses for averting adverse events.

  17. Association of medical home team-based care functions and perceived improvements in patient-centered care at VHA primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Christian D; Dolan, Emily D; Fihn, Stephan D; Rodriguez, Hector P; Meredith, Lisa S; Rosland, Ann-Marie; Lempa, Michele; Wakefield, Bonnie J; Joos, Sandra; Lawler, Lauren H; Harvey, Henry B; Stark, Richard; Schectman, Gordon; Nelson, Karin M

    2014-12-01

    Team-based care is central to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), but most PCMH evaluations measure team structure exclusively. We assessed team-based care in terms of team structure, process and effectiveness, and the association with improvements in teams׳ abilities to deliver patient-centered care. We fielded a cross-sectional survey among 913 VA primary care clinics implementing a PCMH model in 2012. The dependent variable was clinic-level respondent-reported improvements in delivery of patient-centered care. Independent variables included three sets of measures: (1) team structure, (2) team process, and (3) team effectiveness. We adjusted for clinic workload and patient comorbidity. 4819 surveys were returned (25% estimated response rate). The highest ratings were for team structure (median of 89% of respondents being assigned to a teamlet, i.e., a PCP working with the same clinical associate, nurse care manager and clerk) and lowest for team process (median of 10% of respondents reporting the lowest level of stress/chaos). In multivariable regression, perceived improvements in patient-centered care were most strongly associated with participatory decision making (β=32, Pteam processes). A stressful/chaotic clinic environment was associated with higher barriers to patient centered care (β=0.16-0.34, P=Team process and effectiveness measures, often omitted from PCMH evaluations, had stronger associations with perceived improvements in patient-centered care than team structure measures. Team process and effectiveness measures may facilitate synthesis of evaluation findings and help identify positive outlier clinics. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. McKenzie Classification of Extremity Lesions - An audit of primary care patients in 3 clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melbye, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Syndrome classification based on mechanical testing guides clinical decision making in conservative musculoskeletal care. The aim of this audit was to investigate how many patients presenting with problems in the extremities could be classified into the mechanical syndromes described by Robin Mc...

  19. Impact of clinical registries on quality of patient care and clinical outcomes: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewan Md Emdadul Hoque

    Full Text Available Clinical quality registries (CQRs are playing an increasingly important role in improving health outcomes and reducing health care costs. CQRs are established with the purpose of monitoring quality of care, providing feedback, benchmarking performance, describing pattern of treatment, reducing variation and as a tool for conducting research.To synthesise the impact of clinical quality registries (CQRs as an 'intervention' on (I mortality/survival; (II measures of outcome that reflect a process or outcome of health care; (III health care utilisation; and (IV healthcare-related costs.The following electronic databases were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL and Google Scholar. In addition, a review of the grey literature and a reference check of citations and reference lists within articles was undertaken to identify relevant studies in English covering the period January 1980 to December 2016. The PRISMA-P methodology, checklist and standard search strategy using pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria and structured data extraction tools were used. Data on study design and methods, participant characteristics attributes of included registries and impact of the registry on outcome measures and/or processes of care were extracted.We identified 30102 abstracts from which 75 full text articles were assessed and finally 17 articles were selected for synthesis. Out of 17 studies, six focused on diabetes care, two on cardiac diseases, two on lung diseases and others on organ transplantations, rheumatoid arthritis, ulcer healing, surgical complications and kidney disease. The majority of studies were "before after" design (#11 followed by cohort design (#2, randomised controlled trial (#2, experimental non randomised study and one cross sectional comparison. The measures of impact of registries were multifarious and included change in processes of care, quality of care, treatment outcomes, adherence to guidelines and survival. Sixteen of 17

  20. Differences in clinical characteristics between patients assessed for NHS specialist psychotherapy and primary care counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Marco; Fonagy, Peter; Bateman, Anthony W

    2007-12-01

    Although several studies have described patient populations in primary care counselling settings and NHS (National Health Service) specialist psychotherapy settings, there is a paucity of studies specifically comparing differences in clinical characteristics between the two groups of patients. The aim of this study is to ascertain if specialist psychotherapy referrals represent a more challenging client group than primary care counselling patients. We compare the socio-demographic features and severity of presentation in the symptomatic, interpersonal problems and global adjustment dimensions of a sample of patients (N=384) assessed by a primary care counselling service located in North London and a sample of patients (N=853) assessed in eight NHS psychotherapy centres located within urban settings in England. Both the groups completed the Brief Symptom Inventory, the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems and Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation Outcome Measure. Patients referred for specialist psychotherapy services were more dysfunctional than those referred for primary care counselling. The linear function constructed to discriminate the groups showed that a combination of more psychotic symptoms, social inhibitions and higher risk of self-harm effectively identified those referred to psychotherapy services, while patients exhibiting greater levels of somatic and anxiety symptoms and non-assertiveness were more likely to be seen in primary care settings. However, similarities between the two samples were also marked, as shown by the overlap in the distribution of clinical outcomes in routine evaluation clinical scores in the two samples. The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for policy and service delivery of these two types of psychological therapy services.

  1. Clinic Network Collaboration and Patient Tracing to Maximize Retention in HIV Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H McMahon

    Full Text Available Understanding retention and loss to follow up in HIV care, in particular the number of people with unknown outcomes, is critical to maximise the benefits of antiretroviral therapy. Individual-level data are not available for these outcomes in Australia, which has an HIV epidemic predominantly focused amongst men who have sex with men.A network of the 6 main HIV clinical care sites was established in the state of Victoria, Australia. Individuals who had accessed care at these sites between February 2011 and June 2013 as assessed by HIV viral load testing but not accessed care between June 2013 and February 2014 were considered individuals with potentially unknown outcomes. For this group an intervention combining cross-referencing of clinical data between sites and phone tracing individuals with unknown outcomes was performed. 4966 people were in care in the network and before the intervention estimates of retention ranged from 85.9%-95.8% and the proportion with unknown outcomes ranged from 1.3-5.5%. After the intervention retention increased to 91.4-98.8% and unknown outcomes decreased to 0.1-2.4% (p<.01 for all sites for both outcomes. Most common reasons for disengagement from care were being too busy to attend or feeling well. For those with unknown outcomes prior to the intervention documented active psychiatric illness at last visit was associated with not re-entering care (p = 0.04.The network demonstrated low numbers of people with unknown outcomes and high levels of retention in care. Increased levels of retention in care and reductions in unknown outcomes identified after the intervention largely reflected confirmation of clinic transfers while a smaller number were successfully re-engaged in care. Factors associated with disengagement from care were identified. Systems to monitor patient retention, care transfer and minimize disengagement will maximise individual and population-level outcomes for populations with HIV.

  2. A survey of primary care resident attitudes toward continuity clinic patient handover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Kolade

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transfer of clinic patients from graduating residents to interns or junior residents occurs every year, affecting large numbers of patients. Breaches in care continuity may occur, with potential for risk to patient safety. Several guidelines have been developed for implementing standardized inpatient sign-outs, but no specific guidelines exist for outpatient handover. Methods: Residents in primary care programs – internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics – at a US academic medical center were invited to participate in an online survey. The invitation was extended approximately 2 years after electronic medical record (EMR rollout began at the institution. Results: Of 71 eligible residents, 22 (31% responded to the survey. Of these, 18 felt that handover of ambulatory patients was at least moderately important – but only one affirmed the existence of a system for handover. IM residents perceived that they had the highest proportion of high-risk patients (p=0.042; transition-of-care letters were more important to IM residents than other respondents (p=0.041. Conclusion: There is room for improvement in resident acknowledgement of handover processes in continuity clinics. In this study, IM residents attached greater importance to a specific handover tool than other primary care residents. Thus, the different primary care specialties may need to have different handover tools available to them within a shared EMR system.

  3. Alcohol Screening among Opioid Agonist Patients in a Primary Care Clinic and an Opioid Treatment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Jan; Muench, John; Wiest, Katharina; Croff, Raina; Rieckman, Traci; McCarty, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Problem alcohol use is associated with adverse health and economic outcomes, especially among people in opioid agonist treatment. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) are effective in reducing alcohol use; however, issues involved in SBIRT implementation among opioid agonist patients are unknown. To assess identification and treatment of alcohol use disorders, we reviewed clinical records of opioid agonist patients screened for an alcohol use disorder in a primary care clinic (n = 208) and in an opioid treatment program (n = 204) over a two-year period. In the primary care clinic, 193 (93%) buprenorphine patients completed an annual alcohol screening and six (3%) had elevated AUDIT scores. In the opioid treatment program, an alcohol abuse or dependence diagnosis was recorded for 54 (27%) methadone patients. Practitioner focus groups were completed in the primary care (n = 4 physicians) and the opioid treatment program (n = 11 counselors) to assess experience with and attitudes towards screening opioid agonist patients for alcohol use disorders. Focus groups suggested that organizational, structural, provider, patient, and community variables hindered or fostered alcohol screening. Alcohol screening is feasible among opioid agonist patients. Effective implementation, however, requires physician training and systematic changes in workflow.

  4. Perspectives on optimizing care of patients in multidisciplinary chronic kidney disease clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collister, David; Russell, Randall; Verdon, Josee; Beaulieu, Monica; Levin, Adeera

    2016-01-01

    To summarize a jointly held symposium by the Canadian Society of Nephrology (CSN), the Canadian Association of Nephrology Administrators (CANA), and the Canadian Kidney Knowledge Translation and Generation Network (CANN-NET) entitled "Perspectives on Optimizing Care of Patients in Multidisciplinary Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Clinics" that was held on April 24, 2015, in Montreal, Quebec. The panel consisted of a variety of members from across Canada including a multidisciplinary CKD clinic patient (Randall Russell), nephrology fellow (Dr. David Collister), geriatrician (Dr. Josee Verdon), and nephrologists (Dr. Monica Beaulieu, Dr. Adeera Levin). The objectives of the symposium were (1) to gain an understanding of the goals of care for CKD patients, (2) to gain an appreciation of different perspectives regarding optimal care for patients with CKD, (3) to examine the components required for optimal care including education strategies, structures, and tools, and (4) to describe a framework and metrics for CKD care which respect patient and system needs. This article summarizes the key concepts discussed at the symposium from a patient and physician perspectives. Key messages include (1) understanding patient values and preferences is important as it provides a framework as to what to prioritize in multidisciplinary CKD clinic and provincial renal program models, (2) barriers to effective communication and education are common in the elderly, and adaptive strategies to limit their influence are critical to improve adherence and facilitate shared decision-making, (3) the use of standardized operating procedures (SOPs) improves efficiency and minimizes practice variability among health care practitioners, and (4) CKD scorecards with standardized system processes are useful in approaching variability as well as measuring and improving patient outcomes. The perspectives provided may not be applicable across centers given the differences in patient populations including

  5. [Impact of Lean methodology to improve care processes and levels of satisfaction in patient care in a clinical laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morón-Castañeda, L H; Useche-Bernal, A; Morales-Reyes, O L; Mojica-Figueroa, I L; Palacios-Carlos, A; Ardila-Gómez, C E; Parra-Ardila, M V; Martínez-Nieto, O; Sarmiento-Echeverri, N; Rodríguez, C A; Alvarado-Heine, C; Isaza-Ruget, M A

    2015-01-01

    The application of the Lean methodology in health institutions is an effective tool to improve the capacity and workflow, as well as to increase the level of satisfaction of patients and employees. To optimise the time of outpatient care in a clinical laboratory, by implementing a methodology based on the organisation of operational procedures to improve user satisfaction and reduce the number of complaints for delays in care. A quasi-experimental before and after study was conducted between October 2011 to September 2012. XBar and S charts were used to observe the mean service times and standard deviation. The user satisfaction was assessed using service questionnaires. A reduction of 17 minutes was observed in the time of patient care from arrival to leaving the laboratory, and a decrease of 60% in complaints of delay in care. Despite the high staff turnover and 38% increase in the number of patients seen, a culture of empowerment and continuous improvement was acquired, as well as greater efficiency and productivity in the care process, which was reflected by maintaining standards 12 months after implementation. Lean is a viable methodology for clinical laboratory procedures, improving their efficiency and effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Patient safety and quality of care: how may clinical simulation contribute?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    The usability of health information technology (IT) is increasingly recognized as critically important to the development of systems that ensure patient safety and quality of care. The substantial complexity of organizations, work practice and physical environments within the healthcare sector...... in correlation with the clinical context and to study the interaction between users, technology and work practice. Compared with the “classic” methods, such as heuristic inspection and usability testing, clinical simulation takes the clinical context into account. Clinical simulation can be useful in many...... processes in the human-centred design cycle. In the requirement specification, clinical simulation can be useful to analyze user requirements and work practice as well to evaluate requirements. In the design of health IT, clinical simulation can be used to evaluate clinical information systems and serve...

  7. Documentation of clinical care in hospital patients' medical records: A qualitative study of medical students' perspectives on clinical documentation education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Stella; Coverdale, Steven; Callen, Joanne

    2016-12-01

    Clinical documentation is essential for communication between health professionals and the provision of quality care to patients. To examine medical students' perspectives of their education in documentation of clinical care in hospital patients' medical records. A qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with fourth-year medical students was undertaken at a hospital-based clinical school in an Australian university. Several themes reflecting medical students' clinical documentation education emerged from the data: formal clinical documentation education using lectures and tutorials was minimal; most education occurred on the job by junior doctors and student's expressed concerns regarding variation in education between teams and receiving limited feedback on performance. Respondents reported on the importance of feedback for their learning of disease processes and treatments. They suggested that improvements could be made in the timing of clinical documentation education and they stressed the importance of training on the job. On-the-job education with feedback in clinical documentation provides a learning opportunity for medical students and is essential in order to ensure accurate, safe, succinct and timely clinical notes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Clinical and medication profiles stratified by household income in patients referred for diabetes care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenson Lawrence W

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low income individuals with diabetes are at particularly high risk for poor health outcomes. While specialized diabetes care may help reduce this risk, it is not currently known whether there are significant clinical differences across income groups at the time of referral. The objective of this study is to determine if the clinical profiles and medication use of patients referred for diabetes care differ across income quintiles. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted using a Canadian, urban, Diabetes Education Centre (DEC database. Clinical information on the 4687 patients referred to the DEC from May 2000 – January 2002 was examined. These data were merged with 2001 Canadian census data on income. Potential differences in continuous clinical parameters across income quintiles were examined using regression models. Differences in medication use were examined using Chi square analyses. Results Multivariate regression analysis indicated that income was negatively associated with BMI (p Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that low income patients present to diabetes clinic older, heavier and with a more atherogenic lipid profile than do high income patients. Overall medication use was higher among the lower income group suggesting that differences in clinical profiles are not the result of under-treatment, thus invoking lifestyle factors as potential contributors to these findings.

  9. Patient Experience of Chronic Illness Care and Medical Home Transformation in Safety Net Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Elizabeth L; Gao, Yue; Peek, Monica E; Nocon, Robert S; Gunter, Kathryn E; Lee, Sang Mee; Chin, Marshall H

    2018-02-01

    To examine the relationship between medical home transformation and patient experience of chronic illness care. Thirteen safety net clinics located in five states enrolled in the Safety Net Medical Home Initiative. Repeated cross-sectional surveys of randomly selected adult patients were completed at baseline (n = 303) and postintervention (n = 271). Questions from the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) (100-point scale) were used to capture patient experience of chronic illness care. Generalized estimating equation methods were used to (i) estimate how differential improvement in patient-centered medical home (PCMH) capability affected differences in modified PACIC scores between baseline and postintervention, and (ii) to examine cross-sectional associations between PCMH capability and modified PACIC scores for patients at completion of the intervention. In adjusted analyses, high PCMH improvement (above median) was only marginally associated with a larger increase in total modified PACIC score (adjusted β = 7.7, 95 percent confidence interval [CI]: -1.1 to 16.5). At completion of the intervention, a 10-point higher PCMH capability score was associated with an 8.9-point higher total modified PACIC score (95 percent CI: 3.1-14.7) and higher scores in four of five subdomains (patient activation, delivery system design, contextual care, and follow-up/coordination). We report that sustained, 5-year medical home transformation may be associated with modest improvement in patient experience of chronic illness care for vulnerable populations in safety net clinics. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  10. Integrating Musculoskeletal Education and Patient Care at Medical Student-Run Free Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Thomas; Wilcox-Fogel, Nate; Kraus, Emily; Ladd, Amy; Fredericson, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Student-run free clinics (SRFCs) have emerged as an important educational component of United States (U.S.) medical schools. Despite the prevalence of musculoskeletal (MSK) problems presenting to SRFCs, students and clinics are often unprepared to diagnose and to treat common MSK complaints. We sought to determine the scope of diagnosis and treatment at a medical student-run free clinic specializing in musculoskeletal care using physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) residents. Secondary goals included reviewing student satisfaction and determining the appropriateness of the clinic in medical education. Retrospective chart review, anonymous online survey. Primary care, free student clinic affiliated with tertiary academic medical center. A total of 20 medical student volunteers, 6 PM&R residents, and 91 community patients. We established a musculoskeletal clinic as a specialty referral clinic for the 2 primary care SRFCs with institutional support from a partner medical school. We then reviewed clinical operations retrospectively using electronic medical records and student satisfaction based on an online survey. We analyzed patient demographics and chief complaints, referrals provided, and medical services rendered. We also used a 5-point Likert scale to assess student satisfaction. A monthly musculoskeletal referral clinic was established with the oversight of PM&R attendings and residents. The clinic received 91 referrals and managed 61 unique patients over a 2.5-year study period. The most common presentations to the clinic involved knee pain (n = 17, 27.9%) and back pain (n = 16, 26.2%). Pro bono relationships with community and institutional partners enabled all patients to receive medical examinations, physical therapy visits, plain film radiographs, and insurance consultations free of charge. Student satisfaction with teaching and patient care was high, with 19 of 20 students reporting their experience as "good" or "excellent." SRFCs represent an

  11. Patient safety and quality of care: How may clinical simulation contribute?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Jensen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The usability of health information technology (IT is increasingly recognized as critically important to the development of systems that ensure patient safety and quality of care. The substantial complexity of organizations, work practice and physical environments within the healthcare sector influences the development and application of health IT. When health IT is introduced in local clinical work practices, potential patient safety hazards and insufficient support of work practices need to be examined. Qualitative methods, such as clinical simulation, may be used to evaluate new technology in correlation with the clinical context and to study the interaction between users, technology and work practice. Compared with the “classic” methods, such as heuristic inspection and usability testing, clinical simulation takes the clinical context into account. Clinical simulation can be useful in many processes in the human-centred design cycle. In the requirement specification, clinical simulation can be useful to analyze user requirements and work practice as well to evaluate requirements. In the design of health IT, clinical simulation can be used to evaluate clinical information systems and serve as common ground to help to achieve a shared understanding between various communities of practice. In a public procurement process, a clinical simulation-based assessment can help give insight into different solutions and how they support work practice. Before organizational implementation, clinical simulation is a very suitable means, by which to assess an application in connection with work practice.

  12. The proportion of clinically relevant alarms decreases as patient clinical severity decreases in intensive care units: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuchi, Ryota; Sato, Hajime; Nanjo, Yuko; Echigo, Masahiro; Tanaka, Aoi; Ishii, Takeshi; Matsubara, Takehiro; Doi, Kent; Gunshin, Masataka; Hiruma, Takahiro; Nakamura, Kensuke; Shinohara, Kazuaki; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu; Umezu, Mitsuo; Yahagi, Naoki

    2013-09-10

    To determine (1) the proportion and number of clinically relevant alarms based on the type of monitoring device; (2) whether patient clinical severity, based on the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score, affects the proportion of clinically relevant alarms and to suggest; (3) methods for reducing clinically irrelevant alarms in an intensive care unit (ICU). A prospective, observational clinical study. A medical ICU at the University of Tokyo Hospital in Tokyo, Japan. All patients who were admitted directly to the ICU, aged ≥18 years, and not refused active treatment were registered between January and February 2012. The alarms, alarm settings, alarm messages, waveforms and video recordings were acquired in real time and saved continuously. All alarms were annotated with respect to technical and clinical validity. 18 ICU patients were monitored. During 2697 patient-monitored hours, 11 591 alarms were annotated. Only 740 (6.4%) alarms were considered to be clinically relevant. The monitoring devices that triggered alarms the most often were the direct measurement of arterial pressure (33.5%), oxygen saturation (24.2%), and electrocardiogram (22.9%). The numbers of relevant alarms were 12.4% (direct measurement of arterial pressure), 2.4% (oxygen saturation) and 5.3% (electrocardiogram). Positive correlations were established between patient clinical severities and the proportion of relevant alarms. The total number of irrelevant alarms could be reduced by 21.4% by evaluating their technical relevance. We demonstrated that (1) the types of devices that alarm the most frequently were direct measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation and ECG, and most of those alarms were not clinically relevant; (2) the proportion of clinically relevant alarms decreased as the patients' status improved and (3) the irrelevance alarms can be considerably reduced by evaluating their technical relevance.

  13. Epidemiological profile of colombian patients with rheumatoid arthritis in a specialized care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Molano, Wilson; Fernández-Avila, Daniel; Jiménez, Ruth; Cardozo, Rosa; Marín, Andrés; Soler, María Del Pilar; Gómez, Olga; Ruiz, Oscar

    Few studies report the epidemiological profile of RA patients attending clinics for comprehensive care. We describe the clinical, socio-demographic characteristics and comorbidities of a cohort of patients with RA. Cross-sectional study in a cohort of patients according to ACR criteria/EULAR 2010 classification who have entered to the AR clinic since October 2012 until May 2014, referred from primary care. Frequencies for socio-demographic, comorbidity, state of disease activity, functional status, biomarkers and therapeutic modalities variables are described. In total, 1652 patients were included with a mean age of 58 years and a duration of 9 years. Rheumatoid factor was positive in 80% and anti-citrullinated peptide antibody in 63% of patients. In total, 43.6% of patients had comorbidities: Hypertension (20.4%), osteoporosis (17.3%) and Sjögren's syndrome (10.4%). Fifty percent of the patients had moderate and high disease activity level measured by DAS-28 score, and the mean HAQ score was 0.64 (DS 1.12). Seventy three percent of patients were treated with oral disease modified anti rheumatic treatment and 63.6% of them were with methotrexate. 42.4% of the patients were treated with glucocorticoids (mean dose 6.3mg). The epidemiological behavior of a group of RA patients is reported. The presence of comorbidities is significant affecting the risk of morbidity and mortality in these patients. The definition of the epidemiological profile of this population will allow the design of research questions to resolve outstanding problems in the clinical context of this pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  14. Patient care and administrative activities of nurses in clinical/surgical units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Moura Luvisotto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the administrative and nursing care activities most performed by nurses in clinical/surgical units and to determine which are most and least pleasant to them. Methods: A descriptive-exploratory field study, with a quantitative approach and with a sample made up of 40 nurses working in clinical/surgical units who answered a three-part questionnaire composed of identification data and characterization of the professional; a list of nursing and administrative activities for the nurse to grade according to the numbers: “0 = I do not perform it”, “1 = I perform it occasionally”, “2 = I perform it often”, “3 = I perform it daily”; two open-ended questions, in which the nurse listed the activities he/she enjoyed the most and the least. Results: The administrative activities most performed by the nurses were: changing work shifts, preparing employee daily task charts and managing tests; the most performed nursing care activities were related to the stages of the Nursing Care Systematization and the interaction with the multi-professional team; the most enjoyable activities were direct patient care, patient evaluation and implementation of the systematization; the least enjoyable activities were administrative and bureaucratic routines, justification of complaints/problem-solving and preparation of employee task charts. Conclusion: Compared to administrative activities, nursing activities were performed most during the daily routine of the nurse, and the most enjoyable activities were those related to patient care, according to the opinions of the professionals.

  15. Clinical Pathways and the Patient Perspective in the Pursuit of Value-Based Oncology Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersek, Jennifer L; Nadler, Eric; Freeman-Daily, Janet; Mazharuddin, Samir; Kim, Edward S

    2017-01-01

    The art of practicing oncology has evolved substantially in the past 5 years. As more and more diagnostic tests, biomarker-directed therapies, and immunotherapies make their way to the oncology marketplace, oncologists will find it increasingly difficult to keep up with the many therapeutic options. Additionally, the cost of cancer care seems to be increasing. Clinical pathways are a systematic way to organize and display detailed, evidence-based treatment options and assist the practitioner with best practice. When selecting which treatment regimens to include on a clinical pathway, considerations must include the efficacy and safety, as well as costs, of the therapy. Pathway treatment regimens must be continually assessed and modified to ensure that the most up-to-date, high-quality options are incorporated. Value-based models, such as the ASCO Value Framework, can assist providers in presenting economic evaluations of clinical pathway treatment options to patients, thus allowing the patient to decide the overall value of each treatment regimen. Although oncologists and pathway developers can decide which treatment regimens to include on a clinical pathway based on the efficacy of the treatment, assessment of the value of that treatment regimen ultimately lies with the patient. Patient definitions of value will be an important component to enhancing current value-based oncology care models and incorporating new, high-quality, value-based therapeutics into oncology clinical pathways.

  16. Review of electronic patient-reported outcomes systems used in cancer clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Roxanne E; Snyder, Claire F; Abernethy, Amy P; Basch, Ethan; Potosky, Arnold L; Roberts, Aaron C; Loeffler, Deena R; Reeve, Bryce B

    2014-07-01

    The use of electronic patient-reported outcomes (PRO) systems is increasing in cancer clinical care settings. This review comprehensively identifies existing PRO systems and explores how systems differ in the administration of PRO assessments, the integration of information into the clinic workflow and electronic health record (EHR) systems, and the reporting of PRO information. Electronic PRO (e-PRO) systems were identified through a semistructured review of published studies, gray literature, and expert identification. System developers were contacted to provide detailed e-PRO system characteristics and clinical implementation information using a structured review form. A total of 33 unique systems implemented in cancer clinical practice were identified. Of these, 81% provided detailed information about system characteristics. Two system classifications were established: treatment-centered systems designed for patient monitoring during active cancer treatment (n = 8) and patient-centered systems following patients across treatment and survivorship periods (n = 19). There was little consensus on administration, integration, or result reporting between these system types. Patient-centered systems were more likely to provide user-friendly features such as at-home assessments, integration into larger electronic system networks (eg, EHRs), and more robust score reporting options. Well-established systems were more likely to have features that increased assessment flexibility (eg, location, automated reminders) and better clinical integration. The number of e-PRO systems has increased. Systems can be programmed to have numerous features that facilitate integration of PRO assessment and routine monitoring into clinical care. Important barriers to system usability and widespread adoption include assessment flexibility, clinical integration, and high-quality data collection and reporting. Copyright © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Comparing fibromyalgia patients from primary care and rheumatology settings: clinical and psychosocial features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Ana Lledó; Mira Pastor, Maria Angeles; Calatayud, Nieves Pons; Lopez-Roig, Sofía; Cantero Terol, Maria Carmen

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare clinical symptoms, perceived health status, health resource use and psychosocial features in fibromyalgia (FM) patients at different health care levels. A total of 315 participants were recruited from primary care (PC) (n=101) and rheumatology settings (RS) (n=214). Subjects completed a protocol of clinical features and health resource use, hospital anxiety and depression scale, sickness impact profile, chronic pain self-efficacy scale, multidimensional pain locus of control scale, perceived health competence scale and chronic pain coping inventory. Student's t test, effect size, and contrast and power test were performed to examine differences between samples. FM patients treated in PC and RS were similar in most variables assessed and only differed significantly in tender points, sleep disturbance, wellness-focused coping strategies and in self-efficacy beliefs. The similarities do not support patient selection through care levels and thus, in the Spanish health care system at least, endorse PC as a reference unit for treatment and questioning the benefits of referring patients to RS.

  18. Patient satisfaction with TB care clinical consultations in Kampala: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssengooba, Willy; Kirenga, Bruce; Muwonge, Catherine; Kyaligonza, Steven; Kasozi, Samuel; Mugabe, Frank; Boeree, Martin; Joloba, Moses; Okwera, Alphonse

    2016-12-01

    Patient satisfaction towards care during encounter with clinicians is key for better treatment outcomes. We assessed patient satisfaction with TB clinical care consultations in Kampala, Uganda. This was a facility-based cross sectional study done between September 2012 and February 2013 using qualitative method of data collection. Participants consecutively completed a pre-tested structured satisfaction questionnaire. A criteria of the rating as good; >75% was considered acceptable, (50-75%) as more effort is needed and patient satisfaction, were: time spent with clinician (85.4%), explanation of what was done (87.6%), technical skills (91.6%), personal manner of the clinician seen (91.6%). Factors for low satisfaction were; waiting time before getting an appointment (61.8%), convenience of location of consultation office (53.4%), getting through to the office by phone (21.3%) and length of time waiting at the office (61.2%). Tuberculosis patients in Kampala are satisfied with TB clinical care consultations. Addressing factors with low patient satisfaction may significantly impact on treatment outcome.

  19. The development and evaluation of a nursing information system for caring clinical in-patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu-Wen; Li, Chih-Ping; Wang, Mei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The research aimed to develop a nursing information system in order to simplify the admission procedure for caring clinical in-patient, enhance the efficiency of medical information documentation. Therefore, by correctly delivering patients’ health records, and providing continues care, patient safety and care quality would be effectively improved. The study method was to apply Spiral Model development system to compose a nursing information team. By using strategies of data collection, working environment observation, applying use-case modeling, and conferences of Joint Application Design (JAD) to complete the system requirement analysis and design. The Admission Care Management Information System (ACMIS) mainly included: (1) Admission nursing management information system. (2) Inter-shift meeting information management system. (3) The linkage of drug management system and physical examination record system. The framework contained qualitative and quantitative components that provided both formative and summative elements of the evaluation. System evaluation was to apply information success model, and developed questionnaire of consisting nurses’ acceptance and satisfaction. The results of questionnaires were users’ satisfaction, the perceived self-involvement, age and information quality were positively to personal and organizational effectiveness. According to the results of this study, the Admission Care Management Information System was practical to simplifying clinic working procedure and effective in communicating and documenting admission medical information.

  20. Epilepsy and seizure ontology: towards an epilepsy informatics infrastructure for clinical research and patient care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S; Lhatoo, Samden D; Gupta, Deepak K; Cui, Licong; Zhao, Meng; Jayapandian, Catherine; Bozorgi, Alireza; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Objective Epilepsy encompasses an extensive array of clinical and research subdomains, many of which emphasize multi-modal physiological measurements such as electroencephalography and neuroimaging. The integration of structured, unstructured, and signal data into a coherent structure for patient care as well as clinical research requires an effective informatics infrastructure that is underpinned by a formal domain ontology. Methods We have developed an epilepsy and seizure ontology (EpSO) using a four-dimensional epilepsy classification system that integrates the latest International League Against Epilepsy terminology recommendations and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) common data elements. It imports concepts from existing ontologies, including the Neural ElectroMagnetic Ontologies, and uses formal concept analysis to create a taxonomy of epilepsy syndromes based on their seizure semiology and anatomical location. Results EpSO is used in a suite of informatics tools for (a) patient data entry, (b) epilepsy focused clinical free text processing, and (c) patient cohort identification as part of the multi-center NINDS-funded study on sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. EpSO is available for download at http://prism.case.edu/prism/index.php/EpilepsyOntology. Discussion An epilepsy ontology consortium is being created for community-driven extension, review, and adoption of EpSO. We are in the process of submitting EpSO to the BioPortal repository. Conclusions EpSO plays a critical role in informatics tools for epilepsy patient care and multi-center clinical research. PMID:23686934

  1. Surgical Precision in Clinical Documentation Connects Patient Safety, Quality of Care, and Reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittinger, Benjamin J; Matejicka, Anthony; Mahabir, Raman C

    2016-01-01

    Emphasis on quality of care has become a major focus for healthcare providers and institutions. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has multiple quality-of-care performance programs and initiatives aimed at providing transparency to the public, which provide the ability to directly compare services provided by hospitals and individual physicians. These quality-of-care programs highlight the transition to pay for performance, rewarding physicians and hospitals for high quality of care. To improve the use of pay for performance and analyze quality-of-care outcome measures, the Division of Plastic Surgery at Scott & White Memorial Hospital participated in an inpatient clinical documentation accuracy project (CDAP). Performance and improvement on metrics such as case mix index, severity of illness, risk of mortality, and geometric mean length of stay were assessed after implementation. After implementation of the CDAP, the division of plastic surgery showed increases in case mix index, calculated severity of illness, and calculated risk of mortality and a decrease in length of stay. For academic plastic surgeons, quality of care demands precise documentation of each patient. The CDAP provides one avenue to hone clinical documentation and performance on quality measures.

  2. The impact of clinical librarian services on patients and health care organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettle, Alison; Maden, Michelle; Payne, Clare

    2016-06-01

    Systematic reviews have found limited evidence of effectiveness and impact of clinical librarians (CLs) due to the poor quality of reporting, scale and design of previous studies. To measure specific CL impact on organisational and patient outcomes using a robust approach that helps CLs develop research skills. Questionnaire and interviews. Clinical librarians contribute to a wide range of outcomes in the short and longer term reflecting organisational priorities and objectives. These include direct contributions to choice of intervention (36%) diagnosis (26%) quality of life (25%), increased patient involvement in decision making (26%) and cost savings and risk management including avoiding tests, referrals, readmissions and reducing length of stay (28%). Interventions provided by CL's are complex and each contributes to multiple outcomes of importance to health care organisations. This study is unique in taking a wide view of potential and specific impacts to which CLs contribute across health care organisations. It is the largest UK evaluation of CL services to date and demonstrates CLs affect direct patient care, improve quality and save money. Future researchers are urged to use the tools presented to collect data on the same outcomes to build a significant and comprehensive international evidence base about the effectiveness and impact of clinical librarian services. © 2016 Health Libraries Group.

  3. Adjunctive naturopathic care for type 2 diabetes: patient-reported and clinical outcomes after one year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Ryan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several small, uncontrolled studies have found improvements in self-care behaviors and reductions in clinical risk in persons with type 2 diabetes who received care from licensed naturopathic physicians. To extend these findings and determine the feasibility and promise of a randomized clinical trial, we conducted a prospective study to measure the effects of adjunctive naturopathic care (ANC in primary care patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes. Methods Forty patients with type 2 diabetes were invited from a large integrated health care system to receive up to eight ANC visits for up to one year. Participants were required to have hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c values between 7.5-9.5 % and at least one additional cardiovascular risk factor (i.e., hypertension, hyperlipidemia or overweight. Standardized instruments were administered by telephone to collect outcome data on self-care, self-efficacy, diabetes problem areas, perceived stress, motivation, and mood. Changes from baseline scores were calculated at 6- and 12-months after entry into the study. Six and 12-month changes in clinical risk factors (i.e., HbA1c, lipid and blood pressure were calculated for the ANC cohort, and compared to changes in a cohort of 329 eligible, non-participating patients constructed using electronic medical records data. Between-cohort comparisons were adjusted for age, gender, baseline HbA1c, and diabetes medications. Six months was pre-specified as the primary endpoint for outcome assessment. Results Participants made 3.9 ANC visits on average during the year, 78 % of which occurred within six months of entry into the study. At 6-months, significant improvements were found in most patient-reported measures, including glucose testing (P = 0.001, diet (P = 0.001, physical activity (P = 0.02, mood (P = 0.001, self-efficacy (P = 0.0001 and motivation to change lifestyle (P = 0.003. Improvements in glucose testing, mood, self-efficacy and

  4. Foot care and footwear practices among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal A.T. Gayle

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI Diabetes Clinic who engage in recommended foot care and footwear practices. Seventy-two participants from the UHWI Diabetes Clinic completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants were a subset of a sex-stratified random sample of clinic attendees and were interviewed in 2010. Data analysis included frequency estimates of the various foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants had a mean age of 57.0±14.3 years and mean duration of diabetes of 17.0±10.3 years. Fifty-three percent of participants reported being taught how to care for their feet, while daily foot inspection was performed by approximately 60% of participants. Most participants (90% reported daily use of moisturizing lotion on the feet but almost 50% used lotion between the toes. In conclusion, approximately 85% of participants reported wearing shoes or slippers both indoors and outdoors but over 40% reported walking barefoot at some time. Thirteen percent wore special shoes for diabetes while over 80% wore shoes without socks at some time. Although much larger proportions reported wearing broad round toe shoes (82% or leather shoes (64%, fairly high proportions reported wearing pointed toe shoes (39%, and 43% of women wore high heel shoes. Approximately 60% of patients at the UHWI diabetic clinic engage in daily foot inspection and other recommended practices, but fairly high proportions reported foot care or footwear choices that should be avoided.

  5. Identification of symptom clusters in cancer patients at palliative care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülçin Senel Özalp

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cancer patients often experience a large number of symptoms together. The aim of this study is to determine the symptom clusters in cancer patients at palliative care clinic. Methods: Hundred and seventy consecutive patients were enrolled in the study. Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale was used for symptom assessment of the patients. Results: The most experienced symptoms by the patients during the past week before hospitalization in palliative care clinic were lack of energy (95.4%, weight loss (91.2%, lack of appetite (89.4%, pain (88.2%, dry mouth (87.6%, feeling sad (87.6%, feeling nervous (82.9%, worrying (81.2%, and feeling irritable (80.6%. Five symptom clusters were defined. First cluster: pain, feeling nervous, dry mouth, worrying, feeling irritable, weight loss; second cluster: feeling drowsy, numbness/tingling in hands/feet, difficulty in sleeping, dizziness, constipation, I do not look like myself; third cluster: nausea, vomiting; fourth cluster: shortness of breath, difficulty in swallowing, cough, change in the way food tastes; and fifth cluster: feeling bloated, problems with urination, diarrhea, itching, mouth sores, hair loss, swelling of arm or legs, change in the skin. Conclusions: We encountered various symptom clusters in advanced cancer patients. Identification of symptom clusters and knowledge of cluster composition in oncological population may particularly contribute individualization of the treatment.

  6. Impact of Information Technology, Clinical Resource Constraints, and Patient-Centered Practice Characteristics on Quality of Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JongDeuk Baek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Factors in the practice environment, such as health information technology (IT infrastructure, availability of other clinical resources, and financial incentives, may influence whether practices are able to successfully implement the patient-centered medical home (PCMH model and realize its benefits. This study investigates the impacts of those PCMH-related elements on primary care physicians’ perception of quality of care. Methods: A multiple logistic regression model was estimated using the 2004 to 2005 CTS Physician Survey, a national sample of salaried primary care physicians (n = 1733. Results: The patient-centered practice environment and availability of clinical resources increased physicians’ perceived quality of care. Although IT use for clinical information access did enhance physicians’ ability to provide high quality of care, a similar positive impact of IT use was not found for e-prescribing or the exchange of clinical patient information. Lack of resources was negatively associated with physician perception of quality of care. Conclusion: Since health IT is an important foundation of PCMH, patient-centered practices are more likely to have health IT in place to support care delivery. However, despite its potential to enhance delivery of primary care, simply making health IT available does not necessarily translate into physicians’ perceptions that it enhances the quality of care they provide. It is critical for health-care managers and policy makers to ensure that primary care physicians fully recognize and embrace the use of new technology to improve both the quality of care provided and the patient outcomes.

  7. Impact of Information Technology, Clinical Resource Constraints, and Patient-Centered Practice Characteristics on Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, JongDeuk; Seidman, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Factors in the practice environment, such as health information technology (IT) infrastructure, availability of other clinical resources, and financial incentives, may influence whether practices are able to successfully implement the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model and realize its benefits. This study investigates the impacts of those PCMH-related elements on primary care physicians' perception of quality of care. A multiple logistic regression model was estimated using the 2004 to 2005 CTS Physician Survey, a national sample of salaried primary care physicians (n = 1733). The patient-centered practice environment and availability of clinical resources increased physicians' perceived quality of care. Although IT use for clinical information access did enhance physicians' ability to provide high quality of care, a similar positive impact of IT use was not found for e-prescribing or the exchange of clinical patient information. Lack of resources was negatively associated with physician perception of quality of care. Since health IT is an important foundation of PCMH, patient-centered practices are more likely to have health IT in place to support care delivery. However, despite its potential to enhance delivery of primary care, simply making health IT available does not necessarily translate into physicians' perceptions that it enhances the quality of care they provide. It is critical for health-care managers and policy makers to ensure that primary care physicians fully recognize and embrace the use of new technology to improve both the quality of care provided and the patient outcomes.

  8. Patients' attitudes to medical and psychosocial aspects of care in fertility clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Holstein, B E; Boivin, J

    2003-01-01

    services for both men and women was high infertility-related stress in the marital, personal and social domain. CONCLUSIONS: A supportive attitude from medical staff and the provision of both medical and psychosocial information and support should be integral aspects of medical care in fertility clinics...... among infertile people. METHODS: We conducted an epidemiological study based on questionnaires among all new couples attending five fertility clinics with a response rate of 80.0% and a total of 2250 patients. RESULTS: The vast majority of both men and women considered a high level of medical....... Although only a minority of the participants perceived professional psychosocial services as important, they should be available for patients whose infertility causes them much strain, especially for patients whose marital relationship suffered much because of infertility....

  9. The value of the clinical geneticist caring for adults with congenital heart disease: diagnostic yield and patients' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Engelen, Klaartje; Baars, Marieke J. H.; Felix, Joyce P.; Postma, Alex V.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2013-01-01

    For adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), knowledge about the origin and inheritance of their CHD is important. Clinical geneticists may play a significant role in their care. We explored the diagnostic yield of clinical genetic consultation of adult CHD patients, patients' motivations

  10. Development of Clinical Pharmacy in Switzerland: Involvement of Community Pharmacists in Care for Older Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersberger, Kurt E; Messerli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    The role of the community pharmacist in primary care has been undergoing change in Switzerland in parallel to international developments: it has become more clinically and patient oriented. Special services of community pharmacists to older patients taking long-term or multiple medications, discharged from hospitals or experiencing cognitive impairment or disability have been developed. These services require more clinical knowledge and skills from community pharmacists and are based on, for example, 'simple or intermediate medication reviews' focused primarily to improve medication adherence and rational drug use by a patient. Reflecting the new role of community pharmacies, this article describes the current services provided by community pharmacies in Switzerland, e.g., 'polymedication check', 'weekly pill organizer', and 'services for chronic patients', as well as new Swiss educational and reimbursement systems supporting development of these services. In the international context, involvement of community pharmacists in patient-oriented care is growing. This review summarizes positive and negative experiences from implementation of community pharmacy services in Switzerland and provides examples for the development of such services in other countries.

  11. Clinical features of patients with episcleritis and scleritis in an Italian tertiary care referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchicci, Luigi; Miserocchi, Elisabetta; Di Nicola, Maura; La Spina, Carlo; Bandello, Francesco; Modorati, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate demographic characteristics, clinical features, systemic disease associations, visual outcomes, and treatment modalities of patients with episcleritis and scleritis in an Italian tertiary care referral center. Data from 25 patients with episcleritis and from 85 patients with scleritis followed from 2003 to 2012 were retrospectively evaluated. The main outcome measures were demographics, ocular disease characteristics, presence of systemic associated disease, treatment regimen, and follow-up period. Episcleritis and scleritis were found bilaterally in 24% and 31% of patients, respectively (pepiscleritis was diffuse in 15 and focal in 10 patients, while the scleritis was diffuse in 49, nodular in 28, necrotizing in 6, and posterior in 2 patients. Anterior uveitis (4% vs 31%; pepiscleritis and patients with scleritis, respectively. An associated systemic disease was found in 20% and 52% of patients with episcleritis and patients with scleritis (pepiscleritis, 76% required topical corticosteroid treatment to achieve disease resolution, 16% oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and 8% antivirals; 39% of patients with scleritis required systemic NSAIDs, 12% oral corticosteroids, 34% immunosuppressive drugs, and 15% antibiotics or antivirals. The importance of differentiating scleritis from episcleritis is remarkable given the significant difference in the degree of ocular complications and associated systemic diseases between these ocular conditions. Prompt diagnosis, systemic assessment, and treatment are fundamental in all patients with scleral inflammation.

  12. Clinical effectiveness of care managers in collaborative care for patients with depression in Swedish primary health care: a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkelund, Cecilia; Svenningsson, Irene; Hange, Dominique; Udo, Camilla; Petersson, Eva-Lisa; Ariai, Nashmil; Nejati, Shabnam; Wessman, Catrin; Wikberg, Carl; André, Malin; Wallin, Lars; Westman, Jeanette

    2018-02-09

    Depression is one of the leading causes of disability and affects 10-15% of the population. The majority of people with depressive symptoms seek care and are treated in primary care. Evidence internationally for high quality care supports collaborative care with a care manager. Our aim was to study clinical effectiveness of a care manager intervention in management of primary care patients with depression in Sweden. In a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial 23 primary care centers (PCCs), urban and rural, included patients aged ≥ 18 years with a new (Care management including continuous contact between care manager and patient, a structured management plan, and behavioral activation, altogether around 6-7 contacts over 12 weeks. Control condition was care as usual (CAU). Depression symptoms (measured by Mongomery-Asberg depression score-self (MADRS-S) and BDI-II), quality of life (QoL) (EQ-5D), return to work and sick leave, service satisfaction, and antidepressant medication. Data were analyzed with the intention-to-treat principle. One hundred ninety two patients with depression at PCCs with care managers were allocated to the intervention group, and 184 patients at control PCCs were allocated to the control group. Mean depression score measured by MADRS-S was 2.17 lower in the intervention vs. the control group (95% CI [0.56; 3.79], p = 0.009) at 3 months and 2.27 lower (95% CI [0.59; 3.95], p = 0.008) at 6 months; corresponding BDI-II scores were 1.96 lower (95% CI [- 0.19; 4.11], p = 0.07) in the intervention vs. control group at 6 months. Remission was significantly higher in the intervention group at 6 months (61% vs. 47%, p = 0.006). QoL showed a steeper increase in the intervention group at 3 months (p = 0.01). During the first 3 months, return to work was significantly higher in the intervention vs. the control group. Patients in the intervention group were more consistently on antidepressant medication than

  13. Can final year medical students significantly contribute to patient care? A pilot study about the perception of patients and clinical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Christian; Edelhäuser, Friedrich; Tauschel, Diethard; Riechmann, Merle; Tekian, Ara

    2010-01-01

    Active participation of medical students in patient care has been shown to be important for professional development of learners. Not much is known about the impact of active student participation (ASP) to the quality of patient care. We established a Clinical Education Ward (CEW) for the final year medical students caring for patients under structured clinical supervision. This study investigates the views of both patients and clinical staff on the impact of ASP on patient care. The Picker Inpatient Questionnaire (PIQ) was used to survey all the patients admitted to the CEW during the pilot phase. Results concerning the general quality of health care and the patient-physician relationship (PPR) were compared to two matched pair control groups: patients of the same department (CG1) and of internal wards in Germany (CG2). In addition, quantitative and qualitative data were collected from patients and clinical staff members to specify the impact of students on patient care. Out of 111 patients, 64 responded. The PIQ results revealed very minor problems in the assessment of the overall general quality of care and in PPR at the CEW, while significant improvements existed when compared to CG2. Furthermore, 79% of the patients and 95% of the staff members recorded a positive impact of ASP. Qualitative data illustrated and complemented these results. Chances and challenges in programs with high participation of students in clinical care are discussed. ASP may not only be useful for learners but also offers chances and benefits for patient care.

  14. Effect of Continuous Care model on lifestyle modification in patients with hypertension: Randomized clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsane Shahrani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most important modifiable cardiovascular disease. One of the main factors affecting the risk of hypertension is people’s lifestyle, for which appropriate changes in lifestyle-related factors creating cardiovascular risks need to be developed through new and effective approaches in long-term. Follow-up is an important tool for active participation in treatment and behavior changes; therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of continuous care model on the lifestyle of patients with hypertension. In this two-stage clinical trial, two groups of 64 patients with hypertension at the Isfahan Hypertension Center were selected through simple sampling, who hold the study criteria. The samples were randomly divided into two groups of 32 people as the experimental and control groups. The continuous care in the test group was carried out in the form of a four-stage program including orientation, sensitization, control and evaluation for 3 months. The control patients received usual care. Two questionnaires were employed to collect demographic data and lifestyle inventory data for hypertension used in two stages of pre- and post-intervention. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and statistical tests such as chisquare, Mann-Whitney, independent and paired t-test and analysis of covariance by SPSS version 20. Statistical tests showed no significant differences between the mean scores of two groups in life style dimensions before the intervention. After the intervention, however, the mean scores of lifestyle and its dimensions were significantly higher in the test group than those in the control group (p <0.001 According to the results, it can be concluded that applying continuous care model has significantly been effective in lifestyle modification of patients with high blood pressure. Training the patients and strengthening by repetition, monitoring and management of nurses can be important factors in promoting

  15. [Analysis of patient complaints in Primary Care: An opportunity to improve clinical safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Añel-Rodríguez, R M; Cambero-Serrano, M I; Irurzun-Zuazabal, E

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and type of the clinical safety problems contained in the complaints made by patients and users in Primary Care. An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted by analysing both the complaint forms and the responses given to them in the period of one year. At least 4.6% of all claims analysed in this study contained clinical safety problems. The family physician is the professional who received the majority of the complaints (53.6%), and the main reason was the problems related to diagnosis (43%), mainly the delay in diagnosis. Other variables analysed were the severity of adverse events experienced by patients (in 68% of cases the patient suffered some harm), the subsequent impact on patient care, which was affected in 39% of cases (7% of cases even requiring hospital admission), and the level of preventability of adverse events (96% avoidable) described in the claims. Finally the type of response issued to each complaint was analysed, being purely bureaucratic in 64% of all cases. Complaints are a valuable source of information about the deficiencies identified by patients and healthcare users. There is considerable scope for improvement in the analysis and management of claims in general, and those containing clinical safety issues in particular. To date, in our area, there is a lack of appropriate procedures for processing these claims. Likewise, we believe that other pathways or channels should be opened to enable communication by patients and healthcare users. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Rethinking attitudes to student clinical supervision and patient care: a change management success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Maree; Wade, Victoria; McAllister, Sue; Stupans, Ieva; Miller, Jennifer; Burgess, Teresa; LeCouteur, Amanda; Starr, Linda

    2014-08-30

    The aim of this project was to explore the process of change in a busy community dental clinic following a team development intervention designed to improve the management of student supervision during clinical placements. An action research model was used. Seven members of a community dental clinic team (three dentists, two dental therapists, one dental assistant and the clinic manager), together with the university clinical placement supervisor participated in the team development intervention. The intervention consisted of two profiling activities and associated workshops spread six months apart. These activities focused on individual work preferences and overall team performance with the aim of improving the functioning of the clinic as a learning environment for dental students. Evaluation data consisted of 20 participant interviews, fourteen hours of workplace observation and six sets of field notes. Following initial thematic analysis, project outcomes were re-analysed using activity theory and expansive learning as a theoretical framework. At project commencement students were not well integrated into the day-to-day clinic functioning. Staff expressed a general view that greater attention to student supervision would compromise patient care. Following the intervention greater clinical team cohesion and workflow changes delivered efficiencies in practice, enhanced relationships among team members, and more positive attitudes towards students. The physical layout of the clinic and clinical workloads were changed to achieve greater involvement of all team members in supporting student learning. Unexpectedly, these changes also improved clinic functioning and increased the number of student placements available. In navigating the sequential stages of the expansive learning cycle, the clinical team ultimately redefined the 'object' of their activity and crossed previously impervious boundaries between healthcare delivery and student supervision with benefits to

  17. Tooth agenesis in patients referred to an Irish tertiary care clinic for the developmental dental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Atef A; O'Connell, Brian; Nunn, June; O'Connell, Anne; Garvey, Therese; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the prevalence, severity and pattern of hypodontia in Irish patients referred to a tertiary care clinic for developmental dental disorders. Details of 168 patients with hypodontia referred during the period 2002-2006 were entered in a database designed as a national record. Tooth charting was completed using clinical and radiographic examinations. The age of patients ranged from 7-50 years, with a median age of 20 years (Mean: 21.79; SD: 8.005). Hypodontia referrals constituted 65.5% of the total referrals. Females were more commonly affected than males with a ratio of 1.3:1. The number of referrals reflected the population density in this area; the majority were referrals from the public dental service. Mandibular second premolars were the most commonly missing teeth, followed by maxillary second premolars and maxillary lateral incisors; maxillary central incisors were the least affected. Symmetry of tooth agenesis between the right and left sides was an evident feature. Slightly more teeth were missing on the left side (n = 725) than on the right side (n = 706) and in the maxillary arch (n = 768) as compared to the mandibular arch (n = 663). Some 54% of patients had severe hypodontia with more than six teeth missing; 32% had moderate hypodontia, with four to six teeth missing. The most common pattern of tooth agenesis was four missing teeth. Hypodontia was a common presentation in a population referred to this tertiary care clinic. The pattern and distribution of tooth agenesis in Irish patients appears to follow the patterns reported in the literature.

  18. Tooth agenesis in patients referred to an Irish tertiary care clinic for the developmental dental disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hashem, Atef A

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was carried out to determine the prevalence, severity and pattern of hypodontia in Irish patients referred to a tertiary care clinic for developmental dental disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Details of 168 patients with hypodontia referred during the period 2002-2006 were entered in a database designed as a national record. Tooth charting was completed using clinical and radiographic examinations. The age of patients ranged from 7-50 years, with a median age of 20 years (Mean: 21.79; SD: 8.005). RESULTS: Hypodontia referrals constituted 65.5% of the total referrals. Females were more commonly affected than males with a ratio of 1.3:1. The number of referrals reflected the population density in this area; the majority were referrals from the public dental service. Mandibular second premolars were the most commonly missing teeth, followed by maxillary second premolars and maxillary lateral incisors; maxillary central incisors were the least affected. Symmetry of tooth agenesis between the right and left sides was an evident feature. Slightly more teeth were missing on the left side (n = 725) than on the right side (n = 706) and in the maxillary arch (n = 768) as compared to the mandibular arch (n = 663). Some 54% of patients had severe hypodontia with more than six teeth missing; 32% had moderate hypodontia, with four to six teeth missing. The most common pattern of tooth agenesis was four missing teeth. CONCLUSION: Hypodontia was a common presentation in a population referred to this tertiary care clinic. The pattern and distribution of tooth agenesis in Irish patients appears to follow the patterns reported in the literature.

  19. Clinical outcomes of patient mobility in a neuroscience intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkey, Malissa; Bena, James F; Albert, Nancy M

    2014-06-01

    Patients treated in a neuroscience intensive care unit (NICU) are often viewed as too sick to tolerate physical activity. In this study, mobility status in NICU was assessed, and factors and outcomes associated with mobility were examined. Using a prospective design, daily mobility status, medical history, demographics, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III score, and clinical outcomes were collected by medical records and database review. Depression, anxiety, and hostility were assessed before NICU discharge. Analyses included comparative statistics and multivariable modeling. In 228 unique patients, median (minimum, maximum) age was 64.0 (20, 95) years, 66.4% were Caucasian, and 53.6% were men. Of 246 admissions, median NICU stay was 4 (1, 61) days; APACHE III score was 56 (16, 145). Turning, range of motion, and head of bed of >30° were uniformly applied (n = 241), but 94 patients (39%) never progressed; 94 (39%) progressed to head of bed of >45° or dangling legs, 29 (12%) progressed to standing or pivoting to chair, and 24 (10%) progressed to walking. Female gender (p = .019), mechanical ventilation (p patients never progressed beyond bed movement, and only 10% walked. Although limited mobility progression was not associated with many patient factors, it was associated with poorer clinical outcomes. Implementation and evaluation of a progressive mobility protocol are needed in NICU patients. For more insights from the authors, see Supplemental Digital Content 1, at http://link.lww.com/JNN/A10.

