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Sample records for clinical magnetic resonance

  1. Cardiac magnetic resonance in clinical cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas; Kumar; Rodrigo; Bagur

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, cardiac magnetic resonance(CMR) has transformed from a research tool to a widely used diagnostic method in clinical cardiology. This method can now make useful, unique contributions to the work-up of patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease. Advantages of CMR, compared to other imaging methods, include very high resolution imaging with a spatial resolution up to 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm in plane, a large array of different imaging sequences to provide in vivo tissue characterization, and radiationfree imaging. The present manuscript highlights the relevance of CMR in the current clinical practice and new perspectives in cardiology.

  2. Clinical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

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    Marcu, C.B.; Beek, A.M.; Van Rossum, A.C. [Hospital of Saint Raphael, Cardiac Diagnostic Unit, New Haven, CT (United States)], E-mail: bogmarcu@pol.net

    2006-10-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from an effective research tool into a clinically proven, safe and comprehensive imaging modality. It provides anatomic and functional information in acquired and congenital heart disease and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volumes, function and mass. Owing to its excellent interstudy reproducibility, cardiovascular MRI is the optimal method for assessment of changes in ventricular parameters after therapeutic intervention. Delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and robust method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies and less common diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. First-pass magnetic contrast myocardial perfusion is becoming an alternative to radionuclide techniques for the detection of coronary atherosclerotic disease. In this review we outline the techniques used in cardiovascular MRI and discuss the most common clinical applications. (author)

  3. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

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    Alwatban, A Z W

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a ...

  4. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

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    Alwatban, Adnan Z.W

    2002-07-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  5. Cardiac magnetic resonance spectroscopy: potential clinical applications

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    Neubauer, S. [Dept. of Cardiovascular Medicine, Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2000-06-01

    MR spectroscopy is the only method for non-invasive detection of various aspects of cardiac metabolism in humans. While the {sup 1}H nucleus of water and fat molecules is the signal source for MR imaging, the MR spectroscopic technique allows for the study of a number of other nuclei, such as {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F, {sup 23}Na, {sup 31}P, {sup 39}K and {sup 87}Rb. Clinical applications presently are confined to the {sup 31}P nucleus. {sup 31}P-MR spectroscopy allows the non-invasive study of cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolites ATP and phosphocreatine. The phosphocreatine/ATP ratio is considered an index of the energetic state of the heart. Possible clinical indications include heart failure, valve disease and coronary artery disease. In heart failure, the phosphocreatine/ATP ratio is reduced and correlates with clinical severity, ejection fraction and prognosis. In mitral and aortic valve disease, a reduced phosphocreatine/ATP ratio may indicate the optimum timing for valve replacement. In coronary artery disease, a regional decrease of phosphocreatine during stress (''biochemical ergometry'') may indicate local ischemia. Furthermore, absolute quantification of high-energy phosphates may allow diagnosis of myocardial viability. Major technical developments, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution will be necessary to establish MR spectroscopy as a routine clinical tool. (orig.) [German] Die MR-Spektroskopie ist die einzige Methode, die es erlaubt, am Patienten verschiedene Aspekte des Myokardstoffwechsels nichtinvasiv zu untersuchen. Waehrend der {sup 1}H-Kern der Wasser- und Fettmolekuele die Signalquelle fuer die MR-Bildgebung darstellt, kann man mit der Spektroskopie eine Vielzahl anderer Kerne wie {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F, {sup 23}Na, {sup 31}P, {sup 39}K und {sup 87}Rb untersuchen. Klinische Anwendungen sind bisher auf die {sup 31}P-MR Spektroskopie beschraenkt. Mit dieser Methode lassen sich die energiereichen Phosphate ATP und

  6. Normal feline brain: clinical anatomy using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogicato, G; Conchou, F; Layssol-Lamour, C; Raharison, F; Sautet, J

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a clinical anatomy atlas of the feline brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brains of twelve normal cats were imaged using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance unit and an inversion/recovery sequence (T1). Fourteen relevant MRI sections were chosen in transverse, dorsal, median and sagittal planes. Anatomic structures were identified and labelled using anatomical texts and Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria, sectioned specimen heads, and previously published articles. The MRI sections were stained according to the major embryological and anatomical subdivisions of the brain. The relevant anatomical structures seen on MRI will assist clinicians to better understand MR images and to relate this neuro-anatomy to clinical signs.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Li; Yong Du; Hanfeng Yang; Yayong Huang; Jun Meng; Dongmei Xiao

    2013-01-01

    As prostate cancer is a biologically heterogeneous disease for which a variety of treatment options are available,the major objective of prostate cancer imaging is to achieve more precise disease characterization.In clinical practice,magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the imaging tools for the evaluation of prostate cancer,the fusion of MRI or dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is improving the evaluation of cancer location,size,and extent,while providing an indication of tumor aggressiveness.This review summarizes the role of MRI in the application of prostate cancer and describes molecular MRI techniques (including MRSI and DCE-MRI)for aiding prostate cancer management.

  8. The economics of functional magnetic resonance imaging: clinical and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousem, David M

    2014-11-01

    It is difficult to justify maintaining a clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) program based solely on revenue generation. The use of fMRI is, therefore, based mostly in patient care considerations, leading to better outcomes. The high costs of the top-of-the-line equipment, hardware, and software needed for state-of-the-art fMRI and the time commitment by multiple professionals are not adequately reimbursed at a representative rate by current payor schemes for the Current Procedure Terminology codes assigned.

  9. Clinical applications for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsien, Christina; Cao, Yue; Chenevert, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    In this article, we review the clinical applications of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the radiotherapy treatment of several key clinical sites, including those of the central nervous system, the head and neck, the prostate, and the cervix. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) is an imaging technique that is rapidly gaining widespread acceptance owing to its ease and wide availability. DWI measures the mobility of water within tissue at the cellular level without the need of any exogenous contrast agent. For radiotherapy treatment planning, DWI improves upon conventional imaging techniques, by better characterization of tumor tissue properties required for tumor grading, diagnosis, and target volume delineation. Because DWI is also a sensitive marker for alterations in tumor cellularity, it has potential clinical applications in the early assessment of treatment response following radiation therapy.

  10. Magnetic resonance enterography in Crohn's disease: optimal use in clinical practice and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimola, Jordi; Panés, Julián; Ordás, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a practical appraisal of the usefulness of magnetic resonance enterography in the management of Crohn's disease and the potential utilities that this imaging modality may have in clinical research. Also, we review some basic technical considerations that clinicians should know to understand the value and limitations of the technique. Lastly, we outline the future trends and potential contributions of new technological advances in the field of magnetic resonance imaging that can improve the classic magnetic resonance enterography technique.

  11. Unexpected Findings in Magnetic Resonance Enterography and Their Clinical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivathsan Ravindran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To identify the prevalence of colonic and extraenteric incidental findings in magnetic resonance enterography (MRE and their clinical significance. Methods. We retrospectively analysed 470 MRE studies carried out between March 2012 and 2014. Incidental findings were defined as those not expected from or made apparent on the referral. MRE reports were reviewed for colonic and extraenteric findings, subcategorised into “clinically significant” and “insignificant.” Follow-up was identified from the electronic patient record. Results. The majority of MRE requests were made for inflammatory bowel disease (97%. In total, 114 incidental findings were noted in 94 (20% scans performed. There were 29 “colonic” findings (25% with 55% having a diagnosis of colitis. Out of 85 extraenteric findings, ovarian cysts (25%, renal cysts (10%, and abdominal lymphadenopathy (9% were the commonest. Cumulatively, 59 cases were clinically significant (52%; of these, 30 findings were not previously diagnosed, amounting to 26% of all incidental findings. This led to intervention in seven patients. Conclusions. Incidental findings are common in MRE and there is a substantial proportion that is clinically significant and requires further investigation. There need to be stratification of risk and employment of local guidelines in order to achieve this.

  12. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Lin

    2006-01-01

    @@ Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)has been widely used in basic research in the past decade, and more clinically in recent years.Unlike conventional MRI that demonstrates the anatomy and morphology of the brain, fMRI provides the functional information of the brain, including neuronal activation, perfusion, diffusion, metabolism,and fiber connection. Since the publication of the pioneer study by Ogawa et al1 in 1990, blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) technique has been adopted by neuroscientists and psychologists in research into the mechanisms of motion, vision,hearing, language, memory, and functions of the brain. Soon after, clinical studies with BOLD technique were conducted in some fields like surgery (surgical planning). In China, however, basic and clinical studies on fMRI in the early years were limited by the shortage of funding, difficulty in integrating personnel of different disciplines from different institutions, and long-term use of MR scanners. In recent years, the studies on fMRI in this country have been flourishing as the conditions are greatly improved, and the number of published papers has increased because more and more radiologists and clinicians are involved.

  13. Clinical software VIII for magnetic resonance imaging systems

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    Kohno, Satoru; Takeo, Kazuhiro [Medical Applications Department, Medical Systems Division, Shimadzu Corporation, Kyoto (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    This report describes the latest techniques of MRA (magnetic resonance angiography) and the brain attack diagnosis protocol which are now effectively utilized in the Shimadzu-Marconi MAGNEX ECLIPSE MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) system (1.5 tesla type) and the MAGNEX POLARIS MRI system (1.0 tesla type). As for the latest techniques for MRA, this report refers to the SLINKY (sliding interleaved ky) technique, which provides high-resolution images over a wide range in the direction of slice, without using contrast agent, and to the iPass technique which enables highly reliable CE-MRA (contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography), through easy and simple operation. Also reported are the techniques of diffusion imaging and perfusion imaging, utilized for stroke assessment. (author)

  14. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

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    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P. [Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Servico de Neurocirurgia]. E-mail: centro@cerebroecoluna.com.br; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Neurologicas; Andrade, Almir F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Neurocirurgia da Emergencia

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  15. Fractal frontiers in cardiovascular magnetic resonance: towards clinical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Captur, Gabriella; Karperien, Audrey L; Li, Chunming; Zemrak, Filip; Tobon-Gomez, Catalina; Gao, Xuexin; Bluemke, David A; Elliott, Perry M; Petersen, Steffen E; Moon, James C

    2015-09-07

    Many of the structures and parameters that are detected, measured and reported in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) have at least some properties that are fractal, meaning complex and self-similar at different scales. To date however, there has been little use of fractal geometry in CMR; by comparison, many more applications of fractal analysis have been published in MR imaging of the brain.This review explains the fundamental principles of fractal geometry, places the fractal dimension into a meaningful context within the realms of Euclidean and topological space, and defines its role in digital image processing. It summarises the basic mathematics, highlights strengths and potential limitations of its application to biomedical imaging, shows key current examples and suggests a simple route for its successful clinical implementation by the CMR community.By simplifying some of the more abstract concepts of deterministic fractals, this review invites CMR scientists (clinicians, technologists, physicists) to experiment with fractal analysis as a means of developing the next generation of intelligent quantitative cardiac imaging tools.

  16. Cutting edge clinical applications in cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cecco, Carlo N; Muscogiuri, Giuseppe; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Today, the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is widespread in clinical practice. The increased need to evaluate of subtle myocardial changes, coronary artery anatomy, and hemodynamic assessment has prompted the development of novel CMR techniques including T1 and T2 mapping, non-contrast angiography and four dimensional (4D) flow. T1 mapping is suitable for diagnosing pathologies affecting extracellular volume such as myocarditis, diffuse myocardial fibrosis and amyloidosis, and is a promising diagnostic tool for patients with iron overload and Fabry disease. T2 mapping is useful in depicting acute myocardial edema and estimating the amount of salvageable myocardium following an ischemic event. Novel angiography techniques, such as the self-navigated whole-heart or the quiescent-interval single-shot sequence, enable the visualization of the great vessels and coronary artery anatomy without the use of contrast material. The 4D flow technique overcomes the limitations of standard phase-contrast imaging and allows for the assessment of cardiovascular hemodynamics in the great arteries and flow patterns in the cardiac chambers. In conclusion, the future of CMR is heading toward a more reliable quantitative assessment of the myocardium, an improved non-contrast visualization of the coronary artery anatomy, and a more accurate evaluation of the cardiac hemodynamics. PMID:28144400

  17. Use of magnetic resonance imaging for detecting clinically and mammographically occult ductal carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, G; Cheung, Polly S Y

    2008-06-01

    We report on two cases where breast magnetic resonance imaging examination changed clinical management. Breast magnetic resonance imaging is now recognised as an indispensable adjunctive examination to mammography and ultrasound. In each of the two cases described, breast magnetic resonance imaging revealed unsuspected, extensive, and mammographically and ultrasonologically occult, ductal carcinoma in situ. In each of these cases, planned breast conserving surgery was changed to mastectomy. The success of breast conservation treatment depends on removal of all tumour with clear margins at the time of surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging is now considered the most sensitive method for evaluating the extent of breast cancer. Breast magnetic resonance imaging has a very high sensitivity for invasive carcinoma (near 100%), and recent studies show its specificity in high-risk patients is between 93 and 99%. Magnetic resonance imaging may well be proven an important adjunctive examination in patients who have dense breasts or extensive fibrocystic change.

  18. Basic Principles and Clinical Applications of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Neuroradiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Stephan; Backens, Martin; Ahlhelm, Frank J

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool to assist daily clinical diagnostics. This review is intended to give an overview on basic principles of the technology, discuss some of its technical aspects, and present typical applications in daily clinical routine in neuroradiology.

  19. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain: review of metabolites and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, D.P. [Section of Radiology, Department of Surgery, Radiology, Anaesthetics, and Intensive Care, University Hospital of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston (Jamaica)], E-mail: dpsoares@cwjamaica.com; Law, M. [Department of Radiology and Neurosurgery, Mount Sinai Medical Centre, New York, New York (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides anatomic images and morphometric characterization of disease, whereas magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides metabolite/biochemical information about tissues non-invasively in vivo. MRS has been used clinically for more than two decades. The major applications of this advanced MRI tool are in the investigation of neurological and neurosurgical disorders. MRS has also been used in the evaluation of the prostate gland and muscle tissue, but these applications will not be addressed in this review. The aim of this review is to attempt to introduce the technique, review the metabolites and literature, as well as briefly describe our clinical experience.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of true placenta accreta: a clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Tarachkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available True placenta accreta is the attachment of chorionic villi to the myometrium, possibly penetrating into the thickness of the myometrium and its outside, including through the serous tunic. The main current diagnostic techniques are considered to be ultrasonography, laboratory diagnosis (elevated human chorionic gonadotropin and placental lactogen levels, and clinical data (pain and vaginal discharge. Magnetic resonance imaging is deemed to be an adjuvant technique. By using a clinical example, this paper considers the capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose this abnormality and to choose a right treatment policy. The abnormality is compared with the conditions (trophoblastic tumor and myoma with lysis that are similar in their diagnosis and magnetic resonance pattern. The disorder in question is rather rare and its detailed consideration, determination of the capabilities of various techniques, and comparison with externally similar cases areimportant for the development of diagnostic opportunities.

  1. Clinical safety of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implanted SynchroMed EL infusion pumps

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    Diehn, Felix E.; Wood, Christopher P.; Watson, Robert E.; Hunt, Christopher H. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Mauck, William D. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Anesthesiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Burke, Michelle M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Patients with implanted SynchroMed spinal infusion pumps (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN) routinely undergo magnetic resonance imaging at our institution. In August 2008, Medtronic issued an urgent medical device correction report regarding several pumps. Because of the rare potential ''for a delay in the return of proper drug infusion'' and ''for a delay in the logging of motor stall events,'' ''a patient's pump must be interrogated after MRI exposure in order to confirm proper pump functionality.'' This is particularly important in patients receiving intrathecal baclofen, for whom a delay in return of proper pump infusion could lead to life-threatening baclofen withdrawal syndrome. The objective of this report is to present our experience and protocol of performing magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implanted SynchroMed EL pumps. We retrospectively reviewed records of 86 patients with implanted SynchroMed EL spinal infusion pumps who underwent 112 examinations on 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging scanners from September 1, 1998 to July 7, 2004. No SynchroMed EL pumps were damaged by magnetic resonance imaging, and the programmable settings remained unchanged in all patients. Our data suggest that SynchroMed EL pump malfunction is indeed rare after routine clinical 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging examinations. However, based on the Medtronic correction report, we perform pump interrogation before and after imaging. (orig.)

  2. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

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    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  3. ST-Segment resolution and clinical outcome with ischemic postconditioning and comparison to magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob; Holmvang, Lene; Kelbæk, Henning;

    2010-01-01

    Ischemic postconditioning (IPost) during primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) is suggested to reduce myocardial damage. However, the association with ST-segment resolution (STR) and clinical outcome is not determined. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the association of I...... of IPost with STR and clinical outcome. Secondly, we sought to determine the relationship between STR and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) parameters in these patients....

  4. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in brain tumours: clinical applications

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    Burtscher, I.M.; Holtaas, S. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2001-05-01

    Parallel to the rapid development of clinical MRI, MR spectroscopy (MRS) has, after starting as an analytical tool used in chemistry and physics, evolved to a noninvasive clinical examination. Most common neuroradiological diagnostic indications for MRS are functional inborn errors, neonatal hypoxia, ischaemia, metabolic diseases, white matter and degenerative diseases, epilepsy, inflammation, infections and intracranial neoplasm. Compared to CT and MRI, well-established morphological diagnostic tools, MRS provides information on the metabolic state of brain tissue. We review the clinical impact of MRS in diagnosis of tumours and their differentiation from non-neoplastic lesions. (orig.)

  5. Clinically low-risk prostate cancer: evaluation with transrectal doppler ultrasound and functional magnetic resonance imaging

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    Maria Inês Novis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate transrectal ultrasound, amplitude Doppler ultrasound, conventional T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, spectroscopy and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in localizing and locally staging low-risk prostate cancer. INTRODUCTION: Prostate cancer has been diagnosed at earlier stages and the most accepted classification for low-risk prostate cancer is based on clinical stage T1c or T2a, Gleason score <6, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA <10 ng/ml. METHODS: From 2005 to 2006, magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 42 patients, and transrectal ultrasound in 26 of these patients. Seven patients were excluded from the study. Mean patient age was 64.94 years and mean serum PSA was 6.05 ng/ml. The examinations were analyzed for tumor identification and location in prostate sextants, detection of extracapsular extension, and seminal vesicle invasion, using surgical pathology findings as the gold standard. RESULTS: Sixteen patients (45.7% had pathologically proven organ-confined disease, 11 (31.4% had positive surgical margin, 8 (28.9% had extracapsular extension, and 3 (8.6% presented with extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV and accuracy values for localizing low-risk prostate cancer were 53.1%, 48.3%, 63.4%, 37.8% and 51.3% for transrectal ultrasound; 70.4%, 36.2%, 65.1%, 42.0% and 57.7% for amplitude Doppler ultrasound; 71.5%, 58.9%, 76.6%, 52.4% and 67.1% for magnetic resonance imaging; 70.4%, 58.7%, 78.4%, 48.2% and 66.7% for magnetic resonance spectroscopy; 67.2%, 65.7%, 79.3%, 50.6% and 66.7% for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy values for detecting extracapsular extension were 33.3%, 92%, 14.3%, 97.2% and 89.7% for transrectal ultrasound and 50.0%, 77.6%, 13.7%, 95.6% and 75.7% for magnetic resonance imaging

  6. Clinical Presentation and Magnetic Resonance Findings in Sellar Tuberculomas

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    Dulce Bonifacio-Delgadillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Importance. Sellar tuberculomas are extremely rare lesions with nonspecific clinical manifestations. The tuberculous infection of the pituitary gland and sellar region is characterized by the presence of an acute or chronic inflammatory reaction and may occur in the absence of systemic tuberculosis. The diagnosis is difficult prior to the surgery. An adequate diagnostic and antituberculous drugs usually result in a good outcome. Clinical Presentation. We report four cases of sellar tuberculoma, 3/1 female/male, age range: 50–57 years. All patients had visual disturbances and low levels of cortisol. Conclusion. The clinical diagnosis of sellar tuberculoma is a challenge and should be suspected when a sellar lesion shows abnormal enhancement pattern and stalk involvement, and absence of signal suppression in FLAIR.

  7. Advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging: technology and clinical applications.

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    Dickerson, Bradford C

    2007-07-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is a valuable method for use by clinical investigators to study task-related brain activation in patients with neurological or neuropsychiatric illness. Despite the relative infancy of the field, the rapid adoption of this functional neuroimaging technology has resulted from, among other factors, its ready availability, its relatively high spatial and temporal resolution, and its safety as a noninvasive imaging tool that enables multiple repeated scans over the course of a longitudinal study, and thus may lend itself well as a measure in clinical drug trials. Investigators have used fMRI to identify abnormal functional brain activity during task performance in a variety of patient populations, including those with neurodegenerative, demyelinating, cerebrovascular, and other neurological disorders that highlight the potential utility of fMRI in both basic and clinical spheres of research. In addition, fMRI studies reveal processes related to neuroplasticity, including compensatory hyperactivation, which may be a universally-occurring, adaptive neural response to insult. Functional MRI is being used to study the modulatory effects of genetic risk factors for neurological disease on brain activation; it is being applied to differential diagnosis, as a predictive biomarker of disease course, and as a means to identify neural correlates of neurotherapeutic interventions. Technological advances are rapidly occurring that should provide new applications for fMRI, including improved spatial resolution, which promises to reveal novel insights into the function of fine-scale neural circuitry of the human brain in health and disease.

  8. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: protocol optimization, interpretation, and clinical applications.

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    Partridge, Savannah C; McDonald, Elizabeth S

    2013-08-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (DWI) has shown promise for improving the positive predictive value of breast MR imaging for detection of breast cancer, evaluating tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and as a noncontrast alternative to MR imaging in screening for breast cancer. However, data quality varies widely. Before implementing DWI into clinical practice, one must understand the pertinent technical considerations and current evidence regarding clinical applications of breast DWI. This article provides an overview of basic principles of DWI, optimization of breast DWI protocols, imaging features of benign and malignant breast lesions, promising clinical applications, and potential future directions.

  9. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging: techniques, clinical indications, and future applications.

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    Walker, R E; Eustace, S J

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews developments in both pulse sequence design and gradient technology that facilitate rapid imaging of the whole body. It discusses its application in patients with bone marrow neoplasms, including metastases, lymphoma, and myeloma and emphasizes the value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in patients with known vertebral lesions to detect other bone lesions that are easier to biopsy. It outlines possible applications in well-defined clinical situations, including pregnancy and unknown primary tumor.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging for the clinical management of rectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop guidelines describing a standardised approach regarding the acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical staging and restaging of rectal cancer. METHODS: A consensus meeting of 14 abdominal imaging experts from the European...... Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) was conducted following the RAND-UCLA Appropriateness Method. Two independent (non-voting) chairs facilitated the meeting. Two hundred and thirty-six items were scored by participants for appropriateness and classified subsequently as appropriate...

  11. Comparison of magnetic resonance angiography and conventional angiography in sickle cell disease: clinical significance and realibility

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    Kandeel, A.Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Mansoura Univ. Hospital (Egypt); Zimmerman, R.A. [Dept. of Radiology, The Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ohene-Frempong, K. [Div. of Hematology, The Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and conventional angiograms of 21 patients with known sickle cell disease, who underwent a total of 50 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) studies. MRA and conventional angiography were assessed separately for evidence of stenosis or occulusion. Follow up MRI/MRA studies were also assessed for evidence of progression, regression or stability of the disease in these patients. In the carotid circulation, MRA made the correct diagnosis in 85% of the vessels evaluated with a sensitivity of 80.5% and a specificity of 94%. MRA was also found to show evidence of disease progression, more often than did MRI or the clinical condition of the patients. (orig.)

  12. Clinical relevance of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the cirrhotic without overt hepatic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujishima, Yukou; Kato, Akinobu; Suzuki, Kazuyuki [Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-04-01

    To clarify the changes of pallidal high intensity on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and brain metabolites on magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) as related to the severity of hepatic functions, the concentrations of blood ammonia (B-NH{sub 3}) and the levels of trace elements (Mn, Cu and Zn), 30 patients with liver cirrhosis without hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and 5 age-matched healthy control subjects underwent MRI and proton MRS. Pallidal high intensity (Pl index) and glutamine are higher in cirrhosis, and myo-inositol is lower than that of control statistically. In cirrhosis, there were statistically negative correlation between B-NH{sub 3} and myo-inositol and positive correlation between B-NH{sub 3} and glutamine. There was a statistically lower myo-inositol and higher Pl index, glutamine as the severity of hepatic functions increased. Furthermore there was a statistically positive correlation between Pl index and Mn. These data suggest that the changes of MRI and MRS findings already detected in cirrhosis without HE and these abnormalities may be reflect the B-NH{sub 3} and Mn metabolism and the severity of the hepatic functions. (author)

  13. A comprehensive literatures update of clinical researches of superparamagnetic resonance iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idée, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to update the clinical researches using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent published during the past five years. PubMed database was used for literature search, and the search terms were (SPIO OR superparamagnetic iron oxide OR Resovist OR Ferumoxytol OR Ferumoxtran-10) AND (MRI OR magnetic resonance imaging). The literature search results show clinical research on SPIO remains robust, particularly fuelled by the approval of ferumoxytol for intravenously administration. SPIOs have been tested on MR angiography, sentinel lymph node detection, lymph node metastasis evaluation; inflammation evaluation; blood volume measurement; as well as liver imaging. Two experimental SPIOs with unique potentials are also discussed in this review. A curcumin-conjugated SPIO can penetrate brain blood barrier (BBB) and bind to amyloid plaques in Alzheime’s disease transgenic mice brain, and thereafter detectable by MRI. Another SPIO was fabricated with a core of Fe3O4 nanoparticle and a shell coating of concentrated hydrophilic polymer brushes and are almost not taken by peripheral macrophages as well as by mononuclear phagocytes and reticuloendothelial system (RES) due to the suppression of non-specific protein binding caused by their stealthy ‘‘brush-afforded’’ structure. This SPIO may offer potentials for the applications such as drug targeting and tissue or organ imaging other than liver and lymph nodes. PMID:28275562

  14. A comparison of clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance images in temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-15

    To determine the relationship between clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance (MR) images in patients presenting with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. This study was based on 172 joints in 86 patients presenting with TMJ disorders. Joint pain and sound during jaw opening and closing movements were recorded, and the possible relationship between disc positions and bony changes of the condylar head and the articular fossa in MR images in the oblique sagittal planes were examined. Data were analyzed by Chi-square test. There was no statistically significant relationship between clinical symptoms and MR images in the patients with TMJ disorders. In the patient with TMJ disorders, joint pain and sound could not be specific clinical symptoms that are related with MR image findings, and asymptomatic joint did not necessarily imply that the joints are normal according to MR image findings.

  15. Pre-clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging. Pt. I. The kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoellner, Frank G.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Zimmer, Fabian; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine

    2014-07-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing worldwide. In Europe alone, at least 8% of the population currently has some degree of CKD. CKD is associated with serious comorbidity, reduced life expectancy, and high economic costs; hence, the early detection and adequate treatment of kidney disease is important. Pre-clinical research can not only give insights into the mechanisms of the various kidney diseases but it also allows for investigating the outcome of new drugs developed to treat kidney disease. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides non-invasive access to tissue and organ function in animal models. Advantages over classical animal research approaches are numerous: the same animal might be repeatedly imaged to investigate a progress or a treatment of disease over time. This has also a direct impact on animal welfare and the refinement of classical animal experiments as the number of animals in the studies might be reduced. In this paper, we review current state of the art in functional magnetic resonance imaging with a focus on pre-clinical kidney imaging.

  16. DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF CLINICAL AND MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN KNEE MENISCI AND LIGAMENTOUS INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of clinical diagnosis compared to MRI findings in ligamentous and meniscal injuries with respect to arthroscopic confirmation as a gold standard. METHODS 485 patients with knee injuries were prospectively assessed by clinical evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging and correlated after therapeutic arthroscopy. The overall accuracy, clinically productive values of sensitivity and specificity was derived. The actual value of the test with respect to positive predictive and negative predictive value was also derived, taking arthroscopic findings as confirmatory. The overall partial and total agreement among the clinical, MRI and arthroscopy was documented. RESULTS The overall accuracy for clinical examination was 85, 92, 100 and 100 and accuracy for MRI was 90, 97, 97 and 97 for detecting medial meniscus, lateral meniscus, ACL and PCL tears respectively. Clinically lateral meniscus tears are difficult to diagnose clinically with negative predictive value (90 whereas ACL injuries do not need MRI for diagnosis as evident by a high negative predictive value (100 of clinical examination. Total agreement with the clinical findings confirmed by arthroscopy was 64.40% which was relatively high as compared to total agreement of MRI findings which was only 31.50%. We found similar total agreement versus total disagreement of both clinical and MRI to be only 2.74% indicating very high accuracy in clinical diagnosis of meniscal and ligamentous injuries combined. CONCLUSION The clinical evaluation alone is sufficient to diagnose meniscal and ACL/PCL pathologies and MRI should be considered only as a powerful negative diagnostic tool. The arthroscopy decision should not be heavily dependent on MRI for ligamentous injuries but reverse is true for meniscal lesions. MR evaluation functions as a powerful negative diagnostic tool to rule out doubtful and complex knee injuries.

  17. Imaging vascular function for early stage clinical trials using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M.O.; Orton, M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Morgan, B. [Univ. of Leicester, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology, Leicester (United Kingdom); Tofts, P.S. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Univ. of Sussex, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Sussex (United Kingdom); Buckley, D.L. [University of Leeds, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Huang, W. [Oregon Health and Science Univ., Advanced Imaging Research Centre, Portland, OR (United States); Horsfield, M.A. [Medical Physics Section, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences, Leicester (United Kingdom); Chenevert, T.L. [Univ. of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, D.J. [Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jackson, A. [Univ. of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Withington, Manchester, M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Lomas, D. [Univ. of Cambridge, Dept. of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Whitcher, B. [Unit 2 Greenways Business Park, Mango Solutions, Chippenham (United Kingdom); Clarke, L. [Cancer Imaging Program, Imaging Technology Development Branch, Rockville, MD (United States); Plummer, R. [Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne, The Medical School, Medical Oncology, Northern Inst. for Cancer Research, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Judson, I. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jones, R. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Alonzi, R. [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Brunner, T. [Gray Inst. for Radiation, Oncology and Biology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Koh, D.M. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Diagnostic Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2012-07-15

    Many therapeutic approaches to cancer affect the tumour vasculature, either indirectly or as a direct target. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important means of investigating this action, both pre-clinically and in early stage clinical trials. For such trials, it is essential that the measurement process (i.e. image acquisition and analysis) can be performed effectively and with consistency among contributing centres. As the technique continues to develop in order to provide potential improvements in sensitivity and physiological relevance, there is considerable scope for between-centre variation in techniques. A workshop was convened by the Imaging Committee of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) to review the current status of DCE-MRI and to provide recommendations on how the technique can best be used for early stage trials. This review and the consequent recommendations are summarised here. (orig.)

  18. Wernicke's encephalopathy in a malnourished surgical patient: clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolli, M; Barbieri, A; Pinna, C; Pasetto, A; Nicosia, F

    2005-11-01

    We report a clinical and neuroradiological description of a severe case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in a surgical patient. After colonic surgery for neoplasm, he was treated for a long time with high glucose concentration total parenteral nutrition. In the early post-operative period, the patient showed severe encephalopathy with ataxia, ophthalmoplegia and consciousness disorders. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the clinical suspicion of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The radiological feature showed hyperintense lesions which were symmetrically distributed along the bulbo-pontine tegmentum, the tectum of the mid-brain, the periacqueductal grey substance, the hypothalamus and the medial periventricular parts of the thalamus. This progressed to typical Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with ataxia and memory and cognitive defects. Thiamine deficiency is a re-emerging problem in non-alcoholic patients and it may develop in surgical patients with risk factors such as malnutrition, prolonged vomiting and long-term high glucose concentration parenteral nutrition.

  19. In vivo neurochemistry with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sole, Angelo; Gambini, Anna; Falini, Andrea; Lecchi, Michela; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2002-10-01

    The assessment of neurochemical processes in vivo has received much attention in the past decade as techniques such as positron or single photon emission tomography (PET and SPET), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have become more available. With PET and SPET, basic processes, such as blood flow and oxygen or glucose metabolism, can be regionally assessed, along with more specific functions such as the production, release, and reuptake of neurotransmitters and their occupancy of specific receptors. At the same time, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate compounds in the brain. All these methods have been extensively applied for research in neurology, and some applications have reached the clinical level, namely for the study of degenerative diseases, motor-neuron diseases, movement disorders, cerebrovascular diseases, and epilepsy. This article focuses on the most relevant information that can be obtained with these complementary techniques to help clinicians in the assessment of neurological diseases.

  20. In vivo neurochemistry with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sole, Angelo Del [Azienda Ospedaliera San Paolo e Universita di Milano, 20142 Milan (Italy); Gambini, Anna; Falini, Andrea [IRCCS H San Raffaele e Universita Vita e Salute, 20132 Milan (Italy); Lecchi, Michela [Azienda Ospedaliera L. Sacco e Universita di Milano, 20157 Milan (Italy); Lucignani, Giovanni [Azienda Ospedaliera L. Sacco e Universita di Milano, 20157 Milan (Italy); Universita di Milano, Istituto di Scienze Radiologiche, Cattedra di Medicina Nucleare c/o Ospedale L. Sacco, Via G.B. Grassi, 74, 20157 Milan (Italy)

    2002-10-01

    The assessment of neurochemical processes in vivo has received much attention in the past decade as techniques such as positron or single photon emission tomography (PET and SPET), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have become more available. With PET and SPET, basic processes, such as blood flow and oxygen or glucose metabolism, can be regionally assessed, along with more specific functions such as the production, release, and reuptake of neurotransmitters and their occupancy of specific receptors. At the same time, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate compounds in the brain. All these methods have been extensively applied for research in neurology, and some applications have reached the clinical level, namely for the study of degenerative diseases, motor-neuron diseases, movement disorders, cerebrovascular diseases, and epilepsy. This article focuses on the most relevant information that can be obtained with these complementary techniques to help clinicians in the assessment of neurological diseases. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine: technical and clinical observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Boumphrey, F.; Starnes, D.; Duchesneau, P.M.

    1983-12-01

    Seventy-two patients were examined to determine the clinical potential for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine. MRI using different pulse sequences was compared with plain radiography, high-resolution computed tomography, and myelography. There were 35 normal patients; pathologic conditions studied included canal stenosis, herniated disk, metastatic tumor, neurofibroma, trauma, Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, arteriovenous malformation, and rheumatoid arthritis. MRI provided sharply defined anatomic delineation and tissue characterization. It was diagnostic in syringomyelia and Chiari malformation and was useful in the evaluation of trauma and spinal canal block from any cause. MRI was sensitive to degenerative disk disease and infection. The spin-echo technique, with three pulse sequence variations, seems very promising. A short echo time (TE) produces the best signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Lengthening the TE enhances differentiation of various tissues by their signal intensity, whil the combined increase of TE and recovery time (TR) produces selective enhancement of the cerebrospinal fluid signal intensity.

  2. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-09-09

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it.

  3. Clinical features and magnetic resonance image analysis of 15 cases of demyelinating leukoencephalopathy induced by levamisole

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAN, RUIFANG; WU, QINGWU; REN, JIPENG; CUI, HONGKAI; ZHAI, KAIHUA; ZHAI, ZHANSHENG; DUAN, QINGHONG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for levamisole-induced demyelinating leukoencephalopathy. The clinical features and MRI findings of 15 patients with levamisole-induced demyelinating leukoencephalopathy were retrospectively analyzed. The abnormality rate of the patients was demonstrated to be 100% by MRI, and scattered multiple cerebral foci were observed in all of the patients. The majority of the foci were located at the centrum ovale, peri-lateral cerebral ventricles and basal ganglia, while the remainder were located in the brain stem and cerebellum, as well as in the white matter regions of the temporal, frontal, apical and occipital lobes. In addition, mottling and ring-shaped enhancements were observed. The study demonstrated that MRI effectively displays demyelinating leukoencephalopathy, and that the combination of MRI with the medical history of the patient is of significance for the early diagnosis, differentiation and treatment of demyelinating leukoencephalopathy. PMID:23935721

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of a cerebral cavernous haemangioma in a dog : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Schoeman

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available A 13-month-old, neutered, male Golden retriever presented with seizures and progressive depression. Clinical and neurological assessment was consistent with severe intracranial disease. The neurological condition progressively deteriorated and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed the presence of a large, contrast-enhancing, space-occupying mass in the right cerebral hemisphere. Therapy with corticosteroids, mannitol and furosemide ameliorated the signs of depression and ataxia, but the owner elected euthanasia after 1 week. Post mortem examination of the brain confirmed the presence of a large haemorrhagic lesion in the right olfactory lobe, the histopathological appearance of which was consistent with cerebral cavernous haemangioma. This is the 1st case describing the MRI appearance of a cavernous haemangioma of the cerebrum in the veterinary literature.

  5. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate: technical aspects and role in clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Daniel N; Pedrosa, Ivan; Roehrborn, Claus; Rofsky, Neil M

    2014-08-01

    The heterogeneity and largely indolent nature of prostate cancer require better tools to avoid overdetection of low-risk disease and improve diagnostic accuracy in high-risk patients. During the last 3 decades, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved to become the most accurate imaging technique for prostate cancer detection and staging, with a promising role in risk stratification. Because each MRI technique has advantages and limitations, state of the art of the so-called multiparametric MRI of the prostate is achieved combining anatomical T2-weighted imaging integrated with other techniques in which image contrast is related to the pathophysiology of the disease, such as diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, and MR spectroscopy. After reviewing this article, readers will understand the clinical challenges in the management of patients with confirmed or suspected prostate cancer, when and how multiparametric MRI of the prostate can provide meaningful information, and how to perform and interpret it.

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3T as a Clinical Tool in Patients with Intracranial Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westen, D. van; Skagerberg, G.; Olsrud, J.; Fransson, P.; Larsson, E.M. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Depts. of Diagnostic Radiology and Neurosurgery

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3T as a clinical tool in the preoperative evaluation of patients with intracranial tumors. High magnetic field strength such as 3T is of benefit for fMRI because signal-to-noise ratio and sensitivity to susceptibility changes are field-strength-dependent. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with tumors close to eloquent sensorimotor or language areas were studied. Motor, sensory, and two language paradigms (word generation, rhyming) were used; their effectiveness was determined as the percentage of patients in whom the functional area of interest was activated. Activation maps were calculated and their quality rated as high, adequate, or insufficient. The influence of fMRI on the neurosurgical decision regarding operability, surgical approach, and extent of the resection, was assessed. Results: Paradigm effectiveness was 90% for motor and 95% for sensory stimulation, and varied from 79% to 95% for word generation and rhyming in combination. Ninety percent of the activation maps held high or adequate quality. fMRI proved useful: in the decision to operate (9 patients), in the surgical approach (13 patients), and in extent of the resection (12 patients). Conclusion: fMRI at 3T is a clinically applicable tool in the work-up of patients with intracranial tumors.

  7. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) of the human brain: technique, findings and clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscox, Lucy V.; Johnson, Curtis L.; Barnhill, Eric; McGarry, Matt D. J.; Huston 3rd, John; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Starr, John M.; Roberts, Neil

    2016-12-01

    Neurological disorders are one of the most important public health concerns in developed countries. Established brain imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and x-ray computerised tomography (CT) have been essential in the identification and diagnosis of a wide range of disorders, although usually are insufficient in sensitivity for detecting subtle pathological alterations to the brain prior to the onset of clinical symptoms—at a time when prognosis for treatment is more favourable. The mechanical properties of biological tissue provide information related to the strength and integrity of the cellular microstructure. In recent years, mechanical properties of the brain have been visualised and measured non-invasively with magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), a particularly sensitive medical imaging technique that may increase the potential for early diagnosis. This review begins with an introduction to the various methods used for the acquisition and analysis of MRE data. A systematic literature search is then conducted to identify studies that have specifically utilised MRE to investigate the human brain. Through the conversion of MRE-derived measurements to shear stiffness (kPa) and, where possible, the loss tangent (rad), a summary of results for global brain tissue and grey and white matter across studies is provided for healthy participants, as potential baseline values to be used in future clinical investigations. In addition, the extent to which MRE has revealed significant alterations to the brain in patients with neurological disorders is assessed and discussed in terms of known pathophysiology. The review concludes by predicting the trends for future MRE research and applications in neuroscience.