  20. Retention in HIV care depends on patients' perceptions of the clinic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessinger, Matthew H; Hennink, Monique M; Kaiser, Bonnie N; Mangal, Jed P; Gokhale, Runa H; Ruchin, Lauren; Moanna, Abeer; Rimland, David; Farber, Eugene W; Marconi, Vincent C

    2017-10-01

    Institutional barriers in HIV primary care settings can contribute substantially to disparities in retention in HIV treatment and HIV-related outcomes. This qualitative study compared the perceptions of clinic experiences of persons living with HIV (PLWH) in a Veterans Affairs HIV primary care clinic setting who were retained in care with the experiences of those who were not retained in care. Qualitative data from 25 in-depth interviews were analyzed to identify facilitators and barriers to retention in HIV care. Results showed that participants not retained in care experienced barriers to retention involving dissatisfaction with clinic wait times, low confidence in clinicians, and customer service concerns. For participants retained in care, patience with procedural issues, confidence in clinicians, and interpersonal connections were factors that enhanced retention despite the fact that these participants recognized the same barriers as those who were not retained in care. These findings can inform interventions aimed at improving retention in HIV care.

  1. Development of a computer-aided clinical patient education system to provide appropriate individual nursing care for psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Chiu, Hung-Wen

    2012-06-01

    A lot of researches have proven that health education can help patients to maintain and improve their health. And it also shortens the time staying in hospital to save medication resource. Because the patients are willing to get healthcare knowledge to enhance the ability of self-care, they pay more attention to the health education. In Taiwan, the clinical nurses play an important role in patient education, and the health education take most time in their daily work. Such work includes the collection, production and delivery of education materials. To generate the correct and customized health education material is the key of success of patient education. In this study, we established a computer-aided health education contents generating system for psychiatric patients by integrating the databases for disease, medicine and nursing knowledge to assist nurse generating the customized health education document suitable for different patients. This system was evaluated by clinical nurses in usability and feasibility. This system is helpful for nurse to carry out the clinical health education to patients and further to encourage patient to pay attention to self-health.

  2. Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Services exploration of positive patient care synergies fueled by consumer demand: care coordination, advanced clinic access, and patient self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertenberger, Sydney; Yerardi, Ruth; Drake, Audrey C; Parlier, Renee

    2006-01-01

    The consumers who utilize the Veterans Health Administration healthcare system are older, and most are learning to live with chronic diseases. Their desires and needs have driven changes within the Veterans Health Administration. Through patient satisfaction initiatives and other feedback sources, consumers have made it clear that they do not want to wait for their care, they want a say in what care is provided to them, and they want to remain as independent as possible. Two interdisciplinary processes/models of healthcare are being implemented on the national level to address these issues: advanced clinic access and care coordination. These programs have a synergistic relationship and are integrated with patient self-management initiatives. Positive outcomes of these programs also meet the needs of our staff. As these new processes and programs are implemented nationwide, skills of both patients and nursing staff who provide their care need to be enhanced to meet the challenges of providing nursing care now and into the 21st century. Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Services Strategic Planning Work Group is defining and implementing processes/programs to ensure nurses have the knowledge, information, and skills to meet these patient care demands at all levels within the organization.

  3. Assess the clinical applicability of transthoracic echocardiography in laparotomy patients in a general intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abbasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Echocardiography is one of the diagnostic tools that can be applied at the bedside, along with avoiding transporting critically ill patients. This prospective observational study was designed to assess the clinical applicability of the transthoracic echocardiography (TTE device by noncardiologist intensivists. Materials and Methods: Intensivists performed a limited TTE examination on critically ill patients admitted to the surgical intensive care unit (ICU. After initial cardiac clinical assessment in 85 critically ill adult patients, a limited TTE was performed by an intensivist to assess left ventricular (LV function and LV volume status as well as valvular function and qualitative factors. Data were analyzed and presented in proportions using descriptive statistics. The setting was in surgical ICU of an academic medical center. Results: Valvular abnormalities (44.8% as well as qualitative indices (68.3% were the most frequently detected abnormalities. The ejection fraction was the only alteration, which was affected by the risk factors (P = 0.05, mean = 55.57. Conclusion: Transthoracic approach can provide useful information on cardiac anatomy and function in most ICU patients along with detecting severe previously unknown conditions in some patients.

  4. Assessment of patient satisfaction with acute pain management service: Monitoring quality of care in clinical setting

    OpenAIRE

    Farooq, Fizzah; Khan, Robyna; Ahmed, Aliya

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Assessment of patient satisfaction is an important tool for monitoring the quality of care in hospitals. The aim of this survey was to develop a reliable tool to assess patient satisfaction with acute pain management service (APMS) and identify variables affecting this so that care can be improved. Methods: A questionnaire was developed and administered to  patients after being discharged from APMS care by an unbiased person. Data collected from record included patient de...

  5. Patient characteristics and clinical management of patients with shoulder pain in U.S. primary care settings: Secondary data analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansfield Richard J

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although shoulder pain is a commonly encountered problem in primary care, there are few studies examining its presenting characteristics and clinical management in this setting. Methods We performed secondary data analysis of 692 office visits for shoulder pain collected through the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (Survey years 1993–2000. Information on demographic characteristics, history and place of injury, and clinical management (physician order of imaging, physiotherapy, and steroid intraarticular injection were examined. Results Shoulder pain was associated with an injury in one third (33.2% (230/692 of office visits in this population of US primary care physicians. Males, and younger adults (age ≤ 52 more often associated their shoulder pain with previous injury, but there were no racial differences in injury status. Injury-related shoulder pain was related to work in over one-fifth (21.3% (43/202 of visits. An x-ray was performed in 29.0% (164/566 of office visits, a finding that did not differ by gender, race, or by age status. Other imaging (CT scan, MRI, or ultrasound was infrequently performed (6.5%, 37/566. Physiotherapy was ordered in 23.9% (135/566 of visits for shoulder pain. Younger adults and patients with a history of injury more often had physiotherapy ordered, but there was no significant difference in the ordering of physiotherapy by gender or race. Examination of the use of intraarticular injection was not possible with this data set. Conclusion These data from the largest sample of patients with shoulder pain presenting to primary care settings offer insights into the presenting characteristics and clinical management of shoulder pain at the primary care level. The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey is a useful resource for examining the clinical management of specific symptoms in U.S. primary care offices.

  6. What is next after transfer of care from hospital to home for stroke patients? Evaluation of a community stroke care service based in a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aznida Firzah Abdul Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Poststroke care in developing countries is inundated with poor concordance and scarce specialist stroke care providers. A primary care-driven health service is an option to ensure optimal care to poststroke patients residing at home in the community. Aims: We assessed outcomes of a pilot long-term stroke care clinic which combined secondary prevention and rehabilitation at community level. Settings and Design: A prospective observational study of stroke patients treated between 2008 and 2010 at a primary care teaching facility. Subjects and Methods: Analysis of patients was done at initial contact and at 1-year post treatment. Clinical outcomes included stroke risk factor(s control, depression according to Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9, and level of independence using Barthel Index (BI. Statistical Analysis Used: Differences in means between baseline and post treatment were compared using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon-signed rank test. Significance level was set at 0.05. Results: Ninety-one patients were analyzed. Their mean age was 62.9 [standard deviation (SD 10.9] years, mean stroke episodes were 1.30 (SD 0.5. The median interval between acute stroke and first contact with the clinic 4.0 (interquartile range 9.0 months. Mean systolic blood pressure decreased by 9.7 mmHg (t = 2.79, P = 0.007, while mean diastolic blood pressure remained unchanged at 80mmHg (z = 1.87, P = 0.06. Neurorehabilitation treatment was given to 84.6% of the patients. Median BI increased from 81 (range: 2−100 to 90.5 (range: 27−100 (Z = 2.34, P = 0.01. Median PHQ9 scores decreased from 4.0 (range: 0−22 to 3.0 (range: 0−19 though the change was not significant (Z= −0.744, P = 0.457. Conclusions: Primary care-driven long-term stroke care services yield favorable outcomes for blood pressure control and functional level.

  7. Clinical and microbiological profile of diabetic foot ulcer patients in a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateel, Ramya; Augustine, Alfred J; Prabhu, Shivananda; Ullal, Sheetal; Pai, Manohar; Adhikari, Prabha

    To evaluate the clinical and microbiological profile of diabetic foot ulcer patients admitted to a tertiary care hospital. This study recruited 120 diabetic foot ulcer patients of all grade. Their medical records were evaluated retrospectively. We found that median age of patient was 60(52, 67.75) years. 68.3% of patients were males. Median duration of diabetes mellitus was 15(10, 20) years. Mean HbA1C and fasting glucose was 10.3±2.3 and 167.6±52.42 respectively. Neuropathy (35%) and peripheral vascular disease (23.3%) was major micro vascular and macro vascular complication associated. Different locations of ulcers were toe (23.3%), sole (20%), dorsum (18.3%), shin (16.6%), heel (13.3%), and ankle (8.3%). Bacterial infection was seen in 81.66% patients out of which 23.3% had poly microbial infection. Diabetic foot ulcer patient had poor blood glucose control with elevated HbA1C and fasting blood glucose level. Neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease, hypertension were major complications. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa were common infecting bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical management for patients admitted to a critical care unit with severe sepsis or septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Wai Keung; Chau, Lai Sheung; Mak, Iun Ieng Laurinda; Wong, Mei Yi; Wong, Sai Leung; Tiwari, Agnes Fung Yee

    2015-12-01

    The Surviving Sepsis Campaign promotes the use of norepinephrine as the first-line inotropic support for patients presenting with severe sepsis or septic shock in cases of persistent hypotension, despite adequate fluid resuscitation. However, there is little published evidence on how much noradrenaline is administered to such patients when admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). The authors report the clinical management of this group of patients, with a special focus on the total amount and duration of norepinephrine infusion required. A chart review of the admission records of an ICU in Hong Kong was carried out in 2013. A total of 5000 patients were screened by their diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock (in the admissions book) between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2013. A total of 150 of these were identified and 100 included in the study after simultaneous in-depth reviews of their case notes by two of the investigators. The analysis covers those with severe sepsis or septic shock who required ICU admission for further care. Clinical management and outcomes were analysed. 100 patients (median age 61.6; M/F ratio 2:1) met the inclusion criteria. The mean ICU stay was 13.4 days (range=1-371). 14 patients (14%) died in the ICU, with a 28-day mortality rate of 22%. The mean period of mechanical ventilation was 6.1 days (range=0-137). 91.5% (n=43) of patients had been operated on immediately before admission to the ICU, and the majority of these operations had been of the emergency type (97.7%, n=43). The mean total volumes of crystalloid and colloid administered were 3420ml and 478ml, respectively. The mean wean-off period for norepinephrine infusion was 4234minutes (70.5hours). All patients were prescribed norepinephrine for persistent hypotension despite adequate fluid resuscitation, and the mean total amount administered was 87,211mg. Final multiple linear and logistic regression analysis showed different clinical outcomes associated with different

  9. Prevalence of Insomnia and Clinical and Quality of Life Correlates in Chinese Patients With Schizophrenia Treated in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Cai-Lan; Li, Yan; Cai, Mei-Ying; Ma, Xin-Rong; Zang, Yu; Jia, Fu-Jun; Lin, Yong-Qiang; Ungvari, Gabor S; Chiu, Helen F K; Ng, Chee H; Zhong, Bao-Liang; Cao, Xiao-Lan; Tam, Man-Ian; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2017-04-01

    To describe the prevalence and clinical correlates of insomnia in schizophrenia patients treated in primary care. Six hundred and twenty-three schizophrenia patients from 22 primary care services were recruited. The prevalence of at least one type of insomnia was 28.9% (180/623), while those of difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, and early morning wakening were 20.5%, 19.6%, and 17.7%, respectively. Only 53.3% of patients suffering from insomnia received treatment. Insomnia is common in Chinese patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care and the rate of treatment appears low. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Respecting dignity in forensic care: the challenge faced by nurses of maintaining patient dignity in clinical caring situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, L-K; Wigerblad, A; Lindwall, L

    2013-02-01

    We must recognize the importance of increased understanding for maintaining patient dignity to expand earlier formulated knowledge about caring ethics. Illuminations of this topic can create conditions for changing and developing care, as well as making caregivers' preservation of dignity evident. The aim was to illuminate the meaning of maintenance of patient dignity in forensic care. A qualitative design with a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used to analyse and interpret focus group interviews with nurses in forensic care. In the text the meaning of maintenance of patient dignity was protection and respect but also brotherly humanity. Protection was shown outwards to cover or screen the patient and to guard against danger. The inner form was described as protecting the patients' needs and arousing the patients' protection resources. Respect was shown outwards to take the patient seriously and to show others that patients are to be reckoned with, inwards in teaching patients to create respect and in teaching patients to expect respect from others. Meeting patients with human brotherhood was shown in doing 'the little extra' and demonstrating human similarity. The new understanding will enable nurses to plan and provide professional care, based on caring science. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  11. Urine drug screen findings among ambulatory oncology patients in a supportive care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauenzahn, Sherri; Sima, Adam; Cassel, Brian; Noreika, Danielle; Gomez, Teny Henry; Ryan, Lynn; Wolf, Carl E; Legakis, Luke; Del Fabbro, Egidio

    2017-06-01

    Professional organizations provide no guidelines regarding assessment and management of opioid abuse risk in cancer. Universal precautions (UP) developed for non-cancer pain, include assessments for aberrant behavior, screening questionnaires, and urine drug screens (UDS). The role of UDS for identifying opioid abuse risk in cancer is uncertain. Our aim is to characterize inappropriate UDS, and identify a potential role for UDS in therapeutic decision-making. An observational retrospective chart review of 232 consecutive supportive care clinic patients were seen during the study. Twenty-eight of the two hundred thirty-two did not meet inclusion criteria. One hundred fifty of the two hundred four had active cancer, while 54 had no evidence of active disease. Clinicians ordered UDS based on their clinical judgment of patients' substance misuse risk. Edmonton symptom assessment scores, history of substance abuse, alcohol use, tobacco use, aberrant behavior, and morphine equivalent daily dose (MEDD) were obtained. Pain scores and MEDD were higher (p = 0.021; p psychology, psychiatry, or substance abuse specialists. UDS on the 82 oncology patients at high risk for substance misuse were frequently positive (46%) for non-prescribed opioids, benzodiazepines or potent illicit drugs such as heroin or cocaine, and 39% had inappropriately negative UDS, raising concerns for diversion.

  12. STUDY OF CLINICAL AND ENDOCRINE PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH PITUITARY TUMOURS ATTENDING A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binoy Kumar Mohanty

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pituitary tumours are relatively common endocrine tumours. They can present with symptoms related to hormone excess or hormone deficiency. They can also present with compressive symptoms like visual problems and headache. OBJECTIVE To study the various clinical presentations and endocrine profile of patients presenting with pituitary tumours to a tertiary care hospital. DESIGN Cross sectional study. MATERIAL AND METHODS We collected and analysed the clinical data including hormonal status of 33 consecutive patients who presented to our department from March 2014 to February 2016 for evaluation of pituitary tumours. RESULTS Majority of the subjects studied belonged to 40-50 years group (33.34%.The most common type of pituitary tumour in our population was non-functioning pituitary tumours (45.45%. The next common cause was somatotroph adenoma (27.27% followed by prolactinoma (15.15% and corticotroph adenomas (12.13%. There was significant male predominance (60.60% among total cases. Among all patients, headache (54.54% was most common presentation followed by features related to hormone excess (51.51%. CONCLUSIONS Pituitary tumours can present with variety of symptoms. A detailed endocrine workup is essential in each case to reach at correct diagnosis. In our cohort, non-functioning pituitary tumour was the most common tumour subtype.

  13. Sonographic and Clinical Features of Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis in Critical Care Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Blaivas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background-Aim. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT is an increasingly recognized problem in the critically ill. We sought to identify the prevalence of and risk factors for UEDVT, and to characterize sonographically detected thrombi in the critical care setting. Patients and Methods. Three hundred and twenty patients receiving a subclavian or internal jugular central venous catheter (CVC were included. When an UEDVT was detected, therapeutic anticoagulation was started. Additionally, a standardized ultrasound scan was performed to detect the extent of the thrombus. Images were interpreted offline by two independent readers. Results. Thirty-six (11.25% patients had UEDVT and a complete scan was performed. One (2.7% of these patients died, and 2 had pulmonary embolism (5.5%. Risk factors associated with UEDVT were presence of CVC [(odds ratio (OR 2.716, P=0.007], malignancy (OR 1.483, P=0.036, total parenteral nutrition (OR 1.399, P=0.035, hypercoagulable state (OR 1.284, P=0.045, and obesity (OR 1.191, P=0.049. Eight thrombi were chronic, and 28 were acute. We describe a new sonographic sign which characterized acute thrombosis: a double hyperechoic line at the interface between the thrombus and the venous wall; but its clinical significance remains to be defined. Conclusion. Presence of CVC was a strong predictor for the development of UEDVT in a cohort of critical care patients; however, the rate of subsequent PE and related mortality was low.

  14. Do patients and health care professionals view the communication processes of clinical research differently? A Rasch analysis from a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-de Paz, Luis; Kostov, Belchin; Solans-Julian, Pilar; Navarro-Rubio, M Dolores; Sisó-Almirall, Antoni

    2015-10-01

    The increasing amount of the clinical research conducted in the primary health care has enabled extending research beyond traditional settings, but this transfer has implied some trade-offs. Health care professionals who conduct research with trusted patients require assuming the ethical standards of research and communication skills to enable patients' autonomy and freedom of choice. This study aims to measure the opinions of health professionals and patients on issues of communication in clinical research. A cross-sectional study with health care professionals and patients from primary health care centres in Barcelona (Spain). Each group completed a similar self-administered questionnaire. A Rasch model was fitted to data. After examination of goodness-of-fit, differences between groups were compared using analysis of variance, and patients' measures were calibrated to professionals' measures to compare overall mean measures. Professionals and patients found the ethical attitudes most difficult to endorse related to trust in clinical researchers and conflicts of interest. Patients' perceptions of professional ethical behaviour were significantly lower than professionals'. Different item functioning between nurses and family doctors was found in the item on seeking ethical collaboration when collaborating in clinical research. Effective knowledge of ethical norms was associated with greater perceived ethical values in clinical research and confidence in health care professionals among patients. Differences in the views of the communication process between patients and professionals could alert research boards, health care institutions and researchers to the need for greater transparency, trust and ethical instruction when patients are involved in clinical research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Multidisciplinary team approach to improved chronic care management for diabetic patients in an urban safety net ambulatory care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapp, Hazel; Phillips, Shay E; Waxman, Dael; Alexander, Matthew; Brown, Rhett; Hall, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Since the care of patients with multiple chronic diseases such as diabetes and depression accounts for the majority of health care costs, effective team approaches to managing such complex care in primary care are needed, particularly since psychosocial and physical disorders coexist. Uncontrolled diabetes is a leading health risk for morbidity, disability and premature mortality with between 18-31% of patients also having undiagnosed or undertreated depression. Here we describe a team driven approach that initially focused on patients with poorly controlled diabetes (A1c > 9) that took place at a family medicare office. The team included: resident and faculty physicians, a pharmacist, social worker, nurses, behavioral medicine interns, office scheduler, and an information technologist. The team developed immediate integrative care for diabetic patients during routine office visits.

  16. The effectiveness of holistic diabetic management between Siriraj Continuity of Care clinic and medical out-patient department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalermsri, Chalobol; Paisansudhi, Supalerg; Kantachuvesiri, Pitchaporn; Pramyothin, Pornpoj; Washirasaksiri, Chaiwat; Srivanichakorn, Weerachai; Nopmaneejumruslers, Cherdchai; Chouriyagune, Charoen; Pandejpong, Denla; Phisalprapa, Pochamana

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common diseases in the Thai population, and it is well known that diabetic complications could be prevented with appropriate management. Despite published guidelines, most Thai patients with diabetes do not achieve treatment goals. Siriraj Continuity of Care clinic (CC clinic) was recently established in order to provide training for medical students and internal medicine residents. It is possible that the training component in the CC clinic may contribute to better overall outcomes in type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM) patients when compared with usual care at the medical out-patient department (OPD). To compare the effectiveness of diabetic management in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who attended the CC clinic and the medical OPD. Retrospective chart review was performed in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who were treated at either clinic at Siriraj Hospital in 2007-2011. Baseline demographics, treatment strategies and outcomes, and participation in an appropriate health maintenance program were assessed in both groups. Seven hundred and fifty seven medical records were reviewed, including 383 patients in the CC clinic group and 374 in the OPD group. Mean HbA1c was significantly lower in the CC clinic group compared with the OPD group (7.3 +/- 0.9% and 7.8 +/- 1.3%, respectively, 3.0% vs. 7.4%, p < 0.001 for colon cancer). Moreover, significantly more patients in the CC clinic group received recommended immunization (influenza, diphtheria tetanus and pneumococcal vaccine) compared with the control group (p < or = 0.001). Diabetic patients treated at the CC clinic had better clinical outcomes and healthcare maintenance compared with those who received usual care at the medical OPD. Continuity of care and integrated training component may have contributed to the improved outcomes.

  17. The role of technical advances in the adoption and integration of patient-reported outcomes in clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Roxanne E; Rothrock, Nan E; DeWitt, Esi M; Spiegel, Brennan; Tucker, Carole A; Crane, Heidi M; Forrest, Christopher B; Patrick, Donald L; Fredericksen, Rob; Shulman, Lisa M; Cella, David; Crane, Paul K

    2015-02-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are gaining recognition as key measures for improving the quality of patient care in clinical care settings. Three factors have made the implementation of PROs in clinical care more feasible: increased use of modern measurement methods in PRO design and validation, rapid progression of technology (eg, touchscreen tablets, Internet accessibility, and electronic health records), and greater demand for measurement and monitoring of PROs by regulators, payers, accreditors, and professional organizations. As electronic PRO collection and reporting capabilities have improved, the challenges of collecting PRO data have changed. To update information on PRO adoption considerations in clinical care, highlighting electronic and technical advances with respect to measure selection, clinical workflow, data infrastructure, and outcomes reporting. Five practical case studies across diverse health care settings and patient populations are used to explore how implementation barriers were addressed to promote the successful integration of PRO collection into the clinical workflow. The case studies address selecting and reporting of relevant content, workflow integration, previsit screening, effective evaluation, and electronic health record integration. These case studies exemplify elements of well-designed electronic systems, including response automation, tailoring of item selection and reporting algorithms, flexibility of collection location, and integration with patient health care data elements. They also highlight emerging logistical barriers in this area, such as the need for specialized technological and methodological expertise, and design limitations of current electronic data capture systems.

  18. [Role of outpatient heart failure clinics and primary care physicians in the tailored follow-up of heart failure patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maria, Renata; Misuraca, Gianfranco; Milli, Massimo; Filippi, Alessandro

    2010-05-01

    Continuity of care is pivotal to appropriately manage patients affected by heart failure (HF). HF is a chronic disease with frequent exacerbations that requires long-term care at different complexity levels. The lack of adequate communication between hospital cardiologists and primary care physicians (PCPs) is the main pitfall in continuity of care for HF patients. To overcome this problem, all dedicated outpatient HF clinics should organize together with PCPs in the community educational and auditing initiatives, based on locally derived performance measures to assess the appropriateness and effectiveness of integrated care pathways. The primary task of PCPs is to follow up stable HF patients and focus assessment on patient empowerment, adjustment of drug therapy, assessment of clinical stability and the early identification of worsening signs and symptoms. The progress of information technology should help in achieving adequate communication between hospital professionals and PCPs; outpatient clinical records should in any case comply with qualitative standards of discharge summaries for all patients taken in charge by PCPs. Systematic assessment of shared care between hospital cardiologists and PCPs will be a main objective of the outpatient HF clinic network in the near future.

  19. Microalbuminuria in the intensive care unit: Clinical correlates and association with outcomes in 431 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, Peter; Czyz, John; Nightingale, Peter; Manji, Mav

    2006-08-01

    Comparison of urine albumin within 6 hrs of intensive care unit (ICU) admission with demography, clinical classification, outcome, inotrope/vasopressor requirement, clinical assessment of mortality risk, and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores. Urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was measured on ICU admission (ACR 1) and after 4-6 hrs (ACR 2). A 17-bed general ICU in a university teaching hospital. Unselected medical (206) and surgical (225) patients recruited prospectively. None. Bedside urine ACR was measured by nurses using a Bayer DCA 2000 analyzer and expressed in mg/mmol (reference range Po2/Fio2 ratio 48 hrs after ICU admission and positively correlated with duration of mechanical ventilation and ACR 1 with ICU stay. ACR 2 predicted mortality and ACR 1 inotrope requirement independent of clinical mortality risk assessment and APACHE II and SOFA scores. Urine albumin changes rapidly within the first 6 hrs following ICU admission and predicts ICU mortality and inotrope requirement as well as or better than APACHE II and SOFA scores. Serial urine albumin measurement may provide a means of monitoring the microvascular effects of systemic inflammation.

  20. Non-pharmacological care for patients with generalized osteoarthritis: design of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelissen Jessica

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-pharmacological treatment (NPT is a useful treatment option in the management of hip or knee osteoarthritis. To our knowledge however, no studies have investigated the effect of NPT in patients with generalized osteoarthritis (GOA. The primary aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of two currently existing health care programs with different intensity and mode of delivery on daily functioning in patients with GOA. The secondary objective is to compare the cost-effectiveness of both interventions. Methods/Design In this randomized, single blind, clinical trial with active controls, we aim to include 170 patients with GOA. The experimental intervention consist of six self-management group sessions provided by a multi-disciplinary team (occupational therapist, physiotherapist, dietician and specialized nurse. The active control group consists of two group sessions and four sessions by telephone, provided by a specialized nurse and physiotherapist. Both therapies last six weeks. Main study outcome is daily functioning during the first year after the treatment, assessed on the Health Assessment Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are health related quality of life, specific complaints, fatigue, and costs. Illness cognitions, global perceived effect and self-efficacy, will also be assessed for a responder analysis. Outcome assessments are performed directly after the intervention, after 26 weeks and after 52 weeks. Discussion This article describes the design of a randomized, single blind, clinical trial with a one year follow up to compare the costs and effectiveness of two non-pharmacological interventions with different modes of delivery for patients with GOA. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR2137

  1. Clinical characteristics of patients with suspected cardiac chest pain and angiographically normal coronary arteries in a secondary care hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, T. S.; Tijssen, R. Y. G.; Damman, P.; van Bergen, P. F. M. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background An important number of patients with suspected cardiac chest pain have non-obstructive coronary artery disease. Our purpose was to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with normal or near-normal coronary arteries in routine cardiological practice in a secondary care hospital.

  2. A study of patient attitudes towards decentralisation of HIV care in an urban clinic in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukora, Rachel; Charalambous, Salome; Dahab, Maysoon; Hamilton, Robin; Karstaedt, Alan

    2011-08-26

    In South Africa, limited human resources are a major constraint to achieving universal antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage. Many of the public-sector HIV clinics operating within tertiary facilities, that were the first to provide ART in the country, have reached maximum patient capacity. Decentralization or "down-referral" (wherein ART patients deemed stable on therapy are referred to their closest Primary Health Clinics (PHCs) for treatment follow-up) is being used as a possible alternative of ART delivery care. This cross-sectional qualitative study investigates attitudes towards down-referral of ART delivery care among patients currently receiving care in a centralized tertiary HIV clinic. Ten focus group discussions (FGDs) with 76 participants were conducted in early 2008 amongst ART patients initiated and receiving care for more than 3 months in the tertiary HIV clinic study site. Eligible individuals were invited to participate in FGDs involving 6-9 participants, and lasting approximately 1-2 hours. A trained moderator used a discussion topic guide to investigate the main issues of interest including: advantages and disadvantages of down-referral, potential motivating factors and challenges of down-referral, assistance needs from the transferring clinic as well as from PHCs. Advantages include closeness to patients' homes, transport and time savings. However, patients favour a centralized service for the following reasons: less stigma, patients established relationship with the centralized clinic, and availability of ancillary services. Most FGDs felt that for down-referral to occur there needed to be training of nurses in patient-provider communication. Despite acknowledging the down-referral advantages of close proximity and lower transport costs, many participants expressed concerns about lack of trained HIV clinical staff, negative patient interactions with nurses, limited confidentiality and stigma. There was consensus that training of nurses and

  3. Clinical audit of medical care quality by computer informational analytical system in patients with hypertension followed in Saratov polyclinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Kiselev

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to point out potentiality of clinical audit of care quality carried out by IAS "Register AH" in hypertensive patients followed in Saratov polyclinic. Data of medical cards of 205 hypertensive patients (average age 52,8±9,1 years followed in Saratov polyclinic have been analyzed with the help of IAS "Register AH" indicators set. Implementation of clinical recommendations on diagnosis, treatment and following-up of hypertensive patients from 2007 till 2008 has been assessed. There was no correspondence between statements of recommendations of diagnostic measures for clinical status, treatment and following-up of hypertensive patients. Clinical aim of treatment to support the principal blood pressure has not been achieved in 85% of patients. The main cause has consisted in the patient's clinical status without taking into account the treatment and dynamic follow-up. Clinical audit has allowed the complex evaluation of medical care process in hypertensive patients followed in the studied polyclinic and allowed to reveal a cause of inappropriate results of care. The use of IAS "Register AH" systematizes medical data contained in ambulatory cards, automatizes the process of obtaining indicators results. It increases the reliability assessments

  4. Educational Intervention for Nutrition Education in Patients Attending an Outpatient Wound Care Clinic: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lisa M; Ratcliffe, Desi; Masters, Kathleen; Story, Lachel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether nurses could use a structured intervention to educate patients with wounds about foods that promote healing and whether this educational intervention could be provided in a cost-effective manner. Cross-sectional survey. The study was conducted at an outpatient wound care center located on a hospital campus in the Southern United States; 3 full-time nurses and 2 nurses employed on part-time status delivered the intervention. A nutrition education intervention was developed through collaborative efforts of a registered dietitian and a nurse. A cross-sectional survey design was used to (1) evaluate nurses' perceptions of the intervention and (2) identify barriers to implementation of the intervention. Direct costs related to materials and nursing time required to deliver the intervention were calculated. Participants indicated they were competent to deliver the structured intervention, and all were willing to continue its use. Survey results indicated that nurses believed the intervention was beneficial to their patients and they indicated that patients were responsive to the intervention. The intervention was found to be low cost ($8.00 per teaching session); no barriers to implementation of the intervention were identified. The results of this exploratory study suggest that a structured nutrition education intervention can be provided by nurses in outpatient wound clinics at low cost. Further study is needed to determine the impact of this intervention on nutritional intake and wound healing.

  5. Clinical Characteristics of Patients Diagnosed with Synthetic Cannabinoid (Bonsai Intoxication in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Betül Altınışık

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In recent years, synthetic cannabinoids (bonsai poisoning is a widely seen case that needs to be treated in intensive care unit (ICU in our country. In this study, it was aimed to discuss the clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with synthetic cannabinoid intoxication followed in ICU. Material and Method: Patients followed in ICU of Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University and Çanakkale State Hospital between 2014 and 2015 were studied retrospectively. Results: Twelve cases were included. In neurological system; confusions (n=4, drowsiness (n=7, restlessness/agitations (n=5, hallucinations (n=2, anxieties/panics (n=3, acute psychosis (n=1 and amnesias (n=11 were detected. One patient was intubated. In cardiovascular system; tachycardias (n=3, bradycardias (n=2, hypertensions (n=2, hypotension (n=1, and arrhythmias (n=2 were observed. In laboratory tests, leukocytosis (n=4, leukopenia (n=1, hypoglycemias (n=3, elevation in liver and renal function tests (n=1 were identified. The average recovery time was 19.3-hours and the average ICU stay was 3-days. Conclusion: In the synthetic cannabinoid intoxication cases; it should be kept in mind that seizure activities may occur in the first hours, myocardial infarction risk in the first 3-days. Liver-kidney functions should be monitored. Hypopotasemia is the most common electrolyte disorder. Cases without any complication are expected to recover in 24-hours. However, new types of synthetic cannabinoids are put on the market every day.

  6. Using clinical supervision to improve the quality and safety of patient care: a response to Berwick and Francis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Jonathon

    2015-06-11

    After widely publicised investigations into excess patient deaths at Mid Staffordshire hospital the UK government commissioned reports from Robert Francis QC and Professor Don Berwick. Among their recommendations to improve the quality and safety of patient care were lifelong learning, professional support and 'just culture'. Clinical supervision is in an excellent position to support these activities but opportunities are in danger of being squeezed out by regulatory and managerial demands. Doctors who have completed their training are responsible for complex professional judgements for which narrative supervision is particularly helpful. With reference to the literature and my own practice I propose that all practicing clinicians should have regular clinical supervision. Clinical supervision has patient-safety and the quality of patient care as its primary purposes. After training is completed, doctors may practice for the rest of their career without any clinical supervision, the implication being that the difficulties dealt with in clinical supervision are no longer difficulties, or are better dealt with some other way. Clinical supervision is sufficiently flexible to be adapted to the needs of experienced clinicians as its forms can be varied, though its functions remain focused on patient safety, good quality clinical care and professional wellbeing. The evidence linking clinical supervision to the quality and safety of patient care reveals that supervision is most effective when its educational and supportive functions are separated from its managerial and evaluative functions. Among supervision's different forms, narrative-based-supervision is particularly useful as it has been developed for clinicians who have completed their training. It provides ways to explore the complexity of clinical judgements and encourages doctors to question one another's authority in a supportive culture. To be successful, supervision should also be professionally led and

  7. Predictors of perceived asthma control among patients managed in primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilayyan, Owis; Gogovor, Amede; Mayo, Nancy; Ernst, Pierre; Ahmed, Sara

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the extent to which symptom status, physical activity, beliefs about medications, self-efficacy, emotional status, and healthcare utilization predict perceived asthma control over a period of 16 months among a primary care population. The current study is a secondary analysis of data from a longitudinal study that examined health outcomes of asthma among participants recruited from primary care clinics. Path analysis, based on the Wilson and Cleary and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health frameworks, was used to estimate the predictors of perceived asthma control. The path analysis identified initial perceived asthma control asthma (β = 0.43, p perceived asthma control (total effects, i.e., direct and indirect), while emotional status (β = 0.08, p = 0.03) was a significant indirect predictor through physical activity. The model explained 24 % of the variance of perceived asthma control. Overall, the model fits the data well (χ (2) = 6.65, df = 6, p value = 0.35, root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.02, Comparative Fit Index = 0.999, and weighted root-mean-square residual = 0.27). Initial perceived asthma control, current symptoms status, physical activity, and self-efficacy can be used to identify individuals likely to have good perceived asthma control in the future. Emotional status also has an impact on perceived asthma control mediated through physical activity and should be considered when planning patient management. Identifying these predictors is important to help the care team tailor interventions that will allow individuals to optimally manage their asthma, to prevent exacerbations, to prevent other respiratory-related chronic disease, and to maximize quality of life.

  8. Electronic Patient Registries Improve Diabetes Care and Clinical Outcomes in Rural Community Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Cecil; Bailey, Kelly A.; Petitte, Trisha; Baus, Adam; Swim, Mary; Hendryx, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Diabetes care is challenging in rural areas. Research has shown that the utilization of electronic patient registries improves care; however, improvements generally have been described in combination with other ongoing interventions. The level of basic registry utilization sufficient for positive change is unknown. Purpose: The goal of…

  9. Analysis of Patient Cycle Times at the Urgent Care Clinic at Moncrief Army Community Hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chavez, Jose L

    2004-01-01

    ...), no significant improvement in overall satisfaction was found between the two time intervals. Written patient comments indicated a greater concern for personal treatment experienced rather than access time to receive care...

  10. The perioperative nursing care of patients with malignant obstructive jaundice treated with interventional therapy: clinical experience in 71 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huaping; Tao Ran; Zhang Liqin; Zheng Wenping; Jiang Lei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical experience of perioperative nursing for patients with malignant obstructive jaundice who were treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Methods: Sufficient preoperative preparation,careful psychological nursing, serious postoperative observation of vital signs, enhancement of the nutritional support,care of the puncture site and drainage tube, maintenance of the electrolyte balance, correct evaluation of the jaundice, etc. were strictly carried out in all 71 patients with malignant obstructive jaundice who received percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Results: Because the sufficient preoperative preparation and postoperative nursing work were seriously carried out,the obstructive jaundice was well relieved in all patients, the liver function and the living quality were markedly improved and the survival time was prolonged. Conclusion: It is of great clinical significance to intensify the perioperative nursing care for patients with malignant obstructive jaundice who are receiving interventional therapy. (authors)

  11. Stepped care targeting psychological distress in head and neck and lung cancer patients: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krebber Anne-Marie H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological distress is common in cancer survivors. Although there is some evidence on effectiveness of psychosocial care in distressed cancer patients, referral rate is low. Lack of adequate screening instruments in oncology settings and insufficient availability of traditional models of psychosocial care are the main barriers. A stepped care approach has the potential to improve the efficiency of psychosocial care. The aim of the study described herein is to evaluate efficacy of a stepped care strategy targeting psychological distress in cancer survivors. Methods/design The study is designed as a randomized clinical trial with 2 treatment arms: a stepped care intervention programme versus care as usual. Patients treated for head and neck cancer (HNC or lung cancer (LC are screened for distress using OncoQuest, a computerized touchscreen system. After stratification for tumour (HNC vs. LC and stage (stage I/II vs. III/IV, 176 distressed patients are randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Patients in the intervention group will follow a stepped care model with 4 evidence based steps: 1. Watchful waiting, 2. Guided self-help via Internet or a booklet, 3. Problem Solving Treatment administered by a specialized nurse, and 4. Specialized psychological intervention or antidepressant medication. In the control group, patients receive care as usual which most often is a single interview or referral to specialized intervention. Primary outcome is the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Secondary outcome measures are a clinical level of depression or anxiety (CIDI, quality of life (EQ-5D, EORTC QLQ-C30, QLQ-HN35, QLQ-LC13, patient satisfaction with care (EORTC QLQ-PATSAT, and costs (health care utilization and work loss (TIC-P and PRODISQ modules. Outcomes are evaluated before and after intervention and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after intervention. Discussion Stepped care is a system of delivering and

  12. Clinical features and outcomes in patients with disseminated toxoplasmosis admitted to intensive care: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Matthieu; Sonneville, Romain; Schnell, David; Bigé, Naike; Hamidfar, Rebecca; Mongardon, Nicolas; Castelain, Vincent; Razazi, Keyvan; Marty, Antoine; Vincent, François; Dres, Martin; Gaudry, Stephane; Luyt, Charles Edouard; Das, Vincent; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Demoule, Alexandre; Mayaux, Julien

    2013-12-01

    Characteristics and outcomes of adult patients with disseminated toxoplasmosis admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) have rarely been described. We performed a retrospective study on consecutive adult patients with disseminated toxoplasmosis who were admitted from January 2002 through December 2012 to the ICUs of 14 university-affiliated hospitals in France. Disseminated toxoplasmosis was defined as microbiological or histological evidence of disease affecting >1 organ in immunosuppressed patients. Isolated cases of cerebral toxoplasmosis were excluded. Clinical data on admission and risk factors for 60-day mortality were collected. Thirty-eight patients were identified during the study period. Twenty-two (58%) had received an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (median, 61 [interquartile range {IQR}, 43-175] days before ICU admission), 4 (10%) were solid organ transplant recipients, and 10 (27%) were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (median CD4 cell count, 14 [IQR, 6-33] cells/µL). The main indications for ICU admission were acute respiratory failure (89%) and shock (53%). The 60-day mortality rate was 82%. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-5.35; P = .04) and systolic cardiac dysfunction (HR = 3.54; 95% CI, 1.60-8.10; P toxoplasmosis leading to ICU admission has a poor prognosis. Recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant appear to have the highest risk of mortality. We identified systolic cardiac dysfunction as a major determinant of outcome. Strategies aimed at preventing this fatal opportunistic infection may improve outcomes.

  13. Influenza-Like-Illness and Clinically Diagnosed Flu: Disease Burden, Costs and Quality of Life for Patients Seeking Ambulatory Care or No Professional Care at All

    OpenAIRE

    Bilcke, Joke; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to (1) describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI) and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2) assess influential background characteristics, and (3) formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents so...

  14. Factors related to day-care clinic outcomes for dementia patients: differences between hospitalization in the dementia ward and institutionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Toshiyuki; Tamai, Akira; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Tamai, Yuzuru

    2014-03-01

    Few reports have investigated factors related to the outcomes of day-care attendance. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the factors related to the outcomes of patients who attended day-care clinics, with special attention to the differences between hospitalization in the dementia ward and institutionalization. We analyzed data from 333 patients in consecutive cases who attended day care between 1 April 2000 and 31 March 2010 and then followed them until 31 March 2011. For univariate and multivariate analyses, patients were divided into seven groups characterized by their outcomes: (i) patients who continued day-care attendance (continued); (ii) those hospitalized for physical problems (hospital (physical)); (iii) those hospitalized in the dementia ward (ward (dementia)); (iv) those hospitalized in the psychiatric ward for psychiatric problems (ward (psychiatric)); (v) those institutionalized (institution); (vi) those who stopped day-care attendance by choice (intention); and (vii) those who stopped day-care attendance for other or unknown reasons (others). Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia were the main reasons for hospitalization and institutionalization. Men were easier to hospitalize in the dementia ward. Patients who applied for insurance were more likely to be institutionalized. The differences between patients who were hospitalized (dementia ward) and institutionalized were age and cognitive function. Patients who were older and had high cognitive function were institutionalized rather than hospitalized in the dementia ward. Patients with severe dementia symptoms were advised to be treated in the dementia ward. © 2014 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2014 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  15. Patients' Perceptions of Dental Students' Empathic, Person-Centered Care in a Dental School Clinic in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar, Muneer Gohar; Hasan, Syed Shahzad; Yong, Wong Mei; Mitha, Shahid; Al-Waeli, Haider Abdulameer

    2017-04-01

    Empathy has been identified as a crucial foundation in building an effective dentist-patient relationship. The aim of this study was to assess patients' perceptions of dental students' empathic care in the primary oral health care clinic at International Medical University in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in May-October 2014. The study also assessed the validity and reliability of the Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure in this setting; the association between number of encounters and students' CARE Measure scores; and the association between students' empathy (measured by the Toronto Empathy Questionnaire) and CARE Measure scores. Participants were 283 patients (aged ≥18 years) who were asked to self-complete the ten-item CARE Measure immediately after their clinical encounter with students who provided care under supervision of the teaching staff. The results showed that the CARE Measure demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's α=0.95). A single factor solution emerged, accounting for 69% of the variance. The mean CARE Measure score in the consultations was 43.55±6.14, and 26% of the students achieved the maximum possible score of 50. The mean number of encounters with each student was 2.33±2.78. An increase of one episode was associated with an insignificant average CARE score decrease of 0.05 (-0.28, 0.38), whereas students' empathy was associated with a small increase in average CARE Measure score of 0.63 (0.08, 1.18). These results provide evidence of the measure's ability to support feedback to dental students on their empathy when interacting with patients.

  16. Training to Care for Limited English Proficient Patients and Provision of Interpreter Services at U.S. Dental School Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Lisa; Hum, Lauren; Nalliah, Romesh

    2017-02-01

    Legal protections in the United States mandate that individuals with limited English proficiency (LEP) have equal access to health care. However, LEP populations are at higher risk of poor health. Dental school clinics offer lower cost care by supervised dental students and often provide care for LEP patients. The aims of this study were to survey dental students about their clinical experience with LEP patients, the interpreter resources available at their dental school clinics, and the extent of instruction on these topics. Academic deans at 19 dental schools (30.6% of 62 invited schools) distributed the survey to their students, and the survey was completed by 325 students (4.2% of students at the 19 participating schools). Among the responding students, 44% reported their dental school clinic lacked formal interpreter services, and most of the respondents reported receiving minimal instruction on caring for LEP patients. Only 54% of the responding students reported feeling adequately prepared to manage LEP patients following graduation. These results suggest there is limited access to interpreter services for students while in dental school. A large proportion of these dental students thus reported feeling unprepared to treat LEP patients after graduation.

  17. Clinical cardiology consultation at non-cardiology departments: stepchild of patient care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellings, D.A.; Symersky, T.; Ottervanger, J.P.; Ramdat Misier, A.R.; Boer, M.J. de

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although patient care in cardiology departments may be of high quality, patients with cardiac disease in other departments tend to receive less attention from cardiologists. Driven by the shorter duration of admission nowadays and the fact that consultations are often performed in

  18. [Patient's care and management of dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetic patients in the clinical practice in Spain: The LIPEDIA study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual Fuster, Vicente; Ruiz Olivar, Emilio; Pintò Sala, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of atherogenic dyslipidemia (AD) in type 2 diabetes (DM2) should focus on the global control of dyslipidemia. The aim of this study was to determine how hospital (MSs) and primary care specialist (GPs) from Spain manage AD in DM2 during their daily practice. An observational, cross-sectional, multicentric study was conducted. Information about daily practice was obtained from 497 MSs and 872 GPs across Spain. 66% of MSs and 30.5% of GPs considered DM2 patients to be high-risk. Most consider the c-LDL targets based on European guidelines. The statins most widely used are atorvastatin and simvastatin. However both MSs and GPs considered rosuvastatin to be the most appropriate statin for these patients. 82% of MSs and 68% of GPs considered that >50% of their patients achieved the c-LDL target. The main reasons of not achieving this target were lack of treatment adherence and pressure from the administration. Seventy four percent of MSs reported that there are no common clinical protocols with GPs. The differences in the perception of the real cardiovascular risk of the patient, low use of more appropriate statins, lack of adherence and poor perception of real c-LDL control may contribute to the failure in achieving lipid targets in DM2. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification and content validation of wound therapy clinical endpoints relevant to clinical practice and patient values for FDA approval. Part 1. Survey of the wound care community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Vickie R; Gould, Lisa J; Dotson, Peggy; Gibbons, Gary W; Li, William W; Ennis, William J; Kirsner, Robert S; Eaglstein, William H; Bolton, Laura L; Carter, Marissa J

    2017-05-01

    Wounds that exhibit delayed healing add extraordinary clinical, economic, and personal burdens to patients, as well as to increasing financial costs to health systems. New interventions designed to ease such burdens for patients with cancer, renal, or ophthalmologic conditions are often cleared for approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) using multiple endpoints but the requirement of complete healing as a primary endpoint for wound products impedes FDA clearance of interventions that can provide other clinical or patient-centered benefits for persons with wounds. A multidisciplinary group of wound experts undertook an initiative, in collaboration with the FDA, to identify and content validate supporting FDA criteria for qualifying wound endpoints relevant to clinical practice (CP) and patient-centered outcomes (PCO) as primary outcomes in clinical trials. As part of the initiative, a research study was conducted involving 628 multidisciplinary expert wound clinicians and researchers from 4 different groups: the interdisciplinary core advisory team; attendees of the Spring 2015 Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC); clinicians employed by a national network of specialty clinics focused on comprehensive wound care; and Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) and Wound Healing Society (WHS) members who had not previously completed the survey. The online survey assessed 28 literature-based wound care endpoints for their relevance and importance to clinical practice and clinical research. Fifteen of the endpoints were evaluated for their relevance to improving quality of life. Twenty-two endpoints had content validity indexes (CVI) ≥ 0.75, and 15 were selected as meriting potential inclusion as additional endpoints for FDA approval of future wound care interventions. This study represents an important first step in identifying and validating new measurable wound care endpoints for clinical research and practice and for regulatory

  20. Total-Body PET: Maximizing Sensitivity to Create New Opportunities for Clinical Research and Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Simon R; Jones, Terry; Karp, Joel S; Qi, Jinyi; Moses, William W; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2018-01-01

    PET is widely considered the most sensitive technique available for noninvasively studying physiology, metabolism, and molecular pathways in the living human being. However, the utility of PET, being a photon-deficient modality, remains constrained by factors including low signal-to-noise ratio, long imaging times, and concerns about radiation dose. Two developments offer the potential to dramatically increase the effective sensitivity of PET. First by increasing the geometric coverage to encompass the entire body, sensitivity can be increased by a factor of about 40 for total-body imaging or a factor of about 4-5 for imaging a single organ such as the brain or heart. The world's first total-body PET/CT scanner is currently under construction to demonstrate how this step change in sensitivity affects the way PET is used both in clinical research and in patient care. Second, there is the future prospect of significant improvements in timing resolution that could lead to further effective sensitivity gains. When combined with total-body PET, this could produce overall sensitivity gains of more than 2 orders of magnitude compared with existing state-of-the-art systems. In this article, we discuss the benefits of increasing body coverage, describe our efforts to develop a first-generation total-body PET/CT scanner, discuss selected application areas for total-body PET, and project the impact of further improvements in time-of-flight PET. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  1. Virtual interactive musculoskeletal system (VIMS in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida Hiroaki

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System. Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation.

  2. QUEST-RA: quantitative clinical assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis seen in standard rheumatology care in 15 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Toloza, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a cross-sectional review of non-selected consecutive outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as part of standard clinical care in 15 countries for an overview of the characteristics of patients with RA. METHODS: The review included current disease activity using data from...

  3. Urgent Dental Care” – A preclinical patient case scenario as an aid to clinic preparation for treating a patient with urgent dental care needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary L. Drahos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Pre-clinical student competencies are usually assessed in only one specific area and not contextualized in a patient care scenario. Exposing preclinical students to a high fidelity simulated urgent care patient scenario will help the student develop critical thinking and intuitive dental treatment skills that will prepare them for actual urgent dental care (UDC treatment in the clinic. Aims Dental students, in the preclinical years, have difficulty in applying various disciplines of dentistry to an actual patient. The goal of this exercise is to contextualize several disciplines (diagnosis, material selection, oral pathology, electronic record keeping, patient interview and critical thinking into a real patient case. The hypothesis is that providing a preclinical urgent care session in this manner will better prepare students for clinical UDC treatment. Methods An urgent care patient scenario was developed that integrated multiple disciplines and contextualized common urgent clinical situations that are encountered daily, focusing on interviewing skills, basic diagnostic skills, manipulation of electronic patient records, material selection and defence of selection, image and data procurement, prescription writing, critical decision making, oral medicine diagnosis, treatment planning for a focused need, and performance of dental treatment. Second year dental students are required to interview a first time (walk-in urgent care patient to determine the chief complaint, diagnose the urgent problem (based on information obtained by interviewing the patient and to make critical patient care decisions and self-assess their performance. Results Students generally completed the session on time and in a satisfactory fashion. Preparation for the session was key and faculty calibration was essential. Conclusion Completion of this case scenario better prepared the students for the clinic as indicated by student self-assessment, post course

  4. The effect of continuous care on the lifestyle of patients with multiple sclerosis: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Khodaveisi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple sclerosis is a common debilitating chronic disease of the central nervous system with a progressive and prolonged nature. Patients need an adjusted lifestyle and continuous care in order to prevent its recurrence and progressive disabilities. This study aimed to assess the effect of continuous care on lifestyle in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis. Materials and Methods: A randomized clinical trial was conducted among 72 patients with multiple sclerosis who referred to the Farshchian Educational Hospital in Hamadan, Iran in 2013. The patients were allocated to intervention and control groups using balanced block randomization with blocks of four. The steps of continuous care (orientation, sensitization, control, and evaluation were implemented in the case group for 2 months. The patients' lifestyle was assessed before and 1 and 2 months after continuous care using the researcher-developed Lifestyle Questionnaire. The data were analyzed using the Chi-square test, t-test, and repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results: The mean score of lifestyle and its dimensions were significantly higher in the intervention group 1 and 2 months after the intervention compared to the baseline (P = 0.001. In contrast, the mean score of lifestyle and its dimensions had no significant difference in the control group 1 and 2 months after routine care compared to the baseline.Conclusions: Continuous care improved the patients' lifestyle. It could be designed as an appropriate care system into the hospitals or other health care centers. This care system could be used widely in order to improve adherence to suitable lifestyle in patients with chronic diseases.

  5. Distribution of Clinical Isolates at Species Level and Their Antibiotic Susceptibilities in Intensive Care Units Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Barış

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Intensive care units are a hospital’s section where hospital infections and resistant microorganisms are most commonly seen. In this study it was aimed to determine the microorganisms which were isolated from various clinical specimens of the patients in intensive care units for a year and antibiotic susceptibility of the microorganisms. Materials and Methods: MALDI TOF MS and BD Phoenix system were used for the identification of bacteria, antibiotic sensitivities were evaluated by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and BD Phoenix system in accordance with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. Results: In this study, a total of 1163 microorganisms were obtained; 575 (49.4% gram-negative bacteria (GNB, 556 (47.8% gram-positive bacteria (GPB and 32 Candida spp. (2.7%. Strains were produced from blood (488, urine (233, respiratory tract (224, sterile body fluid (88, wounds (68 and catheter samples (62. The most frequently isolated GNBs were found to be Acinetobacter baumannii 131 (11.2%, Klebsiella pneumoniae 109 (9.3%, Escherichia coli 91 (7.8% in order of frequency. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production was observed in 16 E. coli, 29 Klebsiella spp. Carbapenem resistance was identified in 132 Acinetobacter spp., 27 Pseudomonas spp., 14 K. pneumoniae, 1 E. coli. For Pseudomonas strains, ciprofloxacin and amikacin; for Acinetobacter strains, amikacin and colistin; for Escherichia and Klebsiella strains, amikacin and imipenem were determined as the most effective antibiotics. The most frequently isolated GPBs were 351 (30% coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS (192 S. epidermidis, 111 (9.5% Enterococcus spp. (67 Enterococcus faecalis, 55 Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. While Methicillin resistance was determined in 7 S. aureus and 191 CNS; vancomycin resistance was detected in 3 Enterococcus faecium strains. The most effective antibiotics against S. aureus and Enterococcus spp. strains were

  6. Retention of antiretroviral naïve patients registered in HIV care in a program clinic in Pune, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghate, Manisha V.; Zirpe, Sunil S.; Gurav, Nilam P.; Rewari, Bharat B.; Gangakhedkar, Raman R.; Paranjape, Ramesh S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Retention in HIV care ensures delivery of services like secondary prevention, timely initiation of treatment, support, and care on a regular basis. The data on retention in pre antiretroviral therapy (ART) care in India is scanty. Materials and Methods: Antiretroviral naïve HIV-infected adult patients registered between January 2011 and March 2012 in HIV care (pre-ART) were included in the study. The follow-up procedures were done as per the national guidelines. Patients who did not report to the clinic for 1 year were considered as pre-ART lost to follow-up (pre-ART LFU). They were contacted either telephonically or by home visits. Logistic regression analysis was done to find out factors associated with pre-ART loss to follow-up. Results: A total of 689 antiretroviral naïve adult patients were registered in the HIV care. Fourteen (2%) patients died and 76 (11%) were LFU till March 2013. The multivariate analysis showed that baseline CD4 count >350 cells/mm3 (P ART LFUs, 35 (46.1%) informed that they would visit the clinic at their convenient time. NGOs that referred 16 female sex workers (FSWs) who were LFU (21.1%) informed that they would make efforts to refer them to the clinic. Conclusion: Higher CD4 count and illiteracy were significantly associated with lower retention in pre-ART care. Developing effective “retention package” for patients and strengthening linkage strategies between key sub-population such as FSWs and ART programming will help to plug the leaky cascade in HIV care. PMID:26396447

  7. Service quality and patient experiences of ambulatory care in a specialized clinic vs. a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Regge, Melissa; De Groote, Hélène; Trybou, Jeroen; Gemmel, Paul; Brugada, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    Health care organizations are constantly looking for ways to establish a differential advantage to attract customers. To this end, service quality has become an important differentiator in the strategy of health care organizations. In this study, we compared the service quality and patient experience in an ambulatory care setting of a physician-owned specialized facility with that of a general hospital. A comparative case study with a mixed method design was employed. Data were gathered through a survey on health service quality and patient experience, completed with observations, walkthroughs, and photographic material. Service quality and patient experiences are high in both the investigated health care facilities. A significant distinction can be made between the two facilities in terms of interpersonal quality (p = 0.001) and environmental quality (P ≤ 0.001), in favor of the medical center. The difference in environmental quality is also indicated by the scores given by participants who had been in both facilities. Qualitative analysis showed higher administrative quality in the medical center. Environmental quality and patient experience can predict the interpersonal quality; for environmental quality, interpersonal quality and age are significant predictors. Service quality and patient experiences are high in both facilities. The medical center has higher service quality for interpersonal and environmental service quality and is more process-centered.