  8. Sparse Reconstruction Techniques in Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Methods, Applications, and Challenges to Clinical Adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Alice C; Kretzler, Madison; Sudarski, Sonja; Gulani, Vikas; Seiberlich, Nicole

    2016-06-01

    The family of sparse reconstruction techniques, including the recently introduced compressed sensing framework, has been extensively explored to reduce scan times in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). While there are many different methods that fall under the general umbrella of sparse reconstructions, they all rely on the idea that a priori information about the sparsity of MR images can be used to reconstruct full images from undersampled data. This review describes the basic ideas behind sparse reconstruction techniques, how they could be applied to improve MRI, and the open challenges to their general adoption in a clinical setting. The fundamental principles underlying different classes of sparse reconstructions techniques are examined, and the requirements that each make on the undersampled data outlined. Applications that could potentially benefit from the accelerations that sparse reconstructions could provide are described, and clinical studies using sparse reconstructions reviewed. Lastly, technical and clinical challenges to widespread implementation of sparse reconstruction techniques, including optimization, reconstruction times, artifact appearance, and comparison with current gold standards, are discussed.

  9. Clinical use of gadobutrol for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng KT

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth T Cheng1, Hannah Y Cheng2, Kam Leung31Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Freelance Technical Writer, New Orleans, LA, USA; 3National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI is an important clinical tool for diagnosing neurological diseases. The appropriate use of a suitable MRI contrast agent or contrast pharmaceutical is essential for CE-MRI to produce desirable diagnostic images. Currently, there are seven contrast agents (CAs or pharmaceuticals approved for clinical imaging of the central nervous system (CNS in the US, Europe, or Japan. All of the clinically approved CAs are water-soluble gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs which do not penetrate the CNS blood–brain barrier (BBB. These agents are used for imaging CNS areas without a BBB, or various pathologies, such as tumors and infection that break down the BBB and allow CAs to enter into the surrounding parenchyma. Clinically, GBCAs are most useful for detecting primary and secondary cerebral neoplastic lesions. Among these CNS GBCAs, gadobutrol (Gd-BT-DO3A, Gadovist™ is a neutral, nonionic, macrocyclic compound that showed promising results from clinical trials of CNS imaging. In comparison with other GBCAs, Gd-BT-DO3A has relatively high in vitro kinetic stability and r1 relaxivity. Gd-BT-DO3A has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in 2011 for CNS imaging. A review of available literature shows that Gd-BT-DO3A exhibits similar safety and clinical efficacy profiles to other GBCAs. Gd-BT-DO3A has the distinguishing feature that it is the only clinical agent commercially available in a formulation of 1.0 M concentration with a relatively higher in vitro T1 shortening per unit volume than other clinical GBCAs which are only

  10. The diagnosis of silicone breast-implant rupture: clinical findings compared with findings at magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Fryzek, Jon P; Kjøller, Kim;

    2005-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the usefulness of clinical examination in the evaluation of breast-implant integrity, using the diagnosis at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the "gold standard." Fifty-five women with 109 implants underwent a breast examination either just before or shortly after...

  11. EX-VIVO MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-IMAGING OF PRETRANSPLANT HUMAN DONOR LIVER - CLINICAL-EXPERIENCE IN 66 CASES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLF, RFE; MOOYAART, EL; KAMMAN, RL; DEKETH, HP; THIJN, CJP; SLOOFF, MJH

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 66 cold-stored human donor livers. Spin echo images were obtained with a clinical whole body MRI system. Various parenchymal and vascular abnormalities were found. An unexpected finding was the abundant presence of intrahepatic air. Although the majo

  12. Rationale for the combination of nuclear medicine with magnetic resonance for pre-clinical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J; Kapusta, Maciej; Li, Junqiang; Patt, Bradley E

    2006-08-01

    Multi-modality combinations of SPECT/CT and PET/CT have proven to be highly successful in the clinic and small animal SPECT/CT and PET/CT are becoming the norm in the research and drug development setting. However, the use of ionizing radiation from a high-resolution CT scanner is undesirable in any setting and particularly in small animal imaging (SAI), in laboratory experiments where it can result in radiation doses of sufficient magnitude that the experimental results can be influenced by the organism's response to radiation. The alternative use of magnetic resonance (MR) would offer a high-resolution, non-ionizing method for anatomical imaging of laboratory animals. MR brings considerably more than its 3D anatomical capability, especially regarding the imaging of laboratory animals. Dynamic MR imaging techniques can facilitate studies of perfusion, oxygenation, and diffusion amongst others. Further, MR spectroscopy can provide images that can be related to the concentration of endogenous molecules in vivo. MR imaging of injected contrast agents extends MR into the domain of molecular imaging. In combination with nuclear medicine (NM) SPECT and PET modalities in small animal imaging, MR would facilitate studies of dynamic processes such as biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. However, the detectors for nearly all PET and SPECT systems are still based on vacuum tube technology, namely: photomultiplier tubes (PMT's) in which the signal is generated by transporting electrons over a substantial distance within an evacuated glass tube, making them inoperable in even small magnetic fields. Thus the combination of SPECT or PET with MR has not been practical until the recent availability of semiconductor detectors such as silicon avalanche photodiodes (APD's) for PET and CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for SPECT coupled with the availability of high-density low noise ASIC electronics to read out the semiconductor detectors. The strong advantage of these

  13. Clinically relevant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings in elite swimmers’ shoulders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Celliers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shoulder pain is the most common and well-documented site of musculoskeletal pain in elite swimmers. Structural abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of elite swimmers’ symptomatic shoulders are common. Little has been documented about the association between MRI findings in the asymptomatic shoulder versus the symptomatic shoulder.Objective: To assess clinically relevant MRI findings in the shoulders of symptomatic and asymptomatic elite swimmers.Method: Twenty (aged 16–23 years elite swimmers completed questionnaires on their swimming training, pain and shoulder function. MRI of both shoulders (n = 40 were performed and all swimmers were given a standardised clinical shoulder examination. Results: Both shoulders of 11 male and 9 female elite swimmers (n = 40 were examined. Eleven of the 40 shoulders were clinically symptomatic and 29 were asymptomatic. The most common clinical finding in both the symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulders was impingement during internal rotation, with impingement in 54.5% of the symptomatic shoulders and in 31.0% of the asymptomatic shoulders. The most common MRI findings in the symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulders were supraspinatus tendinosis (45.5% vs. 20.7%, subacromial subdeltoid fluid (45.5% vs. 34.5%, increased signal in the AC Joint (45.5% vs. 37.9% and AC joint arthrosis (36.4% vs. 34.5%. Thirty-nine (97.5% of the shoulders showed abnormal MRI features.Conclusion: MRI findings in the symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulders of young elite swimmers are similar and care should be taken when reporting shoulder MRIs in these athletes. Asymptomatic shoulders demonstrate manifold MRI abnormalities that may be radiologically significant but appear not to be clinically significant.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients With Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis: Is There a Relationship Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging Abnormalities of the Common Extensor Tendon and the Patient's Clinical Symptom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Liang; Zhang, Yu-Dong; Yu, Rong-Bin; Shi, Hai-Bin

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the inter-reliability and intra-observer reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for lateral epicondylitis and investigate whether there is a potential relationship between MRI abnormalities of the common extensor tendon (CET) and its clinical symptom.The study group comprised 96 consecutive patients (46 men and 50 women) with a clinical diagnosis of chronic lateral epicondylitis, which were examined on 3.0 T MR. An MRI scoring system was used to grade the degree of tendinopahty. Three independent musculoskeletal radiologists, who were blinded to the patients' clinical information, scored images separately. Clinical symptoms were assessed using the Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE).Of all the patients, total 96 elbows had MRI-assessed tendinopathy, including 38 (39.6%) with grade 1, 31 (32.3%) with grade 2, and 27 (28.1%) with grade 3. Inter-observer reliability and intra-observer agreement for MRI interpretation of the grades of tendinopathy was good, and a positive correlation between the grades of tendinopathy and PRTEE was determined.MRI is a reliable tool in determining radiological severity of chronical lateral epicondylitis. The severity of MR signal changes positively correlate with the patient's clinical symptom.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance based metabolomics and liver diseases: Recent advances and future clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amathieu, Roland; Triba, Mohamed Nawfal; Goossens, Corentine; Bouchemal, Nadia; Nahon, Pierre; Savarin, Philippe; Le Moyec, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is defined as the quantitative measurement of the dynamic multiparametric metabolic response of living systems to pathophysiological stimuli or genetic modification. It is an "omics" technique that is situated downstream of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics. Metabolomics is recognized as a promising technique in the field of systems biology for the evaluation of global metabolic changes. During the last decade, metabolomics approaches have become widely used in the study of liver diseases for the detection of early biomarkers and altered metabolic pathways. It is a powerful technique to improve our pathophysiological knowledge of various liver diseases. It can be a useful tool to help clinicians in the diagnostic process especially to distinguish malignant and non-malignant liver disease as well as to determine the etiology or severity of the liver disease. It can also assess therapeutic response or predict drug induced liver injury. Nevertheless, the usefulness of metabolomics is often not understood by clinicians, especially the concept of metabolomics profiling or fingerprinting. In the present work, after a concise description of the different techniques and processes used in metabolomics, we will review the main research on this subject by focusing specifically on in vitro proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based metabolomics approaches in human studies. We will first consider the clinical point of view enlighten physicians on this new approach and emphasis its future use in clinical "routine".

  17. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography of patients using a standard clinical scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Tomas; Wikstroem, Johan; Eriksson, Mats-Ola; Lundberg, Anders; Ahlstroem, Haakan [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Johansson, Lars [Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Ljungman, Christer [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery, Uppsala (Sweden); Hoogeven, Romhild [Philips Medical Systems, MR Clinical Science, Best (Netherlands)

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technique of whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of patients with a standard clinical scanner. Thirty-three patients referred for stenoses, occlusions, aneurysms, assessment of patency of vascular grafts, vasculitis and vascular aplasia were examined in a 1.5-T scanner using its standard body coil. Three-dimensional sequences were acquired in four stations after administration of one intravenous injection of 40 ml conventional gadolinium contrast agent. Different vessel segments were evaluated as either diagnostic or nondiagnostic and regarding the presence of stenoses with more than 50% diameter reduction, occlusions or aneurysms. Of 923 vessel segments, 67 were not evaluable because of poor contrast filling (n=31), motion artefacts (n=20), venous overlap (n=12) and other reasons (n=4). Stenoses of more than 50%, occlusions or aneurysms were observed in 26 patients (129 segments). In nine patients additional unsuspected pathology was found. In 10 out of 14 patients (71/79 segments) there was conformity between MRA and digital subtraction angiography regarding the grade of stenosis. This study shows that whole-body MRA with a standard clinical scanner is feasible. Motion artefacts and the timing of the contrast agent through the different segments are still problems to be solved. (orig.)

  18. Phased array magnetic resonance imaging for staging clinically localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borre, Michael; Langkilde, Niels Christian; Wolf, Hans [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Urology; Lundorf, Erik [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Center of MRI; Marcussen, Niels [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Inst. of Pathology

    2005-09-01

    Patients suffering from intra-capsular prostate cancer (T1-2, N0, M0) are potential candidates for curative treatment by radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy. Curative intended therapy is frequently associated with substantial side effects, which makes accuracy of preoperative staging important. However, up to 40% of the patients with clinically localized disease turn out to be under-staged and should not have been subjected to curative surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the value of preoperative phased array MRI staging in patients who are candidates for radical prostatectomy. Ninety-five potential candidates for radical prostatectomy suspected of suffering from clinical prostate cancer underwent pre-diagnostic and pre-operative staging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The results were compared with the postoperative pathological findings including evidence of extra-capsular extension (ECE) of the tumor. The MRI results were not taken into consideration when staging the patients preoperatively or offering treatment. Radical prostatectomy was performed within a few weeks after MRI. In 48 patients the diagnostic biopsy did not detect carcinoma but benign hyperplasia of the prostate (BPH), while 9 patients had T3 disease. Thirty-eight patients had clinically localized prostate cancer and underwent radical prostatectomy. In 16 cases (42%) ECE was postoperatively proven by the pathologist, while only 22 (58%) of the patients suffered from true localized prostate cancer. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI detecting ECE were 24% and 86% respectively, while the positive and negative predictive value of MRI with regard to ECE were only 57% and 61% respectively. Phased array MRI did not in its present form provide the necessary accuracy in preoperative staging in clinically localized prostate cancer patients.

  19. Clinical and magnetic resonance evaluation of the temporomandibular joint with rotational disc displacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Masatoshi; Sakurada, Motoyuki; Echigo, Seishi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Dentistry; Kumagai, Masahiro; Kochi, Shoko

    1998-03-01

    The most common direction of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement is anterior. Anterior disc displacement is associated with lateral or medial disc displacement, termed rotational disc displacement (RDD). There have been few systematic studies of the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of TMJs with RDD. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of RDD and to evaluate the relations between the direction of disc displacement (anteromedial RDD, anterolateral RDD, and pure anterior disc displacement) and clinical findings, including joint pain, joint sound, and range of motion, as well as MRI findings, including disc shape, disc reduction, disc mobility, degree of disc displacement, bone changes of the condyle, and degree of condylar translation. The study was based on MRI of 529 TMJs in 409 patients with symptoms and signs of TMJ. Sagittal and coronal T1-weighted SE images (1.5 Tesla) were used. MRI showed anteromedial RDD in 96 joints (18.1%), anterolateral RDD in 64 joints (12.1%), and anterior disc displacement in 207 joints (39.1%). There were no statistical differences between anterolateral RDD, anteromedial RDD, and anterior disc displacement with regard to clinical findings. The incidence of reducible disc was higher in anterolateral RDD than in anteromedial RDD or anterior disc displacement. The incidence of bone changes was lower in anterolateral RDD than in anterior disc displacement. There were no significant differences between anteromedial RDD and anterior disc displacement with regard to MRI findings. In conclusion, anteromedial RDD may represent the same clinical entity as anterior disc displacement, but it remains unclear whether or not anterolateral RDD differs from anteromedial RDD or anterior disc displacement. (author)

  20. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  1. Current technological advances in magnetic resonance with critical impact for clinical diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Val M

    2013-12-01

    The last 5 years of technological advances with major impact on clinical magnetic resonance (MR) are discussed, with greater emphasis on those that are most recent. These developments have already had a critical positive effect on clinical diagnosis and therapy and presage continued rapid improvements for the next 5 years. This review begins with a discussion of 2 topics that encompass the breadth of MR, in terms of anatomic applications, contrast media, and MR angiography. Subsequently, innovations are discussed by anatomic category, picking the areas with the greatest development, starting with the brain, moving forward to the liver and kidney, and concluding with the musculoskeletal system, breast, and prostate. Two final topics are then considered, which will likely, with time, become independent major fields in their own right, interventional MR and MR positron emission tomography (PET).The next decade will bring a new generation of MR contrast media, with research focused on substantial improvements (>100-fold) in relaxivity (contrast effect), thus providing greater efficacy, safety, and tissue targeting. Magnetic resonance angiography will see major advances because of the use of compressed sensing, in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, with movement away from nondynamic imaging. The breadth of available techniques and tissue contrast has greatly expanded in brain imaging, benefiting both from the introduction of new basic categories of imaging techniques, such as readout-segmented echo planar imaging and 3D fast spin echo imaging with variable flip angles, and from new refinements specific to anatomic areas, such as double inversion recovery and MP2RAGE. Liver imaging has benefited from the development of techniques to easily and rapidly assess lipid, and will see, overall, a marked improvement in the next 5 years from new techniques on the verge of clinical introduction, such as controlled aliasing in parallel imaging results in higher acceleration

  2. Temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging signs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyropoulou, Maria I.; Margariti, Persefoni N.; Astrakas, Loukas; Kosta, Paraskevi [Medical School University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Ioannina (Greece); Karali, Aikaterini; Alfandaki, Sapfo; Siamopoulou, Antigoni [University of Ioannina, Department of Child Health, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2009-03-15

    The aim of the study was to define clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Forty-six patients, aged 2.08-36.7 years, with JIA (oligoartitular 18, polyarticular 17, systemic type 11) were examined with standard plain and contrast-enhanced sequences. Of 88 TMJs examined, an abnormal condyle was observed in 32%, flattened articular eminence in 27%, flattened articular disk in 17%, intra-articular fluid in 10%, enhancing pannus in 45% and restricted condylar motion in 9%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that for abnormal condyle and flattened articular eminence, independent predictors were type of JIA (P < 0.015), age at onset (P < 0.038), and duration of disease activity (P < 0.001). Plots of the logistic regression models showed that TMJ involvement approached certainty for systemic sooner than for the other JIA types. Pannus was present with probability >0.5 when the disease started before 4 years of age. In conclusion, the systemic type of JIA, young age at onset and long duration of activity are risk factors for TMJ damage. MRI of the TMJ should be performed in patients who are less than 4 years of age at the onset of JIA, and in those with the systemic type, whatever the age of onset. (orig.)

  3. Clinical significance of pontine high signals identified on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masaki; Takahashi, Akira (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Arahata, Yutaka; Motegi, Yoshimasa; Furuse, Masahiro

    1993-07-01

    Spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated to 530 cases in order to investigate the clinical significance of pontine high signals. The subjects comprised 109 cases of pontine infarction with high signal on T[sub 2]-weighted image and low signal on T[sub 1]-weighted image (PI group), 145 of pontine high signal with high signal on T[sub 2]-weighted image but normal signal on T[sub 1]-weighted image (PH group) and 276 of age-matched control without abnormality either on T[sub 1] or T[sub 2]-weighted images (AC group). Subjective complaints such as vertigo-dizziness were more frequent in the PH group than in the PI group. In both PI and groups, periventricular hyperintensity as well as subcortical high signals in the supratentorium were more severe than in the AC group. These degrees were higher in the PI group than in the PH group. In conclusion, PH as well as PI may result from diffuse arteriosclerosis and PH is considered to be an early finding of pontine ischemia. (author).

  4. Clinical Application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Management of Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon-Hor Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC, also termed primary, induction, or preoperative chemotherapy, is traditionally used to downstage inoperable breast cancer. In recent years it has been increasingly used for patients who have operable cancers in order to facilitate breast-conserving surgery, achieve better cosmetic outcome, and improve prognosis by reaching pathologic complete response (pCR. Many studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can assess residual tumor size after NAC, and that provides critical information for planning of the optimal surgery. NAC also allows for timely adjustment of administered drugs based on response, so ineffective regimens could be terminated early to spare patients from unnecessary toxicity while allowing other effective regimens to work sooner. This review article summarizes the clinical application of MRI during NAC. The use of different MR imaging methods, including dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, proton MR spectroscopy, and diffusion-weighted MRI, to monitor and evaluate the NAC response, as well as how changes of parameters measured at an early time after initiation of a drug regimen can predict final treatment outcome, are reviewed. MRI has been proven a valuable tool and will continue to provide important information facilitating individualized image-guided treatment and personalized management for breast cancer patients undergoing NAC.

  5. Clinical study on magnetic resonance imaging of lacunar infarcts and cerebrovascular high-risk group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hironaka, Masatoshi (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study was performed in 32 patients with recent lacunar stroke. T2-weighted images showed ischemic lesions more clearly than T1-weighted images. Sixty-six percent of 32 patients had periventricular lesions. Eighty-four percent had subcortical white matter lesions. Sixty-nine percent had lesions in basal ganglia. Twenty-eight percent had lesions in brainstem. Periventricular lesions were revealed symmetrically. On the other hand, lesions in other areas were not detected symmetrically. Severe periventricular lesions on MRI were similar to those of Binswanger's disease. Patients with severe periventricular lesions had often hypertension. Moreover, two of them had dementia. Twenty-three patients with transient ischemic attack had less remarkable lesions than patients with lacunar stroke. Thirty-seven patients with a history of cerebrovascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus) had severer lesions compared with normal controls. Sixty-one percent of controls, who had no cerebrovascular symptoms and signs, had MRI lesions. These results suggest that MRI is useful for detection of cerebral ischemic lesions with no associated clinical symptoms or signs. (author).

  6. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance-Verified Myocardial Fibrosis in Chagas Disease: Clinical Correlates and Risk Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uellendahl, Marly; de Siqueira, Maria Eduarda Menezes; Calado, Eveline Barros; Kalil-Filho, Roberto; Sobral, Dário; Ribeiro, Clébia; Oliveira, Wilson; Martins, Silvia; Narula, Jagat; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Chagas disease (CD) is an important cause of heart failure and mortality, mainly in Latin America. This study evaluated the morphological and functional characteristics of the heart as well the extent of myocardial fibrosis (MF) in patients with CD by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). The prognostic value of MF evaluated by myocardial-delayed enhancement (MDE) was compared with that via Rassi score. Methods This study assessed 39 patients divided into 2 groups: 28 asymptomatic patients as indeterminate form group (IND); and symptomatic patients as Chagas Heart Disease (CHD) group. All patients underwent CMR using the techniques of cine-MRI and MDE, and the amount of MF was compared with the Rassi score. Results Regarding the morphological and functional analysis, significant differences were observed between both groups (p < 0.001). Furthermore, there was a strong correlation between the extent of MF and the Rassi score (r = 0.76). Conclusions CMR is an important technique for evaluating patients with CD, stressing morphological and functional differences in all clinical presentations. The strong correlation with the Rassi score and the extent of MF detected by CMR emphasizes its role in the prognostic stratification of patients with CD. PMID:27982271

  7. Clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscles in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies of adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikai, Masahiko; Akiya, Kumiko [National Tokyo Medical Center (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of skeletal muscles in Japanese patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). MRI was performed in 23 adult patients with IIM, including 10 with polymyositis, 12 with dermatomyositis, and 1 with focal myositis. Seven (73%) of 11 patients with active IIM and 2 (17%) of 12 patients with inactive IIM showed hyperintensity of T2-weighted images and normal intensity of T1-weighted images, indicating 'edema-like abnormalities' (MRI findings for active myositis). Muscle lipomatosis and fibrosis were demonstrated in four patients and 1 patient, respectively. Considerable selectivity of muscles in developing inflammatory disorders was found. In quadriceps muscles, for example, vastus muscles seemed to be more often affected in DM patients, whereas adductors were more often affected in PM patients. Serial examination of muscle MRIs was carried out in 4 patients and the findings paralleled the disease activities. The muscle MRI findings did not necessarily correlate with other findings, such as the presence of muscle weakness, elevated serum creatine kinase levels, myogenic electromyogram, or muscle biopsy findings. The muscle MRI was considered to be an additional useful tool for the diagnosis, evaluation of disease activity, and planning treatment of IIM. (author)

  8. Magnetic Resonance Image Evaluation of Temporomandibular Joint Osteophytes: Influence of Clinical Factors and Artrogenics Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Eduardo; Remedi, Marcelo Pereira; Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2016-03-01

    This research aims to examine the presence of osteophyte in patients with arthrogenic temporomandibular disorders through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); to investigate the influence of sex and clinical symptoms in its prevalence; and the position of the osteophytes in the condyle. The study was based on 100 MRI and on reports of patients, which corresponded to the evaluation of 200 joints. Patients of both sexes were aged from 18 to 82 years (average = 49.48) and were subjected to the aforementioned examination from January 2006 to March 2009. The assessment considered the type of disc displacement, the presence of effusion, bone marrow edema, condyle changes, joint noise and pain. The MRI machine used was the GE Signa HDX (General Electric, Milwaukee, WI), with T1 and T2-weighted, 1.5 T magnetic field, sagittal oblique (mouth closed, mouth open) and coronal (mouth closed) imaging, with spherical surface coil and an asymmetric matrix. All images were interpreted by an experienced radiologist. A total of 28% (n = 56) of the temporomandibular joints showed osteophytes on the anterior surface of the mandible. No relationship was found between sex and osteophytes. The authors found a statistically significant difference between osteophytes and disc displacement without reduction (P < 0.001). The presence of osteophytes suggested a possible cause and effect relationship between osteoarthritis and disc displacement without reduction; the osteophyte was always located in the anterior surface of condyle, regardless of the sex variable; no significant difference was found between osteophytes and the main complaints of the patient.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  10. Knee dislocations: a magnetic resonance imaging study correlated with clinical and operative findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bui, Kimmie L. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, HB6, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ilaslan, Hakan; Sundaram, Murali [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Parker, Richard D. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Orthopaedics, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Our objectives were to determine retrospectively the prevalence, patients' demographics, mechanism of injury, combination of torn ligaments, associated intra-articular and extra-articular injuries, fractures, bone bruises, femoral-tibial alignment and neurovascular complications of knee dislocations as evaluated by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. From 17,698 consecutive knee examinations by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over a 6-year period, 20 patients with knee dislocations were identified. The medical records of these patients were subsequently reviewed for relevant clinical history, management and operative findings. The prevalence of knee dislocations was 0.11% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.06-0.16]. There were 16 male patients and four female patients, with ages ranging from 15 years to 76 years (mean 31 years). Fifteen patients had low-velocity injuries (75%), of which 11 were amateur sports related and four were from falls. Four patients (20%) had suffered high-velocity trauma (motor vehicle accidents). One patient had no history available. Anatomic alignment was present at imaging in 16 patients (80%). Eighteen patients had three-ligament tears, two had four-ligament tears. The four-ligament tears occurred with low-velocity injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) were torn in every patient; the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) was torn in 50%, and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) in 60%. Intra-articular injuries included meniscal tears (five in four patients), fractures (eight in seven patients), bone bruises (15 patients), and patellar retinaculum tears (eight partial, two complete). The most common extra-articular injury was a complete biceps femoris tendon tear (five, 25%). There were two popliteal tendon tears and one iliotibial band tear. One patient had received a vascular injury following a motor vehicle accident (MVA) and had been treated prior to undergoing MRI. Bone bruises

  11. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate. Technique and clinical applications; Multiparametrische Magnetresonanztomografie der Prostata. Technik und klinische Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franiel, Tobias [Charite, Berlin (Germany). Radiologie CCM

    2011-07-15

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) includes 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion-weighted imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These new MRI techniques are increasingly being used to supplement conventional T 2 and T 1-weighted MR sequences in prostate imaging. The first part of this review outlines each of these techniques, the most important diagnostic parameters, and the pathophysiological background. The characteristic features of prostate cancer and noncancerous prostate tissue as depicted with each of the three techniques are presented. The second, clinical part outlines the diagnostic applications of the three MRI techniques for the early detection and localization of prostate cancer, staging, and the identification of recurrent cancer and discusses the most recent publications in this field. The review concludes with a look at emerging clinical applications such as the evaluation of biological aggressiveness and tumor volume. (orig.)

  12. Memory assessment in the clinical context using functional magnetic resonance imaging: a critical look at the state of the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2014-11-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging to map language and sensorimotor regions in the brain is rapidly becoming a clinical standard in neurosurgical centers. Despite a wealth of cognitive neuroscience data showing focal medial temporal activation elicited by memory encoding and retrieval tasks in controls, translating such findings to generate reliable metrics for clinical use has been slow. The current review documents some of the successes that have been achieved, using both activation and resting-state functional connectivity in the clinical context of temporal lobe epilepsy, and discusses some of the challenges that remain to be addressed.

  13. The diagnosis of silicone breast-implant rupture: clinical findings compared with findings at magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Fryzek, Jon P; Kjøller, Kim;

    2005-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the usefulness of clinical examination in the evaluation of breast-implant integrity, using the diagnosis at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the "gold standard." Fifty-five women with 109 implants underwent a breast examination either just before or shortly after...... an MRI examination. Twenty-four of 109 implants were clinically diagnosed with possible rupture or rupture. Eighteen of the 24 implants were ruptured according to the MRI examination (75%). Eighty-five implants were clinically classified as intact, and 43 of these were actually ruptured at MRI (51...

  14. Pre-clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging. Pt. II. The heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messner, Nadja M.; Zoellner, Frank G.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine

    2014-07-01

    One third of all deaths worldwide in 2008 were caused by cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and the incidence of CVD related deaths rises ever more. Thus, improved imaging techniques and modalities are needed for the evaluation of cardiac morphology and function. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is a minimally invasive technique that is increasingly important due to its high spatial and temporal resolution, its high soft tissue contrast and its ability of functional and quantitative imaging. It is widely accepted as the gold standard of cardiac functional analysis. In the short period of small animal MRI, remarkable progress has been achieved concerning new, fast imaging schemes as well as purpose-built equipment. Dedicated small animal scanners allow for tapping the full potential of recently developed animal models of cardiac disease. In this paper, we review state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance imaging techniques and applications in small animals at ultra-high fields (UHF).

  15. The clinical study on high intensity zone of magnetic resonance imaging using Scolopendrid Aquacupuncture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-a Lim

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was designed to find out the effect of scolopendrid aquacupuncture on low back pain with or without sciatica showing high intensity zone of magnetic resonance imaging. Methods : The 30 patients who had a diagnosis of high intensity zone by lumbar-MRI and admitted to Gwangju oriental medical hospital in wonkwang university from January 2005 to August 2004 were observed. The symptom of inpatients is low back pain with or without sciatica. We treated 30 patients by scolopendrid aquacupuncture besides the general conservative treatment of oriental medicine. Results and Conclusion : The scolopendrid aquacupuncture treatment led to improvement in the pain and symptom of disability as determined by all efficacy measures. After scolopendrid aquacupuncture treatment, there was improvement in VAS, ROM and SLRT. This results suggest that scolopendrid aquacupuncture is good method for treatment of low back pain with or without sciatica showing high intensity zone of magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Updating magnetic resonance imaging of small bowel: Imaging protocols and clinical indications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiong Zhu; Jian-Rong Xu; Hong-Xia Gong; Yan Zhou

    2008-01-01

    High soft tissue contrast resolution,acquisition of multi-planar images and the possibility to obtain functional information make magnetic resonance an interesting imaging technique to evaluate the small bowel disease.The absence of ionizing radiation is an important feature of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations because inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease (CD) are studied most frequently,which are prevalent among children and young adults.MRI,using modern equipment and a rigorous technical approach,can offer detailed morphologic information and functional data on the small bowel.This article discusses the MRI protocols for small bowel and the MR imaging findings of small bowel diseases,such as CD and small bowel neoplasms.

  17. Involvement of the central nervous system in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: a clinical, electrophysiological and magnetic resonance imaging study.

    OpenAIRE

    Ormerod, I E; Waddy, H M; Kermode, A G; Murray, N M; Thomas, P. K.

    1990-01-01

    In a consecutive series of 30 patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) minor clinical evidence of CNS involvement was found in five. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 28 and revealed abnormalities consistent with demyelination in nine patients aged less than 50 years and abnormalities in five aged 50 years or over. Measurements of central motor conduction time (CMCT) were obtained in 18 and showed unilateral or bilateral abnormalities in s...

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  19. Non-invasive assessment of Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutational status in cerebral gliomas by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in a clinical setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tietze, Anna; Choi, Changho; Mickey, Bruce;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mutations in the Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH) gene are of proven diagnostic and prognostic significance for cerebral gliomas. We evaluated the clinical feasibility of using a recently described method for determining IDH mutational status by using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS...

  20. Clinical Value of Whole-body Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Weighted Imaging on Detection of Malignant Metastases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Li; Zhen-sheng Liu; Xian-mao Du; Ling He; Jian Chen; Wei Wang; Fei Sun; Fang Du; Zhi-gang Luo; Zhen-long Xue; Yi Zhao; Chang-wu Zhou

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the value of whole-body diffusion weighted imaging (WB-DWI) on detection of malignant metastasis.Methods Forty-six patients with malignant tumors underwent WB-DWI examinations between April 2007 and August 2007 in our hospital. Before WB-DWI examination, the primary cancers of all the patients were confirmed by pathology, and the TNM-stage was assessed with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). WB-DWl was performed using short TI inversion recovery echo-planar imaging (STIR-EPI) sequence. Abnormal high signal intensities on WB-DWI were considered as metastases. The results of WB-DWI were compared with other imaging modalities. For the assessment of the diagnostic capability of WB-DWl, WB-DWI were compared with CT for demonstrating mediastinal lymph node metastases and lung metastases, and with conventional MRI for demonstrating metastases in other locations.Results WB-DWI demonstrated 143 focuses, 14 of which were diagnosed to he benign lesions in routine imaging. The number of bone metastases depicted on WB-DWI and routine imaging was 85 and 86; lymph node metastases was 17 and 18; liver metastases was 14 and 14; lung metastases was 4 and 8; and brain metastases was 6 and 8, respectively. WB-DWI failed to detect 12 metastatic lesions including 3 osteoplastic bone metastases, 4 lung metastases, 3 mediastinal lymph node metastases, and 2 brain metastases. Four metastatic lesions including 2 deltopectoral lymph nodes and 2 rib metastases were detected with WB-DWI alone, all of which evolved greatly during clinical follow-up for more than 6 months. WB-DWI had higher detection rates for metastatic lesions in liver, bone, and lymph nodes than those in lung and brain (X2=30, P<0.001).Conclusions WB-DWI could detect most of metastatic lesions that were diagnosed with conventional MRI and CT. The limitations of WB-DWI might be had high false-positive rate and low efficiency in detecting mediastinal lymph node, brain, and

  1. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  2. Single spin magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of a metastatic chemodectoma in a dog : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Naudé

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A 6-year-old, male, Collie-cross was presented with a non-weight bearing right thoracic limb lameness, right m.deltoideus, m.infraspinatus and m.supraspinatus atrophy, and severe neck pain with spasm of the cervical epaxial muscles. MRI revealed complete destruction of the 5th and 6th cervical vertebral bodies with lateral extradural spinal cord compression at the level of the 4th and 5th cervical vertebrae. These lesions were very clearly demonstrated on magnetic resonance images, while only subtle changes were seen on survey radiographs. Post mortem investigation revealed a large heart base chemodectoma with multiple smaller tumours in the cranial mediastinum and a single tumour nodule on the thoracic aorta. The 5th cervical vertebral body had necrotic, haemorrhagic and lytic changes. Histopathology of the heart base tumour, the nodules in the cranial mediastinum and on the thoracic aorta and samples from the 5th cervical vertebra confirmed the presence of a malignant aortic or carotid body tumour originating from the chemoreceptor organs. Diagnostic imaging features and post mortem findings are described. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the magnetic resonance features of a metastatic chemodectoma in a dog.

  4. [Contrast in static images in clinical magnetic resonance imaging. Part 2: Sequences for various contrast weightings and applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, F

    2013-08-01

    The second part of this educational article focuses on sequence techniques in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and on suitable parameter sets for different contrast weightings. The content is based on the recently published part 1 of this educational article providing a survey on tissue properties relevant for most important contrast mechanisms. Characteristics of contrast weightings are presented in exemplary images recorded from healthy volunteers. Typical clinical applications of the most commonly used contrast weightings are described and discussed. Sequences for the following contrast weightings are included: proton density (density of hydrogen in small mobile molecules), relaxation times T1 and T2, chemical shift (water and fat), effects of magnetic susceptibility, restricted diffusion of water molecules and magnetization transfer between macromolecules and water molecules.

  5. [Magnetic Resonance Imaging Conversion Predictors of Clinically Isolated Syndrome to Multiple Sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Sara; Abreu, Pedro

    2016-11-01

    Introdução: A síndrome clinicamente isolada é uma forma de apresentação da esclerose múltipla, doença desmielinizante crónica do sistema nervoso central, e define-se por um único episódio clínico sugestivo de desmielinização. Porém, doentes com esta síndrome podem não desenvolver novos sintomas ou lesões, mesmo após longos períodos de seguimento, não cumprindo os critérios de diagnóstico da doença. Aqui serão revistas, na síndrome clinicamente isolada, as alterações na ressonância magnética que melhor predizem a conversão em esclerose múltipla. Material e Métodos: Pesquisaram-se na base de dados da PubMed artigos publicados entre janeiro de 2010 e junho de 2015 usando os termos ‘clinically isolated syndrome’, ‘cis’, ‘multiple sclerosis’, ‘magnetic resonance imaging’, ‘magnetic resonance’ e ‘mri’. Resultados: Carga lesional, localização das lesões, critérios de Barkhof e áreas/volumes de estruturas cerebrais foram as alterações na ressonância magnética convencional encontradas nos artigos incluídos nesta revisão. As técnicas não convencionais estudadas foram a dupla inversão-recuperação, a transferência de magnetização, a espectroscopia e a imagem de tensor de difusão. Discussão: Enquanto o número de lesões e a sua localização têm um papel claro na previsão da conversão da síndrome clinicamente isolada em esclerose múltipla, as técnicas não convencionais e as restantes alterações na ressonância magnética necessitam de mais estudos para confirmar a sua capacidade de prever o desenvolvimento da doença. Conclusão: Para além do valor preditivo das alterações já citadas, no futuro, diferentes achados neurorradiológicos na síndrome clinicamente isolada poderão ser considerados para os critérios de diagnóstico da esclerose múltipla e/ou modificar as recomendações sobre o seu tratamento.

  6. Measurements of Pulmonary Artery Size for Assessment of Pulmonary Hypertension by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance and Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan YANG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Pulmonary hypertension (PH often leads to dilatation of main pulmonary artery (MPA. MPA measurements can be used to predict PH. This aim of this study is to investigate power of MPA vessel indices, which are acquired from cardiovascular magnetic resonance, to evaluate PH. Methods Cardiovascular-magnetic-resonance-determined parameters of MPA were acquired and calculated in 83 PH patients, whose diagnosis were confirmed with right heart catheterization and 49 healthy volunteers; these parameters included MPA diameter (DPA, ratio of DPA and ascending aorta diameter (DPA/DAo, max mean diameter (MDmax, min mean diameter (MDmin, fraction transverse diameter (fTD, fraction longitudinal diameter (fLD, and distensibility. Results Compared with control group, DPA, DPA/DAo, MDmax, and MDmin were significantly higher in patients with PH (P28.4 mm, and MDmax>32.4 mm (area under the curve, AUC=0.979, 0.981 showed best performance in predicting PH, yielding highest specificity at 100%. Conclusion Noninvasive cardiovascular-magnetic-resonance-derived MPA measurements provide excellent and practical reference in clinical settings for detecting PH.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does it ... and MRI Breast-feeding and MRI What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, ...

  8. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  11. Computer-based magnetic resonance imaging as a tool in clinical diagnosis in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassubek, Jan; Müller, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the core elements within the differential diagnostic work-up of patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia syndromes, Parkinsonian syndromes, and motor neuron diseases. Currently, computerized MRI analyses are not routinely used for individual diagnosis; however, they have improved the anatomical understanding of pathomorphological alterations in various neurodegenerative diseases by quantitative comparisons between patients and controls at the group level. For multiparametric MRI protocols, including T1-weighted MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging, and intrinsic functional connectivity MRI, the potential as a surrogate marker is a subject of investigation. The additional value of MRI with respect to diagnosis at the individual level and for future disease-modifying multicentre trials remains to be defined. Here, we give an overview of recent applications of multiparametric MRI to patients with various neurodegenerative diseases. Starting from applications at the group level, continuous progress of a transfer to individual diagnostic classification is ongoing.

  12. Postmortem whole-body magnetic resonance imaging as an adjunct to autopsy: preliminary clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriquin, L; Kassarjian, A; Barish, M; Casserley, L; O'Brien, M; Andry, C; Eustace, S

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cadavers as an adjunct to autopsy. Eight consecutive patients underwent both whole-body MRI and autopsy [either conventional (six), limited (one), or percutaneous (one)] within 24 hours of death. Comparison was made of major and minor abnormalities and predicted cause of death recorded by independent readers at both MRI and autopsy. Major discrepancies between the recorded primary cause of death at imaging and autopsy occurred in five (5) patients. These included a myocardial infarction found at autopsy alone, bowel infarction and portal venous gas found at MRI alone, and aortic dissection and occipital infarct found at MRI alone in a patient on whom only limited autopsy was performed. Postmortem MRI may represent a useful adjunct to autopsy, particularly in patients in whom autopsy is limited due to patient/family consent, inoculation risks, and ethnic doctrines.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disk disease: clinical and pulse sequence considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modic, M.T.; Pavlicek, W.; Weinstein, M.A.; Boumphrey, F.; Ngo, F.; Hardy, R.; Duchesneau, P.M.

    1984-07-01

    Sixty-five patients were examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MR) to determine what combination of operator-selectable controls would result in a thorough examination of the intervertebral disks. There were 20 normal subjects, 8 with degenerative lumbar disk disease, 27 with both degeneration and herniation, 5 with stenosis of the spinal canal, and 5 with disk space infection. Comparison with radiographs, high-resolution CT scans, and myelograms showed that MR was the most sensitive for identification of degeneration and disk space infection, separating the normal nucleus pulposus from the annulus and degenerated disk. Herniation, stenosis of the canal, and scarring can be identified as accurately with MR as with CT or myeolography.

  14. Colorectal neoplasm: Magnetic resonance colonography with fat enema-initial clinical experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess Magnetic resonance colonography with fat enema as a method for detection of colorectal neoplasm. METHODS: Consecutive twenty-two patients underwent MR colonography with fat enema before colonoscopy. T1-weighted three-dimensional fast spoiled gradientecho with inversion recovery sequence was acquired with the patient in the supine position before and 75 s after Gadopentetate Dimelumine administration. Where by, pre and post MR coronal images were obtained with a single breath hold for about 20 s to cover the entire colon. The quality of MR colonographs and patients' tolerance to fat contrast medium was investigated. Colorectal neoplasms identified by MR colonography were compared with those identified on colonoscopy and sensitivity of detecting the lesions was calculated accordingly. RESULTS: MR colonography with fat enema was well tolerated without sedation and analgesia. 120 out of 132 (90.9%) colonic segments were well distended and only 1 (0.8%) colonic segment was poor distension. After contrast enhancement scan, mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) value between the normal colonic wall and lumen was 18.5 ± 2.9 while mean CNR value between colorectal neoplasm and lumen was 20.2 ± 3.1. By Magnetic resonance colonography, 26 of 35 neoplasms (sensitivity 74.3%) were detected. However, sensitivity of MRC was 95.5% (21 of 22) for neoplasm larger than 10 mm and 55.6% (5 of 9) for 5-10 mm neoplasm. CONCLUSION: MR colonography with fat enema and T1-weighted three-dimensional fast spoiled gradientecho with inversion recovery sequence is feasible in detecting colorectal neoplasm larger than 10 mm.

  15. Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Uecker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The main disadvantage of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are its long scan times and, in consequence, its sensitivity to motion. Exploiting the complementary information from multiple receive coils, parallel imaging is able to recover images from under-sampled k-space data and to accelerate the measurement. Because parallel magnetic resonance imaging can be used to accelerate basically any imaging sequence it has many important applications. Parallel imaging brought a fundamental shift in image reconstruction: Image reconstruction changed from a simple direct Fourier transform to the solution of an ill-conditioned inverse problem. This work gives an overview of image reconstruction from the perspective of inverse problems. After introducing basic concepts such as regularization, discretization, and iterative reconstruction, advanced topics are discussed including algorithms for auto-calibration, the connection to approximation theory, and the combination with compressed sensing.

  16. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.

    1985-12-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness.

  17. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Enterography in Crohn's Disease: Assessment of Radiologic Criteria and Endpoints for Clinical Practice and Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, Parakkal; Fletcher, Joel G; Fidler, Jeff L; Bruining, David H

    2016-09-01

    Early recognition of Crohn's disease with initiation of disease-modifying therapy has emerged as a prominent inflammatory bowel disease management strategy. Clinical practice and trials have often focused on patient symptoms, and more recently, serologic tests, stool inflammatory markers, and/or endoscopic inflammatory features for study entry criteria, treatment targets, disease activity monitoring, and to assess therapeutic response. Unfortunately, patient symptoms do not correlate well with biological disease activity, and endoscopy potentially misses or underestimates disease extent and severity in small bowel Crohn's disease. Computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) are potential tools to identify and quantify transmural structural damage and disease activity in the small bowel. In this review, we discuss the role of computed tomography enterography and MRE in disease management algorithms in clinical practice. We also compare the currently developed MRE-based scoring systems, their strengths and pitfalls, as well as the role for MRE in clinical trials for Crohn's disease.

  18. Comparison of clinical, magnetic resonance and evoked potentials data in a case of valproic-acid-related hyperammonemic coma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantson, Philippe [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Intensive Care, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Grandin, Cecile; Duprez, Thierry [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Neuroradiology, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Nassogne, Marie-Cecile [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Guerit, Jean-Michel [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Laboratory of Neurophysiology, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) multimodality evoked potentials (MEPs) and clinical findings were correlated in a 47-year-old epileptic man in whom parenteral valproic acid (VPA) therapy induced severe comatose hyperammonemic encephalopathy without biological signs of hepatotoxicity (or hepatocytic dysfunction). Although the plasma VPA level remained within a normal therapeutic range, the ammoniemia increased to a toxic peak level at 411 {mu}mol/l 24 h after symptom onset, requiring VPA therapy discontinuation. Brain MR monitoring demonstrated early cytotoxic edema evolving into delayed vasogenic edema and final brain atrophy. Concomitantly to abnormalities within the brainstem on MR images, an increase in brainstem conduction at MEPs and clinical disturbance of brainstem reflexes were observed at the initial phase of the disease course. Later, the resolution of the MR and MEPs abnormalities paralleled the clinical recovery of the reflexes. (orig.)

  19. Is There a Difference in Diagnostic Accuracy and Clinical Impact between Endoscopic Ultrasonography and Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ainsworth, Alan Patrick; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Wamberg, Peter;

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: It is still unknown whether there is a difference in diagnostic accuracy and clinical impact between endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). PATIENTS AND METHODS: The test performance and potential clinical impact of EUS...... following EUS compared with 11 patients following MRCP ( P = 0.004). For the 57 patients with an intermediate probability of needing endoscopic therapy, EUS and MRCP would have spared 37 and 38 patients, respectively, from the need to have an ERCP. In 31 patients with a presumed low risk of needing...... endoscopic therapy, 30 and 29 patients would have been spared from ERCP had EUS and MRCP, respectively, been performed initially. CONCLUSIONS: There was no difference in the diagnostic accuracy and clinical impact between EUS and MRCP in the majority of the patients. The impact of EUS or MRCP on the ERCP...

  20. Imaging in the diagnosis and management of peripheral psoriatic arthritis-The clinical utility of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Eder, Lihi; Christiansen, Sara Nysom

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterised by the presence of arthritis and often enthesitis and/or spondylitis in patients with psoriasis. However, it presents a wide range of disease manifestations in various patterns. Imaging is an important part of management of Ps...... or clinical studies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows detailed assessment of all peripheral and axial joints involved in PsA, and can visualise both inflammation and structural changes. Ultrasonography (US) can visualise many of the peripheral heterogeneous tissue compartments affected by Ps......A. In contrast to MRI, US is not useful for assessing axial involvement in the spine and sacroiliac joints. In this paper, we will provide an overview of the status, strengths and limitations of MRI and US in peripheral PsA in routine clinical practice and clinical trials....

  1. Clinical, magnetic-resonance imaging and surgical findings in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders - a survey of 47 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raustia, A.M. (Dept. of Prosthodontics and Stomatognathic Physiology, Inst. of Dentistry, Oulu Univ., Aapistie (Finland)); Pyhtinen, J. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Central Hospital, Oulu (Finland)); Pernu, H. (Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Inst. of Dentistry, Oulu Univ. (Finland))

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and correlate the clinical, magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI), and surgical findings in 47 patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. 51 TMJs (24 right, 27 left) were operated on, because 4 patients underwent treatment of both TMJs. The best correlation between MRI and surgical findings was noted in connection with position of the disk. This was surgically confirmed altogether in 88% of cases (45/51). The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by surgical findings in 75% of cases of anterior dislocation of the disk with reduction and 89% of cases of anterior dislocation of the disk without reduction. Bone changes noted by MRI were confirmed by surgery in 71% of cases. MRI was excellent especially relating to disk position and changes in disk morphology. The results show also that there are findings using MRI, e.g. of joint effusion, which cannot be confirmed during surgery. (orig.)

  2. A study of familial MELAS: Evaluation of A3243G mutation, clinical phenotype, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy-monitored progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunnuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical manifestations of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes syndrome (MELAS syndrome are nonspecific and can easily be misdiagnosed. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS-based detection of lactate in the brain has been found to be of diagnostic help in MELAS syndrome, however, the issue of whether MRS features vary by stage remains unresolved. We assessed the causative mutation and radiological features of a family of MELAS. Four of the family members harbored the A3243G mutation, probably of maternal inheritance. However, the clinical phenotypic expression was different in these patients. MRS showed a lactate peak, decreased N-acetylaspartate, choline, and creatine, which became more pronounced with progression of the disease, demonstrating that brain-MRS-based detection of lactate may be a suitable way to monitor the progression and treatment of MELAS.

  3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Bulatowicz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This presentation will describe the operational principles, design basics, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  4. Disc pathology after whiplash injury. A prospective magnetic resonance imaging and clinical investigation; Pathologie vertebrale apres le coup du lapin. Une investigation clinique et d` imagerie prospective par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, K.; Hildingsson, C.; Toolanen, G.; Fagerlund, M.; Bjornebrink, J. [University Hospital of Northem (Sweden)

    1997-09-01

    Although disc pathology seems to be one contributing factor in the development of chronic symptoms after whiplash injury, it may be unnecessary to examine these patients in the acute phase with magnetic resonance imaging ; correlating initial symptoms and signs to magnetic resonance imaging findings is difficult because of the relatively high proportion of false-positive results. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated later in the course of treatment in patients with persistent arm pain, neurologic deficits, or clinical signs of nerve root compression to diagnose disc herniations requiring surgery. (authors).

  5. Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Cholangiography: Practical Tips and Clinical Indications for Biliary Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmucci, Stefano; Roccasalva, Federica; Piccoli, Marina; Fuccio Sanzà, Giovanni; Foti, Pietro Valerio; Ragozzino, Alfonso; Milone, Pietro; Ettorre, Giovanni Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Since its introduction, MRCP has been improved over the years due to the introduction of several technical advances and innovations. It consists of a noninvasive method for biliary tree representation, based on heavily T2-weighted images. Conventionally, its protocol includes two-dimensional single-shot fast spin-echo images, acquired with thin sections or with multiple thick slabs. In recent years, three-dimensional T2-weighted fast-recovery fast spin-echo images have been added to the conventional protocol, increasing the possibility of biliary anatomy demonstration and leading to a significant benefit over conventional 2D imaging. A significant innovation has been reached with the introduction of hepatobiliary contrasts, represented by gadoxetic acid and gadobenate dimeglumine: they are excreted into the bile canaliculi, allowing the opacification of the biliary tree. Recently, 3D interpolated T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo images have been proposed for the evaluation of the biliary tree, obtaining images after hepatobiliary contrast agent administration. Thus, the acquisition of these excretory phases improves the diagnostic capability of conventional MRCP-based on T2 acquisitions. In this paper, technical features of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography are briefly discussed; main diagnostic tips of hepatobiliary phase are showed, emphasizing the benefit of enhanced cholangiography in comparison with conventional MRCP.

  6. Wernicke's encephalopathy due to hyperemesis gravidarum: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, V V; Prijesh, J; Praveenkumar, R; Saifudheen, K

    2016-01-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum-induced Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is an underestimated condition. The purpose of this study is to improve its awareness and early diagnosis. We report five cases of WE secondary to hyperemesis gravidarum. Classic triad of encephalopathy, ataxia, and ocular signs was seen in four out of five patients. Two unusual features noted in this series were papilledema in one patient and severe sensory-motor peripheral neuropathy in one patient. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was abnormal in all the five patients, and high signal in medial thalamus and surrounding the aqueduct was the most common abnormality (5/5). Involvement of caudate nucleus was seen in two patients with severe psychosis, and two patients had bilateral cerebellar peduncle involvement. Median time delay between onset of neurological symptoms and diagnosis was 7 days. All patients improved with thiamine, but minor sequelae were seen in four patients at 12 months follow-up. One patient had a fetal demise. Hyperemesis gravidarum-induced WE is a common cause of maternal morbidity. Typical MRI findings of symmetric medial thalamic and periaqueductal signal changes may permit a specific diagnosis. A delay in diagnosis, therefore treatment, leads to worse prognosis.

  7. Wernicke's encephalopathy due to hyperemesis gravidarum: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V V Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperemesis gravidarum-induced Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE is an underestimated condition. The purpose of this study is to improve its awareness and early diagnosis. We report five cases of WE secondary to hyperemesis gravidarum. Classic triad of encephalopathy, ataxia, and ocular signs was seen in four out of five patients. Two unusual features noted in this series were papilledema in one patient and severe sensory-motor peripheral neuropathy in one patient. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was abnormal in all the five patients, and high signal in medial thalamus and surrounding the aqueduct was the most common abnormality (5/5. Involvement of caudate nucleus was seen in two patients with severe psychosis, and two patients had bilateral cerebellar peduncle involvement. Median time delay between onset of neurological symptoms and diagnosis was 7 days. All patients improved with thiamine, but minor sequelae were seen in four patients at 12 months follow-up. One patient had a fetal demise. Hyperemesis gravidarum-induced WE is a common cause of maternal morbidity. Typical MRI findings of symmetric medial thalamic and periaqueductal signal changes may permit a specific diagnosis. A delay in diagnosis, therefore treatment, leads to worse prognosis.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of clinically stable late pregnancy bleeding: beyond ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masselli, Gabriele; Gualdi, Gianfranco [Sapienza University, Radiology Dea Department, Umberto I Hospital, Rome (Italy); Brunelli, Roberto; Perrone, Giuseppina [Sapienza University, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Umberto I Hospital, Rome (Italy); Parasassi, Tiziana [Institute of Neurobiology and Molecular Medicine, National Research Council, Rome (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    To compare the accuracy of magnetic resonance (MRI) and colour Doppler-ultrasound (US) in the diagnosis of late pregnancy bleeding and to assess the accuracy of the different MR sequences in visualizing the origin of haemorrhage. 42 patients in the third trimester of pregnancy underwent to US and MRI for the evaluation of painless vaginal bleeding. Multiplanar HASTE, True Fisp, 3D T1 GRE and sagittal DWI sequences were acquired. Two radiologists, blinded to the results of US, reviewed each case, resolving by consensus any discrepancy. Reference standards were surgical and pathological findings. The reference standards identified 22 placenta previa, 11 placental abruptions (1 coincident with a placental chorioangioma), 1 thrombohaematoma and 1 fibroma with haemorrhagic degeneration. MRI identified correctly all these condition with an interobserver agreement of 0.955. DWI and T1 weighted sequences were statistically superior to Haste and True Fisp sequences in detecting the cause of bleeding (p <.001). US had 6 false negatives and 2 false positive results, its diagnostic accuracy resulting lower than MRI (p =.001). MRI accurately evaluates pregnancy bleeding with an excellent interobserver agreement and can grant new and additional data when US is negative. (orig.)

  9. Anatomical Variations of Cystic Ducts in Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarawagi, Radha; Sundar, Shyam; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Raghuwanshi, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anatomical variations of cystic duct (CD) are frequently unrecognized. It is important to be aware of these variations prior to any surgical, percutaneous, or endoscopic intervention procedures. Objectives. The purpose of our study was to demonstrate the imaging features of CD and its variants using magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and document their prevalence in our population. Materials and Methods. This study included 198 patients who underwent MRCP due to different indications. Images were evaluated in picture archiving communication system (PACS) and variations of CD were documented. Results. Normal lateral insertion of CD at middle third of common hepatic duct was seen in 51% of cases. Medial insertion was seen in 16% of cases, of which 4% were low medial insertions. Low insertion of CD was noted in 9% of cases. Parallel course of CD was present in 7.5% of cases. High insertion was noted in 6% and short CD in 1% of cases. In 1 case, CD was draining into right hepatic duct. Congenital cystic dilation of CD was noted in one case with evidence of type IV choledochal cyst. Conclusion. Cystic duct variations are common and MRCP is an optimal imaging modality for demonstration of cystic duct anatomy. PMID:27313891

  10. Collagene order of articular cartilage by clinical magnetic resonance images and its age dependency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, P.; Gruender, W. [Inst. of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The present papers describes a novel method to obtain information on the degree of order of the collagen network of the knee meniscal cartilage by means of a single clinical MRI. Images were obtained from 34 healthy volunteers aged between 6 and 76 years as well as from one patient with clinically-diagnosed arthrosis at the age of 32 and 37 years. A siemens vision (1.5 T) MRT with TR = 750 ms, TE = 50 ms, FoV = 160 mm, and Matrix 512 x 512 was used for this purpose. The MR signal intensities of the cartilage were read out along slices with constant height above the subchondral bone and plotted versus the actual angle to the external magnetic field. The obtained intensity curves were fitted by a model distribution, and the degree of order of the collagen fibers was calculated. For the knee meniscal cartilage, there was an age-dependency of the degree of order and a significant deviation of the volunteer with arthrosis from the normal curve. The results are discussed in view of the arcade model and of a possible use of non-invasive clinical MRT for the detection of early arthrotic changes of cartilage. (orig.)

  11. Diagnostic value of magnetic resonance lymphography in preoperative staging of clinically negative necks in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, B.M.; Deserno, W.M.L.L.G.; Bondt, R.B. de; Marres, H.A.M.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Barentsz, J.O.; Hoogen, F.J. van den

    2011-01-01

    Pilot study evaluating the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) compared with conventional imaging techniques in the preoperative staging of the clinically (palpable) negative neck (cN0) in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC). Patients with SCCOC without clinical

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book introduces the fundamentals and principles of MRI, its capabilities and various techniques of application. Appropriate background for MRI is provided, including basic nuclear magnetic phenomena, modifications required for imaging, the current state of clinical knowledge and a survey of the future potential for in vivo MRI.

  14. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imager)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoshinori [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1995-05-01

    MRI is a widely used diagnostic imaging modality because it has excellent diagnostic capabilities, is safe to use and generates images not affected by bone artifacts. Images are obtained by utilizing the phenomenon of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) by which protons located in a static magnetic field absorb radio frequency (RF) pulses with a specific frequency and release a part of the energy as a NMR signal. Potentially MRI has the ability to provide functional and metabolic information (such as flow, temperature, diffusion, neuron activity) in addition to morphological information. This paper describes the imaging principles and provides a general outline of some applications: flow imaging, metabolite imaging and temperature imaging. (J.P.N.).

  15. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging-conditional devices: Luxury or real clinical need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogeni, Sophie I; Poulos, George; Kolovou, Genovefa; Theodorakis, George

    2017-01-10

    Although the risk of MRI scanning on patients with conventional devices is lower than initially thought, the patient's safety can only be guaranteed when using MRI-conditional devices. The most important modifications in MRI-conditional devices include a) Reduction in ferromagnetic components to reduce magnetic attraction and susceptibility artifacts; b) Replacement of the reed switch by a Hall sensor in order to avoid unpredictable reed switch behavior; c) Lead coil design to minimize lead heating and electrical current induction; d) Filter circuitry to prevent damage to the internal power supply; and e) Dedicated pacemaker programming to prevent inappropriate pacemaker inhibition and competing rhythms. Although many companies claim to have MRI-conditional devices, adoption in clinical practice is limited because a) Not all companies have MRI-conditional devices approved for both 1.5 and 3T; b) Not all companies offer the option of unlimited MRI scanning (without an exclusion zone in the thorax); c) Certain companies allow only a 30-min MRI scanning and only in afebrile patients; and d) Despite having MRI-conditional pacemakers, certain companies do not have MRI-conditional defibrillators and CRT systems. It is clear that this new technology opens the door for MRI to a growing number of patients; however, the widespread adoption of MRI-conditional devices will depend on real-life issues, such as cost, clinical indications for such a device and the permanent education of health care professionals.

  18. Clinical evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging in coronary heart disease: The CE-MARC study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sculpher Mark

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several investigations are currently available to establish the diagnosis of coronary heart disease (CHD. Of these, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR offers the greatest information from a single test, allowing the assessment of myocardial function, perfusion, viability and coronary artery anatomy. However, data from large scale studies that prospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of multi-parametric CMR for the detection of CHD in unselected populations are lacking, and there are few data on the performance of CMR compared with current diagnostic tests, its prognostic value and cost-effectiveness. Methods/design This is a prospective diagnostic accuracy cohort study of 750 patients referred to a cardiologist with suspected CHD. Exercise tolerance testing (ETT will be preformed if patients are physically able. Recruited patients will then undergo CMR and single photon emission tomography (SPECT followed in all patients by invasive X-ray coronary angiography. The order of the CMR and SPECT tests will be randomised. The CMR study will comprise rest and adenosine stress perfusion, cine imaging, late gadolinium enhancement and whole-heart MR coronary angiography. SPECT will use a gated stress/rest protocol. The primary objective of the study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of CMR in detecting significant coronary stenosis, as defined by X-ray coronary angiography. Secondary objectives include an assessment of the prognostic value of CMR imaging, a comparison of its diagnostic accuracy against SPECT and ETT, and an assessment of cost-effectiveness. Discussion The CE-MARC study is a prospective, diagnostic accuracy cohort study of 750 patients assessing the performance of a multi-parametric CMR study in detecting CHD using invasive X-ray coronary angiography as the reference standard and comparing it with ETT and SPECT. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN77246133

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging flow void changes after cerebrospinal fluid shunt in post-traumatic hydrocephalus: clinical correlations and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missori, Paolo; Miscusi, Massimo; Formisano, Rita; Peschillo, Simone; Polli, Filippo M; Melone, Antonio; Martini, Stefano; Paolini, Sergio; Delfini, Roberto

    2006-07-01

    The assessment of the flow-void in the cerebral aqueduct of patients with post-traumatic hydrocephalus on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation could concur the right diagnosis and have a prognostic value. We analysed prospectively 28 patients after a severe head injury (GCSclinical suspicion of post-traumatic hydrocephalus and a fast flow-void signal in the cerebral acqueduct on T2-weighted and proton density MRI. Twenty-two patients were shunted (n=19) or revised (n=3). Six patients were followed-up without surgery. Twenty out of 22 shunted patients (91%) showed variable reduction of the fast flow-void. Eighteen of the operated patients (82%) presented a significant clinical improvement at 6-month follow-up. All patients (n=2) who had no change of the fast flow-void after surgery did not clinically improve. The six non-shunted patients did not present any clinical or radiological improvement. In head-injured patients, fast flow-void in the cerebral aqueduct is diagnostic for post-traumatic hydrocephalus and its reduction after ventriculo-peritoneal shunt is correlated with a neurological improvement. In already shunted patients, a persistent fast flow-void is associated with a lack of or very slow clinical improvement and it should be considered indicative of under-drainage.

  20. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  2. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  3. Prevalence and clinical signs of degenerative temporomandibular joint changes validated by magnetic resonance imaging in a non-patient group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Olaf; Biffar, Reiner; Kocher, Thomas; Meyer, Georg

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate associations between degenerative bony changes of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a non-patient group. A total of 307 subjects (140 males and 167 females) were selected from the cross-sectional epidemiological study "Study of Health in Pomerania" (SHIP) for this evaluation. A clinical functional examination of the masticatory muscles and the TMJs was performed as well as an MRI examination of the TMJs. Another 77 subjects (25%) exhibited degenerative changes of one or both TMJs in the MRI. Clinical analysis revealed pain on palpation of the masticatory muscles in 113 subjects. Some 39 subjects had pain during palpation of the TMJs. There were significant associations between the MRI confirmed diagnosis of osteoarthrosis and some clinical signs (joint noises, joint palpation pain, reduced mouth opening) and symptoms (reported pain in the jaw and masticatory muscles) of TMD as well as further MRI diagnoses (disc displacement with and without reduction, fibrosis of the posterior ligament). Although there were some associations, clinical examination alone is not sufficient for diagnosing degenerative joint diseases. MRI is a necessary diagnostic adjunct for estimating the prevalence of TMD subgroups in non-patient populations.

  4. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  5. Estimation of the extent of local prostate cancer spread according to magnetic resonance imaging findings and clinical prognostic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Kazymov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the extent of local tumor spread is a main goal in the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PC. The value of this criterion is that its clinical stage plays a key role in choosing a treatment policy. Overestimation of the clinical stage of cancer leads to the fact that specialists refuse radical and its underestimation gives rise to its recurrence. Our trial defined criteria for the diagnostic efficiency of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in 150 PC patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The findings were as follows: the diagnostic sensitivity of the method in determining the spread of the cancer beyond the organ was 76.8 %; its diagnostic specificity and accuracy were 80.2 and 78.7 %, respectively. The positive predictive value in detecting the extra-organ spread of the tumor was equal to 76.8 %; the negative predictive value was 80.2 %. A prognostic classification of a risk for locally advanced PS has been developed using the independent clinical and MRI signs found.

  6. Central pontine myelinolysis in a chronic alcoholic: A clinical and brain magnetic resonance imaging follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dujmović Irena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM is a noninflammatory, demyelinating lesion usually localised in the basis pontis. Chronic alcoholism is frequently associated with this condition which may have a variable clinical outcome. Until now, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI follow-up in alcoholic CPM cases after alcohol withdrawal has been rarely described. Case report. We reported a 30- year-old male with a 12-year history of alcohol abuse, who presented with inability to stand and walk, nausea, vomiting and somnolence. Neurological examination revealed: impared fixation on lateral gaze, dysarthria, mild spastic quadriparesis, truncal and extremity ataxia, sock-like hypesthesia and moderate decrease in vibration sense in legs. Brain MRI showed a trident-shaped non-enhancing pontine lesion highly suggestive of CPM. After an eight-month alcoholfree follow-up period, the patient’s clinical status significantly improved, while the extent of MRI pontine lesion was merely slightly reduced. Conclusion. The presented case demonstrates that CPM in chronic alcoholics may have a benign clinical course after alcohol withdrawal, which is not necessarily associated with the reduction of lesions on brain MRI. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175031

  7. Ultrasonography of the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints in rheumatoid arthritis: a comparison with magnetic resonance imaging, conventional radiography and clinical examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szkudlarek, Marcin; Klarlund, Mette; Narvestad, E.;

    2006-01-01

    ultrasonography can provide information on signs of inflammation and destruction in RA finger joints that are not available with conventional radiography and clinical examination, and comparable to the information provided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The second to fifth metacarpophalangeal and proximal...

  8. MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-IMAGING USING A CLINICAL WHOLE-BODY SYSTEM - AN INTRODUCTION TO A USEFUL TECHNIQUE IN SMALL ANIMAL-EXPERIMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLF, RFE; LAM, KH; MOOYAART, EL; BLEICHRODT, RP; NIEUWENHUIS, P; SCHAKENRAAD, JM

    1992-01-01

    A clinical whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with high resolution coils was used to obtain non-invasive images of the living rat. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the set-up and the advantages of this new imaging technique: detailed information, no extra costs, longitudina

  9. The Value of Neurosurgical and Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography in Clinically Integrated Neuroanatomy Modules: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familiari, Giuseppe; Relucenti, Michela; Heyn, Rosemarie; Baldini, Rossella; D'Andrea, Giancarlo; Familiari, Pietro; Bozzao, Alessandro; Raco, Antonino

    2013-01-01

    Neuroanatomy is considered to be one of the most difficult anatomical subjects for students. To provide motivation and improve learning outcomes in this area, clinical cases and neurosurgical images from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractographies produced using an intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging apparatus (MRI/DTI) were presented and…

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging: Clinical experience with an open low-field-strength scanner in a resource challenged African state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G I Ogbole

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the fact that an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been in clinical use for over 20 years, its use and availability in Nigeria, a West African state, is still extremely low. Hence, only few publications are available on the clinical experience with MRI from Nigeria. We set out to evaluate our initial clinical experience with a low-field-strength MRI in a Nigeria′s foremost university hospital. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of all studies, performed with an open 0.2 Tesla MAGNETOM Concerto (Siemens Medical MRI scanner over a 5-year period (2006 - 2010 was conducted. All patients with complete records were evaluated for their clinical and demographic characteristics. Results: The records of 799 MRI studies were available. Patients′ ages ranged from 1 day to 90 years, with a mean of 40.1 years (± 20.7 SD. There were 463 (57.9% males and 336 (42.1% females. Over 90% of the studies were requested to evaluate brain or spine lesions. Low back pain represented the commonest (161/799, 20.7% clinical indication for MRI. The largest number of patients was referred by physicians from surgical specialties (65.6%. Conclusion: The awareness and competence for proper use of MRI in Nigeria appears high. Low back pain is the commonest indication for MRI in our institution, and surgeons make a greater use of the facility. The provision of high-signal strength MRI may be beneficial in making a wider range of applications available to clinicians.

  12. Clinical signs, magnetic resonance imaging findings and outcome in 77 cats with vestibular disease: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrin, Arianna; Cherubini, Giunio B; Lamb, Chris; Benigni, Livia; Adams, Vicky; Platt, Simon

    2010-04-01

    Medical records of 77 cats that had clinical signs of vestibular disease and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head were reviewed retrospectively. The aetiological, clinical and MRI characteristics were described and evaluated for a relationship with patient outcome. Forty cats (52%) had signs of central vestibular dysfunction (CVD), which was part of a multifocal disease in 17 cats (43%). The most frequent causes of CVD were inflammatory conditions (18 cats; 45%), including bacterial inflammation as an intracranial extension of otitis interna (five cats; 13%), feline infectious peritonitis (three cats; 8%) and toxoplasmosis (two cats; 5%). Neoplasia (12 cats; 30%) and vascular disease (four cats; 10%) were respectively the second and the third most frequent causes of CVD. Thiamine deficiency was diagnosed in one cat based on MRI findings and improvement following vitamin B(1) supplementation. Of 37 cats (48%) with peripheral vestibular dysfunction (PVD), idiopathic vestibular syndrome (IVS) was suspected in 16 (43%) and otitis media/interna was suspected in 16 (43%). Within the group of cats with evident MRI lesions, the location of the imaged lesions agreed with the clinical classification of vestibular dysfunction in 52/55 (95%) cats. Most of the cats (nine cases; 56%) with presumed IVS had rapid and complete recovery of their clinical signs. As most of these cats presented with progressive clinical signs over 3 weeks they were classified as having 'atypical' IVS to differentiate them from cats with the typical non-progressive IVS. No underlying systemic diseases were documented in any of these cases. Statistically significant predictors of survival included neurolocalisation (central or peripheral vestibular system), age and gender. No difference in survival was observed between cats with presumed idiopathic peripheral syndrome and cats with otitis media/interna.

  13. Assessment of sub-clinical acute cellular rejection after heart transplantation: comparison of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieghoff, Christian; Hildebrand, Lysann; Grothoff, Matthias; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Luecke, Christian; Andres, Claudia; Nitzsche, Stefan; Riese, Franziska; Gutberlet, Matthias [University Leipzig - Heart Centre, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Barten, Markus J.; Strueber, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm [University Leipzig - Heart Centre, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Comparing the diagnostic value of multi-sequential cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) with endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) for sub-clinical cardiac allograft rejection. One hundred and forty-six examinations in 73 patients (mean age 53 ± 12 years, 58 men) were performed using a 1.5 Tesla system and compared to EMB. Examinations included a STIR (short tau inversion recovery) sequence for calculation of edema ratio (ER), a T1-weighted spin-echo sequence for assessment of global relative enhancement (gRE), and inversion-recovery sequences to visualize late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Histological grade ≥1B was considered relevant rejection. One hundred and twenty-seven (127/146 = 87 %) EMBs demonstrated no or mild signs of rejection (grades ≤1A) and 19/146 (13 %) a relevant rejection (grade ≥1B). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive, and negative predictive values were as follows: ER: 63 %, 78 %, 30 %, and 93 %; gRE: 63 %, 70 %, 24 %, and 93 %; LGE: 68 %, 36 %, 13 %, and 87 %; with the combination of ER and gRE with at least one out of two positive: 84 %, 57 %, 23 %, and 96 %. ROC analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0.724 for ER and 0.659 for gRE. CMR parameters for myocarditis are useful to detect sub-clinical acute cellular rejection after heart transplantation. Comparable results to myocarditis can be achieved with a combination of parameters. (orig.)

  14. Characteristics and clinical relevance of late gadolinium enhancement in cardiac magnetic resonance in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Makoto; Satoh, Hiroshi; Suwa, Kenichiro; Nobuhara, Mamoru; Saitoh, Takeji; Saotome, Masao; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Shimoyama, Kumiko; Suzuki, Daisuke; Ogawa, Noriyoshi; Takehara, Yasuo; Sakahara, Harumi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2015-11-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) is considerably frequent in autopsy, but the early identification is clinically difficult. Recent advantages in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) enabled to detect myocardial fibrotic scar as late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). We aimed to examine the prevalence and distribution of LGE in patients with SSc, and associate them with clinical features, electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac function. Forty patients with SSc (58 ± 14 years-old, 35 females, limited/diffuse 25/15, disease duration 106 ± 113 months) underwent serological tests, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and CMR. Seven patients (17.5 %) showed LGE in 26 segments of left ventricle (LV). LGE distributed mainly in the basal to mid inter-ventricular septum and the right ventricular (RV) insertion points, but involved all the myocardial regions. More patients with LGE showed NYHA functional class II and more (71 vs. 21 %, p 125 pg/ml). When cardiac involvement of SSc was defined as low LVEF, ECG abnormalities or high NT-proBNP, the sensitivity, specificity positive and negative predictive values of LGE were 36, 92, 71 and 72 %, respectively. We could clarify the prevalence and distribution of LGE in Japanese patients with SSc. The presence of LGE was associated with cardiac symptom, conduction disturbance and impaired LV/RV contraction.

  15. Detection and Evaluation of Early Breast Cancer via Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Studies of Mouse Models and Clinical Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    K, Degani H. Magnetic reso- nance imaging reveals functional diversity of the vasculature in benign and malignant breast lesions. Cancer 2005;104:708...resonance imaging reveals functional diversity of the vasculature in benign and malignant breast lesions. Cancer 2005;104(4):708-718. 18. Tofts PS...resonance imaging reveals functional diversity of the vasculature in benign and malignant breast lesions. Cancer 2005;104(4):708-718. 405 9. Tofts PS

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  18. Routine clinical measures of adiposity as predictors of visceral fat in adolescence: a population-based magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Goodwin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Visceral fat (VF increases cardiometabolic risk more than fat stored subcutaneously. Here, we investigated how well routine clinical measures of adiposity, namely body mass index (BMI and waist circumference (waist, predict VF and subcutaneous fat (SF in a large population-based sample of adolescents. As body-fat distribution differs between males and females, we performed these analyses separately in each sex. DESIGN AND METHODS: VF and SF were measured by magnetic resonance imaging in 1,002 adolescents (482 males, age 12-18 years. Relationships of BMI and waist with VF and SF were tested in multivariable analyses, which adjusted for potentially confounding effects of age and height. RESULTS: In both males and females, BMI and waist were highly correlated with VF and SF, and explained 55-76% of their total variance. When VF was adjusted for SF, however, BMI and waist explained, respectively, only 0% and 4% of VF variance in males, and 4% and 11% of VF variance in females. In contrast, when SF was adjusted for VF, BMI and waist explained, respectively, 36% and 21% of SF variance in males, and 48% and 23% of SF variance in females. These relationships were similar during early and late puberty. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: During adolescence, routine clinical measures of adiposity predict well SF but not VF. This holds for both sexes and throughout puberty. Further longitudinal studies are required to assess how well these measures predict changes of VF and SF over time. Given the clinical importance of VF, development of cost-effective imaging techniques and/or robust biomarkers of VF accumulation that would be suitable in everyday clinical practice is warranted.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging tracking of ferumoxytol-labeled human neural stem cells: studies leading to clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutova, Margarita; Frank, Joseph A; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Gilchrist, Megan M; Annala, Alexander J; Metz, Marianne Z; Abramyants, Yelena; Herrmann, Kelsey A; Ghoda, Lucy Y; Najbauer, Joseph; Brown, Christine E; Blanchard, M Suzette; Lesniak, Maciej S; Kim, Seung U; Barish, Michael E; Aboody, Karen S; Moats, Rex A

    2013-10-01

    Numerous stem cell-based therapies are currently under clinical investigation, including the use of neural stem cells (NSCs) as delivery vehicles to target therapeutic agents to invasive brain tumors. The ability to monitor the time course, migration, and distribution of stem cells following transplantation into patients would provide critical information for optimizing treatment regimens. No effective cell-tracking methodology has yet garnered clinical acceptance. A highly promising noninvasive method for monitoring NSCs and potentially other cell types in vivo involves preloading them with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) to enable cell tracking using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We report here the preclinical studies that led to U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for first-in-human investigational use of ferumoxytol to label NSCs prior to transplantation into brain tumor patients, followed by surveillance serial MRI. A combination of heparin, protamine sulfate, and ferumoxytol (HPF) was used to label the NSCs. HPF labeling did not affect cell viability, growth kinetics, or tumor tropism in vitro, and it enabled MRI visualization of NSC distribution within orthotopic glioma xenografts. MRI revealed dynamic in vivo NSC distribution at multiple time points following intracerebral or intravenous injection into glioma-bearing mice that correlated with histological analysis. Preclinical safety/toxicity studies of intracerebrally administered HPF-labeled NSCs in mice were also performed, and they showed no significant clinical or behavioral changes, no neuronal or systemic toxicities, and no abnormal accumulation of iron in the liver or spleen. These studies support the clinical use of ferumoxytol labeling of cells for post-transplant MRI visualization and tracking.

  20. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for pre-treatment local staging of prostate cancer: A Cancer Care Ontario clinical practice guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Jennifer; Finelli, Antonio; Morash, Chris; Morgan, Scott C.; Power, Nicholas; Schieda, Nichola; Haider, Masoom A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The utility of T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the local staging of prostate cancer is controversial. Due to the success of multiparametric MRI in cancer localization, there is renewed interested in MRI (± functional sequences) for local staging. Guidance on pre-treatment local staging of prostate cancer by MRI was developed using systematic review methodology and expert consultation. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and other databases were searched to identify studies comparing: (1) MRI staging vs. radical prostatectomy staging on diagnostic accuracy outcomes; and (2) MRI staging vs. routine clinical staging on clinical and patient outcomes. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were synthesized by outcome and sensitivity/specificity analysis by tumour location was performed. Evidence quality of included studies was assessed and considered in recommendation formulation. Results: The literature search identified 2510 citations; 62 studies were included. Analysis of MRI ≥1.5 T plus endorectal coil (ER) (± functional sequences) in the detection of extraprostatic extension or seminal vesicle invasion showed modest sensitivities (≥50%) and excellent specificities (>85%) among patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy. MRI upstaging was shown in 20/21 studies, with large variation in correctness (11–85%). Scarcity of clinical and patient outcomes among studies limited synthesis and evaluation. Quality assessment found non-trivial biases. Conclusions: Modest imaging performance was shown for MRI (1.5 T + ER and 3 T ± ER) ± functional sequences in regards to sensitivity. Limitations in study design, reporting of clinical and patient outcomes, and the heterogeneous use of MRI tempered the strength of the recommendations.

  1. Clinical and Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features in a Cohort of Chinese Patients with Kearns-Sayre Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Yu; Zhe Zhang; Qing-Qing Wang; Jing Liu; Yue-Huan Zuo; Lei Yu; Jiang-Xi Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Background:Keams-Sayre syndrome (KSS) is a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion disorder characterized by a triad of onset before 20 years of age,ophthalmoplegia,and pigmentary retinopathy.The heart and central nervous system are commonly involved.We summarized clinical and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of a cohort of Chinese KSS patients.Methods:Nineteen patients confirmed by muscle biopsy and mtDNA analysis were enrolled.We examined clinical profiles,mainly focusing on changes in electrocardiogram (ECG) and brain MRI.The correlation between genotype and phenotype was statistically analyzed.Results:The mean age of onset was 9.6 ± 4.3 years,with all developing the classic triad at the time of diagnosis.Heart conduction block was detected in 63.2%,with four initially presenting as bundle branch block and developing into complete atrioventricular block over 3-72 months.Brain MRI showed symmetric high-T2 signals in 100% of cerebral and cerebellar white matter,as well as brainstem,46.7% of basal ganglia,and 53.3% of thalamus.There were two patterns of cerebral white matter involvements,one with selective subcortical U-fibers and the other with periventricular white matter.The size of mtDNA deletion did not significantly correlate with age of onset or percentage of ragged blue fibers on muscle pathology.Conclusions:The clinical features of KSS evolve dynamically,affecting the cardiac conduction system predominantly,highlighting the significance of ECG monitoring.Brain MRI showed changes involving both the white matter and deep gray nuclei.Clinical presentation or severity of muscle pathological changes is not related to the size of mtDNA deletions.