  8. Clinical review : Treatment of new-onset atrial fibrillation in medical intensive care patients - a clinical framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleeswijk, Mengalvio E.; Van Noord, Trudeke; Tulleken, Jaap E.; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.; Girbes, Armand R. J.; Zijlstra, Jan G.

    2007-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation occurs frequently in medical intensive care unit patients. Most intensivists tend to treat this rhythm disorder because they believe it is detrimental. Whether atrial fibrillation contributes to morbidity and/or mortality and whether atrial fibrillation is an epiphenomenon of

  9. Assessment of patient satisfaction with acute pain management service: Monitoring quality of care in clinical setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fizzah Farooq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Assessment of patient satisfaction is an important tool for monitoring the quality of care in hospitals. The aim of this survey was to develop a reliable tool to assess patient satisfaction with acute pain management service (APMS and identify variables affecting this so that care can be improved. Methods: A questionnaire was developed and administered to  patients after being discharged from APMS care by an unbiased person. Data collected from record included patient demographics, surgical procedure, analgesic modality, co-analgesics and dynamic and static pain scores. Questions included pain expected and pain experienced, APMS response time, quality of pain relief with treatment, professionalism of APMS team, overall experience of pain relief and choosing/suggesting same modality for themselves/family/friends again. Five-point Likert scale was used for most of the options. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 19. Results: Frequency and percentages were computed for qualitative observation and presented on pie chart and histogram. Seventy-one per cent patients expected severe pain while 43% actually experienced it. About 79.4% would choose same analgesia modality in future for self/family/friends. Ninety-nine per cent found APMS staff courteous and professional. About 89% rated their experience of pain management as excellent to very good. Conclusion: The survey of patients′ satisfaction to monitor the quality of care provided by APMS provided positive inputs on its role. This also helps to identify areas requiring improvement in care and as a tool to gauge the quality of care.

  10. Assessment of patient satisfaction with acute pain management service: Monitoring quality of care in clinical setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Fizzah; Khan, Robyna; Ahmed, Aliya

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Assessment of patient satisfaction is an important tool for monitoring the quality of care in hospitals. The aim of this survey was to develop a reliable tool to assess patient satisfaction with acute pain management service (APMS) and identify variables affecting this so that care can be improved. Methods: A questionnaire was developed and administered to patients after being discharged from APMS care by an unbiased person. Data collected from record included patient demographics, surgical procedure, analgesic modality, co-analgesics and dynamic and static pain scores. Questions included pain expected and pain experienced, APMS response time, quality of pain relief with treatment, professionalism of APMS team, overall experience of pain relief and choosing/suggesting same modality for themselves/family/friends again. Five-point Likert scale was used for most of the options. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 19. Results: Frequency and percentages were computed for qualitative observation and presented on pie chart and histogram. Seventy-one per cent patients expected severe pain while 43% actually experienced it. About 79.4% would choose same analgesia modality in future for self/family/friends. Ninety-nine per cent found APMS staff courteous and professional. About 89% rated their experience of pain management as excellent to very good. Conclusion: The survey of patients’ satisfaction to monitor the quality of care provided by APMS provided positive inputs on its role. This also helps to identify areas requiring improvement in care and as a tool to gauge the quality of care. PMID:27141107

  11. Patient involvement in decision-making: a cross-sectional study in a Malaysian primary care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambigapathy, Ranjini; Chia, Yook Chin; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2016-01-04

    Shared decision-making has been advocated as a useful model for patient management. In developing Asian countries such as Malaysia, there is a common belief that patients prefer a passive role in clinical consultation. As such, the objective of this study was to determine Malaysian patients' role preference in decision-making and the associated factors. A cross-sectional study. Study was conducted at an urban primary care clinic in Malaysia in 2012. Patients aged >21 years were chosen using systematic random sampling. Consenting patients answered a self-administered questionnaire, which included demographic data and their preferred and actual role before and after consultation. Doctors were asked to determine patients' role preference. The Control Preference Scale was used to assess patients' role preference. Prevalence of patients' preferred role in decision-making. (1) Actual role played by the patient in decision-making. (2) Sociodemographic factors associated with patients' preferred role in decision-making. (3) Doctors' perception of patients' involvement in decision-making. The response rate was 95.1% (470/494). Shared decision-making was preferred by 51.9% of patients, followed by passive (26.3%) and active (21.8%) roles in decision-making. Higher household income was significantly associated with autonomous role preference (p=0.018). Doctors' perception did not concur with patients' preferred role. Among patients whom doctors perceived to prefer a passive role, 73.5% preferred an autonomous role (p=0.900, κ=0.006). The majority of patients attending the primary care clinic preferred and played an autonomous role in decision-making. Doctors underestimated patients' preference to play an autonomous role. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Sonographic and Clinical Features of Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis in Critical Care Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Blaivas, Michael; Stefanidis, Konstantinos; Nanas, Serafim; Poularas, John; Wachtel, Mitchell; Cohen, Rubin; Karakitsos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Background-Aim. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) is an increasingly recognized problem in the critically ill. We sought to identify the prevalence of and risk factors for UEDVT, and to characterize sonographically detected thrombi in the critical care setting. Patients and Methods. Three hundred and twenty patients receiving a subclavian or internal jugular central venous catheter (CVC) were included. When an UEDVT was detected, therapeutic anticoagulation was started. Additionall...

  13. Integrated disease management improves one-year quality of life in primary care COPD patients: a controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavannes, Niels H; Grijsen, Marlous; van den Akker, Marjan; Schepers, Huub; Nijdam, Maddy; Tiep, Brian; Muris, Jean

    2009-09-01

    AIMD: To assess the long-term effectiveness of an integrated disease management (IDM) program (consisting of optimal medication, reactivation, education, and exacerbation management) in primary care patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Controlled trial comparing the effects of IDM on quality of life--assessed by the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ)--in primary care COPD patients. The minimal clinically important change on the SGRQ was accepted as being -4 points. Baseline and one year differences were compared using paired sample T-tests. The differential effects of an FEV1/FVC ratio 2 and FEV1/FVC 2.

  14. [Epidemiologic and clinical features of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care facilities (Sousse, Tunisie)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Drissi, Leila; Tlili, Henda; Gaha, Khaled; Soltane, Ibtissem; Amrani, Raja; Ghannemr, Hassen

    2006-07-01

    As a result of epidemiologic transition, diabetes mellitus became a major public health problem in Tunisia. We tried to determine the epidemiological and clinical features of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary health care units in Sousse (Tunisia). It was a cross sectional study about a stratified sample of 404 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients followed in primary care offices in Sousse in 2003. Average age was 60 + 10.9 years and sex-ratio was 0.5. Hypertension and obesity were found in respectively 71.3% and 37.6%. Diabetic neuropathy was the most frequent degenerative complication (41.1%) followed by diabetic retinopathy (18.3%). Thus, type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, followed in primary care units show a high cardiovascular risk with serious and frequent complications. That's why, the national care program of type diabetes mellitus, in primary health care should take in consideration, in its guidelines, the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of these patients.

  15. Clinical Problems in Community Mental Health Care for Patients with Severe Borderline Personality Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekkoek, B.W.; Meijel, B.K.G. van; Schene, A.H.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the problems that professionals perceive in the community mental health care for patients with severe borderline personality disorder that do not fit into specialized therapy. A group of national experts (n = 8) participated in a four-phase

  16. Evaluating patient experiences in decentralised acute care using the Picker Patient Experience Questionnaire; Methodological and clinical findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonardsen, Ann Chatrin Linqvist; Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Ghanima, Waleed

    2017-01-01

    . Most problems were related to continuity and transition, while fewest problems were related to respect for patient preferences. A higher Charlson comorbidity score was the only variable that was negatively associated with patient experience. Conclusion: Patients reported problems in several items......Background: Decentralised acute care services have, through the establishment of municipality acute wards (MAWs), been launched in Norway. The aim is to provide treatment for patients who otherwise would need hospitalisation. Currently there is a lack of studies investigating patient experiences...... in such services. The aims of this study were therefore to a) translate and validate the Picker Patient Experience Questionnaire (PPE-15) in Norwegian, and b) assess patient experiences in decentralised acute care, and potential factors associated with these experiences. Methods: Patients were recruited from five...

  17. A modified Delphi process to identify clinical and research priorities in patient and family centred critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oczkowski, Simon J W; Au, Selena; des Ordons, Amanda Roze; Gill, Marlyn; Potestio, Melissa L; Smith, Orla; Sinuff, Tasnim; Stelfox, Henry T; Fox-Robichaud, Alison E

    2017-12-01

    To identify elements which enable patient and family centred care (PFCC) in the intensive care unit (ICU) and priorities for PFCC research. We engaged a panel of multidisciplinary stakeholders in a modified Delphi process. Items generated from a literature review and panelist suggestions were rated in 3 successive rounds on a scale from 1 to 7. Median score was used to rate each item's priority, with 5 or more indicating "essential priority," 4 or 5 "moderate priority" and 3 or less "low priority." Interquartile range (IQR) was used to measure consensus, with IQR of 1 indicating "high" consensus, 2 "moderate" consensus, and 3 or greater "low" consensus. Six items were rated essential elements for facilitating PFCC with high consensus (flexible visiting hours, family participation in bedside care, trained family support person, interventions to facilitate continuity of care, staff education to support families, continuity of staff assignments). Three items were rated essential research topics: interventions to facilitate continuity of care following ICU discharge (moderate consensus), family participation in bedside care (low consensus), and decision aids for end of life decision-making (low consensus). Stakeholders identified clear and distinct priorities for PFCC in clinical care and research, though there was greater consensus for clinical care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Travel Time to Clinic but not Neighborhood Crime Rate is Associated with Retention in Care Among HIV-Positive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Jessica P; Almirol, Ellen A; Schmitt, Jessica; Schuble, Todd; Schneider, John A

    2018-03-29

    Using geospatial analysis, we examined the relationship of distance between a patient's residence and clinic, travel time to clinic, and neighborhood violent crime rates with retention in care or viral suppression among people living with HIV (PLWH). For HIV-positive patients at a large urban clinic, we measured distance and travel time between home and clinic and violent crime rate within a two block radius of the travel route. Kruskal-Wallis rank sum was used to compare outcomes between groups. Over the observation period, 2008-2016, 219/602 (36%) patients were retained in care. Median distance from clinic was 3.6 (IQR 2.1-5.6) miles versus 3.9 (IQR 2.7-6.1) miles among those retained versus not retained in care, p = 0.06. Median travel time by car was 15.9 (IQR 9.6-22.9) versus 17.1 (IQR 12.0-24.6) minutes for those retained versus not retained, p = 0.04. Violent crime rate along travel route was not associated with retention. There was no significant association between travel time or distance and viral suppression.

  19. Influenza-like-illness and clinically diagnosed flu: disease burden, costs and quality of life for patients seeking ambulatory care or no professional care at all.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke Bilcke

    Full Text Available This is one of the first studies to (1 describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2 assess influential background characteristics, and (3 formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever, a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5-6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86-91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51-€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries.

  20. Influenza-like-illness and clinically diagnosed flu: disease burden, costs and quality of life for patients seeking ambulatory care or no professional care at all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilcke, Joke; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to (1) describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI) and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2) assess influential background characteristics, and (3) formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever), a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics) and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5-6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86-91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51-€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries.

  1. Effects of Early Integrated Palliative Care on Caregivers of Patients with Lung and Gastrointestinal Cancer: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jawahri, Areej; Greer, Joseph A; Pirl, William F; Park, Elyse R; Jackson, Vicki A; Back, Anthony L; Kamdar, Mihir; Jacobsen, Juliet; Chittenden, Eva H; Rinaldi, Simone P; Gallagher, Emily R; Eusebio, Justin R; Fishman, Sarah; VanDusen, Harry; Li, Zhigang; Muzikansky, Alona; Temel, Jennifer S

    2017-12-01

    The family and friends (caregivers) of patients with advanced cancer often experience tremendous distress. Although early integrated palliative care (PC) has been shown to improve patient-reported quality of life (QOL) and mood, its effects on caregivers' outcomes is currently unknown. We conducted a randomized trial of early PC integrated with oncology care versus oncology care alone for patients who were newly diagnosed with incurable lung and noncolorectal gastrointestinal cancers and their caregivers. The early PC intervention focused on addressing the needs of both patients and their caregivers. Eligible caregivers were family or friends who would likely accompany patients to clinic visits. The intervention entailed at least monthly patient visits with PC from the time of diagnosis. Caregivers were encouraged, but not required, to attend the palliative care visits. We used the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Medical Health Outcomes Survey Short-Form to assess caregiver mood and QOL. Two hundred seventy-five caregivers (intervention n  = 137; control n  = 138) of the 350 patients participated. The intervention led to improvement in caregivers' total distress (HADS-total adjusted mean difference = -1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.76 to -0.15, p  = .029), depression subscale (HADS-depression adjusted mean difference = -0.71, 95% CI -1.38 to -0.05, p  = .036), but not anxiety subscale or QOL at week 12. There were no differences in caregivers' outcomes at week 24. A terminal decline analysis showed significant intervention effects on caregivers' total distress (HADS-total), with effects on both the anxiety and depression subscales at 3 and 6 months before patient death. Early involvement of PC for patients with newly diagnosed lung and gastrointestinal cancers leads to improvement in caregivers' psychological symptoms. This work demonstrates that the benefits of early, integrated PC models in oncology care extend

  2. A clinical study of COPD severity assessment by primary care physicians and their patients compared with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapel, Douglas W; Dalal, Anand A; Johnson, Phaedra; Becker, Laura; Hunter, Alyssa Goolsby

    2015-06-01

    Primary care physicians often do not use spirometry to confirm the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This project was designed to see how well physicians' impressions about their patients' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity correlate with the severity of airflow obstruction measured by spirometry and to assess whether spirometry results subsequently changed the physicians' opinions about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity and treatment. We performed a multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study conducted in 83 primary care clinics from across the United States. A total of 899 patients with a clinical diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease completed a questionnaire and spirometry testing. Physicians completed a questionnaire and case report forms. Concordance among physician ratings, patient ratings, and spirometry results was evaluated. Physicians' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity ratings before spirometry were accurate for only 30% of patients with evaluable spirometry results, and disease severity in 41% of patients was underestimated. Physicians also underestimated severity compared with patients' self-assessment among 42% of those with evaluable results. After spirometry, physicians changed their opinions on the severity for 30% of patients and recommended treatment changes for 37%. Only 75% of patients performed at least 1 high-quality spirometry test; however, the physicians' opinions and treatment decisions were similar regardless of suboptimal test results. Without performing spirometry, physicians are likely to underestimate their patients' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity or inadequately characterize their patients' lung disease. Spirometry changed the physicians' clinical impressions and treatments for approximately one third of these patients; thus, spirometry is a valuable tool for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management in primary care. Copyright © 2015

  3. The one-stop clinic as the standard of out-patient care in a hospital urology department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Páez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of a 'one-stop' clinic in terms of proportion of discharges or inclusion in surgical waiting lists. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients were referred from primary care facilities (population 220.646 and from different departments in the hospital. Eight senior urologists, two registered nurses and two nurse attendants participated in the experience. Prior to the start of the project, referral protocols had been agreed with the primary care physicians involved. Compliance with the protocols was periodically tested. Eventually 5537 first visits (January-December 2009 where evaluable. RESULTS: Overall, the 'one-stop' format proved feasible in 74.2% of the patients (4108/5537. Patients, who successfully used the 'one-stop' format, were significantly younger than those who required additional consultations (43 vs 50 years old, respectively, Student's t test < 0.001. For obvious reasons the 'one-stop' format was universally possible in male sterilization and penile phimosis patients. Similarly, the 'one-stop' policy was applied in most consultations due to male sexual dysfunction (75% and urinary tract infection (73%. Other health problems, such as haematuria (62% and renal colic (46%, required more than one visit so that care of the patient reverted to the traditional, outpatient care model. CONCLUSION: A 'one-stop' philosophy is feasible for a number of procedures in a urological outpatient clinic. The costs to implement such an approach would be limited to managerial expenditure.

  4. Radiology clinical synopsis: a simple solution for obtaining an adequate clinical history for the accurate reporting of imaging studies on patients in intensive care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Mervyn D.; Alam, Khurshaid

    2005-01-01

    Lack of clinical history on radiology requisitions is a universal problem. We describe a simple Web-based system that readily provides radiology-relevant clinical history to the radiologist reading radiographs of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Along with the relevant history, which includes primary and secondary diagnoses, disease progression and complications, the system provides the patient's name, record number and hospital location. This information is immediately available to reporting radiologists. New clinical information is immediately entered on-line by the radiologists as they are reviewing images. After patient discharge, the data are stored and immediately available if the patient is readmitted. The system has been in routine clinical use in our hospital for nearly 2 years. (orig.)

  5. Clinical coaching in primary care: Capable of improving control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Guajardo, Eduardo Enrique; Salinas-Martínez, Ana María; Botello-García, Antonio; Mathiew-Quiros, Álvaro

    2016-06-01

    Few clinical coaching studies are both endorsed by real cases and focused on reducing suboptimal diabetes control. We evaluated the effectiveness of coaching on improving type 2 diabetes goals after 3 years of implementation in primary care. A cross-sectional study with follow up was conducted during 2008-2011. Coaching consisted of guiding family doctors to improve their clinical abilities, and it was conducted by a medical doctor trained in skill building, experiential learning, and goal setting. Effectiveness was assessed by means of fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin outcomes. The main analysis consisted of 1×3 and 2×3 repeated measures ANOVAs. A significant coaching×time interaction was observed, indicating that the difference in glucose between primary care units with and without coaching increased over time (Wilks' lambda multivariate test, PCoaching increased 1.4 times (95%CI 1.3, 1.5) the possibility of reaching the fasting glucose goal after controlling for baseline values. There was also a significant improvement in glycosylated hemoglobin (Bonferroni-corrected p-value for pairwise comparisons, Pcoaching was found to be worth the effort to improve type 2 diabetes control in primary care. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypertension risk and clinical care in patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia; a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerbe, Luis; Forgnone, Ivo; Addo, Juliet; Siguero, Ana; Gelati, Stefano; Ayis, Salma

    2018-01-01

    A higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has been observed in patients with bipolar disorder (BPD) or schizophrenia, partly due to an increased risk of hypertension (HTN), or a less effective care of it. This systematic review and meta-analysis, presents a critical appraisal and summary of the studies addressing the risk of HTN, or the differences in its care, for those with schizophrenia or BPD. Prospective studies were searched in PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, Scopus, and the Web of Science, from database inception to June 2017. A meta-analysis was undertaken to obtain pooled estimates of the risk of HTN. Five studies reporting the risk of HTN, and five studies presenting differences in its clinical care, were identified. An increased risk of HTN was observed for BPD patients, with an overall Incidence Rate Ratio 1.27(1.15-1.40). The pooled Incidence Rate Ratio of HTN for those with schizophrenia was 0.94 (0.75 - 1.14). A poorer care of HTN (lower rates of screening, prescription, and adherence) was reported in four studies of schizophrenia, and two of BPD patients, compared to people without these conditions. reduced number of studies on risk and care of HTN on patients with BPD or schizophrenia. Limited evidence suggests that patients with BPD have a higher risk of HTN. Patients with schizophrenia and BPD receive poor care of HTN. Understanding the risk of HTN, and the differences in its care, is essential for clinicians to reduce the cardiovascular morbidity and overall mortality of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sociodemographic and Clinical Characteristics of Patients attending Psychotherapy in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zena Al-Sharbati

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There is significant evidence that psychotherapy is a pivotal treatment for persons diagnosed with Axis I clinical psychiatric conditions; however, a psychotherapy service has only recently been established in the Omani health care system. This study aimed to investigate the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of attendees at a psychotherapy clinic at a tertiary care hospital. Methods: An analysis was carried out of 133 new referrals to the Psychotherapy Service at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, a tertiary care hospital. Results: The majority of referrals were females (59%, aged 18–34 years, employed (38%, had ≤12 years of formal education (51%, and were single (54%. A total of 43% were treated for anxiety disorders (including obsessive compulsive disorder, while 22% were treated for depression. A total of 65% were prescribed psychotropic medications. The utilisation of the Psychotherapy Service and its user characteristics are discussed within the context of a culturally diverse Omani community which has unique personal belief systems such as in supernatural powers (Jinn, contemptuous envy (Hassad, evil eye (Ain and sorcery (Sihr which are often used to explain the aetiology of mental illness and influence personal decisions on utilising medical and psychological treatments. Conclusion: Despite the low number of referrals to the Psychotherapy Service, there is reason to believe that psychotherapy would be an essential tool to come to grips with the increasing number of mental disorders in Oman.

  8. Pediatric Intensive Care Unit admission criteria for haemato-oncological patients: a basis for clinical guidelines implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piastra, Marco; Fognani, Giuliana; Franceschi, Alessia

    2011-06-16

    Recent advances in supportive care and progress in the development and use of chemotherapy have considerably improved the prognosis of many children with malignancy, thus the need for intensive care admission and management is increasing, reaching about 40% of patients throughout the disease course. Cancer remains a major death cause in children, though outcomes have considerably improved over the past decades. Prediction of outcome for children with cancer in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) obviously requires clinical guidelines, and these are not well defined, as well as admission criteria. Major determinants of negative outcomes remain severe sepsis/septic shock association and respiratory failure, deserving specific approach in children with cancer, particularly those receiving a bone marrow transplantation. A nationwide consensus should be achieved among pediatric intensivists and oncologists regarding the threshold clinical conditions requiring Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission as well as specific critical care protocols. As demonstrated for the critically ill non-oncologic child, it appears unreasonable that pediatric patients with malignancy can be admitted to an adult Intensive Care Unit ICU. On a national basis a pool of refecence institutions should be identified and early referral to an oncologic PICU is warranted.

  9. Clinical ethics and patient advocacy: the power of communication in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, Inken Annegret; Fröhlich-Güzelsoy, Leyla; Bruns, Florian; Friedrich, Bernd; Frewer, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, the rights of patients have assumed a more pivotal role in international discussion. Stricter laws on the protection of patients place greater priority on the perspective and the status of patients. The purpose of this study is to emphasize ethical aspects in communication, the role of patient advocates as contacts for the concerns and suggestions of patients, and how many problems of ethics disappear when communication is highlighted. We reviewed 680 documented cases of consultation in a 10-year period of patient advocates' activity at a big German university hospital with 1,300 beds. On the basis of this extensive material, the article will focus on the intersection of the advocate's work with the problems of patients in hospitals. Deficits in the level of communication between health care professionals and patients were frequently uncovered. Patients primarily complain about the lack of dialogue and empathy. Middle-aged patients consulted the patients' advocate disproportionately more often. Measured against this baseline, the group of 65 and older complained less frequently. Besides complaints the advocate was asked in more than one-third of all cases for information about medical matters, hospital regulations or administrative problems. Patients obviously see the advocate as a well-connected and ideally unbiased contact person for uncertainties concerning their malady or a potential stay in hospital. Those seeking help often set hope in the information given by the voluntary patient representative. It should be highly recommended for every German hospital to establish the position of a patient advocate. Furthermore, patients can profit from regular exchange between the advocate and the Ethics Committee, also, to help ensure that their rights are taken into account and implemented in an ethically desirable context.

  10. Patient Partnerships Transforming Sleep Medicine Research and Clinical Care: Perspectives from the Sleep Apnea Patient-Centered Outcomes Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redline, Susan; Baker-Goodwin, Si; Bakker, Jessie P; Epstein, Matthew; Hanes, Sherry; Hanson, Mark; Harrington, Zinta; Johnston, James C; Kapur, Vishesh K; Keepnews, David; Kontos, Emily; Lowe, Andy; Owens, Judith; Page, Kathy; Rothstein, Nancy

    2016-07-15

    Due to an ongoing recent evolution in practice, sleep medicine as a discipline has been compelled to respond to the converging pressures to reduce costs, improve outcomes, and demonstrate value. Patient "researchers" are uniquely placed to participate in initiatives that address the specific needs and priorities of patients and facilitate the identification of interventions with high likelihood of acceptance by the "customer." To date, however, the "patient voice" largely has been lacking in processes affecting relevant policies and practice guidelines. In this Special Report, patient and research leaders of the Sleep Apnea Patient-Centered Outcomes Network (SAPCON), a national collaborative group of patients, researchers and clinicians working together to promote patient-centered comparative effectiveness research, discuss these interrelated challenges in the context of sleep apnea, and the role patients and patient-centered networks may play in informing evidence-based research designed to meet patient's needs. We first briefly discuss the challenges facing sleep medicine associated with costs, outcomes, and value. We then discuss the key role patients and patient-centered networks can play in efforts to design research to guide better sleep health care, and national support for such initiatives. Finally, we summarize some of the challenges in moving to a new paradigm of patient-researcher-clinician partnerships. By forging strong partnerships among patients, clinicians and researchers, networks such as SAPCON can serve as a living demonstration of how to achieve value in health care. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  11. Direct and indirect patient costs of dermatology clinic visits and their impact on access to care and provider preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Brooke E; Gonzalez, Jessica; Cunningham, Kiera; Saraiya, Ami; Dornelles, Adriana C; Nguyen, Bichchau M

    2017-12-01

    The direct and indirect costs of dermatology clinic visits are infrequently quantified. Indirect costs, such as the time spent traveling to and from appointments and the value of lost earnings from time away from work, are substantial costs that often are not included in economic analyses but may pose barriers to receiving care. Due to the national shortage of dermatologists, patients may have to wait longer for appointments or travel further to see dermatologists outside of their local community, resulting in high time and travel costs for patients. Patients' lost time and earnings comprise the opportunity cost of obtaining care. A monetary value for this opportunity cost can be calculated by multiplying a patient's hourly wage by the number of hours that the patient dedicated to attending the dermatology appointment. Using a single institution survey, this study quantified the direct and indirect patient costs, including opportunity costs and time burden, associated with dermatology clinic visits to better appreciate the impact of these factors on health care access and dermatologic provider preference.

  12. Consent, Refusal, and Waivers in Patient-Centered Dysphagia Care: Using Law, Ethics, and Evidence to Guide Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Jennifer; Modayil, Maria; Chapman, Laura Roche; Dinh, An

    2016-11-01

    When patients refuse medical or rehabilitation procedures, waivers of liability have been used to bar future lawsuits. The purpose of this tutorial is to review the myriad issues surrounding consent, refusal, and waivers. The larger goal is to invigorate clinical practice by providing clinicians with knowledge of ethics and law. This tutorial is for educational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice. The authors use a hypothetical case of a "noncompliant" individual under the care of an interdisciplinary neurorehabilitation team to illuminate the ethical and legal features of the patient-practitioner relationship; the elements of clinical decision-making capacity; the duty of disclosure and the right of informed consent or informed refusal; and the relationship among noncompliance, defensive practices, and iatrogenic harm. We explore the legal question of whether waivers of liability in the medical context are enforceable or unenforceable as a matter of public policy. Speech-language pathologists, among other health care providers, have fiduciary and other ethical and legal obligations to patients. Because waivers try to shift liability for substandard care from health care providers to patients, courts usually find waivers of liability in the medical context unenforceable as a matter of public policy.

  13. Enhanced Personal Contact With HIV Patients Improves Retention in Primary Care: A Randomized Trial in 6 US HIV Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Lytt I.; Giordano, Thomas P.; Marks, Gary; Wilson, Tracey E.; Craw, Jason A.; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Keruly, Jeanne C.; Rodriguez, Allan E.; Malitz, Faye; Moore, Richard D.; Bradley-Springer, Lucy A.; Holman, Susan; Rose, Charles E.; Girde, Sonali; Sullivan, Meg; Metsch, Lisa R.; Saag, Michael; Mugavero, Michael J.; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Ferreira, Cintia; Koppelman, Lisa; McDoom, Maya; Naisteter, Michal; Osella, Karina; Ruiz, Glory; Skolnik, Paul; Sullivan, Meg; Gibbs-Cohen, Sophia; Desrivieres, Elana; Frederick, Mayange; Gravesande, Kevin; Holman, Susan; Johnson, Harry; Taylor, Tonya; Wilson, Tracey; Cheever, Laura; Malitz, Faye; Mills, Robert; Craw, Jason; Gardner, Lytt; Girde, Sonali; Marks, Gary; Batey, Scott; Gaskin, Stephanie; Mugavero, Michael; Murphree, Jill; Raper, Jim; Saag, Michael; Thogaripally, Suneetha; Willig, James; Zinski, Anne; Arya, Monisha; Bartholomew, David; Biggs, Tawanna; Budhwani, Hina; Davila, Jessica; Giordano, Tom; Miertschin, Nancy; Payne, Shapelle; Slaughter, William; Jenckes, Mollie; Keruly, Jeanne; McCray, Angie; McGann, Mary; Moore, Richard; Otterbein, Melissa; Zhou, Liming; Garzon, Carolyn; Jean-Simon, Jesline; Mercogliano, Kathy; Metsch, Lisa; Rodriguez, Allan; Saint-Jean, Gilbert; Shika, Marvin; Bradley-Springer, Lucy; Corwin, Marla

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to determine whether enhanced personal contact with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients across time improves retention in care compared with existing standard of care (SOC) practices, and whether brief skills training improves retention beyond enhanced contact. Methods. The study, conducted at 6 HIV clinics in the United States, included 1838 patients with a recent history of inconsistent clinic attendance, and new patients. Each clinic randomized participants to 1 of 3 arms and continued to provide SOC practices to all enrollees: enhanced contact with interventionist (EC) (brief face-to-face meeting upon returning for care visit, interim visit call, appointment reminder calls, missed visit call); EC + skills (organization, problem solving, and communication skills); or SOC only. The intervention was delivered by project staff for 12 months following randomization. The outcomes during that 12-month period were (1) percentage of participants attending at least 1 primary care visit in 3 consecutive 4-month intervals (visit constancy), and (2) proportion of kept/scheduled primary care visits (visit adherence). Results. Log-binomial risk ratios comparing intervention arms against the SOC arm demonstrated better outcomes in both the EC and EC + skills arms (visit constancy: risk ratio [RR], 1.22 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.09–1.36] and 1.22 [95% CI, 1.09–1.36], respectively; visit adherence: RR, 1.08 [95% CI, 1.05–1.11] and 1.06 [95% CI, 1.02–1.09], respectively; all Ps < .01). Intervention effects were observed in numerous patient subgroups, although they were lower in patients reporting unmet needs or illicit drug use. Conclusions. Enhanced contact with patients improved retention in HIV primary care compared with existing SOC practices. A brief patient skill-building component did not improve retention further. Additional intervention elements may be needed for patients reporting illicit

  14. Touch screens as a tool in patient care in the IBD outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Lone; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Fallingborg, Jan; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius; Jess, Tine

    2016-09-01

    We have introduced online touch screens in the waiting room for patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) for recording of symptoms before their consultation. This has made disease activity scores readily available to the physician in our newly established database, 'Gastrobio'. We wanted to validate the use of touch screens compared to paper questionnaires. A total of 54 patients with UC and 74 patients with CD were included in the study. The UC patients filled out the Short Health Scale (SHS) and Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index (SSCAI). The CD patients filled out the SHS and Harvey-Bradshaw Index (HBI). Paper questionnaires and touch screen versions were used in random order and comparison between the two modalities was made by Spearman correlation test, Bland-Altman plots, and Kappa-statistics. Among the 128 patients, the two SHS scores (SHS touch versus SHS paper) were found to be highly correlated (Spearman correlation; 0.92 for UC and 0.92 for CD). Also, on average, Bland-Altman plots demonstrated a difference close to zero between the two modalities. Agreement between paper version and touch screen version of SCCAI and HBI scores was also high (Kappa-statistics; 78% raw and 98% weighted for SCCAI; 65% raw and 97% weighted for HBI). It is feasible to introduce touch screens in the outpatient clinic and to have patients record their symptoms before the consultation. However, the study may not be representative for elderly patients.

  15. Knowledge of and attitude to foot care amongst Type 2 diabetes patients attending a university-based primary care clinic in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabi I. Ekore

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Individuals living with diabetes mellitus are at an increased risk of developing foot ulcers and cardiovascular complications or a neuropathy that may result in amputations. These complications have been shown to be already present in about 10% of diabetic patients at the time of diagnosis.Objectives: This study was carried out to determine the level of awareness and attitude to foot care among adult diabetic patients attending a university health centre (i.e. a primary care centre and to emphasise the ever-present need for health education and promotion and early complication detection (especially of foot problems among diabetic patients.Method: A descriptive cross-sectional, clinic-based study was carried out at the University of Ibadan Health Centre (Jaja Clinic. The study population consisted of consenting adult diabetic patients. Data were collected by the self-administration of structured questionnaires to eligible subjects and were analysed using the SPSS v.15software. Appropriate statistics were employed to analyse the collected data.Results: A total of 137 patients participated in the study and ranged in age from 37 to 75 years, with the mean ± SD age being 58.2 ± 9.2 years. Of the participants, 98 (71.5% were men and 39 (28.5%were women; all of the participants were married. The duration of illness ranged from 1 year to 20 years, with the median duration of illness being 3 ± 1.7 years. One hundred and twenty-six (92%patients had never received any education on foot care from their healthcare providers, while 11(8% had received some form of foot care education. Among those who had never received any foot care education, 92 (73% had been diabetic for 1–5 years, while the remaining 34 (27% had been diabetic for 6 – 20 years. Of the foot care measures that were known, 35 (25.5% patients knew to wash their feet daily and dry in between the toes thoroughly, 31 (22.6% knew not to go outdoors barefooted, 27 (19.7% checked

  16. Information, motivation, and behavioral skills for early pre-ART engagement in HIV care among patients entering clinical care in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laramie R; Amico, K Rivet; Shuper, Paul A; Christie, Sarah; Fisher, William A; Cornman, Deborah H; Doshi, Monika; MacDonald, Susan; Pillay, Sandy; Fisher, Jeffrey D

    2013-01-01

    Little is known regarding factors implicated in early engagement and retention in HIV care among individuals not yet eligible for antiretroviral therapy (pre-ART) in sub-Saharan Africa. Identifying such factors is critical for supporting retention in pre-ART clinical care to ensure timely ART initiation and optimize long-term health outcomes. We assessed patients' pre-ART HIV care-related information, motivation, and behavioral skills among newly diagnosed ART-ineligible patients, initiating care in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The survey was interviewer-administered to eligible patients, who were aged 18 years or older, newly entering care (diagnosed within the last six-months), and ineligible for ART (CD4 count > 200 cells/mm(3)) in one of four primary care clinical sites. Self-reported information, motivation, and behavioral skills specific to retention in pre-ART HIV-care were characterized by categorizing responses into those reflecting potential strengths and those reflective of potential deficits. Information, motivation, and behavioral skills deficits sufficiently prevalent in the overall sample (i.e.,≥30% prevalent) were identified as areas in need of specific attention through intervention efforts adapted to the clinic level. Gender-based differences were also evaluated. A total of 288 patients (75% female) completed structured interviews. Across the sample, eight information, eight motivation, and eight behavioral skills deficit areas were identified as sufficiently prevalent to warrant specific targeted attention. Gender differences did not emerge. The deficits in pre-ART HIV care-related information, motivation, and behavioral skills that were identified suggest that efforts to improve accurate information on immune function and HIV disease are needed, as is accurate information regarding HIV treatment and transmission risk prior to ART initiation. Additional efforts to facilitate the development of social support, including positive interactions

  17. Comprehensive geriatric assessment in the older cancer patient: coming of age in clinical cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu, Cynthia; Berger, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer care at the extremes of life, in the young and the old, is characterized by unique issues associated with pediatrics and geriatric medicine, accentuated by the special vulnerabilities of these groups. In response to these needs, the field of pediatric oncology has been well honed to deal with the special problems associated with juvenile cancer patients. While most adult oncologists consider themselves well prepared to deal with older cancer patients, the current expansion of the geriatric population – their variable levels of fitness, frailty and vulnerability, the fact that cancer is primarily a disease of older adults, the significant expansion of agents and approaches to treat cancer, as well as their resultant toxicities and complications – has led to the development of specialized geriatric oncologists. Moreover, the special characteristics and needs of these patients have led to the evolution of new guidelines for evaluation, management and the conduct of research in older patients with cancer. PMID:25642321

  18. Assessment of activities performed by clinical nurse practitioners and implications for staffing and patient care at primary health care level in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude Igumbor

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The shortage of nurses in public healthcare facilities in South Africa is well documented; finding creative solutions to this problem remains a priority. Objective: This study sought to establish the amount of time that clinical nurse practitioners (CNPs in one district of the Western Cape spend on clinical services and the implications for staffing and skills mix in order to deliver quality patient care. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted across 15 purposively selected clinics providing primary health services in 5 sub-districts. The frequency of activities and time CNPs spent on each activity in fixed and mobile clinics were recorded. Time spent on activities and health facility staff profiles were correlated and predictors of the total time spent by CNPs with patients were identified. Results: The time spent on clinical activities was associated with the number of CNPs in the facilities. CNPs in fixed clinics spent a median time of about 13 minutes with each patient whereas CNPs in mobile clinics spent 3 minutes. Fixed-clinic CNPs also spent more time on their non-core functions than their core functions, more time with patients, and saw fewer patients compared to mobile-clinic CNPs. Conclusions: The findings give insight into the time CNPs in rural fixed and mobile clinics spend with their patients, and how patient caseload may affect consultation times. Two promising strategies were identified – task shifting and adjustments in health workerd eployment – as ways to address staffing and skills mix, which skills mix creates the potential for using healthcare workers fully whilst enhancing the long-term health of these rural communities.

  19. STUDY OF THYROID DYSFUNCTION IN ELDERLY PATIENTS AND ITS CLINICAL CORRELATION IN TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyasagar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Thyroid dysfunction in elderly is not uncommon. Thyroid abnormalities were more among females than in males. Clinical diagnosis is difficult to make but Thyroid Function Tests always help in diagnosing the disease. Subclinical state is equally common as clinical state in elderly population. As the age advances the incidence of thyroid disorders increase. The study was undertaken with an objective to study the spectrum of thyroid dysfunction in elderly and to correlate clinical symptoms with abnormal thyroid function. Thyroid disorders were present in 26%, overt hypothyroidism in 12%, subclinical hypothyroidism in 8% cases, hyperthyroidism in 3% and subclinical hyperthyroidism in 3% patients was noted. In this study, 36 patients were males and 64 were females. Females (20% had high incidence of thyroid disorders than males (6%.

  20. Incidence of dizziness and vertigo in Japanese primary care clinic patients with lifestyle-related diseases: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Masaoki; Takeshima, Taro; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Nagasaka, Shoichiro; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Oki, Hiroshi; Kajii, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and vertigo are highly prevalent symptoms among patients presenting at primary care clinics, and peripheral vestibular disorder (PVD) is their most frequent cause. However, the incidence of PVD has not been well documented. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of dizziness, vertigo, and PVD among patients presenting at a primary care clinic. This was an observational study. Between November 2011 and March 2013, we observed 393 patients, all at least 20 years old, who had been treated for chronic diseases such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus for at least 6 months at a primary clinic (Oki Clinic) in Japan. The main outcome of interest was new incidence of dizziness, vertigo, and PVD events. During the 1-year follow-up period, the otorhinolaryngologist diagnosed and reported new PVD events. The mean age of the 393 participants at entry was 65.5 years. Of the study participants, 12.7%, 82.4%, and 92.6% had diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, respectively. We followed up all the participants (100%). During the 662.5 person-years of follow-up, 121 cases of dizziness or vertigo (dizziness/vertigo) and 76 cases of PVD were observed. The incidence of dizziness/vertigo and PVD was 194.7 (95% confidence interval: 161.6-232.6) per 1,000 person-years and 115.7 (95% confidence interval: 92.2-142.6) per 1,000 person-years, respectively. There were 61 cases of acute peripheral vestibulopathy, 12 of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and three of Meniere's disease among the 76 PVD patients. We reported the incidence of dizziness/vertigo among Japanese primary care clinic patients, which was higher than that usually observed in the general population. Furthermore, we described the incidence of PVD and found that it was a major cause of dizziness/vertigo.

  1. Incidence of dizziness and vertigo in Japanese primary care clinic patients with lifestyle-related diseases: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Masaoki; Takeshima, Taro; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Nagasaka, Shoichiro; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Oki, Hiroshi; Kajii, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dizziness and vertigo are highly prevalent symptoms among patients presenting at primary care clinics, and peripheral vestibular disorder (PVD) is their most frequent cause. However, the incidence of PVD has not been well documented. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of dizziness, vertigo, and PVD among patients presenting at a primary care clinic. Design This was an observational study. Setting and participants Between November 2011 and March 2013, we observed 393 patients, all at least 20 years old, who had been treated for chronic diseases such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus for at least 6 months at a primary clinic (Oki Clinic) in Japan. Outcome The main outcome of interest was new incidence of dizziness, vertigo, and PVD events. During the 1-year follow-up period, the otorhinolaryngologist diagnosed and reported new PVD events. Results The mean age of the 393 participants at entry was 65.5 years. Of the study participants, 12.7%, 82.4%, and 92.6% had diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, respectively. We followed up all the participants (100%). During the 662.5 person-years of follow-up, 121 cases of dizziness or vertigo (dizziness/vertigo) and 76 cases of PVD were observed. The incidence of dizziness/vertigo and PVD was 194.7 (95% confidence interval: 161.6–232.6) per 1,000 person-years and 115.7 (95% confidence interval: 92.2–142.6) per 1,000 person-years, respectively. There were 61 cases of acute peripheral vestibulopathy, 12 of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and three of Meniere’s disease among the 76 PVD patients. Conclusion We reported the incidence of dizziness/vertigo among Japanese primary care clinic patients, which was higher than that usually observed in the general population. Furthermore, we described the incidence of PVD and found that it was a major cause of dizziness/vertigo. PMID:25931828

  2. Experiences of a student-run clinic in primary care: a mixed-method study with students, patients and supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröberg, Maria; Leanderson, Charlotte; Fläckman, Birgitta; Hedman-Lagerlöf, Erik; Björklund, Karin; Nilsson, Gunnar H; Stenfors, Terese

    2018-03-01

    To explore how a student-run clinic (SRC) in primary health care (PHC) was perceived by students, patients and supervisors. A mixed methods study. Clinical learning environment, supervision and nurse teacher evaluation scale (CLES + T) assessed student satisfaction. Client satisfaction questionnaire-8 (CSQ-8) assessed patient satisfaction. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with supervisors. Gustavsberg PHC Center, Stockholm County, Sweden. Students in medicine, nursing, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and psychology and their patients filled in questionnaires. Supervisors in medicine, nursing and physiotherapy were interviewed. Mean values and medians of CLES + T and CSQ-8 were calculated. Interviews were analyzed using content analysis. A majority of 199 out of 227 student respondents reported satisfaction with the pedagogical atmosphere and the supervisory relationship. Most of the 938 patient respondents reported satisfaction with the care given. Interviews with 35 supervisors showed that the organization of the SRC provided time and support to focus on the tutorial assignment. Also, the pedagogical role became more visible and targeted toward the student's individual needs. However, balancing the student's level of autonomy and the own control over care was described as a challenge. Many expressed the need for further pedagogical education. High student and patient satisfaction reported from five disciplines indicate that a SRC in PHC can be adapted for heterogeneous student groups. Supervisors experienced that the SRC facilitated and clarified their pedagogical role. Simultaneously their need for continuous pedagogical education was highlighted. The SRC model has the potential to enhance student-centered tuition in PHC. Key Points Knowledge of student-run clinics (SRCs) as learning environments within standard primary health care (PHC) is limited. We report experiences from the perspectives of students, their patients and supervisors

  3. Using a clinical decision support system to determine the quality of antimicrobial dosing in intensive care patients with renal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmons, P J; Grouls, Rene J; Roos, A N; Bindels, A J; Wessels-Basten, S J; Ackerman, E W; Korsten, E H

    2010-02-01

    The benefits on clinical practice of a clinical decision support system (CDSS) are predominantly determined by the quality of the clinical rules used in this system. Therefore, it is essential to investigate the performance and potential benefits on quality of care of these rules. A clinical rule assisting physicians in selecting the appropriate dosage according to renal function of frequently prescribed antimicrobials was developed. In 2004, 1788 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for more than 12 h were included in this retrospective study. The actual number of dosage adjustments without the support of the CDSS was compared with the theoretical number of dosage adjustments determined by the clinical rule in patients with moderate (creatinine clearance (Cl(creat)) 10-50 ml/min) and severe (Cl(creat) renal dysfunction. If dosage adjustment was omitted, the duration of excessive anti-infective dosing and extra drug costs involved was determined. Dosage adjustment of antimicrobials was omitted in 163 patients (86%) with moderate renal failure and 13 patients (54%) with severe renal failure. Excessive exposure was most frequently detected in patients receiving fluconazole and ciprofloxacin (median duration of 6 days). In our ICU alone, more than 16,000 euro ($19 000) can be saved annually by adjusting the dosage according to renal function of frequently prescribed antimicrobials. Despite intensive monitoring of patients in the ICU, dosage adjustment of antimicrobials is often omitted. Implementing this clinical rule has the potential to contribute to a significant improvement in medication safety and is expected to generate substantial savings.

  4. Is Lower Quality Clinical Care Ethically Justifiable for Patients Residing in Areas with Infrastructure Deficits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhorn, Marcia C; Patrizio, Pasquale

    2018-03-01

    Reproductive health services, including infertility care, are important in countries with infrastructure deficits, such as Lebanon, which now hosts more than one million Syrian refugees. Islamic prohibitions on child adoption and third-party reproductive assistance (donor eggs, sperm, embryos, and surrogacy) mean that most Muslim couples must turn to in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) to overcome their childlessness. Attempts to bring low-cost IVF-ICSI to underserved populations might help infertile couples where no other services are available. However, a low-cost IVF-ICSI protocol for male infertility remains technically challenging and thus may result in two standards of clinical care. Nonetheless, low-cost IVF-ICSI represents a form of reproductive justice in settings with infrastructure deficits and is clearly better than no treatment at all. © 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Role of clinical pathway in improving the quality of care for patients with faecal incontinence: A randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Zeiad I; Lim, Michael; Stojkovic, Stevan

    2017-02-06

    To assess the development and implementation of the Integrated Rapid Assessment and Treatment (IRAT) pathway for the management of patients with fecal incontinence and measure its impact on patients' care. Patients referred to the colorectal unit in our hospital for the management of faecal incontinence were randomised to either the Standard Care pathway or the newly developed IRAT pathway in this feasibility study. The IRAT pathway is designed to provide a seamless multidisciplinary care to patients with faecal incontinence in a timely fashion. On the other hand, patients in the Standard Pathway were managed in the general colorectal clinic. Percentage improvements in St. Marks Incontinence Score, Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score and Rockwood Faecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale after completion of treatment in both groups were the primary outcome measures. Secondary endpoints were the time required to complete the management and patients' satisfaction score. χ 2 , Mann-Whitney-U and Kendall tau-c correlation coefficient tests were used for comparison of outcomes of the two study groups. A P value of 0.05 or less was considered significant. Thirty-nine patients, 34 females, consented to participate. Thirty-one (79.5%) patients completed the final assessment and were included in the outcome analysis. There was no significant difference in the quality of life scales and incontinence scores. Patients in the IRAT pathway were more satisfied with the time required to complete management ( P = 0.033) and had stronger agreement that all aspects of their problem were covered ( P = 0.006). Despite of the lack of significant difference in outcome measures, the new pathway has positively influenced patient's mindset, which was reflected in a higher satisfaction score.

  6. Intensive care for the cancer patient - unique clinical and ethical challenges and outcome prediction in the critically ill cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigmore, Timothy James; Farquhar-Smith, Paul; Lawson, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    With the rising number of cancer cases and increasing survival times, cancer patients with critical illness are increasingly presenting to the intensive care unit. This article considers the unique challenges they pose in terms of oncological-specific disease processes and treatment and reviews current trends in outcome prediction. We also consider the ethical standpoints surrounding the treatment of patients for whom there may be no cure and their subsequent transition to palliative care, should it become necessary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Longer term clinical and economic benefits of offering acupuncture care to patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K J; MacPherson, H; Ratcliffe, J; Thorpe, L; Brazier, J; Campbell, M; Fitter, M; Roman, M; Walters, S; Nicholl, J P

    2005-08-01

    To test whether patients with persistent non-specific low back pain, when offered access to traditional acupuncture care alongside conventional primary care, gained more long-term relief from pain than those offered conventional care only, for equal or less cost. Safety and acceptability of acupuncture care to patients, and the heterogeneity of outcomes were also tested. A pragmatic, two parallel group, randomised controlled trial. Patients in the experimental arm were offered the option of referral to the acupuncture service comprising six acupuncturists. The control group received usual care from their general practitioner (GP). Eligible patients were randomised in a ratio of 2:1 to the offer of acupuncture to allow between-acupuncturist effects to be tested. Three non-NHS acupuncture clinics, with referrals from 39 GPs working in 16 practices in York, UK. Patients aged 18-65 years with non-specific low back pain of 4-52 weeks' duration, assessed as suitable for primary care management by their general practitioner. The trial protocol allowed up to ten individualised acupuncture treatments per patient. The acupuncturist determined the content and the number of treatments according to patient need. The Short Form 36 (SF-36) Bodily Pain dimension (range 0-100 points), assessed at baseline, and 3, 12 and 24 months. The study was powered to detect a 10-point difference between groups at 12 months post-randomisation. Cost--utility analysis was conducted at 24 months using the EuroQoL 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) and a preference-based single index measure derived from the SF-36 (SF-6D). Secondary outcomes included the McGill Present Pain Index (PPI), Oswestry Pain Disability Index (ODI), all other SF-36 dimensions, medication use, pain-free months in the past year, worry about back pain, satisfaction with care received, and safety and acceptability of acupuncture care. A total of 159 patients were in the 'acupuncture offer' arm and 80 in the 'usual care' arm. All 159 patients

  8. Integrative qualitative communication analysis of consultation and patient and practitioner perspectives: towards a theory of authentic caring in clinical relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Peter; Mendick, Nicola; Young, Bridget

    2011-03-01

    We developed a method whereby relationships can be studied simultaneously from the perspectives of each party and researchers' observations of their dialogue. Then we used this method to study how to recognise authentic, caring clinical relationships. Participants were 20 patients who had recently received surgery for breast cancer and nine surgeons with whom they had a post-operative consultation. We audiorecorded consultations, before interviewing patients and surgeons about their perceptions of the consultation and each other. Cross-case qualitative analyses (analysing consultations and surgeon and patient interviews, respectively) were supplemented by integrative, within-case analysis. Surgeons and patients described their relationship as personal and emotional, but emotional talk was absent from consultations. For patients and surgeons, their relationship depended, instead, on surgeons' expertise and character. Our integrative approach suggested that authentic caring in these relationships lay in practitioners' conscientious execution of their role and, contrary to currently influential views, not in an explicit emotional engagement. Relationships between patients and practitioners cannot be described adequately using analyses of interactions between them. Researchers will need to triangulate between these observations and the patient and practitioner perspectives in order to understand what makes for authentically caring relationships. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical Alarms in intensive care: implications of alarm fatigue for the safety of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Carla Bridi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to identify the number of electro-medical pieces of equipment in a coronary care unit, characterize their types, and analyze implications for the safety of patients from the perspective of alarm fatigue.METHOD: this quantitative, observational, descriptive, non-participatory study was conducted in a coronary care unit of a cardiology hospital with 170 beds.RESULTS: a total of 426 alarms were recorded in 40 hours of observation: 227 were triggered by multi-parametric monitors and 199 were triggered by other equipment (infusion pumps, dialysis pumps, mechanical ventilators, and intra-aortic balloons; that is an average of 10.6 alarms per hour.CONCLUSION: the results reinforce the importance of properly configuring physiological variables, the volume and parameters of alarms of multi-parametric monitors within the routine of intensive care units. The alarms of equipment intended to protect patients have increased noise within the unit, the level of distraction and interruptions in the workflow, leading to a false sense of security.

  10. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients referred to psychiatric unit in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousafzai, A.W.; Kazim, M.; Jehangiri, A.U.R.