  2. Non-uniformity of Clinical Head, Head and Neck, and Body Coils in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Nazarpoor

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Signal intensity uniformity in a magnetic resonance (MR image indicates how well the MR imaging (MRI system represents an object. One of the major sources of image non-uniformity in high-field MRI scanners is inhomogeneity of radio-frequency coil. The aim of this study was to investigate non-uniformity in head, head and neck, and body coils and compare the obtained results to determine the best clinical coil for future clinical application. Materials and Methods A phantom was designed to investigate the non-uniformity of coils. All evaluations were carried out using a 1.5 T clinical MRI scanner. T1-weighted inversion recovery sequence (linear phase encoding and turbo fast low angle shot (TurboFLASH images were used to find non-uniformity in the clinical coils. For testing the uniformity of coils, signal intensity profiles in parts of the coronal image of phantom were measured over X and Y axes. Results The results showed that body coil was the most uniform coil of all; in addition, the head and neck coil was more uniform than the head coil. The results also indicated that signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the head and neck coil was higher than the head and body coils. Moreover, SNR of the head coil was higher than that of the body coil. Conclusion In order to accurately find or apply an image signal intensity for measuring organ blood flow or perfusion, coil non-uniformity corrections are required.

  3. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference.

  4. Is magnetic resonance imaging reliable in predicting clinical outcome after articular cartilage repair of the knee?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, de T.S.; Welsch, G.H.; Brittberg, M.; Vonk, L.A.; Marlovits, S.; Trattnig, S.; Saris, D.B.F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: While MRI can provide a detailed morphological evaluation after articular cartilage repair, its additional value in determining clinical outcome has yet to be determined. Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between MRI and clinical outcome after cartilage repair and to identify parame

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metallic objects from being attracted by the powerful magnet of the MR system, you will typically receive ... teeth with magnetic keepers Other implants that involve magnets Medication patch (i.e., transdermal patch) that contains ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  10. The clinical impact of late gadolinium enhancement in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: serial analysis of cardiovascular magnetic resonance images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoh Hideki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our study aimed to investigate both the clinical implications of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR and the relation of LGE to clinical findings in patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC. Methods We evaluated 20 consecutive patients (2 men, 18 women; median age, 77 years; interquartile range [IQR] 67-82 years who were admitted to our hospital with the diagnosis of TTC. CMR was performed within 1 week after admission, and follow-up studies were conducted 1.5 and 6 months later. Results In 8 patients, CMR imaging during the sub-acute phase revealed LGE in the area matched with wall motion impairment. Cardiogenic shock was more frequently observed in patients with LGE than in those without LGE (38% vs 0%, p = 0.049. The patients with LGE needed a longer duration for ECG normalization and recovery of wall motion than did those without LGE (median 205 days, IQR [152-363] vs 68 days, [43-145], p = 0.005; 15 days, [10-185] vs 7 days, [4-13], p = 0.030, respectively. In 5 of these 8 patients, LGE disappeared within 45-180 days (170, IQR [56-180] of onset. The patients with LGE remaining in the chronic phase had higher peak creatine kinase levels than did those without LGE (median 307 IU/L, IQR [264-460] vs 202 IU/L, [120-218], p = 0.017. Conclusion LGE by CMR in the sub-acute phase may be associated with the severity and prolonged recovery to normal of clinical findings in TTC.

  11. Correlation of 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Clinical and Intraoperative Findings for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Arvind; Patil, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Study Design A single-center prospective study. Purpose A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is undeniably the gold standard for the diagnosis of a lumbar disc prolapse. Unfortunately it shares a strong association with incidental findings. In this study, we aimed to determine the extent to which a 1.5 Tesla MRI correlates with the clinical features and intraoperative findings in cases of lumbar disc prolapse. Overview of Literature Few studies have correlated MRI with clinical findings, and none have extended this correlation to intraoperative findings. Methods Over a 2-year period, 50 consecutive patients with lumbar disc herniation requiring discectomy were studied. The MRI findings we observed consisted of the prolapse level, type, position, migration, high-intensity zones (HIZ), lateral recess, and foraminal stenosis. A logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the significance for the various MRI findings. Finally, the MRI observations were confirmed with intraoperative findings and inferences were drawn. Results MRI scan sensitivity and specificity for determining surgically significant levels was 100% and 94.94%, respectively. Straight leg raising test was positive in 74% of patients, with 85%, 43%, and 75% for paracentral, central, and foraminal levels, respectively. A foraminal compromise was the only MRI parameter to share a significant association with neurological deficits. Patients with a HIZ on the MRI had a significant increase in back pain and 63% exhibited identifiable annular tears intraoperatively. The intraoperative anatomical findings correlated extensively with the MRI findings. Conclusions MRI findings strongly correlate with intraoperative features and can serve as a useful tool when planning surgery due to the accurate depiction of the morphometric features. However, the decision for surgery should be made only when detailed clinical findings in conjunction with MRI findings allow for an accurate identification of the

  12. Quantitative magnetic resonance methods for in vivo investigation of the human liver and spleen. Technical aspects and preliminary clinical results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C

    1996-01-01

    This project was initiated with the introduction of magnetic resonance (MR) in Denmark in order to evaluate the possibilities of this technique as a diagnostic aid in non-focal liver and splenic diseases. The signal intensities in the MR image are sensitive to the longitudinal relaxation (T1...

  13. Advanced echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease : insights in right ventricular mechanics and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, Anna Elisabeth van der

    2011-01-01

    The thesis provides new insights into advanced echocardiographic and magnetic resonance imaging techniques for comprehensive mechanical assessment of the right ventricle in healthy children and in pediatric patients with right ventricular dysfunction. It is shown that the right ventricle does not co

  14. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING CONTRAST ENHANCEMENT OF EXTRA-OCULAR MUSCLES IN DOGS WITH NO CLINICAL EVIDENCE OF ORBITAL DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOSLYN, S.; Richards, S.; Boroffka, S.A.E.B.; Mitchell, M.; Hammond, G.; Sullivan, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancement of extra-ocular muscles has been reported in cases of orbital pathology in both veterinary and medical magnetic resonance imaging.We have also observed this finding in the absence of orbital disease. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe extra-ocular muscle contrast enh

  15. Advances in magnetic resonance 4

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 4 deals with the relaxation, irradiation, and other dynamical effects that is specific to systems having resolved structure in their magnetic resonance spectra. This book discusses the anisotropic rotation of molecules in liquids by NMR quadrupolar relaxation; rotational diffusion constants; alternating linewidth effect; and theoretical formulations of the problem. The line shapes in high-resolution NMR; matrix representations of the equations of motion; matrix representations of the equations of motion; and intramolecular hydrogen bonds are also delibera

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  17. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Walter A; Truwit, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    Neurosurgeons have become reliant on image-guidance to perform safe and successful surgery both time-efficiently and cost-effectively. Neuronavigation typically involves either rigid (frame-based) or skull-mounted (frameless) stereotactic guidance derived from computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that is obtained days or immediately before the planned surgical procedure. These systems do not accommodate for brain shift that is unavoidable once the cranium is opened and cerebrospinal fluid is lost. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) systems ranging in strength from 0.12 to 3 Tesla (T) have been developed in part because they afford neurosurgeons the opportunity to accommodate for brain shift during surgery. Other distinct advantages of ioMRI include the excellent soft tissue discrimination, the ability to view the surgical site in three dimensions, and the ability to "see" tumor beyond the surface visualization of the surgeon's eye, either with or without a surgical microscope. The enhanced ability to view the tumor being biopsied or resected allows the surgeon to choose a safe surgical corridor that avoids critical structures, maximizes the extent of the tumor resection, and confirms that an intraoperative hemorrhage has not resulted from surgery. Although all ioMRI systems allow for basic T1- and T2-weighted imaging, only high-field (>1.5 T) MRI systems are capable of MR spectroscopy (MRS), MR angiography (MRA), MR venography (MRV), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and brain activation studies. By identifying vascular structures with MRA and MRV, it may be possible to prevent their inadvertent injury during surgery. Biopsying those areas of elevated phosphocholine on MRS may improve the diagnostic yield for brain biopsy. Mapping out eloquent brain function may influence the surgical path to a tumor being resected or biopsied. The optimal field strength for an ioMRI-guided surgical system and the best configuration for that system are as yet

  18. Characterization of the onboard imaging unit for the first clinical magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yanle, E-mail: Hu.Yanle@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona 85054 (United States); Rankine, Leith; Green, Olga L.; Kashani, Rojano; Li, H. Harold; Li, Hua; Rodriguez, Vivian; Santanam, Lakshmi; Wooten, H. Omar; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Nana, Roger; Shvartsman, Shmaryu; Victoria, James; Dempsey, James F. [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, Ohio 44146 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To characterize the performance of the onboard imaging unit for the first clinical magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods: The imaging performance characterization included four components: ACR (the American College of Radiology) phantom test, spatial integrity, coil signal to noise ratio (SNR) and uniformity, and magnetic field homogeneity. The ACR phantom test was performed in accordance with the ACR phantom test guidance. The spatial integrity test was evaluated using a 40.8 × 40.8 × 40.8 cm{sup 3} spatial integrity phantom. MR and computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired and coregistered. Objects were identified around the surfaces of 20 and 35 cm diameters of spherical volume (DSVs) on both the MR and CT images. Geometric distortion was quantified using deviation in object location between the MR and CT images. The coil SNR test was performed according to the national electrical manufacturers association (NEMA) standards MS-1 and MS-9. The magnetic field homogeneity test was measured using field camera and spectral peak methods. Results: For the ACR tests, the slice position error was less than 0.10 cm, the slice thickness error was less than 0.05 cm, the resolved high-contrast spatial resolution was 0.09 cm, the resolved low-contrast spokes were more than 25, the image intensity uniformity was above 93%, and the percentage ghosting was less than 0.22%. All were within the ACR recommended specifications. The maximum geometric distortions within the 20 and 35 cm DSVs were 0.10 and 0.18 cm for high spatial resolution three-dimensional images and 0.08 and 0.20 cm for high temporal resolution two dimensional cine images based on the distance-to-phantom-center method. The average SNR was 12.0 for the body coil, 42.9 for the combined torso coil, and 44.0 for the combined head and neck coil. Magnetic field homogeneities at gantry angles of 0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120° were 23.55, 20.43, 18.76, 19

  19. Pathoanatomy of clinical findings in patients with sciatica : a magnetic resonance imaging study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroomen, PCAJ; de Krom, CTFM; Wilmink, JT

    2000-01-01

    Object. Anatomical details of nerve root compression may explain the production of the signs and symptoms of sciatica. The authors of anatomical studies have offered many theories without clearly demonstrating the clinical relevance of the observations. Clinicoanatomical series are scarce and are af

  20. Clinical and magnetic resonance observations in cerebral small-vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwa, V.I.H.

    1999-01-01

    The study reported in this thesis tried to address the following questions: 1. Is it possible to detect genetic factors and vascular risk factors that are specifically associated with the development of small- or large-vessel disease? 2. Are the different clinical and MRI manifestations, that are at

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of sacroiliitis in early seronegative spondylarthropathy. Abnormalities correlated to clinical and laboratory findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puhakka, K B; Jurik, A G; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a new MRI scoring system of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) in early spondylarthropathy (SpA) with clinical and laboratory parameters. METHODS: Forty-one patients (24 males, 17 females) with a median age of 26 yr and a median duration of inflammatory low back pain of 19 months...

  2. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in the clinical management of the acutely locked knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, Eugene G.; Nasser, Khalid N.; Dawson, Stewart; Goh, Leslie A. [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre and Oxford Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, OX3 7LD (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-01

    To explore prospectively the hypothesis that MRI of the acutely locked knee can alter surgical decision-making.Design and patients. The study group comprised patients with a clinical diagnosis of knee locking requiring arthroscopy. The decision to carry out arthroscopy was made by an experienced consultant orthopaedic surgeon specialising in trauma and recorded in the patient's notes prior to MRI. Preoperative MRI was carried out using a 1.5 T system. The management was altered from surgical to conservative treatment in 20 (48%) patients on the basis of the MR findings. Arthroscopy was limited to patients with an MR diagnosis of a mechanical block, usually a displaced meniscal tear or loose body. Both patient groups were followed clinically until symptoms resolved.Results. Forty-two patients were entered into the study. MRI identified a mechanical cause for locking in 22 patients (21 avulsion meniscal tears and 1 loose body). All were confirmed at arthroscopy. Twenty patients were changed from operative to non-operative treatment on the basis of the MRI findings. One patient in this group required a delayed arthroscopy for an impinging anterior cruciate ligament stump. The sensitivity/specificity/accuracy of MRI in identifying patients who require arthroscopy was therefore 96%/100%/98% respectively.Conclusion. MRI can successfully segregate patients with a clinical diagnosis of mechanical locking into those who have a true mechanical block and those who can be treated conservatively. MRI should precede arthroscopy in this clinical setting. (orig.)

  3. Clinical safety of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T early after stent placement for acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jehl, Jerome; Comte, Alexandre; Aubry, Sebastien; Kastler, Bruno [Hopital Jean Minjoz, Service de Radiologie A and C, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Besancon, Besancon (France); Meneveau, Nicolas; Schiele, Francois [Hopital Jean Minjoz, Service de Cardiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Besancon, Besancon (France)

    2009-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the safety of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging at 3 T performed early (less than 14 days) after bare metal or drug-eluting coronary stent implantation in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Seventy-two consecutive patients with AMI treated by percutaneous revascularisation with a stent underwent CMR examination with a median delay of 6 days. Patients were followed-up for major adverse cardiac events, during hospitalisation and at 6 months. After CMR imaging, no acute stent thrombosis, death or repeated AMI were recorded at 6-month follow-up. Two symptomatic in-stent restenoses and two silent in-stent restenoses were recorded, at a mean delay of 106 days. In our population, we found a target revascularisation rate of 5.6%. This is consistent with the 6-month event rates after coronary artery stent (CAS) placement for AMI, evaluated by several studies. This preliminary clinical study supports the safety of 3-T CMR imaging performed early after coronary stent placement. (orig.)

  4. Common and Uncommon Anatomical Variants of Intrahepatic Bile Ducts in Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography and its Clinical Implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarawagi, Radha; Sundar, Shyam; Raghuvanshi, Sameer; Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar; Jayaraman, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Preoperative knowledge of intrahepatic bile duct (IHD) anatomy is critical for planning liver resections, liver transplantations and complex biliary reconstructive surgery. The purpose of our study was to demonstrate the imaging features of various anatomical variants of IHD using magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP) and their prevalence in our population. Material/Methods This observational clinical evaluation study included 224 patients who were referred for MRCP. MRCP was performed in a 1.5-Tesla magnet (Philips) with SSH MRCP 3DHR and SSHMRCP rad protocol. A senior radiologist assessed the biliary passage for anatomical variations. Results The branching pattern of the right hepatic duct (RHD) was typical in 55.3% of subjects. The most common variant was right posterior sectoral duct (RPSD) draining into the left hepatic duct (LHD) in 27.6% of subjects. Trifurcation pattern was noted in 9.3% of subjects. In 4% of subjects, RPSD was draining into the common hepatic duct (CHD) and in 0.8% of subjects into the cystic duct. Other variants were noted in 2.6% of subjects. In 4.9% of cases there was an accessory duct. The most common type of LHD branching pattern was a common trunk of segment 2 and 3 ducts joining the segment 4 duct in 67.8% of subjects. In 23.2% of subjects, segment 2 duct united with the common trunk of segment 3 and 4 and in 3.4% of subjects segment 2, 3, and 4 ducts united together to form LHD. Other uncommon branching patterns of LHD were seen in 4.9% of subjects. Conclusions Intrahepatic bile duct anatomy is complex with many common and uncommon variations. MRCP is a reliable non-invasive imaging method for demonstration of bile duct morphology, which is useful to plan complex surgeries and to prevent iatrogenic injuries. PMID:27298653

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging; Imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanel, F. [Centre Hospitalier, 40 - Mont-de -Marsan (France); Clerc, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France); Theolier, S. [Hospice Civils de Lyon, 69 - Lyon (France); Verdenet, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France)

    1997-04-01

    The last improvements in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are detailed here, society by society with an expose of their different devices. In the future the different technological evolutions will be on a faster acquisition, allowing to reduce the examination time, on the development of a more acute cardiac imaging, of a functional neuro-imaging and an interactive imaging for intervention. With the contrast products, staying a longer time in the vascular area, the angiography will find its place. Finally, the studies on magnetic fields should allow to increase the volume to examine. (N.C.).

  6. Brainstem tegmental lesions in neonates with hypoxicischemic encephalopathy: Magnetic resonance diagnosis and clinical outcome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlo Cosimo Quattrocchi; Giuseppe Fariello; Daniela Longo

    2016-01-01

    Lesions of the brainstem have been reported in the clinical scenarios of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy(HIE), although the prevalence of these lesions is probably underestimated. Neuropathologic studies have demonstrated brainstem involvement in severely asphyxiated infants as an indicator of poor outcome. Among survivors to HIE, the most frequent clinical complaints that may be predicted by brainstem lesions include feeding problems, speech, language and communication problems and visual impairments. Clinical series, including vascular and metabolic etiologies, have found selective involvement of the brainstem with the demonstration of symmetric bilateral columnar lesions of the tegmentum. The role of brainstem lesions in HIE is currently a matter of debate, especially when tegmental lesions are present in the absence of supratentorial lesions. Differential diagnosis of tegmental lesions in neonates and infants include congenital metabolic syndromes and drug-related processes. Brainstem injury with the presence of supratentorial lesions is a predictor of poor outcome and high rates of mortality and morbidity. Further investigation will be conducted to identify specific sites of the brainstem that are vulnerable to hypoxic-ischemic and toxic-metabolic insults.

  7. Septo-optic dysplasia plus: clinical presentation and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matushita Junior, Joao Paulo K. [Instituto de Pos-Graduacao Medica Carlos Chagas (IPGMCC), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Tiel, Chan; Py, Marco [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Neurologia Deolindo Couto; Batista, Raquel Ribeiro [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho; Gasparetto, Emerson L., E-mail: egasparetto@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia

    2010-04-15

    Septo-optic dysplasia (SOD) is a heterogeneous developmental malformation characterized by optic nerve hypoplasia associated with dysgenesis of the septum pellucidum and other cerebral malformations. The clinical manifestations include psychomotor retardation, visual impairment, thermoregulatory disturbances, conjugated hyperbilirubinemia and seizures. In 2000, Miller et al. first named the association of SOD and cortical dysplasia as SOD-plus. In this report, all the cases had severe clinical impairment, presenting global developmental delay and spastic motor deficits. Subsequent reports of SOD-plus also stressed the psychomotor development delay, spastic motor deficits and seizures seen in these patients, emphasizing the severity of the brain involvement. Recently, Kwak et al. reported a case of SOD-plus presenting with cortical dysplasia involving the insular cortex bilaterally. However, differently from all the previous reports, the patient had no signs or symptoms of cortical dysfunction, except for one episode of seizure. We report an additional case of SOD-plus, which presented extensive cortical malformation, with no signs or symptoms of cortical dysfunction. We suggest that similar to the classical form of SOD, the clinical presentation in patients with SOD-plus can also range from mild to extremely severe. (author)

  8. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  9. Advances in magnetic resonance 5

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 5 deals with the interpretation of ESR spectra and provides descriptions of experimental apparatus. This book discusses the halogen hyperfine interactions; organic radicals in single crystals; pulsed-Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; and inhomogenizer and decoupler. The spectrometers for multiple-pulse NMR; weak collision theory of relaxation in the rotating frame; and spin Hamiltonian for the electron spin resonance of irradiated organic single crystals are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the NMR in helium three and m

  10. Clinical diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases using fat/water suppression magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsubahara, Akio [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Okajima, Yasutomo

    1996-01-01

    Pixel values in fat/water suppression MRI, and the T1 and T2 relaxation times of skeletal muscles were measured to establish criteria for the clinical MRI diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases. The subjects were 15 patients with a diagnosis of neuromuscular disease based on clinical symptoms and findings made by electrophysiological methods, and 3 patients with hysterical conversion reactions. Normal values were obtained from 33 healthy volunteers. Transaxial MR images of the bilateral thigh muscles were recorded with T1/T2 relaxation time calculation imaging and fat/water suppression imaging (Dixon`s method). The patients with muscular dystrophy showed remarkably decreased pixel values in their water images (PV 1) and tremendously increased pixel values in their fat images (PV 2). The finding that T1 became much shorter and T2 slightly longer seemed to be related to the fact that the extent of the increase in PV 2 was relatively greater than that of the decrease in PV 1. The patients with polymyositis showed a PV 1 value that was higher than normal. This finding was quite different from that for muscular dystrophy. As this disease grew worse, the PV 2 increased. The length of T1 seemed to depend on the relationship between PV 1 and PV 2. Prolongation of T2 appeared to be due to increase in PV 2. Both PV 1 and PV 2 in myotonic dystrophy and neurogenic diseases were slightly higher than normal. The patients with polyradiculoneuropathy showed both T1 and T2 relaxation times that were longer than normal. However, the T1 relaxation time in motor neuron diseases had a tendency to become shorter. The parameters in the patients with hysterical conversion reactions remained approximately within normal range. We concluded that measurements of the objective parameters in MRI are useful for the clinical diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases. (author)

  11. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound: a new technology for clinical neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolesz, Ferenc A; McDannold, Nathan J

    2014-02-01

    Transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) is an old idea but a new technology that may change the entire clinical field of the neurosciences. TcMRgFUS has no cumulative effect, and it is applicable for repeatable treatments, controlled by real-time dosimetry, and capable of immediate tissue destruction. Most importantly, it has extremely accurate targeting and constant monitoring. It is potentially more precise than proton beam therapy and definitely more cost effective. Neuro-oncology may be the most promising area of future TcMRgFUS applications.

  12. Magnetic resonance lung function – a breakthrough for lung imaging and functional assessment? A phantom study and clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauh Manfred

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic lung diseases are a major issue in public health. A serial pulmonary assessment using imaging techniques free of ionizing radiation and which provides early information on local function impairment would therefore be a considerably important development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a powerful tool for the static and dynamic imaging of many organs. Its application in lung imaging however, has been limited due to the low water content of the lung and the artefacts evident at air-tissue interfaces. Many attempts have been made to visualize local ventilation using the inhalation of hyperpolarized gases or gadolinium aerosol responding to MRI. None of these methods are applicable for broad clinical use as they require specific equipment. Methods We have shown previously that low-field MRI can be used for static imaging of the lung. Here we show that mathematical processing of data derived from serial MRI scans during the respiratory cycle produces good quality images of local ventilation without any contrast agent. A phantom study and investigations in 85 patients were performed. Results The phantom study proved our theoretical considerations. In 99 patient investigations good correlation (r = 0.8; p ≤ 0.001 was seen for pulmonary function tests and MR ventilation measurements. Small ventilation defects were visualized. Conclusion With this method, ventilation defects can be diagnosed long before any imaging or pulmonary function test will indicate disease. This surprisingly simple approach could easily be incorporated in clinical routine and may be a breakthrough for lung imaging and functional assessment.

  13. Acupuncture for Parkinson's Disease: a review of clinical, animal, and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Danqing

    2015-12-01

    Acupuncture has been commonly used as an adjuvant therapy or monotherapy in the treatment of Parkinson's disease in China and in other countries. Animal studies have consistently show that this treatment is both neuroprotective, protecting dopaminergic neurons from degeneration and also restorative, restoring tyrosine hydroxylase positive dopaminergic terminals in striatum, resulting in improvements in motor performance in animal models of Parkinsonism. Studies show that this protection is mediated through the same common mechanisms as other neuroprotective agents, including anti-oxidative stress, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic pathways at molecular and cellular levels. Restoration of function seems to involve activation of certain compensatory brain regions as a mechanism at the network level to correct the imbalances to the nervous system resulting from loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra. Clinical studies in China and Korea, in particular, have shown a positive benefit of acupuncture in treating Parkinson's disease, especially in reducing the doses of dopaminergic medications and the associated side effects. However, large and well-controlled clinical trials are still needed to further demonstrate the efficacy and effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  14. Cell tracking using {sup 19}F magnetic resonance imaging: Technical aspects and challenges towards clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiri, Houshang [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Tumor Immunology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Srinivas, Mangala; Vries, I.J.M. de [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Tumor Immunology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Veltien, Andor; Uden, Mark J. van; Heerschap, Arend [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-11-06

    {sup 19}F MRI is emerging as a new imaging technique for cell tracking. It is particularly attractive because of its potential for direct and precise cell quantification. The most important challenge towards in vivo applications is the sensitivity of the technique, i.e. the detection limit in a reasonable imaging time. Optimal sensitivity can be achieved with dedicated {sup 19}F compounds together with specifically adapted hardware and acquisition methods. In this paper we introduce the {sup 19}F MRI technique focusing on these key sensitivity issues and review the state-of-the-art of {sup 19}F MRI and developments towards its clinical use. We calculate {sup 19}F detection limits reported in preclinical cell and clinical {sup 19}F drug studies in terms of tissue concentration in a 1 cm{sup 3} voxel, as an alternate way to compare detection limits. We estimate that a tissue concentration of a few millimoles per litre (mM) of {sup 19}F is required for a human study at a resolution of 1 cm{sup 3}. (orig.)

  15. The clinical value of routine whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in palliative care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geitung, Jonn Terje (Department of Radiology, Haraldspass Deaconess (University) Hospital (Norway); Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen (Norway)), Email: jtgeit@online.no; Eikeland, Joakim (Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen (Norway)); Rosland, Jan Henrik (Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen (Norway); Sunniva Clinic for Palliative Care, Haraldsplass Deaconess (University) Hospital (Norway))

    2012-03-15

    Background. Whole-body MRI (WBMRI) has become an accessible method for detecting different types of pathologies both in the skeleton and the viscera, which may explain painful conditions, for example tumors and inflammation. Purpose. To assess a possible value of using WBMRI in order to improve palliative care. Material and Methods. Twenty patients (all eligible patients) admitted to the Department for Palliative Care were consecutively included in this study. They underwent a modified WBMRI, with fewer and shorter pulse sequences than in a standard WBMRI, to reduce patient stress. However, the patients' physicians were to exclude patients where little might be obtained and discomfort, distress, and pain could be induced. The treating physicians registered clinical utility directly after receiving the MRI report in a questionnaire. The registration was repeated after ended treatment. Results. Eighty percent had new findings detected, and 40% of the patients had a change in treatment due to the MRI result, mainly changes in analgesics and/or radiation therapy. Conclusion. The WBMRI helped the clinicians to improve treatment and a majority of the patients benefited from this. In eight patients the treatment was changed due to the results. The clinical value (utility) was indicated to be high

  16. "Absolute" quantification in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: validation of a clinical protocol in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagory, Matthieu; Durand-Dubief, Françoise; Ibarrola, Danielle; Confavreux, Christian; Sappey-Marinier, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    MRS allows to measure cerebral metabolites, thus helping to characterize brain disease diagnosis and followup. Metabolite concentration quantification is usually based on metabolite ratio referring to creatine. If this metabolite concentration is supposed to be constant, it may vary in pathological processes. Therefore, "absolute" concentration methodology is needed. The aim of this study is to validate a clinical "absolute" quantification protocol through the development of an external metabolic phantom, calibration and correction, and the investigation of reproducibility issues. When phantom stability was investigated by a short-term and a long-term reproducibility study, both Standard Deviations (SD) were in agreement with literature values. This "absolute" quantification method was applied to patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The results show a significant decrease in both N-Acetyl Aspartate (NAA) and choline concentrations.

  17. Sacroiliitis at diagnosis of juvenile spondyloarthritis assessed by radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and clinical examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Pamela F; Xiao, Rui; Biko, David M; Chauvin, Nancy A

    2015-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the prevalence of sacroiliitis at diagnosis of juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA) and the accuracy of physical examination and back pain to detect sacroiliitis, using imaging as the reference standard. Methods We performed a prospective cross-sectional study of 40 children with newly diagnosed JSpA and 14 healthy controls. Subjects were assessed using physical examination, anteroposterior pelvic radiograph, and pelvic MRI. Differences in clinical features between those children with and without sacroiliitis were assessed by Fisher’s exact test for categorical variables and Wilcoxon rank sum test for continuous variables. Accuracy of physical examination and back pain for detection of sacroiliitis was determined using MRI as the reference standard. Predicted probability of sacroiliitis was determined using exact multivariate logistic regression. Results Eight (20%) children with JSpA had active sacroiliitis. Of those subjects with active changes on MRI, 7/8 (88%) also had evidence of erosions or sclerosis. Five (13%) children with JSpA and 1 (7%) control had non-periarticular bone marrow edema. Of the subjects with active sacroiliitis only 3 (38%) reported a history of back pain or tenderness on palpation of the sacroiliac joints. The positive and negative predictive values of clinical exam features and back pain for detection of sacroiliitis were low. The estimated probability of having sacroiliitis was 0.84 (95% CI: 0.40–1.00) in HLA-B27+ patients with an elevated CRP. Conclusion Active sacroiliitis by MRI is common at diagnosis in JSpA and is frequently asymptomatic. Children who are HLA-B27+ and have elevated CRP levels have the highest probability of sacroiliitis. PMID:26212574

  18. SU-E-J-181: Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Workflow: Initial Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, O; Kashani, R; Santanam, L; Wooten, H; Li, H; Rodriguez, V; Hu, Y; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hand, T; Victoria, J [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH (United States); Steele, C [Barnes Jewish Hospital, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aims of this work are to describe the workflow and initial clinical experience treating patients with an MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRIGRT) system. Methods: Patient treatments with a novel MR-IGRT system started at our institution in mid-January. The system consists of an on-board 0.35-T MRI, with IMRT-capable delivery via doubly-focused MLCs on three {sup 60} Co heads. In addition to volumetric MR-imaging, real-time planar imaging is performed during treatment. So far, eleven patients started treatment (six finished), ranging from bladder to lung SBRT. While the system is capable of online adaptive radiotherapy and gating, a conventional workflow was used to start, consisting of volumetric imaging for patient setup using visible tumor, evaluation of tumor motion outside of PTV on cine images, and real-time imaging. Workflow times were collected and evaluated to increase efficiency and evaluate feasibility of adding the adaptive and gating features while maintaining a reasonable patient throughput. Results: For the first month, physicians attended every fraction to provide guidance on identifying the tumor and an acceptable level of positioning and anatomical deviation. Average total treatment times (including setup) were reduced from 55 to 45 min after physician presence was no longer required and the therapists had learned to align patients based on soft-tissue imaging. Presently, the source strengths were at half maximum (7.7K Ci each), therefore beam-on times will be reduced after source replacement. Current patient load is 10 per day, with increase to 25 anticipated in the near future. Conclusion: On-board, real-time MRI-guided RT has been incorporated into clinical use. Treatment times were kept to reasonable lengths while including volumetric imaging, previews of tumor movement, and physician evaluation. Workflow and timing is being continuously evaluated to increase efficiency. In near future, adaptive and gating capabilities of the system will

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute tendon ruptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daffner, R.H.; Lupetin, A.R.; Dash, N.; Riemer, B.L.

    1986-11-01

    The diagnosis of acute tendon ruptures of the extensor mechanism of the knee or the Achilles tendon of the ankle may usually be made by clinical means. Massive soft tissue swelling accompanying these injuries often obscures the findings, however. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can rapidly demonstrate these tendon ruptures. Examples of the use of MRI for quadriceps tendon, and Achilles tendon rupture are presented.

  20. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  1. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    Real-time acquisition, reconstruction and interactively changing the slice position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been possible for years. However, the current clinical use of interactive real-time MRI is limited due to an inherent low spatial and temporal resolution. This PhD proje...

  2. THE TISSUE HYDRATION STATE IN UW-PRESERVED HUMAN DONOR LIVERS - A CLINICAL-STUDY OF THE RELATION BETWEEN PROTON MAGNETIC-RESONANCE RELAXATION-TIMES, DONOR CONDITION, PRESERVATION PROCEDURE, AND EARLY GRAFT FUNCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLF, RFE; DENBUTTER, G; KAMMAN, RL; DEKETH, HP; SLUTTER, WJ; SLOOFF, MJH

    1994-01-01

    To determine the relation between tissue hydration state-as indicated by tissue proton magnetic resonance relaxation times-in UW-preserved human donor livers and viability parameters of the donor and early graft function, ''ex vivo'' magnetic resonance relaxometry was performed with a clinical MR im

  3. Vacuum phenomenon in the temporomandibular joint: a clinical, computed tomography and magnetic resonance case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, G; Oyarzo, J F; Moncada, M; Marholz, C; Millas, R

    2008-05-01

    A 28-year-old woman presented with a history of clicking and mandibular clenching. She was studied clinically and with axial and coronal CT. The patient was going through a tense emotional period and reported tightening of her teeth (clenching); she was under psychological and neurological treatment for depression including pharmacological therapy. She presented slight pain only at maximum mouth opening at the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and in the lateral pole on palpation; there was no coincidence between initial and maximal interocclusal contacts because of premature dental contacts. She showed occlusal group function in the right side and canine guidance in the left side with a right contact of balance, local muscular pain in the right deep masseter muscle and in the superior and middle portion of the right trapezium on palpation. On CT, a spherical area of 3 mm diameter with an average density of -647 HU (SD+/-4.7) was found in the upper and posterior area of the lower space of the right TMJ, together with a thicker lower synovial tissue. This observation was confirmed by MRI. Like other joints, the TMJ could present vacuum phenomenon images inside synovial tissue in the presence of degenerative disease. It is important for radiologists to recognize this rare entity.

  4. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of pulmonary lesions: Description of a technique aiming clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel, E-mail: marcelk46@yahoo.com.br [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Radiology Department, German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum – DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Hospital of the School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Bandeirantes 3900, Campus Universitario Monte Alegre, 14048 900 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Optazaite, Elzbieta, E-mail: optazaite@andrulis.eu [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine, Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik), University of Heidelberg, Amalienstraße 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Sommer, Gregor, E-mail: gregor.sommer@usb.ch [Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Basel, Petersgraben 4, CH-4031 Basel (Switzerland); Safi, Seyer, E-mail: seyer.safi@gmail.com [Surgery Department, Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik), University of Heidelberg, Amalienstraße 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Heussel, Claus Peter, E-mail: heussel@uni-heidelberg.de [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine, Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik), University of Heidelberg, Amalienstraße 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Im Neuenheimer Feld 350, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: hans-ulrich.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Im Neuenheimer Feld 350, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2015-01-15

    To propose a technique for evaluation of pulmonary lesions using contrast-enhanced MRI; to assess morphological patterns of enhancement and correlate quantitative analysis with histopathology. Material and methods: Thirty-six patients were prospectively studied. Volumetric-interpolated T1W images were obtained during consecutive breath holds after bolus triggered contrast injection. Volume coverage of first three acquisitions was limited (higher temporal resolution) and last acquisition obtained at 4th min. Two radiologists individually evaluated the patterns of enhancement. Region-of-interest-based signal intensity (SI)-time curves were created to assess quantitative parameters. Results: Readers agreed moderately to substantially concerning lesions’ enhancement pattern. SI-time curves could be created for all lesions. In comparison to benign, malignant lesions showed higher values of maximum enhancement, early peak, slope and 4th min enhancement. Early peak >15% showed 100% sensitivity to detect malignancy, maximum enhancement >40% showed 100% specificity. Conclusions: The proposed technique is robust, simple to perform and can be applied in clinical scenario. It allows visual evaluation of enhancement pattern/progression together with creation of SI-time curves and assessment of derived quantitative parameters. Perfusion analysis was highly sensitive to detect malignancy, in accordance to what is recommended by most recent guidelines on imaging evaluation of pulmonary lesions.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in perinatal brain injury: clinical presentation, lesions and outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Mary; Ward, Phil; Allsop, Joanna; Counsell, Serena [Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, Robert Steiner MR Unit, Imaging Sciences Department, Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom); Srinivasan, Latha; Dyet, Leigh; Cowan, Frances [Imperial College, Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Imaging Sciences Department, Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    Neonatal MR imaging is invaluable in assessing the term born neonate who presents with an encephalopathy. Successful imaging requires adaptations to both the hardware and the sequences used for adults. The perinatal and postnatal details often predict the pattern of lesions sustained and are essential for correct interpretation of the imaging findings, but additional or alternative diagnoses in infants with apparent hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy should always be considered. Perinatally acquired lesions are usually at their most obvious between 1 and 2 weeks of age. Very early imaging (<3 days) may be useful to make management decisions in ventilated neonates, but abnormalities may be subtle at that stage. Diffusion-weighted imaging is clinically useful for the early identification of ischaemic white matter in the neonatal brain but is less reliable in detecting lesions within the basal ganglia and thalami. The pattern of lesions seen on MRI can predict neurodevelopmental outcome. Additional useful information may be obtained by advanced techniques such as MR angiography, venography and perfusion-weighted imaging. Serial imaging with quantification of both structure size and tissue damage provides invaluable insights into perinatal brain injury. (orig.)

  6. A clinical study of brainstem infarction identified on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masaki; Takahashi, Akira (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Arahata, Yutaka; Motegi, Yoshimasa; Furuse, Masahiro

    1993-04-01

    We conducted a clinical study of 155 cases that were confirmed to have brainstem infarctions on MRI (T[sub 1]-weighted image showed a low signal and T[sub 2]-weighted image showed a high signal, measuring in excess of 2 x 2 mm). The majority of the brainstem infarction was located in the pontine base in 132 cases (85.2%). Of these, 19 cases had double lesions including infarctions in the pontine base. Second infarctions frequently occurred in the cerebral peduncle or medical medulla oblongata, unilateral to the pontine infarctions. In addition to 98 symptomatic cases, there were 57 cases of 'asymptomatic' brainstem infarction. They comprised 24 cases accompanying other symptomatic cerebrovascular diseases in the supratentorium and 33 cases of transient subjective complaints such as headache or vertigo-dizziness. Complication by supratentorial infarctions was significantly frequent in cases of brainstem infarction (p<0.001), 122 of 155 cases (78.7%), especially in the pontine base (88.6%); while in the control cases (without brainstem infarction) only 65 of 221 cases (29.4%). These findings are considered to show the widespread progress of arteriosclerosis in brainstem infarction, especially in ones in the pontine base. (author).

  7. Magnetic resonance in Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scotti, G.; Scialfa, G.; Biondi, A.; Landoni, L.; Caputo, D.; Cazzullo, C.L.

    1986-07-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres.

  8. Non-cardiovascular findings in clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadimi Mahani, Maryam [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Morani, Ajaykumar C. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Lu, Jimmy C.; Dorfman, Adam L. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Fazeli Dehkordy, Soudabeh [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Providence Hospital and Medical Centers, Department of Graduate Medical Education, Southfield, MI (United States); Jeph, Sunil [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Geisinger Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Danville, PA (United States); Agarwal, Prachi P. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Division of Cardiothoracic Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-04-15

    With increasing use of pediatric cardiovascular MRI, it is important for all imagers to become familiar with the spectrum of non-cardiovascular imaging findings that can be encountered. This study aims to ascertain the prevalence and nature of these findings in pediatric cardiovascular MRIs performed at our institution. We retrospectively evaluated reports of all cardiovascular MRI studies performed at our institute from January 2008 to October 2012 in patients younger than18 years. Most studies (98%) were jointly interpreted by a pediatric cardiologist and a radiologist. We reviewed the electronic medical records of all cases with non-cardiovascular findings, defined as any imaging finding outside the cardiovascular system. Non-cardiovascular findings were classified into significant and non-significant, based on whether they were known at the time of imaging or they required additional workup or a change in management. In 849 consecutive studies (mean age 9.7 ± 6.3 years), 145 non-cardiovascular findings were found in 140 studies (16.5% of total studies). Overall, 51.0% (74/145) of non-cardiovascular findings were in the abdomen, 30.3% (44/145) were in the chest, and 18.6% (27/145) were in the spine. A total of 19 significant non-cardiovascular findings were observed in 19 studies in individual patients (2.2% of total studies, 47% male, mean age 5.9 ± 6.7 years). Significant non-cardiovascular findings included hepatic adenoma, arterially enhancing focal liver lesions, asplenia, solitary kidney, pelvicaliectasis, renal cystic diseases, gastric distention, adrenal hemorrhage, lung hypoplasia, air space disease, bronchial narrowing, pneumomediastinum and retained surgical sponge. Non-cardiovascular findings were seen in 16.5% of cardiovascular MRI studies in children, of which 2.2% were clinically significant findings. Prevalence and nature of these non-cardiovascular findings are different from those reported in adults. Attention to these findings is important

  9. Stroke With Unknown Time of Symptom Onset: Baseline Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data of the First Thousand Patients in WAKE-UP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomalla, Götz; Boutitie, Florent; Fiebach, Jochen B

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We describe clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of stroke patients with unknown time of symptom onset potentially eligible for thrombolysis from a large prospective cohort. METHODS: We analyzed baseline data from WAKE-UP (Efficacy and Safety of MR...... a time window for safe and effective thrombolysis. Patients with daytime onset unwitnessed stroke differ from wake-up stroke patients with regards to clinical characteristics but are comparable in terms of MRI characteristics of lesion age. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http......://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01525290. URL: https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu. Unique identifier: 2011-005906-32....