    2015-01-01

    Very few studies from Pakistan have examined the profile of patients seen by psychiatrists in general hospital. The aim of this research is to describe the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients referred to the psychiatric unit of a general hospital over a one year period. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, from January 1st to December 31st 2012. All patients being referred to psychiatry were included in the study over one year period. The information was recorded on a structured questionnaire and analysed the data using SPSS-19.0. Results: Out of the 105 patients referred to the psychiatric unit, 74 (72.3%) were females. A total of 69 (68.5%) patients were married. More than half were uneducated and only number 4 (3%) patients had university qualification. Housewives made up 64.4% of the patient population followed by students (11%). Majority 55 (53%) had less than Rs. 5000/ monthly income. About 30% patients were shifted to psychiatry ward while, nearly one tenth were discharged. In 35% cases the psychiatrist was asked to help in the management, while in 50% cases only opinion was sought. Aggressive and threatening behaviour was source of concern in majority of patients for the primary team while 34% exhibited suicidal behaviour. Depression was most frequent diagnosis in 45 43% patients, followed by conversion disorder 19 (17%) and delirium 16 (14%). Conclusion: The rate of psychiatric referrals is dismal with only one third of the patients being transferred to the psychiatric ward. The major psychiatric diagnosis was depression. Patients with aggressive and threatening behaviour were more frequently referred. (author)

  11. Attitudes and Self-Care Behaviors of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis Referred to Rheumatology Clinical Centers in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Morowatisharifabad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Knee Osteoarthritis is the most common age-related causes of knee pain which can induce disability, disablement and reduced quality of life. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine attitudes and self-care behaviors of knee osteoarthritis patients referred to three Rheumatology Clinical Centers in Yazd. Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was carried out on 235 patients referred to Health Care Centers of Yazd who were selected randomly. In order to glean the study data, a researcher-designed questionnaire was utilized probing into demographic variables as well as patients' attitudes and self-care behaviors. The reliability and validity of the questionnaire were approved, as well. The study data were analyzed applying SPSS software (ver. 18 via T-Test, ANOVA, Pearson correlation coefficient at 0.05 of the significant level. Results: The participants' mean age and Mean BMI were reported 54.90±9.15 and 28.8±4.61, respectively. Mean score of patients' attitude toward self-care was 47.4±3.95 out of 55 and the mean score of their self-care behaviors was 43.11±5.75 out of 60, which the both scores were at a moderate level. Furthermore, a positive significant correlation was detected between attitude and self-care behaviors (p=0.01. Within different self-care behaviors, participants' attitude towards the positive effect of using crutches while walking was at the lowest level. Meanwhile, according to the patients' attitude, using crutches was demonstrated to have the least performance within the self-care behaviors. Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, the attitude level can cause an increase in the patients' self-care behaviors. Moreover, since the participants' attitude towards such behaviors as using crutches, using pool and weight loss were at a low level, interventional programs are recommended to emphasize the mentioned issues. Keywords: Attitude; Knee osteoarthritis; Performance; Self-care

  12. An Internal Audit of Diabetes Care for Type 2 Diabetic Patients in a Public Hospital Diabetes Clinic in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieng, Yung Chun

    2017-03-01

    Earlier studies have identified a gap between guidelines and actual clinical diabetes care in Malaysia. We audited the quality of care for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) attending our diabetes clinic at a public hospital. A structured review of the outpatient clinic cards, prescriptions and laboratory results was conducted for patients attending the diabetes clinic at Sibu Hospital in October and November 2014. For the total of 233 patients who were audited, the levels of fasting blood sugar, blood pressure, body mass index and fasting lipid profile were satisfactory at 99.1%, 99.6%, 92.6% and 99.6% respectively. 79.7% of the subjects had had HbA1c performed at least once over the previous six months. Only 25.8% had annual foot screening, while the eye screening rate was 71.2% and the albuminuria screening rate was 93.6%. For outcome measures, the mean (SD) HbA1c level was 9.2% (1.91%), with 13 patients (6.7%) having HbA1c less than 6.5%; 36.4% of participants achieved BP < 130/80 mmHg; and 69.4% had LDL < 2.6 mmol/L. The majority of the patients were overweight or obese (91.4%). Overall, the performance of diabetic care processes at our hospital was satisfactory, except for foot examination. The glycaemic and weight control among the subjects were suboptimal and warrant an optimised and comprehensive approach on the part of the management.

  13. Clinical features and visual outcomes of scleritis patients presented to tertiary care eye centers in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Al Barqi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To describe the clinical features, systemic associations, treatment and visual outcomes in Saudi patients with scleritis. A retrospective chart review was performed for patients with scleritis presenting to two tertiary care eye hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from 2001 to 2011. Data were collected on the clinical features of scleritis, subtypes of scleritis, associated systemic disease, history of previous ocular surgery and medical therapy, including the use of immunosuppressants. Treatment outcomes were evaluated based on best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and response to treatment. Of the 52 patients included in the study, non-necrotizing anterior scleritis was the most common type of scleritis in 22 patients (42.3%, followed by posterior scleritis in 14 patients (26.9%. The majority of cases, 31 patients (59.6%, were idiopathic in nature. Systemic associations were present in 12 patients (23.1%. Infectious scleritis was confirmed in 6 patients (11.5%: 3 with bacterial scleritis after pterygium excision, 2 patients with scleritis related to tuberculosis and 1 patient with scleritis resulting from herpes simplex infection. For the various subtypes of scleritis, BCVA values after treatment and time to remission significantly differed (P Non-necrotizing anterior scleritis was the most common subtype of scleritis. Final visual outcome and time to remission differed among the various scleritis subtypes.

  14. The impact of emotional intelligence in health care professionals on caring behaviour towards patients in clinical and long-term care settings: Findings from an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Suzanne; Spiby, Helen; Sheen, Kayleigh; Slade, Pauline

    2018-01-11

    Over recent years there has been criticism within the United Kingdom's health service regarding a lack of care and compassion, resulting in adverse outcomes for patients. The impact of emotional intelligence in staff on patient health care outcomes has been recently highlighted. Many recruiters now assess emotional intelligence as part of their selection process for health care staff. However, it has been argued that the importance of emotional intelligence in health care has been overestimated. To explore relationships between emotional intelligence in health care professionals, and caring behaviour. To further explore any additional factors related to emotional intelligence that may impact upon caring behaviour. An integrative review design was used. Psychinfo, Medline, CINAHL Plus, Social Sciences Citation Index, Science Citation Index, and Scopus were searched for studies from 1995 to April 2017. Studies providing quantitative or qualitative exploration of how any healthcare professionals' emotional intelligence is linked to caring in healthcare settings were selected. Twenty two studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Three main types of health care professional were identified: nurses, nurse leaders, and physicians. Results indicated that the emotional intelligence of nurses was related to both physical and emotional caring, but emotional intelligence may be less relevant for nurse leaders and physicians. Age, experience, burnout, and job satisfaction may also be relevant factors for both caring and emotional intelligence. This review provides evidence that developing emotional intelligence in nurses may positively impact upon certain caring behaviours, and that there may be differences within groups that warrant further investigation. Understanding more about which aspects of emotional intelligence are most relevant for intervention is important, and directions for further large scale research have been identified. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All

  15. Self-management in patients with COPD: theoretical context, content, outcomes, and integration into clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaptein AA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ad A Kaptein, Maarten J Fischer, Margreet Scharloo Medical Psychology Section, Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC, Leiden, the Netherlands Abstract: In this narrative review, we put self-management in the context of a 50-year history of research about how patients with COPD respond to their illness. We review a definition of self-management, and emphasize that self-management should be combined with disease management and the chronic care model in order to be effective. Reviewing the empirical status of self-management in COPD, we conclude that self-management is part and parcel of modern, patient-oriented biopsychosocial care. In pulmonary rehabilitation programs, self-management is instrumental in improving patients’ functional status and quality of life. We conclude by emphasizing how studying the way persons with COPD make sense of their illness helps in refining self-management, and thereby patient-reported outcomes in COPD. Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, self-management, psychology, quality of life, biopsychosocial model, medical humanities

  16. [Electronic medical records: Evolution of physician-patient relationship in the Primary Care clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Santonja, T; Gómez-Paredes, L; Álvarez-Montero, S; Cabello-Ballesteros, L; Mombiela-Muruzabal, M T

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of electronic medical records and computer media in clinics, has influenced the physician-patient relationship. These modifications have many advantages, but there is concern that the computer has become too important, going from a working tool to the centre of our attention during the clinical interview, decreasing doctor interaction with the patient. The objective of the study was to estimate the percentage of time that family physicians spend on computer media compared to interpersonal communication with the patient, and whether this time is modified depending on different variables such as, doctor's age or reason for the consultation. An observational and descriptive study was conducted for 10 weeks, with 2 healthcare centres involved. The researchers attended all doctor- patient interviews, recording the patient time in and out of the consultation. Each time the doctor fixed his gaze on computer media the time was clocked. A total of 436 consultations were collected. The doctors looked at the computer support a median 38.33% of the total duration of an interview. Doctors of 45 years and older spent more time fixing their eyes on computer media (P<.05). Family physicians used almost 40% of the consultation time looking at computer media, and depends on age of physician, number of queries, and number of medical appointments. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Patients' experience of care and treatment outcome at the Department of Clinical Oral Physiology, Dental Public Service in Stockholm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christidis, Nikolaos; Smedberg, Erica; Hägglund, Helene; Hedenberg-Magnusson, Britt

    2010-01-01

    Chronic pain conditions in the craniofacial region are common in the adult population with a prevalence of approximately 10%. They are included in the generic term temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and accompanied by restricted mouth opening capacity, chewing difficulties, headache and neck pain. These pain conditions cause psychological suffering, impaired social relations, and recurrent sick leave, subsequently leading to frequent use of health care, medication and consequently to a decreased quality of life. Approximately 25% of children have signs of TMD and girls are shown to be more affected than boys. These signs increase with age and in the adult population the prevalence is approximately 38-40%, also here with a higher frequency in women than in men. This study comprised 198 patients who answered an anonymous questionnaire after termination of their treatment. The study aimed to investigate the activity at the department of clinical oral physiology at the Folktandvården Eastman Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, regarding the patients and their cause of care-seeking, as well as the patients' subjective experiences of the specialist care and the treatment outcome. As a secondary aim the purpose was to investigate how/if the clinicians at the department of clinical oral physiology reached their intention of being "curious", "considerate" and "accessible". The results from this study show that the majority of the patients (57.1%) were referred from the dental public service in Stockholm. 71.7% of the patients were young women between the ages of 11 and 20. The main causes of care-seeking were temporomandibular joint clickings, followed by limited jaw movement, headache and orofacial pain. Further, an immense majority of the patients (89.9%) were very satisfied with their treatment as well as the treatment outcome. These results indicate that the clinicians at the department reached their intention of being "curious", "considerate"and "accessible", which also

  18. Effect of Supportive Nursing Care on Self Esteem of Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Self-esteem is an important potential indicator in etiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with severe mental illness. ECT is a popular treatment for these patients that can effect on their self-esteem and reinforce their problems. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of supportive nursing care in increasing self esteem of patients receiving ECT. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted in the Baharan psychiatric hospital of Zahedan. A total of 70 cases of patients who received ECT were randomly allocated to control (n=35 and intervention (n=35 groups. The data were collected by demographic characteristics questionnaire and Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES. Intervention group received the supportive nursing care. The control group received only routine treatment. Self esteem level was measured and compared before and after intervention for two groups. The data was analyzed by SPSS using the χ2, t-test and ANCOVA. Results: Results showed that both groups were homogeneous on the socio- demographic characteristics. The mean self esteem in the intervention group compared with the control group was significantly increased. While controlling the effects of individual and social variables, the result shows significant differences between two groups in the mean scores of self esteem after the intervention.Conclusion: The results suggest that supportive nursing care can have positive effect on self esteem of patients receiving ECT. It is recommended to use this method for increasing self esteem of these patients.

  19. Effect of supportive nursing care on self esteem of patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Navidian, Ali; Keykha, Roghaieh

    2014-06-01

    Self-esteem is an important potential indicator in etiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with severe mental illness. ECT is a popular treatment for these patients that can effect on their self-esteem and reinforce their problems. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of supportive nursing care in increasing self esteem of patients receiving ECT. This clinical trial was conducted in the Baharan psychiatric hospital of Zahedan. A total of 70 cases of patients who received ECT were randomly allocated to control (n=35) and intervention (n=35) groups. The data were collected by demographic characteristics questionnaire and Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES). Intervention group received the supportive nursing care. The control group received only routine treatment. Self esteem level was measured and compared before and after intervention for two groups. The data was analyzed by SPSS using the χ(2), t-test and ANCOVA. RESULTS showed that both groups were homogeneous on the socio- demographic characteristics. The mean self esteem in the intervention group compared with the control group was significantly increased. While controlling the effects of individual and social variables, the result shows significant differences between two groups in the mean scores of self esteem after the intervention. The results suggest that supportive nursing care can have positive effect on self esteem of patients receiving ECT. It is recommended to use this method for increasing self esteem of these patients.

  20. Effect of Combined Patient Decision Aid and Patient Navigation vs Usual Care for Colorectal Cancer Screening in a Vulnerable Patient Population: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuland, Daniel S; Brenner, Alison T; Hoffman, Richard; McWilliams, Andrew; Rhyne, Robert L; Getrich, Christina; Tapp, Hazel; Weaver, Mark A; Callan, Danelle; Cubillos, Laura; Urquieta de Hernandez, Brisa; Pignone, Michael P

    2017-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is underused, especially among vulnerable populations. Decision aids and patient navigation are potentially complementary interventions for improving CRC screening rates, but their combined effect on screening completion is unknown. To determine the combined effect of a CRC screening decision aid and patient navigation compared with usual care on CRC screening completion. In this randomized clinical trial, data were collected from January 2014 to March 2016 at 2 community health center practices, 1 in North Carolina and 1 in New Mexico, serving vulnerable populations. Patients ages 50 to 75 years who had average CRC risk, spoke English or Spanish, were not current with recommended CRC screening, and were attending primary care visits were recruited and randomized 1:1 to intervention or control arms. Intervention participants viewed a CRC screening decision aid in English or Spanish immediately before their clinician encounter. The decision aid promoted screening and presented colonoscopy and fecal occult blood testing as screening options. After the clinician encounter, intervention patients received support for screening completion from a bilingual patient navigator. Control participants viewed a food safety video before the encounter and otherwise received usual care. The primary outcome was CRC screening completion within 6 months of the index study visit assessed by blinded medical record review. Characteristics of the 265 participants were as follows: their mean age was 58 years; 173 (65%) were female, 164 (62%) were Latino; 40 (15%) were white non-Latino; 61 (23%) were black or of mixed race; 191 (78%) had a household income of less than $20 000; 101 (38%) had low literacy; 75 (28%) were on Medicaid; and 91 (34%) were uninsured. Intervention participants were more likely to complete CRC screening within 6 months (68% vs 27%); adjusted-difference, 40 percentage points (95% CI, 29-51 percentage points). The intervention was

  1. Clinical trial insurance coverage for cancer patients under the Affordable Care Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine B. Mackay

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Three main factors limit the effectiveness of the ACA provisions in expanding clinical trial coverage: 1 ‘grandfathered’ self-funded employer plans not subject to state Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA regulations, 2 Medicaid coverage limits not addressed under the ACA, 3 populations that remain uninsured. Kansas saw a negligible increase in insurance coverage as a result of the ACA thus lack of insurance coverage is likely to remain a concern for cancer patients.

  2. Metallo-β-lactamase-producing clinical isolates from patients of a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durgesh Gopalrao Deshmukh

    2011-01-01

    Results: Of 638 gram negative bacilli isolates and 3.39% showed imipenem resistance, 2.9% showed MBL production, of which 1.7% were non-fermenters and 1.25% were Enterobacteriaceae, 0.3% showing non-MBL KPC carbapenemas. Most isolates were from the intensive care unit and from post-operative patients. Our findings show that there are significant numbers of isolates having MBL production along with multidrug resistance. There is a need for active surveillance to detect MBL producers.

  3. The use of patient-reported outcomes becomes standard practice in the routine clinical care of lung–heart transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J Santana

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Maria J Santana1, David Feeny2, Justin Weinkauf1, Roland Nador1, Ali Kapasi1, Kathleen Jackson1, Marianne Schafenacker1, Dalyce Zuk1, Dale Lien11Lung Transplant Program, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; 2The Center for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Portland, OR, USAObjective: To assess the use of patient-reported outcome (PROs measures in the routine clinical care of lung–heart transplant patients. We assessed whether the addition of PROs in routine clinical care affected the duration of the consultation and patient’s and clinician’s views.Method: Consecutive lung–heart transplant patients visiting the outpatient clinic, University of Alberta Hospital, completed the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ and the Health Utilities Index (HUI on touchscreen computers. Information on the patient’s responses was made available to the members of the transplant team prior to the encounter with the patient. The duration of clinical encounters was noted. At the end of every visit, clinicians completed a questionnaire on the usefulness of having PRO information available. After 6 months patients completed a survey of their experiences.Results: The final patient sample consisted of 172 patients with a mean (SD age of 52 (13.3 years old; 47% were female; 68% were organ recipients and 32% candidates. The transplant team, comprising four pulmunologists, two nurses, and one pharmacist had an average of 9 years of practical experience in pulmunology. The mean duration of patient–clinician encounters in minutes was 15.15 (4.52. Ninety-eight percent of patients indicated that they would be happy to complete the CRQ and HUI at every clinic visit. Ninety-one percent of the assessments completed by clinicians showed complete satisfaction with the use of PROs in routine practice. Further, the clinicians developed guidelines for the use of PRO information in clinical practice.Conclusions: The incorporation of PRO

  4. Linking care of patients with obesity to outpatient weight control clinics following acute hospitalizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris CM

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ché M Harris,1 Lawrence J Cheskin,2 Trina L Gipson-Jones,3 Jennifer A Hartfield,4 Flora Kisuule1 1Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 2Department of Health, Behavior and Society, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3School of Nursing, Hampton University, Hampton, VA, USA; 4Center for Research on Men’s Health, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Despite obesity impacting over one-third of US adults, guideline recommendations have not been effectively utilized by health care providers in hospital settings. Initiation of weight loss plans for obese patients during hospitalizations followed by linkage of care to weight control centers may improve compliance with the guidelines. Provider recognition and awareness that obesity is a chronic condition that warrants inpatient counsel and management with appropriate arrangement of postdischarge follow-up care will be critical to guideline implementation. Keywords: guideline compliance, health systems, intervention, linkage 

  5. Lipodystrophy among HIV-Infected Patients Attending Care and Treatment Clinics in Dar es Salaam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Njelekela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. HIV infection and long-term HAART use are associated with metabolic and morphological changes. We assessed prevalence, types, and risk factors associated with lipodystrophy among HIV-infected adults attending CTC in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods. Analysis included 466 HIV-infected patients. Study protocol involved administration of structured questionnaire to collect sociodemographic and clinical information. Diagnosis of lipodystrophy was based on physician clinical assessment. Results. Lipodystrophy was present in 95 (20.4% of the study participants, with lipoatrophy being the most common (49.5% followed by mixed lipodystrophy (37.9%, and lipohypertrophy was the least prevalent (12.6%. Male gender, older age, long duration on HAART, and use of Stavudine containing regimen were associated with lipodystrophy (all p<0.05. The risk for lipodystrophy was 1.6 times (AOR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.01–2.72 for male participants and 13.3 times (AOR = 13.3, 95% CI = 6.4–27.7 for those on HAART. Long duration on HAART and use of Stavudine containing regimen were also associated with increased risk for lipodystrophy. Lipodystrophy was associated with poor perception about own body image and decreased social interactions. Conclusions. Lipodystrophy is common among HIV-infected patients in Tanzania, especially among male patients and those on HAART. Regular screening, monitoring, and patient awareness are needed for early identification and appropriate management.

  6. Incidence of dizziness and vertigo in Japanese primary care clinic patients with lifestyle-related diseases: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Masaoki Wada,1,2 Taro Takeshima,1 Yosikazu Nakamura,3 Shoichiro Nagasaka,4 Toyomi Kamesaki,1 Hiroshi Oki,2 Eiji Kajii1 1Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan; 2Oki Clinic, Ibaraki, Japan; 3Department of Public Health, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan Objective: Dizziness and vertigo are highly prevalent symptoms among patients presenting at primary care clinics, and peripheral vestibular disorder (PVD is their most frequent cause. However, the incidence of PVD has not been well documented. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of dizziness, vertigo, and PVD among patients presenting at a primary care clinic. Design: This was an observational study. Setting and participants: Between November 2011 and March 2013, we observed 393 patients, all at least 20 years old, who had been treated for chronic diseases such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus for at least 6 months at a primary clinic (Oki Clinic in Japan. Outcome: The main outcome of interest was new incidence of dizziness, vertigo, and PVD events. During the 1-year follow-up period, the otorhinolaryngologist diagnosed and reported new PVD events. Results: The mean age of the 393 participants at entry was 65.5 years. Of the study participants, 12.7%, 82.4%, and 92.6% had diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, respectively. We followed up all the participants (100%. During the 662.5 person-years of follow-up, 121 cases of dizziness or vertigo (dizziness/vertigo and 76 cases of PVD were observed. The incidence of dizziness/vertigo and PVD was 194.7 (95% confidence interval: 161.6–232.6 per 1,000 person-years and 115.7 (95% confidence interval: 92.2–142.6 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. There were 61 cases of acute peripheral vestibulopathy, 12 of

  7. Implementation strategies of Systems Medicine in clinical research and home care for cardiovascular disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Carbone, Federico; Dini, Frank Lloyd; Fiuza, Manuela; Pinto, Fausto J; Martelli, Antonietta; Palombo, Domenico; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Mach, François; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2014-11-01

    Insights from the "-omics" science have recently emphasized the need to implement an overall strategy in medical research. Here, the development of Systems Medicine has been indicated as a potential tool for clinical translation of basic research discoveries. Systems Medicine also gives the opportunity of improving different steps in medical practice, from diagnosis to healthcare management, including clinical research. The development of Systems Medicine is still hampered however by several challenges, the main one being the development of computational tools adequate to record, analyze and share a large amount of disparate data. In addition, available informatics tools appear not yet fully suitable for the challenge because they are not standardized, not universally available, or with ethical/legal concerns. Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a very promising area for translating Systems Medicine into clinical practice. By developing clinically applied technologies, the collection and analysis of data may improve CV risk stratification and prediction. Standardized models for data recording and analysis can also greatly broaden data exchange, thus promoting a uniform management of CVD patients also useful for clinical research. This advance however requires a great organizational effort by both physicians and health institutions, as well as the overcoming of ethical problems. This narrative review aims at providing an update on the state-of-art knowledge in the area of Systems Medicine as applied to CVD, focusing on current critical issues, providing a road map for its practical implementation. Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The impact of the advanced practice nursing role on quality of care, clinical outcomes, patient satisfaction, and cost in the emergency and critical care settings: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Brigitte Fong Yeong; Lee, Jasmine Xin Yu; Tam, Wilson Wai San

    2017-09-11

    The prevalence of chronic illness and multimorbidity rises with population aging, thereby increasing the acuity of care. Consequently, the demand for emergency and critical care services has increased. However, the forecasted requirements for physicians have shown a continued shortage. Among efforts underway to search for innovations to strengthen the workforce, there is a heightened interest to have nurses in advanced practice participate in patient care at a great extent. Therefore, it is of interest to evaluate the impact of increasing the autonomy of nurses assuming advanced practice roles in emergency and critical care settings on patient outcomes. The objectives of this study are to present, critically appraise, and synthesize the best available evidence on the impact of advanced practice nursing on quality of care, clinical outcomes, patient satisfaction, and cost in emergency and critical care settings. A comprehensive and systematic search of nine electronic databases and a hand-search of two key journals from 2006 to 2016 were conducted to identify studies evaluating the impact of advanced practice nursing in the emergency and critical care settings. Two authors were involved selecting the studies based on the inclusion criteria. Out of the original search yield of 12,061 studies, 15 studies were chosen for appraisal of methodological quality by two independent authors and subsequently included for analysis. Data was extracted using standardized tools. Narrative synthesis was undertaken to summarize and report the findings. This review demonstrates that the involvement of nurses in advanced practice in emergency and critical care improves the length of stay, time to consultation/treatment, mortality, patient satisfaction, and cost savings. Capitalizing on nurses in advanced practice to increase patients' access to emergency and critical care is appealing. This review suggests that the implementation of advanced practice nursing roles in the emergency and

  9. Clinical and socio-demographic determinants of self-care behaviours in patients with heart failure and diabetes mellitus: A multicentre cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausili, Davide; Rebora, Paola; Di Mauro, Stefania; Riegel, Barbara; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Paturzo, Marco; Alvaro, Rosaria; Vellone, Ercole

    2016-11-01

    Self-care is vital for patients with heart failure to maintain health and quality of life, and it is even more vital for those who are also affected by diabetes mellitus, since they are at higher risk of worse outcomes. The literature is unclear on the influence of diabetes on heart failure self-care as well as on the influence of socio-demographic and clinical factors on self-care. (1) To compare self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence of patients with heart failure and diabetes versus those heart failure patients without diabetes; (2) to estimate if the presence of diabetes influences self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence of heart failure patients; (3) to identify socio-demographic and clinical determinants of self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence in patients with heart failure and diabetes. Secondary analysis of data from a multicentre cross-sectional study. Outpatient clinics from 29 Italian provinces. 1192 adults with confirmed diagnosis of heart failure. Socio-demographic and clinical data were abstracted from patients' medical records. Self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence were measured with the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index Version 6.2; each scale has a standardized score from 0 to 100, where a score diabetes. In these 379, heart failure self-care behaviours were suboptimal (means range from 53.2 to 55.6). No statistically significant differences were found in any of the three self-care measures in heart failure patients with and without diabetes. The presence of diabetes did not influence self-care maintenance (p=0.12), self-care management (p=0.21) or self-care confidence (p=0.51). Age (p=0.04), number of medications (p=0.01), presence of a caregiver (p=0.04), family income (p=0.009) and self-care confidence (pdiabetes mellitus. This population needs more intensive interventions to improve self-care. Determinants of self-care in

  10. An intervention program to reduce the number of hospitalizations of elderly patients in a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asher Maya

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elderly population consumes a large share of medical resources in the western world. A significant portion of the expense is related to hospitalizations. Objectives To evaluate an intervention program designed to reduce the number of hospitalization of elderly patients by a more optimal allocation of resources in primary care. Methods A multidimensional intervention program was conducted that included the re-engineering of existing work processes with a focus on the management of patient problems, improving communication with outside agencies, and the establishment of a system to monitor quality of healthcare parameters. Data on the number of hospitalizations and their cost were compared before and after implementation of the intervention program. Results As a result of the intervention the mean expenditure per elderly patient was reduced by 22.5%. The adjusted number of hospitalizations/1,000 declined from 15.1 to 10.7 (29.3%. The number of adjusted hospitalization days dropped from 132 to 82 (37.9% and the mean hospitalization stay declined from 8.2 to 6.7 days (17.9%. The adjusted hospitalization cost ($/1,000 patients dropped from $32,574 to $18,624 (42.8%. The overall clinic expense, for all age groups, dropped by 9.9%. Conclusion Implementation of the intervention program in a single primary care clinic led to a reduction in hospitalizations for the elderly patient population and to a more optimal allocation of healthcare resources.

  11. Clinical and epidemiological characterization of patients receiving home care in the city of Maceió, in the state of Alagoas, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Carnaúba, Carla Montenegro Dâmaso; Silva, Thaysa Dayse Alves e; Viana, Juliana Felizardo; Alves, Júlia Badra Nogueira; Andrade, Natália Lima; Trindade Filho, Euclides Maurício

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To clinically and epidemiologically characterize patients receiving home care in the city of Maceio, in the state of Alagoas, Brazil. Methods: An observational, cross-sectional study with a sample of 859 patients was carried out, based on data obtained from the medical records of institutions that provide a home care service. A total of 445 patients were from a public service and 414 were from a private service. Descriptive analysis was used for the demographic, clinic...

  12. Clinical questionnaire study of oral health care and symptoms in diabetic vs. non-diabetic predialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterinen, Maarit; Ruokonen, Hellevi; Furuholm, Jussi; Honkanen, Eero; Meurman, Jukka H

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims to study oral symptoms (burning mouth sensation, xerostomia, dysphagia, and dysgeusia) and background characteristics among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The hypothesis was that patients experience oral discomfort and show interest towards dental care differently depending on the origin of their kidney disease. One hundred thirty-eight CKD patients at predialysis stage (94 men, 44 women, mean age 54 years) at the Helsinki University Central Hospital participated in the study. The patients were divided into a diabetic nephropathy group and a group of patients with other kidney diseases. The patients had a clinical oral examination and filled in a structured questionnaire. The data were analyzed and compared between the groups (SPSS for Windows version 15.0). T test was used for parameters normally distributed while binomial data were analyzed with cross-tabulations and chi-square test. Contrary to our study hypothesis, no statistically significant differences were seen in the questionnaire study between the diabetic vs. non-diabetic CKD patients in any other study parameter except in the use of medication (10 ± 2.3 vs. 8 ± 3.1 drugs daily, p patients investigated (41.7% in diabetic, 48.2% in non-diabetic patients). No difference was seen in the frequency of oral discomfort among the different groups of predialysis patients investigated. Clinicians should be aware of nephropathy patients who frequently suffer from oral discomfort, particularly xerostomia.

  13. Disease patterns and clinical outcomes of patients admitted in intensive care units of tertiary referral hospitals of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawe, Hendry R; Mfinanga, Juma A; Lidenge, Salum J; Mpondo, Boniventura C T; Msangi, Silas; Lugazia, Edwin; Mwafongo, Victor; Runyon, Michael S; Reynolds, Teri A

    2014-09-23

    In sub-Saharan Africa the availability of intensive care unit (ICU) services is limited by a variety of factors, including lack of financial resources, lack of available technology and well-trained staff. Tanzania has four main referral hospitals, located in zones so as to serve as tertiary level referral centers. All the referral hospitals have some ICU services, operating at varying levels of equipment and qualified staff. We analyzed and describe the disease patterns and clinical outcomes of patients admitted in ICUs of the tertiary referral hospitals of Tanzania. This was a retrospective analysis of ICU patient records, for three years (2009 to 2011) from all tertiary referral hospitals of Tanzania, namely Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC), Mbeya Referral Hospital (MRH) and Bugando Medical Centre (BMC). MNH is the largest of the four referral hospitals with 1300 beds, and MRH is the smallest with 480 beds. The ratio of hospital beds to ICU beds is 217:1 at MNH, 54:1 at BMC, 39:1 at KCMC, and 80:1 at MRH. KCMC had no infusion pumps. None of the ICUs had a point-of-care (POC) arterial blood gas (ABG) analyzer. None of the ICUs had an Intensive Care specialist or a nutritionist. A masters-trained critical care nurse was available only at MNH. From 2009-2011, the total number of patients admitted to the four ICUs was 5627, male to female ratio 1.4:1, median age of 34 years. Overall, Trauma (22.2%) was the main disease category followed by infectious disease (19.7%). Intracranial injury (12.5%) was the leading diagnosis in all age groups, while pneumonia (11.7%) was the leading diagnosis in pediatric patients (resources, making it difficult or impossible to provide optimum care to critically ill patients and likely contributing to the dauntingly high mortality rates.

  14. A clinical prediction model to identify patients at high risk of hemodynamic instability in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potes, Cristhian; Conroy, Bryan; Xu-Wilson, Minnan; Newth, Christopher; Inwald, David; Frassica, Joseph

    2017-11-20

    Early recognition and timely intervention are critical steps for the successful management of shock. The objective of this study was to develop a model to predict requirement for hemodynamic intervention in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU); thus, clinicians can direct their care to patients likely to benefit from interventions to prevent further deterioration. The model proposed in this study was trained on a retrospective cohort of all patients admitted to a tertiary PICU at a single center in the United States, and validated on another retrospective cohort of all patients admitted to the PICU at a single center in the United Kingdom. The PICU clinical information system database (Intellivue Clinical Information Portfolio, Philips, UK) was interrogated to collect physiological and laboratory data. The model was trained using a variant of AdaBoost, which learned a set of low-dimensional classifiers, each of which was age adjusted. A total of 7052 patients admitted to the US PICU was used for training the model, and a total of 970 patients admitted to the UK PICU was used for validation. On the training/validation datasets, the model showed better prediction of hemodynamic intervention (area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) = 0.81/0.81) than systolic blood pressure-based (AUCROC = 0.58/0.67) or shock index-based (AUCROC = 0.63/0.65) models. Both of these models were age adjusted using the same classifier. The proposed model reliably predicted the need for hemodynamic intervention in PICU patients and provides better classification performance when compared to systolic blood pressure-based or shock index-based models alone. This model could readily be built into a clinical information system to identify patients at risk of hemodynamic instability.

  15. Quality of care and clinical outcomes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with schizophrenia. A Danish nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette; Mainz, Jan; Lange, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Public Danish hospitals.Participants72 692 COPD patients with hospital contacts including 621 with schizophrenia.InterventionCOPD care.Main Outcome MeasuresThe quality of COPD care was defined as meeting guideline-recommended process performance measures of care. Potential predictors of COPD care among patients...

  16. Cleveland Clinic Imaging Institute's "Commitment to Respect" and Impact on Quality of Care and Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creagh, Carl; Flamm, Scott D; Madonia, Heather; O'Keefe, Patrick; Ricaurte, Frank; Triner, Jean

    2017-09-01

    Cleveland Clinic's Imaging Institute implemented a "Commitment to Respect" initiative and survey process in March 2013 with the goal of improving communication and teamwork among employees and, in turn, improving patient satisfaction. Since the rollout of this initiative, we have worked to increase acceptance of the process, improve the survey response, and more fully incorporate results into staff development. Now that we have 4 years of annual data for analysis, we can state based on feedback from caregivers that the process has had a positive effect on relationships between radiologists and frontline clinical staff. The survey identifies behaviors that individuals were not previously aware of, allowing staff members to make changes based on this feedback. Additionally, institute leaders are able to reinforce the respectful behaviors of those scoring well and support the efforts of those whose scores need improvement. Both scenarios are reinforced through the radiologist annual performance review process.

  17. A fixed protocol for outpatient clinic routines in the care of patients with severe renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadimeri, Henrik; Frisenette-Fich, Carsten; Deurell, Sven-Ingemar; Svensson, Lars; Carlsson-Bjering, Lena; Fernström, Anders; Almroth, Gabriel; Melander, Stefan; Haarhaus, Mattias; Andersson, Per-Olof; Cassel, Agneta; Mauritz, Nils-Johan; Ståhl-Nilsson, Agneta; Wilske, Jan; Nordström, Kataryna; Oruda, Pavel; Eriksson, Marie; Larsson, Annelie Inghilesi; Stegmayr, Bernd

    2013-07-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess whether a fixed protocol, using a specially trained team, for intermediate follow-up to fulfillment of guideline targets is non-inferior to conventional follow-up in the care of uraemic patients. A secondary aim was to investigate possible impact on patient outcome. The cohort comprised 424 patients from seven centers. Inclusion criteria were either serum creatinine exceeding 200 µmol/l or calculated clearance below 30 ml/min, representing CKD 4 or 5a. Six centers followed a standardized protocol (group 1). One center provided controls (group 2). The study design was prospective and interventional. The variables measured were blood hemoglobin, bicarbonate, calcium, phosphate, intact parathyroid hormone, albumin, renal function variables, blood pressure and RAAS blockade. The number of patients achieving the set goals was analyzed as a time trend to determine if the intervention resulted in an improvement. At baseline, group 1 had significantly lower GFR and higher serum creatinine, calcium, phosphate, calcium × phosphate product and bicarbonate, lower mean arterial pressure (MAP), systolic blood pressures and less use of RAAS. During the intervention, group 1 improved in the direction of guidelines for blood hemoglobin, albumin, bicarbonate and MAP. Outcome of secondary endpoints gave a risk of death of 30% in both groups, while the risk of renal replacement therapy was higher in group 1. However, the time to renal replacement therapy was significantly shorter in the intervention group, indicating that other variables than guideline achievements are important for the patient.

  18. Clinical and demographic profile of HIV/AIDS patients diagnosed at a tertiary care centre in Kashmir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mir, M.A.; Ahmad, P.M.; Siddeque, M.A.; Sofi, F.A.; Ahmad, S.N.; Dar, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To study the clinical and demographic profile of HIV/AIDS patients diagnosed at a tertiary care centre. Methods: The study was conducted on a group of 1141 patients suspected of having HIV/AIDS on clinical grounds. Screening was done using different Elisa's as advised by NACO and those confirmed as HIV positive were studied for their clinical spectrum and different demographic parameters. Results: Out of 1141 patients tested, 26 proved to have HIV 1 infection with no case of HIV 2 detected. Mean age of presentation was 40.04 +- 7 years, main age group affected 31-40 years and a male: female ratio of 4.2:1 was observed. More than 42% were non Kashmiris with armed forces outnumbering all other occupational classes. Heterosexual transmission was the commonest with married out numbering unmarried. Fever, asthenia and weight loss were the predominant symptoms and pulmonary tuberculosis and oropharyngeal candidiasis commonest opportunistic infections. Conclusion: The clinical and demographic profile of HIV/AIDS patients in Kashmir is largely similar to the rest of India. Kashmir no longer stands immune to the menace of HIV/AIDS. With increasing globalization, frequent travel and change in social values the state is likely to witness an alarming rise in new cases unless a multi pronged approach is undertaken to control the spread. (author)

  19. Effects of Collaboration Care Model on the Quality of Life in Patients after Coronary Angioplasty: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezapoor, Parastoo; Shahriari, Mohsen; Sanei, Hamid; Moeini, Mahin

    2017-04-01

    Coronary artery diseases and therapies such as coronary angioplasty would lead to changes in the quality of life in patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of collaborative care model on the quality of life in patients after coronary angioplasty. This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in Isfahan, Iran during 2015. In this study, 50 samples were selected by simple sampling and randomly allocated into two equal groups of intervention and control. Collaborative care model was performed in the intervention group for 3 months. Data were collected using quality of life (SF-36) questionnaire which includes 36 questions on physical and psychological dimensions and was completed before and one month after the intervention in both groups. Data were analyzed using descriptive and analytical statistics and by independent t- test, paired t test, Chi square and Mann-Whitney tests through SPSS 18. After the intervention, the mean score of quality of life in the intervention group was significantly higher than the control group (Pquality of life and its dimensions in patients undergoing coronary angioplasty 3 months after the intervention (Pmodel had better scores of quality of life in all the physical, mental and social dimensions than the control group. Therefore, using this model for taking care of patients after coronary angioplasty is recommended. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2015120120912N4.

  20. Thinking Clinically from the Beginning: Early Introduction of the Pharmacists' Patient Care Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkin, Anastasia

    2016-12-25

    Objective. To describe a student-centered teaching method used to introduce a pharmacist patient care process (PPCP) during the first year of a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Design. In the fall of 2014, a cohort of students (n=85) began an integrated pharmacotherapy (IPT) course sequence in the first semester of pharmacy school. The first course in this sequence laid the foundation for the delivery of care, focusing on the individual components of a PPCP. Faculty member used a variety of teaching methods in the course to introduce medication history taking, identification of drug-related problems, identifying components of a patient case, and learning/beginning to write subjective, objective, assessment, plan (SOAP) notes. Students' SOAP notes submissions and performance on multiple-choice examinations were evaluated to demonstrate evidence of learning. Students also completed online course evaluations. Assessment. Course-imbedded assessments were designed to measure student learning related to individual School of Pharmacy outcomes and course learning objectives. The mean individual student score on exam questions related to the PPCP topics was 83.7%±18.8%. The majority of students (86%-88%) rated their progress on achieving course learning objectives as "substantial" or "exceptional." Students also enrolled in the introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) in a community setting after completing the first IPT. The students performed significantly better than a historic cohort in identifying actual and potential drug therapy problems. Conclusion. The described teaching methods, when introduced in early curricular stages, are effective in building a foundation for learning PPCP.

  1. Clinical features and visual outcomes of scleritis patients presented to tertiary care eye centers in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Barqi, Mohammad; Behrens, Ashley; Alfawaz, Abdullah M

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical features, systemic associations, treatment and visual outcomes in Saudi patients with scleritis. A retrospective chart review was performed for patients with scleritis presenting to two tertiary care eye hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from 2001 to 2011. Data were collected on the clinical features of scleritis, subtypes of scleritis, associated systemic disease, history of previous ocular surgery and medical therapy, including the use of immunosuppressants. Treatment outcomes were evaluated based on best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and response to treatment. Of the 52 patients included in the study, non-necrotizing anterior scleritis was the most common type of scleritis in 22 patients (42.3%), followed by posterior scleritis in 14 patients (26.9%). The majority of cases, 31 patients (59.6%), were idiopathic in nature. Systemic associations were present in 12 patients (23.1%). Infectious scleritis was confirmed in 6 patients (11.5%): 3 with bacterial scleritis after pterygium excision, 2 patients with scleritis related to tuberculosis and 1 patient with scleritis resulting from herpes simplex infection. For the various subtypes of scleritis, BCVA values after treatment and time to remission significantly differed (P<0.05, all cases). Systemic immunosuppressive therapies in addition to steroids were administered to 46.2% of all patients. The T-sign was present on B-scan ultrasonography in 9 (64.3%) of the 14 posterior scleritis patients. Non-necrotizing anterior scleritis was the most common subtype of scleritis. Final visual outcome and time to remission differed among the various scleritis subtypes.

  2. Regional differences in clinical care among patients with type 1 diabetes in Brazil: Brazilian Type 1 Diabetes Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marília B; Cobas, Roberta A; Matheus, Alessandra S; Tannus, Lucianne R; Negrato, Carlos Antonio; Rodacki, Melanie; Braga, Neuza; Cordeiro, Marilena M; Luescher, Jorge L; Berardo, Renata S; Nery, Marcia; Arruda-Marques, Maria do Carmo A; Calliari, Luiz E; Noronha, Renata M; Manna, Thais D; Zajdenverg, Lenita; Salvodelli, Roberta; Penha, Fernanda G; Foss, Milton C; Foss-Freitas, Maria C; Pires, Antonio C; Robles, Fernando C; Guedes, Mariadefátimas; Dib, Sergio A; Dualib, Patricia; Silva, Saulo C; Sepulvida, Janice; Almeida, Henriqueta G; Sampaio, Emerson; Rea, Rosangela; Faria, Ana Cristina R; Tschiedel, Balduino; Lavigne, Suzana; Cardozo, Gustavo A; Azevedo, Mirela J; Canani, Luis Henrique; Zucatti, Alessandra T; Coral, Marisa Helena C; Pereira, Daniela Aline; Araujo, Luiz Antonio; Tolentino, Monica; Pedrosa, Hermelinda C; Prado, Flaviane A; Rassi, Nelson; Araujo, Leticia B; Fonseca, Reine Marie C; Guedes, Alexis D; Matos, Odelissa S; Faria, Manuel; Azulay, Rossana; Forti, Adriana C; Façanha, Cristina; Montenegro, Ana Paula; Montenegro, Renan; Melo, Naira H; Rezende, Karla F; Ramos, Alberto; Felicio, João Sooares; Santos, Flavia M; Jezini, Deborah L; Cordeiro, Marilena M

    2012-10-29

    To determine the characteristics of clinical care offered to type 1 diabetic patients across the four distinct regions of Brazil, with geographic and contrasting socioeconomic differences. Glycemic control, prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, screening for chronic complications and the frequency that the recommended treatment goals were met using the American Diabetes Association guidelines were evaluated. This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study conducted from December 2008 to December 2010 in 28 secondary and tertiary care public clinics in 20 Brazilian cities in north/northeast, mid-west, southeast and south regions. The data were obtained from 3,591 patients (56.0% females and 57.1% Caucasians) aged 21.2 ± 11.7 years with a disease duration of 9.6 ± 8.1 years (region. Hypertension was more frequent in the mid-west (32%) and north/northeast (25%) than in the southeast (19%) and south (17%) regions (psoutheast region achieved LDL cholesterol goals and were treated with statins (pregions were screened for retinopathy and nephropathy, compared with patients from the south and southeast. Patients from the south/southeast regions had more intensive insulin regimens than patients from the north/northeast and mid-west regions (pregion (pregion (pregion were younger, non-Caucasian, from lower economic status, used less continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, performed less SBGM and were less overweight/obese (pregions, did not meet metabolic control goals and were not screened for diabetes-related chronic complications. These results should guide governmental health policy decisions, specific to each geographic region, to improve diabetes care and decrease the negative impact diabetes has on the public health system.

  3. A clinical algorithm for triaging patients with significant lymphadenopathy in primary health care settings in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eltahir A.G. Khalil

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis is a major health problem in developing countries. The distinction between tuberculous lymphadenitis, non-specific lymphadenitis and malignant lymph node enlargement has to be made at primary health care levels using easy, simple and cheap methods. Objective: To develop a reliable clinical algorithm for primary care settings to triage cases ofnon-specific, tuberculous and malignant lymphadenopathies. Methods: Calculation of the odd ratios (OR of the chosen predictor variables was carried out using logistic regression. The numerical score values of the predictor variables were weighed against their respective OR. The performance of the score was evaluated by the ROC (ReceiverOperator Characteristic curve. Results: Four predictor variables; Mantoux reading, erythrocytes sedimentation rate (ESR,nocturnal fever and discharging sinuses correlated significantly with TB diagnosis and were included in the reduced model to establish score A. For score B, the reduced model included Mantoux reading, ESR, lymph-node size and lymph-node number as predictor variables for malignant lymph nodes. Score A ranged 0 to 12 and a cut-off point of 6 gave a best sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 90% respectively, whilst score B ranged -3 to 8 and a cut-off point of3 gave a best sensitivity and specificity of 83% and 76% respectively. The calculated area underthe ROC curve was 0.964 (95% CI, 0.949 – 0.980 and -0.856 (95% CI, 0.787 ‑ 0.925 for scores Aand B respectively, indicating good performance. Conclusion: The developed algorithm can efficiently triage cases with tuberculous andmalignant lymphadenopathies for treatment or referral to specialised centres for furtherwork-up.

  4. A clinical algorithm for triaging patients with significant lymphadenopathy in primary health care settings in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eltahir A.G. Khalil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis is a major health problem in developing countries. The distinction between tuberculous lymphadenitis, non-specific lymphadenitis and malignant lymph node enlargement has to be made at primary health care levels using easy, simple and cheap methods.Objective: To develop a reliable clinical algorithm for primary care settings to triage cases ofnon-specific, tuberculous and malignant lymphadenopathies.Methods: Calculation of the odd ratios (OR of the chosen predictor variables was carried out using logistic regression. The numerical score values of the predictor variables were weighed against their respective OR. The performance of the score was evaluated by the ROC (ReceiverOperator Characteristic curve.Results: Four predictor variables; Mantoux reading, erythrocytes sedimentation rate (ESR,nocturnal fever and discharging sinuses correlated significantly with TB diagnosis and were included in the reduced model to establish score A. For score B, the reduced model included Mantoux reading, ESR, lymph-node size and lymph-node number as predictor variables for malignant lymph nodes. Score A ranged 0 to 12 and a cut-off point of 6 gave a best sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 90% respectively, whilst score B ranged -3 to 8 and a cut-off point of3 gave a best sensitivity and specificity of 83% and 76% respectively. The calculated area underthe ROC curve was 0.964 (95% CI, 0.949 – 0.980 and -0.856 (95% CI, 0.787 ‑ 0.925 for scores Aand B respectively, indicating good performance.Conclusion: The developed algorithm can efficiently triage cases with tuberculous andmalignant lymphadenopathies for treatment or referral to specialised centres for furtherwork-up.

  5. Clinical Pharmacist-Provided Services In Iron-Overloaded Beta-Thalassaemia Major Children: A New Insight Into Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahnasawy, Salma M; El Wakeel, Lamia M; Beblawy, Nagham El; El-Hamamsy, Manal

    2017-04-01

    Iron-overloaded β-thalassaemia major (BTM) children have high risk of delayed sexual/physical maturation, liver/heart diseases and reduced life expectancy. The lifelong need to use iron chelators, their unpleasant administration, side effects and lack of awareness regarding iron overload risks all hamper BTM patient compliance to iron chelators. This study evaluated the impact of clinical pharmacist-provided services on the outcome of iron-overloaded BTM children. Forty-eight BTM children were randomly assigned to either control group, who received standard medical care, or intervention group, who received standard medical care plus clinical pharmacist-provided services. Services included detection of drug-related problems (DRPs) and their management, patient education regarding disease nature and iron chelators, as well as providing patient-tailored medication charts. After six months of study implementation, there was a highly significant difference between the control and intervention groups in serum ferritin (SF) (mean: 3871 versus 2362, μg/l, p = 0.0042), patient healthcare satisfaction (median: 24.47 versus 90.29, p < 0.0001) and quality of life (QoL) (median: 49.84 versus 63.51, p = 0.0049). The intervention group showed a decline from baseline to the end of study in DRPs (64-4), the number of non-compliant patients (24-3) and mean SF levels (3949-2362 μg/l, p < 0.0001). Clinical pharmacist-provided services can positively impact the outcome of BTM children. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  6. Clinical outcome of elderly peritoneal dialysis patients with assisted care in a single medical centre: a 25 year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Hung; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Chuang, Ya-Wen; Huang, Shih-Ting; Chou, Ming-Chih; Chang, Horng-Rong

    2013-06-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an alternative treatment for elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In Taiwan, non-professional personnel are employed to provide assisted care for elderly patients. Whether assisted care is appropriate for elderly patients is unknown. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the outcomes of assisted care in a single centre. This is a retrospective cohort study in a single medical centre. The outcomes were derived from the assessment of patient survival, technique survival and peritonitis incidence between self-care patients and assisted-care patients. From 1984 to 2010, there were 138 elderly PD patients at Taichung Veterans General Hospital, of which 70% were assisted-care patients and 30% self-care patients. The mean duration of PD survival was 49.2 months in self-care patients, which was significantly longer than the 17.0 months of assisted-care patients (P self-care patients had a lower risk in both patient survival (Hazard Ratio 0.15; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.2-0.94, P care patients. Type of assistance was not a risk factor for PD-related peritonitis. Our elderly assisted care had patients had a poorer survival and technique survival rates than those of the self-care patients. We argue that this is because early recognition of medical deterioration and early medical intervention are necessary for a better outcome for elderly PD patients. © 2013 The Authors. Nephrology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  7. Harmonizing and consolidating the measurement of patient-reported information at health care institutions: a position statement of the Mayo Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eton DT

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available David T Eton,1,2 Timothy J Beebe,1,2 Philip T Hagen,3 Michele Y Halyard,4 Victor M Montori,1,5 James M Naessens,1,2 Jeff A Sloan,6 Carrie A Thompson,7 Douglas L Wood1,81Division of Heath Care Policy and Research, Department of Health Sciences Research, 2Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, 3Department of Preventive, Occupational, and Aerospace Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, 5Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit, 6Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, 7Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, 8Center for Innovation, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Patient-reported outcomes (PROs capture how patients perceive their health and their health care; their use in clinical research is longstanding. Today, however, PROs increasingly are being used to inform the care of individual patients, and document the performance of health care entities. We recently wrote and internally distributed an institutional position statement titled "Harmonizing and Consolidating the Measurement of Patient-Reported Outcomes at Mayo Clinic: A Position Statement for the Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery". The statement is meant to educate clinicians, clinical teams, and institutional administrators about the merits of using PROs in a systematic manner for clinical care and quality measurement throughout the institution. The present article summarizes the most important messages from the statement, describing PROs and their use, identifying practical considerations for implementing them in routine practice, elucidating potential barriers to their use, and formulating strategies to overcome these barriers. The lessons learned from our experience – including pitfalls, challenges, and successes – may inform other health care institutions that are interested in

  8. Care Management: Adherence to Therapies Among Patients at Bu-Alicina Clinic, Qazvin, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Asefzadeh

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-adherence to treatment is a problem of increasing concern for all stakeholders. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of non-adherence among the clients consulting internists or cardiologists at Bu-Alicina Clinic in Qazvin. Methods: A total number of 400 clients came to Bu-Alicina Clinic (center for internal medicine and cardiology were randomly interviewed through a questionnaire during a two month period in 2003. Self-administered methods were used if the clients applied. The data were interpreted using statistical methods. Results: The clients were between 14 and 78 years old (33.7+8.5 and 57.5% of them were women and 42.5% were men. Of total number, 30.7% were consulting for continuation of their therapies and of these clients, 41.5% had pooradherence to their current therapies. The more educated clients were 1.6 times (OR=1.62; 95% CI=0.71, 3.74 likely to be more adherent to the therapies.There was no significant difference between the internal diseases patients and cardiology patients in this regard (41.7%vs 40%. Of the total number of 400 clients, 79.5% had history of consulting to medical clinics during the last three months and 37.4% of them had non-adherence to their past therapies. The more frequent factors were: forgetfulness (13.3%, not to be able to afford to pay for treatment costs (10.3%, disbelieve to the doctor and consulting another ones (8.4%, long distance (8.4%, feeling that it is not important to take medications (7.4%, side effects (7.4%, disbelieve to the diagnosis (7.1%, religious considerations (6.5%, and misunderstanding or lack of information about the prescription (5.8%. No significant difference was found between men and women on this aspect. Conclusion: Patients need advice, supported information from professionals about their health and therapies. Certain studies must be done to determine the pitfalls and effective interventions address that barriers can be developed. Keywords

  9. Computer Simulation: A Methodology to Improve the Efficiency in the Brooke Army Medical Center Family Care Clinic (A Patient Wait Case Study)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Merkie, John

    2000-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study was to describe the current system and to evaluate the potential impact of process/resource changes in patient wait times, access and resource utilization at the BAMC Family Care Clinic (FCC...

  10. Comparison of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients managed early after diagnosis in specialty versus community care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljohani, Roaa; Gladman, Dafna D; Su, Jiandong; Urowitz, Murray B

    2017-08-01

    To compare management and outcomes of SLE patients treated in community clinics (Cc) with those treated in specialty clinic (Sc) within 10 years after SLE diagnosis. A single-center, matched cohort study design was used. We identified 54 SLE patients who were referred to a Sc from Cc within 5 years of SLE diagnosis, and 101 inception SLE patients who followed in a Sc. Patients in Cc were matched 1:2 based on gender, decade of SLE diagnosis, and age at diagnosis within 3 years with Sc patients. Disease characteristics, damage accumulation, death, cardiovascular (CVS) risk factors, and events were compared at 5 and 10 years of disease. Regression analyses taking into account the paired data were conducted. At 5 years of disease, patients referred from Cc had less cumulative ACR criteria, but more active disease. They were on higher doses of glucocorticoids (GCS) but less antimalarial treatment. At 10 years of disease and follow-up entirely in Sc, Sc patients had less disease activity. They had lower cumulative GCS doses. They had less hypertension and osteoporosis but more hypercholesterolemia than Cc patients. No statistically significant difference in damage accrual, CVS events, and death were detected. Regression analysis confirmed an association between being inception Sc patients and less active disease at 10 years. Lupus patients should be under the care of a lupus specialist early in their disease course for better control of their disease activity and to minimize use of GCS.

  11. Oropharyngeal flora in patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit: clinical factors and acid suppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandah, Wesam; Colmer-Hamood, Jane; Mojazi Amiri, Hoda; Raj, Rishi; Nugent, Kenneth

    2013-05-01

    Acid suppression therapy in critically ill patients significantly reduces the incidence of stress ulceration and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding; however, recent studies suggest that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) increase the risk of pneumonia. We wanted to test the hypothesis that acid suppressive therapy promotes alteration in the bacterial flora in the GI tract and leads to colonization of the upper airway tract with pathogenic species, potentially forming the biological basis for the observed increased incidence of pneumonia in these patients. This was a prospective observational study on patients (adults 18 years or older) admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) at a tertiary care centre. Exclusion criteria included all patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia at admission, with infection in the upper airway, or with a history of significant dysphagia. Oropharyngeal cultures were obtained on day 1 and days 3 or 4 of admission. We collected data on demographics, clinical information, and severity of the underlying disease using APACHE II scores. There were 110 patients enrolled in the study. The mean age was 49±16 years, 50 were women, and the mean APACHE II score was 9.8 ± 6.5. Twenty per cent of the patients had used a PPI in the month preceding admission. The first oropharyngeal specimen was available in 110 cases; a second specimen at 72-96 h was available in 68 cases. Seventy-five per cent of the patients admitted to the MICU had abnormal flora. In multivariate logistic regression, diabetes mellitus and PPI use were associated with abnormal oral flora on admission. Chronic renal failure and a higher body mass index reduced the frequency of abnormal oral flora on admission. Most critically ill patients admitted to our MICU have abnormal oral flora. Patients with diabetes and a history of recent PPI use are more likely to have abnormal oral flora on admission.

  12. Effect of a Collaborative Care Intervention vs Usual Care on Health Status of Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: The CASA Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelman, David B; Allen, Larry A; McBryde, Connor F; Hattler, Brack; Fairclough, Diane L; Havranek, Edward P; Turvey, Carolyn; Meek, Paula M

    2018-04-01

    Many patients with chronic heart failure experience reduced health status despite receiving conventional therapy. To determine whether a symptom and psychosocial collaborative care intervention improves heart failure-specific health status, depression, and symptom burden in patients with heart failure. A single-blind, 2-arm, multisite randomized clinical trial was conducted at Veterans Affairs, academic, and safety-net health systems in Colorado among outpatients with symptomatic heart failure and reduced health status recruited between August 2012 and April 2015. Data from all participants were included regardless of level of participation, using an intent-to-treat approach. Patients were randomized 1:1 to receive the Collaborative Care to Alleviate Symptoms and Adjust to Illness (CASA) intervention or usual care. The CASA intervention included collaborative symptom care provided by a nurse and psychosocial care provided by a social worker, both of whom worked with the patients' primary care clinicians and were supervised by a study primary care clinician, cardiologist, and palliative care physician. The primary outcome was patient-reported heart failure-specific health status, measured by difference in change scores on the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (range, 0-100) at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included depression (measured by the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire), anxiety (measured by the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire), overall symptom distress (measured by the General Symptom Distress Scale), specific symptoms (pain, fatigue, and shortness of breath), number of hospitalizations, and mortality. Of 314 patients randomized (157 to intervention arm and 157 to control arm), there were 67 women and 247 men, mean (SD) age was 65.5 (11.4) years, and 178 (56.7%) had reduced ejection fraction. At 6 months, the mean Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire score improved 5.5 points in the intervention arm and 2.9 points in the control

  13. Nurses' and patients' communication in smoking cessation at nurse-led COPD clinics in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efraimsson, Eva Österlund; Klang, Birgitta; Ehrenberg, Anna; Larsson, Kjell; Fossum, Bjöörn; Olai, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have high nicotine dependence making it difficult to quit smoking. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a method that is used in stimulating motivation and behavioral changes. To describe smoking cessation communication between patients and registered nurses trained in MI in COPD nurse-led clinics in Swedish primary health care. A prospective observational study with structured quantitative content analyses of the communication between six nurses with basic education in MI and 13 patients in non-smoking consultations. Only to a small extent did nurses' evoke patients' reasons for change, stimulate collaboration, and support patients' autonomy. Nurses provided information, asked closed questions, and made simple reflections. Patients' communication was mainly neutral and focusing on reasons for and against smoking. It was uncommon for patients to be committed and take steps toward smoking cessation. The nurses did not adhere to the principles of MI in smoking cessation, and the patients focused to a limited extent on how to quit smoking. To make patients more active, the nurses need more education and continuous training in motivational communication.

  14. 'It's a matter of patient safety': understanding challenges in everyday clinical practice for achieving good care on the surgical ward - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangland, Eva; Nyberg, Berit; Yngman-Uhlin, Pia

    2017-06-01

    Surgical care plays an important role in the acute hospital's delivery of safe, high-quality patient care. Although demands for effectiveness are high in surgical wards quality of care and patient safety must also be secured. It is therefore necessary to identify the challenges and barriers linked to quality of care and patient safety with a focus on this specific setting. To explore situations and processes that support or hinder good safe patient care on the surgical ward. This qualitative study was based on a strategic sample of 10 department and ward leaders in three hospitals and six surgical wards in Sweden. Repeated reflective interviews were analysed using systematic text condensation. Four themes described the leaders' view of a complex healthcare setting that demands effectiveness and efficiency in moving patients quickly through the healthcare system. Quality of care and patient safety were often hampered factors such as a shift of care level, with critically ill patients cared for without reorganisation of nurses' competencies on the surgical ward. There is a gap between what is described in written documents and what is or can be performed in clinical practice to achieve good care and safe care on the surgical ward. A shift in levels of care on the surgical ward without reallocation of the necessary competencies at the patient's bedside show consequences for quality of care and patient safety. This means that surgical wards should consider reviewing their organisation and implementing more advanced nursing roles in direct patient care on all shifts. The ethical issues and the moral stress on nurses who lack the resources and competence to deliver good care according to professional values need to be made more explicit as a part of the patient safety agenda in the surgical ward. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. A hybrid hierarchical decision support system for cardiac surgical intensive care patients. Part II. Clinical implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jonathan J; Denaï, Mouloud A; Mahfouf, Mahdi

    2009-01-01

    Patients emerging from cardiac surgery can display varying degrees of cardiovascular instability arising from potentially complex, multi-factorial and interlinked causes. Stabilization and control of the cardiovascular system are currently managed by healthcare experts using experiential knowledge, and, in some centers, manually inputted decision pathway algorithms. This paper describes a clinical trial undertaken to determine the basic functioning of a clinical decision support system (CDSS) designed and constructed by the authors to facilitate the control of the major cardiovascular components in the early post-operative phase. Part II follows Part I's description of the software and simulation testing of the CDSS, and describes the hardware setup of a patient monitoring and CDSS. The system is evaluated on three post-cardiac surgery intensive care patients whom had all undergone cardio-pulmonary bypass. The study was approved by the Sheffield Teaching Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust Research Ethics Committee and conducted at the North Trent cardio-thoracic surgical unit and cardiac intensive care unit (CICU), Northern General Hospital, Sheffield (UK). Patients considered as 'very likely' to require active intervention to support the cardiovascular function following routine cardiac surgery were recruited during pre-operative surgical and anesthetic assessment, giving written informed consent when admitted for their operation. These patients underwent routine induction and maintenance of anesthesia by a non-study consultant anesthetist and the operation performed. There were no restrictions placed on the types of invasive monitoring used, on the use of trans-oesophageal echocardiography, drug selection, or the anesthetic agents selected by the clinicians performing the operations. All patients had full, routine invasive and non-invasive monitoring applied, including electrocardiography, central venous and peripheral arterial

  16. Frequency of changing enteral alimentation bags and tubing, and adverse clinical outcomes in patients in a long term care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, S; McIntyre, M; Chicoine, J; Gerard, B; Laughren, R; Cowley, G; Morrison, J; Aoki, F Y; Nicolle, L E

    1993-01-01

    Enteral alimentation, given via nasogastric or gastrostomy tubes, is a well established practice to provide nutrition for patients with significant neurological injury. The frequency with which enteral feeding bags and tubes require change and potential adverse effects associated with bacterial contamination of tube feeds remain controversial. The authors studied different times between enteral feeding bag and tube changes, and the effect on adverse clinical outcomes in residents of a long term care facility. In the first study, residents were randomized to 24 h (n = 2), 48 h (n = 3) or 72 h (n = 6) tube feeding and bag changes with clinical status monitored in a standardized fashion for six months. In the second study, patients were randomized to 24 h (n = 6) or 72 h (n = 6) changes. Patient-days of follow-up were 382, 574 and 1000 for the three arms of the first study period and 556 and 496 for the two arms of the second study. No differences in potential clinical adverse events--including fever, gastrointestinal symptoms or pneumonia--were observed with different durations of tubing change. This study suggests it is appropriate to change alimentation tube and feeding bags every 72 h (rather than every 24 h). The less frequent changes will decrease supply costs and free nursing time for other activities.

  17. Clinical guidelines from the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition: best practice recommendations for patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Ainsley

    2014-01-01

    The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) is an interdisciplinary society whose vision is to ensure that every patient receives safe, efficacious, and high-quality nutrition care. The society has produced clinical guidelines to assist practitioners in enteral and parenteral nutrition decision making. A.S.P.E.N. clinical guideline development has evolved through the years, and recently has incorporated a rigorous and transparent development process using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process. This article will examine A.S.P.E.N.'s guideline development process, discuss current population- and disease-specific practice guidelines, and highlight recommendations useful for the clinician involved in nutrition therapy decision making.

  18. The Effect of Orem's Self-Care Model on Quality of Life in Patients with Migraine: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh Zarandi, Fatemeh; Raiesifar, Afsaneh; Ebadi, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Many aspects of the lives of migraineurs are commonly affected by the condition, including occupational affairs, social and family life, responsibilities and ultimately the quality of life. This study was designed to determine the effect of orem's self-care nursing model on quality of life in patients with a migraine. This study was carried out in Tehran, Iran. According to the pre-post design of the randomized clinical trial, 88 patients were selected. After obtaining approval from the ethics committee of the Baqiyatallah Medical Sciences University's Research Deputy; Patients who signed the informed consent aged 20-55 years and without any more disease or disability affecting the quality of life were selected and randomly assigned to a group. Data collection tools were a demographic questionnaire, general health survey short form (SF36), and Orem cognition form and self-care checklist. Self-care model were held as four 30-45 minutes training sessions based on self-care deficit needs for the experimental group. The quality of life scores was measured in two stages, before and three months after intervention then were compared in both groups. Data were analyzed with statistical software SPSS and use of descriptive analysis tests, Chi-square, Mann-Whitney u and Wilcoxon. The final analysis was performed on 43 experimental and 40 controls. No significant difference was detected in the two groups in terms of demographic variables (P>0.05). All dimensions of quality of life including physical functioning, physical role limitation, body pain, general health, vitality, social functioning and emotional role limitation and mental health in the experimental group showed a significant increase after intervention compared to the control group (Pmodel improves function and overall quality of life and reduces the high cost of a migraine and migraine-related disability to individuals and society.

  19. Validation of a clinical prediction model for early admission to the intensive care unit of patients with pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labarère, José; Schuetz, Philipp; Renaud, Bertrand; Claessens, Yann-Erick; Albrich, Werner; Mueller, Beat

    2012-09-01

    The Risk of Early Admission to the Intensive Care Unit (REA-ICU) index is a clinical prediction model that was derived based on 4,593 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) for predicting early admission to the intensive care unit (ICU; i.e., within 3 days following emergency department [ED] presentation). This study aimed to validate the REA-ICU index in an independent sample. The authors retrospectively stratified 850 CAP patients enrolled in a multicenter prospective randomized trial conducted in Switzerland, using the REA-ICU index, alternate clinical prediction models of severe pneumonia (SMART-COP, CURXO-80, and the 2007 IDSA/ATS minor severity criteria), and pneumonia severity assessment tools (the Pneumonia Severity Index [PSI] and CURB-65).   The rate of early ICU admission did not differ between the validation and derivation samples within each risk class of the REA-ICU index, ranging from 1.1% to 1.8% in risk class I to 27.1% to 27.6% in risk class IV. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.70 to 0.83) and 0.80 (95% CI = 0.77 to 0.83) in the validation and derivation samples, respectively. In the validation sample, the REA-ICU index performed better than the pneumonia severity assessment tools, but failed to demonstrate an accuracy advantage over alternate prediction models in predicting ICU admission. The REA-ICU index reliably stratifies CAP patients into four categories of increased risk for early ICU admission within 3 days following ED presentation. Further research is warranted to determine whether inflammatory biomarkers may improve the performance of this clinical prediction model. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  20. Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Depression and Self-Care in Heart Failure Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Kenneth E.; Carney, Robert M.; Rich, Michael W.; Steinmeyer, Brian C.; Rubin, Eugene H.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Depression and inadequate self-care are common and interrelated problems that increase the risks of hospitalization and mortality in patients with heart failure (HF). Objective To determine the efficacy of an integrative cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) intervention for depression and HF self-care. Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized clinical trial with single-blind outcome assessments. Eligible patients were enrolled at Washington University Medical Center in St. Louis between January 4, 2010 and June 28, 2013. The participants were 158 outpatients in New York Heart Association Class I, II, and III heart failure with comorbid major depression. Interventions Cognitive behavior therapy delivered by experienced therapists plus usual care (UC), or usual care alone. Usual care was enhanced in both groups with a structured HF education program delivered by a cardiac nurse. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome was severity of depression at 6 months as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory. The Self-Care of Heart Failure Index Confidence and Maintenance subscales were co-primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes included measures of anxiety, depression, physical functioning, fatigue, social roles and activities, and quality of life. Hospitalizations and deaths were exploratory outcomes. Results One hundred fifty-eight patients were randomized to UC (n=79) or CBT (n=79). Within each arm, 26 (33%) of the patients were taking an antidepressant at baseline. One hundred thirty-two (84%) of the participants completed the 6-month posttreatment assessments; 60 (76%) of the UC and 58 (73%) of the CBT participants completed every follow-up assessment (P−.88). Six-month depression scores were lower in the CBT than the UC arm on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) (12.8 [10.6] vs 17.3 [10.7]; P−.008). Remission rates differed on the BDI-II (46% vs 19%; number needed to treat [NNT] = 3.76; 95% CI, 3.62-3.90; PSelf-Care Maintenance or Confidence

  1. A conceptual framework of clinical nursing care in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção; Apostolidis, Thémistoklis; Brandão, Marcos Antônio Gomes

    2015-01-01

    to propose a conceptual framework for clinical nursing care in intensive care. descriptive and qualitative field research, carried out with 21 nurses from an intensive care unit of a federal public hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic and lexical content analysis, supported by Alceste software. the characteristics of clinical intensive care emerge from the specialized knowledge of the interaction, the work context, types of patients and nurses characteristic of the intensive care and care frameworks. the conceptual framework of the clinic's intensive care articulates elements characteristic of the dynamics of this scenario: objective elements regarding technology and attention to equipment and subjective elements related to human interaction, specific of nursing care, countering criticism based on dehumanization.

  2. A conceptual framework of clinical nursing care in intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Celestino da Silva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to propose a conceptual framework for clinical nursing care in intensive care.Method: descriptive and qualitative field research, carried out with 21 nurses from an intensive care unit of a federal public hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic and lexical content analysis, supported by Alceste software.Results: the characteristics of clinical intensive care emerge from the specialized knowledge of the interaction, the work context, types of patients and nurses characteristic of the intensive care and care frameworks.Conclusion: the conceptual framework of the clinic's intensive care articulates elements characteristic of the dynamics of this scenario: objective elements regarding technology and attention to equipment and subjective elements related to human interaction, specific of nursing care, countering criticism based on dehumanization.

  3. Medical Assistant-Based Care Management for High-Risk Patients in Small Primary Care Practices: A Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, T.; Peters-Klimm, F.; Boyd, C.M.; Mahler, C.; Gensichen, J.; Erler, A.; Beyer, M.; Gondan, M.; Rochon, J.; Gerlach, F.M.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk for potentially avoidable hospitalizations, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. OBJECTIVE:

  4. Clinical and Patient-Related Variables Associated with Initiating GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes Patients in Primary Care in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Qiao

    Full Text Available To investigate real-world clinical and patient-related variables associated with initiating GLP-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA treatment relative to initiation of other glucose-lowering therapies in type 2 diabetes (T2D patients of primary care in Germany.Data for 938 T2D patients who started therapy with a GLP-1RA within 823 practices of primary care throughout Germany were retrospectively analyzed (Disease Analyser: 01/2011-03/2014. 5,197 T2D patients who initiated other non-GLP-1RA antidiabetic therapies were selected as controls. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to identify factors associated with GLP-1RA initiation in primary care.Mean age (SD of GLP-1RA users was 57.8 (11.8 years (males: 55.5% and the average BMI was 36.1 (6.7 kg/m2. 22.8% were in diabetologist care and 12.0% had private health insurance. In multivariate regression, choice of GLP-1RA therapy instead of a different glucose-lowering drug class was associated with obesity (odds ratio: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.34-2.10, private health insurance (2.42; 1.89-3.09, younger age (0.94; 0.93-0.95 per year, male sex (0.85; 0.73-0.99, diabetologist care (2.11; 1.73-2.57, and geographic practice location (East vs. West-Germany; 1.25; 1.05-1.49. Among co-medication, angiotensin II antagonists (increased and non-steroidal antirheumatic agents (decreased were related to GLP-1RA prescriptions (both p<0.001.Consistent with German guidelines, GLP-1RA is mainly prescribed preferentially in T2D patients who are obese. GLP-1RA drugs were more frequently used than other options in privately health insured patients and in patients seeing a diabetologist.

  5. Predicting Calcium Values for Gastrointestinal Bleeding Patients in Intensive Care Unit Using Clinical Variables and Fuzzy Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Khalili-Zadeh-Mahani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Reducing unnecessary laboratory tests is an essential issue in the Intensive Care Unit. One solution for this issue is to predict the value of a laboratory test to specify the necessity of ordering the tests. The aim of this paper was to propose a clinical decision support system for predicting laboratory tests values. Calcium laboratory tests of three categories of patients, including upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding, and unspecified hemorrhage of gastrointestinal tract, have been selected as the case studies for this research. Method: In this research, the data have been collected from MIMIC-II database. For predicting calcium laboratory values, a Fuzzy Takagi-Sugeno model is used and the input variables of the model are heart rate and previous value of calcium laboratory test. Results: The results showed that the values of calcium laboratory test for the understudy patients were predictable with an acceptable accuracy. In average, the mean absolute errors of the system for the three categories of the patients are 0.27, 0.29, and 0.28, respectively. Conclusion: In this research, using fuzzy modeling and two variables of heart rate and previous calcium laboratory values, a clinical decision support system was proposed for predicting laboratory values of three categories of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Using these two clinical values as input variables, the obtained results were acceptable and showed the capability of the proposed system in predicting calcium laboratory values. For achieving better results, the impact of more input variables should be studied. Since, the proposed system predicts the laboratory values instead of just predicting the necessity of the laboratory tests; it was more generalized than previous studies. So, the proposed method let the specialists make the decision depending on the condition of each patient.

  6. Genes, Race, and Culture in Clinical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Linda M.; Truesdell, Nicole D.; Kreiner, Meta J.

    2015-01-01

    Race, although an unscientific concept, remains prominent in health research and clinical guidelines, and is routinely invoked in clinical practice. In interviews with 58 primary care clinicians we explored how they understand and apply concepts of racial difference. We found wide agreement that race is important to consider in clinical care. They explained the effect of race on health, drawing on common assumptions about the biological, class, and cultural characteristics of racial minorities. They identified specific race-based clinical strategies for only a handful of conditions and were inconsistent in the details of what they said should be done for minority patients. We conclude that using race in clinical medicine promotes and maintains the illusion of inherent racial differences and may result in minority patients receiving care aimed at presumed racial group characteristics, rather than care selected as specifically appropriate for them as individuals. [race and genetics, primary care, health disparities, racial profiling] PMID:23804331

  7. Ethnocultural and Sex Characteristics of Patients Attending a Tertiary Care Pain Clinic in Toronto, Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Mailis-Gagnon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ethnocultural factors and sex may greatly affect pain perception and expression. Emerging literature is also documenting racial and ethnic differences in pain access and care.

  8. Prevalence of hyponatremia in palliative care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoba Nair

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Prevalence of hyponatremia is significant in palliative care patients. A prospective study looking at the causes and clinical outcomes associated with hyponatremia in palliative care patients is needed.

  9. Clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness of accelerated diagnostic protocol in a chest pain center compared with routine care of patients with chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Elad; Reuveni, Haim; Shlomo, Nir; Gerber, Yariv; Beigel, Roy; Narodetski, Michael; Eldar, Michael; Or, Jacob; Hod, Hanoch; Shamiss, Arie; Matetzky, Shlomi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare in patients presenting with acute chest pain the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of an accelerated diagnostic protocol utilizing contemporary technology in a chest pain unit versus routine care in an internal medicine department. Hospital and 90-day course were prospectively studied in 585 consecutive low-moderate risk acute chest pain patients, of whom 304 were investigated in a designated chest pain center using a pre-specified accelerated diagnostic protocol, while 281 underwent routine care in an internal medicine ward. Hospitalization was longer in the routine care compared with the accelerated diagnostic protocol group (pdiagnostic protocol patients (98%) vs. 57 (20%) routine care patients underwent non-invasive testing, (pdiagnostic imaging testing was performed in 125 (44%) and 26 (9%) patients in the routine care and accelerated diagnostic protocol patients, respectively (pdiagnostic protocol patients compared with those receiving routine care was associated with a lower incidence of readmissions for chest pain [8 (3%) vs. 24 (9%), pdiagnostic protocol remained a predictor of lower acute coronary syndromes and readmissions after propensity score analysis [OR = 0.28 (CI 95% 0.14-0.59)]. Cost per patient was similar in both groups [($2510 vs. $2703 for the accelerated diagnostic protocol and routine care group, respectively, (p = 0.9)]. An accelerated diagnostic protocol is clinically superior and as cost effective as routine in acute chest pain patients, and may save time and resources.

  10. Early health technology assessment of future clinical decision rule aided triage of patients presenting with acute chest pain in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Robert T.A.; Kip, Michelle M.A.; Koffijberg, Hendrik; Kusters, Ron; Buntinx, Frank; Glatz, Jan F.C.; Dinant, Geert Jan

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to estimate the number of patients presenting with chest pain suspected of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in primary care and to calculate possible cost effects of a future clinical decision rule (CDR) incorporating a point-of-care test (PoCT) as compared with current

  11. Relationships with clinical staff after a diagnosis of breast cancer are associated with patients' experience of care and abuse in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Peter; Holcombe, Christopher; Clark, Louise; Krespi, Rita; Fisher, Jean; Hill, Jonathan

    2007-09-01

    Patients experiencing the crisis of the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer need to form trusting and supportive relationships with clinical staff. However, adverse childhood experiences damage the ability to form supportive relationships as adults. We tested the prediction that women recalling childhood abuse and lack of parental care would experience poorer support from clinical staff caring for them around the time of diagnosis and surgical treatment of breast cancer. Two to 4 days after surgery, women with primary breast cancer (N=355) self-reported: childhood sexual, physical, and emotional abuse and parental care; perceived social support; support experienced from the surgeon and breast and ward nurses; and current emotional distress. Logistic regression analyses and covariance structure modeling tested the dependence of perceived professional support on childhood abuse and care and on current social support, controlling for emotional distress and age. Women who reported feeling fully supported by clinical staff were more likely to recall no abuse and good parental care. The influence of parental care, but not abuse, was explained by its association with experiencing good social support generally, which was itself associated with feeling fully supported by clinical staff. These relationships were independent of current emotional distress. Patients' ability to feel fully supported by clinical staff reflects not only how much support staff make available but also patients' experience of close relationships in childhood. We suggest that, whereas lack of parental care compromises adult supportive relationships in general, abuse specifically reduces support from clinical staff.

  12. International Classification of Primary Care-2 coding of primary care data at the general out-patients' clinic of General Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olawunmi Abimbola Olagundoye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary care serves as an integral part of the health systems of nations especially the African continent. It is the portal of entry for nearly all patients into the health care system. Paucity of accurate data for health statistics remains a challenge in the most parts of Africa because of inadequate technical manpower and infrastructure. Inadequate quality of data systems contributes to inaccurate data. A simple-to-use classification system such as the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC may be a solution to this problem at the primary care level. Objectives: To apply ICPC-2 for secondary coding of reasons for encounter (RfE, problems managed and processes of care in a Nigerian primary care setting. Furthermore, to analyze the value of selected presented symptoms as predictors of the most common diagnoses encountered in the study setting. Materials and Methods: Content analysis of randomly selected patients' paper records for data collection at the end of clinic sessions conducted by family physicians at the general out-patients' clinics. Contents of clinical consultations were secondarily coded with the ICPC-2 and recorded into excel spreadsheets with fields for sociodemographic data such as age, sex, occupation, religion, and ICPC elements of an encounter: RfE/complaints, diagnoses/problems, and interventions/processes of care. Results: Four hundred and one encounters considered in this study yielded 915 RfEs, 546 diagnoses, and 1221 processes. This implies an average of 2.3 RfE, 1.4 diagnoses, and 3.0 processes per encounter. The top 10 RfE, diagnoses/common illnesses, and processes were determined. Through the determination of the probability of the occurrence of certain diseases beginning with a RfE/complaint, the top five diagnoses that resulted from each of the top five RfE were also obtained. The top five RfE were: headache, fever, pain general/multiple sites, visual disturbance other and abdominal pain

  13. Efficacy of Oral Risperidone, Haloperidol, or Placebo for Symptoms of Delirium Among Patients in Palliative Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agar, Meera R; Lawlor, Peter G; Quinn, Stephen; Draper, Brian; Caplan, Gideon A; Rowett, Debra; Sanderson, Christine; Hardy, Janet; Le, Brian; Eckermann, Simon; McCaffrey, Nicola; Devilee, Linda; Fazekas, Belinda; Hill, Mark; Currow, David C

    2017-01-01

    Antipsychotics are widely used for distressing symptoms of delirium, but efficacy has not been established in placebo-controlled trials in palliative care. To determine efficacy of risperidone or haloperidol relative to placebo in relieving target symptoms of delirium associated with distress among patients receiving palliative care. A double-blind, parallel-arm, dose-titrated randomized clinical trial was conducted at 11 Australian inpatient hospice or hospital palliative care services between August 13, 2008, and April 2, 2014, among participants with life-limiting illness, delirium, and a delirium symptoms score (sum of Nursing Delirium Screening Scale behavioral, communication, and perceptual items) of 1 or more. Age-adjusted titrated doses of oral risperidone, haloperidol, or placebo solution were administered every 12 hours for 72 hours, based on symptoms of delirium. Patients also received supportive care, individualized treatment of delirium precipitants, and subcutaneous midazolam hydrochloride as required for severe distress or safety. Improvement in mean group difference of delirium symptom score (severity range, 0-6) between baseline and day 3. Five a priori secondary outcomes: delirium severity, midazolam use, extrapyramidal effects, sedation, and survival. Two hundred forty-seven participants (mean [SD] age, 74.9 [9.8] years; 85 women [34.4%]; 218 with cancer [88.3%]) were included in intention-to-treat analysis (82 receiving risperidone, 81 receiving haloperidol, and 84 receiving placebo). In the primary intention-to-treat analysis, participants in the risperidone arm had delirium symptom scores that were significantly higher than those among participants in the placebo arm (on average 0.48 Units higher; 95% CI, 0.09-0.86; P = .02) at study end. Similarly, for those in the haloperidol arm, delirium symptom scores were on average 0.24 Units higher (95% CI, 0.06-0.42; P = .009) than in the placebo arm. Compared with placebo, patients in both

  14. Health care clinics in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollschlaeger, K

    1995-04-01

    Under the Pol Pot Khmer Rouge regime, most physicians with clinical experience were either killed or fled the country. The few practitioners who managed to survive were forced to hide their knowledge; much of that knowledge and experience is now lost. As part of a general process of national rehabilitation, Cambodia has trained since the 1980s hundreds of physicians and physician assistants. There were 700 physicians, 1300 physician assistants, and 4000 nurses in the country by 1992. Problems do, however, remain with medical education in Cambodia. In particular, the medical texts and lectures are in French, a language which very few of the younger generation speak; instructional texts are designed to meet the needs of developing nations, not a rehabilitating one like Cambodia; emphasis is upon curative health care, hospitals, and vertical programs instead of primary and preventive health care; Cambodian physicians are used to a system based upon the division of patients by ability to pay instead of by age, disease, or need; corruption has grown as the cost of living has outstripped the level of official salaries; and there is neither professional contact, feedback, nor program evaluation within health care programs. The authors is a resident in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Chicago who worked at two clinics during a stay in Phnom Penh. She recommends that instead of simply training more doctors, these training-related problems should be addressed, including a revision of the curriculum to include both primary health care medicine and psychiatry. Moreover, people in Cambodia need to be taught the importance of preventive health care, which should then reduce the number of visits to physicians. This process will be accomplished more effectively with the cooperation of physicians, the government, nongovernmental organizations, and international organizations associated with health care.

  15. Managing Psychiatrist-Patient Relationships in the Digital Age: a Summary Review of the Impact of Technology-enabled Care on Clinical Processes and Rapport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Michelle Burke; Fazio, Sarina; Chan, Steven; Yellowlees, Peter M

    2017-10-27

    Participatory medicine and the availability of commercial technologies have given patients more options to view and track their health information and to communicate with their providers. This shift in the clinical process may be of particular importance in mental healthcare where rapport plays a significant role in the therapeutic process. In this review, we examined literature related to the impact of technology on the clinical workflow and patient-provider rapport in the mental health field between January 2014 and June 2017. Thirty three relevant articles, of 226 identified articles, were summarized. The use of technology clinically has evolved from making care more accessible and efficient to leveraging technology to improve care, communication, and patient-provider rapport. Evidence exists demonstrating that information and communication technologies may improve care by better connecting patients and providers and by improving patient-provider rapport, although further research is needed.

  16. Clinical experience with Liraglutide in 196 patients with type 2 diabetes from a tertiary care center in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parjeet Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RA are unique antidiabetic agents that have the ability to lower blood glucose without causing hypoglycemia, while at the same time promoting weight loss. Information on the efficacy and safety of GLP-1 RA in the Indian diabetic population is limited. Aims: (1 To evaluate the effect of GLP-1 RA, Liraglutide on glycemic control, and weight in obese Indian patients with type 2 diabetes. (2 To study the adverse event profile of Liraglutide in these patients in real-world clinical setting. Settings and Design: Observational study conducted in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Liraglutide was prescribed to 196 obese patients with type 2 diabetes who had poor glycemic control on oral medications ± insulin. The initial dose of Liraglutide was 0.6 mg, which was up-titrated to 1.2 mg after 1 week; further up-titration to 1.8 mg was done based on tolerance. Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV inhibitors were discontinued and dose of other medications adjusted according to clinical judgment during the study period. Results: Mean age of patients was 49.9 ± 9.6 years. Three month data were available for 175 patients out of a total of 196. At 3 months, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c was 7.6 ± 0.9% vs. 9.2 ± 1.9% at baseline (P = 0.007 and mean body weight was 96.0 ± 16.5 kg vs. 100.1 ± 17.5 kg at baseline (P < 0.001. Most common adverse events were nausea, burping, and eructation (10%. Conclusion: Liraglutide significantly improves glycemic control with low risk of hypoglycemia and is associated with significant weight loss in obese Indian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  17. From Clinical Standards to Translating Next-Generation Sequencing Research into Patient Care Improvement for Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrochristos, Ioannis D; Glantzounis, Georgios K; Ziogas, Demosthenes E; Gizas, Ioannis; Schizas, Dimitrios; Lykoudis, Efstathios G; Felekouras, Evangelos; Machairas, Anastasios; Katsios, Christos; Liakakos, Theodoros; Cho, William C; Roukos, Dimitrios H

    2017-01-18

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic (HBP) cancers are associated with high cancer-related death rates. Surgery aiming for complete tumor resection (R0) remains the cornerstone of the treatment for HBP cancers. The current progress in the adjuvant treatment is quite slow, with gemcitabine chemotherapy available only for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). In the advanced and metastatic setting, only two targeted drugs have been approved by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA), which are sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma and erlotinib for PDA. It is a pity that multiple Phase III randomized control trials testing the efficacy of targeted agents have negative results. Failure in the development of effective drugs probably reflects the poor understanding of genome-wide alterations and molecular mechanisms orchestrating therapeutic resistance and recurrence. In the post-ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) era, cancer is referred to as a highly heterogeneous and systemic disease of the genome. The unprecedented potential of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to accurately identify genetic and genomic variations has attracted major research and clinical interest. The applications of NGS include targeted NGS with potential clinical implications, while whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing focus on the discovery of both novel cancer driver genes and therapeutic targets. These advances dictate new designs for clinical trials to validate biomarkers and drugs. This review discusses the findings of available NGS studies on HBP cancers and the limitations of genome sequencing analysis to translate genome-based biomarkers and drugs into patient care in the clinic.

  18. From Clinical Standards to Translating Next-Generation Sequencing Research into Patient Care Improvement for Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis D. Kyrochristos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatobiliary and pancreatic (HBP cancers are associated with high cancer-related death rates. Surgery aiming for complete tumor resection (R0 remains the cornerstone of the treatment for HBP cancers. The current progress in the adjuvant treatment is quite slow, with gemcitabine chemotherapy available only for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA. In the advanced and metastatic setting, only two targeted drugs have been approved by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA, which are sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma and erlotinib for PDA. It is a pity that multiple Phase III randomized control trials testing the efficacy of targeted agents have negative results. Failure in the development of effective drugs probably reflects the poor understanding of genome-wide alterations and molecular mechanisms orchestrating therapeutic resistance and recurrence. In the post-ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements era, cancer is referred to as a highly heterogeneous and systemic disease of the genome. The unprecedented potential of next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies to accurately identify genetic and genomic variations has attracted major research and clinical interest. The applications of NGS include targeted NGS with potential clinical implications, while whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing focus on the discovery of both novel cancer driver genes and therapeutic targets. These advances dictate new designs for clinical trials to validate biomarkers and drugs. This review discusses the findings of available NGS studies on HBP cancers and the limitations of genome sequencing analysis to translate genome-based biomarkers and drugs into patient care in the clinic.

  19. Clinical profile, quality of care, and recurrence in Arab-American and Caucasians prostate cancer patients in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussawi, Ahmad H; Yassine, May; Dey, Subhojit; Soliman, Amr S

    2013-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States with striking differences in incidence and mortality among ethnic groups. Michigan has one of the largest concentrations of Arab Americans (AAs) in the U.S. and little is known about this ethnic minority with respect to prostate cancer. This study investigated differences in clinical profile, quality of care, and recurrence among prostate cancer survivors comparing AAs and Caucasian Americans (CAs). Participants in this study included 2499 prostate cancer survivors from the Michigan Cancer Registry from 1985 to 2004. Participants completed surveys regarding health-seeking behavior, post-treatment symptoms, quality of care and recurrence. Ethnicity was self-reported and AAs and CAs were compared with respect to clinical profile, quality of care, and recurrence. There were 52 AAs and 1886 CAs patients with AAs being younger ([Formula: see text] age 68.3 ± SD 21.4 years, [Formula: see text] age 72.3 ± SD 14.1 years, for AAs and CAs, respectively) (P = 0.05). AAs had lower socioeconomic standard than CAs (34 vs. 10.6 %, <$20,000 yearly income/year; for AAs vs. CAs, respectively) (P < 0.0001). AAs reported poorer health than AAs (7.7 vs. 3.0 % for AAs vs. CAs, respectively) (P < 0.0001). AAs were more likely to visit specialists for prostate follow-up (44.5 vs. 19.7 % visited a specialist, for AAs vs. CAs respectively) (P < 0.0001) and received supplementary healthcare workers (13 % of AAs vs. 3.1 % CAs) (P = 0.032). In addition, AAs reported higher occurrence of urinary incontinence compared to CAs (67.4 vs. 60.4 %, for AAs vs. CAs, respectively) (P = 0.001). Ethnic background was not a predictor of recurrence [(Odds ratio (OR) = 1.1 (95 % confidence intervals CI = 0.40, 2.9)] (P = 0.873) even after adjusting for age, PSA levels within the last 2 years, metastasis and hormonal therapy. While AAs prostate cancer patients were different from CAs in age, income

  20. CLINICAL PRESENTATION, RADIOLOGICAL FEATURES AND COURSE OF THE DISEASE IN SWINE FLU POSITIVE PATIENTS ADMITTED IN THE RESPIRATORY INTENSIVE CARE UNIT OF A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Since the 2009 pandemic of H1N1 or Swine Flu influenza , there have been respiratory emergencies every year throughout India , but in the early part of this year that is between January and April 2015 an explosion of cases was seen throughout the country , and so also in our state , Andhra Pradesh. The study of clinical presentation , radiological features and course of the disease helps in early suspicion , isolation , detection and institution of treatment in swine flu positive patients so that further spread of the disease can be co ntrolled and the patients saved . MATERIAL AND METHODS : This is a cross - sectional study conducted at the Department of Pulmonary Medicine , S.V.R.R. Govt. General Hospital , Tirupathi , between January 2015 and April 2015. Study sample was the total number of swine flu suspects who were admitted in the Respiratory Intensive Care Unit and swine flu wards of the Department of Pulmonary Medicine. SUMMARY : Out of 32 suspects admitted , 13 tested positive for swine flu. 8 of the 13 were females (61% and 5 were males (39%. Cold , cough and breathlessness were present in all the patients (100%. Sore throat was present in only 4 patients (30%. 11 out of the 13 patients were in respiratory failure (85%. 9 out of the 13 had comorbidities like diabetes , bronchial asthma and chronic kidney disease (70%. Chest X - ray and CT chest showed ARDS like pic ture and pneumonia in 11 out of the 13 patients (85%.

  1. The prevalence and the clinical characteristics of metabolic syndrome patients admitted to the cardiac care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyad Alakkas

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Of the patients admitted to the CCU, 47.8% had MetS, with those patients likely to be female and obese. Furthermore, MetS patients were more likely to be admitted with heart failure and suffer from moderate-to-severe LVH.

  2. Building a clinical leadership community to drive improvement: a multi-case educational study to inform 21st century clinical commissioning, professional capability and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Marion; Verner, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The new NHS requires transformational leadership; people with the knowledge and motivation to make effective change combined with an understanding of the system they work in. The aim of the Practice Leaders' Programme (PLP) is to generate the conditions needed to focus the energy and collaborative creativity required for innovation to enhance leadership skills across the health economy improving patient care. The PLP engaged 60 local leaders from central England in a new approach enabling them to influence others. It has informed educational policy and practice and helped change professional behaviours. Each participant implemented improvements in care and participated in six action learning sets (ALS) and up to six coaching sessions. Evidence of progress, learning and impact was identified in project reports, reflective diaries and evaluations. The ALS brought together key individuals from clinical and management disciplines across a diverse organisation to redesign a system by developing a shared vision for improving the quality of patient care. The links forged, the projects initiated, and the skills cultivated through the PLP produced ongoing benefits and outcomes beyond the course itself. Coaching sessions helped participants focus their efforts to achieve maximum impact and to become resilient in managing service change effectively. The programme has evolved over four years, building on recommendations from external evaluation which identified statistically significant increases in leadership competences. Further enhancement of this programme secured an International Health Improvement Award. Three key findings of positive impact have emerged; personal growth, service improvement, and legacy and sustainability.

  3. Effect of non-clinical inter-hospital critical care unit to unit transfer of critically ill patients: a propensity-matched cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Helen; Harrison, David A; Rowan, Kathryn M; Raine, Rosalind

    2012-10-03

    No matter how well resourced, individual hospitals cannot expect to meet all peaks in demand for adult general critical care. However, previous analyses suggest that patients transferred for non-clinical reasons have worse outcomes than those who are not transferred, but these studies were underpowered and hampered by residual case-mix differences. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of transferring adult general critical care patients to other hospitals for non-clinical reasons. We carried out a propensity-matched cohort analysis comparing critical care patients who underwent a non-clinical critical care unit to unit transfer to another hospital with those who were not transferred. The primary outcome measure was mortality at ultimate discharge from acute hospital. Secondary outcomes were mortality at ultimate discharge from critical care, plus length of stay in both critical care and acute hospital. A total of 308,323 patients were admitted to one of 198 adult general critical care units in England and Wales between January 2008 and September 2011. This included 759 patients who underwent a non-clinical transfer within 48 hours of admission to the unit and 1,518 propensity-matched patients who were not transferred. The relative risk of ultimate acute hospital mortality was 1.01 (95% confidence interval = 0.87 to 1.16) for the non-clinical transfer group, compared with patients who were not transferred but had a similar propensity for transfer. There was no statistically significant difference in ultimate critical care unit mortality. Transferred patients received on average three additional days of critical care (P analysis the difference in mortality between non-clinical transferred and nontransferred patients was not statistically significant. Nevertheless, non-clinical transfers received, on average, an additional 3 days of critical care. This has potential ramifications in terms of distress, inconvenience and cost for patients, their families

  4. Assessment of knowledge, attitudes, and behavior about skin care and moisturizers in patients presenting to dermatology outpatient clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Munise Daye; İnci Mevlitoğlu; Tahir Kemal Şahin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Design: For having a healthy skin; there are cleaning and cosmetic products that are specially prepared (nourishing,moisturizing,sunscreen, etc.) should be used and/or referred to as "skin care". In our study we aimed to determine knowledge and behaviors about skin care and moisturizers of dermatology patients. Materials and Methods: Between March-May 2013, we filled dermatology patients a questionary about their skin care products and moisturizers, behaviours abuot using th...

  5. Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Depression and Self-Care in Heart Failure Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Kenneth E; Carney, Robert M; Rich, Michael W; Steinmeyer, Brian C; Rubin, Eugene H

    2015-11-01

    Depression and inadequate self-care are common and interrelated problems that increase the risks of hospitalization and mortality in patients with heart failure (HF). To determine the efficacy of an integrative cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) intervention for depression and HF self-care. Randomized clinical trial with single-blind outcome assessments. Eligible patients were enrolled at Washington University Medical Center in St Louis between January 4, 2010, and June 28, 2013. The primary data analyses were conducted in February 2015. The participants were 158 outpatients in New York Heart Association Class I, II, and III heart failure with comorbid major depression. Cognitive behavior therapy delivered by experienced therapists plus usual care (UC), or UC alone. Usual care was enhanced in both groups with a structured HF education program delivered by a cardiac nurse. The primary outcome was severity of depression at 6 months as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory. The Self-Care of Heart Failure Index Confidence and Maintenance subscales were coprimary outcomes. Secondary outcomes included measures of anxiety, depression, physical functioning, fatigue, social roles and activities, and quality of life. Hospitalizations and deaths were exploratory outcomes. One hundred fifty-eight patients were randomized to UC (n = 79) or CBT (n = 79). Within each arm, 26 (33%) of the patients were taking an antidepressant at baseline. One hundred thirty-two (84%) of the participants completed the 6-month posttreatment assessments; 60 (76%) of the UC and 58 (73%) of the CBT participants completed every follow-up assessment (P = .88). Six-month depression scores were lower in the CBT than the UC arm on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) (12.8 [10.6] vs 17.3 [10.7]; P = .008). Remission rates differed on the BDI-II (46% vs 19%; number needed to treat [NNT] = 3.76; 95% CI, 3.62-3.90; P Beck Depression Inventory scores 6 months after randomization were lower in the CBT

  6. Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Use of Integrative Therapies as Supportive Care in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balneaves, Lynda G.; Carlson, Linda E.; Cohen, Misha; Deng, Gary; Hershman, Dawn; Mumber, Matthew; Perlmutter, Jane; Seely, Dugald; Sen, Ananda; Zick, Suzanna M.; Tripathy, Debu

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. Methods Following the Institute of Medicine’s guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment. Trials were included if the majority of participants had breast cancer and/or breast cancer patient results were reported separately, and outcomes were clinically relevant. Recommendations were organized by outcome and graded based upon a modified version of the US Preventive Services Task Force grading system. Results The search (January 1, 1990–December 31, 2013) identified 4900 articles, of which 203 were eligible for analysis. Meditation, yoga, and relaxation with imagery are recommended for routine use for common conditions, including anxiety and mood disorders (Grade A). Stress management, yoga, massage, music therapy, energy conservation, and meditation are recommended for stress reduction, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and quality of life (Grade B). Many interventions (n = 32) had weaker evidence of benefit (Grade C). Some interventions (n = 7) were deemed unlikely to provide any benefit (Grade D). Notably, only one intervention, acetyl-l-carnitine for the prevention of taxane-induced neuropathy, was identified as likely harmful (Grade H) as it was found to increase neuropathy. The majority of intervention/modality combinations (n = 138) did not have sufficient evidence to form specific recommendations (Grade I). Conclusions Specific integrative therapies can be recommended as evidence-based supportive care options during breast cancer treatment. Most integrative therapies require further investigation via well

  7. Resistant hypertension: demography and clinical characteristics in 6,292 patients in a primary health care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijón-Conde, Teresa; Graciani, Auxiliadora; Banegas, José R

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of resistant hypertension has recently been reported, but there are no studies on its demography. This study aimed to examine the demography and clinical characteristics of resistant hypertension in a large sample of primary care patients. A cross-sectional study was performed of all computerized medical records of hypertensive patients in Health Area 6 of Madrid (Spain). Of 63 167 hypertensive patients, we selected 48 744 with prescription of antihypertensive medication; of these, we selected those who met the American Heart Association criteria for resistant hypertension. A total of 6292 patients had resistant hypertension, representing 9.9% of all hypertensive patients and 12.9% of those treated. A total of 5.5% were 80 years (15.8% men and 31.4% women) (P hypertension was associated with male sex (odds ratio female/male = 0.006; 95% confidence interval, 0.000-0.042; P 80 years, resistant hypertension was associated with female sex (odds ratio female/male = 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1,10; P = .004), systolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, obesity, chronic kidney disease, coronary heart disease, and atrial fibrillation (P 80 years with resistant hypertension had cardiovascular disease. One in 4 patients with resistant hypertension is > 80 years. Resistant hypertension is associated with cardiovascular disease, age 80 years in women. There is a high proportion of cardiovascular disease in elderly patients with resistant hypertension. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Patient attitudes and preferences regarding literacy screening in ambulatory cancer care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Hahn

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth A Hahn1, Sofia F Garcia1, Hongyan Du2, David Cella11Department of Medical Social Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago; 2Center on Outcomes, Research and Education, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, USAObjectives: To evaluate patient attitudes towards literacy screening, agreement between literacy tests, and associations between literacy, informed consent comprehension, and health-related quality of life (HRQL.Methods: Participants completed three literacy tests, read a sample consent form, and reported their HRQL, experiences, and attitudes.Results: We enrolled 97 cancer patients, of whom 66% were female, 67% were African American, and 65% were high school graduates. Sixty percent of patients with lower reading comprehension had trouble reading health information, and 31% had trouble reading everyday written material. Even patients with higher reading comprehension had trouble reading health information (29% and everyday written material (10%. Low-literacy patients were more likely to feel anxious about literacy screening. However, the majority of patients (84% would be willing to have literacy results given to providers. Comprehension of informed consent increased with higher literacy. There were no HRQL differences.Conclusions: Patients report difficulty comprehending written health information. Literacy assessment is acceptable and it is considered important for providers to be aware of their patients’ reading abilities. Patient preference data should be used to improve literacy testing strategies and measures. Enhancing detection of low literacy can facilitate interventions to reduce health disparities.Keywords: health literacy, screening, informed consent, reading, writing

  9. Primary care patients with mental health problems: outcome of a randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuders, G.A.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Smit, J.H.; Rijmen, F.P.J.; Stalman, W.A.B.; van Oppen, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of patients with mental health problems in general practice is high, and at least one-third of these problems last for 6 months or longer. Patients with these problems take up more time during a consultation and attend more frequently. Aim: This study investigated the

  10. N-of-1 trials in the clinical care of patients in developing countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemayehu, Chalachew; Nikles, Jane; Mitchell, Geoffrey

    2018-04-23

    N-of-1 trials have a potential role in promoting patient-centered medicine in developing countries. However, there is limited academic literature regarding the use of N-of-1 trials in the clinical care of patients in resource-poor settings. To assess the extent of use, purpose and treatment outcome of N-of-1 trials in developing countries. A systematic review of clinical N-of-1 trials was conducted between 1985 and September 2015 using PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Grey literature databases and clinical trial registers were also searched. This review included randomized, multi-cycle, crossover within individual patient trials involving drug intervention. Quality assessment and data extraction were conducted by two independent reviewers. Out of 131 N-of-1 trials identified, only 6 (4.5%) were conducted in developing countries. The major reason that N-of-1 trials were used was to provide evidence on feasibility, effectiveness and safety of therapies. A total of 72 participants were involved in these trials. Five of the studies were conducted in China and all evaluated Chinese traditional medicine. The remaining study was conducted in Brazil. The completion rate was 93%. More than half, 46 (69%) of subjects made medication changes consistent with trial results after trial completion. A number of threats to the validity of the included evidence limited the validity of the evidence. In particular, the estimated overall effect in four of the included studies could have been affected by the "carry over" of the previous treatment effect as no adequate pharmacokinetic evidence regarding traditional medicines was presented. The prevalence and scope of N-of-1 trials in developing countries is low. A coordinated effort among government, clinicians, researchers and sponsor organizations is needed to increase their uptake and quality in developing countries. PROSPERO CRD42015026841 .

  11. Hepatitis C virus infection in patients and family members attending two primary care clinics in Puebla, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Colombo, Aurelio; Meléndez-Mena, Daniel; Sedeño-Monge, Virginia; Camacho-Hernández, José R; Vázquez-Cruz, Eduardo; Morales-Hernández, Eduardo R; Sosa-Jurado, Francisca; Márquez-Domínguez, Luis; Santos-López, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 180 million persons (~2.8%) globally are estimated to be infected by hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV prevalence in Mexico has been estimated to be between 1.2 and 1.4%. The aim of present work was to determine the prevalence of HCV infection in patients and family members attending two primary care clinics in Puebla, Mexico. Patients and their accompanying family members in two clinics were invited to participate in this study between May and September 2010. A total of 10,214 persons were included in the study; 120 (1.17%) persons were anti-HCV reactive. Of the reactive subjects, detection of viral RNA was determined in 114 subjects and 36 were positive (31%). The more frequent risk factors were having a family history of cirrhosis (33.1%) and having a blood transfusion prior to 1995 (29%). After a multiple logistic regression analysis only transfusion prior to 1995 resulted significant to HCV transmission (p = 0.004). The overall detected HCV genotypes were as follows: 1a (29%), 1b (48.5%), 2/2b (12.8%), and 3a (6.5%). The HCV prevalence in this population is in agreement with previous studies in other regions of Mexico.

  12. Clinical Impact of Education Provision on Determining Advance Care Planning Decisions among End Stage Renal Disease Patients Receiving Regular Hemodialysis in University Malaya Medical Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing Wong, Albert; Chin, Loh Ee; Ping, Tan Li; Peng, Ng Kok; Kun, Lim Soo

    2016-01-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) is a process of shared decision-making about future health-care plans between patients, health care providers, and family members, should patients becomes incapable of participating in medical treatment decisions. ACP discussions enhance patient's autonomy, focus on patient's values and treatment preferences, and promote patient-centered care. ACP is integrated as part of clinical practice in Singapore and the United States. To assess the clinical impact of education provision on determining ACP decisions among end-stage renal disease patients on regular hemodialysis at University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC). To study the knowledge and attitude of patients toward ACP and end-of-life issues. Fifty-six patients were recruited from UMMC. About 43 questions pretest survey adapted from Lyon's ACP survey and Moss's cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attitude survey was given to patients to answer. An educational brochure is then introduced to these patients, and a posttest survey carried out after that. The results were analyzed using SPSS version 22.0. Opinion on ACP, including CPR decisions, showed an upward trend on the importance percentage after the educational brochure exposure, but this was statistically not significant. Seventy-five percent of participants had never heard of ACP before, and only 3.6% had actually prepared a written advanced directive. The ACP educational brochure clinically impacts patients' preferences and decisions toward end-of-life care; however, this is statistically not significant. Majority of patients have poor knowledge on ACP. This study lays the foundation for execution of future larger scale clinical trials, and ultimately, the incorporation of ACP into clinical practice in Malaysia.

  13. From the galleries to the clinic: applying art museum lessons to patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexa; Grohe, Michelle; Khoshbin, Shahram; Katz, Joel T

    2013-12-01

    Increasingly, medical educators integrate art-viewing into curricular interventions that teach clinical observation-often with local art museum educators. How can cross-disciplinary collaborators explicitly connect the skills learned in the art museum with those used at the bedside? One approach is for educators to align their pedagogical approach using similar teaching methods in the separate contexts of the galleries and the clinic. We describe two linked pedagogical exercises--Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) in the museum galleries and observation at the bedside--from "Training the Eye: Improving the Art of Physical Diagnosis," an elective museum-based course at Harvard Medical School. It is our opinion that while strategic interactions with the visual arts can improve skills, it is essential for students to apply them in a clinical context with faculty support-requiring educators across disciplines to learn from one another.

  14. Effects of Early Integrated Palliative Care in Patients With Lung and GI Cancer: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Jennifer S; Greer, Joseph A; El-Jawahri, Areej; Pirl, William F; Park, Elyse R; Jackson, Vicki A; Back, Anthony L; Kamdar, Mihir; Jacobsen, Juliet; Chittenden, Eva H; Rinaldi, Simone P; Gallagher, Emily R; Eusebio, Justin R; Li, Zhigang; Muzikansky, Alona; Ryan, David P

    2017-03-10

    Purpose We evaluated the impact of early integrated palliative care (PC) in patients with newly diagnosed lung and GI cancer. Patients and Methods We randomly assigned patients with newly diagnosed incurable lung or noncolorectal GI cancer to receive either early integrated PC and oncology care (n = 175) or usual care (n = 175) between May 2011 and July 2015. Patients who were assigned to the intervention met with a PC clinician at least once per month until death, whereas those who received usual care consulted a PC clinician upon request. The primary end point was change in quality of life (QOL) from baseline to week 12, per scoring by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General scale. Secondary end points included change in QOL from baseline to week 24, change in depression per the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and differences in end-of-life communication. Results Intervention patients ( v usual care) reported greater improvement in QOL from baseline to week 24 (1.59 v -3.40; P = .010) but not week 12 (0.39 v -1.13; P = .339). Intervention patients also reported lower depression at week 24, controlling for baseline scores (adjusted mean difference, -1.17; 95% CI, -2.33 to -0.01; P = .048). Intervention effects varied by cancer type, such that intervention patients with lung cancer reported improvements in QOL and depression at 12 and 24 weeks, whereas usual care patients with lung cancer reported deterioration. Patients with GI cancers in both study groups reported improvements in QOL and mood by week 12. Intervention patients versus usual care patients were more likely to discuss their wishes with their oncologist if they were dying (30.2% v 14.5%; P = .004). Conclusion For patients with newly diagnosed incurable cancers, early integrated PC improved QOL and other salient outcomes, with differential effects by cancer type. Early integrated PC may be most effective if targeted to the specific needs of each patient population.

  15. Using the patient-centred medicine clinical framework to better appreciate and explore the many barriers to care in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Ron; Titchener, Janet

    2014-12-01

    There are many barriers to diabetes care. This paper explores whether organising these barriers to Type 2 diabetes care within the clinical framework of patient-centred medicine (PCM) enables a better appreciation and conceptualisation of these barriers. The terms 'diabetes', 'barriers to care', 'self-management', 'patient-centred care' and 'outcome assessment' were used to identify 28 articles describing multiple barriers (minimum of three) to care in Type 2 diabetes. Identified barriers were organised within the clinical framework of PCM. Barriers to diabetes care were numerous and diverse, but all could be accommodated within the PCM framework, except for one, that of patient non-compliance (non-adherence). This paternalistic concept contradicts patient autonomy, a key component of the PCM paradigm. Accepting non-adherence as a plausible barrier stops providers from recognising the actual barriers to diabetes self-management. Clinicians need to stop attributing blame for poor disease outcomes on patients, and instead to become partners in identifying and addressing their patients' real barriers to better health by using the practical clinical framework of PCM.