  10. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  11. GADOLINIUM(Gd)-BASED and Ion Oxide Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Pre-Clinical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (mri) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Thian C.

    2012-06-01

    It is known that one strength of MRI is its excellent soft tissue discrimination. It naturally provides sufficient contrast between the structural differences of normal and pathological tissues, their spatial extent and progression. However, to further extend its applications and enhance even more contrast for clinical studies, various Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents have been developed for different organs (brain strokes, cancer, cardio-MRI, etc). These Gd-based contrast agents are paramagnetic compounds that have strong T1-effect for enhancing the contrast between tissue types. Gd-contrast can also enhance magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) for studying stenosis and for measuring perfusion, vascular susceptibility, interstitial space, etc. Another class of contrast agents makes use of ferrite iron oxide nanoparticles (including Superparamagnetic Ion Oxide (SPIO) and Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (USPIO)). These nanoparticles have superior magnetic susceptibility effect and produce a drop in signal, namely in T2*-weighted images, useful for the determination of lymph nodes metastases, angiogenesis and arteriosclerosis plaques.

  12. Distal border fragments of the equine navicular bone: association between magnetic resonance imaging characteristics and clinical lameness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Elizabeth H.; Judy, Carter E.; Saveraid, Travis C.; McGowan, Conor P.; Caldwell, Fred J.

    2014-01-01

    Distal border fragments of the navicular bone are increasingly being detected due to the improved capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but their clinical significance remains unclear. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the location, size, and frequency of fragments in a cohort of horses presented for MRI of the foot and to compare MRI findings with severity of lameness. Archived MRI studies and medical records were searched from March 2006 to June 2008. Horses were included if a distal border fragment of the navicular bone was visible in MRI scans. Confidence interval comparisons and linear regression analyses were used to test hypotheses that fragments were associated with lameness and lameness severity was positively correlated with fragment volume and biaxial location. A total of 453 horses (874 limbs) were included. Fragments were identified in 60 horses (13.25%) and 90 limbs (10.3%). Fifty percent of the horses had unilateral fragments and 50% had bilateral fragments. Fragments were located at the lateral (62.2%), medial (8.89%), or medial and lateral (28.9%) angles of the distal border of the navicular bone. There was no increased probability of being categorized as lame if a fragment was present. There was no significant difference in fragment volume across lameness severity categorizations. Confidence intervals indicated a slightly increased probability of being classified as lame if both medial and lateral fragments were present. Findings indicated that distal border fragments of the navicular bone in equine MRI studies are unlikely to be related to existing lameness.

  13. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  14. magnetic resonance imaging,etc.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张福基

    1998-01-01

    magnetic resonance imaging n.[1984] a noninvasive diagnostic technique that produces computerized images of internal body tissues and is based on nuclear magnetic resonance of atoms within he body induced by the application of radio waves磁共振成像(指一种非侵害 性诊断技术,能生成内部身体组织的计算机化影像,其依据是应用无线电波 感生体内原子并使之产磁共振)

  15. Advances in magnetic resonance 8

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 8 describes the magnetic resonance in spin polarization and saturation transfer. This book discusses the theory of chemically induced dynamic spin polarization; basic results for the radical-pair mechanism; and optical spin polarization in molecular crystals. The theory of optical electronic polarization (OEP); NMR in flowing systems; and applications of NMR in a flowing liquid are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the saturation transfer spectroscopy; studies of spin labels in the intermediate and fast motion regions; and spin-density matrix and

  16. Effectiveness of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating clinical responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yin-hua; YE Jing-ming; XU Ling; HUANG Qing-yun; ZHAO Jian-xin; DUAN Xue-ning; QIN Nai-shan; WANG Xiao-ying

    2011-01-01

    Background Use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy necessitates assessment of response to cytotoxic drugs.The aim of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating clinical responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.Methods We examined patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for primary breast cancer between October 2007and September 2008.Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was used to examine breast tumors prior to and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.The MRI examination assessed tumors using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST).The Miller-Payne grading system was used as a histopathological examination to assess the effect of the treatment.We examined the relationship between the results of RECIST and histopathological criteria.In addition,we used time-signal intensity curves (MRI T-SI) to further evaluate the effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on tumor response.Results MRI examination of patients completing four three-week anthracycline-taxanes chemotherapy treatment revealed that no patients had complete responses (CR),58 patients had partial responses (PR),29 patients had stable disease (SD),and four with progressive disease (PD).The effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CR + PR) was 63.7% (58/91).The postoperative histopathological evaluations revealed the following:seven G5 (pCR) cases (7.7%),39G4 cases (42.9%),16 G3 cases (17.6%),23 G2 cases (25.3%),and six G1 cases (6.6%).The effectiveness (G5 + G4 +G3) was 68.1% (62/91).MRI T-SI standards classified 53 responding cases,29 stable cases,and nine progressing cases.These results indicated that the treatment was 58.2% effective (53/91) overall.Conclusions Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and histopathological standards were highly correlated.Importantly,MRI T-SI evaluation was found to be useful in assessing the clinical effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  17. Ultrasonography of the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints in rheumatoid arthritis: a comparison with magnetic resonance imaging, conventional radiography and clinical examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szkudlarek, Marcin; Klarlund, Mette; Narvestad, E.

    2006-01-01

    ultrasonography can provide information on signs of inflammation and destruction in RA finger joints that are not available with conventional radiography and clinical examination, and comparable to the information provided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The second to fifth metacarpophalangeal and proximal...... interphalangeal joints of 40 RA patients and 20 control persons were assessed with ultrasonography, clinical examination, radiography and MRI. With MRI as the reference method, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasonography in detecting bone erosions in the finger joints were 0.59, 0.98 and 0...

  18. Ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, radiography, and clinical assessment of inflammatory and destructive changes in fingers and toes of patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiell, Charlotte; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Hasselquist, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess ultrasonography (US) for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in finger and toe joints, tendons, and entheses in patients with psoriasis-associated arthritis (PsA) by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), projection radiography...... (x-ray), and clinical findings. Fifteen patients with PsA, 5 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 5 healthy control persons were examined by means of US, contrast-enhanced MRI, x-ray, and clinical assessment. Each joint of the 2nd-5th finger (metacarpophalangeal joints, proximal interphalangeal [PIP...... in fingers and toes of patients with PsA. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-null...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Image Wavelet Enhancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    1Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico−DF, 09340, Mexico email:arog@xanum.uam.mx. Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics...Number Task Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico-DF

  20. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance imaging ( ... address): From (your name): Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full ... address): From (your name): Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ...

  5. Aortic dissection: magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amparo, E G; Higgins, C B; Hricak, H; Sollitto, R

    1985-05-01

    Fifteen patients with suspected or known aortic dissection were imaged with magnetic resonance (MR). Thirteen of these patients were eventually shown to have dissection. In most instances the diagnosis was established by aortography and/or computed tomography (CT) prior to the MR study. Surgical proof (6/13) and/or aortographic proof (10/13) were available in 11/13 patients with aortic dissection. MR demonstrated the intimal flap and determined whether the dissection was type A or type B. In addition, MR: differentiated between the true and false lumens; determined the origins of the celiac, superior mesenteric, and renal arteries from the true or false lumen in the cases where the dissection extended into the abdominal aorta (8/12); allowed post-surgical surveillance of the dissection; and identified aortoannular ectasia in the three patients who had Marfan syndrome. In addition to the 13 cases with dissection, there were two cases in whom the diagnosis of dissection was excluded by MR. Our early experience suggests that MR can serve as the initial imaging test in clinically suspected cases of aortic dissection and that the information provided by MR is sufficient to manage many cases. Additionally, MR obviates the use of iodinated contrast media.

  6. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  8. The working principle of magnetic resonance therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Brizhik, Larissa; Fermi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe briefly the basic aspects of magnetic resonance therapy, registered as TMR therapy. Clinical studies have shown that application of this therapy significantly accelerates wound healing and, in particular, healing of the diabetic foot disease. To understand the working principle of this therapy, we analyze relevant to it biological effects produced by magnetic fields. Based on these data, we show that there is a hierarchy of the possible physical mechanisms, which can produce such effects. The mutual interplay between the mechanisms can lead to a synergetic outcome delayed in time, which can affect the physiological state of the organism. In particular, we show that soliton mediated charge transport during the redox processes in living organisms is sensitive to magnetic fields, so that such fields can facilitate redox processes in particular, and can stimulate the healing effect of the organism in general. This and other non-thermal resonant mechanisms of the biological effects of mag...

  9. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.;

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper review...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8......Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...

  10. "PALPATION BY IMAGING": MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Xu; Pei-yi Gao

    2006-01-01

    Elasticity is an important physical property of human tissues.There is a tremendous difference in elasticity between normal and pathological tissues.Noninvasive evaluation of the elasticity of human tissues would be valuable for clinical practice.Magnetic resonance elastography(MRE)is a recently developed noninvasive imaging technique that can directly visualize and quantitatively measure tissue elasticity.This article reviewed the MRE technique and its current status.

  11. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  12. 磁共振血管造影在临床应用的新进展%Magnetic Resonance Angiography in Clinical Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董军; 孙洪珍; 吴树冰

    2013-01-01

      本文介绍了最新发展的无创性磁共振血管造影检查方法,就其成像原理、应用技术及磁共振造影在血管影像诊断方面的临床应用及其评价进行综述。%This paper introduces the latest development of non-invasive magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) method, the imaging principle, application technology and MRA in vascular imaging diagnosis of clinical application and evaluation were reviewed in this article.

  13. Virtopsy post-mortem multi-slice computed tomograhy (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating descending tonsillar herniation: comparison to clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghayev, Emin; Yen, Kathrin; Thali, Michael; Jackowski, Christian; Dirnhofer, Richard [Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, IRM-Buehlstrasse 20, 3012, Bern (Switzerland); Sonnenschein, Martin [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Inselspital, 3010, Bern (Switzerland); Ozdoba, Christoph [Department of Neuroradiology, Inselspital, 3010, Bern (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    Descending cerebellar tonsillar herniation is a serious and common complication of intracranial mass lesions. We documented three cases of fatal blunt head injury using post-mortem multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The results showed massive bone and soft-tissue injuries of the head and signs of high intracranial pressure with herniation of the cerebellar tonsils. The diagnosis of tonsillar herniation by post-mortem radiological examination was performed prior to autopsy. This paper describes the detailed retrospective evaluation of the position of the cerebellar tonsils in post-mortem imaging in comparison to clinical studies. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging and morphometric histologic analysis of prostate tissue composition in predicting the clinical outcome of terazosin therapy in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isen, K. [Karaelmas Univ., Zonguldak (Turkey). School of Medicine; Sinik, Z.; Alkibay, T.; Sezer, C.; Soezen, S.; Atilla, S.; Ataoglu, O.; Isik, S.

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or quantitative color-imaged morphometric analysis (MA) of the prostate gland are related to the clinical response to terazosin. Thirty-six male patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with a serum prostate-specific antigen level of 4-10 ng/mL underwent MRI with body coil, transrectal prostate unltrasonography and biopsy prior to terazosin therapy. For MRI-determined stromal and non-stromal BPH, the ratio of the signal intensity of the inner gland to the obturator internus muscle was evaluated. Histologic sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The MA of the specimens was performed by Samba 2000. Results of the two techniques were interpreted according to the terazosin therapy results. The mean stromal percentage was 60.5{+-}18.0%. No statistically significant relationship was found between the clinical outcome of terazosin and the MRI findings. The MA results showed a significant relationship between the percentage of stroma and the percent change of the peak urinary flow rate, but not with the percent change of the international prostate symptom score after terazosin therapy (P<0.05). Magnetic resonance imaging alone is not sufficient in predicting the response to terazosin therapy. Morphometric analysis of BPH tissue composition can be used in predicting the clinical outcome of terazosin therapy but it is suitable only in patients for whom prostatic biopsy is necessary in order to rule out prostate cancer. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging findings as predictors of clinical outcome in patients with sciatica receiving active conservative treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tue Secher; Albert, Hanne B; Sorensen, Joan S

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to investigate the possible prognostic value of disk-related magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in relation to recovery at 14 months in patients with severe sciatica, and whether improvement of disk herniation and/or nerve root compromise is concurrent...... disability score of 3 or less. Potential predictors of interest were disk-related MRI findings in the lumbar spine. Bi- and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify any predictors of recovery. Age, sex, and treatment were included in the analyses as possible confounding....../modifying factors. RESULTS: According to the definitions used, 53% of 154 patients recovered; 63% of men (n = 84) and 40% of women (n = 70). In the multivariate analyses, broad-based protrusions, extrusions, and male sex were found to be predictive of a positive outcome. Sex was identified as a true confounder...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology. An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenbaum, M A; Adamis, M K

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has revolutionized the assessment of pathology involving the musculoskeletal system. The soft tissue contrast, superb resolution, multiplanar acquisition potential, and the ability to monitor physiologic processes combine the best features of other imaging modalities. The sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for a wide range of disease processes matches or supersedes conventional radiology, nuclear medicine, and clinical examination. This article provides a brief overview of the use of MR imaging for some of the more common clinical situations confronting the rheumatologist.

  17. Resonancia magnética cardíaca: aplicaciones clínicas Cardiac magnetic resonance: clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bastarrika

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad cardiovascular es la causa más frecuente de mortalidad en los países desarrollados y constituye un grave problema social, económico y sanitario. Aunque existen muy diversas técnicas útiles para diagnosticar las enfermedades cardíacas, con frecuencia es preciso realizar más de una prueba para llegar a un diagnóstico concreto. La resonancia magnética es una técnica inocua, bien tolerada y segura que actualmente se encuentra disponible en la mayoría de los centros hospitalarios. Esta técnica permite estudiar en una única exploración la anatomía del corazón y valorar de forma cualitativa, semicuantitativa y cuantitativa los parámetros de función cardíaca. Es útil para el estudio de las enfermedades valvulares, miocardiopatías y de la enfermedad pericárdica. Aporta información de la anatomía y función cardíaca y vascular en las cardiopatías congénitas complejas. Además, con la administración de contraste intravenoso, permite conocer la viabilidad miocárdica en la cardiopatía isquémica. Por tanto, la resonancia magnética cardíaca se perfila como una de las técnicas más prometedoras para el estudio de la patología cardíaca congénita y adquirida.Cardiovascular disease is the most frequent cause of mortality in the developed countries and represents a serious social, economic and health problem. Although very diverse, useful techniques exist for diagnosing cardiac diseases, it is frequently necessary to ask for more than one test to reach a specific diagnosis. Magnetic resonance is a harmless, well tolerated and safe technique, which is currently available in the majority of hospitals. This technique makes it possible in a single exploration to study the anatomy of the heart and to make a qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative assessment of the parameters of cardiac function. It provides information of cardiac and vascular anatomy and function in complex congenital cardiopathies. Besides

  18. Cryogenic phased-array for high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); assessment of clinical and research applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Flora S.

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging is one of the most powerful tools in diagnostic medicine for soft tissue imaging. Image acquisition techniques and hardware receivers are very important in achieving high contrast and high resolution MR images. An aim of this dissertation is to design single and multi-element room and cryogenic temperature arrays and make assessments of their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and SNR gain. In this dissertation, four sets of MR receiver coils are built. They are the receiver-only cryo-coils that are not commercially available. A tuning and matching circuit is attached to each coil. The tuning and matching circuits are simple; however, each device component has to operate at a high magnetic field and cryogenic temperature environment. Remote DC bias of the varactor controls the tuning and matching outside the scanner room. Active detuning of the resonator is done by two p-i-n junction (PIN) diodes. Cooling of the receiver is done by a customized liquid nitrogen cryostat. The first application is to build a 3-Tesla 2x1 horseshoe counter-rotating current (CRC) cryogenic array to image the tibia in a human body. With significant increase in SNR, the surface coil should deliver high contrast and resolution images that can show the trabecular bone and bone marrow structure. This structural image will be used to model the mechanical strength of the bone as well as bone density and chance of fracture. The planar CRC is a unique design of this surface array. The second application is to modify the coil design to 7-Tesla to study the growth of infant rhesus monkey eyes. Fast scan MR images of the infant monkey heads are taken for monitoring shapes of their eyeballs. The monkeys are induced with shortsightedness by eye lenses, and they are scanned periodically to get images of their eyeballs. The field-of-view (FOV) of these images is about five centimeters and the area of interest is two centimeters deep from the surface. Because of these reasons

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging for the clinical management of rectal cancer patients: recommendations from the 2012 European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) consensus meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Maas, Monique [Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barbaro, Brunella [Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Caseiro-Alves, Filipe; Curvo-Semedo, Luis [Coimbra University Hospitals, Coimbra (Portugal); Fenlon, Helen M. [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Gollub, Marc J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Gourtsoyianni, Sofia [University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS FT, London (United Kingdom); Halligan, Steve; Taylor, Stuart A. [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Hoeffel, Christine [Reims University Hospital, Reims (France); Kim, Seung Ho [Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Laghi, Andrea [Sapienza - University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Maier, Andrea [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Rafaelsen, Soeren R. [Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark); Torkzad, Michael R. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Blomqvist, Lennart [Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    To develop guidelines describing a standardised approach regarding the acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical staging and restaging of rectal cancer. A consensus meeting of 14 abdominal imaging experts from the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) was conducted following the RAND-UCLA Appropriateness Method. Two independent (non-voting) chairs facilitated the meeting. Two hundred and thirty-six items were scored by participants for appropriateness and classified subsequently as appropriate or inappropriate (defined by {>=} 80 % consensus) or uncertain (defined by < 80 % consensus). Items not reaching 80 % consensus were noted. Consensus was reached for 88 % of items: recommendations regarding hardware, patient preparation, imaging sequences, angulation, criteria for MRI assessment and MRI reporting were constructed from these. These expert consensus recommendations can be used as clinical guidelines for primary staging and restaging of rectal cancer using MRI. (orig.)

  20. Selecting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcome measures for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) clinical trials: first report of the MRI in JIA special interest group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemke, Robert; Doria, Andrea S; Tzaribachev, Nikolay; Maas, Mario; van der Heijde, Désirée M F M; van Rossum, Marion A J

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have substantially improved the evaluation of joint pathologies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Because of the current availability of highly effective antirheumatic therapies and the unique and useful features of MRI, there is a growing need for an accurate and reproducible MRI assessment scoring system for JIA, such as the rheumatoid arthritis MRI Scoring (RAMRIS) for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To effectively evaluate the efficacy of treatment in clinical research trials, we need to develop and validate scoring methods to accurately measure joint outcomes, standardize imaging protocols for data acquisition and interpretation, and create imaging atlases to differentiate physiologic and pathologic joint findings in childhood and adolescence. Such a standardized, validated, JIA-MRI scoring method could be used as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

  1. Ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, radiography, and clinical assessment of inflammatory and destructive changes in fingers and toes of patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiell, Charlotte; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Hasselquist, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess ultrasonography (US) for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in finger and toe joints, tendons, and entheses in patients with psoriasis-associated arthritis (PsA) by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), projection radiography...... (x-ray), and clinical findings. Fifteen patients with PsA, 5 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 5 healthy control persons were examined by means of US, contrast-enhanced MRI, x-ray, and clinical assessment. Each joint of the 2nd-5th finger (metacarpophalangeal joints, proximal interphalangeal [PIP...... tendons of the fingers were assessed for the presence of insertional changes and tenosynovitis. One hand was assessed by means of MRI for the aforementioned changes. X-rays of both hands and feet were assessed for bone erosions and proliferations. US was repeated in 8 persons by another ultrasonographer...

  2. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging.

  3. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  4. Introduction to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manatt, Stanley L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to try to give a short overview of what the status is on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's a subject where one really has to spend some time to look at the physics in detail to develop a proper working understanding. I feel it's not appropriate to present to you density matrices, Hamiltonians of all sorts, and differential equations representing the motion of spins. I'm really going to present some history and status, and show a few very simple concepts involved in NMR. It is a form of radio frequency spectroscopy and there are a great number of nuclei that can be studied very usefully with the technique. NMR requires a magnet, a r.f. transmitter/receiver system, and a data acquisition system.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda, E-mail: ferbraggion@yahoo.com.br [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Teixeira, Sara Reis [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Volpe, Gustavo Jardim [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Divisão de Cardiologia - Universidade Johns Hopkins, Baltimore (United States); Trad, Henrique Simão [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Schmidt, André [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility.

  6. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of hemochromatosis arthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eustace, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Buff, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, C. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); MacMathuana, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Gilligan, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Ennis, J.T. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    1994-10-01

    This study was undertaken to compare plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of hemochromatosis arthropathy of the knees of ten patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis. Both modalities enabled visualisation of bony degenerative changes; magnetic resonance imaging enabled additional visualization of deformity of both cartilage and menisci. Magnetic resonance imaging failed reliably to confirm the presence of intra-articular iron in the patients studied. No correlation was observed between synovial fluid magnetic resonance signal values, corresponding serum ferritin levels, or the severity of the observed degenerative changes. (orig.)

  8. Potential clinical impact of cardiovascular magnetic resonance assessment of ejection fraction on eligibility for cardioverter defibrillator implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Subodh B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the primary prevention of sudden cardiac death, guidelines provide left ventricular ejection fraction (EF criteria for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD placement without specifying the technique by which it should be measured. We sought to investigate the potential impact of performing cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR for EF on ICD eligibility. Methods The study population consisted of patients being considered for ICD implantation who were referred for EF assessment by CMR. Patients who underwent CMR within 30 days of echocardiography were included. Echocardiographic EF was determined by Simpson’s biplane method and CMR EF was measured by Simpson’s summation of discs method. Results Fifty-two patients (age 62±15 years, 81% male had a mean EF of 38 ± 14% by echocardiography and 35 ± 14% by CMR. CMR had greater reproducibility than echocardiography for both intra-observer (ICC, 0.98 vs 0.94 and inter-observer comparisons (ICC 0.99 vs 0.93. The limits of agreement comparing CMR and echocardiographic EF were – 16 to +10 percentage points. CMR resulted in 11 of 52 (21% and 5 of 52 (10% of patients being reclassified regarding ICD eligibility at the EF thresholds of 35 and 30% respectively. Among patients with an echocardiographic EF of between 25 and 40%, 9 of 22 (41% were reclassified by CMR at either the 35 or 30% threshold. Echocardiography identified only 1 of the 6 patients with left ventricular thrombus noted incidentally on CMR. Conclusions CMR resulted in 21% of patients being reclassified regarding ICD eligibility when strict EF criteria were used. In addition, CMR detected unexpected left ventricular thrombus in almost 10% of patients. Our findings suggest that the use of CMR for EF assessment may have a substantial impact on management in patients being considered for ICD implantation.

  9. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maceira Alicia M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension.

  10. Magnetic resonance in hearing loss and vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ángel MARTÍN-PÉREZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Hearing loss and vertiginous syndrome represent an important part of the otorhinolaryngology clinic. The role of the radiologist plays in their workup become fundamental. Studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI are essential to guide or give the diagnosis in these cases. Method: After performing a retrospective analysis of 456 MRI studies of patients with these symptoms, we conducted a review of the main pathologies recorded that can cause these symptoms. Results: We classify into vascular disorders and other variants, tumor pathology, malformations and inflammatory pathology; We also describe the most relevant findings on MRI and illustrated with examples of our center.

  11. Lymphoma of uterine cervix: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanaan, Daniel; Constantino, Carolina Pesce Lamas; Souza, Rodrigo Canellas de, E-mail: daniel.kanaan@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Parente, Daniella Braz [Instituto D' Or de Pesquisa e Ensino, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    Lymphoma of the cervix is a rare disease. About 1.0% to 1.5% of extranodal lymphomas originates in the female genital tract. The clinical presentation of this condition is nonspecific and magnetic resonance imaging is important for diagnostic elucidation. The present report describes the case of a 80-year-old patient with lumbar pain, whose magnetic resonance imaging showed a large uterine mass. The final diagnosis was lymphoma. (author)

  12. Compact low field magnetic resonance imaging magnet: Design and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciandrone, M.; Placidi, G.; Testa, L.; Sotgiu, A.

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed with a very large instrument that allows the patient to be inserted into a region of uniform magnetic field. The field is generated either by an electromagnet (resistive or superconductive) or by a permanent magnet. Electromagnets are designed as air cored solenoids of cylindrical symmetry, with an inner bore of 80-100 cm in diameter. In clinical analysis of peripheral regions of the body (legs, arms, foot, knee, etc.) it would be better to adopt much less expensive magnets leaving the most expensive instruments to applications that require the insertion of the patient in the magnet (head, thorax, abdomen, etc.). These "dedicated" apparati could be smaller and based on resistive magnets that are manufactured and operated at very low cost, particularly if they utilize an iron yoke to reduce power requirements. In order to obtain good field uniformity without the use of a set of shimming coils, we propose both particular construction of a dedicated magnet, using four independently controlled pairs of coils, and an optimization-based strategy for computing, a posteriori, the optimal current values. The optimization phase could be viewed as a low-cost shimming procedure for obtaining the desired magnetic field configuration. Some experimental measurements, confirming the effectiveness of the proposed approach (construction and optimization), have also been reported. In particular, it has been shown that the adoption of the proposed optimization based strategy has allowed the achievement of good uniformity of the magnetic field in about one fourth of the magnet length and about one half of its bore. On the basis of the good experimental results, the dedicated magnet can be used for MRI of peripheral regions of the body and for animal experimentation at very low cost.

  13. Research progress of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a clinical diagnostic modality, which has become popular in hospitals around the world. Approximately 30% of MRI exams include the use of contrast agents. The research progress of the paramagnetic resonance imaging contrast agents was described briefly. Three important approaches in the soluble paramagnetic resonance imaging contrast agents design including nonionic, tissue-specific and macromolecular contrast agents were investigated. In addition, the problems in the research and development in future were discussed.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.H.; Nathanson, J.A.; Fox, A.J.; Pelz, D.M.; Lownie, S.P.

    1995-06-01

    In order to demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the brain in patients with clinical brain death, high-field MRI was performed on 5 patients using conventional T1-weighted and T2-weighted imaging. The study showed MRI exhibited similar features for all of the patients, features which were not found in MRI of comatose patients who were not clinically brain dead. It was stated that up to now the most important limitation in MRI of patients with suspected brain death has been the extreme difficulty of moving them out of the intensive care setting. If this problem can be overcome, and it appears possible with with the advent of MRI-compatible ventilators and noninvasive monitoring, MRI could become an excellent alternative for confirming clinical diagnosis of brain death for such patients. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Clinical relevance and indications for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging 2013. An interdisciplinary expert statement; Klinischer Stellenwert und Indikationen zur Magnetresonanztomografie des Herzens 2013. Ein interdisziplinaeres Expertenstatement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hergan, Klaus [Universitaetsklinikum Salzburg (Austria). Universitaetsinst. fuer Radiologie; Globits, S. [Herz-Kreislauf-Zentrum Gross Gerungs (Austria); Schuchlenz, H. [Landeskrankenhaus Graz-West (Austria). Dept. fuer Kardiologie/Intensivmedizin] [and others

    2013-03-15

    During the last years the indications of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) have been continuously expanded. However, the acceptance of the method by cardiologists and radiologists does not correlate with respect to the diagnostic potential. Several factors, such as expensive equipment, relatively long examination times, high technical know how and lack of remuneration, limit the application of CMRI in everyday clinical practice. Furthermore, doctors tend to apply more conventional, well established diagnostic procedures, the access to the method is still limited and there exist difficulties in the interdisciplinary collaboration. The interdisciplinary Austrian approach to Cardiac Imaging is aimed to improve the aforementioned problems and to support the implementation of CMRI in the diagnostic tree of cardiac diseases thus enabling a cost efficient management of patients in cardiology. (orig.)

  16. Functionalized Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agent Selectively Binds to Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa on Activated Human Platelets under Flow Conditions and Is Detectable at Clinically Relevant Field Strengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin von zur Mühlen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides the opportunity to image cells and cellular receptors using microparticles of iron oxide (MPIOs. However, imaging targets on vessel walls remains challenging owing to the quantity of contrast agents delivered to areas of interest under shear stress conditions. We evaluated ex vivo binding characteristics of a functional MRI contrast agent to ligand-induced binding sites (LIBSs on activated glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptors of human platelets, which were lining rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques and could therefore facilitate detection of platelet-mediated pathology in atherothrombotic disease. MPIOs were conjugated to anti-LIBS single-chain antibodies (LIBS-MPIO or control antibodies (control MPIO. Ex vivo binding to human platelet-rich clots in a dose-dependent manner was confirmed on a 3 T clinical MRI scanner and by histology (p < .05 for LIBS-MPIO vs control MPIO. By using a flow chamber setup, significant binding of LIBS-MPIO to a platelet matrix was observed under venous and arterial flow conditions, but not for control MPIO (p < .001. A newly generated MRI contrast agent detects activated human platelets at clinically relevant magnetic field strengths and binds to platelets under venous and arterial flow conditions, conveying high payloads of contrast to specific molecular targets. This may provide the opportunity to identify vulnerable, rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques via noninvasive MRI.

  17. Comparison of the clinical state and its changes in patients with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy with results of in vivo {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, M. [MR Unit, Inst. for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Grosmanova, A. [Dept. of Neuropediatrics, Thomayer`s Hospital, Prague (Czech Republic); Horska, A. [MR Unit, Inst. for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Urban, P. [Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, Prague Inst. of Chemical Technology (Czech Republic)

    1993-12-01

    A total of 14 boys with the Duchenne and Becker forms of muscular dystrophy (DMD, BMD) were examined using {sup 31}P magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy; 12 boys were examined repeatedly. The results were correlated with clinical findings (including those of genetic tests) and with data obtained from examinations of an age-matched control group. Evaluation of results using principal component analysis revealed maximum variability in the following ratios: phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi), phosphocreatine/phosphodiesters (PCr/PDe) and phosphocreatine/phosphomonoesters (PCr/PMe). A decrease in PCr/Pi correlates with weakness of the hip girdle and of the lower part of the shoulder girdle in DMD/BMD patients. The values of all ratios in the group of patients with the DMD phenotype differ significantly from results obtained in the group with the BMD phenotype. Continuous follow-up of patients using {sup 31}P MR spectroscopy revealed a marked decrease in PCr/Pi in DMD/BMD patients at an age that could be expected in subjects with a typical clinical course of DMD/BMD. An attempt to manage a concomitant disease with prednisone and carnitene was followed by an increase in PCr/Pi in 3 cases. A rise in the PCr/Pi ratio signalled clinical improvement in the patients. A decrease in PCr/Pi was found after controlled physical training, a finding consistent with data obtained from clinical observations describing an adverse effect of physical stress on the dystrophic process. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  20. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  1. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  2. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled.

  3. Clinical correlation of magnetic resonance imaging with symptom complex in prolapsed intervertebral disc disease: A cross-sectional double blind analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeetendra Bajpai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Low backache (LBA is one of the most common problems and herniated lumbar disc is one of the most commonly diagnosed abnormalities associated with LBA. Disc herniation of the same size may be asymptomatic in one patient and can lead to severe nerve root compromise in another patient. Objective: To evaluate correlation between the clinical features of disc collapse and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI finding to determine the clinical importance of anatomical abnormalities identified by MRI technique. Summary: From January 2010 to January 2012, 75 otherwise healthy patients (43 males 32 females between the age of 19 and 55 years (average age was 44.5 years with low back pain and predominant complaint of root pain who presented to our clinic were included in the study. Materials and Methods: Proper screening was done to rule out previous spine affection and subjected to MRI. Results: The results were analyzed under four headings viz. disc herniation, disc degeneration, thecal sac deformation and neural foramen effacement. All patients had a visual analog score (VAS score more than 6. The interrater correlation coefficient kappa was calculated to be k=0.51. There were total 44 patients with herniation, 25 patients had mild, one patient had moderate degree of thecal sac deformation, 21 patients had one or more levels of foraminal effacement by the herniated tissue, 100% of the patients had disc degeneration ranging from grade 1 to 3 at different levels; and 48 patients (64% had radiculopathy, six (8% patients had bilateral and others had ipsilateral affection. Conclusion: In our study, the correlation was made between clinical findings and MRI findings. It can safely be concluded that treating physician should put more emphasis on history, clinical examination, and make the inference by these and then should correlate the clinical findings with that of MRI to reach a final diagnosis.

  4. Italian registry of cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francone, Marco [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Di Cesare, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche Applicate e Biotecnologie, Università di L’Aquila (Italy); Cademartiri, Filippo [Cardio-Vascular Imaging Unit, Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Monastier di Treviso, TV (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pontone, Gianluca [IRCCS Centro Cardiologico Monzino (Italy); Lovato, Luigi [Policlinico S. Orsola Bologna (Italy); Matta, Gildo [Azienda ospedaliera G Brotzu Cagliari (Italy); Secchi, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Maffei, Erica [Cardio-Vascular Imaging Unit, Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Monastier di Treviso, TV (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pradella, Silvia [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi (Italy); Carbone, Iacopo [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Marano, Riccardo [Policlinico Gemelli, Università Cattolica Roma (Italy); Bacigalupo, Lorenzo [Ospedale Galliera, Genova (Italy); Chiodi, Elisabetta [Ospedale S. Anna Ferrara (Italy); Donato, Rocco [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria G. Martino, Me (Italy); Sbarbati, Stefano [Ospedale Madre Giuseppina Vannini, Roma (Italy); De Cobelli, Francesco [IRCCS S. Raffaele, Università Vita Salute, Milano (Italy); Di Renzi, Paolo [Fate Bene Fratelli Isola tiberina, Roma (Italy); Ligabue, Guido; Mancini, Andrea [Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria Policlinico di Modena (Italy); Palmieri, Francesco [Diparimento di Diagnostica per immagini e radiologia interventistica, Ospedale S. Maria delle Grazie, Pozzuoli, Napoli (Italy); and others

    2014-01-15

    Objectives: Forty sites were involved in this multicenter and multivendor registry, which sought to evaluate indications, spectrum of protocols, impact on clinical decision making and safety profile of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Materials and methods: Data were prospectively collected on a 6-month period and included 3376 patients (47.2 ± 19 years; range 1–92 years). Recruited centers were asked to complete a preliminary general report followed by a single form/patient. Referral physicians were not required to exhibit any specific certificate of competency in CMR imaging. Results: Exams were performed with 1.5 T scanners in 96% of cases followed by 3 T (3%) and 1 T (1%) magnets and contrast was administered in 84% of cases. The majority of cases were performed for the workup of inflammatory heart disease/cardiomyopathies representing overall 55.7% of exams followed by the assessment of myocardial viability and acute infarction (respectively 6.9% and 5.9% of patients). In 49% of cases the final diagnosis provided was considered relevant and with impact on patient's clinical/therapeutic management. Safety evaluation revealed 30 (0.88%) clinical events, most of which due to patient's preexisting conditions. Radiological reporting was recorded in 73% of exams. Conclusions: CMR is performed in a large number of centers in Italy with relevant impact on clinical decision making and high safety profile.

  5. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation.

  6. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhegger, Bruno; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Elias Junior, Jorge; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Araujo Neto, César Augusto; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation. PMID:26811555

  7. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging: challenges of implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Ronald; Fowler, Kathryn; Schmidt, Ryan; Ippolito, Joseph; Siegel, Cary; Narra, Vamsi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is among the most common causes of cancer and cancer deaths in men. Screening methods and optimal treatments have become controversial in recent years. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is gaining popularity as a tool to assist diagnosis, risk assessment, and staging. However, implementation into clinical practice can be difficult, with many challenges associated with image acquisition, postprocessing, interpretation, reporting, and radiologic-pathologic correlation. Although state-of-the-art technology is available at select sites for targeting tissue biopsy and interpreting multiparametric prostate MRI, many institutions struggle with adapting this new technology into an efficient multidisciplinary model of patient care. This article reviews several of the challenges that radiologists should be aware of when integrating prostate MRI into their clinical practice.

  8. Multimodal morphometry and functional magnetic resonance imaging in schizophrenia and auditory hallucinations

    OpenAIRE

    García-Martí, Gracián; Aguilar, Eduardo Jesús; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Escartí, M José; Sanjuán, Julio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To validate a multimodal [structural and functional magnetic resonance (MR)] approach as coincidence brain clusters are hypothesized to correlate with clinical severity of auditory hallucinations.

  9. Clinical application value of magnetic resonance imaging inner ear hydrography%磁共振内耳水成像的临床应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文武; 李维; 傅伟琪; 周旭洋; 陈国栋

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨磁共振(MRI)内耳水成像在内耳病变患者中的临床价值。方法对45例怀疑内耳病变患者,行磁共振内耳水成像扫描,并进行最大密度投影(MIP)、多平面重建(MPR)、容积重建(VR)后处理。结果45例患者均能清晰显示内耳结构,其中内耳畸形8例,结构正常37例。结论内耳水成像能清晰、立体的显示内耳膜迷路及内听道精细解剖结构,并显示其发育状况及通畅程度,能够为内耳病变患者的诊断和术前评估提供重要的影像学依据。%Objective To explore the clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inner ear hydrography in inner ear disease patients.Methods MRI inner ear hydrography was applied in 45 patients with suspected inner ear disease, with process of maximum intensity projection (MIP), multiplanar reconstruction (MRP), and volume reconstruction (VR).Results The inner ear anatomical structures were displayed clearly in all the 45 cases, and there were 8 cases with inner ear malformations and 37 cases with normal structure.Conclusion The magnetic resonance inner ear hydrography can not only clearly and stereoscopically show anatomical structure of inner ear membranous labyrinth and inner auditory canal, but also show their developmental situation and unobstructed degree. It can provide important imaging parameters for the diagnosis and preoperative assessment of patients with inner ear disease.

  10. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keevil, Stephen F [Department of Medical Physics, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Guy' s Hospital, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Division of Imaging Sciences, King' s College London, Guy' s Campus, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-21

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications. (topical review)

  11. Magnetic resonance images of hematospermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Norio; Miki, Kenta; Kato, Nobuki; Furuta, Nozomu; Ohishi, Yukihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Kondo, Naoya; Tashiro, Kazuya

    1998-12-01

    We performed MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in the pelvic region of 70 cases with hematospermia and conducted a study on the abnormal MRI findings to which hematospermia could be attributed. We conducted a study on the morphological anomaly and change in the signal intensity in the prostate gland and of the seminal vesicle as well as on the presence or absence of dilation in the plexus venous surrounding the deferent duct or the prostate gland out of the abnormal MRI findings. As for the seminal vesicle, the patients whose seminal vesicle was seen in higher intensity than the prostate gland in T1 weighted images were diagnosed as having hemorrhagic focus and the patients whose seminal vesicle was seen in low intensity both in T1 and T2 weighted images were diagnosed as having fibrosis caused by chronic inflammation. Abnormal MRI findings were seen in 40 out of the 70 cases (57%). Anomaly in the prostate gland was indicated in 6 (9%) cases. Abnormality in the seminal vesicle was indicated in 30 cases (43%) including hemorrhage of seminal vesicle in 25 cases, chronic inflammation in five cases and cyst of seminal vesicle in one case. In conducting an examination of the patients with hematospermia, MRI is the nonivasive and reproducible method and it is possible to identify the hemorrhagic region. Therefore, MRI is thought to be useful to identify the causal organs of hematospermia. (author)

  12. Update on the OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging Task Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; McQueen, Fiona M; Bird, Paul;

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an important biomarker across a range of rheumatological diseases. At the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 11 meeting, the MRI task force continued its work of developing and improving the use of MRI outcomes for use in clinical trials. The brea......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an important biomarker across a range of rheumatological diseases. At the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 11 meeting, the MRI task force continued its work of developing and improving the use of MRI outcomes for use in clinical trials...