  16. Group Patient Education: Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care in Greece: A Clinically Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merakou, K.; Knithaki, A.; Karageorgos, G.; Theodoridis, D.; Barbouni, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55…

  17. How does knowledge from translational research impact our clinical care of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Lee A

    2012-06-01

    Recent translational studies have provided new insights into pathogenesis, disease behavior, and treatment responses in pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Registry studies have identified distinct clinical phenotypes with increasing age of onset; this has led to a revision of the clinical phenotyping system, now termed the Paris classification system. It is recognized that there are infantile (age <2 years), very early onset (VEO, age 2-10), and early onset (EO, age 10-17) forms of disease. Rare genetic mutations affecting anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory pathways have been discovered in infantile and VEO forms, while genetic pathways identified in EO disease have been similar to adult-onset IBD. Genetic and serologic patterns measured soon after diagnosis have been shown to be associated with more aggressive stricturing behavior; these patterns may now be used clinically to help predict disease course. More recently, clinical and genetic models have been developed that, if validated, could be used to predict treatment responses.

  18. Assessment of knowledge, attitudes, and behavior about skin care and moisturizers in patients presenting to dermatology outpatient clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munise Daye

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: For having a healthy skin; there are cleaning and cosmetic products that are specially prepared (nourishing,moisturizing,sunscreen, etc. should be used and/or referred to as "skin care". In our study we aimed to determine knowledge and behaviors about skin care and moisturizers of dermatology patients. Materials and Methods: Between March-May 2013, we filled dermatology patients a questionary about their skin care products and moisturizers, behaviours abuot using them, how to use them, where they get knowledge about them, what are the attension points about choosing them, who they are asking for these products, where they buy these products, what are they looking for buying them. Results: The study involved 984 patients.608 (61.8% were female, 376 (38.2% were male. In our study; (48.2% 474 of patient specified that they understand skin care is cleaning, (% 34.2 337 patient spesified that the lack of skin disease. 303 (30.8% of patients knew one skin care product, 213% (21.6 of patients knew two skin care products, 284 (28.9% of patients knew more product, 184% (18.7 of patients didn’t know skin care products. 528 (%53,7 patient were using skin products, 200 of them patients were using regularly, 328 were using sometimes. 456 (%46,3 patient were not using skin care products. When they are choosing their skin care products; 648 (%65,9 of them get information from dermatologists, 154 (%15,7 internet, 106 (%10,8 advertisements, 37 (%3,8 their neighbours, 39 (%4 phamacy. 300 (%30,5 patients were using moisturizers, 340 (%34,6 patients were using sometimes, 344 (%35 were not using moisturizers. Conclusion: Our patients did not have the behavior of using skin care products regularly. Our society needs to be informed about regular skin care, and choosing the right moisturizers, buying these products from appropriate places as well as using these products correctly.

  19. A novel assessment tool for clinical care of patients with autoinflammatory disease: juvenile autoinflammatory disease multidimensional assessment report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konukbay, Dilek; Gattorno, Marco; Yildiz, Dilek; Frenkel, Joost; Acikel, Cengizhan; Sozeri, Betul; Makay, Balahan; Aktay Ayaz, Nuray; Barut, Kenan; Kisaarslan, Aysenur; Bilginer, Yelda; Karaman, Dursun; Peru, Harun; Simsek, Dogan; Aydog, Ozlem; Unsal, Erbil; Gunduz, Zubeyde; Fidanci, Berna Eren; Kone-Paut, Isabelle; Kasapcopur, Ozgur; Ravelli, Angelo; Ozen, Seza; Demirkaya, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    To develop and test a new multidimensional questionnaire for assessment of children with auto-inflammatory disease (AID) such as FMF, PFAPA, HIDS, TRAPS in standard clinical care. The juvenile auto-inflammatory disease multidimensional assessment report (JAIMAR) includes 16 parent or patient-centered measures and four dimensions that assess functional status, pain, therapeutic compliance and health-related quality of life (physical, social, school, emotional status) with disease outcome. It is proposed for use as both a proxy-report and a patient self-report, with the suggested age range of 8-18 years for use as a self-report. 250 children with FMF were included in the study. Total of 179 forms were filled up by parents and patients, and 71 forms were filled up by parents having children less than 8 years. Completing and scoring the JAIMAR can be done in 15 minutes. For the JAIMAR's dimensions, the Cronbach's alpha coefficient for internal consistency was between 0.507-0.998. There was a significant and a positive correlation between the test-retest scale scores (ICC=0.607-0.966). Concerning construct validity, all factors loadings were above 0.30. For the criterion validity, the correlation level between each dimension and the related scale ranged from medium (r=0.329, preported and children's self-reported data were outstandingly concordant (r=0.770-0.989). The development of the JAIMAR introduces a new and multi-dimensional approach in paediatric rheumatology practice. It is a new tool for children with auto-inflammatory dis-ease and it may help enhance their quality of care.

  20. Enhanced Patient-Centred Care: Physiotherapists' Perspectives on the Impact of International Clinical Internships on Canadian Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesaroli, Giulia; Bourgeois, Anne-Marie; McCurry, Ellen; Condren, Allison; Petropanagos, Peter; Fraser, Michelle; Nixon, Stephanie A

    2015-01-01

    To explore the perspectives of physiotherapists who participated in an international clinical internship (ICI) in low- or middle-income countries (LMICs) during their physiotherapy (PT) training in a Canadian PT programme regarding the ICI's impact on their PT practice in Canada. This qualitative descriptive study used in-depth semi-structured interviews. Data were organized using NVivo; inductive and deductive coding were used to analyze data and develop broader themes. The 13 practising Canadian physiotherapists interviewed described three enhanced capacities: (1) critical reflection on culture, values and practice; (2) communication skills; and (3) creativity and resourcefulness. These capacities were perceived to transfer to Canadian practice by enhancing participants' ability to deliver patient-centred care, specifically through an enhanced understanding of patients' values and social determinants of health, regardless of the Canadian setting or patient population. For PT students considering an ICI, the study findings provide insight into the perceived impact of ICIs on Canadian practice. For PT academic programmes, the findings can guide decisions on the extent of investment in ICIs as learning opportunities that will enhance practice in Canada.

  1. Quality of life in patients with visual impairment in Ibadan: a clinical study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adigun, Kehinde; Oluleye, Tunji S; Ladipo, Modupe Ma; Olowookere, Samuel Anu

    2014-01-01

    Visual function is important for optimal orientation in functional and social life, and has an effect on physical and emotional well-being. Visual impairment, therefore, leads to restrictions in all aspects of daily living and is related to quality of life. The aim of this study was to provide information on the causes of visual impairment in patients presenting to their family physician, the spectrum of impairment, and its impact on quality of life for these patients. This descriptive cross-sectional study of 375 adult patients with ocular symptoms was performed in the general outpatient department of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, from July to September, 2009. After checking their presenting visual acuity, the patients were interviewed using the Vision-Related Quality of Life questionnaire to determine the impact of visual impairment on their quality of life. Ophthalmic examinations were performed to determine the causes of visual impairment. The results were analyzed using proportions and percentages. The main causes of visual impairment were cataracts (58.7%), refractive error (19.4%), and glaucoma (2.9%). Visual impairment was found to be associated with advancing age, low education, and unemployment (Pvisual function (64.2%) and social interaction (50.9%). Quality of life was found to be related to the degree of visual impairment, ie, blind patients reported poor quality of life (41.4%) when compared with those having low vision (8.6%) or near normal vision (2.4%, Pvisual impairment. Family physicians need to identify these visually impaired patients early and make timely referrals.

  2. Step by step development of clinical care pathways for older cancer patients: necessary or desirable?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Weert, J.C.M. van; Jansen, J.; Lemmens, E.P.P.; Maas, A.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Medical and nursing staff in oncology for older cancer patients are confronted with a range of problems including co-morbidity, poly-pharmacy, cognitive impairments, emotional problems, functional limitations, sensory impairment and a lack of social support. Comprehensive geriatric assessment

  3. New-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus among patients receiving HIV care at Newlands Clinic, Harare, Zimbabwe: retrospective cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimbetete, Cleophas; Mugglin, Catrina; Shamu, Tinei; Kalesan, Bindu; Bertisch, Barbara; Egger, Matthias; Keiser, Olivia

    2017-07-01

    To assess the incidence and associated factors of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) among people living with HIV (PLHIV) in Zimbabwe. We analysed data of all HIV-infected patients older than 16 years who attended Newlands Clinic between March 1, 2004 and April 29, 2015. The clinic considers patients whose random blood sugar is higher than 11.1 mmol/l and which is confirmed by a fasting blood sugar higher than 7.0 mmol/l to have T2DM. T2DM is also diagnosed in symptomatic patients who have a RBS >11.0 mmol/l. Risk factors for developing T2DM were identified using Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for confounding. Missing baseline BMI data were multiply imputed. Results are presented as adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Data for 4,110 participants were included: 67.2% were women; median age was 37 (IQR: 31-43) years. Median baseline CD4 count was 197 (IQR: 95-337) cells/mm 3 . The proportion of participants with hypertension at baseline was 15.5% (n=638). Over a median follow-up time of 4.7 (IQR: 2.1-7.2) years, 57 patients developed T2DM; the overall incidence rate was 2.8 (95% CI: 2.1-3.6) per 1000 person-years of follow-up. Exposure to PIs was associated with T2DM (HR: 1.80, 95% CI: 1.04-3.09). In the multivariable analysis, obesity (BMI>30 kg/m 2 ) (aHR=2.26, 95% CI: 1.17-4.36), age >40 years (aHR=2.16, 95% CI: 1.22-3.83) and male gender, (aHR=2.13, 95% CI: 1.22-3.72) were independently associated with the risk of T2DM. HIV-related factors (baseline CD4 cell count and baseline WHO clinical stage) were not independent risk factors for developing T2DM. Although the incidence of T2DM in this HIV cohort was lower than that has been observed in others, our results show that risk factors for developing T2DM among HIV-infected people are similar to those of the general population. HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa need a comprehensive approach to care that includes better health services for prevention, early

  4. The effectiveness of clinical networks in improving quality of care and patient outcomes: a systematic review of quantitative and qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bernadette Bea; Patel, Cyra; McInnes, Elizabeth; Mays, Nicholas; Young, Jane; Haines, Mary

    2016-08-08

    Reorganisation of healthcare services into networks of clinical experts is increasing as a strategy to promote the uptake of evidence based practice and to improve patient care. This is reflected in significant financial investment in clinical networks. However, there is still some question as to whether clinical networks are effective vehicles for quality improvement. The aim of this systematic review was to ascertain the effectiveness of clinical networks and identify how successful networks improve quality of care and patient outcomes. A systematic search was undertaken in accordance with the PRISMA approach in Medline, Embase, CINAHL and PubMed for relevant papers between 1 January 1996 and 30 September 2014. Established protocols were used separately to examine and assess the evidence from quantitative and qualitative primary studies and then integrate findings. A total of 22 eligible studies (9 quantitative; 13 qualitative) were included. Of the quantitative studies, seven focused on improving quality of care and two focused on improving patient outcomes. Quantitative studies were limited by a lack of rigorous experimental design. The evidence indicates that clinical networks can be effective vehicles for quality improvement in service delivery and patient outcomes across a range of clinical disciplines. However, there was variability in the networks' ability to make meaningful network- or system-wide change in more complex processes such as those requiring intensive professional education or more comprehensive redesign of care pathways. Findings from qualitative studies indicated networks that had a positive impact on quality of care and patients outcomes were those that had adequate resources, credible leadership and efficient management coupled with effective communication strategies and collaborative trusting relationships. There is evidence that clinical networks can improve the delivery of healthcare though there are few high quality quantitative

  5. The costs, resource use and cost-effectiveness of Clinical Nurse Specialist-led interventions for patients with palliative care needs: A systematic review of international evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamanca-Balen, Natalia; Seymour, Jane; Caswell, Glenys; Whynes, David; Tod, Angela

    2018-02-01

    Patients with palliative care needs do not access specialist palliative care services according to their needs. Clinical Nurse Specialists working across a variety of fields are playing an increasingly important role in the care of such patients, but there is limited knowledge of the extent to which their interventions are cost-effective. To present results from a systematic review of the international evidence on the costs, resource use and cost-effectiveness of Clinical Nurse Specialist-led interventions for patients with palliative care needs, defined as seriously ill patients and those with advanced disease or frailty who are unlikely to be cured, recover or stabilize. Systematic review following PRISMA methodology. Medline, Embase, CINAHL and Cochrane Library up to 2015. Studies focusing on the outcomes of Clinical Nurse Specialist interventions for patients with palliative care needs, and including at least one economic outcome, were considered. The quality of studies was assessed using tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute. A total of 79 papers were included: 37 randomized controlled trials, 22 quasi-experimental studies, 7 service evaluations and other studies, and 13 economic analyses. The studies included a wide variety of interventions including clinical, support and education, as well as care coordination activities. The quality of the studies varied greatly. Clinical Nurse Specialist interventions may be effective in reducing specific resource use such as hospitalizations/re-hospitalizations/admissions, length of stay and health care costs. There is mixed evidence regarding their cost-effectiveness. Future studies should ensure that Clinical Nurse Specialists' roles and activities are clearly described and evaluated.

  6. Enoxaparin, effective dosage for intensive care patients: double-blinded, randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Sian; Zincuk, Aleksander; Strøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    the subcutaneous (SC) dose of enoxaparin that would give the best anti-factor Xa levels in ICU patients. METHODS: The 72 patients admitted to a mixed ICU at Odense University Hospital (OUH) in Denmark were randomised into four groups to receive 40, 50, 60, or 70 mg SC enoxaparin for a period of 24 hours. Anti...... in enoxaparin dose, from 0.13 IU/ml at 40 mg, to 0.14 IU/ml at 50 mg, 0.27 IU/ml at 60 mg, and 0.29 IU/ml at 70 mg (P = 0.002). At 12 hours after administration, median aFXa levels were still within therapeutic range for those patients who received 60 mg (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirmed......-factor Xa activity (aFXa) was measured before, and at 4, 12, and 24 hours after administration. An AFXa level between 0.1 to 0.3 IU/ml was considered evidence of effective antithrombotic activity. RESULTS: Median peak (4 hours after administration), aFXa levels increased significantly with an increase...

  7. Child Maltreatment and the Adolescent Patient With Severe Obesity: Implications for Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Meg H; Noll, Jennie G; Sarwer, David B; Reiter-Purtill, Jennifer; Rofey, Dana L; Baughcum, Amy E; Peugh, James; Courcoulas, Anita P; Michalsky, Marc P; Jenkins, Todd M; Becnel, Jennifer N

    2015-08-01

    To characterize prevalence and correlates of child maltreatment (CM) in a clinical sample of adolescents with severe obesity. Multicenter baseline data from 139 adolescents undergoing weight loss surgery (Mage = 16.9; 79.9% female, 66.2% White; Mbody mass index [BMI] = 51.5 kg/m(2)) and 83 nonsurgical comparisons (Mage = 16.1; 81.9% female, 54.2% White; MBMI = 46.9 kg/m(2)) documented self-reported CM (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire) and associations with psychopathology, quality of life, self-esteem and body image, high-risk behaviors, and family dysfunction.  CM prevalence (females: 29%; males: 12%) was similar to national adolescent base rates. Emotional abuse was most prevalent. One in 10 females reported sexual abuse. For females, CM rates were higher in comparisons, yet correlates were similar for both cohorts: greater psychopathology, substance use, and family dysfunction, and lower quality of life. While a minority of adolescents with severe obesity reported a CM history, they carry greater psychosocial burden into the clinical setting. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Child Maltreatment and the Adolescent Patient With Severe Obesity: Implications for Clinical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Jennie G.; Sarwer, David B.; Reiter-Purtill, Jennifer; Rofey, Dana L.; Baughcum, Amy E.; Peugh, James; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Michalsky, Marc P.; Jenkins, Todd M; Becnel, Jennifer N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize prevalence and correlates of child maltreatment (CM) in a clinical sample of adolescents with severe obesity. Method Multicenter baseline data from 139 adolescents undergoing weight loss surgery (Mage = 16.9; 79.9% female, 66.2% White; Mbody mass index [BMI] = 51.5 kg/m2) and 83 nonsurgical comparisons (Mage = 16.1; 81.9% female, 54.2% White; MBMI = 46.9 kg/m2) documented self-reported CM (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire) and associations with psychopathology, quality of life, self-esteem and body image, high-risk behaviors, and family dysfunction. Results CM prevalence (females: 29%; males: 12%) was similar to national adolescent base rates. Emotional abuse was most prevalent. One in 10 females reported sexual abuse. For females, CM rates were higher in comparisons, yet correlates were similar for both cohorts: greater psychopathology, substance use, and family dysfunction, and lower quality of life. Conclusion While a minority of adolescents with severe obesity reported a CM history, they carry greater psychosocial burden into the clinical setting. PMID:25774054

  9. Implantable port devices in paediatric oncology patients: A clinical experience from a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogar, S.A.; Khan, M.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the frequency of infection of portacath in children having malignant tumours and undergoing chemotherapy, and to assess the association of the infection with already known risk factors. Methods: The retrospective review was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, and involved patient data related to the period between January 2005 to December 2010. A questionnaire was designed to collect the required data. A total of 67 children were included having portacath inserted for chemotherapy. Children in which portacath was inserted under local anaesthesia in Radiology department, reinserted or inserted because of a reason other than childhood malignancy were excluded. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the total, 46 (67%) patients were males and a majority of the total (n=31; 46%) was between 6-10 years of age. Besides, 42 (63%) patients had leukaemia, 7(11%) had lymphoma and 18(26%) had various solid tumours. Six (8.95%) ports were removed due to infection. There was significant difference between infection and non-infection groups with respect to absolute neutrophilic count levels (p <0.001). Positive association was found between low absolute neutrophilic count level (<500) and the occurrence of port infection. Conclusions: Port infection rate is higher in children with low absolute neutrophilic count. The issue needs to be addressed and one may have to alter the timings of port insertion. It is recommended to insert port when absolute neutrophilic count is normal. To further evaluate the subject, a multicentre trial must be conducted. (author)

  10. A review of the empirical evidence of the value of structuring and coding of clinical information within electronic health records for direct patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak Kalra

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The case has historically been presented that structured and/or coded electronic health records (EHRs benefit direct patient care, but the evidence base for this is not well documented.Methods We searched for evidence of direct patient care value from the use of structured and/or coded information within EHRs. We interrogated nine international databases from 1990 to 2011. Value was defined using the Institute of Medicine’s six areas for improvement for healthcare systems: effectiveness, safety, patient-centredness, timeliness, efficiency and equitability. We included studies satisfying the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC group criteria.Results Of 5016 potentially eligible papers, 13 studies satisfied our criteria: 10 focused on effectiveness, with eight demonstrating potential for improved proxy and actual clinical outcomes if a structured and/or coded EHR was combined with alerting or advisory systems in a focused clinical domain. Three studies demonstrated improvement in safety outcomes. No studies were found reporting value in relation to patient-centredness, timeliness, efficiency or equitability.Conclusions We conclude that, to date, there has been patchy effort to investigate empirically the value from structuring and coding EHRs for direct patient care. Future investments in structuring and coding of EHRs should be informed by robust evidence as to the clinical scenarios in which patient care benefits may be realised.

  11. Clinical caring science as a scientific discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnsfeldt, Arne; Arman, Maria; Lindström, Unni Å

    2017-09-01

    Clinical caring science will be described from a theory of science perspective. The aim of this theoretical article to give a comprehensive overview of clinical caring science as a human science-based discipline grounded in a theory of science argumentation. Clinical caring science seeks idiographic or specific variations of the ontology, concepts and theories, formulated by caring science. The rationale is the insight that the research questions do not change when they are addressed in different contexts. The academic subject contains a concept order with ethos concepts, core and basic concepts and practice concepts that unites systematic caring science with clinical caring science. In accordance with a hermeneutic tradition, the idea of the caring act is based on the degree to which the theory base is hermeneutically appropriated by the caregiver. The better the ethos, essential concepts and theories are understood, the better the caring act can be understood. In order to understand the concept order related to clinical caring science, an example is given from an ongoing project in a disaster context. The concept order is an appropriate way of making sense of the essence of clinical caring science. The idea of the concept order is that concepts on all levels need to be united with each other. A research project in clinical caring science can start anywhere on the concept order, either in ethos, core concepts, basic concepts, practice concepts or in concrete clinical phenomena, as long as no parts are locked out of the concept order as an entity. If, for example, research on patient participation as a phenomenon is not related to core and basic concepts, there is a risqué that the research becomes meaningless. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  12. Expressive writing for high-risk drug dependent patients in a primary care clinic: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedgwood Lucinda

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has shown that expressive writing is beneficial in terms of both physical and emotional health outcomes. This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness and acceptability of a brief expressive writing intervention for high-risk drug dependent patients in a primary care clinic, and to determine the relationship between linguistic features of writing and health outcomes. Methods Participants completed four 15-minute expressive writing tasks over a week, in which they described their thoughts and feelings about a recent stressful event. Self-report measures of physical (SF-12 and psychological health (DASS-21 were administered at baseline and at a two-week follow-up. Fifty-three participants were recruited and 14 (26% completed all measures. Results No statistically significant benefits in physical or psychological health were found, although all outcomes changed in the direction of improvement. The intervention was well-received and was rated as beneficial by participants. The use of more positive emotion words in writing was associated with improvements in depression and stress, and flexibility in first person pronoun use was associated with improvements in anxiety. Increasing use of cognitive process words was associated with worsening depressive mood. Conclusion Although no significant benefits in physical and psychological health were found, improvements in psychological wellbeing were associated with certain writing styles and expressive writing was deemed acceptable by high-risk drug dependent patients. Given the difficulties in implementing psychosocial interventions in this population, further research using a larger sample is warranted.

  13. The prevalence of severe pain, its etiopathological characteristics and treatment profile of patients referred to a tertiary cancer care pain clinic

    OpenAIRE

    P N Jain; Kaveri Pai; Aparna S Chatterjee

    2015-01-01

    Pain is the most feared symptom in cancer. About 52?77% patients suffer pain despite World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations. Out of total, one-third patients suffer moderate to severe pain. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence, etiopathogenesis and characteristics of severe pain and treatment response among pain clinic referrals in a busy tertiary care cancer center. This study found a high prevalence (31.5%) of severe pain. A total of 251 patients who had complete p...

  14. Self-care behavior change and depression among low-income predominantly Hispanic patients in safety-net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyunsung; Ell, Kathleen; Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2017-09-01

    This study examined whether changes in self-care behaviors during a 12-month period predicted the likelihood of screening positive for depression concurrently and prospectively among low-income Hispanic patients with diabetes. Secondary analyses were conducted with longitudinal data collected from a randomized controlled trial that had tested effectiveness of collaborative depression care. We examined whether changes in self-care behaviors observed during the 12 months after baseline predicted the likelihood of screening positive for depression at 12-, 18-, and 24-month follow-up. Self-care behaviors included healthy diet, exercise, self-blood glucose monitoring, and foot care, which were measured by a validated self-reported instrument. Logistic regression analyses indicated that patients with more frequent healthy diet during the 12 months after baseline had significantly lower likelihood of depression. Patients with more frequent exercise had a lower likelihood of screening for depression at 18- and 24-month follow-up. No significant association was found with self-blood glucose monitoring and foot care. These findings suggest the importance of integrated care that emphasizes healthy diet and exercise, together with traditional depression treatment, when helping low-income Hispanic patients with diabetes and comorbid depression.

  15. The impact of Multimedia Software Support on the Knowledge and Self-Care Behaviors of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moloud Farmahini Farahani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Education is the most effective and economical part of diabetes treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a training program with multimedia software on the knowledge and self-care behaviors of patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial in which 60 patients referred to diabetes clinic at Arak city were divided randomly into experimental (n=30 and control (n=30 groups. The instruments for collecting data were "Summary of Diabetes self-care activities questionnaire" and "knowledge of self-care in patients with diabetes". Data were collected before and 2 months after the intervention in the both groups. Educational program with equal content was applied for both experimental group (self-care program with multimedia software support & control group (lecture and presentation with PowerPoint. Data analysis was done using SPSS Ver.13. Results: Implementation of the self-care program with multimedia software support resulted in improvements in patients’ self-care behaviors in the experimental group, whereas these behaviors had not significant changes in the control group after eight weeks. There was a significant difference in the mean score of knowledge in both the experiment and control groups before and after the intervention. Conclusion: Considering beneficial effects of training program with multimedia software support on the knowledge and self-care behaviors and the importance of this issue, suggested that the patients preferably provide terms of use of educational software for themselves.

  16. [Bacteriologic and clinical analysis of nosocomial infections in patients from the intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikodemski, T

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate what pathogens are mainly responsible for infection among all hospitalised at our ITU patients, to define the influence of antibiotic use on the aetiology of nosocomial infection. The research was conducted on a six-bedded surgical ITU in a 700-bed teaching hospital from January 1995 till June 1996. In August 1995 we changed infection control protocols (more stress on: handwashing with antiseptic soaps and routine microbiological culture for early prediction of infection) and antibiotic guidelines on our ITU (third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones and Vancomycin were used only as the last option and never in prevention). 1276 samples for microbiological culture were obtained in routine manner. From 60% positive cultures 1216 strains were isolated (Tab. 1) and resistance to antibiotics were defined (Tab. 3). Monthly antibiotic consumption was expressed in defined daily dose (DDD) for 1000 hospitalisation-days. DDD = (X/Y)/Z x x 1000, were: X-cumulative antibiotic consumption during analysed period (g), Y-standard daily dose (g/24 h), Z-number of hospitalisation-days during analysed period (Tab. 2). Values were expressed as the mean +/- standard error (SE). Relationships between variables were analysed using linear correlation. All data were categorised for the frequency table. Statistically significant differences were considered to exist when calculated p values were less than 0.05. There were no statistically significant differences in the number of treated patients, length of stay and mortality rate on our ITU in 18 months. 58% of isolated strains were Gram-negative bacteria especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa (22%) and Acinetobacter spp. (16%) and Proteus spp. (9%). The commonly isolated Gram-positive bacteria were Enterococcus faecalis (14%), Staphylococcus aureus (12%)--of which 90% were MRSA. In 8% of cases we have isolated Candida spp. Monthly antibiotic consumption was displayed in table 2. Trend analysis

  17. A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol to Evaluate the Effectiveness of an Integrated Care Management Approach to Improve Adherence Among HIV-Infected Patients in Routine Clinical Care: Rationale and Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Heidi M; Fredericksen, Rob J; Church, Anna; Harrington, Anna; Ciechanowski, Paul; Magnani, Jennifer; Nasby, Kari; Brown, Tyler; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Harrington, Robert D; Lober, William B; Simoni, Jane; Safren, Stevan A; Edwards, Todd C; Patrick, Donald L; Saag, Michael S; Crane, Paul K; Kitahata, Mari M

    2016-10-05

    Adherence to antiretroviral medications is a key determinant of clinical outcomes. Many adherence intervention trials investigated the effects of time-intensive or costly interventions that are not feasible in most clinical care settings. We set out to evaluate a collaborative care approach as a feasible intervention applicable to patients in clinical care including those with mental illness and/or substance use issues. We developed a randomized controlled trial (RCT) investigating an integrated, clinic-based care management approach to improve clinical outcomes that could be integrated into the clinical care setting. This is based on the routine integration and systematic follow-up of a clinical assessment of patient-reported outcomes targeting adherence, depression, and substance use, and adapts previously developed and tested care management approaches. The primary health coach or care management role is provided by clinic case managers allowing the intervention to be generalized to other human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinics that have case managers. We used a stepped-care approach to target interventions to those at greatest need who are most likely to benefit rather than to everyone to maintain feasibility in a busy clinical care setting. The National Institutes of Health funded this study and had no role in study design, data collection, or decisions regarding whether or not to submit manuscripts for publication. This trial is currently underway, enrollment was completed in 2015, and follow-up time still accruing. First results are expected to be ready for publication in early 2017. This paper describes the protocol for an ongoing clinical trial including the design and the rationale for key methodological decisions. There is a need to identify best practices for implementing evidence-based collaborative care models that are effective and feasible in clinical care. Adherence efficacy trials have not led to sufficient improvements, and there remains

  18. Redesigning ambulatory care business processes supporting clinical care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, C; Sinkewich, M; Short, J; Callas, E

    1997-04-01

    The first step in redesigning the health care delivery process for ambulatory care begins with the patient and the business processes that support the patient. Patient-related business processes include patient access, service documentation, billing, follow-up, collection, and payment. Access is the portal to the clinical delivery and care management process. Service documentation, charge capture, and payment and collection are supporting processes to care delivery. Realigned provider networks now demand realigned patient business services to provide their members/customers/patients with improved service delivery at less cost. Purchaser mandates for cost containment, health maintenance, and enhanced quality of care have created an environment where every aspect of the delivery system, especially ambulatory care, is being judged. Business processes supporting the outpatient are therefore being reexamined for better efficiency and customer satisfaction. Many health care systems have made major investments in their ambulatory care environment, but have pursued traditional supporting business practices--such as multiple access points, lack of integrated patient appointment scheduling and registration, and multiple patient bills. These are areas that are appropriate for redesign efforts--all with the customer's needs and convenience in mind. Similarly, setting unrealistic expectations, underestimating the effort required, and ignoring the human elements of a patient-focused business service redesign effort can sabotage the very sound reasons for executing such an endeavor. Pitfalls can be avoided if a structured methodology, coupled with a change management process, are employed. Deloitte & Touche Consulting Group has been involved in several major efforts, all with ambulatory care settings to assist with the redesign of their business practices to consider the patient as the driver, instead of the institution providing the care.

  19. Confronting the caring crisis in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fang; Li, Jiping; Zhu, Dan; Bai, Yangjuan; Song, Jianhua

    2013-10-01

    In light of the call for humanistic caring in the contemporary health care system globally and in China, the issue of improving the caring skills that are essential to student success, high-quality nursing practice and positive patient outcomes is at the forefront of nursing education. The aim of this mixed-methods quantitative and qualitative study was to investigate baccalaureate nursing students' caring ability in the context of China and to explore the role of clinical practice learning in the development of students' caring skills. A two-phase, descriptive study utilising a mixed methodology consisting of a caring ability survey and focus group interviews was conducted. In the quantitative phase, 598 baccalaureate nursing students at two colleges in Yunnan Province in southwest China were surveyed using the Caring Ability Inventory (CAI). In the qualitative phase, 16 of the students who had participated in the quantitative phase were interviewed. Students obtained lower scores on the CAI than have been reported elsewhere by other researchers. In addition, students in the clinical stage of training scored lower than students in the pre-clinical stage. Three themes concerning facilitation by and three themes concerning the obstructive effects of clinical practice learning in the development of caring ability were identified. Themes pertaining to facilitation were: (i) promoting a sense of professional responsibility and ethics; (ii) providing an arena in which to practise caring, and (iii) learning from positive role models. Themes pertaining to obstruction were: (i) a critical practice learning environment; (ii) encountering inappropriate clinical teachers, and (iii) experiencing shock at the contrast between an idealised and the real environment. The key to developing students' ability to care lies in highlighting caring across the entire health care system. By diminishing exposure to negative role models, and adopting appropriate pedagogical ideas about

  20. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY COMPREHENSIVE CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR MEDICAL CARE OF PATIENTS WITH OBESITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, W Timothy; Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Brett, Elise M; Garber, Alan J; Hurley, Daniel L; Jastreboff, Ania M; Nadolsky, Karl; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Plodkowski, Raymond

    2016-07-01

    Development of these guidelines is mandated by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) Board of Directors and the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) Board of Trustees and adheres to published AACE protocols for the standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Recommendations are based on diligent review of clinical evidence with transparent incorporation of subjective factors. There are 9 broad clinical questions with 123 recommendation numbers that include 160 specific statements (85 [53.1%] strong [Grade A]; 48 [30.0%] intermediate [Grade B], and 11 [6.9%] weak [Grade C], with 16 [10.0%] based on expert opinion [Grade D]) that build a comprehensive medical care plan for obesity. There were 133 (83.1%) statements based on strong (best evidence level [BEL] 1 = 79 [49.4%]) or intermediate (BEL 2 = 54 [33.7%]) levels of scientific substantiation. There were 34 (23.6%) evidence-based recommendation grades (Grades A-C = 144) that were adjusted based on subjective factors. Among the 1,790 reference citations used in this CPG, 524 (29.3%) were based on strong (evidence level [EL] 1), 605 (33.8%) were based on intermediate (EL 2), and 308 (17.2%) were based on weak (EL 3) scientific studies, with 353 (19.7%) based on reviews and opinions (EL 4). The final recommendations recognize that obesity is a complex, adiposity-based chronic disease, where management targets both weight-related complications and adiposity to improve overall health and quality of life. The detailed evidence-based recommendations allow for nuanced clinical decision-making that addresses real-world medical care of patients with obesity, including screening, diagnosis, evaluation, selection of therapy, treatment goals, and individualization of care. The goal is to facilitate high-quality care of patients with obesity and provide a rational, scientific approach to management that optimizes health outcomes and safety. A1C = hemoglobin A1c AACE = American

  1. How can we improve outcomes for patients and families under palliative care? implementing clinical audit for quality improvement in resource limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Selman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative care in India has made enormous advances in providing better care for patients and families living with progressive disease, and many clinical services are well placed to begin quality improvement initiatives, including clinical audit. Clinical audit is recognized globally to be essential in all healthcare, as a way of monitoring and improving quality of care. However, it is not common in developing country settings, including India. Clinical audit is a cyclical activity involving: identification of areas of care in need of improvement, through data collection and analysis utilizing an appropriate questionnaire; setting measurable quality of care targets in specific areas; designing and implementing service improvement strategies; and then re-evaluating quality of care to assess progress towards meeting the targets. Outcome measurement is an important component of clinical audit that has additional advantages; for example, establishing an evidence base for the effectiveness of services. In resource limited contexts, outcome measurement in clinical audit is particularly important as it enables service development to be evidence-based and ensures resources are allocated effectively. Key success factors in conducting clinical audit are identified (shared ownership, training, managerial support, inclusion of all members of staff and a positive approach. The choice of outcome measurement tool is discussed, including the need for a culturally appropriate and validated measure which is brief and simple enough to incorporate into clinical practice and reflects the holistic nature of palliative care. Support for clinical audit is needed at a national level, and development and validation of an outcome measurement tool in the Indian context is a crucial next step.

  2. Reliability of clinical impact grading by healthcare professionals of common prescribing error and optimisation cases in critical care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Richard S; Shulman, Rob; Tomlin, Mark; Borthwick, Mark; Berry, Will; Mills, Gary H

    2017-04-01

    To identify between and within profession-rater reliability of clinical impact grading for common critical care prescribing error and optimisation cases. To identify representative clinical impact grades for each individual case. Electronic questionnaire. 5 UK NHS Trusts. 30 Critical care healthcare professionals (doctors, pharmacists and nurses). Participants graded severity of clinical impact (5-point categorical scale) of 50 error and 55 optimisation cases. Case between and within profession-rater reliability and modal clinical impact grading. Between and within profession rater reliability analysis used linear mixed model and intraclass correlation, respectively. The majority of error and optimisation cases (both 76%) had a modal clinical severity grade of moderate or higher. Error cases: doctors graded clinical impact significantly lower than pharmacists (-0.25; P error cases, respectively. Representative clinical impact grades for over 100 common prescribing error and optimisation cases are reported for potential clinical practice and research application. The between professional variability highlights the importance of multidisciplinary perspectives in assessment of medication error and optimisation cases in clinical practice and research.

  3. Primary Care Clinics and Accountable Care Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Ortiz PhD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Accountable Care Organization (ACO is one of the new models of health care delivery in the United States. To date, little is known about the characteristics of health care organizations that have joined ACOs. We report on the findings of a survey of primary care clinics, the objective of which was to investigate the opinions of clinic management about participation in ACOs and the characteristics of clinic organizational structure that may contribute to joining ACOs or be willing to do so. Methods: A 27-item survey questionnaire was developed and distributed by mail in 3 annual waves to all Rural Health Clinics (RHCs in 9 states. Two dependent variables—participation in ACOs and willingness to join ACOs—were created and analyzed using a generalized estimating equation approach. Results: A total of 257 RHCs responded to the survey. A small percentage (5.2% of the respondent clinics reported that they were participating in ACOs. Rural Health Clinics in isolated areas were 78% less likely to be in ACOs (odds ratio = 0.22, P = .059. Nonprofit RHCs indicated a higher willingness to join an ACO than for-profit RHCs (B = 1.271, P = .054. There is a positive relationship between RHC size and willingness to join an ACO (B = 0.402, P = .010. Conclusion: At this early stage of ACO development, many RHC personnel are unfamiliar with the ACO model. Rural providers’ limited technological and human resources, and the lack of ACO development in rural areas, may delay or prevent their participation in ACOs.

  4. Health-related quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis attending two primary care clinics in Malaysia: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Zainal F

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measurement of health-related quality of life (HRQOL among patients with osteoarthritis (OA helps the health care provider to understand the impact of the disease in the patients' own perspective and make health services more patient-centered. The main aim of this study was to measure the quality of life among patients with symptomatic knee OA attending primary care clinic. We also aimed to ascertain the association between socio-demographic and medical status of patients with knee OA and their quality of life. Methods A clinic based, cross sectional study using the Short Form-36 (SF-36 questionnaire was conducted in two primary care health clinics in Hulu Langat, Selangor, Malaysia over a period of 8 months. The nurses and medical assistants were involved in recruiting the patients while the family physicians conducted the interview. Results A total 151 respondents were recruited. The mean age was 65.6 ± 10.8 years with females constituted 119 (78.8% of the patients. The mean duration of knee pain was 4.07 ± 2.96 years. Half of the patients were overweight and majority, 138 (91.4%, had at least one co-morbidity, the commonest being hypertension. The physical health status showed lower score as compared to mental health component. The domain concerning mental health components showed positive correlation with age. There was a significant negative correlation between age and physical functioning (p Conclusions This study has shown that patients with knee OA attending primary care clinics have relatively poor quality of life pertaining to the physical health components but less impact was seen on the patients' mental health.

  5. Prevalence of Undiagnosed Diabetes and Quality of Care in Diabetic Patients Followed at Primary and Tertiary Clinics in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadi, Hussein; Al-Kaabi, Jumaa; Benbarka, Mahmoud; Khalili, Ali; Almahmeed, Wael; Nagelkerke, Nicolaas; Abdel-Wareth, Laila; Al Essa, Awad; Yasin, Javed; Al-Dabbagh, Bayan; Kazam, Elsadig

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the prevalence of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D) at primary health care (PHC) clinics, and to assess the quality of care of diabetic patients followed at a tertiary hospital diabetes center in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE). METHODS: Between May 2009 and October 2010, adult patients attending two PHC clinics, and adult diabetic patients attending the diabetes center, were invited to participate in the study. After overnight fast, participants returned for interview and laboratory tests. Undiagnosed T2D was defined by FPG ≥ 7.0 mmol/l or HbA1c ≥ 6.5%. Quality of care was assessed by reported care practices and achievement of internationally recognized targets. RESULTS: Out of 239 patients at PHC clinics without history of T2D, 14.6% had undiagnosed T2D, and 31% had increased risk of diabetes (FPG 5.6-7.0 mmol/l or HbA1c 5.7-6.5%). The independent predictors of undiagnosed T2D were age (adjusted OR per year 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.11, p < 0.001) and BMI ≥ 25 (adjusted OR 4.2, 95% CI 0.91-19.7, p = 0.033). Amongst all 275 diagnosed T2D patients, including those attending PHC clinics and those followed at the diabetes center, it was found that 40.1% followed dietary recommendations, 12% reported visiting a diabetes educator, 28.2% walked for exercise, and 13.5% attained recognized targets of HbA1c < 7%, blood pressure < 130/80 mmHg, and LDL cholesterol < 2.6 mmol/l. CONCLUSIONS: Almost half of the adult patients attending PHC clinics had undiagnosed T2D, or increased diabetes risk. Care practices, and achievement of treatment targets, were suboptimal. PMID:21713317

  6. Prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and quality of care in diabetic patients followed at primary and tertiary clinics in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadi, Hussein; Al-Kaabi, Jumaa; Benbarka, Mahmoud; Khalili, Ali; Almahmeed, Wael; Nagelkerke, Nicolaas; Abdel-Wareth, Laila; Al Essa, Awad; Yasin, Javed; Al-Dabbagh, Bayan; Kazam, Elsadig

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D) at primary health care (PHC) clinics, and to assess the quality of care of diabetic patients followed at a tertiary hospital diabetes center in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Between May 2009 and October 2010, adult patients attending two PHC clinics, and adult diabetic patients attending the diabetes center, were invited to participate in the study. After overnight fast, participants returned for interview and laboratory tests. Undiagnosed T2D was defined by FPG ≥ 7.0 mmol/l or HbA1c ≥ 6.5%. Quality of care was assessed by reported care practices and achievement of internationally recognized targets. Out of 239 patients at PHC clinics without history of T2D, 14.6% had undiagnosed T2D, and 31% had increased risk of diabetes (FPG 5.6-7.0 mmol/l or HbA1c 5.7-6.5%). The independent predictors of undiagnosed T2D were age (adjusted OR per year 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.11, p < 0.001) and BMI ≥ 25 (adjusted OR 4.2, 95% CI 0.91-19.7, p = 0.033). Amongst all 275 diagnosed T2D patients, including those attending PHC clinics and those followed at the diabetes center, it was found that 40.1% followed dietary recommendations, 12% reported visiting a diabetes educator, 28.2% walked for exercise, and 13.5% attained recognized targets of HbA1c < 7%, blood pressure < 130/80 mmHg, and LDL cholesterol < 2.6 mmol/l. Almost half of the adult patients attending PHC clinics had undiagnosed T2D, or increased diabetes risk. Care practices, and achievement of treatment targets, were suboptimal.

  7. The clinical and cost-effectiveness of stratified care for patients with sciatica: the SCOPiC randomised controlled trial protocol (ISRCTN75449581).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Nadine E; Konstantinou, Kika; Lewis, Martyn; Ogollah, Reuben; Dunn, Kate M; van der Windt, Danielle; Beardmore, Ruth; Artus, Majid; Bartlam, Bernadette; Hill, Jonathan C; Jowett, Sue; Kigozi, Jesse; Mallen, Christian; Saunders, Benjamin; Hay, Elaine M

    2017-04-26

    Sciatica has a substantial impact on patients, and is associated with high healthcare and societal costs. Although there is variation in the clinical management of sciatica, the current model of care usually involves an initial period of 'wait and see' for most patients, with simple measures of advice and analgesia, followed by conservative and/or more invasive interventions if symptoms fail to resolve. A model of care is needed that does not over-treat those with a good prognosis yet identifies patients who do need more intensive treatment to help with symptoms, and return to everyday function including work. The aim of the SCOPiC trial (SCiatica Outcomes in Primary Care) is to establish whether stratified care based on subgrouping using a combination of prognostic and clinical information, with matched care pathways, is more effective than non-stratified care, for improving time to symptom resolution in patients consulting with sciatica in primary care. We will also assess the impact of stratified care on service delivery and evaluate its cost-effectiveness compared to non-stratified care. Multicentre, pragmatic, parallel arm randomised trial, with internal pilot, cost-effectiveness analysis and embedded qualitative study. We will recruit 470 adult patients with sciatica from general practices in England and Wales, over 24 months. Patients will be randomised to stratified care or non-stratified care, and treated in physiotherapy and spinal specialist services, in participating NHS services. The primary outcome is time to first resolution of sciatica symptoms, measured on a 6-point ordered categorical scale, collected using text messaging. Secondary outcomes include physical function, pain intensity, quality of life, work loss, healthcare use and satisfaction with treatment, and will be collected using postal questionnaires at 4 and 12-month follow-up. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with a subsample of participants and clinicians will explore the

  8. Depression and heart failure associated with clinical COPD questionnaire outcome in primary care COPD patients : A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urff, Manon; Van Den Berg, Jan Willem K; Uil, Steven M.; Chavannes, Niels H.; Damoiseaux, Roger Amj

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Improvement in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is one of the main goals in treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Impaired HRQoL in COPD is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, hospitalisations and burden on our health-care system. The Clinical COPD

  9. Smoking and its associations with sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Hou, Cai-Lan; Ma, Xin-Rong; Zang, Yu; Jia, Fu-Jun; Zhong, Bao-Liang; Lin, Yong-Qiang; Chiu, Helen F K; Ungvari, Gabor S; Himelhoch, Seth; Cao, Xiao-Lan; Cai, Mei-Ying; Lai, Kelly Y C; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance treatment for clinically stable patients with schizophrenia is usually provided by Chinese primary care physicians, but no study has investigated smoking rates in this population. This study investigated the rate of smoking and its associations with sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and quality of life (QOL) in patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care in China. This was a cross-sectional, community-based survey. A total of 621 schizophrenia patients were recruited from 22 primary care services in Guangzhou, China, in 2013. Patients' sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, smoking status, and QOL were recorded. The frequency of current smoking was 23.8% in the whole sample; 41.5% for men and 2.5% for women. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that male gender, married status, alcohol use, older age at onset, fewer major medical conditions, lower education level and more hospitalizations were independently associated with current smoking. The frequency of smoking in Chinese schizophrenia patients treated by primary care physicians is lower than most figures reported from Western and Chinese psychiatric settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinicians' perspectives on patient satisfaction in adult congenital heart disease clinics--a dimension of health care quality whose time has come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenblum, Ronen; Gianola, Ann; Ionescu-Ittu, Raluca; Verstappen, Amy; Landzberg, Michael; Gurvitz, Michelle; Jenkins, Kathy; Bates, David W; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centered care and patient satisfaction represent key dimensions of health care quality. This is relevant for the growing number of patients with life-long conditions. In the present study, our goal was to examine clinicians' attitudes and behavior with respect to patient satisfaction in adult congenital heart disease outpatient clinics. A 34-question survey was developed to assess adult congenital heart disease clinicians' awareness, attitudes, and behavior relative to patient satisfaction and administered in-person or online to clinicians from the largely U.S.-based Adult Congenital Heart Association's database of adult congenital heart disease health care providers. Overall, 267 questionnaires were filled out: 108 were collected in person (79% response rate) and 159 online (17.5% response rate). Responses were received from physicians (161); nurses (73); physician assistants (20); and others (13). Although 85% of clinicians believed it was important to inquire about patient satisfaction, only 28% reported routinely inquiring about this dimension of care. Only 34% claimed they had adequate training to cope with varying levels of patient satisfaction, 44% stated that their department utilized patient satisfaction surveys, and 37% received feedback from the hospital management in the preceding 12 months. In multivariate analyses, clinicians that received feedback from the hospital management and had adequate training were more likely to inquire about patient satisfaction. Although patient satisfaction is perceived as an important dimension of quality care by adult congenital heart disease clinicians, most of them reported insufficient institutional support to achieve this. Our findings suggest that clinicians would benefit from health care organizations engaging them in the delivery of this dimension of health care quality. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A cluster randomized trial to assess the impact of clinical pathways for patients with stroke: rationale and design of the Clinical Pathways for Effective and Appropriate Care Study [NCT00673491

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri Antonella

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with stroke should have access to a continuum of care from organized stroke units in the acute phase, to appropriate rehabilitation and secondary prevention measures. Moreover to improve the outcomes for acute stroke patients from an organizational perspective, the use of multidisciplinary teams and the delivery of continuous stroke education both to the professionals and to the public, and the implementation of evidence-based stroke care are recommended. Clinical pathways are complex interventions that can be used for this purpose. However in stroke care the use of clinical pathways remains questionable because little prospective controlled data has demonstrated their effectiveness. The purpose of this study is to determine whether clinical pathways could improve the quality of the care provided to the patients affected by stroke in hospital and through the continuum of the care. Methods Two-arm, cluster-randomized trial with hospitals and rehabilitation long-term care facilities as randomization units. 14 units will be randomized either to arm 1 (clinical pathway or to arm 2 (no intervention, usual care. The sample will include 238 in each group, this gives a power of 80%, at 5% significance level. The primary outcome measure is 30-days mortality. The impact of the clinical pathways along the continuum of care will also be analyzed by comparing the length of hospital stay, the hospital re-admissions rates, the institutionalization rates after hospital discharge, the patients' dependency levels, and complication rates. The quality of the care provided to the patients will be assessed by monitoring the use of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures during hospital stay and rehabilitation, and by the use of key quality indicators at discharge. The implementation of organized care will be also evaluated. Conclusion The management of patients affected by stroke involves the expertise of several professionals, which can

  12. Worksite primary care clinics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahly, Victoria; Kessler, Ronald C; Duncan, Ian

    2014-10-01

    Despite levels of health spending that are higher per capita and as share of gross domestic product than any country worldwide, the US health care system is fragmented, technology and administration heavy, and primary care deficient. Studies of regional variations in US health care show similar "disconnects" between higher spending and better health outcomes. Faced with rising health benefit costs and suboptimal workforce health amid economic downturn, concerned US employers have implemented innovative payment and health care delivery strategies such as consumer-driven health plans and targeted prevention programs. The former may impose undue cost shifting, prohibitive out-of-pocket expenses, and health literacy challenges, while the latter have shown inconsistent near-term economic returns and long-term clinical efficacy. Employers have begun exploring more comprehensive health delivery platforms such as integrated worksite primary care clinics that have potential to cost-effectively address several pressing problems with current US health care: the growing primary care physician shortage, poor access to routine care, lack of coordinated and patient-centered treatment models, low rates of childhood immunizations, and "quality-blind" fee-for-service payment mechanisms. Such on-site medical clinics exploit one of the rare comparative strengths of the US health care system-its plentiful supply of highly skilled registered nurses-to offer workers and their dependents convenient, high-quality, affordable care. A relatively recent health care paradigm, worksite clinics must yet develop consistent reporting strategies and credible demonstration of outcomes. This review explores available evidence regarding worksite primary care clinics, including current rationale, historical trends, prevalence and projected growth, expected health and financial benefits, challenges, and future research directions.

  13. Effect of a wearable patient sensor on care delivery for preventing pressure injuries in acutely ill adults: A pragmatic randomized clinical trial (LS-HAPI study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickham, David; Berte, Nic; Pihulic, Mike; Valdez, Andre; Mayer, Barbara; Desai, Manisha

    2018-04-01

    Though theoretically sound, studies have failed to demonstrate the benefit of routine repositioning of at-risk patients for the prevention of hospital acquired pressure injuries. To assess the clinical effectiveness of a wearable patient sensor to improve care delivery and patient outcomes by increasing the total time with turning compliance and preventing pressure injuries in acutely ill patients. Pragmatic, investigator initiated, open label, single site, randomized clinical trial. Two Intensive Care Units in a large Academic Medical Center in California. Consecutive adult patients admitted to one of two Intensive Care Units between September 2015 to January 2016 were included (n = 1564). Of the eligible patients, 1312 underwent randomization. Patients received either turning care relying on traditional turn reminders and standard practices (control group, n = 653), or optimal turning practices, influenced by real-time data derived from a wearable patient sensor (treatment group, n = 659). The primary and secondary outcomes of interest were occurrence of hospital acquired pressure injury and turning compliance. Sensitivity analysis was performed to compare intention-to-treat and per-protocol effects. The mean age was 60 years (SD, 17 years); 55% were male. We analyzed 103,000 h of monitoring data. Overall the intervention group had significantly fewer Hospital Acquired Pressure Injuries during Intensive Care Unit admission than the control group (5 patients [0.7%] vs. 15 patients [2.3%] (OR = 0.33, 95%CI [0.12, 0.90], p = 0.031). The total time with turning compliance was significantly different in the intervention group vs. control group (67% vs 54%; difference 0.11, 95%CI [0.08, 0.13], p < 0.001). Turning magnitude (21°, p = 0.923) and adequate depressurization time (39%, p = 0.145) were not statistically different between groups. Among acutely ill adult patients requiring Intensive Care Unit admission, the provision of

  14. "Patient care in radiology"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro Brask, Kirsten; Birkelund, Regner

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to research how the staff experience care expressed during the brief encounter with the patients in a diagnostic imaging department. This was a qualitative study with a phenomenological and hermeneutical frame of reference. The data were collected using field observations...... and semistructured interviews and analyzed according to the guidelines for meaning condensation by Giorgi. The imaging staff found that care is expressed in an administrative, an instrumental, and a compassionate sense. The imaging staff perceived care in a way that clearly differs from the traditional perception...... of care understood as the close relations between people. In their self-understanding, the staff found that care not only comprised the relational aspect but also that it was already delivered during the preparatory phases before the actual meeting with the patient and up until the image...

  15. Caring during clinical practice: Midwives’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmajapi E. Chokwe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring forms the core of nursing and midwifery. Despite caring being an important emotional aspect of midwifery and nursing, there are general public complaints about uncaring behaviour in midwifery. Therefore, there is a need to explore caring from midwives’ point of view with the hope of identifying solutions and recommendations for midwifery practice. Furthermore, the study aimed to stimulate debate and discussion about the caring behaviour of midwives.Objective: To explore caring during clinical practice as perceived and experienced by midwives.Method: The study was contextual, exploratory and qualitative. The participants were midwives working in state and private hospitals in Tshwane,South Africa where BTech II and III midwifery learners were allocated for work integrated learning (WIL. Data collection was carried out through self-report using a questionnaire and focus group. Questionnaires were distributed to 40 midwives at private and state hospitals in Tshwane. This was followed by two focus group sessions to ensure that data is enriched. The hermeneutic interpretive approach was used to analyse data, and analysis continued until saturation.Results: Themes of caring and uncaring related to patient care and midwives emerged. Thefindings illustrated that the midwives had excellent theoretical knowledge of caring, but someof them did not display caring behaviour during clinical practice.Conclusion: Some of the midwives did not display caring behaviour. Implication for practicewas provided based on the research findings. Recommendations included measures of improving caring behaviours during midwifery practice.

  16. Evaluating the impact of a 'virtual clinic' on patient experience, personal and provider costs of care in urinary incontinence: A randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Jones

    Full Text Available To evaluate the impact of using a 'virtual clinic' on patient experience and cost in the care of women with urinary incontinence.Women, aged > 18 years referred to a urogynaecology unit were randomised to either (1 A Standard Clinic or (2 A Virtual Clinic. Both groups completed a validated, web-based interactive, patient-reported outome measure (ePAQ-Pelvic Floor, in advance of their appointment followed by either a telephone consultation (Virtual Clinic or face-to-face consultation (Standard Care. The primary outcome was the mean 'short-term outcome scale' score on the Patient Experience Questionnaire (PEQ. Secondary Outcome Measures included the other domains of the PEQ (Communications, Emotions and Barriers, Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ, Short-Form 12 (SF-12, personal, societal and NHS costs.195 women were randomised: 98 received the intervention and 97 received standard care. The primary outcome showed a non-significant difference between the two study arms. No significant differences were also observed on the CSQ and SF-12. However, the intervention group showed significantly higher PEQ domain scores for Communications, Emotions and Barriers (including following adjustment for age and parity. Whilst standard care was overall more cost-effective, this was minimal (£38.04. The virtual clinic also significantly reduced consultation time (10.94 minutes, compared with a mean duration of 25.9 minutes respectively and consultation costs compared to usual care (£31.75 versus £72.17 respectively, thus presenting potential cost-savings in out-patient management.The virtual clinical had no impact on the short-term dimension of the PEQ and overall was not as cost-effective as standard care, due to greater clinic re-attendances in this group. In the virtual clinic group, consultation times were briefer, communication experience was enhanced and personal costs lower. For medical conditions of a sensitive or intimate nature, a virtual clinic

  17. Swallowing rehabilitation with nutrition therapy improves clinical outcome in patients with dysphagia at an acute care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Masako; Higashibeppu, Naoki; Arioka, Yasutaka; Nakaya, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia is associated with nutritional deficits and increased risk of aspiration pneumonia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of nutrition therapy for the patients with dysphagia at an acute care hospital. We also tried to clarify the factors which improve swallowing function in these patients. Seventy patients with dysphagia were included in the present study. Multidisciplinary nutrition support team evaluated swallowing function and nutrition status. Most patients were fed by parenteral or enteral nutrition at the time of the first round. Of these 70 patients, 36 became able to eat orally. The improvement of swallowing function was associated with higher BMI in both genders and higher AMC in men. Mortality was high in the patients with lower BMI and %AMC, suggesting importance of maintaining muscle mass. Thirteen (38.2%) of 34 patients who did not show any improvement in swallowing function died, but no patients who showed improvement died (pdysphagia and poor outcome, compared to those with about>22 kcal/kg/day. These results suggest that it is important to maintain nutritional status to promote rehabilitation in patients with dysphagia even in an acute care hospital.

  18. Pain measurement and management in elderly patients : Clinical studies in long term hospital care and after cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Pesonen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The proportion of patients over 75 years of age, receiving all different types of healthcare, is constantly increasing. The elderly undergo surgery and anaesthetic procedures more often than middle-aged patients. Poor pain management in the elderly is still an issue. Although the elderly consumes the greatest proportion of prescribed medicines in Western Europe, most clinical pharmacological studies have been performed in healthy volunteers or middle-aged patients. The aim of this study was t...

  19. Curbing the urge to care : A Bourdieusian analysis of the effect of the caring disposition on nurse middle managers’ clinical leadership in patient safety practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalleman, P. C B; Smid, G. A C; Lagerwey, M. D.; Shortridge-Baggett, L. M.; Schuurmans, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nurse managers play an important role in implementing patient safety practices in hospitals. However, the influence of their professional background on their clinical leadership behaviour remains unclear. Research has demonstrated that concepts of Bourdieu (dispositions of habitus,

  20. Curbing the urge to care : a Bourdieusian analysis of the effect of the caring disposition on nurse middle managers’ clinical leadership in patient safety practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterbas Lalleman; Mary Lagerwey; L.M. Shortridge-Baggett; Prof. Dr. M.J. Schuurmans; Gerhard Smid

    2016-01-01

    Nurse managers play an important role in implementing patient safety practices in hospitals. However, the influence of their professional background on their clinical leadership behaviour remains unclear. Research has demonstrated that concepts of Bourdieu (dispositions of habitus, capital and

  1. Nursing care for stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulek, Zeliha; Poulsen, Ingrid; Gillis, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To conduct a survey of the clinical nursing practice in European countries in accordance with the European Stroke Strategies (ESS) 2006, and to examine to what extent the ESS have been implemented in stroke care nursing in Europe. BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death...... comprising 61 questions based on the ESS and scientific evidence in nursing practice was distributed to representatives of the European Association of Neuroscience Nurses, who sent the questionnaire to nurses active in stroke care. The questionnaire covered the following areas of stroke care: Organization...... of stroke services, Management of acute stroke and prevention including basic care and nursing, and Secondary prevention. RESULTS: Ninety-two nurses in stroke care in 11 European countries participated in the survey. Within the first 48 hours after stroke onset, 95% monitor patients regularly, 94% start...

  2. Impact of military physician rank and appearance on patient perceptions of clinical competency in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Richard E; Pearson, Ryan

    2013-09-01

    The patient-physician interaction is an important aspect of primary care medicine. Few studies have investigated the military specific factors that influence these interactions. Using a cross-sectional survey, we evaluated the impact of physician rank and attire on a patient's confidence in their physician's medical abilities and willingness to disclose personal information. Patient perception was assessed in the domains of (1) confidence in physician's medical abilities and (2) comfort discussing sexual, psychological, and personal problems with a physician. Our results found physicians of higher rank showing a higher positive impact on patient's confidence compared to lower ranks (p appearance shows a statistically significant impact to patient-physician interactions. Lower rank and casual attire is statistically detrimental to the patient's perception of their physician's abilities irrespective of resident physician involvement. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  3. Failure to Validate a Multivariable Clinical Prediction Model to Identify Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Patients at High Risk for Candidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Brian T; Ross, Rachael K; Roilides, Emmanuel; Palazzi, Debra L; Abzug, Mark J; Hoffman, Jill A; Berman, David M; Prasad, Priya A; Localio, A Russell; Steinbach, William J; Vogiatzi, Lambrini; Dutta, Ankhi; Zaoutis, Theoklis E

    2016-12-01

    We attempted to validate a previously derived clinical prediction rule for candidemia in the pediatric intensive care unit. This multicenter case control study did not identify significant association of candidemia with most of the previously identified predictors. Additional study in larger cohorts with other predictor variables is needed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The Impact of Primary Care Providers on Patient Screening Mammography and Initial Presentation in an Underserved Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshinro, Ajaratu; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Rifkind, Kenneth; Dhage, Shubhada; Joseph, Kathie-Ann

    2017-03-01

    Cancer screening is a key component of primary care, and access to regular screening mammography (SMG) is highly dependent on recommendation and referral by a primary care provider (PCP). Women with no health insurance or who are underinsured often lack access to a regular PCP and thus access to routine screening. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 173 surgical patients diagnosed between January 2012 and December 2013. The main outcome variables were PCP status, method of cancer detection, and breast cancer stage at diagnosis. Additional variables included race, age at diagnosis, family history of breast and ovarian cancer, and medical comorbidities. Patients with a PCP received more mammograms (SMG) compared with patients without a PCP (61 vs. 37 %; p = 0.003). The majority (73 %) of patients without a PCP presented symptomatically with a palpable mass versus 42 % of patients with a PCP. A significant difference was noted with regard to final pathologic stage of breast cancer between the two groups (p = 0.019), and Caucasian and African American patients were more likely to have locally advanced breast cancer. Underserved patients with a PCP are more likely to present asymptomatically and at an earlier stage of breast cancer compared with patients without a PCP. Community engagement programs that build relationships with patients may help bring vulnerable patients into the healthcare system for routine screening. Moreover, PCP education regarding the subtleties of breast cancer screening guidelines and referral to a breast specialist is also critical in improving outcomes of underserved patients.

  5. Beyond the clinic: redefining hospital ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogut, L

    1997-07-01

    Responding to changes in health care financing, government policy, technology, and clinical judgment, and the rise of managed care, hospitals are shifting services from inpatient to outpatient settings and moving them into the community. Institutions are evolving into integrated delivery systems, developing the capacity to provide a continuum of coordinated services in an array of settings and to share financial risk with physicians and managed care organizations. Over the past several years, hospitals in New York City have shifted considerable resources into ambulatory care. In their drive to expand and enhance services, however, they face serious challenges, including a well-established focus on hospitals as inpatient centers of tertiary care and medical education, a heavy reliance upon residents as providers of medical care, limited access to capital, and often inadequate physical plants. In 1995, the United Hospital Fund awarded $600,000 through its Ambulatory Care Services Initiative to support hospitals' efforts to meet the challenges of reorganizing services, compete in a managed care environment, and provide high-quality ambulatory care in more efficient ways. Through the initiative, 12 New York City hospitals started projects to reorganize service delivery and build an infrastructure of systems, technology, and personnel. Among the projects undertaken by the hospitals were:--broad-based reorganization efforts employing primary care models to improve and expand existing ambulatory care services, integrate services, and better coordinate care;--projects to improve information management, planning and testing new systems for scheduling appointments, registering patients, and tracking ambulatory care and its outcomes;--training programs to increase the supply of primary care providers (both nurse practitioners and primary care physicians), train clinical and support staff in the skills needed to deliver more efficient and better ambulatory care, prepare staff

  6. Disparities in HIV clinic care across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffery V.; Laut, Kamilla Grønborg; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although advances in HIV medicine have yielded increasingly better treatment outcomes in recent years, HIV-positive people with access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) still face complex health challenges. The EuroSIDA Study Group surveyed its clinics to explore regional differences...... in clinic services. Methods: The EuroSIDA study is a prospective observational cohort study that began enrolling patients in 1994. In early 2014, we conducted a 59-item survey of the 98 then-active EuroSIDA clinics. The survey covered HIV clinical care and other aspects of patient care. The EuroSIDA East...... tuberculosis/HIV treatment integration in the East Europe group (27% versus 84% p

  7. Predictors of Medication Adherence and Blood Pressure Control among Saudi Hypertensive Patients Attending Primary Care Clinics: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Khayyat

    Full Text Available To assess the level of medication adherence and to investigate predictors of medication adherence and blood pressure control among hypertensive patients attending primary healthcare clinics in Makkah, Saudi Arabia.Hypertensive patients meeting the eligibility criteria were recruited from eight primary care clinics between January and May 2016 for this study. The patients completed Arabic version of Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8, an eight-item validated, self-reported measure to assess medication adherence. A structured data collection form was used to record patients' sociodemographic, medical and medication data.Two hundred and four patients, of which 71.6% were females, participated in the study. Patients' mean age was 59.1 (SD 12.2. The mean number of medication used by patients was 4.4 (SD 1.89. More than half (110; 54% of the patients were non-adherent to their medications (MMAS score 65 years (OR 2.0 [95% CI: 1.0-4.2; P = 0.04], and being diabetic (OR 0.25 [95% CI: 0.1-0.6; P = 0.04] were found to be independent predictors of medication adherence.Medication adherence is alarmingly low among hypertensive patients attending primary care clinics in Saudi Arabia which may partly explain observed poor blood pressure control. There is a clear need to educate patients about the importance of medication adherence and its impact on improving clinical outcomes. Future research should identify barriers to medication adherence among Saudi hypertensive patients.

  8. Spiritual Care Communication in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lee; Billitteri, Jacob; Reblin, Maija; Clayton, Margaret F

    2017-12-01

    To provide a definition of spirituality, define the scope and nature of spiritual care communication, describe how to initiate communication about, and elicit, a spiritual history, and introduce the AMEN protocol to support patient/family hopes for a miracle. Literature review. Spiritual communication is important throughout cancer care. Nurses can assess and integrate patient and family caregivers' spiritual needs in clinical care by practicing self-awareness and engaging in spiritual care communication strategies. Spirituality is recognized as an essential component of quality care. Spiritual conversations can increase patients' satisfaction with care and improve well-being. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Audio-computer-assisted survey interview and patient navigation to increase chronic viral hepatitis diagnosis and linkage to care in urban health clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, A N; Castaneda, I; Ahmad, M; Ekholy, N; Tham, N; Herrera, I B; Beaty, P; Malapero, R J; Ayoub, F; Slim, J; Johnson, M B

    2017-12-01

    Intravenous drug use and sexual practices account for 60% of hepatitis C (HCV) and B (HBV) infection. Disclosing these activities can be embarrassing and reduce risk reporting, blood testing and diagnosis. In diagnosed patients, linkage to care remains a challenge. Audio-computer-assisted survey interview (Audio-CASI) was used to guide HCV and HBV infection testing in urban clinics. Risk reporting, blood testing and serology results were compared to historical controls. A patient navigator (PN) followed up blood test results and provided patients with positive serology linkage to care (LTC). Of 1932 patients surveyed, 574 (30%) were at risk for chronic viral hepatitis. A total of 254 (44.3%) patients were tested, 34 (13.5%) had serology warranting treatment evaluation, and 64% required HBV vaccination. Of 16 patients with infection, seven HCV and three HBV patients started treatment following patient LTC. Of 146 HBV-naïve patients, 70 completed vaccination. About 75% and 49% of HCV antibody and HBV surface antigen-positive patients were born between 1945 and 1965. Subsequently, automated HCV testing of patients born between 1945 and 1965 was built into our hospital electronic medical records. Average monthly HCV antibody testing increased from 245 (January-June) to 1187 (July-October). Patient navigator directed LTC for HCV antibody-positive patients was 61.6%. In conclusion, audio-CASI can identify patients at risk for HCV or HBV infection and those in need of HBV vaccination in urban medical clinics. Although blood testing once a patient is identified at risk for infection needs to increase, a PN is useful to provide LTC of newly diagnosed patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. User-centered design of quality of life reports for clinical care of patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izard, Jason; Hartzler, Andrea; Avery, Daniel I; Shih, Cheryl; Dalkin, Bruce L; Gore, John L

    2014-05-01

    Primary treatment of localized prostate cancer can result in bothersome urinary, sexual, and bowel symptoms. Yet clinical application of health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) questionnaires is rare. We employed user-centered design to develop graphic dashboards of questionnaire responses from patients with prostate cancer to facilitate clinical integration of HRQOL measurement. We interviewed 50 prostate cancer patients and 50 providers, assessed literacy with validated instruments (Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine short form, Subjective Numeracy Scale, Graphical Literacy Scale), and presented participants with prototype dashboards that display prostate cancer-specific HRQOL with graphic elements derived from patient focus groups. We assessed dashboard comprehension and preferences in table, bar, line, and pictograph formats with patient scores contextualized with HRQOL scores of similar patients serving as a comparison group. Health literacy (mean score, 6.8/7) and numeracy (mean score, 4.5/6) of patient participants was high. Patients favored the bar chart (mean rank, 1.8 [P = .12] vs line graph [P concept of a dynamic HRQOL dashboard that permits a base patient-centered report in bar chart format that can be toggled to other formats and include error bars that frame comparison group scores. Inclusion of lower literacy patients may yield different preferences. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Indonesian infertility patients' health seeking behaviour and patterns of access to biomedical infertility care: an interviewer administered survey conducted in three clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Linda Rae; Wiweko, Budi; Hinting, Aucky; Adnyana, I B Putra; Pangestu, Mulyoto

    2012-09-28

    Indonesia has high levels of biological need for infertility treatment, great sociological and psychological demand for children, and yet existing infertility services are underutilized. Access to adequate comprehensive reproductive health services, including infertility care, is a basic reproductive right regardless of the economic circumstances in which individuals are born into. Thus, identifying and implementing strategies to improve access to assisted reproductive technology (ART) in Indonesia is imperative. The principle objectives of this article are to improve our understanding of infertility patients' patterns of health seeking behaviour and their patterns of access to infertility treatment in Indonesia, in order to highlight the possibilities for improving access. An interviewer-administered survey was conducted with 212 female infertility patients recruited through three Indonesian infertility clinics between July and September 2011. Participants were self-selected and data was subject to descriptive statistical analysis. Patients identified a number of barriers to access, including: low confidence in infertility treatment and high rates of switching between providers due to perceived treatment failure; the number and location of clinics; the lack of a well established referral system; the cost of treatment; and patients also experienced fear of receiving a diagnosis of sterility, of vaginal examinations and of embarrassment. Women's age of marriage and the timing of their initial presentation to gynaecologists were not found to be barriers to timely access to infertility care. The findings based on the responses of 212 female infertility patients indicated four key areas of opportunity for improving access to infertility care. Firstly, greater patient education about the nature and progression of infertility care was required among this group of women. Secondly, increased resources in terms of the number and distribution of infertility clinics would

  12. Patients with severe accidental tetanus admitted to an intensive care unit in Northeastern Brazil: clinical-epidemiological profile and risk factors for mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Marcus Vinícius Dantas da; Reis, Ricardo Coelho; Aguiar, Isabel Cristina Veras; Queiroz, Timóteo Vasconcelos; Lima, Ana Claudia Feitosa; Pereira, Eanes Delgado Barros; Ferreira, Raquel Feijó de Araújo

    2016-01-01

    Tetanus, an acute infectious disease, is highly prevalent worldwide, especially in developing countries. Due to respiratory failure and hemodynamic instability associated with dysautonomia, severe cases require intensive care, but little has been published regarding the management in the Intensive Care Unit. To draw a 10-year clinical-epidemiological profile of Intensive Care Unit patients with severe tetanus, observe their evolution in the Intensive Care Unit and identify risk factors for mortality. In this retrospective study, we used a standardized questionnaire to collect information from the records of patients with severe tetanus admitted to the intensive care unit of a referral hospital for infectious and contagious diseases in Northeastern Brazil. The initial sample included 144 patients, of whom 29 were excluded due to incomplete information, leaving a cohort of 115 subjects. The average age was 49.6±15.3 years, most patients had no (or incomplete) vaccination against tetanus, and most were male. The main intensive care-related complications were pneumonia (84.8%) and dysautonomia (69.7%). Mortality (44.5%) was higher than expected from the mean APACHE II score (11.8), with shock/multiple organ failure as the main cause of death (72.9%). The independent factors most predictive of mortality were APACHE II score, dysautonomia, continuous neuromuscular blockade and age. A high mortality rate was observed in our cohort of Intensive Care Unit patients with severe tetanus and a number of risk factors for mortality were identified. Our results provide important insights for the development of intervention protocols capable of reducing complications and mortality in this patient population. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of Yemeni patients with acute heart failure aged 50years or younger: Data from Gulf Acute Heart Failure Registry (Gulf CARE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munibari, A-Nasser; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Al-Sagheer, Nora; Hadi, Hana Abu; Othman, Ali; Al-Wather, Nawar; Hamoud, Abdu; Alawlagy, Mutae; Almehdar, Salem; Alhammadi, Abdulkarim; Almogayed, Mohammed; Caretta, Giorgio; Al Jabri, Anees; Agati, Luciano

    2017-02-15

    There is a shortage of data about acute heart failure (AHF) in the young, including its underlying causes, clinical presentation and outcomes. We aim to describe clinical characteristics, causes and outcomes of AHF in Yemeni patients aged 50years or younger. we evaluated Yemeni patients with AHF enrolled in Gulf CARE registry. Patients were divided into two groups: young patients (≤50years) and older patients (>50years). A total of 1536 patients with AHF were enrolled, of whom 635 (41.3%) were 50years old or younger. The mean age for this group was 38.8 (±9.5) years; and 399 (62.8%) were males. Younger patients had a higher prevalence of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (41% vs 11.1%, pvalvular disease (27.9% vs 3.2%, pdisease (61.6% vs 25.5%, pdisease (18.3% vs 6.3%, p<0.001) were more frequent in the elderly group. Cardiogenic shock was more frequent among younger patients (13.7% vs 7.0, p<0.001). In-hospital mortality was higher in patient aged ≤50years (12% vs 7.6%, p=0.002) while no difference in all-cause mortality was present at 3months (17.8 vs 14.5, p=0.089) and after 1year (21.9% vs 20.6%, p=0.56). This analysis of Gulf CARE registry represents the largest report of patients admitted with AHF in Yemen. There were differences among cause of HF and precipitating factors of AHF among younger and elderly patients. Younger patients had higher in-hospital mortality and more severe clinical condition at admission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical Outcomes in a Large Cohort of Musculoskeletal Patients Undergoing Chiropractic Care in the United Kingdom: A Comparison of Self- and National Health Service-Referred Routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Jonathan R; Newell, Dave

    2016-01-01

    An innovative commissioning pathway has recently been introduced in the United Kingdom allowing chiropractic organizations to provide state-funded chiropractic care to patients through referral from National Health Service (NHS) primary care physicians. The purpose of this study was to examine the outcomes of NHS and private patient groups presenting with musculoskeletal conditions to chiropractors under the Any Qualified Provider scheme and compare the clinical outcomes of these patients with those presenting privately. A prospective cohort design monitoring patient outcomes comparing self-referring and NHS-referred patients undergoing chiropractic care was used. The primary outcome was the change in Bournemouth Questionnaire scores. Within- and between-group analyses were performed to explore differences between outcomes with additional analysis of subgroups as categorized by the STarT back tool. A total of 8222 patients filled in baseline questionnaires. Of these, NHS patients (41%) had more adverse health measures at baseline and went on to receive more treatment. Using percent change in Bournemouth Questionnaire scores categorized at minimal clinical change cutoffs and adjusting for baseline differences, patients with low back and neck pain presenting privately are more likely to report improvement within 2 weeks and to have slightly better outcomes at 90 days. However, these patients were more likely to be attending consultations beyond 30 days. This study supports the contention that chiropractic services as provided in United Kingdom are appropriate for both private and NHS-referred patient groups and should be considered when general medical physicians make decisions concerning referral routes and pain pathways for patients with musculoskeletal conditions. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Direct-Access Online Care for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial Examining Patient Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornmehl, Heather; Singh, Sanminder; Johnson, Mary Ann; Armstrong, April W

    2017-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic disease requiring regular follow-up. To increase access to dermatological care, online management of AD is being studied. However, a critical knowledge gap exists in determining AD patients' quality of life in direct-to-patient online models. In this study, we examined quality of life in AD patients managed through a direct-access online model. We randomized 156 patients to receiving care through a direct-access online platform or in person. Patients were seen for six visits over 12 months. At each visit, the patients completed Dermatology Life Quality Index/Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI/CDLQI), and Short Form (SF-12). Between baseline and 12 months, the mean (standard deviation, SD) within-group difference in DLQI score in the online group was 4.1 (±2.3); for the in-person group, the within-group difference was 4.8 (±2.7). The mean (SD) within-group difference in CDLQI score in the online group was 4.7 (±2.8); for the in-person group, the within-group difference was 4.9 (±3.1). The mean (SD) within-group difference in physical component score (PCS) and mental component score (MCS) SF-12 scores in the online group was 6.5 (±3.8) and 8.6 (±4.3); for the in-person group, it was 6.8 (±3.2) and 9.1(±3.8), respectively. The difference in the change in DLQI, CDLQI, SF-12 PCS, and SF-12 MCS scores between the two groups was 0.72 (95% confidence interval [90% CI], -0.97 to 2.41), 0.23 (90% CI, -2.21 to 2.67), 0.34 (90% CI, -1.16 to 1.84), and 0.51 (90% CI, -1.11 to 2.13), respectively. All differences were contained within their equivalence margins. Adult and pediatric AD patients receiving direct-access online care had equivalent quality of life outcomes as those see in person. The direct-access online model has the potential to increase access to care for patients with chronic skin diseases.

  16. Encounter Decision Aid vs. Clinical Decision Support or Usual Care to Support Patient-Centered Treatment Decisions in Osteoporosis: The Osteoporosis Choice Randomized Trial II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie LeBlanc

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis Choice, an encounter decision aid, can engage patients and clinicians in shared decision making about osteoporosis treatment. Its effectiveness compared to the routine provision to clinicians of the patient's estimated risk of fracture using the FRAX calculator is unknown.Patient-level, randomized, three-arm trial enrolling women over 50 with osteopenia or osteoporosis eligible for treatment with bisphosphonates, where the use of Osteoporosis Choice was compared to FRAX only and to usual care to determine impact on patient knowledge, decisional conflict, involvement in the decision-making process, decision to start and adherence to bisphosphonates.We enrolled 79 women in the three arms. Because FRAX estimation alone and usual care produced similar results, we grouped them for analysis. Compared to these, use of Osteoporosis Choice increased patient knowledge (median score 6 vs. 4, p = .01, improved understanding of fracture risk and risk reduction with bisphosphonates (p = .01 and p<.0001, respectively, had no effect on decision conflict, and increased patient engagement in the decision making process (OPTION scores 57% vs. 43%, p = .001. Encounters with the decision aid were 0.8 minutes longer (range: 33 minutes shorter to 3.0 minutes longer. There were twice as many patients receiving and filling prescriptions in the decision aid arm (83% vs. 40%, p = .07; medication adherence at 6 months was no different across arms.Supporting both patients and clinicians during the clinical encounter with the Osteoporosis Choice decision aid efficiently improves treatment decision making when compared to usual care with or without clinical decision support with FRAX results.clinical trials.gov NCT00949611.

  17. High-risk alcohol use and associated socio-demographic, health and psychosocial factors in patients with HIV infection in three primary health care clinics in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veld, Diana Huis In 't; Pengpid, Supa; Colebunders, Robert; Skaal, Linda; Peltzer, Karl

    2017-06-01

    Alcohol use may have a negative impact on the course of HIV disease and the effectiveness of its treatment. We studied patients with HIV who use alcohol and associated socio-demographic, health and psychosocial factors. Outcomes from this study may help in selecting patients from clinical practice with high-risk alcohol use and who are likely to benefit most from alcohol reduction interventions. In a cross sectional study in three primary health care clinics in Pretoria, South Africa, from January 2012 to June 2012, patients with HIV infection were interviewed and patients' medical files were reviewed to obtain data on levels of alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test), patients' socio-demographic characteristics, HIV-related information, health related quality of life (WHOQoL-HIVBref), internalized AIDS stigma, symptoms of depression and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Analyses consisted of descriptive statistics, bi- and multivariate logistic regression models. A total of 2230 patients (1483 [66.5%] female) were included. The median age was 37 years (interquartile range 31-43), 99.5% were black Africans, 1975 (88.6%) had started ART and the median time on ART was 22 months (interquartile range 9-40). No alcohol was used by 64% of patients, 8.9% were low risk drinkers, 25.1% of patients were hazardous or harmful drinkers and 2.0% had possible alcohol dependence. In multivariate analysis high-risk drinking was positively associated with male gender, never being married, tobacco use, a higher score for the 'level of independence'-domain measured with the WHOQoL-HIVBref questionnaire, and with more depressive symptoms compared to low-risk drinking. This study shows a high prevalence of hazardous or harmful drinking in patients with HIV infection (especially men) attending primary health care clinics in South Africa. Routine screening for alcohol use should be introduced in these clinics and harm reduction interventions should be evaluated, taking

  18. FACTORS INFLUENCING ADHERENCE TO ARVS AMONG PATIENTS ATTENDING COMPREHENSIVE CARE CLINIC WITHIN JOMO KENYATTA UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURE AND TECHNOLOGY, KIAMBU COUNTY, KENYA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, A N; Ng'ang'a, Z; Wanzala, P; Karanja, S M

    2014-04-01

    The efficacy of anti-retroviral Therapy (ART) depends on adherence to the prescribed regimen. However, lack of adherence leads to treatment failure and drug resistance among other negative outcomes. To determine factors influencing adherence to ARVS among patients attending the Comprehensive Care Clinic (CCC) within Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT). A descriptive cross sectional study. Comprehensive Care Clinic within JKUAT. Three hundred HIV positive patients, undergoing ART treatment and follow up at the JKUAT clinic for a minimum duration of one month before the study, were recruited. Of the 300 patients enrolled for the study (70% females and 30% males), 81% were adhering to ARV treatment. The factors that were significantly associated with adherence included; Support (encouragement and reminder to take drugs) (P = 0.025); the number of meals respondents took in a day (P = 0.001); pill burden (P = 0.002) and forgetfulness (P = 0.001). However, there was no significant relationship between adherence and age, marital status, education, employment status or time taken to travel to the clinic. This study concluded that, the observed level of sub-optimal adherence to ART (19%) is of public health concern. These patients are vulnerable to treatment failure and development of resistant viral strains. Consequently the modifiable factors (Support, Number of meals taken, pill burden, and forgetfulness, should be addressed to change the current tread.

  19. Effectiveness of an intervention for improving drug prescription in primary care patients with multimorbidity and polypharmacy : study protocol of a cluster randomized clinical trial (Multi-PAP project)

    OpenAIRE

    Prados-Torres, Alexandra; del Cura-González, Isabel; Prados-Torres, Daniel; López-Rodríguez, Juan A.; Leiva-Fernández, Francisca; Calderón-Larrañaga, Amaia; López-Verde, Fernando; Gimeno-Feliu, Luis A.; Escortell-Mayor, Esperanza; Pico-Soler, Victoria; Sanz-Cuesta, Teresa; Bujalance-Zafra, M. Josefa; Morey-Montalvo, Mariel; Boxó-Cifuentes, José Ramón; Poblador-Plou, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Background Multimorbidity is associated with negative effects both on people?s health and on healthcare systems. A key problem linked to multimorbidity is polypharmacy, which in turn is associated with increased risk of partly preventable adverse effects, including mortality. The Ariadne principles describe a model of care based on a thorough assessment of diseases, treatments (and potential interactions), clinical status, context and preferences of patients with multimorbidity, with the aim ...

  20. Screening and brief interventions for hazardous and harmful alcohol use among patients with active tuberculosis attending primary care clinics in South Africa: a cluster randomized controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl K; Naidoo, Pamela P; Matseke, Gladys G; Zuma, Khangelani K

    2011-05-26

    In 2008 the World Health Organization (WHO) reported that South Africa had the highest tuberculosis (TB) incidence in the world. This high incidence rate is linked to a number of factors, including HIV co-infection and alcohol use disorders. The diagnosis and treatment package for TB and HIV co-infection is relatively well established in South Africa. However, because alcohol use disorders may present more insidiously, making it difficult to diagnose, those patients with active TB and misusing alcohol are not easily cured from TB. With this in mind, the primary purpose of this cluster randomized controlled trial is to provide screening for alcohol misuse and to test the efficacy of brief interventions in reducing alcohol intake in those patients with active TB found to be misusing alcohol in primary health care clinics in three provinces in South Africa. Within each of the three selected health districts with the highest TB burden in South Africa, 14 primary health care clinics with the highest TB caseloads will be selected. Those agreeing to participate will be stratified according to TB treatment caseload and the type of facility (clinic or community health centre). Within strata from 14 primary care facilities, 7 will be randomly selected into intervention and 7 to control study clinics (42 clinics, 21 intervention clinics and 21 control clinics). At the clinic level systematic sampling will be used to recruit newly diagnosed TB patients. Those consenting will be screened for alcohol misuse using the AUDIT. Patients who screen positive for alcohol misuse over a 6-month period will be given either a brief intervention based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioural Skills (IMB) Model or an alcohol use health education leaflet.A total sample size of 520 is expected. The trial will evaluate the impact of alcohol screening and brief interventions for patients with active TB in primary care settings in South Africa. The findings will impact public health and will

  1. Screening and brief interventions for hazardous and harmful alcohol use among patients with active tuberculosis attending primary care clinics in South Africa: a cluster randomized controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naidoo Pamela P

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2008 the World Health Organization (WHO reported that South Africa had the highest tuberculosis (TB incidence in the world. This high incidence rate is linked to a number of factors, including HIV co-infection and alcohol use disorders. The diagnosis and treatment package for TB and HIV co-infection is relatively well established in South Africa. However, because alcohol use disorders may present more insidiously, making it difficult to diagnose, those patients with active TB and misusing alcohol are not easily cured from TB. With this in mind, the primary purpose of this cluster randomized controlled trial is to provide screening for alcohol misuse and to test the efficacy of brief interventions in reducing alcohol intake in those patients with active TB found to be misusing alcohol in primary health care clinics in three provinces in South Africa. Methods/Design Within each of the three selected health districts with the highest TB burden in South Africa, 14 primary health care clinics with the highest TB caseloads will be selected. Those agreeing to participate will be stratified according to TB treatment caseload and the type of facility (clinic or community health centre. Within strata from 14 primary care facilities, 7 will be randomly selected into intervention and 7 to control study clinics (42 clinics, 21 intervention clinics and 21 control clinics. At the clinic level systematic sampling will be used to recruit newly diagnosed TB patients. Those consenting will be screened for alcohol misuse using the AUDIT. Patients who screen positive for alcohol misuse over a 6-month period will be given either a brief intervention based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioural Skills (IMB Model or an alcohol use health education leaflet. A total sample size of 520 is expected. Discussion The trial will evaluate the impact of alcohol screening and brief interventions for patients with active TB in primary care settings in

  2. Quality of care in gout: a clinical audit on treating to the target with urate lowering therapy in real-world gout patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Carly A; Jansen, Tim L Th A; Oude Voshaar, Martijn A H; Vonkeman, Harald E; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2017-09-01

    The current paper aimed to describe the quality of care for gout patients by showing the clinical outcomes achieved in two patient cohorts in which differing targeted urate lowering therapy (ULT) treatment approaches were employed, both aiming to reach the European League Against Rheumatism recommended serum urate (sUA) targets. A retrospective medical chart review study was conducted. Data from the medical records of gout patients from two clinical centers in The Netherlands, both applying targeted ULT treatments (albeit using different approaches), were reviewed. Patients in cohort A were given a combination of xanthine oxidase inhibitors with uricosurics if treatment with allopurinol monotherapy failed to reach sUA target levels, whereas patients in cohort B were treated with sequential monotherapy. Data on patient characteristics and clinical outcomes were collected. A total of 177 patient dossiers were included: 99 from cohort A and 78 from cohort B. The great majority (n = 146, 82.5%) of the patients in both cohorts had a current sUA level <360 µmol/L. In addition, more than half (n = 104, 58.8%) of the patients met the stringent sUA target level of <300 µmol/L. The largest reductions in mean sUA levels were observed for patients who were treated with combination therapy. This clinical audit of two cohorts of gout patients provides initial-yet promising-results regarding the proportion of real-world gout patients in whom recommended that sUA target levels can be achieved, and demonstrates the added value that a targeted treatment approach may have in reaching these goals.

  3. Randomized clinical trial of an intravenous hydromorphone titration protocol versus usual care for management of acute pain in older emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Andrew K; Bijur, Polly E; Davitt, Michelle; Gallagher, E John

    2013-09-01

    Opioid titration is an effective strategy for treating pain; however, titration is generally impractical in the busy emergency department (ED) setting. Our objective was to test a rapid, two-step, hydromorphone titration protocol against usual care in older patients presenting to the ED with acute severe pain. This was a prospective, randomized clinical trial of patients 65 years of age and older presenting to an adult, urban, academic ED with acute severe pain. The study was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01429285). Patients randomized to the hydromorphone titration protocol initially received 0.5 mg intravenous hydromorphone. Patients randomized to usual care received any dose of any intravenous opioid. At 15 min, patients in both groups were asked, 'Do you want more pain medication?' Patients in the hydromorphone titration group who answered 'yes' received a second dose of 0.5 mg intravenous hydromorphone. Patients in the usual care group who answered 'yes' had their ED attending physician notified, who then could administer any (or no) additional medication. The primary efficacy outcome was satisfactory analgesia defined a priori as the patient declining additional analgesia at least once when asked at 15 or 60 min after administration of the initial opioid. Dose was calculated in morphine equivalent units (MEU: 1 mg hydromorphone = 7 mg morphine). The need for naloxone to reverse adverse opioid effects was the primary safety outcome. 83.0 % of 153 patients in the hydromorphone titration group achieved satisfactory analgesia compared with 82.5 % of 166 patients in the usual care group (p = 0.91). Patients in the hydromorphone titration group received lower mean initial doses of opioids at baseline than patients in the usual care group (3.5 MEU vs. 4.7 MEU, respectively; p ≤ 0.001) and lower total opioids through 60 min (5.3 MEU vs. 6.0 MEU; p = 0.03). No patient needed naloxone. Low-dose titration of intravenous hydromorphone in increments of

  4. Weight loss in nonalcoholic Fatty liver disease patients in an ambulatory care setting is largely unsuccessful but correlates with frequency of clinic visits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Dudekula

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NALFD is a leading cause of liver disease. Weight loss improves clinical features of NAFLD; however, maintenance of weight loss outside of investigational protocols is poor. The goals of this study were to characterize patterns and clinical predictors of long-term weight loss in ambulatory patients with NAFLD.We retrospectively reviewed 924 non-cirrhotic patients with NAFLD presenting to a liver clinic from May 1st 2007 to April 30th 2013. Overweight and obese patients were counseled on lifestyle modifications for weight loss as per USPSTF guidelines. The primary outcome was percent weight change between the first and last recorded visits: % weight change  =  (weightinitial - weightfinal/(weightinitial. Baseline BMI and percent BMI change were secondary measures. Predictors of weight loss were determined using logistic regression.The mean baseline BMI was 33.3±6.6 kg/m2, and the mean follow-up duration was 17.3±17.6 months. Most patients with NAFLD were in either overweight (26.1% or class I obesity (30.5% categories at baseline, while the prevalence of underweight and class III obesity was lower (0.2% and 15.4%, respectively. Overall, there was no change in mean weight or BMI during the follow-up period, and only 183 patients (19.8% lost at least 5% body weight during the follow up period. Independent predictors of weight loss included number of clinic visits and baseline BMI, and patients with higher baseline BMI required more clinic visits to lose weight.Weight loss is largely unsuccessful in NAFLD patients in the ambulatory care setting. Frequent clinical encounters are associated with weight reduction, especially among individuals with high baseline BMI. Future studies are required to define effective weight loss strategies in NAFLD patients.

  5. Clinical and Hematological Profile of Patients with Dengue Fever at a Tertiary Care Hospital - An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Kunal; Tewari, Vishal Vishnu; Mehta, Ritu

    2018-01-01

    Dengue is a major health issue with seasonal rise in dengue fever cases imposing an additional burden on hospitals, necessitating bolstering of services in the emergency department, laboratory with creation of additional dengue fever wards. To study the clinical and hematological profile of dengue fever cases presenting to a hospital. Patients with fever and other signs of dengue with either positive NS1 antigen test or IgM or IgG antibody were included. Age, gender, clinical presentation, platelet count and hematocrit were noted and patients classified as dengue fever without warning signs (DF) or with warning signs (DFWS), and severe dengue (SD) with severe plasma leakage, severe bleeding or severe organ involvement. Duration of hospitalization, bleeding manifestations, requirement for platelet component support and mortality were recorded. There were 443 adults and 57 children between 6 months to 77 year age. NS1 was positive in 115 patients (23%). Fever (99.8%) and severe body ache (97.4%) were the commonest presentation. DF was seen in 429 (85.8 %), DFWS in 55 (11%), SD with severe bleeding in 10 (2%) and SD with severe plasma leakage in 6 cases (1.2%). Outpatient department (OPD) treatment was needed in 412 (82%) and hospitalization in 88 (18%). Intravenous fluid resuscitation was needed in 16 (3.2%) patients. Thrombocytopenia was seen in 335 (67%) patients at presentation. Platelet transfusion was needed in 46 (9.2%). Packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion was given in 3 patients with DFWS and 10 of SD with severe bleeding. Death occurred in 3 patients of SD with severe plasma leak and 2 patients with SD and severe bleeding. Majority of DF cases can be managed on OPD basis. SD with severe bleeding or with severe plasma leakage carries high mortality. Hospitals can analyze annual data for resource allocation for capacity expansion.

  6. Perceptions and acceptability of mHealth interventions for improving patient care at a community-based HIV/AIDS clinic in Uganda: a mixed methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Larry W; Njie-Carr, Veronica; Kalenge, Sheila; Kelly, Jack F; Bollinger, Robert C; Alamo-Talisuna, Stella

    2013-01-01

    mHealth (mobile technologies for health) represents a growing array of tools being applied in diverse health care settings. mHealth interventions for improving HIV/AIDS care is a promising strategy, but its evidence-base is limited. We conducted a formative research evaluation to inform the development of novel, mHealth HIV/AIDS care interventions to be used by community health workers (CHWs) in Kampala, Uganda. A mixed methods formative research approach was utilized. Qualitative methods included 20 in-depth interviews and 6 focus groups with CHWs, clinic staff, and patients. Thematic analysis was performed and selected quotations used to illustrate themes. Quantitative methods consisted of a survey administered to CHWs and clinic staff using categorical and Likert scale questions regarding current mobile phone and internet access and perceptions on the potential use of smartphones by CHWs. Qualitative results included themes on significant current care challenges, multiple perceived mHealth benefits, and general intervention acceptability. Key mHealth features desired included tools to verify CHW task completions, clinical decision support tools, and simple access to voice calling. Inhibiting factors identified included concerns about CHW job security and unrealistic expectations of mHealth capabilities. Quantitative results from 27 staff participants found that 26 (96%) did not have internet access at home; yet, only 2 (7.4%) did not own a mobile phone. Likert scale survey responses (1–5, 1=Strongly Disagree, 5=Strongly Agree) indicated general agreement that smartphones would improve efficiency (Mean=4.35) and patient care (4.31) but might be harmful to patient confidentiality (3.88) and training was needed (4.63). Qualitative and quantitative results were generally consistent, and, overall, there was enthusiasm for mHealth technology. However, a number of potential inhibiting factors were also discovered. Findings from this study may help guide future design

  7. Characterization of clinical course and usual care patterns in female metastatic breast cancer patients treated with zoledronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason; Nickman, Nancy A; Biskupiak, Joseph E; Barney, Reed B; Gaffney, David K; Namjoshi, Madhav; Brandt, Patricia

    2013-08-01

    To describe usual care received by women with bony metastatic breast cancer (ICD-9: 174.xx and 198.5) treated in a United States specialty cancer hospital, an Electronic Medical Record (EMR)-based retrospective review identified 111 deceased female breast cancer patients ≥18 years of age treated with zoledronic acid (ZOL). Baseline symptoms included bone pain/fracture (58.6%), breathing difficulties (24.3%), or mental status changes (11.7%). ZOL was started at/after metastatic diagnosis for 75.7% of women (N = 84), with average administration of 15.9 months (median 11.3). Nearly 20% required reduced ZOL doses, most (54.5%) due to impaired renal function; 61.3% discontinued ZOL due to patient death/disease progression. Adverse events were reported in 10.8%, while 0.9% (N = 1) had a documented osteonecrosis of the jaw. Initiation of palliative care should be considered early in patients with a history of metastatic breast cancer who report bone pain or other skeletal-related events. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Admission Indications, Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Obstetric Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of a Teaching Hospital Center: A Five-Year Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzi, Farnoush; Mirmansouri, Ali; Atrkar Roshan, Zahra; Naderi Nabi, Bahram; Biazar, Gelareh; Yazdipaz, Shima

    2017-06-01

    Care of obstetric patients has always been a challenge for critical care physicians, because in addition to their complex pregnancy-related disease, fetal viability is considered. The aim of this study was to review the admission indications, clinical characteristics and outcomes of obstetric patients, admitted to the intensive care unit of Alzzahra teaching hospital affiliated to Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran. This retrospective cohort study was conducted on pregnant /post-partum (up to 6 weeks) patients admitted to the ICU over a 5-year period from April 2009 to April, 2014. Data from 1019 subjects were analyzed. Overall, 90.1% of the patients were admitted in the postpartum period. The most common indications for admission were pregnancy related hypertensive disorders (27.5%) and obstetric hemorrhage (13.5%). Epilepsy (5.4%) and cardiac disease (5.2%) were the most common non-obstetric indications. Pregnancy-related hypertensive disorders and obstetric hemorrhage were the main reasons for admission, and epilepsy and cardiac disease were the most common non-obstetric indications. Efforts must be concentrated on increasing antenatal care.

  9. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarazona-Santabalbina FJ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Francisco José Tarazona-Santabalbina,1,2 Ángel Belenguer-Varea,1,2 Eduardo Rovira,1,2 David Cuesta-Peredó1,21Geriatric Medicine Unit, Internal Medicine Department, Hospital Universitario de la Ribera, 2Medical School, Universidad Católica de Valencia San vicente Mártir, Valencia, SpainAbstract: Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. Keywords: hip fractures, geriatric assessment, orthogeriatric care, recovery of function, mortality

  10. Patient-centered care in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, M. van der

    2015-01-01

    Patient centeredness means providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs and values, and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions’.The concept assumes that both physicians and patients are experts; physicians in diagnostic and

  11. Knowledge, adherence and control among patients with hypertension attending a peri-urban primary health care clinic, KwaZulu-Natal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olowe, Olumuyiwa A; Ross, Andrew J

    2017-10-19

    Despite hypertension being a common condition among patients attending primary health care (PHC) clinics, blood pressure (BP) control is often poor. Greater insight into patient-related factors that influence the control of hypertension will assist in the development of an intervention to address the issues identified. The aim of the study was to assess patient-related variables associated with hypertension control among patients attending a peri-urban PHC clinic. The setting for this study was a peri-urban PHC clinic in KwaZulu-Natal. This was an observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study with 348 patients selected over a 1-month period. A validated questionnaire was used to collect data on patients' hypertension knowledge and self-reported adherence, and BP recordings from their medical record were recorded to ascertain control. Of the 348 participants, only 49% had good BP control and 44% (152/348) had concurrent diabetes mellitus. The majority of patients had moderate levels of knowledge on hypertension and exhibited moderate adherence. There was a significant relationship between knowledge and reported adherence, between reported adherence and control, but not between reported knowledge and control. Despite over 90% of the study population having moderate knowledge, and 62% with moderate reported adherence, BP was well controlled in only less than 50% of the study population. These findings suggest a need to emphasise adherence and explore new ways of approaching adherence.

  12. A non-clinical randomised controlled trial to assess the impact of pharmaceutical care intervention on satisfaction level of newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Dinesh Kumar; Mohamed Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham; Mishra, Pranaya; Alurkar, Vijay M

    2015-02-12

    Patient satisfaction is the ultimate goal of healthcare system which can be achieved from good patient-healthcare professional relationship and quality of healthcare services provided. Study was conducted to determine the baseline satisfaction level of newly diagnosed diabetics and to explore the impact of pharmaceutical care intervention on patients' satisfaction during their follow-ups in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Nepal. An interventional, pre-post non-clinical randomised controlled study was designed among randomly distributed 162 [control group (n = 54), test 1 group (n = 54) and test 2 group (n = 54)] newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients by consecutive sampling method for 18 months. Diabetes Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire was used to evaluate patient's satisfaction scores at baseline, three, six, nine and, twelve months' follow-ups. Test groups patients were provided pharmaceutical care whereas control group patients only received their usual care from physician/nurses. The responses were entered in SPSS version 16. Data distribution was not normal on Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Non-parametric tests i.e. Friedman test, Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to find the differences among the groups before and after the intervention (p ≤0.05). There were significant (p patients' satisfaction scores in the test groups on Friedman test. Mann-Whitney U test identified the significant differences in satisfaction scores between test 1 and test 2 groups, control and test 1 groups and, control and test 2 groups at 3-months (p = 0.008), (p satisfaction level of diabetics in the test groups compare to the control group. Diabetic kit demonstration strengthened the satisfaction level among the test 2 group patients. Therefore, pharmacist can act as a counsellor through pharmaceutical care program and assist the patients in managing their disease. This will not only modify the patients' related outcomes and their

  13. Caring for Latino patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckett, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Latinos comprise nearly 16 percent of the U.S. population, and this proportion is anticipated to increase to 30 percent by 2050. Latinos are a diverse ethnic group that includes many different cultures, races, and nationalities. Barriers to care have resulted in striking disparities in quality of health care for these patients. These barriers include language, lack of insurance, different cultural beliefs, and in some cases, illegal immigration status, mistrust, and illiteracy. The National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services address these concerns with recommendations for culturally competent care, language services, and organizational support. Latinos have disproportionately higher rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Other health problems include stress, neurocysticercosis, and tuberculosis. It is important to explore the use of alternative therapies and belief in traditional folk illnesses, recognizing that health beliefs are dependent on education, socioeconomic status, and degree of acculturation. Many-but not all-folk and herbal treatments can be safely accommodated with conventional therapy. Physicians must be sensitive to Latino cultural values of simpatia (kindness), personalismo (relationship), respeto (respect), and modestia (modesty). The LEARN technique can facilitate cross-cultural interviews. Some cultural barriers may be overcome by using the "teach back" technique to ensure that directions are correctly understood and by creating a welcoming health care environment for Latino patients.

  14. Early health technology assessment of future clinical decision rule aided triage of patients presenting with acute chest pain in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Robert T A; Kip, Michelle M A; Koffijberg, Hendrik; Kusters, Ron; Buntinx, Frank; Glatz, Jan F C; Dinant, Geert Jan

    2018-03-01

    The objective of the paper is to estimate the number of patients presenting with chest pain suspected of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in primary care and to calculate possible cost effects of a future clinical decision rule (CDR) incorporating a point-of-care test (PoCT) as compared with current practice. The annual incidence of chest pain, referrals and ACS in primary care was estimated based on a literature review and on a Dutch and Belgian registration study. A health economic model was developed to calculate the potential impact of a future CDR on costs and effects (ie, correct referral decisions), in several scenarios with varying correct referral decisions. One-way, two-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to test robustness of the model outcome to changes in input parameters. Annually, over one million patient contacts in primary care in the Netherlands concern chest pain. Currently, referral of eventual ACS negative patients (false positives, FPs) is estimated to cost €1,448 per FP patient, with total annual cost exceeding 165 million Euros in the Netherlands. Based on 'international data', at least a 29% reduction in FPs is required for the addition of a PoCT as part of a CDR to become cost-saving, and an additional €16 per chest pain patient (ie, 16.4 million Euros annually in the Netherlands) is saved for every further 10% relative decrease in FPs. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the model outcome was robust to changes in model inputs, with costs outcomes mainly driven by costs of FPs and costs of PoCT. If PoCT-aided triage of patients with chest pain in primary care could improve exclusion of ACS, this CDR could lead to a considerable reduction in annual healthcare costs as compared with current practice.

  15. Multicenter clinical research in adult critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Deborah; Brower, Roy; Cooper, Jamie; Brochard, Laurent; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2002-07-01

    To describe the development, organization, and operation of several collaborative groups conducting investigator-initiated multicenter clinical research in adult critical care. To review the process by which investigator-initiated critical care clinical research groups were created using examples from Europe, Australia, the United States, and Canada. Various models of group structure and function are discussed, highlighting complementary approaches to protocol development, multicenter study management, and project funding. Published peer review research and unpublished terms of reference documents on the structure and function of these groups. The overall goal of clinical critical care research groups engaged in multicenter studies is to improve patient outcomes through conducting large, rigorous investigations. Research programs we reviewed included the following: a) multicenter epidemiologic studies and surveys; b) technology evaluations of mechanical ventilation; c) investigations focused on three priority fields (acute lung injury, infection, and acute brain injury); d) a series of randomized trials of treatments for one syndrome (acute respiratory distress syndrome); and e) diverse methodologies addressing several clinical problems. The structure and function of these research groups differ according to their historical development, research culture, and enabling resources. Specific protocols emerge from clinical questions generated by investigators or from collectively prioritized research agendas. Project funding includes government support, peer-review grants, intensive care foundations, industry, local hospital funds, and hybrid models. Infrastructure for study management varies widely. Several national and international groups have engaged in investigator-initiated multicenter critical care research. The development, organization, and operational methods of these groups illustrate several collaborative models for clinical investigations in the intensive

  16. Mind the Gap: Gaps in Antidepressant Treatment, Treatment Adjustments, and Outcomes among Patients in Routine HIV Care in a Multisite U.S. Clinical Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushina Cholera

    Full Text Available Depression affects 20-30% of HIV-infected patients and is associated with worse HIV outcomes. Although effective depression treatment is available, depression is largely untreated or undertreated in this population.We quantified gaps in antidepressant treatment, treatment adjustments, and outcomes among US patients in routine HIV care in the nationally distributed CNICS observational clinical cohort. This cohort combines detailed clinical data with regular, self-reported depressive severity assessments (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, PHQ-9. We considered whether participants with likely depression received antidepressants, whether participants on antidepressants with persistently high depressive symptoms received timely dose adjustments, and whether participants achieved depression remission. We considered a cross-sectional analysis (6,219 participants in care in 2011-2012 and a prospective analysis (2,936 participants newly initiating CNICS care when PHQ-9 screening was active.The cross-sectional sample was 87% male, 53% Caucasian, 25% African American, and 18% Hispanic; the prospective sample was similar. In both samples, 39-44% had likely depression, with 44-60% of those receiving antidepressants. Of participants receiving antidepressants, 20-26% experienced persistently high depressive symptoms; only a small minority of those received antidepressant dose adjustments. Overall, 35-40% of participants on antidepressants achieved full depression remission. Remission among participants with persistently high depressive symptoms was rare regardless of dose adjustments.In this large, diverse cohort of US patients engaged in routine HIV care, we observed large gaps in antidepressant treatment, timely dose adjustment to address persistently high depressive symptoms, and antidepressant treatment outcomes. These results highlight the importance of more effective pharmacologic depression treatment models for HIV-infected patients.

  17. Oral health-related quality of life in patients with stroke: a randomized clinical trial of oral hygiene care during outpatient rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ruoxi; Lam, Otto L T; Lo, Edward C M; Li, Leonard S W; McGrath, Colman

    2017-08-09

    This study was to evaluate the effectiveness of oral hygiene care in improving oral health- and health-related quality of life (OHRQoL and HRQoL) among patients receiving outpatient stroke rehabilitation. Subjects were randomized to: (1) a conventional oral hygiene care programme (COHCP) comprising a manual toothbrush, and oral hygiene instruction, or (2) an advanced oral hygiene care programme (AOHCP) comprising a powered toothbrush, 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthrinse, and oral hygiene instruction. The interventional period lasted for 3 months, followed by a 3-month observational period. HRQoL was assessed by SF-12, and OHRQoL was assessed by Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14), General Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI), and Oral Health Transitional Scale (OHTS). Participants in AOHCP group had significantly better OHRQoL at the end of clinical trial as assessed by OHTS (p improving subjective health.