  13. Clinical management of electromagnetic interferences in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: review of the literature and focus on magnetic resonance conditional devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corzani, Alessandro; Ziacchi, Matteo; Biffi, Mauro; Allaria, Luca; Diemberger, Igor; Martignani, Cristian; Bratten, Tara; Gardini, Beatrice; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    The number of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) has greatly increased in the last 10 years. Many electronic devices used in daily activities generate electromagnetic interferences (EMIs) that can interact with CIEDs. In clinical practice, it is very important to know the potential sources of EMIs and their effect on CIEDs in order to understand how to manage or mitigate them. A very important source of EMI is magnetic resonance (MR), which is considered nowadays the diagnostic gold standard for different anatomical districts. In this review, we focused on the effects of EMI on CIEDs and on the clinical management. Moreover, we made a clarification about MR and CIEDs.In patients with CIEDs, EMIs may cause potentially serious and even life-threatening complications (inappropriate shocks, device malfunctions, inhibition of pacing in pacemaker-dependent patients) and may rarely dictate device replacement. The association of inappropriate shocks with increased mortality highlights the importance of minimizing the occurrence of EMI. Adequate advice and recommendations about the correct management of EMIs in patients with CIEDs are required to avoid all complications during hospitalization and in daily life. Furthermore, the article focused on actual management about MR and CIEDs.

  14. Association Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Temporo-Mandibular Joint Scanographic Findings and Clinical Manifestations of Joint Pain and Sounds in Temporo-Mandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Goodarzi Pour

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Exploring the association between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI,"ntemporomandibular joint (TMJ scanography and clinical manifestations of joint pain and sounds"nin patients with temporomandibular (TM disorder."nPatients and Methods: This study included 62 TM joints with internal derangement. Sagittal"nscanography and MRI of these TMJs were obtained and reported blindly by the consensus of two"nradiologists."nResults: No significant association was observed between clinical and scanographic findings with"nMRI. The abnormal range of motion had significant relationship with pain (P=0.017 and sound"n(P=0.046. There was a strong association between sound and condylar flattening (P=0.007."nConclusion: It was demonstrated that joint pain and sounds were predictors of the abnormal"nrange of motion in TMJ scanography. Sound could be heard more often in patients with condylar"nflattening, and TMJ scanographic findings as well as joint pain and sounds had limited value in the"ndiagnosis of disk position or effusion.

  15. Clinical application of bilateral high temporal and spatial resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast at 7 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, K.; Baltzer, P.; Bernathova, M.; Weber, M.; Leithner, D.; Helbich, T.H. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna (Austria); Bogner, W.; Trattnig, S.; Gruber, S.; Zaric, O. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Abeyakoon, O. [King' s College, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Dubsky, P. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Bago-Horvath, Z. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Pathology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-04-15

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the clinical application of bilateral high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (HR DCE-MRI) of the breast at 7 T. Following institutional review board approval 23 patients with a breast lesion (BIRADS 0, 4-5) were included in our prospective study. All patients underwent bilateral HR DCE-MRI of the breast at 7 T (spatial resolution of 0.7 mm{sup 3} voxel size, temporal resolution of 14 s). Two experienced readers (r1, r2) and one less experienced reader (r3) independently assessed lesions according to BI-RADS registered. Image quality, lesion conspicuity and artefacts were graded from 1 to 5. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were assessed using histopathology as the standard of reference. HR DCE-MRI at 7 T revealed 29 lesions in 23 patients (sensitivity 100 % (19/19); specificity of 90 % (9/10)) resulting in a diagnostic accuracy of 96.6 % (28/29) with an AUC of 0.95. Overall image quality was excellent in the majority of cases (27/29) and examinations were not hampered by artefacts. There was excellent inter-reader agreement for diagnosis and image quality parameters (κ = 0.89-1). Bilateral HR DCE-MRI of the breast at 7 T is feasible with excellent image quality in clinical practice and allows accurate breast cancer diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  17. Treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus with autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis: clinical and magnetic resonance evaluation at one-year follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    USUELLI, FEDERICO GIUSEPPE; GRASSI, MIRIAM; MANZI, LUIGI; GUARRELLA, VINCENZO; BOGA, MICHELE; DE GIROLAMO, LAURA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study is to report the clinical and imaging results recorded by a series of patients in whom osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) were repaired using the autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis (ACIC) technique with a completely arthroscopic approach. Methods nine patients (mean age 37.4±10 years) affected by OLTs (lesion size 2.1±0.9 cm2) were treated with the ACIC technique. The patients were evaluated clinically both preoperatively and at 12 months after surgery using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale (AOFAS) and a visual analog scale (VAS). For morphological evaluation, the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score was used. Results the AOFAS score improved from 51.4±11.6 preoperatively to 71.8±20.6 postoperatively, while the VAS value decreased from 6.9±1.8 to 3.2±1.9. The mean MOCART score was 51.7±16.6 at 12 months of follow-up; these scores did not directly correlate with the clinical results. Conclusion use of the ACIC technique for arthroscopic repair of OLTs allowed satisfactory clinical results to be obtained in most of the patients as soon as one year after surgery, with no major complications or delayed revision surgery. ACIC is a valid and low-invasive surgical technique for the treatment of chondral and osteochondral defects of the talus. Level of evidence therapeutic case series, level IV. PMID:27602347

  18. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  19. Clinical and Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features in a Cohort of Chinese Patients with Kearns-Sayre Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Yu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The clinical features of KSS evolve dynamically, affecting the cardiac conduction system predominantly, highlighting the significance of ECG monitoring. Brain MRI showed changes involving both the white matter and deep gray nuclei. Clinical presentation or severity of muscle pathological changes is not related to the size of mtDNA deletions.

  20. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test ... of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast material ...

  1. Semi-quantitative Assessment of Brain Maturation by Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neonates with Clinically Mild Hypoxic-ischemic Encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Gao; Qin-Li Sun; Yu-Miao Zhang; Yan-Yan Li; Huan Li; Xin Hou; Bo-Lang Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Mild hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) injury is becoming the major type in neonatal brain diseases.The aim of this study was to assess brain maturation in mild HIE neonatal brains using total maturation score (TMS) based on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Methods:Totally,45 neonates with clinically mild HIE and 45 matched control neonates were enrolled.Gestated age,birth weight,age after birth and postmenstrual age at magnetic resonance (MR) scan were homogenous in the two groups.According to MR findings,mild HIE neonates were divided into three subgroups:Pattern Ⅰ,neonates with normal MR appearance; Pattern Ⅱ,preterm neonates with abnormal MR appearance; Pattern Ⅲ,full-term neonates with abnormal MR appearance.TMS and its parameters,progressive myelination (M),cortical infolding (C),involution of germinal matrix tissue (G),and glial cell migration bands (B),were employed to assess brain maturation and compare difference between HIE and control groups.Results:The mean of TMS was significantly lower in mild HIE group than it in the control group (mean ± standard deviation [SD] 11.62 ± 1.53 vs.12.36 ± 1.26,P < 0.001).In four parameters of TMS scores,the M and C scores were significantly lower in mild HIE group.Of the three patterns of mild HIE,Pattern Ⅰ (10 cases) showed no significant difference of TMS compared with control neonates,while Pattern Ⅱ (22 cases),Ⅲ (13 cases) all had significantly decreased TMS than control neonates (mean ± SD 10.56 ± 0.93 vs.11.48 ± 0.55,P < 0.05; 12.59 ± 1.28 vs.13.25 ± 1.29,P < 0.05).It was M,C,and GM scores that significantly decreased in Pattern Ⅱ,while for Pattern Ⅲ,only C score significantly decreased.Conclusions:The TMS system,based on conventional MRI,is an effective method to detect delayed brain maturation in clinically mild HIE.The conventional MRI can reveal the different retardations in subtle structures and development processes among the different patterns of

  2. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Markovich, Dmitry; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    All-dielectric "magnetic light" nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here a new approach for increasing magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer nanoantenna. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of magnetic polarizability, tailoring the later in the dynamical range of 100 % and enhancement up to 36 % relative to performances of standalone spherical particles....

  3. Torque-mixing Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losby, Joseph; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Grandmont, Dylan; Diao, Zhu; Belov, Miro; Burgess, Jacob; Compton, Shawn; Hiebert, Wayne; Vick, Doug; Mohammad, Kaveh; Salimi, Elham; Bridges, Gregory; Thomson, Douglas; Freeman, Mark

    A universal, mechanical torque method for magnetic resonance spectroscopy is presented. In analogy to resonance detection by induction, a signal proportional to the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment can be measured as a pure mechanical torque in broadband, frequency-swept spectroscopy. Comprehensive electron spin resonance of a single-crystal, mesoscopic yttrium iron garnet disk at room temperature are presented to demonstrate the method. The rich detail allows analysis of even complex 3D spin textures.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foram Gala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies.

  5. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huijun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR of the carotid vessel wall is one promising modality in the evaluation of patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. Advances in carotid vessel wall CMR allow comprehensive assessment of morphology inside the wall, contributing substantial disease-specific information beyond luminal stenosis. Although carotid vessel wall CMR has not been widely used to screen for carotid atherosclerotic disease, many trials support its potential for this indication. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding carotid vessel wall CMR and its potential clinical application for management of carotid atherosclerotic disease.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Starnes, D.L.; Duchesneau, P.M.; Boumphrey, F.; Hardy, R.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Forty subjects were examined to determine the accuracy and clinical usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination of the spine. The NMR images were compared with plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomograms, and myelograms. The study included 15 patients with normal spinal cord anatomy and 25 patients whose pathological conditions included canal stenosis, herniated discs, metastatic tumors, primary cord tumor, trauma, Chiari malformations, syringomyelia, and developmental disorders. Saturation recovery images were best in differentiating between soft tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. NMR was excellent for the evaluation of the foramen magnum region and is presently the modality of choice for the diagnosis of syringomyelia and Chiari malformation. NMR was accurate in diagnosing spinal cord trauma and spinal canal block.

  7. Breast conserving therapy and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Tsuneaki; Masuda, Yu; Hachiya, Junichi; Nitatori, Toshiaki; Fukushima, Hisayoshi; Uchigasaki, Shinya [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-12-01

    Recently, breast conserving therapy has been widely accepted in our country. The extensive intraductal component (EIC) is a serious problem in breast conserving therapy, because it is well-known that EIC frequently causes locoregional recurrence in preserved breast parenchyma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful method for detecting breast masses due to its excellent contrast resolution. We studied the application of MRI to detection of intraductal spread in twenty-two patients. All cases were revealed invasive cancer with intraductal spread by histopathological examination. MRI findings of intraductal spread can be divided into two major groups. One is daugter nodules or strand-like enhancement and the other is bridging enhancement. We also reffered to the preliminary study of MR-guiding transcutaneous aspiration biopsy of mammographically and clinically occult breast masses. (author)

  8. Surface Coil for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Taimy Ricardo Ferro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, has become a vital tool for the clinical diagnosis of various diseases, especially in the Nervisos Central System and the Musculos keletal System. Coils(RF are an essential component in the generation of these images, are responsible for exciting thespins of nuclei in a sample and/or detect the resultant signal coming from them. The use of surface RF coils has increased considerably, because they have a high signal to noise ratio, a parameter that defines the quality of the image. In the present work, there was realized the theoretical design and practical implementation of a circular surface RF coil. The experimental prototype was optimized to be used in the tomograph Giroimag03  built in Medical Biophysics Center

  9. Effect of tunnel placements on clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings 2 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the double-bundle technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suomalainen P

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Piia Suomalainen,1 Tommi Kiekara,2 Anna-Stina Moisala,1 Antti Paakkala,2 Pekka Kannus,3 Timo Järvelä4 1Division of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Trauma, Musculoskeletal Surgery and Rehabilitation, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, 2Medical Imaging Centre, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, 3Injury and Osteoporosis Research Center, UKK Institute, Tampere, 4Arthroscopic and Sports Medicine Center Omasairaala, Helsinki, Finland Purpose: The purpose of the study reported here was to find out if the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings of a reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL have an association. Our hypothesis, which was based on the different functions of the ACL bundles, was that the visibility of the anteromedial graft would have an impact on anteroposterior stability, and the visibility of the posterolateral graft on rotational stability of the knee. Methods: This study is a level II, prospective clinical and MRI study (NCT02000258. The study involved 75 patients. One experienced orthopedic surgeon performed all double-bundle ACL reconstructions. Two independent examiners made the clinical examinations at 2-year follow-up: clinical examination of the knee; KT-1000, International Knee Documentation Committee and Lysholm knee evaluation scores; and International Knee Documentation Committee functional score. The MRI evaluations were made by two musculoskeletal radiologists separately, and the means of these measurements were used. Results: We found that the location of the graft in the tibia had an impact on the MRI visibility of the graft at 2-year follow-up. There were significantly more partially or totally invisible grafts if the insertion of the graft was more anterior in the tibia. No association was found between the clinical results and the graft locations. Conclusion: Anterior graft location in the tibia can cause graft invisibility in the MRI 2 years after ACL reconstruction, but this

  10. Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Feature Analysis of 36 Cases clinical Isolated Syndrome%临床孤立综合征36例临床和磁共振成像特点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉玮

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究分析临床孤立综合征(CIS)的临床及磁共振成像(MRI)特征。方法选取2013年4月至2015年10月在我院所进行核磁共振的36例脊髓型临床孤立综合征病患,对影像结果进行观察分析。结果首次MRI阳性率达34(94.2%),20(55.3%)为颈髓受累,22(61.2%)的首发症状为孤立的感觉障碍;基线MRI的检查结果与确诊时的EDSS评分有正相关关系。结论磁共振成像(MRI)检查对于诊断临床孤立综合征(CIS)具有一定的作用,能够帮助确诊避免出现误诊和漏诊现象,同时皮质类固醇激素冲击治疗能够使病患的病情得到及时有效的控制及治疗,值得在临床中普及运用。%Objective: To study the clinical isolated syndrome(CIS) of the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) features.Methods: a total of 2013 April to October 2015 in our hospital by nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) 36 cases of spinal clinically isolated syndrome patients, the image results were observed and analyzed.Results: the first MRI positive rate reached 34 (94.2%), 20(55.3%) for cervical spinal involvement, the first symptom of 22(61.2%) for isolated sensory disturbance; baseline MRI findings and diagnosis of EDSS score has positive correlation.Conclusion: magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) examination for the diagnosis of clinically isolated syndrome(CIS) has a role to help the diagnosis to avoid misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis phenomenon, at the same time the corticosteroid impulse therapy can make the patient’s condition to get timely and effective control and treatment, worth in clinical universal use.

  11. The Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Predict the Clinical Outcome of Non-Surgical Treatment for Lumbar Interverterbal Disc Herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Kim, Chung Hwan; Shin, Myung Jin; Ryu, Dae Sik; Ahn, Jae Hong; Jung, Seung Moon; Park, Man Soo [GangNeung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, GangNeung, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jae Seok [University of Kwandong College of Medicine, GangNeung (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    We wanted to investigate the relationship between the magnetic resonance (MR) findings and the clinical outcome after treatment with non-surgical transforaminal epidural steroid injections (ESI) for lumbar herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) patients. Transforaminal ESI were performed in 91 patients (50 males and 41 females, age range: 13 78 yrs) because of lumbosacral HIVD from March 2001 to August 2002. Sixty eight patients whose MRIs and clinical follow-ups were available were included in this study. The medical charts were retrospectively reviewed and the patients were divided into two groups; the successful (responders, n = 41) and unsatisfactory (non-responders, n = 27) outcome groups. A successful outcome required a patient satisfaction score greater than two and a pain reduction score greater than 50%. The MR findings were retrospectively analyzed and compared between the two groups with regard to the type (protrusion, extrusion or sequestration), hydration (the T2 signal intensity), location (central, right/left central, subarticular, foraminal or extraforaminal), and size (volume) of the HIVD, the grade of nerve root compression (grade 1 abutment, 2 displacement and 3 entrapment), and an association with spinal stenosis. There was no significant difference between the responders and nonresponders in terms of the type, hydration and size of the HIVD, or an association with spinal stenosis (p > 0.05). However, the location of the HIVD and the grade of nerve root compression were different between the two groups (p < 0.05). MRI could play an important role in predicting the clinical outcome of non-surgical transforaminal ESI treatment for patients with lumbar HIVD.

  12. Clinical recommendations of cardiac magnetic resonance, Part II: inflammatory and congenital heart disease, cardiomyopathies and cardiac tumors: a position paper of the working group 'Applicazioni della Risonanza Magnetica' of the Italian Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontone, Gianluca; Di Bella, Gianluca; Silvia, Castelletti; Maestrini, Viviana; Festa, Pierluigi; Ait-Ali, Lamia; Masci, Pier Giorgio; Monti, Lorenzo; di Giovine, Gabriella; De Lazzari, Manuel; Cipriani, Alberto; Guaricci, Andrea I; Dellegrottaglie, Santo; Pepe, Alessia; Marra, Martina Perazzolo; Aquaro, Giovanni D

    2017-04-01

    The current document was developed by the working group on the 'application of cardiac magnetic resonance' of the Italian Society of Cardiology to provide a perspective on the current state of technical advances and clinical cardiac magnetic resonance applications and to inform cardiologists how to implement their clinical and diagnostic pathway with the introduction of this technique in the clinical practice. Appropriateness criteria were defined using a score system: score 1-3 = inappropriate (test is not generally acceptable and is not a reasonable approach for the indication), score 4-6 = uncertain (test may be generally acceptable and may be a reasonable approach for the indication but more research and/or patient information is needed to classify the indication definitively) and score 7-9 = appropriate (test is generally acceptable and is a reasonable approach for the indication).

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging-based measures of atlas position: Relationship to canine atlantooccipital overlapping, syringomyelia and clinical signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda-Gonzalez, S; Bibi, K F; Gifford, A T; Mudrak, E L; Scrivani, P V

    2016-03-01

    Canine atlantooccipital overlapping (AOO) is characterized by a decreased distance between the dorsal arch of the atlas and the supraoccipital bone. Current diagnostic criteria for this condition are subjective and clinician-dependent; objective criteria are needed to allow a reliable and reproducible diagnosis in clinical and research settings and assess clinical significance. We propose four standardized MRI-based measurements to objectively assess the proximity of the atlas to the foramen magnum. Inclusion criteria for dogs in this study were bodyweight 5 months, and availability of a complete MRI study performed with the craniocervical junction in extension. Exclusion criteria were space-occupying lesions and poor image quality (i.e. unclear bony margins). Measurements also included blinded determinations of skull type, presence of craniocervical junction anomalies and presence and severity of syringomyelia. Clinical status at the time of imaging was noted. Measurements were obtained in 271 dogs; these were reproducible and reliable. Findings varied by skull type: dolichocephalic dogs had smaller foramen magnum, whereas brachycephalic dogs had more cranially and dorsally positioned atlas bodies in comparison to the other skull types. Measurements also increased with increases in bodyweight. This study demonstrated a close association between AOO, syringomyelia and clinical signs. Toy and small breed dogs (including Cavalier King Charles spaniels) showed higher than previously reported prevalence of AOO; its occurrence was also associated with lower bodyweights within the study population of <15 kg toy/small breed dogs.

  19. Comparing hepatic 2D and 3D magnetic resonance elastography methods in a clinical setting – Initial experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael F. Forsgren

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This pilot study shows that different MRE methods can produce comparable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of the liver. The existence of such comparable measurements is important, both from a clinical as well as a research perspective, since it allows for equipment-independent monitoring of disease progression.

  20. Clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuester-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome: diagnosis of associated malformations, uterine rudiments and intrauterine endometrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preibsch, H.; Wietek, B.M.; Claussen, C.D.; Siegmann-Luz, K.C. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Rall, K.; Brucker, S.Y. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tuebingen (Germany); Staebler, A. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Institute of Pathology and Neuropathology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of malformations associated with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuester-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome and identification of uterine endometrium to optimise the clinical management. We retrospectively reviewed 214 consecutive MRKH patients, mean age 19 years, who underwent laparoscopy-assisted neovagina creation. A total of 115 patients (53.7 %) met the inclusion criterion of sufficient preoperative MRI. In 110 of them (95.7 %), MRI findings were correlated with laparoscopy and associated malformations. In 39 cases (35.5 %) uterine rudiments were removed and analysed histopathologically. Ten per cent (11/110) of the patients showed complete uterine agenesis. The others presented with either unilateral (n = 16; 14.5 %) or bilateral (n = 83; 75.5 %) uterine rudiments. MRI detection of uterine rudiments agreed in 78.2 % (86/110) with laparoscopy. In 85.4 % of the removed rudiments, MRI could correctly diagnose the existence of the endometrium. Compared to laparoscopy, MRI could exactly detect ovaries in 97.3 % (107/110). Renal or ureteral malformations were seen in 32 cases (27.8 %). In 83 % of unilateral renal agenesis and unilateral rudiment, the latter was located at the side of the kidney. MRI is useful for preoperative detection of MRKH-associated malformations and assessment of the endometrium to further optimise MRKH patient treatment. (orig.)

  1. Turbo STIR magnetic resonance imaging as a whole-body screening tool for metastases in patients with breast carcinoma: preliminary clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R; Kessar, P; Blanchard, R; Dimasi, M; Harper, K; DeCarvalho, V; Yucel, E K; Patriquin, L; Eustace, S

    2000-04-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the utility of whole-body turbo short tau inversion recovery (STIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect metastases to liver, brain, and bone as a single examination in women with breast cancer. Seventeen patients with biopsy-proven breast cancer and suspected metastatic disease attending over a 12-month period referred for both conventional imaging and whole-body MRI were included in the study. Three patients were found to be free of metastases at both conventional and MR imaging. Appendicular or axial skeletal metastases were identified in 11 of 17 patients, with correlation between findings at whole-body MRI and scintigraphy in 15 of the 17 patients. Five patients had evidence of hepatic metastases on whole-body MRI, of which metastases were identified in only three patients at CT despite contrast enhancement. Four patients had brain abnormalities (metastases in three patients, meningioma in one patient) detected on both whole-body and dedicated brain MRI. Preliminary clinical experience suggests that turbo STIR whole-body MRI may represent a convenient and cost-effective method of total body screening for metastases in patients with breast carcinoma.

  2. Clinical value of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in surgery for hepatocellular carcinoma - with a special emphasis on early hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Masanori

    2015-12-28

    Gadoxetic acid- or gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI) achieves excellent lesion detection and characterization for both hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in arterial phase imaging and hypovascular early HCC (small well-differentiated HCC of the vaguely nodular type) in hepatobiliary phase imaging, and has become an indispensable imaging modality in the treatment of HCC. Early HCCs have been detected more frequently since the introduction of EOB-MRI into daily clinical practice. Early HCC is known to progress to conventional hypervascular HCC, and many risk factors have been identified for the hypervascularization of early HCC including the diameter of the tumor, presence of fat, and imaging findings of EOB-MRI. The rate of the development of hypervascular HCC was previously reported to be high in patients with chronic liver disease and early HCC. The presence of early HCC is regarded as a predictor for the recurrence of HCC following hepatic resection. On the other hand, although early HCC itself is currently not regarded as a target lesion for hepatic resection, early HCC at high risk of hypervascularity needs to be treated by local ablation therapy. If concomitant early HCC with progressed HCC is at high risk of hypervascularization and the functional liver reserve of a patient is sufficient, its simultaneous treatment at the time of hepatic resection for progressed HCC is recommended. Further studies on larger numbers of patients are needed before this strategy is adopted.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging quality and volumes of brain structures from live and postmortem imaging of California sea lions with clinical signs of domoic acid toxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montie, Eric W; Wheeler, Elizabeth; Pussini, Nicola; Battey, Thomas W K; Barakos, Jerome; Dennison, Sophie; Colegrove, Kathleen; Gulland, Frances

    2010-09-17

    Our goal in this study was to compare magnetic resonance images and volumes of brain structures obtained alive versus postmortem of California sea lions Zalophus californianus exhibiting clinical signs of domoic acid (DA) toxicosis and those exhibiting normal behavior. Proton density-(PD) and T2-weighted images of postmortem-intact brains, up to 48 h after death, provided similar quality to images acquired from live sea lions. Volumes of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) of the cerebral hemispheres were similar to volumes calculated from images acquired when the sea lions were alive. However, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes decreased due to leakage. Hippocampal volumes from postmortem-intact images were useful for diagnosing unilateral and bilateral atrophy, consequences of DA toxicosis. These volumes were similar to the volumes in the live sea lion studies, up to 48 h postmortem. Imaging formalin-fixed brains provided some information on brain structure; however, images of the hippocampus and surrounding structures were of poorer quality compared to the images acquired alive and postmortem-intact. Despite these issues, volumes of cerebral GM and WM, as well as the hippocampus, were similar to volumes calculated from images of live sea lions and sufficient to diagnose hippocampal atrophy. Thus, postmortem MRI scanning (either intact or formalin-fixed) with volumetric analysis can be used to investigate the acute, chronic and possible developmental effects of DA on the brain of California sea lions.

  4. Numerical Analysis of a Flexible Dual Loop Coil and its Experimental Validation for pre-Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rodents at 7 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Najera, S.; Vazquez, F.; Hernandez, R.; Marrufo, O.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2016-12-01

    A surface radio frequency coil was developed for small animal image acquisition in a pre-clinical magnetic resonance imaging system at 7 T. A flexible coil composed of two circular loops was developed to closely cover the object to be imaged. Electromagnetic numerical simulations were performed to evaluate its performance before the coil construction. An analytical expression of the mutual inductance for the two circular loops as a function of the separation between them was derived and used to validate the simulations. The RF coil is composed of two circular loops with a 5 cm external diameter and was tuned to 300 MHz and 50 Ohms matched. The angle between the loops was varied and the Q factor was obtained from the S11 simulations for each angle. B1 homogeneity was also evaluated using the electromagnetic simulations. The coil prototype was designed and built considering the numerical simulation results. To show the feasibility of the coil and its performance, saline-solution phantom images were acquired. A correlation of the simulations and imaging experimental results was conducted showing a concordance of 0.88 for the B1 field. The best coil performance was obtained at the 90° aperture angle. A more realistic phantom was also built using a formaldehyde-fixed rat phantom for ex vivo imaging experiments. All images showed a good image quality revealing clearly defined anatomical details of an ex vivo rat.

  5. Clinical significance of three-dimensional measurement of tumour thickness on magnetic resonance imaging in patients with oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Minsu [Gyeongsang National University Hospital, School of Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hyun; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Ji Won; Lee, Yoon-Se; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Centre, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Hyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Centre, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Yoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Centre, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To identify the clinical significance of primary tumour thickness (TT) and its direction in patients with oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC), we measured TT in all axial/coronal/sagittal views on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and evaluated their meaning. A total of 53 OTSCC patients were analysed who had undergone preoperative three-dimensional MRI and had been surgically treated. TT measured on axial (mediolateral direction), coronal (superoinferior direction), and sagittal (anteroposterior direction) views was compared to that in pathologic specimens. The association between TT on MRI and other pathologic parameters was also evaluated. TT on MRI in each plane showed relatively high concordance rates with the histological measurements. TT in all three planes was significantly correlated with lymph node (LN) metastasis. Occult LN metastasis was found in 15 of 39 (38.5 %) patients, and the cutoff value of TT in axial/coronal/sagittal MRI predicting occult LN metastasis was 6.7 mm, 7.2 mm, and 12.3 mm, respectively. TT on MRI did not show any significant association with recurrence and survival. TT on MRI in all three planes showed relatively high coincidence with TT on histopathology and presented a potential cut-off value as a predictive indicator for occult LN metastasis. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Follow-up Assessment of Sciatica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L. A. M.; Nijeholt, Geert J. Lycklama A.; Van der Kallen, Bas F.; van den Hout, Wilbert B.; Jacobs, Wilco C. H.; Koes, Bart W.; Peul, Wilco C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently performed during follow-up in patients with known lumbar-disk herniation and persistent symptoms of sciatica. The association between findings on MRI and clinical outcome is controversial. METHODS We studied 283 patients in a randomized trial

  7. Voriconazole-related periostitis presenting on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Derik L

    2015-01-01

    Painful periostitis is a complication of long-term antifungal therapy with voriconazole. A high clinical suspicion coupled with imaging and laboratory assessment is useful to establish the diagnosis. Prompt discontinuance of voriconazole typically results in the resolution of symptoms and signs. This report describes the presentation of voriconazole-related periostitis on magnetic resonance imaging.

  8. Voriconazole-related periostitis presenting on magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Derik L

    2015-01-01

    Painful periostitis is a complication of long-term antifungal therapy with voriconazole. A high clinical suspicion coupled with imaging and laboratory assessment is useful to establish the diagnosis. Prompt discontinuance of voriconazole typically results in the resolution of symptoms and signs. This report describes the presentation of voriconazole-related periostitis on magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: A clinicial perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Edge

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in screening for breast cancer and its use after the diagnosis of breast cancer is discussed. The topic is enormous, with over 5 000 papers published in the last 10 years. In this précis, we focused on articles that examine its clinical relevance. We did not look at economic factors.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of peripheral joints in rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Møller, Uffe;

    2004-01-01

    The need for better methods than the conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographical examinations in the management of inflammatory joint diseases is evident, since these methods are not sensitive or specific to early pathologies and subtle changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers...

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis advances and research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, FM; Bird, P;

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used extensively in cross-sectional and observational studies as well as in controlled clinical trials to assess disease activity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MRI measurements or scores for erosions, bone edema, and synovitis have been...

  12. Transarterial embolization for uterine fibroids: clinical success rate and results of magnetic resonance imaging; Transarterielle Embolisation bei Uterus myomatosus: klinische Erfolgsrate und kernspintomographische Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroencke, T.J.; Scheurig, C.; Kluener, C.; Fischer, T.; Klessen, C.; Rudolph, J.; Siara, K.; Zimmermann, E.; Hamm, B. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany); Gauruder-Burmester, A. [Klinik fuer Frauenheilkunde und Geburtshilfe, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany); Gronewold, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Frauenheilkunde und Geburtshilfe, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to analyze the clinical success rate and the findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after uterine artery embolization of symptomatic leiomyomas (fibroids) of the uterus. Materials and methods: this is a prospective single-center case study of 80 consecutively treated patients, followed for 3-6 months (group I), 7-12 months, (group II), and 13-25 months (group III). MRI was used to determine the uterine volume and size of the dominant leiomyoma. Symptoms and causes requiring repeat interventions were analyzed. Results: significant (p < 0.01) volume reduction of the uterus (median: 34.95% confidence interval [CI]: 30.41 - 41.76%) and dominant leiomyoma (median: 52.07%, CI: 47.71 - 61.57%) was found. The decrease in uterine volume (I-III: 22.68%, 33.56%, 47.93%) and dominant leiomyoma volume (I-III: 41.86%, 62.16%, 73.96%) progressed with the follow-up time. Bleeding resolved significantly (p < 0.0001) in all three follow-up groups (groups I-III: 92.86%, 95.23%, 96.67%). Furthermore, urinary frequency (groups I-III: 70%, 75%, 82.35%) and sensation of pelvic pressure (groups I-III: 42.86%, 60%, 93.75%) improved, which was statistically significant in group III (p < 0.01). The number of leiomyomas correlated (p < 0.05) with improvement of the bleeding and the pelvic pressure. Repeat therapy was necessary for complications in four patients (5%) and for therapeutic failure in three patients (3.8%). Permanent amenorrhea was observed in four patients (5%) of age 45 years or older. Conclusion: uterine artery embolization of uterine leiomyomas has a high clinical success rate with an acceptable incidence of complications and repeat interventions. (orig.)

  13. A clinical study to identify the possible etiology of complex partial seizures using magnetic resonance imaging brain findings and its implications on treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Nancy Jeniffer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Epilepsy is one of the common neurological disorders worldwide. Fundamentally, there are two types of epilepsy—primary generalized epilepsy and localization-related epilepsy. Partial seizures account for about 40% of childhood seizures in some series and can be classified as simple or complex.[1] Partial seizures, more so the complex partial seizures (CPSs, are presumed to have a structural etiology. Aims: (1 To study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI brain findings in CPSs in children aged 1–18 years. (2 To identify treatable causes of CPSs based on MRI findings and institute appropriate treatment. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed using percentages and proportions. Methods: Hospital based prospective study in which MRI brain was done on all newly diagnosed children with complex partial seizures, aged 1 to 18 yrs, during the study period. Final diagnosis was made correlating clinical features, radiological features and other supportive evidences, and appropriate treatment instituted. Follow up of cases was done until the completion of treatment (maximum 6 months. Results: Among the 64 children who were clinically diagnosed to have CPSs and subjected to MRI study of the brain, 40(62.5% children were detected to have structural lesions, of which neurocysticercosis (NCC was noted in 17 (42.5%, tuberculoma in 12 (30%, hippocampal sclerosis (HS in 6 (15%, gliosis in 4 (10%, and tumor in 1 (2.5% patient. Sixty-two (96.8% children were treated medically, and 2 (3.2% children underwent surgery. Conclusions: Etiology of CPS based on MRI findings showed a substantial number of medically- and surgically-treatable pathologies. This study done on South Indian children showed neuro infections to be the most common cause of CPS, followed by HS, with NCC being the most common lesion noted. MRI not only identifies specific epileptogenic substrates, but also determines the specific treatment and predicts prognosis and should

  14. Magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) for the evaluation of autologous chondrocyte transplantation: Determination of interobserver variability and correlation to clinical outcome after 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlovits, Stefan [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.marlovits@meduniwien.ac.at; Singer, Philipp [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Zeller, Philip [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mandl, Irena [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Haller, Joerg [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich-Collin-Strasse, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Trattnig, Siegfried [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    In an observational study, the validity and reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) in the knee joint was determined. Two years after implantation, high-resolution MRI was used to analyze the repair tissue with nine pertinent variables. A complete filling of the defect was found in 61.5%, and a complete integration of the border zone to the adjacent cartilage in 76.9%. An intact subchondral lamina was present in 84.6% and an intact subchondral bone was present in 61.5%. Isointense signal intensities of the repair tissue compared to the adjacent native cartilage were seen in 92.3%. To evaluate interobserver variability, a reliability analysis with the determination of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated. An 'almost perfect' agreement, with an ICC value >0.81, was calculated in 8 of 9 variables. The clinical outcome after 2 years showed the visual analog score (VAS) at 2.62 (S.D. {+-}0.65). The values for the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) subgroups were 68.29 ({+-}23.90) for pain, 62.09 ({+-}14.62) for symptoms, 75.45 ({+-}21.91) for ADL function, 52.69 ({+-}28.77) for sport and 70.19 ({+-}22.41) for knee-related quality of life. The clinical scores were correlated with the MRI variables. A statistically significant correlation was found for the variables 'filling of the defect,' 'structure of the repair tissue,' 'changes in the subchondral bone,' and 'signal intensities of the repair issue'. High resolution MRI and well-defined MRI variables are a reliable, reproducible and accurate tool for assessing cartilage repair tissue.

  15. Early assessment of sub-clinical cardiac involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) using delayed enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (CE-MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Cesare, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it [Department of Radiology, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio 1, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Battisti, Sara; Di Sibio, Alessandra [Department of Radiology, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio 1, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Cipriani, Paola; Giacomelli, Roberto; Liakouli, Vasiliky; Ruscitti, Piero [Rheumatology Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine and Public Health, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio 1, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Objectives: Systemic sclerosis heart involvement (SHI) is one of systemic sclerosis (SSc) most frequent complications, both in diffuse (dcSSc) and limited (lcSSc) cutaneous forms of disease. Nowadays, SHI is a major factor decreasing SSc survival rate because, when clinically evident, is associated with 70% of mortality at 5 years. SHI shows different forms, primary and/or secondary. Primary myocardial SHI is characterized by fibrosis. Aim of our study is to assess the presence and pattern of fibrosis as detected by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in systemic sclerosis. Methods: In this study, we used CE-MRI (contrast enhanced-MRI) in 58 female SSc patients. Images were evaluated to obtain functional parameters and to see presence, location and pattern (nodular, linear or diffuse) of myocardial LE, sign of fibrosis. CE-MRI findings were correlated with patients clinical setting. Results: Myocardial fibrosis was detected in 25 of 58 patients (43%). The main finding observed in 16 of these 25 patients was a late enhancement showing a linear pattern, without coronary distribution and sparing the sub-endocardial myocardial layers. A patchy nodular enhancement pattern was observed in 9 patients (36%). Patients with linear pattern presented dcSSc, on the contrary patients with nodular LE displayed the lcSSc form. Conclusions: This study shows that CE-MRI is a reliable technique to detect SHI earlier than other methods. SHI increase passive myocardial stiffness, proportional to collagen deposition degree, leading to cardiac remodelling with possible development of heart failure, even with normal ejection fraction. An early treatment of SHI might improve SSc patients outcome.

  16. Bone marrow edema pattern in advanced hip osteoarthritis: quantitative assessment with magnetic resonance imaging and correlation with clinical examination, radiographic findings, and histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Schwartz, Stephanie A. [The University of Arizona HSC, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Graham, Anna R. [The University of Arizona HSC, Department of Pathology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Benjamin, James B. [University Orthopaedic Specialists, Tucson, AZ (United States); Gmitro, Arthur F.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Hunter, Tim B. [The University of Arizona, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Resnick, Donald L. [University of California, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2008-05-15

    To correlate the amount of bone marrow edema (BME) calculated by magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) with clinical findings, histopathology, and radiographic findings, in patients with advanced hip osteoarthritis(OA). The study was approved by The Institutional Human Subject Protection Committee. Coronal MRI of hips was acquired in 19 patients who underwent hip replacement. A spin echo (SE) sequence with four echoes and separate fast spin echo (FSE) proton density (PD)-weighted SE sequences of fat (F) and water (W) were acquired with water and fat suppression, respectively. T2 and water:fat ratio calculations were made for the outlined regions of interest. The calculated MRI values were correlated with the clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic findings. Analyses of variance were done on the MRI data for W/(W + F) and for T2 values (total and focal values) for the symptomatic and contralateral hips. The values were significantly higher in the study group. Statistically significant correlations were found between pain and total W/(W + F), pain and focal T2 values, and the number of microfractures and calculated BME for the focal W/(W + F) in the proximal femora. Statistically significant correlations were found between the radiographic findings and MRI values for total W/(W + F), focal W/(W + F) and focal T2 and among the radiographic findings, pain, and hip movement. On histopathology, only a small amount of BME was seen in eight proximal femora. The amount of BME in the OA hip, as measured by MRI, correlates with the severity of pain, radiographic findings, and number of microfractures. (orig.)

  17. The relationship between cognitive impairment and in vivo metabolite ratios in patients with clinical Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, A.D. [Department of Imaging, Charing Cross Hospital and Dementia Research Group, University College London, Fulham Palace Road, W6 8RF, London (United Kingdom); Rai, G.S. [Department of Care of Older People, Whittington Hospital, Highgate Hill, London (United Kingdom)

    2003-08-01

    Previous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies have shown increased myo-inositol (MI) and decreased N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) levels in the parieto-occipital lobes of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to those with other dementias and normal subjects. This study aimed to establish the quantitative relationship between metabolite ratios and degree of cognitive impairment in patients with mild to moderate AD and sub-cortical ischaemic vascular dementia (SIVD). Forty-four older people with clinical dementia were recruited from a memory clinic and followed up for 2.0-3.5 years; 20 cases were finally classified as probable AD, 18 as SIVD and 6 as mixed type. Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and short echo time single voxel automated MRS from the mesial parieto-occipital lobes were performed at the time of initial referral. Spearman rank correlation coefficients were calculated for MMSE scores and measured metabolite ratios MI/Cr, NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and NAA/MI. The AD group showed a significant correlation between MMSE and NAA/MI (r=0.54, P=0.014) and NAA/Cr (r=0.48, P=0.033), and a negative, non-significant association with MI/Cr (r=-0.41, P=0.072). MI/Cr was negatively correlated with NAA/Cr (r=-0.51, P=0.021). Neither Cho/Cr ratios nor age correlated with cognitive function. The SIVD group showed no correlation between any of the measured metabolite ratios and MMSE score. This study reinforces the specific association between reduced NAA and increased MI levels in the parieto-occipital region and cognitive impairment in AD. MRS may have a role in evaluating disease progression and therapeutic monitoring in AD, as new treatments become available. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  19. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rossum Albert C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR examinations.

  20. Liver magnetic resonance imaging: State of the art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul; E; Sijens

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used for about three decades to characterize the human liver in a non-invasive way, that is without the need of using ionizing radiation or removing tissue samples. During the past few years, technical progress has been considerable and novel applications of MRI have been implemented in the clinic. The beginning of a new decade offers an excellent opportunity for having fi ve experts to present their view on the current status of MRI (and magnetic resonance spec...