  18. Sustainability of a nurse-driven early progressive mobility protocol and patient clinical and psychological health outcomes in a neurological intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Kate E; Bena, James F; Mulkey, Malissa; Albert, Nancy M

    2018-04-01

    To determine sustainable impact of an early progressive mobility protocol on mobility level and clinical outcomes. Prospective, longitudinal, comparative study using three time points (pre-, immediate post-intervention and 12-month post-intervention sustainability). Analyses included comparative statistics and multivariable modelling. Data were collected by clinical nurses, from administrative databases. Psychological health data were collected using a valid, reliable tool. Patients treated in a 22-bed Neurological Intensive Care Unit of a quaternary-care medical centre. Highest mobility level, length of stay, mortality, discharge disposition, quality metrics and psychological profile including depression, anxiety, and hostility. Amongst 260 pre-intervention, 377 post-implementation, and 480 twelve-month post-implementation patients (N = 1117) walking increased post-implementation and was sustained at the eight-month assessment, p mobility programmes (all p mobility programme in a neurological intensive care environment led to sustained improvement in patients' level of mobility, length of unit and hospital stay, depression, anxiety and hostility levels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Resource use and costs of type 2 diabetes patients receiving managed or protocolized primary care: a controlled clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, A.A.W.A. van der; Bruijne, M.C. de; Feenstra, T.L.; Dekker, J.M.; Baan, C.A.; Bosmans, J.E.; Bot, S.D.M.; Donker, G.A.; Nijpels, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The increasing prevalence of diabetes is associated with increased health care use and costs. Innovations to improve the quality of care, manage the increasing demand for health care and control the growth of health care costs are needed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the care

  20. Effects of a palliative care intervention on clinical outcomes in patients with advanced cancer: the Project ENABLE II randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T; Balan, Stefan; Brokaw, Frances C; Seville, Janette; Hull, Jay G; Li, Zhongze; Tosteson, Tor D; Byock, Ira R; Ahles, Tim A

    2009-08-19

    There are few randomized controlled trials on the effectiveness of palliative care interventions to improve the care of patients with advanced cancer. To determine the effect of a nursing-led intervention on quality of life, symptom intensity, mood, and resource use in patients with advanced cancer. Randomized controlled trial conducted from November 2003 through May 2008 of 322 patients with advanced cancer in a rural, National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center in New Hampshire and affiliated outreach clinics and a VA medical center in Vermont. A multicomponent, psychoeducational intervention (Project ENABLE [Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends]) conducted by advanced practice nurses consisting of 4 weekly educational sessions and monthly follow-up sessions until death or study completion (n = 161) vs usual care (n = 161). Quality of life was measured by the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy for Palliative Care (score range, 0-184). Symptom intensity was measured by the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (score range, 0-900). Mood was measured by the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (range, 0-60). These measures were assessed at baseline, 1 month, and every 3 months until death or study completion. Intensity of service was measured as the number of days in the hospital and in the intensive care unit (ICU) and the number of emergency department visits recorded in the electronic medical record. A total of 322 participants with cancer of the gastrointestinal tract (41%; 67 in the usual care group vs 66 in the intervention group), lung (36%; 58 vs 59), genitourinary tract (12%; 20 vs 19), and breast (10%; 16 vs 17) were randomized. The estimated treatment effects (intervention minus usual care) for all participants were a mean (SE) of 4.6 (2) for quality of life (P = .02), -27.8 (15) for symptom intensity (P = .06), and -1.8 (0.81) for depressed mood (P = .02). The estimated treatment effects in

  1. The prevalence of severe pain, its etiopathological characteristics and treatment profile of patients referred to a tertiary cancer care pain clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, P N; Pai, Kaveri; Chatterjee, Aparna S

    2015-01-01

    Pain is the most feared symptom in cancer. About 52-77% patients suffer pain despite World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations. Out of total, one-third patients suffer moderate to severe pain. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence, etiopathogenesis and characteristics of severe pain and treatment response among pain clinic referrals in a busy tertiary care cancer center. This study found a high prevalence (31.5%) of severe pain. A total of 251 patients who had complete pain data were analyzed for etiopathological characteristics and treatment response. Head and neck cancer contributed the highest prevalence among all regions. Oncologists prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or paracetamol with or without mild opioids to 14% patients and pain clinic physicians prescribed opioids and overall 63.7% patients had a better response after pain clinic referral, even then, morphine was not prescribed to many deserving patients. Doctors need pain education about opioids to remove any fear of prescribing opioids in presence of severe pain.

  2. [Results following the implementation of a clinical pathway in the process of care to elderly patients with osteoporotic hip fracture in a second level hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Hernández, N; Sáez-López, P; Paniagua-Tejo, S; Valverde-García, J A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of a clinical pathway in the management of elderly patients with fragility hip fracture in a second level hospital in terms of length of stay time to surgery, morbidity, hospital mortality, and improved functional outcome. A comparative and prospective study was carried out between two groups of patients with hip fracture aged 75 and older prior to 2010 (n=216), and after a quality improvement intervention in 2013 (n=196). A clinical pathway based on recent scientific evidence was implemented. The degree of compliance with the implemented measures was quantified. The characteristics of the patients in both groups were similar in age, gender, functional status (Barthel Index) and comorbidity (Charlson Index). Median length of stay was reduced by more than 45% in 2013 (16.61 vs. 9.08 days, p=.000). Also, time to surgery decreased 29.4% in the multidisciplinary intervention group (6.23 vs. 4.4 days, p=.000). Patients assigned to the clinical pathway group showed higher medical complications rate (delirium, malnutrition, anaemia and electrolyte disorders), but a lower hospital mortality (5.10 vs. 2.87%, p>.005). The incidence of surgical wound infection (p=.031) and functional efficiency (p=.001) also improved in 2013. An increased number of patients started treatment for osteoporosis (14.80 vs. 76.09%, p=.001) after implementing the clinical pathway. The implementation of a clinical pathway in the care process of elderly patients with hip fracture reduced length of stay and time to surgery, without a negative impact on associated clinical and functional outcomes. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Extubation process in bed-ridden elderly intensive care patients receiving inspiratory muscle training: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cader, Samária Ali; de Souza Vale, Rodrigo Gomes; Zamora, Victor Emmanuel; Costa, Claudia Henrique; Dantas, Estélio Henrique Martin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extubation process in bed-ridden elderly intensive care patients receiving inspiratory muscle training (IMT) and identify predictors of successful weaning. Twenty-eight elderly intubated patients in an intensive care unit were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 14) that received conventional physiotherapy plus IMT with a Threshold IMT(®) device or to a control group (n = 14) that received only conventional physiotherapy. The experimental protocol for muscle training consisted of an initial load of 30% maximum inspiratory pressure, which was increased by 10% daily. The training was administered for 5 minutes, twice daily, 7 days a week, with supplemental oxygen from the beginning of weaning until extubation. Successful extubation was defined by the ventilation time measurement with noninvasive positive pressure. A vacuum manometer was used for measurement of maximum inspiratory pressure, and the patients' Tobin index values were measured using a ventilometer. The maximum inspiratory pressure increased significantly (by 7 cm H(2)O, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4-10), and the Tobin index decreased significantly (by 16 breaths/ min/L, 95% CI -26 to 6) in the experimental group compared with the control group. The Chi-squared distribution did not indicate a significant difference in weaning success between the groups (χ(2) = 1.47; P = 0.20). However, a comparison of noninvasive positive pressure time dependence indicated a significantly lower value for the experimental group (P = 0.0001; 95% CI 13.08-18.06). The receiver-operating characteristic curve showed an area beneath the curve of 0.877 ± 0.06 for the Tobin index and 0.845 ± 0.07 for maximum inspiratory pressure. The IMT intervention significantly increased maximum inspiratory pressure and significantly reduced the Tobin index; both measures are considered to be good extubation indices. IMT was associated with a reduction in noninvasive positive

  4. Multiple somatic symptoms in primary care patients: a cross-sectional study of consultation content, clinical management strategy and burden of encounter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, Mette T; Carlsen, Anders H; Budtz-Lilly, Anna; Rosendal, Marianne

    2016-07-30

    Consultations involving patients with multiple somatic symptoms may be considered as challenging and time-consuming by general practitioners (GPs). Yet, little is known about the possible links between consultation characteristics and GP-experienced burden of encounter. We aimed to explore consultation content, clinical management strategies, time consumption and GP-experienced burden of encounters with patients suffering from multiple somatic symptoms as defined by the concept of bodily distress syndrome (BDS). Cross-sectional study of patient encounters in primary care from December 2008 to December 2009; 387 GPs participated (response rate: 44.4 %). Data were based on a one-page registration form completed by the GP and a patient questionnaire including the 25-item BDS checklist for somatic symptoms. Using logistic regression analyses, we compared patients who met the BDS criteria with patients who did not. A total of 1505 patients were included (response rate: 55.6 %). Health problems were less frequently reported as 'new' in patients with BDS (odds ratio (OR) = 0.73, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 0.54; 0.97). Medical prescriptions and referral rates were comparable in the two patient groups. Consultations focusing on mainly biomedical aspects were less frequent among patients with BDS (OR = 0.31, 95 % CI: 0.22; 0.43), whereas additional biomedical and psychosocial problems were more often discussed. GPs were more likely to ensure continuity of care in BDS patients by watchful waiting strategies (OR = 2.32, 95 % CI: 1.53; 3.52) or scheduled follow-up visits (OR = 1.61, 95 % CI: 1.09; 2.37). Patients with BDS were found to be more time-consuming (OR = 1.77, 95 % CI: 1.26; 2.48) and burdensome (OR = 2.54, 95 % CI: 1.81; 3.55) than patients without BDS. However, after adjustments for biomedical and psychosocial content of the consultation, the identified differences for time consumption and burden were no longer statistically

  5. AETIOLOGY AND CLINICAL PROFILE OF ORAL CANCERS IN PATIENTS ATTENDING A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN RURAL KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulaseedharan Sreedharan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the world. Oral cancer represents 14% of all cancer cases in Kerala. The aim of this study is to find out the aetiological factors, symptomatology, morphologic types and the distribution in the sub-sites of oral cavity. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Department of ENT, Government Medical College, Thrissur, Kerala from May 2009 to October 2013; 136 patients (88 males and 48 females with histopathologically confirmed oral cancers were studied. Variables such as age, sex, residing area, occupation, educational level, socio-economic status, substance abuse, oral hygiene, family history and premalignant conditions were assessed. The presenting complaints, the site, morphology and histopathology of the lesions were noted. RESULTS Mean age in this study was 57.83 with male-to-female ratio of 1.83:1. Majority of cases were from socially and economically weaker section, 62% patients were smokers, 45% patients were alcoholic, 41% patients were pan chewers and 90% had more than one bad habit; 72.05% patients had poor orodental hygiene. Most common symptom in our patients was growth in the mouth. Tongue and buccal mucosa were the most affected sites. Majority presented with ulcerative type and most of the cases were squamous cell carcinoma. CONCLUSION Oral cancers are mainly seen in males of 55 – 64 years’ age group. Important aetiological factors identified in this study are substance abuse, poor oral hygiene and poor socio-economic status. Tobacco consumption is the most dominant risk factor. Most common symptom in our patients is growth in the mouth. Tongue and buccal mucosa are the most affected sites. Most of the cases were squamous cell carcinoma. The study of aetiology and common clinical presentations may help in prevention, early detection and management.

  6. Effects of patient and personal demographic, clinical and psychosocial characteristics on the burden of family members caring for patients with advanced cancer in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govina, Ourania; Kotronoulas, Grigorios; Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Katsaragakis, Stylianos; Vlachou, Eugenia; Patiraki, Elisabeth

    2015-02-01

    Caregiving burden affects the lives of family members providing care to patients with advanced cancer, with a host of factors possibly contributing to this. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of patient and caregiver variables on the perceptions of burden in families caring for a loved one living with advanced cancer in Greece. A convenience sample of 100 pairs of patients receiving palliative radiotherapy for advanced cancer and their respective primary family caregivers were consecutively recruited at one radiotherapy centre. Patients and caregivers completed a set of questionnaires during face-to-face interviews. Correlational and multiple regression analyses were performed to identify potential predictors of caregiving burden. Caregiving burden was linked to both patient (gender, age, past surgery or chemotherapy treatment, depression and impact of cancer-related symptoms) and caregiver variables (gender, family status, education, place of residence, previous experience of care, employment status, difficulty of caregiving, anxiety and depression). In multiple regression analyses, caregiving burden was significantly predicted by caregivers' depressed mood, perceived difficulty of caregiving, family status, employment status, as well as by patients' past surgery, in a model that explained 49% of the total variance. Greek family caregivers reporting greater depressive mood and difficulty with caregiving tasks, those married, those not employed, and those who cared for patients who had not undergone surgery were found at greater distress and disadvantage. Systematic assessment and intervention strategies are required to identify these vulnerable carers and help them cope when sharing in patient's cancer experience. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Physical activity program for patients with dementia and their relative caregivers: randomized clinical trial in Primary Health Care (AFISDEMyF study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Sánchez, Emiliano; Criado-Gutiérrez, José María; Mora-Simón, Sara; Muriel-Diaz, M Paz; Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A; Recio-Rodríguez, José I; Patino-Alonso, M Carmen; Valero-Juan, Luis F; Maderuelo-Fernandez, José A; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2014-04-01

    The aging of the population has led to the increase of chronic diseases, especially dementia and cardiovascular diseases, and it has become necessary for their relatives to dedicate more time in caregiving.The objective in the first phase of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a Primary Health Care procedure to increase the physical activity of people with dementia and their relative caregivers. Also the effect on the cognitive state and cardiovascular risk will be assessed. Clinical, multicentric and randomized trial. A simple random sampling to select 134 patients diagnosed with dementia will be carried out. After contacting their relatives, his/her participation in the trial will be requested. A basal assessment will be made and the participants will be asigned to control or intervention group (1:1). The main measure will be the assessment of physical activity (podometer and 7-PAR) in patients and caregivers. In patients with dementia: ADAS-cog, functional degree and cardiovascular risk. In caregivers: cardiovascular risk, general health and quality of life. For 3 months, participants will receive instructions to do physical activity with an adapted program. This program will be designed and applied by Primary Health Care professionals in patients with dementia and their caregivers. The control group will receive regular care. An intention-to-treat analysis will be carried out by comparing the observed differences between basal, 6 and 12 months measures. Change in the mean of daily steps assessed with the podometer and 7-PAR will be the main result. If the main hypothesis is confirmed, it could be useful to improve the cognitive state of patients with dementia, as well as the cardiovascular risk of all of them. The results can be good to improve technical features of the devices that register the physical activity in the patients with dementia, and it could facilitate its commercialization. Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT02044887.

  8. Study of clinical spectrum of pediatric dermatoses in patients attending a Tertiary Care Center in North Kerala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Subba Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Skin diseases are a major health problem in the pediatric age group. Aim: To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of different pediatric dermatoses in a tertiary care centre in Kerala. Materials and Methods: Children with age 18 years and below with clinical evidence of cutaneous disorders were studied. Results: 500 cases were studied which showed a female preponderance of 51.4%. The most common dermatoses was infections and infestations (33.8% followed by eczemas (32.6%, disorders of sweat and sebaceous glands (7.4%, keratinisation and paulosquamous disorders (4%. Nutritional disorders were seen in 1% of children. 3.6% had photodermatoses, 2.6% had hair and nail disorders and 0.4 % had adverse cutaneous drug reactions. Conclusions: Fungal infection was the most common infection noted in the study, followed by viral and bacterial infection. Allergic contact dermatitis was the commonest exogenous eczema and juvenile plantar dermatosis was the commonest endogenous eczemas. Acne, insect bite reaction and miliaria were the other common dermatoses.

  9. Death is not always a failure: outcomes from implementing an online virtual patient clinical case in palliative care for family medicine clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amy; Ross, Shelley Paige; Duerksen, Kimberley

    2013-11-22

    The dying patient is a reality of medicine. Medical students, however, feel unprepared to effectively manage the complex end-of-life (EOL) management issues of the dying patient and want increased experiential learning in Palliative Care. To address the need for more formal curriculum in EOL care, we developed and implemented an online virtual patient (VP) clinical case in Palliative Care into the 2010-2011 Year Three Family Medicine Clerkship rotation curriculum. A mixed-method design was used to measure the change in knowledge and perceived preparedness level in EOL care before and after completing the online VP case. A survey collected qualitative descriptions of the students' educational experience of using this case. Ninety five percent (130/137) of the students voluntarily consented to have their results analyzed. The group knowledge score (n=127) increased significantly from a pre-course average of 7.69/16±2.27, to a post-course average of 10.02/16±2.39 (p<0.001). The students' self-assessed comfort level increased significantly with all aspects of EOL management from pre-course to post-course (p<0.001). Nearly, 91.1% of the students rated the VP realism as 'Good to Excellent', 86% rated the case as educationally beneficial. Nearly 59.3% of students felt emotionally engaged with the VP. Qualitative feedback found that the case content was very useful and realistic, but that the interface was sometimes awkward to navigate. The online VP case in Palliative Care is a useful teaching tool that may help to address the need for increased formal Palliative Care experience in medical school training programs.

  10. Death is not always a failure: outcomes from implementing an online virtual patient clinical case in palliative care for family medicine clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Tan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The dying patient is a reality of medicine. Medical students, however, feel unprepared to effectively manage the complex end-of-life (EOL management issues of the dying patient and want increased experiential learning in Palliative Care. Aims: To address the need for more formal curriculum in EOL care, we developed and implemented an online virtual patient (VP clinical case in Palliative Care into the 2010–2011 Year Three Family Medicine Clerkship rotation curriculum. Methods: A mixed-method design was used to measure the change in knowledge and perceived preparedness level in EOL care before and after completing the online VP case. A survey collected qualitative descriptions of the students’ educational experience of using this case. Results: Ninety five percent (130/137 of the students voluntarily consented to have their results analyzed. The group knowledge score (n=127 increased significantly from a pre-course average of 7.69/16±2.27, to a post-course average of 10.02/16±2.39 (p<0.001. The students’ self-assessed comfort level increased significantly with all aspects of EOL management from pre-course to post-course (p<0.001. Nearly, 91.1% of the students rated the VP realism as ‘Good to Excellent’, 86% rated the case as educationally beneficial. Nearly 59.3% of students felt emotionally engaged with the VP. Qualitative feedback found that the case content was very useful and realistic, but that the interface was sometimes awkward to navigate. Conclusions: The online VP case in Palliative Care is a useful teaching tool that may help to address the need for increased formal Palliative Care experience in medical school training programs.

  11. Clinical characteristics of patients with suspected cardiac chest pain and angiographically normal coronary arteries in a secondary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, T S; Tijssen, R Y G; Damman, P; van Bergen, P F M M

    2017-06-01

    An important number of patients with suspected cardiac chest pain have non-obstructive coronary artery disease. Our purpose was to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with normal or near-normal coronary arteries in routine cardiological practice in a secondary care hospital. In 2013, consecutive patients referred for invasive coronary angiography with suspected cardiac chest pain were analysed at a single-centre (Westfriesgasthuis, Hoorn, the Netherlands). Coronary arteries were defined as normal or near-normal if they showed no stenosis or only slight wall irregularities on visual assessment. Patients with a final non-cardiac diagnosis for the chest pain were excluded. A total of 558 patients were included. Of these, 151 (27%) showed normal or near-normal coronary arteries on visual assessment. This group of patients were significantly more often female (p normal or near-normal coronary arteries at coronary angiography showed an elevated troponin. In routine cardiological practice, around 1 out of 4 patients with suspected cardiac chest pain undergoing invasive angiography had normal or near-normal coronary arteries. We suggest that premenopausal women with suspected cardiac chest pain could be considered for non-invasive coronary imaging as a first step in clinical practice.

  12. Adding point of care ultrasound to assess volume status in heart failure patients in a nurse-led outpatient clinic. A randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Guri Holmen; Norekval, Tone M; Haug, Hilde Haugberg; Skjetne, Kyrre; Kleinau, Jens Olaf; Graven, Torbjorn; Dalen, Havard

    2016-01-01

    Medical history, physical examination and laboratory testing are not optimal for the assessment of volume status in heart failure (HF) patients. We aimed to study the clinical influence of focused ultrasound of the pleural cavities and inferior vena cava (IVC) performed by specialised nurses to assess volume status in HF patients at an outpatient clinic. HF outpatients were prospectively included and underwent laboratory testing, history recording and clinical examination by two nurses with and without an ultrasound examination of the pleural cavities and IVC using a pocket-size imaging device, in random order. Each nurse worked in a team with a cardiologist. The influence of the different diagnostic tests on diuretic dosing was assessed descriptively and in linear regression analyses. Sixty-two patients were included and 119 examinations were performed. Mean±SD age was 74±12 years, EF was 34±14%, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) value was 3761±3072 ng/L. Dosing of diuretics differed between the teams in 31 out of 119 consultations. Weight change and volume status assessed clinically with and without ultrasound predicted dose adjustment of diuretics at follow-up (p<0.05). Change of oedema, NT-proBNP, creatinine, and symptoms did not (p≥0.10). In adjusted analyses, only volume status based on ultrasound predicted dose adjustments of diuretics at first visit and follow-up (all ultrasound p≤0.01, all other p≥0.2). Ultrasound examinations of the pleural cavities and IVC by nurses may improve diagnostics and patient care in HF patients at an outpatient clinic, but more studies are needed to determine whether these examinations have an impact on clinical outcomes. NCT01794715. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. The HAQ compared with the MDHAQ: "keep it simple, stupid" (KISS), with feasibility and clinical value as primary criteria for patient questionnaires in usual clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Theodore; Swearingen, Christopher J

    2009-11-01

    The health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) is the questionnaire most widely used to assess and monitor patients with rheumatic diseases. The HAQ includes 20 activities grouped into 8 categories of 2 or 3 (and queries the use of "aids and devices" and "help from another person" to perform these activities), and visual analog scales (VAS) for pain and patient global estimate of status. Use of the HAQ in usual care over the years has led to several modifications to develop a multidimensional HAQ (MDHAQ). The MDHAQ includes 10 activities, one from each category of the HAQ plus 2 complex activities-walk 2 miles or 3 km-all on one side of a page for easy "eyeball" review by a clinician; pain, global and fatigue VAS with 21 circles rather than 10-cm lines for ease of scoring; recent medical history; review of systems; a query about exercise; and scoring templates for the 3 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) Core Data Set patient-reported measures-physical function, pain, and global estimate-for a routine assessment of patient index data (RAPID3) composite score. Both the HAQ and MDHAQ involve 2 sides of one sheet of paper, and are completed by patients in 5 to 10 minutes. The HAQ requires 42 seconds to score, compared with 5 to 10 seconds for RAPID3 on the MDHAQ.

  14. Effects of repeated use of the American Osteopathic Association's Clinical Assessment Program on measures of care for patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubrook, Jay H; Snow, Richard J; McGill, Sharon L

    2011-01-01

    The American Osteopathic Association developed its Clinical Assessment Program (AOA-CAP) for Residencies to provide a mechanism for osteopathic residency programs to measure and improve their quality of patient care. To compare program performance in processes of care and intermediate outcomes for patients with diabetes mellitus in residency programs that contributed data to the AOA-CAP for the first time vs residency programs that contributed data repeatedly. Osteopathic family medicine residency programs that entered data into the AOA-CAP diabetes registry between July 1, 2005, and December 31, 2007, were included in the present study. Residency programs were separated into those that entered data into the registry for the first time during the 2005-2007 cycle (ie, first-time programs) and those that also entered data into the registry during the previous cycle (2003-2005) (ie, repeat programs). Measures of processes of care were annual foot examination, annual referral for ophthalmologic examination, annual microalbuminuria screening, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) if albuminuria is present, use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs if hypertension is present, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) test in the previous year, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) test in the previous year. Measures of intermediate outcomes were control of blood pressure, HbA(1c), and LDL-C. Processes of care and outcome composite scores were also computed. Data from 52 osteopathic family medicine residency programs consisting of 2568 patient cases were analyzed. Twenty-three first-time programs with 992 cases and 29 repeat programs with 1576 cases entered data into the registry in the 2005-2007 cycle. Repeat programs had statistically significant better performance than first-time programs in the composite measure of processes of care (P=.0023)-largely the result of increased use of ACE inhibitors and ARBs in patients with

  15. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in patients presenting to a Tertiary Care Hospital in South India: clinical spectrum and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundavaram Paul Prabhakar Abhilash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AUFI may have similar clinical presentation, and the etiology is varied and region specific. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary hospital in South India. All adult patients presenting with AUFI of 3-14 days duration were evaluated for etiology, and the differences in presentation and outcome were analyzed. Results: The study cohort included 1258 patients. A microbiological cause was identified in 82.5% of our patients. Scrub typhus was the most common cause of AUFI (35.9% followed by dengue (30.6%, malaria (10.4%, enteric fever (3.7%, and leptospirosis (0.6%. Both scrub typhus and dengue fever peaked during the monsoon season and the cooler months, whereas no seasonality was observed with enteric fever and malaria. The mean time to presentation was longer in enteric fever (9.9 [4.7] days and scrub typhus (8.2 [3.2] days. Bleeding manifestations were seen in 7.7% of patients, mostly associated with dengue (14%, scrub typhus (4.2%, and malaria (4.6%. The requirement of supplemental oxygen, invasive ventilation, and inotropes was higher in scrub typhus, leptospirosis, and malaria. The overall mortality rate was 3.3% and was highest with scrub typhus (4.6% followed by dengue fever (2.3%. Significant clinical predictors of scrub typhus were breathlessness (odds ratio [OR]: 4.96; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.38-7.3, total whole blood cell count >10,000 cells/mm 3 (OR: 2.31; 95% CI: 1.64-3.24, serum albumin <3.5 g % (OR: 2.32; 95% CI: 1.68-3.2. Overt bleeding manifestations (OR: 2.98; 95% CI: 1.84-4.84, and a platelet count of <150,000 cells/mm 3 (OR: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.47-2.98 were independent predictors of dengue fever. Conclusion: The similarity in clinical presentation and diversity of etiological agents demonstrates the complexity of diagnosis and treatment of AUFI in South India. The etiological profile will be of use in the development of

  16. Profiles of sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical and psychosocial characteristics among primary care patients with comorbid obesity and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to characterize profiles of obese depressed participants using baseline data collected from October 2014 through December 2016 for an ongoing randomized controlled trial (n=409 in Bay Area, California, USA. Four comorbidity severity categories were defined by interaction of the binary levels of body mass index (BMI and depression Symptom Checklist 20 (SCL20 scores. Sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical and psychosocial characteristics were measured. Mean (SD age was 51 (12.1 years, BMI 36.7 (6.4 kg/m2, and SCL20 1.5 (0.5. Participants in the 4 comorbidity severity categories had similar sociodemographic characteristics, but differed significantly in the other characteristics. Two statistically significant canonical dimensions were identified. Participants with BMI≥35 and SCL20≥1.5 differed significantly from those with BMI<35 and SCL20<1.5 on dimension 1, which primarily featured high physical health (e.g., central obesity, high blood pressure and impaired sleep and mental health comorbidities (e.g., post-traumatic stress and anxiety, poor health-related quality of life (in general and problems specifically with obesity, anxiety, depression, and usual daily activities, and an avoidance problem-solving style. Participants with BMI<35 and SCL20≥1.5 differed significantly from those with BMI≥35 and SCL20<1.5 on dimension 2, which primarily included fewer Hispanics, less central obesity, and more leisure-time physical activity, but greater anxiety and post-traumatic stress and poorer obesity- or mental health-related quality of life. In conclusion, patients with comorbid obesity and depression of varying severity have different profiles of behavioral, clinical and psychosocial characteristics. This insight may inform analysis of treatment heterogeneity and development of targeted intervention strategies.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT02246413 Keywords: Obesity, Depression, Behavior, Clinical

  17. Extubation process in bed-ridden elderly intensive care patients receiving inspiratory muscle training: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cader SA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Samária Ali Cader,1 Rodrigo Gomes de Souza Vale,1 Victor Emmanuel Zamora,2 Claudia Henrique Costa,2 Estélio Henrique Martin Dantas11Laboratory of Human Kinetics Bioscience, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro State, 2Pedro Ernesto University Hospital, School of Medicine, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extubation process in bed-ridden elderly intensive care patients receiving inspiratory muscle training (IMT and identify predictors of successful weaning.Methods: Twenty-eight elderly intubated patients in an intensive care unit were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 14 that received conventional physiotherapy plus IMT with a Threshold IMT® device or to a control group (n = 14 that received only conventional physiotherapy. The experimental protocol for muscle training consisted of an initial load of 30% maximum inspiratory pressure, which was increased by 10% daily. The training was administered for 5 minutes, twice daily, 7 days a week, with supplemental oxygen from the beginning of weaning until extubation. Successful extubation was defined by the ventilation time measurement with noninvasive positive pressure. A vacuum manometer was used for measurement of maximum inspiratory pressure, and the patients' Tobin index values were measured using a ventilometer.Results: The maximum inspiratory pressure increased significantly (by 7 cm H2O, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4–10, and the Tobin index decreased significantly (by 16 breaths/min/L, 95% CI −26 to 6 in the experimental group compared with the control group. The Chi-squared distribution did not indicate a significant difference in weaning success between the groups (Χ2 = 1.47; P = 0.20. However, a comparison of noninvasive positive pressure time dependence indicated a significantly lower value for the experimental group (P = 0.0001; 95% CI 13.08–18.06. The receiver

  18. Clinical and resource utilization patterns in patients with refractory neuropathic pain prescribed pregabalin for the first time in routine medical practice in primary care settings in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Concepción; Navarro, Ana; Saldaña, María T; Masramón, Xavier; Pérez, María; Rejas, Javier

    2013-12-01

    To describe clinical and resource utilization patterns in patients with refractory neuropathic pain (NeP) who were prescribed pregabalin for the first time in routine medical practice in primary care settings. Post-hoc analysis of a 12-week prospective observational study including pregabalin naïve adult patients with refractory chronic NeP of at least 6-months duration. Self-reported pain intensity, disability, sleep disturbances, symptoms of anxiety and depression, disability, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), health care resource utilization, and corresponding costs were assessed in this post-hoc analysis. One thousand three hundred fifty-four patients were enrolled in the study, and three treatment groups were identified: (1) 598 patients replaced prior pain treatments with pregabalin as monotherapy; (2) 589 added pregabalin to their existing pain treatments; and (3) 167 other pain treatments were prescribed according with physician routine medical practice. Statistically significant differences were reported at baseline for intensity of pain, patient disability, severity of depressive symptoms, and HRQoL (P use of direct and indirect resources vs the other groups, resulting in significantly higher quarterly overall costs per patient: €2,397 (2,308), €2,470 (1,857), and €3,110 (2,496), respectively (P < 0.001). These findings suggest that primary care physicians chose pregabalin as an option for treating refractory patients who tended to have much more severe NeP profiles, costing society more than when they chose other therapeutic strategies not including pregabalin. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Acute Care Management of the HIV-Infected Patient: A Report from the HIV Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Spencer H; Badowski, Melissa E; Liedtke, Michelle D; Rathbun, R Chris; Pecora Fulco, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) admitted to the hospital have complex antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens with an increased medication error rate upon admission. This report provides a resource for clinicians managing HIV-infected patients and ART in the inpatient setting. A survey of the authors was conducted to evaluate common issues that arise during an acute hospitalization for HIV-infected patients. After a group consensus, a review of the medical literature was performed to determine the supporting evidence for the following HIV-associated hospital queries: admission/discharge orders, antiretroviral hospital formularies, laboratory monitoring, altered hepatic/renal function, drug-drug interactions (DDIs), enteral administration, and therapeutic drug monitoring. With any hospital admission for an HIV-infected patient, a specific set of procedures should be followed including a thorough admission medication history and communication with the ambulatory HIV provider to avoid omissions or substitutions in the ART regimen. DDIs are common and should be reviewed at all transitions of care during the hospital admission. ART may be continued if enteral nutrition with a feeding tube is deemed necessary, but the entire regimen should be discontinued if no oral access is available for a prolonged period. Therapeutic drug monitoring is not generally recommended but, if available, should be considered in unique clinical scenarios where antiretroviral pharmacokinetics are difficult to predict. ART may need adjustment if hepatic or renal insufficiency ensues. Treatment of hospitalized patients with HIV is highly complex. HIV-infected patients are at high risk for medication errors during various transitions of care. Baseline knowledge of the principles of antiretroviral pharmacotherapy is necessary for clinicians managing acutely ill HIV-infected patients to avoid medication errors, identify DDIs, and correctly dose medications if organ

  20. Effectiveness of Collaborative Care for Depression in Public-Sector Primary Care Clinics Serving Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomasino, Isabel T; Dwight-Johnson, Megan; Green, Jennifer M; Tang, Lingqi; Zhang, Lily; Duan, Naihua; Miranda, Jeanne

    2017-04-01

    Quality improvement interventions for depression care have been shown to be effective for improving quality of care and depression outcomes in settings with primarily insured patients. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a collaborative care intervention for depression that was tailored for low-income Latino patients seen in public-sector clinics. A total of 400 depressed patients from three public-sector primary care clinics were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of a tailored collaborative care intervention versus enhanced usual care. Social workers without previous mental health experience served as depression care specialists for the intervention patients (N=196). Depending on patient preference, they delivered a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention or facilitated antidepressant medication given by primary care providers or both. In enhanced usual care, patients (N=204) received a pamphlet about depression, a letter for their primary care provider stating that they had a positive depression screen, and a list of local mental health resources. Intent-to-treat analyses examined clinical and process-of-care outcomes at 16 weeks. Compared with patients in the enhanced usual care group, patients in the intervention group had significantly improved depression, quality of life, and satisfaction outcomes (pclinics. Social workers without prior mental health experience can effectively provide CBT and manage depression care.

  1. Prevalence of psychological distress and associated factors in tuberculosis patients in public primary care clinics in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Naidoo, Pamela; Matseke, Gladys; Louw, Julia; McHunu, Gugu; Tutshana, Bomkazi

    2012-07-27

    Psychological distress has been rarely investigated among tuberculosis patients in low-resource settings despite the fact that mental ill health has far-reaching consequences for the health outcome of tuberculosis (TB) patients. In this study, we assessed the prevalence and predictors of psychological distress as a proxy for common mental disorders among tuberculosis (TB) patients in South Africa, where over 60 % of the TB patients are co-infected with HIV. We interviewed 4900 tuberculosis public primary care patients within one month of initiation of anti-tuberculosis treatment for the presence of psychological distress using the Kessler-10 item scale (K-10), and identified predictors of distress using multiple logistic regressions. The Kessler scale contains items associated with anxiety and depression. Data on socio-demographic variables, health status, alcohol and tobacco use and adherence to anti-TB drugs and anti-retroviral therapy (ART) were collected using a structured questionnaire. Using a cut off score of ≥28 and ≥16 on the K-10, 32.9 % and 81 % of tuberculosis patients had symptoms of distress, respectively. In multivariable analysis older age (OR = 1.52; 95 % CI = 1.24-1.85), lower formal education (OR = 0.77; 95 % CI = 0.65-0.91), poverty (OR = 1.90; 95 % CI = 1.57-2.31) and not married, separated, divorced or widowed (OR = 0.74; 95 % CI = 0.62-0.87) were associated with psychological distress (K-10 ≥28), and older age (OR = 1.30; 95 % CI = 1.00-1.69), lower formal education (OR = 0.55; 95 % CI = 0.42-0.71), poverty (OR = 2.02; 95 % CI = 1.50-2.70) and being HIV positive (OR = 1.44; 95 % CI = 1.19-1.74) were associated with psychological distress (K-10 ≥16). In the final model mental illness co-morbidity (hazardous or harmful alcohol use) and non-adherence to anti-TB medication and/or antiretroviral therapy were not associated with psychological distress. The

  2. Clinical research and medical care: towards effective and complete integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacristán, José A

    2015-01-09

    Despite their close relationship, clinical research and medical care have become separated by clear boundaries. The purpose of clinical research is to generate generalizable knowledge useful for future patients, whereas medical care aims to promote the well-being of individual patients. The evolution towards patient-centered medicine and patient-oriented research, and the gradual standardization of medicine are contributing to closer ties between clinical research and medical practice. But the integration of both activities requires addressing important ethical and methodological challenges. From an ethical perspective, clinical research should evolve from a position of paternalistic beneficence to a situation in which the principle of non-maleficence and patient autonomy predominate. The progressive adoption of "patient-oriented informed consent", "patient equipoise", and "altruism-based research", and the application of risk-based ethical oversight, in which the level of regulatory scrutiny is adapted to the potential risk for patients, are crucial steps to achieve the integration between research and care. From a methodological standpoint, careful and systematic observations should have greater relevance in clinical research, and experiments should be embedded into usual clinical practice. Clinical research should focus on individuals through the development of patient-oriented research. In a complementary way, the integration of experiments into medical practice through the systematic application of "point of care research" could help to generate knowledge for the individuals and for the populations. The integration of clinical research and medical care will require researchers, clinicians, health care managers, and patients to reevaluate the way they understand both activities. The development of an integrated learning health care system will contribute to generating and applying clinically relevant medical knowledge, producing benefits for present and future

  3. Clinical update: communication issues and advance care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Crystal Dea; Reynolds, Ashley M

    2013-11-01

    To provide a clinical update on practical strategies to enhance the quality of communication in the palliative and end-of-life medical care settings. Published articles, textbooks, reports, and clinical experience. The components of effective and compassionate care throughout the advanced illness trajectory require thoughtful and strategic communication with patients, families, and members of the health care team. Unfortunately, few health care professionals are formally trained in communication skills. Nurses who possess self-awareness and are skilled in effective communication practices are integral to the provision of high-quality palliative care for patients and families coping with advanced malignancies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of a Patient-Centered Communication Intervention on Oncologist-Patient Communication, Quality of Life, and Health Care Utilization in Advanced Cancer: The VOICE Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Ronald M; Duberstein, Paul R; Fenton, Joshua J; Fiscella, Kevin; Hoerger, Michael; Tancredi, Daniel J; Xing, Guibo; Gramling, Robert; Mohile, Supriya; Franks, Peter; Kaesberg, Paul; Plumb, Sandy; Cipri, Camille S; Street, Richard L; Shields, Cleveland G; Back, Anthony L; Butow, Phyllis; Walczak, Adam; Tattersall, Martin; Venuti, Alison; Sullivan, Peter; Robinson, Mark; Hoh, Beth; Lewis, Linda; Kravitz, Richard L

    2017-01-01

    Observational studies demonstrate links between patient-centered communication, quality of life (QOL), and aggressive treatments in advanced cancer, yet few randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of communication interventions have been reported. To determine whether a combined intervention involving oncologists, patients with advanced cancer, and caregivers would promote patient-centered communication, and to estimate intervention effects on shared understanding, patient-physician relationships, QOL, and aggressive treatments in the last 30 days of life. Cluster RCT at community- and hospital-based cancer clinics in Western New York and Northern California; 38 medical oncologists (mean age 44.6 years; 11 (29%) female) and 265 community-dwelling adult patients with advanced nonhematologic cancer participated (mean age, 64.4 years, 146 [55.0%] female, 235 [89%] white; enrolled August 2012 to June 2014; followed for 3 years); 194 patients had participating caregivers. Oncologists received individualized communication training using standardized patient instructors while patients received question prompt lists and individualized communication coaching to identify issues to address during an upcoming oncologist visit. Both interventions focused on engaging patients in consultations, responding to emotions, informing patients about prognosis and treatment choices, and balanced framing of information. Control participants received no training. The prespecified primary outcome was a composite measure of patient-centered communication coded from audio recordings of the first oncologist visit following patient coaching (intervention group) or enrollment (control). Secondary outcomes included the patient-physician relationship, shared understanding of prognosis, QOL, and aggressive treatments and hospice use in the last 30 days of life. Data from 38 oncologists (19 randomized to intervention) and 265 patients (130 intervention) were analyzed. In fully adjusted models, the

  5. The role of HIV nursing consultants in the care of HIV-infected patients in Dutch hospital outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, Sigrid C. J. M.; Dijkstra, Boukje M.; Hazelzet, Esther E. B.; Grypdonck, Mieke H. F.; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Borleffs, Jan C. C.

    Objective: In the Netherlands HIV nursing consultants have participated in HIV-care since 1985: their profession has changed with developments in HIV-treatment over time. The study goal was to gather information about their role in HIV-care and to provide an useful example to other (HIV-)care

  6. Center to Advance Palliative Care palliative care clinical care and customer satisfaction metrics consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David E; Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    Data collection and analysis are vital for strategic planning, quality improvement, and demonstration of palliative care program impact to hospital administrators, private funders and policymakers. Since 2000, the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) has provided technical assistance to hospitals, health systems and hospices working to start, sustain, and grow nonhospice palliative care programs. CAPC convened a consensus panel in 2008 to develop recommendations for specific clinical and customer metrics that programs should track. The panel agreed on four key domains of clinical metrics and two domains of customer metrics. Clinical metrics include: daily assessment of physical/psychological/spiritual symptoms by a symptom assessment tool; establishment of patient-centered goals of care; support to patient/family caregivers; and management of transitions across care sites. For customer metrics, consensus was reached on two domains that should be tracked to assess satisfaction: patient/family satisfaction, and referring clinician satisfaction. In an effort to ensure access to reliably high-quality palliative care data throughout the nation, hospital palliative care programs are encouraged to collect and report outcomes for each of the metric domains described here.

  7. Clinical course, characteristics and prognostic indicators in patients presenting with back and leg pain in primary care. The ATLAS study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinou Kika

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-back related leg pain with or without nerve root involvement is associated with a poor prognosis compared to low back pain (LBP alone. Compared to the literature investigating prognostic indicators of outcome for LBP, there is limited evidence on prognostic factors for low back-related leg pain including the group with nerve root pain. This 1 year prospective consultation-based observational cohort study will describe the clinical, imaging, demographic characteristics and health economic outcomes for the whole cohort, will investigate differences and identify prognostic indicators of outcome (i.e. change in disability at 12 months, for the whole cohort and, separately, for those classified with and without nerve root pain. In addition, nested qualitative studies will provide insights on the clinical consultation and the impact of diagnosis and treatment on patients' symptom management and illness trajectory. Methods Adults aged 18 years and over consulting their General Practitioner (GP with LBP and radiating leg pain of any duration at (n = 500 GP practices in North Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent, UK will be invited to participate. All participants will receive a standardised assessment at the clinic by a study physiotherapist and will be classified according to the clinically determined presence or absence of nerve root pain/involvement. All will undergo a lumbar spine MRI scan. All participants will be managed according to their clinical need. The study outcomes will be measured at 4 and 12 months using postal self-complete questionnaires. Data will also be collected each month using brief postal questionnaires to enable detailed description of the course of low back and leg pain over time. Clinical observations and patient interviews will be used for the qualitative aspects of the study. Discussion This prospective clinical observational cohort will combine self-reported data, comprehensive clinical and MRI

  8. Clinical characteristics of patients with atrial fibrillation at a tertiary care hospital in the central region of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih A Bin Salih

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report on the clinical presentation, etiology, and laboratory features of acute and chronic atrial fibrillation (AF in a tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively studied records of 720 patients with AF seen in outpatients and inpatients departments at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, during the period of 1 January 2002 to 31 August 2008. Results: Documented acute and chronic AF was present in 157 (21.8% and 563 (78.1% patients, respectively. Palpitations, dizziness and syncope were the most frequent symptoms in acute AF, while dyspnea and palpitations were the most common symptoms in the chronic type. Acute respiratory problems and acute myocardial infarction were significantly more common in acute AF, while congestive heart failure and acute respiratory problems (chest infection, bronchial asthma, and pulmonary embolism were significantly more common in chronic AF. The most common causes of both types of AF were diabetes mellitus (DM in 68.8%, hypertension (HTN in 59.3%, chronic lung diseases (bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease in 31.8%, valvular heart disease in 23.6%, and ischemic heart disease (IHD in 23.1%. In 9 (1.3% patients, no cause was detected. The echocardiographic findings of left ventricular hypertrophy, valve lesions, and depressed left ventricular function were significantly more common in chronic AF (P<0.01. Conclusions : Nowadays, DM, HTN, and IHD are becoming the most common predisposing factors for AF in the central region of Saudi Arabia and require prevention and control

  9. Mystery patient insight into clinical laboratory service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, John

    2003-01-01

    Gone are the days when most patients tolerated impersonal service from their physicians and health-care providers in general. Every day, customer and patient satisfaction becomes more critical to a health-care provider's success and survival. Open communications, Internet-informed patients, and aggressive watch groups reveal those health-care providers who consistently deliver poor service. Most health-care providers employ patient satisfaction surveys to monitor their level of service; however, written and telephone surveys seldom provide the surveyor the insight necessary to provide differentiating service because of a large illiteracy rate and fear of reprisal. Toward this end, a well-trained mystery patients offers the health-care provider greater insight into how service is dispensed to its customers and patients. This article offers an aggregate of mystery patient insights into delivering clinical laboratory services both in hospital and medical practice environments, supported with insightful information into creating winning service strategies.

  10. Availability of volunteer-led home-based care system and baseline factors as predictors of clinical outcomes in HIV-infected patients in rural Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B Estopinal

    Full Text Available We assessed the impact of home-based care (HBC for HIV+ patients, comparing outcomes between two groups of Zambians receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART who lived in villages with and without HBC teams.We conducted a retrospective cohort study using medical charts from Macha Mission Hospital, a hospital providing HIV care in Zambia's rural Southern Province. Date of birth, date of ART initiation, place of residence, sex, body mass index (BMI, CD4+ cell count, and hemoglobin (Hgb were abstracted. Logistic regression was used to test our hypothesis that HBC was associated with treatment outcomes.Of 655 patients, 523 (80% were eligible and included in the study. There were 428 patients (82% with favorable outcomes (alive and on ART and 95 patients (18% with unfavorable outcomes (died, lost to follow-up, or stopped treatment. A minority of the 523 eligible patients (n = 84, 16% lived in villages with HBC available. Living in a village with HBC was not significantly associated with treatment outcomes; 80% of patients in a village with HBC had favorable outcomes, compared to 82% of patients in a village without HBC (P = 0.6 by χ(2. In bivariable analysis, lower BMI (P<0.001, low CD4+ cell count (P = 0.02, low Hgb concentration (P = 0.02, and older age at ART initiation (P = 0.047 were associated with unfavorable outcomes. In multivariable analysis, low BMI remained associated with unfavorable outcomes (P<0.001.We did not find that living in a village with HBC available was associated with improved treatment outcomes. We speculate that the ART clinic's rigorous treatment preparation before ART initiation and continuous adherence counseling during ART create a motivated group of patients whose outcomes did not improve with additional HBC support. An alternative explanation is that the quality of the HBC program is suboptimal.

  11. Occupational therapy for delirium management in elderly patients without mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit: A pilot randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Evelyn A; Garrido, Maricel A; Tobar, Eduardo A; Prieto, Stephanie A; Vergara, Sebastian O; Briceño, Constanza D; González, Francisco J

    2017-02-01

    Delirium has negative consequences such as increased mortality, hospital expenses and decreased cognitive and functional status. This research aims to determine the impact of occupational therapy intervention in duration, incidence and severity of delirium in elderly patients in the intensive care unit; secondary outcome was to assess functionality at hospital discharge. This is a pilot randomized clinical trial of patients without mechanical ventilation for 60 years. Patients were assigned to a control group that received standard strategies of prevention (n=70) or to an experimental group that received standard strategies plus occupational therapy twice a day for 5 days (n=70). Delirium was valued with Confusion Assessment Method and Delirium Rating Scale, and functional outcomes at discharge with Functional Independence Measure, Hand Dynamometer, and Mini-Mental State Examination. A total of 140 participants were recruited. The experimental group had lower duration (risk incidence ratios, 0.15 [P=.000; 95% confidence interval, 0.12-0.19] vs 6.6 [P=.000, 95% confidence interval, 5.23-8.3]) and incidence of delirium (3% vs 20%, P=.001), and had higher scores in Motor Functional Independence Measure (59 vs 40 points, POccupational therapy is effective in decreasing duration and incidence of delirium in nonventilated elderly patients in the intensive care unit and improved functionality at discharge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of emergency care services by immigrants—a survey of walk-in patients who attended the Oslo Accident and Emergency Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruud, Sven Eirik; Aga, Ruth; Natvig, Bård; Hjortdahl, Per

    2015-10-07

    The Oslo Accident and Emergency Outpatient Clinic (OAEOC) experienced a 5-6% annual increase in patient visits between 2005 and 2011, which was significantly higher than the 2-3% annual increase among registered Oslo residents. This study explored immigrant walk-in patients' use of both the general emergency and trauma clinics of the OAEOC and their concomitant use of regular general practitioners (RGPs) in Oslo. A cross-sectional survey of walk-in patients attending the OAEOC during 2 weeks in September 2009. We analysed demographic data, patients' self-reported affiliation with the RGP scheme, self-reported number of OAEOC and RGP consultations during the preceding 12 months. The first approach used Poisson regression models to study visit frequency. The second approach compared the proportions of first- and second-generation immigrants and those from the four most frequently represented countries (Sweden, Pakistan, Somalia and Poland) among the patient population, with their respective proportions within the general Oslo population. The analysis included 3864 patients: 1821 attended the Department of Emergency General Practice ("general emergency clinic"); 2043 attended the Section for Orthopaedic Emergency ("trauma clinic"). Both first- and second-generation immigrants reported a significantly higher OAEOC visit frequency compared with Norwegians. Norwegians, representing 73% of the city population accounted for 65% of OAEOC visits. In contrast, first- and second-generation immigrants made up 27% of the city population but accounted for 35% of OAEOC visits. This proportional increase in use was primarily observed in the general emergency clinic (42% of visits). Their proportional use of the trauma clinic (29%) was similar to their proportion in the city. Among first-generation immigrants only 71% were affiliated with the RGP system, in contrast to 96% of Norwegians. Similar finding were obtained when immigrants were grouped by nationality. Compared to

  13. [Effectiveness of an educational program for respiratory rehabilitation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease patients in Primary Care in improving the quality of life, symptoms, and clinical risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blánquez Moreno, Cristina; Colungo Francia, Cristina; Alvira Balada, M Carme; Kostov, Belchin; González-de Paz, Luis; Sisó-Almirall, Antoni

    2017-10-04

    To determine the impact of an educational program to improve the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that contributes to an increase of the quality of life, exercise capacity, level of dyspnoea, and clinical risk. Intervention study without controls. Primary Healthcare Centre. 193 patients with COPD were invited, 73 accepted and 55 participated in the educational program. Respiratory rehabilitation educational program with basic concepts of pulmonary and respiratory pathophysiology, respiratory physiotherapy exercises, practical workshop on the use of the most frequent inhalation devices, understanding of chronic disease and self-care measures in case of exacerbation. The quality of life (the COPD assessment test), exercise tolerance (the Six-Minute Walk Test), rating of perceived exertion (Borg Dyspnoea Score) and clinical risk (BODE index) were assessed by means of validated questionnaires in Spanish. A total of 43 (78.2%) participants completed the program. An improvement in the quality of life by a mean of 3.3 points was observed (95%CI; 1.76-4.84). Just over half (53.5%) of the participants obtained a clinically relevant improvement. Participants also improved their physical exercise capacity at post-intervention by increasing the distance that they walked in 6min by a mean of 20.76m (95%CI; 2.57-38.95). Improvements in the level of dyspnoea and clinical risk were also observed. The educational program shows a statistically significant and clinically relevant improvement in the quality of life, fatigue, symptomatology, exercise capacity, level of dyspnoea, and clinical risk. The program is adaptable to the health care routine of healthcare centres. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. A conceptual framework of clinical nursing care in intensive care1

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, M?rcia de Assun??o; Apostolidis, Th?mistoklis; Brand?o, Marcos Ant?nio Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to propose a conceptual framework for clinical nursing care in intensive care. Method: descriptive and qualitative field research, carried out with 21 nurses from an intensive care unit of a federal public hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic and lexical content analysis, supported by Alceste software. Results: the characteristics of clinical intensive care emerge from the specialized knowledge of the interaction, the work context, types of patients and nu...

  15. Effects of secondary prevention clinics on health status in patients with coronary heart disease: 4 year follow-up of a randomized trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Peter; Campbell, Neil C; Ritchie, Lewis D; Deans, H George; Thain, Joan

    2004-10-01

    The long-term effects of disease management programmes for coronary heart disease on health status are unknown. In a randomized trial of nurse-led secondary prevention clinics, we found significantly improved health status at 1 year. Participants were followed-up again at 4 years to determine if improvements had been sustained. Our aim was to evaluate the effects on health of nurse-led clinics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in primary care. A total of 1343 patients with coronary heart disease were randomized to nurse-led secondary prevention clinics or usual care, with follow-up at 1 and 4 years by review of medical case notes and national data sets, and postal questionnaires. The study involved a stratified, random sample of 19 general practices in north-east Scotland. Health status was measured by the SF-36 questionnaire, chest pain by the angina TyPE specification and anxiety and depression by the hospital anxiety and depression scale. At 1 year, there were significant improvements in five of eight SF-36 domains (all functioning scales, pain and general health) in patients randomized to clinics. Role limitations attributed to physical problems improved the most [adjusted difference 8.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.16-12.9]. At 4 years, the intervention group scored higher than control in all domains, but differences were no longer significant. At 1 year, fewer patients in the intervention group reported worsening chest pain (odds ratio 0.59, 95% C1 0.37-0.94). At 4 years, there were no significant differences between the proportion of intervention or control group patients who reported chest pain in the last week or who reported worsening chest pain. No significant effects were observed on anxiety or depression at 1 or 4 years. We have demonstrated previously a significantly greater survival in attendees at nurse-led secondary prevention clinics. Despite this, improvements in health status achieved in the first year of the study were

  16. Patients' attitudes to medical and psychosocial aspects of care in fertility clinics: Findings from the Copenhagen Multi-centre Psychosocial Infertility (COMPI) Research Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Holstein, B E; Boivin, J

    2003-01-01

    services for both men and women was high infertility-related stress in the marital, personal and social domain. CONCLUSIONS: A supportive attitude from medical staff and the provision of both medical and psychosocial information and support should be integral aspects of medical care in fertility clinics......BACKGROUND: The aims were (i) to identify gender differences in motivations to seek assisted reproduction and gender differences in expectations about medical and psychosocial services and (ii) to examine factors that predict the perceived importance of, and intention to use, psychosocial services...... among infertile people. METHODS: We conducted an epidemiological study based on questionnaires among all new couples attending five fertility clinics with a response rate of 80.0% and a total of 2250 patients. RESULTS: The vast majority of both men and women considered a high level of medical...

  17. [Control of anticoagulation in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation in a primary care clinical practice setting in the different autonomous communities. PAULA study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo García, J; Barrios Alonso, V; Escobar Cervantes, C; Prieto Valiente, L; Lobos Bejarano, J M; Vargas Ortega, D; Prieto Díaz, M Á; Alonso Moreno, F J; Barquilla García, A

    2017-04-01

    To determine the differences between regions in the level of control of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation treated with vitamin K antagonists, included in the PAULA study. Observational, and coss-sectional/retrospective study, including 139 Primary Care physicians from 99 Health Care centres in all autonomous communities (except La Rioja). Anticoagulation control was defined as the time in therapeutic range assessed by either the direct method (poor control <60%), or the Rosendaal method (poor control <65%). A total of 1,524 patients were included. Small differences in baseline characteristics of the patients were observed. Differences in the percentage of time in therapeutic range were observed, according to the Rosendaal method (mean 69.0±17.7%), from 78.1%±16.6 (Basque Country) to 61.5±14% (Balearic Islands), by the direct method (mean 63.2±17.9%) from 73.6%±16.6 (Basque Country) to 57.5±15.7% (Extremadura). When comparing regions, in those where the Primary Care physicians assumed full control without restrictions on prescription, the percentage of time in therapeutic range by the direct method was 63.89 vs. 60.95% in those with restrictions (p=.006), by Rosendaal method, 69.39% compared with 67.68% (p=.1036). There are significant differences in the level of control between some regions are still inadequate. Regions in which the Primary Care physicians assumed the management of anticoagulation and without restrictions, time in therapeutic range was somewhat higher, and showed a favourable trend for better control. These findings may have clinical implications, and deserve consideration and specific analysis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Can the use of urgent care clinics improve access to care without undermining continuity in primary care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor, Sally; Krouse, Helene J

    2016-06-01

    There is a niche for urgent care clinics as an alternate source