  1. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of compressive cervical myelopathy with traumatic intervertebral disc herniation in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Hye-Jin; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Park, Seong Hoe

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) with nucleus pulposus extrusion, traumatic or not, is a devastating clinical condition accompanied by neurological problems. Here we report a cynomolgus macaque suffering from acute and progressive neurological dysfunction by a blunt trauma due to neck collar, an animal handling device. Tetraplegia, urinary incontinence, decreased proprioception, and imperception of pain were shown on physical and neurological examinations. MRI sagittal T2 weighted sequences revealed an extensive protrusion of disc material between C2 and C3 cervical vertebra, and this protrusion resulted in central stenosis of the spinal cord. Histopathologic findings showed a large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated at sites of spinal cord injury (SCI). This case is the first report of compressive cervical SCI caused by IVDH associated with blunt trauma. PMID:28053621

  2. Safety and efficacy of gadoteric acid in pediatric magnetic resonance imaging: overview of clinical trials and post-marketing studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balassy, Csilla [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of General and Pediatric Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Roberts, Donna [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology, Charleston, SC (United States); Miller, Stephen F. [LeBonheur Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Gadoteric acid is a paramagnetic gadolinium macrocyclic contrast agent approved for use in MRI of cerebral and spinal lesions and for body imaging. To investigate the safety and efficacy of gadoteric acid in children by extensively reviewing clinical and post-marketing observational studies. Data were collected from 3,810 children (ages 3 days to 17 years) investigated in seven clinical trials of central nervous system (CNS) imaging (n = 141) and six post-marketing observational studies of CNS, musculoskeletal and whole-body MR imaging (n = 3,669). Of these, 3,569 children were 2-17 years of age and 241 were younger than 2 years. Gadoteric acid was generally administered at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg. We evaluated image quality, lesion detection and border delineation, and the safety of gadoteric acid. We also reviewed post-marketing pharmacovigilance experience. Consistent with findings in adults, gadoteric acid was effective in children for improving image quality compared with T1-W unenhanced sequences, providing diagnostic improvement, and often influencing the therapeutic approach, resulting in treatment modifications. In studies assessing neurological tumors, gadoteric acid improved border delineation, internal morphology and contrast enhancement compared to unenhanced MR imaging. Gadoteric acid has a well-established safety profile. Among all studies, a total of 10 children experienced 20 adverse events, 7 of which were thought to be related to gadoteric acid. No serious adverse events were reported in any study. Post-marketing pharmacovigilance experience did not find any specific safety concern. Gadoteric acid was associated with improved lesion detection and delineation and is an effective and well-tolerated contrast agent for use in children. (orig.)

  3. Embroidered Coils for Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. Newton

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging is a widely used technique for medical and materials imaging. Even though the objects being imaged are often irregularly shaped, suitable coils permitting the measurement of the radio-frequency signal in these systems are usually made of solid copper. One problem often encountered is how to ensure the coils are both in close proximity and conformal to the object being imaged. Whilst embroidered conductive threads have previously been used as antennae in mobile telecommunications applications, they have not previously been reported for use within magnetic resonance. In this paper we show that an embroidered single loop coil can be used in a commercial unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance system as an alternative to a solid copper. Data is presented showing the determination of both longitudinal (T1 and effective transverse (T2eff relaxation times for a flat fabric coil and the same coil conformed to an 8 cm diameter cylinder. We thereby demonstrate the principles required for the wider use of fabric based conformal coils within nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of iliotibial band syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, E F; Pope, T; Martin, D F; Curl, W W

    1994-01-01

    Seven cases of iliotibial band syndrome and the pathoanatomic findings of each, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging, are presented. These findings were compared with magnetic resonance imaging scans of 10 age- and sex-matched control knees without evidence of lateral knee pain. Magnetic resonance imaging signal consistent with fluid was seen deep to the iliotibial band in the region of the lateral femoral epicondyle in five of the seven cases. Additionally, when compared with the control group, patients with iliotibial band syndrome demonstrated a significantly thicker iliotibial band over the lateral femoral epicondyle (P iliotibial band in the disease group was 5.49 +/- 2.12 mm, as opposed to 2.52 +/- 1.56 mm in the control group. Cadaveric dissections were performed on 10 normal knees to further elucidate the exact nature of the area under the iliotibial band. A potential space, i.e., a bursa, was found between the iliotibial band and the knee capsule. This series suggests that magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates objective evidence of iliotibial band syndrome and can be helpful when a definitive diagnosis is essential. Furthermore, correlated with anatomic dissection, magnetic resonance imaging identifies this as a problem within a bursa beneath the iliotibial band and not a problem within the knee joint.

  5. Anatomical, functional and molecular biomarker applications of magnetic resonance neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Christina H

    2015-01-01

    MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) along with computed tomography and PET are the most common imaging modalities used in the clinics to detect structural abnormalities and pathological conditions in the brain. MRI generates superb image resolution/contrast without radiation exposure that is associated with computed tomography and PET; MRS and spectroscopic imaging technologies allow us to measure changes in brain biochemistry. Increasingly, neurobiologists and MRI scientists are collaborating to solve neuroscience problems across sub-cellular through anatomical levels. To achieve successful cross-disciplinary collaborations, neurobiologists must have sufficient knowledge of magnetic resonance principles and applications in order to effectively communicate with their MRI colleagues. This review provides an overview of magnetic resonance techniques and how they can be used to gain insight into the active brain at the anatomical, functional and molecular levels with the goal of encouraging neurobiologists to include MRI/MRS as a research tool in their endeavors.

  6. Prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with clinically isolated syndrome conversion to multiple sclerosis: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous studies have investigated the associations of brain or spinal cord MRI with the risk of developing Multiple Sclerosis (MS in people with Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS, however, the findings are uncertain. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis based on 24 publications to comprehensively evaluate such associations. Materials and Methods: The databases of EMBASE and MEDLINE (January 1980-August 2011 were searched electronically for all relevant studies. Data were extracted from each study independently by both reviewers using a predefined structured spreadsheet. The quality of each study was assessed independently by two reviewers according to Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for reading cohort study proposed by Deeks et al. The meta-analysis including 24 qualified studies was performed by using the Cochrane Collaborations RevMan5.0 software. Results: Twenty-four identified studies met the inclusion criteria and minimum quality threshold. A meta-analysis of cohort studies indicated that the CISs having MRI lesions did have significantly increased risk for MS (risk ratio [RR] = 3.71, 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.27-4.21, P 9 lesions (RR = 0.97, 95% CI, 0.82-1.15, P = 0.72. Meanwhile, the CIS patients with abnormal baseline MRI, especially with infratentorial lesions, had a high risk of conversion to MS compared to patients without the such infratentorial lesions (RR = 1.37, % CI, 1.09-1.73, P = 0.0008. Conclusions: Despite some limitations, this meta-analysis established solid statistical evidence for an association between the presence or absence of MRI lesions within the brain or spinal cord MRI and the risk of developing MS, particularly for studies with large sample size. The CIS patients with abnormal baseline MRI, especially with infratentorial lesions, had a high risk of conversion to MS. However, this association warrants additional validation in larger and well designed studies.

  7. Therapeutic imaging window of cerebral infarction revealed by multisequence magnetic resonance imaging An animal and clinical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Lu; Hui Hu; Zhanping He; Xiangjun Han; Jing Chen; Rong Tu

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we established a Wistar rat model of right middle cerebral artery occlusion and observed pathological imaging changes (T2-weighted imaging [T2WI], T2FLAIR, and diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI]) following cerebral infarction. The pathological changes were divided into three phases: early cerebral infarction, middle cerebral infarction, and late cerebral infarction. In the early cerebral infarction phase (less than 2 hours post-infarction), there was evidence of intracellular edema, which improved after reperfusion. This improvement was defined as the ischemic penumbra. In this phase, a high DWI signal and a low apparent diffusion coefficient were observed in the right basal ganglia region. By contrast, there were no abnormal T2WI and T2FLAIR signals. For the middle cerebral infarction phase (2–4 hours post-infarction), a mixed edema was observed. After reperfusion, there was a mild improvement in cell edema, while the angioedema became more serious. A high DWI signal and a low apparent diffusion coefficient signal were observed, and some rats showed high T2WI and T2FLAIR signals. For the late cerebral infarction phase (4–6 hours post-infarction), significant angioedema was visible in the infarction site. After reperfusion, there was a significant increase in angioedema, while there was evidence of hemorrhage and necrosis. A mixed signal was observed on DWI, while a high apparent diffusion coefficient signal, a high T2WI signal, and a high T2FLAIR signal were also observed. All 86 cerebral infarction patients were subjected to T2WI, T2FLAIR, and DWI. MRI results of clinic data similar to the early infarction phase of animal experiments were found in 51 patients, for which 10 patients (10/51) had an onset time greater than 6 hours. A total of 35 patients had MRI results similar to the middle and late infarction phase of animal experiments, of which eight patients (8/35) had an onset time less than 6 hours. These data suggest that defining the

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of peripheral joints in rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Møller, Uffe;

    2004-01-01

    The need for better methods than the conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographical examinations in the management of inflammatory joint diseases is evident, since these methods are not sensitive or specific to early pathologies and subtle changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers...... of radiographical outcome in RA. Similarly, there is solid evidence for MRI synovitis representing true synovial inflammation and being of considerable practical, clinical and radiological significance in RA. Describing the encouraging current knowledge regarding MRI for diagnosis, monitoring and prognosis...

  9. Comparative characterization of the data of magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray and clinical studies of the hand and foot joints in patients with early psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Olegovna Krasnenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical manifestations of psoriatic arthritis (PsA at its early stage may be inadequately informative. In this connection, radiological techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and X-ray study of peripheral joints, in addition to clinical examination are of paramount importance in the diagnosis of early PsA. Objective: To compare the data of clinical examination and various imaging methods (MRI and X-ray of the hand and foot joints in early peripheral PsA. Subjects and methods. The trial included 45 patients (14 men and 31 women; mean age 42.08±13.7 years; median PsA duration 1 year [range 0.55 to 2] with early peripheral PsA without previous therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, who met the CASPAR criteria (2006. A standard clinical examination was performed and the activity of peripheral arthritis and the presence of enthesitis and dactylitis were determined in the patients. Not later than 2 days after the clinical examination, a standard X-ray examination of the hands and feet in the direct projection and MRI of the same areas were made. Results. When included into the study, the entire group of patients was found to have a moderate PsA by DAS; its median was 3.12 [2.21 to 3.89]. Cutaneous PsA was noted in 40 patients; 5 persons had a family history of PsA; one female patient had ungual PsA only. In the study group, the clinical signs of enthesitis in the tendon attachments at different sites were revealed in 33 (75.3% patients. Dactylitis was found in 34 (75% patients. The clinical examination showed inflammatory changes in the hand and foot joints in 36 (80% and 38 (84% patients, respectively; while MRT revealed them in 31 (69% and 32 (71% patients. Hand MRI displayed arthritis of the proximal interpha-langeal (PIP, metacarpophalangeal (MCP, and distal interphalangeal (DIP joints in 27 (87%, 21 (68%, and 12 (40% of the 31 patients, respectively. Foot MRI exhibited MCP, PIP, and DIP joint arthritis in

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other ... that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other ... that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... the exam if your child has a known allergy to contrast material. Your child should wear loose, ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if your child has any implanted medical or electronic devices. Inform your doctor and the technologist prior ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ability to see through the skull and the ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is ... routine and have him/her take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require your ...

  19. Magnetic resonance of magnetic fluid and magnetoliposome preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Paulo C. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil)]. E-mail: pcmor@unb.br; Santos, Judes G. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Skeff Neto, K. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Pelegrini, Fernando [Universidade Federal de Goias, Instituto de Fisica, 74001-970 Goiania-GO (Brazil); Cuyper, Marcel de [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Campus Kortrijk, Interdisciplinary Research Centre, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2005-05-15

    In this study, magnetic resonance was used to investigate lauric acid-coated magnetite-based magnetic fluid particles and particles which are surrounded by a double layer of phospholipid molecules (magnetoliposomes). The data reveal the presence of monomers and dimers in both samples. Whereas evidence for a thermally induced disruption of dimers is found in the magnetic fluid, apparently, the bilayer phospholipid envelop prevents the dissociation in the magnetoliposome samples.

  20. Pancreatitis: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, P.J.A.; Sheridan, M.B. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, St. James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2000-03-01

    The value of CT in management of severe acute pancreatitis is well established. Some, but not all, experimental studies suggest a detrimental effect of intravenous iodinated contrast agents in acute pancreatitis, but although initial clinical data tends to support this, the positive advantages of enhanced CT outweigh the possible risks. Magnetic resonance imaging has been shown to be as effective as CT in demonstrating the presence and extent of pancreatic necrosis and fluid collections, and probably superior in indicating the suitability of such collections for percutaneous drainage. Image-guided intervention remains a key approach in the management of severely ill patients, and the indications, techniques and results of radiological intervention are reviewed herein. Both CT and MRI can be used to diagnose advanced chronic pancreatitis, with the recent addition of MRCP as a viable alternative to diagnostic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Both MRCP and CT/MR imaging of the pancreatic parenchyma still have limitations in the recognition of the earliest changes of chronic pancreatitis - for which ERCP and tests of pancreatic function remain more sensitive - but the clinical significance of these minor changes remains contentious. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  2. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridjonsson, E. O.; Creber, S. A.; Vrouwenvelder, J. S.; Johns, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  3. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  4. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Schmid, Maximilian P., E-mail: maximilian.schmid@akhwien.at [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  5. Quantitative study of liver magnetic resonance spectroscopy quality at 3T using body and phased array coils with physical analysis and clinical evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xu

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the quality difference of short echo time (TE breathhold 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS of the liver at 3.0T using the body and phased array coils, respectively. In total, 20 pairs of single-voxel proton spectra of the liver were acquired at 3.0T using the phased array and body coils as receivers. Consecutive stacks of breathhold spectra were acquired using the point resolved spectroscopy (PRESS technique at a short TE of 30 ms and a repetition time (TR of 1500 ms. The first spectroscopy sequence was "copied" for the second acquisition to ensure identical voxel positioning. The MRS prescan adjustments of shimming and water suppression, signal-to noise ratio (SNR, and major liver quantitative information were compared between paired spectra. Theoretical calculation of the SNR and homogeneity of the region of interest (ROI, 2 cm×2 cm×2 cm using different coils loaded with 3D liver electromagnetic model of real human body was implemented in the theoretical analysis. The theoretical analysis showed that, inside the ROI, the SNR of the phase array coil was 2.8387 times larger than that of body coil and the homogeneity of the phase array coil and body coil was 80.10% and 93.86%, respectively. The experimental results showed excellent correlations between the paired data (all r > 0.86. Compared with the body coil group, the phased array group had slightly worse shimming effect and better SNR (all P values 0.05. The theoretical analysis and clinical experiment showed that the phased array coil was superior to the body coil with respect to 3.0T breathhold hepatic proton MRS.

  6. Effectiveness of Adalimumab in Non-radiographic Axial Spondyloarthritis: Evaluation of Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Outcomes in a Monocentric Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarini, Luca; Fabbroni, Marta; Talarico, Rosaria; Costa, Luisa; Caso, Francesco; Cuneo, Gian Luca; Frediani, Bruno; Faralli, Gabriele; Vitale, Antonio; Brizi, Maria Giuseppina; Sabadini, Luciano; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2015-07-01

    The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of adalimumab (ADA) in a cohort of non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA), and the secondary aims were to identify predictive factors of response and evaluate radiological progression.We evaluated 37 patients (male/female: 12/25; mean age 49 ± 14; mean disease duration: 6.3 ± 5.8) with active nr-axSpA (Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society criteria), despite the treatment with ≥1 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug for at least 3 months, initiating the treatment with ADA 40 mg every other week. Patients were treated for 24 months, and evaluated at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months. Outcome measures included Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index. Radiograph of the spine and sacroiliac joints and magnetic resonance of the sacroiliac joints were performed at baseline and according to the standard of assessment for the disease.The proportion of patients that achieved a BASDAI50 response at 6, 12 and 24 months was 51.3%, 70.3%, and 76.8%, respectively. Treatment was well tolerated with no unexpected adverse events and/or serious adverse events. All patients remained on treatment for 2 years, with a good compliance. We did not identify any predictive factor of response to therapy. Moreover, modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score and Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada scores showed a trend of improvement during the study period.ADA was effective on clinical and radiological outcomes at 2-year follow-up; thus, early treatment with ADA may prevent radiographic damage and be associated with low disease activity or remission. Moreover, data from this cohort study have confirmed safety and tolerability profile of ADA in nr-axSpA in the long term.

  7. Urethrogram-directed Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer in Patients with Contraindications to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima ePaydar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-directed stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has been established as a safe and effective treatment for prostate cancer. For patients with contraindications to MRI, CT-urethrogram is an alternative imaging approach to identify the location of the prostatic apex to guide treatment. This study sought to evaluate the safety of urethrogram-directed SBRT for prostate cancer.Methods: Between February 2009 and January 2014, 31 men with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated definitively with urethrogram-directed SBRT with or without supplemental intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT at Georgetown University Hospital. SBRT was delivered either as a primary treatment of 35-36.25 Gray (Gy in 5 fractions or as a boost of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions followed by supplemental conventionally fractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (45-50.4 Gy. Toxicities were recorded and scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAE v.4.0.Results: The median patient age was 70 years with a median prostate volume of 38 cc. The median follow-up was 3.7 years. The patients were elderly (Median age = 70, and comorbidities were common (Carlson Comorbidity Index > 2 in 36%. 71% of patients utilized alpha agonists prior to treatment, and 9.7% had prior procedures for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. The 3-year actuarial incidence rates of > Grade 3 GU toxicity and > Grade 2 GI toxicity were 3.2% and 9.7%, respectively. There were no Grade 4 or 5 toxicities.Conclusions: MRI is the preferred imaging modality to guide prostate SBRT treatment. However, urethrogram-directed SBRT is a safe alternative for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer who are unable to undergo MRI.

  8. Progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Emsley, J W; Sutcliffe, L H

    2013-01-01

    Progress in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Part 1 is a two-chapter text that reviews significant developments in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications.The first chapter discusses NMR studies of molecules physisorbed on homogeneous surfaces. This chapter also describes the phase changes in the adsorbed layer detected by following the variation in the NMR parameters. The second chapter examines the process to obtain a plotted, data reduced Fourier transform NMR spectrum. This chapter highlights the pitfalls that can cause a decrease in information content in a NMR spectrum. The

  9. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Ledbetter, Micah; Theis, Thomas; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectr...

  10. Gender and magnetic resonance imaging classification-related differences in clinical and biochemical characteristics of Cushing's disease: a single-centre study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yufan; Mei Xiaobo; Jian Fangfang; Ma Qinyun; Chen Xiao; Bian Liuguan; Sun Qingfang

    2014-01-01

    Background Cushing's disease (CD) presents a remarkable preponderance in female gender,and a significant minority of patients with CD presented with negative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings.The aim of this study was to evaluate gender-related and MRI classification-related differences in clinical and biochemical characteristics of CD.Methods We retrospectively studied 169 patients with CD,comprising 132 females and 37 males,and 33 patients had no visible adenoma on MRI.Results We observed that male and MRI-positive patients presented with high adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) values (P <0.05).Female patients presented with higher prevalence of hirsutism and hyperpigmentation and lower prevalence of purple striae (P <0.05).The prevalence of buffalo-hump and hypertension was greater in MRI-negative patients (P <0.05).In addition,male patients with CD presented at a younger age compared with females (P <0.05).Patients with fatigue and hypokalaemia presented significantly higher urinary-free cortisol,ACTH and cortisol levels compared with patients without these symptoms (P <0.05).The prevalence of LH reduction,hyper total cholesterol (TC) and hyper low-density lipoprotein was more frequent in MRI-positive patients (P <0.05).Hyper-TC levels and PRL reduction were more frequent in males (P <0.05).T3,T4 and FT3 levels negatively correlated with age at diagnosis (r=-0.310,P <0.01; r=-0.191,P <0.05; r=-0.216,P <0.05).T3,T4,FT3 and FT4 levels significantly negatively correlated with 8-am plasma cortisol levels (r=-0.328,P <0.01; r=-0.195,P <0.05; r=-0.333,P <0.01; r=-0.180,P <0.05).Females presented higher total protein level (P <0.01) and lower blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels (P <0.01),compared with male patients.Conclusions Carefulness and caution are required in all patients with CD,because of the complexity of clinical and biochemical characteristics in CD patients of different gender and MRI classification

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    2001-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing rad

  12. Sports health magnetic resonance imaging challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Gary A; Stadnick, Michael E; Awh, Mark H

    2010-11-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex are often suspected, particularly in the setting of midfoot pain without radiographic abnormality. Knowledge of the anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging findings of injuries to this region is helpful for the diagnosing and treating physicians.

  13. Breast magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mi Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Despite the high sensitivity of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pathologic confirmation by biopsy is essential because of limited specificity. MRI-guided biopsy is required in patients with lesions only seen on MRI. We review preprocedural considerations and the technique of MRI-guided biopsy, challenging situations and trouble-shooting, and correlation of radiologic and pathologic findings.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Biomedical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaśpar, Jan; Hána, Karel; Smrčka, Pavel; Brada, Jiří; Beneš, Jiří; Šunka, Pavel

    2007-11-01

    The basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging covering physical principles and basic imaging techniques will be presented as a strong tool in biomedical engineering. Several applications of MRI in biomedical research practiced at the MRI laboratory of the FBMI CTU including other laboratory instruments and activities are introduced.

  15. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Giovanni; Tortora, Fabio; Baldelli, Roberto; Cocchiara, Francesco; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Sbardella, Emilia; Simeoli, Chiara; Caranci, Ferdinando; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria

    2017-03-01

    Adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary tumor represents about 10 % of pituitary adenomas and at the time of diagnosis most of them are microadenomas. Transsphenoidal surgery is the first-line treatment of Cushing's disease and accurate localization of the tumor within the gland is essential for selectively removing the lesion and preserving normal pituitary function. Magnetic resonance imaging is the best imaging modality for the detection of pituitary tumors, but adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary microadenomas are not correctly identified in 30-50 % of cases, because of their size, location, and enhancing characteristics. Several recent studies were performed with the purpose of better localizing the adrenocorticotropin-secreting microadenomas through the use in magnetic resonance imaging of specific sequences, reduced contrast medium dose and high-field technology. Therefore, an improved imaging technique for pituitary disease is mandatory in the suspect of Cushing's disease. The aims of this paper are to present an overview of pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of Cushing's disease and to provide a magnetic resonance imaging protocol to be followed in case of suspicion adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in syringomyelia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L.J. Tanghe (Hervé)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBased on an own material of 19 patients with syringomyelia and on the related literature a survey is given on the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, postoperative evaluation and the dynamics of CSF and cyst fluids, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The following conclusions can be

  17. Biliary ascariasis on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A Hashmi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old girl presented with features of biliary obstruction. Magnetic resonance cholangi-pancreatography revealed typical linear signals in common bile duct, which appears like Ascaris lumbricoides. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic removal of the worm.

  18. Was magnetic resonance imaging scan contraindicated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Khizar

    2010-01-01

    An intravenous drug abuser with a retained needle posed a management problem at a neurosurgical unit, having declined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on safety grounds. However, later, having been assessed by the senior radiologist, she went though the MRI scan safely.

  19. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  20. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soernes, A.R

    1998-07-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system.

  1. 植入型凶险性前置胎盘应用磁共振的临床分析%Clinical Analysis of Magnetic Resonance in the Application of Implantable Dangerous Placenta Previa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕冲

    2016-01-01

    目的:探究对植入型凶险性前置胎盘的临床诊断中磁共振的临床应用情况。方法回顾性分析2013年7月—2015年6月在该院接诊的凶险性前置胎盘患者60例,其中植入型凶险性前置胎盘患者25例,结合患者的手术和病理检查结果为参考标准,对植入型凶险性前置胎盘患者进行核磁共振以及彩色多普勒超声检查的联合应用评估,同时患者分别为粘连胎盘、植入性胎盘以及穿透性胎盘,结床分析。结果在胎盘植入的临床诊断中磁共振与磁共振和彩超联合诊断的临床诊断价值无合患者的病症分型对患者的磁共振图像进行临统计学差异(P﹥0.05),但结合患者的病理分型对磁共振的诊断准确率进行判定显示差异有统计学意义(P﹤0.05),在穿透性胎盘的诊断中其应用价值最高,而在粘连性胎盘的诊断中其应用价值则相对较低,数据显示差异有统计学意义(P﹤0.05)。结论在植入型凶险性前置胎盘的临床诊断中应用磁共振具有较高的诊断准确性,同时对患者的临床分型也有一定的应用,值得在临床上推广应用。%Objective To discuss the clinical application situation of magnetic resonance in the clinical diagnosis of im-plantable dangerous placenta previa. Methods 60 cases of patients with dangerous placenta previa treated in our hospital from June 2013 to June 2015 were retrospectively analyzed, among them, 25 cases were implantable dangerous placenta previa and they were evaluated by the combined application of magnetic resonance and color Doppler ultrasonography ac-cording to the operative and pathological examination results and divided into the adherent placenta, implantable percreta and placenta percreta according to the clinical analysis. Results The difference in the clinical diagnostic value between the magnetic resonance diagnosis of placenta implantation and magnetic resonance combined with colour

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and ... sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... technologist if you have any devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before ... imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  5. Compression-sensitive magnetic resonance elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Sebastian; Beyer, Frauke; Guo, Jing; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Tzschaetzsch, Heiko; Braun, Juergen; Sack, Ingolf

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) quantifies the shear modulus of biological tissue to detect disease. Complementary to the shear elastic properties of tissue, the compression modulus may be a clinically useful biomarker because it is sensitive to tissue pressure and poromechanical interactions. In this work, we analyze the capability of MRE to measure volumetric strain and the dynamic bulk modulus (P-wave modulus) at a harmonic drive frequency commonly used in shear-wave-based MRE. Gel phantoms with various densities were created by introducing CO2-filled cavities to establish a compressible effective medium. The dependence of the effective medium's bulk modulus on phantom density was investigated via static compression tests, which confirmed theoretical predictions. The P-wave modulus of three compressible phantoms was calculated from volumetric strain measured by 3D wave-field MRE at 50 Hz drive frequency. The results demonstrate the MRE-derived volumetric strain and P-wave modulus to be sensitive to the compression properties of effective media. Since the reconstruction of the P-wave modulus requires third-order derivatives, noise remains critical, and P-wave moduli are systematically underestimated. Focusing on relative changes in the effective bulk modulus of tissue, compression-sensitive MRE may be useful for the noninvasive detection of diseases involving pathological pressure alterations such as hepatic hypertension or hydrocephalus.

  6. Magnetic resonance angiography in suspected cerebral vasculitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, Philippe; De Ruyter, Nele; Wilms, Guido [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis, KU Leuven, 3000, Leuven (Belgium); Maes, Frederik [Department of Medical Imaging Computing, Universitair Ziekenhuis, KU Leuven, 3000, Leuven (Belgium); Velghe, Beatrijs [Department of Radiology, Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Schiepse Bos 6, 3600, Genk (Belgium)

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the technical capacity and diagnostic accuracy of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in suspected cerebral vasculitis in a retrospective analysis of MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in 14 young patients with clinical and/or radiological suspicion of cerebral vasculitis. A total of nine arteries were evaluated in each patient. Consensus review of DSA by three observers was the reference standard. The sensitivity for detecting a stenosis varied from 62 to 79% for MRA and from 76 to 94% for DSA, depending on the observer. The specificity for detecting a stenosis varied from 83 to 87% for MRA and from 83 to 97% for DSA. Using the criterion ''more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions'' to consider the examination as being true positive, the false-positive rates for MRA and DSA were comparable. MRA plays a role as the first angiographical examination in the diagnostic work-up of suspected cerebral vasculitis. When more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions are depicted on MRA, DSA is not expected to add a significant diagnostic contribution in a patient with suspected cerebral vasculitis. DSA remains necessary when MRA is normal or when less than three stenoses are seen. (orig.)

  7. Potts disease: Diagnosis with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pursey, Jacqueline [MRI Department, Gartnavel General Hospitial, 1053 Great Western road, Glasgow G12 0YN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Jacqueline.pursey@ggc.scot.nhs.uk; Stewart, Sharon [School of Health and Social Care, Caledonian University, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    The eponymously named Potts disease is a relatively rare form of Tuberculosis (TB) which affects the spine. TB of the spine is one of the earliest diseases known to man and in the 20th century was thought to be a disease which had been defeated by the advent of antitubercular drugs. Over the last two decades there have been several reports which indicate a revival of TB in both the developing and developed world. Factors which may be contributing to this are the spread of the HIV virus, increased immigration and the emergence of drug resistant strains of the TB bacteria. Potts disease has an insidious onset and often the radiographic findings are far advanced when a diagnosis is finally reached. MRI is able to detect changes to the vertebrae in Potts disease earlier than radiographs. This case report outlines the clinical presentation of a young male with Potts disease who was HIV negative, and the important role that MRI plays in diagnosis and therefore in appropriate and timely intervention. The typical magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features and the radiographic hallmarks of the disease will also be discussed.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaicher, Wibke; Brugger, Peter C; Mittermayer, Christoph; Schwindt, Jens; Deutinger, Josef; Bernaschek, Gerhard; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-02-01

    The goal of this study was to provide a representative description of the normal placenta with contrast medium-free magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to determine a standard of reference. One hundred consecutive singleton pregnancies were investigated by MRI without application of a contrast medium. The mean gestational age (GA) at the time of investigation was 29.5 weeks (range 19-40). Patients with suspected utero-placental insufficiency (UPI) or placental anomalies were excluded. Signal intensities were assessed and correlated with the respective GA. Antenatal MRI without contrast medium was able to depict placental status and morphological changes during gestation. A regular homogeneous structure was found in weeks 19-23. Subsequently, sporadic, slightly marked lobules appeared, which increased in number and markedness with ongoing gestation. Stratification of the lobules was observed after 36 weeks. The ratio of placental and amniotic fluid signal intensities decreased significantly with higher GA and with placental grading. MRI is well suited as an imaging method for the placenta. Our data may be used as a reference in the assessment of the placenta on MRI, and may have further clinical impact with respect to the determination of UPI.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal placenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaicher, Wibke [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: wibke.blaicher@meduniwien.ac.at; Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Mittermayer, Christoph [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology and Intensive Care, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Schwindt, Jens [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology and Intensive Care, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Deutinger, Josef [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Vienna (Austria); Bernaschek, Gerhard [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    The goal of this study was to provide a representative description of the normal placenta with contrast medium-free magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to determine a standard of reference. One hundred consecutive singleton pregnancies were investigated by MRI without application of a contrast medium. The mean gestational age (GA) at the time of investigation was 29.5 weeks (range 19-40). Patients with suspected utero-placental insufficiency (UPI) or placental anomalies were excluded. Signal intensities were assessed and correlated with the respective GA. Antenatal MRI without contrast medium was able to depict placental status and morphological changes during gestation. A regular homogeneous structure was found in weeks 19-23. Subsequently, sporadic, slightly marked lobules appeared, which increased in number and markedness with ongoing gestation. Stratification of the lobules was observed after 36 weeks. The ratio of placental and amniotic fluid signal intensities decreased significantly with higher GA and with placental grading. MRI is well suited as an imaging method for the placenta. Our data may be used as a reference in the assessment of the placenta on MRI, and may have further clinical impact with respect to the determination of UPI.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Neuromyelitis Optica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sun Kyung; Song, Chang June; Park, Woon Ju; Lee, In Ho; Son, Eun Hee [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    To report the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of the spinal cord and brain in patients of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Between January 2001 and March 2010, the MR images (spinal cord, brain, and orbit) and the clinical and serologic findings of 11 NMO patients were retrospectively reviewed. The contrast-enhancement of the spinal cord was performed (20/23). The presence and pattern of the contrast-enhancement in the spinal cord were classified into 5 types. Acute myelitis was monophasic in 8 patients (8/11, 72.7%); and optic neuritis preceded acute myelitis in most patients. Longitudinally extensive cord lesion (average, 7.3 vertebral segments) was involved. The most common type was the diffuse and subtle enhancement of the spinal cord with a multifocal nodular, linear or segmental intense enhancement (45%). Most of the brain lesions (5/11, 10 lesions) were located in the brain stem, thalamus and callososeptal interphase. Anti-Ro autoantibody was positive in 2 patients, and they showed a high relapse rate of acute myelitis. Anti-NMO IgG was positive in 4 patients (4/7, 66.7%). The imaging findings of acute myelitis in NMO may helpful in making an early diagnosis of NMO which can result in a severe damage to the spinal cord, and to make a differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and inflammatory diseases of the spinal cord such as toxocariasis.

  11. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yumin

    2013-12-01

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters-shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  12. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  13. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yumin, E-mail: ymhou@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-12-15

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory rheumatoid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Mróz, Joanna; Ostrowska, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is used more and more frequently to diagnose changes in the musculoskeletal system in the course of rheumatic diseases, at their initial assessment, for treatment monitoring and for identification of complications. The article presents the history of magnetic resonance imaging, the basic principles underlying its operation as well as types of magnets, coils and MRI protocols used in the diagnostic process of rheumatic diseases. It enumerates advantages and disadvantages of individual MRI scanners. The principles of MRI coil operation are explained, and the sequences used for MR image analysis are described, particularly in terms of their application in rheumatology, including T1-, T2-, PD-weighted, STIR/TIRM and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Furthermore, views on the need to use contrast agents to optimise diagnosis, particularly in synovitis-like changes, are presented. Finally, methods for the assessment of MR images are listed, including the semi-quantitative method by RAMRIS and quantitative dynamic examination.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance properties of lunar samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, D.; Weeks, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of Na-23, Al-27, and P-31 in fines samples 10084,60 and 14163,168 and in crystalline rock samples 12021,55 and 14321,166, have been recorded over a range of frequencies up to 20 MHz. A shift in the field at which maximum absorption occurs for all of the spectra relative to the field at which maximum absorption occurs for terrestrial analogues is attributed to a sample-dependent magnetic field at the Na, Al, and P sites opposing the laboratory field. The magnitude of these fields internal to the samples is sample dependent and varies from 5 to 10 G. These fields do not correlate with the iron content of the samples. However, the presence of single-domain particles of iron distributed throughout the plagioclase fraction that contains the principal fraction of Na and Al is inferred from electron magnetic resonance spectra shapes.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in ADNI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Clifford R.; Barnes, Josephine; Bernstein, Matt A.; Borowski, Bret J.; Brewer, James; Clegg, Shona; Dale, Anders M.; Carmichael, Owen; Ching, Christopher; DeCarli, Charles; Desikan, Rahul S.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Fjell, Anders M.; Fletcher, Evan; Fox, Nick C.; Gunter, Jeff; Gutman, Boris A.; Holland, Dominic; Hua, Xue; Insel, Philip; Kantarci, Kejal; Killiany, Ron J.; Krueger, Gunnar; Leung, Kelvin K.; Mackin, Scott; Maillard, Pauline; Molone, Ian; Mattsson, Niklas; McEvoy, Linda; Modat, Marc; Mueller, Susanne; Nosheny, Rachel; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schuff, Norbert; Senjem, Matthew L.; Simonson, Alix; Thompson, Paul M.; Rettmann, Dan; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Walhovd, Kristine; Zhao, Yansong; Zuk, Samantha; Weiner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION ADNI is now in its 10th year. The primary objective of the MRI core of ADNI has been to improve methods for clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders. METHODS We review the contributions of the MRI core from present and past cycles of ADNI (ADNI 1, GO and 2). We also review plans for the future – ADNI 3. RESULTS Contributions of the MRI core include creating standardized acquisition protocols and quality control methods; examining the effect of technical features of image acquisition and analysis on outcome metrics; deriving sample size estimates for future trials based on those outcomes; and piloting the potential utility of MR perfusion, diffusion, and functional connectivity measures in multicenter clinical trials. DISCUSSION Over the past decade the MRI core of ADNI has fulfilled its mandate of improving methods for clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease and will continue to do so in the future. PMID:26194310

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging safety of deep brain stimulator devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the standard of care for the evaluation of different neurological disorders of the brain and spinal cord due to its multiplanar capabilities and excellent soft tissue resolution. With the large and increasing population of patients with implanted deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices, a significant proportion of these patients with chronic neurological diseases require evaluation of their primary neurological disease processes by MRI. The presence of an implanted DBS device in a magnetic resonance environment presents potential hazards. These include the potential for induction of electrical currents or heating in DBS devices, which can result in neurological tissue injury, magnetic field-induced device migration, or disruption of the operational aspects of the devices. In this chapter, we review the basic physics of potential interactions of the MRI environment with implanted DBS devices, summarize results from phantom studies and clinical series, and discuss present recommendations for safe MRI in patients with implanted DBS devices.

  18. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy may hold promise in studying metabolites, tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-02-24

    Almost 15 years ago, in a basement at Chicago's University of Illinois Medical Center, Michael Barany, MD, PhD, measured phosphorus metabolites in an intact frog muscle using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Prior to that, chemists used spectroscopy solely to analyze the contents of test tubes. Only a British group preceded Barany in proving that it would work in tissue as well. Today, he does spectroscopy clinically, one day a week, at the Greenberg Radiology Institute in Highland Park, IL, north of Chicago. Barany says that he can distinguish malignant from benign tumors in the living brain. The tool he uses is a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. While MRI capabilities have forged ahead, human MRS has been awaiting improvements in magnet and computer technology. Barany is one of a number of researchers who, since the early 1980s, have been developing MRS technology and techniques so that it can be done in the human body.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorramdin, A. [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Isapour, Gh. [Department of Materials and Engineering, Hakim Sabzevari University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants. - Highlights: • This paper studies the physics of MRI as a powerful diagnostic technique. • MRI uses the differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. • The relaxation times can be shortened by the use of a magnetic contrast agent. • The magnetic nanoparticles act as contrast agents, helping to increase the resolution. • Different synthesis methods can influence the magnetic resonance behavior.

  20. Applications of Magnetic Resonance in Model Systems: Cancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L. Evelhoch

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The lack of information regarding the metabolism and pathophysiology of individual tumors limits, in part, both the development of new anti-cancer therapies and the optimal implementation of currently available treatments. Magnetic resonance [MR, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR] provides a powerful tool to assess many aspects of tumor metabolism and pathophysiology. Moreover, since this information can be obtained nondestructively, pre-clinical results from cellular or animal models are often easily translated into the clinic. This review presents selected examples of how MR has been used to identify metabolic changes associated with apoptosis, detect therapeutic response prior to a change in tumor volume, optimize the combination of metabolic inhibitors with chemotherapy and/or radiation, characterize and exploit the influence of tumor pH on the effectiveness of chemotherapy, characterize tumor reoxygenation and the effects of modifiers of tumor oxygenation in individual tumors, image transgene expression and assess the efficacy of gene therapy. These examples provide an overview of several of the areas in which cellular and animal model studies using MR have contributed to our understanding of the effects of treatment on tumor metabolism and pathophysiology and the importance of tumor metabolism and pathophysiology as determinants of therapeutic response.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in deep pelvic endometriosis: iconographic essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho Junior, Antonio Carlos; Coutinho, Elisa Pompeu Dias; Lima, Claudio Marcio Amaral de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Erica Barreiros; Aidar, Marisa Nassar [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Clinica Multi-Imagem, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); E-mail: cmaol@br.inter.net; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia

    2008-03-15

    Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of normal endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity. In patients with deep pelvic endometriosis, uterosacral ligaments, rectum, rectovaginal septum, vagina or bladder may be involved. Clinical manifestations may be variable, including pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, urinary symptoms and infertility. Complete surgical excision is the gold standard for treating this disease, and hence the importance of the preoperative work-up that usually is limited to an evaluation of sonographic and clinical data. Magnetic resonance imaging is of paramount importance in the diagnosis of endometriosis, considering its high accuracy in the identification of lesions intermingled with adhesions, and in the determination of peritoneal lesions extent. The present pictorial review describes the main magnetic resonance imaging findings in deep pelvic endometriosis. (author)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, A. O.; Rojas, R.; Barrios, F. A.

    2001-10-01

    MR imaging has experienced an important growth worldwide and in particular in the USA and Japan. This imaging technique has also shown an important rise in the number of MR imagers in Mexico. However, the development of MRI has followed a typical way of Latin American countries, which is very different from the path shown in the industrialised countries. Despite the fact that Mexico was one the very first countries to install and operate MR imagers in the world, it still lacks of qualified clinical and technical personnel. Since the first MR scanner started to operate, the number of units has grown at a moderate space that now sums up approximately 60 system installed nationwide. Nevertheless, there are no official records of the number of MR units operating, physicians and technicians involved in this imaging modality. The MRI market is dominated by two important companies: General Electric (approximately 51%) and Siemens (approximately 17.5%), the rest is shared by other five companies. According to the field intensity, medium-field systems (0.5 Tesla) represent 60% while a further 35% are 1.0 T or higher. Almost all of these units are in private hospitals and clinics: there is no high-field MR imagers in any public hospital. Because the political changes in the country, a new public plan for health care is still in the process and will be published soon this year. This plan will be determined by the new Congress. North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and president Fox. Experience acquired in the past shows that the demand for qualified professionals will grow in the new future. Therefore, systematic training of clinical and technical professionals will be in high demand to meet the needs of this technique. The National University (UNAM) and the Metropolitan University (UAM-Iztapalapa) are collaborating with diverse clinical groups in private facilities to create a systematic training program and carry out research and development in MRI

  3. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance contains three articles which review quite fundamentally different aspects of coherent spectroscopy. An enormous variety of effects can be observed when optical and spin resonances are coupled, usually by a combination of radio frequency and laser irradiation. The first article reviews these effects and pays particular attention to developing a theoretical framework which is as similar as possible for the optical and spin cases. Subsequent articles examine deuterium relaxation in molecular solids, and the spatiotemporal growth of multiple spin coheren

  4. [Magnetic resonance compatibility research for coronary mental stents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Li; Wang, Shuo; Shang, Ruyao; Wang, Chunren

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to research magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents, and to evaluate the magnetic resonance compatibility based on laboratory testing results. Coronary stents magnetic resonance compatibility test includes magnetically induced displacement force test, magnetically induced torque test, radio frequency induced heating and evaluation of MR image. By magnetic displacement force and torque values, temperature, and image distortion values to determine metal coronary stent demagnetization effect. The methods can be applied to test magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents and evaluate its demagnetization effect.

  5. Tuberous sclerosis complex: Diagnostic role of magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra N Sehgal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is a well-known clinical entity, characterized by facial angio-fibroma, shagreen patch, and hypo-melanotic, and confetti-like skin lesions. An exquisite fresh case is being narrated, emphasizing its microscopic pathology. The role of magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, in particular, is highlighted to define the large variety of neurological abrasions for determining its future progression.

  6. Giant right atrial myxoma: characterization with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ridge, Carole A

    2012-02-01

    A 53-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 2-week history of dyspnoea and chest pain. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography was performed to exclude acute pulmonary embolism (PE). This demonstrated a large right atrial mass and no evidence of PE. Transthoracic echocardiography followed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a mobile right atrial mass. Surgical resection was then performed confirming a giant right atrial myxoma. We describe the typical clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features of right atrial myxoma.

  7. A review of functional magnetic resonance imaging for Brainnetome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Song; Tianzi Jiang

    2012-01-01

    The functional brain network using blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has revealed the potentials for probing brain architecture,as well as for identifying clinical biomarkers for brain diseases.In the general context of Brainnetome,this review focuses on the development of approaches for modeling and analyzing functional brain networks with BOLD fMRI.The prospects for these approaches are also discussed.

  8. Metabolic Syndrome, Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We explored cognitive impairment in metabolic syndrome in relation to brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 819 participants free of clinical stroke and dementia of the population-based Austrian Stroke Prevention Study who had undergone brain MRI, neuropsychological testing, and a risk factor assessment relevant to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria–defined metabolic syndrome. High-sensitivity C...

  9. Ultrasound versus high field magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, York Kiat; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul;

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there have been significant advances in the field of musculoskeletal imaging, especially in the application of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both modalities offer significant advantages over the previous...... standards of clinical examination and radiography, and allow direct visualisation of both joint inflammation and structural damage. Although measuring similar pathology, each of these imaging tools has its own benefits and limitations; understanding these will help researchers and clinicians to determine...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging and its applicability in veterinary cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, José Manuel de Seiça

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a technique whereby images are created by the manipulation of hydrogen atoms in magnetic fields; it is based on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (MR), which is non-invasive and non-ionising (Constantine, Shan, Flamm, & Sivananthan, 2004). Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) uses the same principle: application of magnetic-field gradients that are adjusted to highlight desired tissue characteristics, producing a variety of sequences that all...

  11. Resonantly detecting axion-mediated forces with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A

    2014-10-17

    We describe a method based on precision magnetometry that can extend the search for axion-mediated spin-dependent forces by several orders of magnitude. By combining techniques used in nuclear magnetic resonance and short-distance tests of gravity, our approach can substantially improve upon current experimental limits set by astrophysics, and probe deep into the theoretically interesting regime for the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion. Our method is sensitive to PQ axion decay constants between 10(9) and 10(12) GeV or axion masses between 10(-6) and 10(-3) eV, independent of the cosmic axion abundance.

  12. Clinical recommendations of cardiac magnetic resonance, Part I: ischemic and valvular heart disease: a position paper of the working group 'Applicazioni della Risonanza Magnetica' of the Italian Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquaro, Giovanni Donato; Di Bella, Gianluca; Castelletti, Silvia; Maestrini, Viviana; Festa, Pierluigi; Ait-Ali, Lamia; Masci, Pier Giorgio; Monti, Lorenzo; di Giovine, Gabriella; De Lazzari, Manuel; Cipriani, Alberto; Guaricci, Andrea I; Dellegrottaglie, Santo; Pepe, Alessia; Marra, Martina Perazzolo; Pontone, Gianluca

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has emerged as a reliable and accurate diagnostic tool for the evaluation of patients with cardiac disease in several clinical settings and with proven additional diagnostic and prognostic value compared with other imaging modalities. This document has been developed by the working group on the 'application of CMR' of the Italian Society of Cardiology to provide a perspective on the current state of technical advances and clinical applications of CMR and to inform cardiologists on how to implement their clinical and diagnostic pathways with the inclusion of this technique in clinical practice. The writing committee consisted of members of the working group of the Italian Society of Cardiology and two external peer reviewers with acknowledged experience in the field of CMR.

  13. High speed functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, A M

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the except where indicated by reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to October 2001. This thesis documents the implementation and application of a novel high-speed imaging technique, the multi-slice, echo shifted, echo planar imaging technique. This was implemented on the Nottingham 3 T imaging system, for functional magnetic resonance imaging. The technique uses echo shifting over the slices in a multi-slice echo planar imaging acquisition scheme, making the echo time longer than the repetition time per slice. This allows for rapid volumar sampling of the blood oxygen level dependent effect in the human brain. The new high-speed technique was used to investigate the variability of measuring the timing differences between haemodynamic responses, at the same cortical location, to simple cued motor tasks. The technique was also used in an investigation into motor cortex functional connect...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in tuberculous meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Memon, W.A. [Aga Khan Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing tuberculosis from other types of meningoencephalitis. MRIs of 100 patients with tuberculous (50), pyogenic (33), viral (14), or fungal (3) meningoencephalitis were analyzed independently by 2 radiologists. Number, size, location, signal characteristics, surrounding edema, and contrast enhancement pattern of nodular lesions; location and pattern of meningeal enhancement; extent of infarct or encephalitis and hydrocephalus were evaluated. Contrast-enhancing nodular lesions were detected in patients with tuberculous (43 of 50 patients), pyogenic (9 of 33), and fungal (3 of 3) infections. No nodules were detected in patients with viral meningoencephalitis. Using the criteria of 1 or more solid rim or homogeneously enhancing nodules smaller than 2 cm, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing tuberculous meningitis were 86.0%, 90.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in distinguishing tuberculous from pyogenic, viral and fungal meningoencephalitis. (author)

  15. Introduction to Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    It is quite possible to acquire images with an MR scanner without understanding the principles behind it, but choosing the best parameters and methods, and interpreting images and artifacts, requires understanding. This text serves as an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging techniques. It is aimed at beginners in possession of only a minimal level of technical expertise, yet it introduces aspects of MR that are typically considered technically challenging. The notes were written in conn...

  16. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Choon; Hua; Thng; Tong; San; Koh; David; J; Collins; Dow; Mu; Koh

    2010-01-01

    Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies quantify the microcirculatory status of liver parenchyma and liver lesions, and can be used for the detection of liver metastases, assessing the effectiveness of antiangiogenic therapy, evaluating tumor viability after anticancer therapy or ablation, and diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and its severity. In this review, we discuss the basic concepts of perfusion MRI using tracer kinetic modeling, the common kinetic models applied for analyses, the MR scanning t...

  17. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus......). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup....

  18. Magnetic resonance in diagnosis of ureterocele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Humberto do; Hachul, Mauricio; Macedo Junior, Antonio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Div. de Urologia]. E-mail: humbertojr1@aol.com

    2003-05-15

    Ultrasonography is the main non-invasive technique for screening of ureterocele, but presents some difficulties for its diagnosis. Other supplementary diagnostic methods have the disadvantage of being invasive or using ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) has a high sensitivity for diagnosing urinary tract malformations in adults and children. We report one case of ureterocele in a 1-year old child with the purpose of presenting its diagnosis through MR. (author)

  19. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E

    2008-08-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are "stiffness weighted" and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of uveitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Charles Q.; Mafee, Mahmood F. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Cho, Aaron A. [Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Edward, Neeraj J. [University of Cincinnati, Department of Anesthesiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Edward, Deepak P. [King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fajardo, Roman G. [University of California, San Diego, Shiley Eye Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Uveitis is a term used to describe inflammation of the choroid, iris, or ciliary body, which make up the uveal tract. It can be idiopathic or associated with a systemic disease which may be infectious or noninfectious. With the exception of B-scan ultrasonography, current imaging methods for diagnosing and monitoring uveitis are predominately non-radiologic. Although MRI has been anecdotally shown to detect various inflammatory conditions of the globe, such as posterior scleritis, endophthalmitis, and posterior uveitis secondary to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, a more comprehensive review of the MRI findings in uveitis of various etiologies is presented here. The MRI and CT studies of seven patients with uveitis and the clinical history of three of them (not available in four patients) were reviewed. Etiologies included ankylosing spondylitis, relapsing polychondritis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, sarcoidosis, and tuberculosis. Increased gadolinium enhancement of the uveal tract, which is visualized as the enhancing layer immediately deep to the low-signal sclera, was seen on all six MRI studies. Diffusion-weighted imaging of a case with posterior uveitis and subretinal effusions revealed restriction within the uvea and effusions. Two patients had inflammatory nodules adherent to the uvea, two patients had vitreous humor abnormalities, and one patient exhibited proximal perineural and perimuscular spread of enhancement. Uveoscleral thickening and enhancement with a posterior calcification were observed in the patient with chronic uveitis imaged with CT. Increased uveal tract enhancement is a common finding in patients with uveitis, regardless of anatomic distribution and etiology. MRI can also further evaluate complications of uveitis and help differentiate it from masquerade syndromes. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefrova, Jana, E-mail: sefrova@post.cz [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Odrazka, Karel [Department of Clinical and Radiation Oncology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First and Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Paluska, Petr [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Belobradek, Zdenek [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Brodak, Milos [Department of Urology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Dolezel, Martin [Department of Clinical and Radiation Oncology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First and Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Prosvic, Petr [Department of Urology, Regional Hospital Nachod, Nachod (Czech Republic); Macingova, Zuzana; Vosmik, Milan [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Hoffmann, Petr [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Louda, Miroslav [Department of Urology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Nejedla, Anna [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prostate bed treatment planning could influence definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk. Methods and Materials: A total of 21 consecutive patients referred for prostate bed radiotherapy were included in the present retrospective study. The CTV was delineated according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer recommendations on computed tomography (CT) and T{sub 1}-weighted (T{sub 1}w) and T{sub 2}-weighted (T{sub 2}w) MRI. The CTV magnitude, agreement, and spatial differences were evaluated on the planning CT scan after registration with the MRI scans. Results: The CTV was significantly reduced on the T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w MRI scans (13% and 9%, respectively) compared with the CT scans. The urinary bladder was drawn smaller on the CT scans and the rectum was smaller on the MRI scans. On T{sub 1}w MRI, the rectum and urinary bladder were delineated larger than on T{sub 2}w MRI. Minimal agreement was observed between the CT and T{sub 2}w images. The main spatial differences were measured in the superior and superolateral directions in which the CTV on the MRI scans was 1.8-2.9 mm smaller. In the posterior and inferior border, no difference was seen between the CT and T{sub 1}w MRI scans. On the T{sub 2}w MRI scans, the CTV was larger in these directions (by 1.3 and 1.7 mm, respectively). Conclusions: The use of MRI in postprostatectomy radiotherapy planning resulted in a reduction of the CTV. The main differences were found in the superior part of the prostate bed. We believe T{sub 2}w MRI enables more precise definition of prostate bed CTV than conventional planning CT.

  2. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain in paediatrics: The diagnosis of creatine deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijens, P.E.; Oudkerk, M.

    2005-01-01

    The diagnosis of creatine deficiencies, a paediatric application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy that has already become a diagnostic tool in clinical practice, is reviewed and illustrated with results from recent examinations

  3. Development of the 1.2 T~1.5 T Permanent Magnetic Resonance Imaging Device and Its Application for Mouse Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By improving the main magnet, gradient, and RF coils design technology, manufacturing methods, and inventing new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI special alloy, a cost-effective and small animal specific permanent magnet-type three-dimensional magnetic resonance imager was developed. The main magnetic field strength of magnetic resonance imager with independent intellectual property rights is 1.2~1.5 T. To demonstrate its effectiveness and validate the mouse imaging experiments in different directions, we compared the images obtained by small animal specific permanent magnet-type three-dimensional magnetic resonance imager with that obtained by using superconductor magnetic resonance imager for clinical diagnosis.

  4. CT及磁共振诊断中枢神经系统感染的临床研究%Clinical research of CT and magnetic resonance in the diagnosis of central nervous system infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琳

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究C T、磁共振诊断中枢神经系统感染的临床价值。方法选取2011-01-2013-01入院诊治的中枢神经感染的患者120例,分别作C T、磁共振诊断检查,并选取同期入院体检的健康受试者120例分别作上述检查,将2组患者的检查结果进行对比分析。结果120例患者中C T诊断正常53例,异常67例,磁共振检查正常2例,异常118例;C T早期病变61例,磁共振早期病变109例;C T检查病脑21例,化脑6例,结脑20例,隐脑8例,脑囊虫病12例,磁共振检查分别为62例、7例、25例、9例、15例。120例健康体检者中,C T见8例腔隙性脑梗死,磁共振见18例轻微脑萎缩,其余患者均正常。结论 CT、磁共振对中枢神经系统感染均具有一定的诊断价值,但CT联合磁共振对该病的诊断效果、评价病情程度、预后判断优于单纯的CT诊断。%Objective To research the clinical value of CT and magnetic resonance in the diagnosis of central nervous sys-tem infection .Methods Totally 120 patients with central nervous system infection treated in our hospital from January 2011 to January 2013 were selected ,and were diagnosed by CT and magnetic resonance .And 120 healthy examiners during the same period were selected and received the above examination .The examination results of two groups were compared and analyzed . Results For the 120 patients ,CT diagnosis indicated 53 normal cases and 67 abnormal cases .The magnetic resonance exami-nation indicated 2 normal cases and 118 abnormal cases .There were 61 cases with CT early lesion ,and 109 cases with magnetic resonance early lesion .CT examination indicated 21 cases with sickness brain ,6 cases with chemical brain ,20 cases with tu-berculosis meningitis ,8 cases with cryptococcal meningitis and 12 cases with cerebral cysticercosis .The magnetic resonance ex-amination indicated 62 cases with sickness brain ,7 cases with chemical brain ,25 cases with

  5. Electro-Mechanical Resonant Magnetic Field Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Temnykh, A B; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor which is termed an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore a high Q fundamental mode of frequency $f_1$. An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type using for the elastic element a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001G for an applied magnetic field of $ \\sim 1$G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of $\\sim ...

  6. Exploring the elusive link between subclinical fibrosis and clinical events in end-stage renal disease: does cardiac magnetic resonance imaging hold the key?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Gautam R; Raggi, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Extensive myocardial fibrosis is known to occur in patients undergoing dialysis due to a variety of mechanisms not necessarily restricted to coronary artery disease. Fibrosis may predispose to reentry arrhythmias and long-term myocardial dysfunction, and sudden death and congestive heart failure are the most frequent causes of death in patients undergoing renal replacement therapy. Despite the high accuracy of magnetic resonance for imaging of myocardial fibrosis, its use has been restricted by the risk of inducing nephrogenic systemic sclerosis with the injection of gadolinium. The development of new sequences that allow the detection and quantifying of the severity of extracellular myocardial fibrosis offers a chance to study the pathogenesis of this condition and identify potential interventions to retard or reverse it. Whether these will lead to an improved outcome needs to be prospectively tested.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in the staging of cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camisao, Claudia C. [Hospital Sao Lucas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: ccamisao@inca.gov.br; Brenna, Sylvia M.F. [Hospital Maternidade Leonor Mendes de Barros, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lombardelli, Karen V.P. [Hospital do Cancer (HCII), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Djahjah, Maria Celia R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Zeferino, Luiz Carlos [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Ginecologia

    2007-05-15

    Cervical cancer is the worldwide leading cause of cancer-related death of women, especially in developing countries. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics recommends staging during surgery, however, surgical-pathologic staging would not be feasible in cases of more advanced cancers. Generally, in these cases, the staging is performed by means of clinical and gynecological examination and basic imaging studies. However, such an approach fails to demonstrate the actual extent of the disease, and does not include significant prognostic factors such as tumor volume, stromal invasion and lymph node involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging has increasingly been utilized in cervical cancer staging, since at early stages of the disease its performance may be compared to intraoperative findings and, at advanced stages, it shows to be superior to the clinical evaluation. Additionally, magnetic resonance imaging presents an excellent imaging resolution for the different densities of pelvic structures, does not require ionizing radiation, is comfortable for the patient, improves de staging, allowing the early detection of recurrence and the identification of reliable prognostic factors which contribute to the therapeutic decision making process and results prediction with an excellent cost-effectiveness. The present article is aimed at reviewing the most significant aspects of magnetic resonance imaging in the cervical cancer staging. (author)

  8. Gated SPECT evaluation of left ventricular function using a CZT camera and a fast low-dose clinical protocol: comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorgetti, Assuero; Masci, Pier Giorgio; Marras, Gavino; Gimelli, Alessia; Genovesi, Dario; Lombardi, Massimo [Fondazione CNR/Regione Toscana ' ' G. Monasterio' ' , Pisa (Italy); Rustamova, Yasmine K. [Azerbaijan Medical University, Department of internal medicine Central Customs Hospital, Baku (Azerbaijan); Marzullo, Paolo [Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica del CNR, Pisa (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    CZT technology allows ultrafast low-dose myocardial scintigraphy but its accuracy in assessing left ventricular function is still to be defined. The study group comprised 55 patients (23 women, mean age 63 {+-} 9 years) referred for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. The patients were studied at rest using a CZT camera (Discovery NM530c; GE Healthcare) and a low-dose {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin clinical protocol (mean dose 264 {+-} 38 MBq). Gated SPECT imaging was performed as a 6-min list-mode acquisition, 15 min after radiotracer injection. Images were reformatted (8-frame to 16-frame) using Lister software on a Xeleris workstation (GE Healthcare) and then reconstructed with a dedicated iterative algorithm. Analysis was performed using Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS) software. Within 2 weeks patients underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI, 1.5-T unit CVi; GE Healthcare) using a 30-frame acquisition protocol and dedicated software for analysis (MASS 6.1; Medis). The ventricular volumes obtained with 8-frame QGS showed excellent correlations with the cMRI volumes (end-diastolic volume (EDV), r = 0.90; end-systolic volume (ESV), r = 0.94; p < 0.001). However, QGS significantly underestimated the ventricular volumes (mean differences: EDV, -39.5 {+-} 29 mL; ESV, -15.4 {+-} 22 mL; p < 0.001). Similarly, the ventricular volumes obtained with 16-frame QGS showed an excellent correlations with the cMRI volumes (EDV, r = 0.92; ESV, r = 0.95; p < 0.001) but with significant underestimations (mean differences: EDV, -33.2 {+-} 26 mL; ESV, -17.9 {+-} 20 mL; p < 0.001). Despite significantly lower values (47.9 {+-} 16 % vs. 51.2 {+-} 15 %, p < 0.008), 8-frame QGS mean ejection fraction (EF) was closely correlated with the cMRI values (r = 0.84, p < 0.001). The mean EF with 16-frame QGS showed the best correlation with the cMRI values (r = 0.91, p < 0.001) and was similar to the mean cMRI value (49.6 {+-} 16 %, p not significant). Regional analysis showed a good

  9. Diffusion and Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging:Fundamentals and Advances

    CERN Document Server

    Assili, Sanam

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, magnetic resonance imaging has been utilized as a powerful imaging modality to evaluate the structure and function of various organs in the human body,such as the brain. Additionally, diffusion and perfusion MR imaging have been increasingly used in neurovascular clinical applications. In diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, the mobility of water molecules is explored in order to obtain information about the microscopic behavior of the tissues. In contrast, perfusion weighted imaging uses tracers to exploit hemodynamic status, which enables researchers and clinicians to consider this imaging modality as an early biomarker of certain brain diseases. In this review, the fundamentals of physics for diffusion and perfusion MR imaging both of which are highly sensitive to microenvironmental alterations at the cellular level as well as their application in the treatment of aging, Alzheimer's disease, brain tumors and cerebral ischemic injury were discussed.

  10. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: A quick review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaghela Viratsinh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ability to non-invasively map the hemodynamic changes occurring focally in areas of brain involved in various motor, sensory and cognitive functions by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has revolutionized research in neuroscience in the last two decades. This technique has already gained clinical use especially in pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy and neurosurgical planning of resection of mass lesions adjacent to eloquent cortex. In this review we attempt to illustrate basic principles and techniques of fMRI, its applications, practical points to consider while performing and evaluating clinical fMRI and its limitations.

  11. Demonstration of coarctation of the aorta by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amparo, E.; Higgins, C.B.; Shafton, E.P.

    1984-12-01

    The physical findings in coarctation of the aorta are sufficiently characteristic to allow a reasonably accurate clinical diagnosis. The preoperative evaluation has been accomplished by catheterization, aortography, intravenous digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography (CT), and two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography. The authors report a case of coarctation of the aorta clinically suspected in a 29-year-old man. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was the initial preoperative imaging technique. In retrospect, it provided sufficient information for preoperative evaluation so that other imaging techniques would not have been required.

  12. Filling defect artefacts in magnetic resonance urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girish, G.; Chooi, W.K.; Morcos, S.K. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, S5 7AU, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of filling defect artefacts (FDA) in magnetic resonance urography (MRU). Retrospectively, we assessed MRU examinations of 45 patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction (21 men, 24 women; mean age 35 years, age range 18-71 years). The MRU was performed 30 min after intramuscular injection of 20 mg frusemide using heavily T2-weighted fast-spin-echo techniques [axial, thick coronal slab, coronal maximum intensity projection (MIP) images] with fat saturation. The images were reviewed by two observers to determine the presence of filling defects and dilatation of pelvicalyceal system and ureters. The filling defects were classified into central, eccentric and complete. Clinical course and plain films were reviewed to determine significance of the detected filling defects. True filling defects were observed in 5 patients (11%) and all due to stones seen on the plain radiograph of the abdomen. Filling defects artefacts (FDAs) were seen in 23 patients (51%; 17 pelvicalyceal system, 17 upper third of ureters, 7 mid ureters and 1 distal ureter). No stones were seen on the plain radiograph of these patients and they had a favourable clinical course for over 24 months. The true filling defects were large in size, eccentric in position and seen in more than one sequence of the MRU examination (axial, n=5; slab, n=5; and MIP, n=4). Four (80%) of the patients with true defects and 21 (91%) of those with FDAs had dilatation of the pelvicalyceal system and ureters. The FDAs were small in size, centrally placed (74%) and always seen in axial images, rarely in slab images (2 cases) and not seen in MIP images. Artefactual filling defects can be seen in MRU examinations. The cause of the FDAs is not fully explained and could be secondary to turbulent and fast flow of the urine. Some of the FDAs seen in the calyces could be due to the tips of the papillae. Awareness of such defects obviates misinterpretation and prevents

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  14. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed.

  15. 76 FR 58281 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop AGENCY... the safe use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and approaches to mitigate risks. The overall goal is...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Magnetic...

  16. Achilles Impingement Tendinopathy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Mark J; Mourelatos, Jan; Mar, Alice

    2017-02-28

    Haglund's syndrome is impingement of the retrocalcaneal bursa and Achilles tendon caused by a prominence of the posterosuperior calcaneus. Radiographic measurements are not sensitive or specific for diagnosing Haglund's deformity. Localization of a bone deformity and tendinopathy in the same sagittal section of a magnetic resonance imaging scan can assist with the diagnosis in equivocal cases. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of Haglund's syndrome in patients presenting with Achilles tendinopathy and note any associated findings to determine the criteria for a diagnosis of Haglund's syndrome. We reviewed 40 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles tendinopathy and 19 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles high-grade tears and/or ruptures. Achilles tendinopathy was often in close proximity to the superior aspect of the calcaneal tuberosity, consistent with impingement (67.5%). Patients with Achilles impingement tendinopathy were more often female (p < .04) and were significantly heavier than patients presenting with noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy (p = .014) or Achilles tendon rupture (p = .010). Impingement tendinopathy occurred medially (8 of 20) and centrally (10 of 20) more often than laterally (2 of 20) and was associated with a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with a loss of calcaneal recess more often than a superior projection (22 of 27 versus 8 of 27; p < .001). Haglund's deformity should be reserved for defining a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with loss of calcaneal recess because this corresponds with impingement. Achilles impingement tendinopathy might be more appropriate terminology for Haglund's syndrome, because the bone deformity is often subtle. Of the 27 images with Achilles impingement tendinopathy, 10 (37.0%) extended to a location prone to Achilles tendon rupture. Given these findings, insertional and noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy are not mutually

  17. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Thyroid and Parathyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gonzalo-Domínguez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The assessment of the thyroid and parathyroid pathology is usually achieved with ultrasounds. There are several systems of classification that are internationally accepted in neoplastic disease, such as TIRADS system, and there are well-defined patterns for ultrasound imaging in inflammatory disease. Material and methods: However, there are specific needs that require magnetic resonance imaging. We review the main indications of MRI in the evaluation of thyroid and parathyroid in 64 patients and determine which protocols are more appropriate and which sequences are better for a proper characterization. Results: Then we review the semiology obtained by this technique, making correlation with disease processes affecting these cervical structures.

  19. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Consumer Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Martin; Schilke, Oliver; Weber, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    of prior fMRI research related to consumer behavior and highlights the features that make fMRI an attractive method for consumer and marketing research. The authors discuss advantages and limitations and illustrate the proposed procedures with an applied study, which investigates loss aversion when buying......Although the field of psychology is undergoing an immense shift toward the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the application of this methodology to consumer research is relatively new. To assist consumer researchers in understanding fMRI, this paper elaborates on the findings...

  20. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and human genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengstschlaeger, Markus [Medical Genetics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: markus.hengstschlaeger@meduniwien.ac.at

    2006-02-15

    The use of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in addition to prenatal genetic testing and sonography, has the potential to improve prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders. MRI plays an important role in the evaluation of fetal abnormalities and malformations. Fetal MRI often enables a differential diagnosis, a determination of the extent of the disorder, the prognosis, and an improvement in therapeutic management. For counseling of parents, as well as to basically understand how genetic aberrations affect fetal development, it is of great importance to correlate different genotypes with fetal MRI data.

  1. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjoerstad, K.; Kaass, B.; Svihus, R.

    1987-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical region was carried out on 139 patients in a ten-month period. 64 patients came from Rogaland Central Hospital and 75 from the rest of Norway. A retrospective questionnaire was filled in by the referring physicians. MRI seems to be of great value in the diagnosis of cervical vertebrogenic myelopathy, multiple sclerosis, syringomyelia, and intraspinal tumors. Besides its diagnostic superiority, at least in patients with cervical myelopathy, MRI has definite economic advantages compared to CT and myelography.

  3. Magnetic resonance images of chronic patellar tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodne, D.; Quinn, S.F.; Murray, W.T.; Cochran, C.; Bolton, T.; Rudd, S.; Lewis, K.; Daines, P.; Bishop, J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendinitis can be a frustrating diagnostic and therapeutic problem. This report evaluates seven tendons in five patients with chronic patellar tendinitis. The etiologies included 'jumper's knee' and Osgood-Schlatter disease. In all cases magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed thickening of the tendon. Some of the tendons had focal areas of thickening which helped establish the etiology. All cases had intratendinous areas of increased signal which, in four cases, proved to be chronic tendon tears. MRI is useful in evaluating chronic patellar tendinitis because it establishes the diagnosis, detects associated chronic tears, and may help determine appropriate rehabilitation. (orig.)

  4. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti......-angiogenic treatment is presented in the first manuscript. In the second and third manuscript, two separate methods of quantifying perfusion, blood volume and vessel permeability are presented. The methods are used to show that drug delivery to a xenografted tumor is plausible and to show possible vascular maturation...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic neuroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashihara, Kengo; Murata, Hideaki; Ito, Haruhide; Onishi, Hiroaki; Kadoya, Masumi; Suzuki, Masayuki.

    1989-03-01

    Thirteen patients with acoustic neuroma were studied on a 1.5T superconductive magnetic resonance (MR) imager. Acoustic neuromas appeared as lower signal intensity than the surrounding brain stem on T1 weighted image (W.I.), and as higher signal intensity on T2 W.I.. Axial and coronal sections of T1 W.I. were very useful in observing the tumor in the auditory canal and in investigating the anatomical relations of the tumor and the surrounding structures. MR imaging is very excellent examination to make early diagnosis of the acoustic neuroma and preoperative anatomical evaluation.

  6. Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Mollasadeghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI devices produce noise, which may affect patient’s or operators’ hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus. In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient’s hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of rat fetuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, Yo; Kawanishi, Hiroaki (Imamichi Institute for Animal Reproduction, Ibaraki (Japan)); Hasegawa, Kenichi; Otsu, Shinichi

    1993-06-01

    The internal structures of rat fetuses on day 18.0 of pregnancy were studied by magnetic resonance imaging in 1-mm sagittal slices. Each organ was represented as white to gray images different in tone according to the [sup 1]H proton content and the relaxation time. In solid organs, portions with high cell density were seen as white areas and those with low cell density as gray areas. In the tubular organs, the margins were imaged as white and the lumina as gray. (author).

  8. MRCP. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography; MRCP. Magnetresonanzcholangiopankreatografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja [Wisconsin-Madison Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Lauenstein, Thomas [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Duesseldorf (Germany). Radiologie

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a special MR technique to display and analyze the biliary tract and pancreatic ducts. MRCP sequences are equivalent to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for diagnostic purposes due to technical developments of the classical T2 weighted MRCP sequences and the availability of contrast enhanced T1 weighted sequences. Therefore, MRCP plays a fundamental role in the diagnoses of hepatobliary and pancreatic diseases, which are presented in this review article as are technical details of sequence acquisitions and the underlying anatomy.

  9. [Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros Mendoza, L H; Cañete Celestino, E; Velilla Marco, O

    2008-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small joint with complex anatomy and function. Diverse pathologies with very different symptoms can affect the TMJ. While various imaging techniques such as plain-film radiography and computed tomography can be useful, magnetic resonance imaging's superior contrast resolution reveals additional structures like the articular disk, making this technique essential for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. We analyze the MRI signs of the different pathologies that can affect the TMJ from the structural and functional points of view.

  10. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  11. Enhancement of magnetic resonance imaging with metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Slobozhanyuk, A P; Raaijmakers, A J E; Berg, C A T van den; Kozachenko, A V; Dubrovina, I A; Melchakova, I V; Kivshar, Yu S; Belov, P A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the cornerstone technique for diagnostic medicine, biology, and neuroscience. This imaging method is highly innovative, noninvasive and its impact continues to grow. It can be used for measuring changes in the brain after enhanced neural activity, detecting early cancerous cells in tissue, as well as for imaging nanoscale biological structures, and controlling fluid dynamics, and it can be beneficial for cardiovascular imaging. The MRI performance is characterized by a signal-to-noise ratio, however the spatial resolution and image contrast depend strongly on the scanner design. Here, we reveal how to exploit effectively the unique properties of metasurfaces for the substantial improvement of MRI efficiency. We employ a metasurface created by an array of wires placed inside the MRI scanner under an object, and demonstrate a giant enhancement of the magnetic field by means of subwavelength near-field manipulation with the metasurface, thus strongly increasing the scanner sen...

  12. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  13. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Ledbetter, Micah; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with non-trivial spectra.

  14. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, M P; Theis, T; Blanchard, J W; Ring, H; Ganssle, P; Appelt, S; Blümich, B; Pines, A; Budker, D

    2011-09-02

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near zero field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high-field case, where heteronuclear J couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with nontrivial spectra.

  15. Plasmon coupling of magnetic resonances in an asymmetric gold semishell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Kong, Yan; Liu, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The generation of magnetic dipole resonances in metallic nanostructures is of great importance for constructing near-zero or even negative refractive index metamaterials. Commonly, planar two-dimensional (2D) split-ring resonators or relevant structures are basic elements of metamaterials. In this work, we introduce a three-dimensional (3D) asymmetric Au semishell composed of two nanocups with a face-to-face geometry and demonstrate two distinct magnetic resonances spontaneously in the visible-near infrared optical wavelength regime. These two magnetic resonances are from constructive and destructive hybridization of magnetic dipoles of individual nanocups in the asymmetric semishell. In contrast, complete cancellation of magnetic dipoles in the symmetric semishell leads to only a pronounced electric mode with near-zero magnetic dipole moment. These 3D asymmetric resonators provide new ways for engineering hybrid resonant modes and ultra-high near-field enhancement for the design of 3D metamaterials.

  16. Application of magnetic resonance techniques for imaging tumour physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbs, M. [Saint George' s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1999-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques have the unique ability to measure in vivo the biochemical content of living tissue in the body in a dynamic, non-invasive and non-destructive manner. MR also permits serial investigations of steady-state tumour physiology and biochemistry, as well as the response of a tumour to treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and a mixture of the two techniques (spectroscopic imaging) allow some physiological parameters, for example pH, to be 'imaged'. Using these methods, information on tissue bioenergetics and phospolipid membrane turnover, pH, hypoxia, oxygenation, and various aspects of vascularity including blood flow, angiogenesis, permeability and vascular volume can be obtained. In addition, MRS methods can be used for monitoring anticancer drugs (e.g. 5FU, ifosfamide) and their metabolites at their sites of action. The role of these state-of-the-art MR methods in imaging tumour physiology and their potential role in the clinic are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in adnexial torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Ronald Meira Castro; Quadros, Marianne Siquara de [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa], e-mail: rtrindade@einstein.br; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rosemberg, Michelle; Racy, Marcelo de Castro Jorge; Tachibana, Adriano [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Service

    2010-01-15

    Adnexial torsion is an unusual event, but a major cause of abdominal pain in women. It is often associated with ovarian tumor or cyst, but can occur in normal ovaries, especially in children. The twisting of adnexial structures may involve the ovary or tube, but frequently affects both. In most cases, it is unilateral, with slight predilection for the right size. In imaging findings, increased ovarian volume and adnexial masses are observed, with reduced or absent vascularisation. In cases of undiagnosed or untreated complete twist, hemorrhagic necrosis may occur leading to complications; in that, peritonitis is the most frequent. Early diagnosis helps preventing irreversible damage with conservative treatment, thereby saving the ovary. Limitations in performing physical examination, possible inconclusive results in ultrasound and exposure to radiation in computed tomography makes magnetic resonance imaging a valuable tool in emergency assessment of gynecological diseases. The objective of this study was to report two confirmed cases of adnexial twist, emphasizing the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. (author)

  19. 肉芽肿性乳腺炎的临床表现与X线及MRI诊断特点%The Clinical Radiographic Findings and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of 31 Patients with Granulomatous Mastitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱丽萍; 贾文霄; 倪多; 李涌涛; 吴涛; 赵倩

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨肉芽肿性乳腺炎(granulomatous mastitis,GM)的临床表现与X线及MRI诊断特点.资料与方法 对31例经病理证实的GM患者的临床表现与X线及MRI资料进行回顾性分析.结果 临床表现为乳房肿块短期内迅速增大,边缘不清与皮肤有粘连,部分伴有腋窝淋巴结肿大;钼靶X线表现呈多样性,病灶呈等密度或稍高于腺体密度结节状不规则影多见,部分显示局限性敛密影结构紊乱,边缘不清、毛糙分叶及不规则状;MRT1WI呈等或高信号,T2WI呈高信号,增强扫描病变呈片状强化,高于周围正常腺体,边缘呈渐进性强化.结论 GM临床表现缺乏特异性,与乳腺X线与MRI相结合有助于准确诊断.%Objective To explore the clinical radiographic findings and magnetic resonance imaging features of granulomatous mastitis. Materials and Methods The clinical radiographic findings and magnetic resonance imaging data from 31 patients with granulomatous mastitis proved by pathological results were analyzed retrospectively. Results The clinical findings of GM were quickly augmentation of lump in breast in short time, ill-defined margin and adherence to skin, some lesions often accompanied by intumesce of axillary nodes. The radiographic findings of GM demonstrated diversity. The lesions' density were found as isodense or higher than glands density with irregular tubercle. Some lesions of GM displayed as architeetual distortion of local asymmetric density, ill-defined margin, ruffled, lobulated and irregular. The MR signs of GM lesions included hyper or isointensity signal on T1 WI images, hyperintensity signal on T2 WI images. The granulomatous mastitis lesions appeared pathcy enhancement, which was higher than that of normal glands adjacent to tumor, the border appeared gradually enhancement. Conclusion Granulomatous mastitis has no specific clinical findings, combination molybdenum target radiography and magnetic resonance imaging is helpful for the

  20. Methotrexate-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles for thermochemotherapy and magnetic resonance imaging of tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Fuping, E-mail: gaofp158@gmail.com [Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medical Physics and Engineering, Department of Engineering Physics (China); Yan Zixing [Shanxi Medical University, Second Hospital (China); Zhou Jing; Cai Yuanyuan; Tang Jintian, E-mail: tangjt@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medical Physics and Engineering, Department of Engineering Physics (China)

    2012-10-15

    There is significant interest in recent years in developing magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) having multifunctional characteristics with complimentary roles. In this study, methotrexate (MTX) was conjugated on the iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles surface via a poly(ethyleneimine) self-assembled monolayer (MTX-MNPs). The novel platform combined cancer chemotherapy, hyperthermia and potential monitoring of the progression of disease through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The conjugation of MTX on the magnetite surface was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and change of zeta potential. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed that MTX-MNPs were morphologically spherical. The average diameter of MTX-MNPs was 30.1 {+-} 5.2 nm determined by dynamic light scattering. Magnetic measurements revealed that the saturation magnetization of MTX-MNPs reached 68.8 emu/g and the nanoparticles were superparamagnetic. The MTX-MNPs had good heating properties in an alternating magnetic field. TEM results showed that a larger number of MTX-MNPs were internalized into the MCF-7 cellular cytoplasm compared with the MNPs. The MTX-MNPs demonstrated highly synergistic antiproliferative effects of simultaneous chemotherapy and hyperthermia in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. A significant negative contrast enhancement was observed with magnetic resonance phantom imaging for MCF-7 cells over L929cells, when both were cultured with the nanoconjugate. The MTX-MNPs with combined characteristics of thermochemotherapy and MRI could be of high clinical significance in the treatment of tumor.

  1. Purely electric and magnetic dipole resonances in metamaterial dielectric resonators through perturbation theory inspired geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Campione, Salvatore; Warne, Larry K; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe a methodology for tailoring the design of metamaterial dielectric resonators, which represent a promising path toward low-loss metamaterials at optical frequencies. We first describe a procedure to decompose the far field scattered by subwavelength resonators in terms of multipolar field components, providing explicit expressions for the multipolar far fields. We apply this formulation to confirm that an isolated high-permittivity cube resonator possesses frequency separated electric and magnetic dipole resonances, as well as a magnetic quadrupole resonance in close proximity to the electric dipole resonance. We then introduce multiple dielectric gaps to the resonator geometry in a manner suggested by perturbation theory, and demonstrate the ability to overlap the electric and magnetic dipole resonances, thereby enabling directional scattering by satisfying the first Kerker condition. We further demonstrate the ability to push the quadrupole resonance away from the degenerate dipole ...

  2. Dental magnetic resonance imaging; MRT der Zaehne und des Zahnhalteapparats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2016-03-15

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  3. Fast abdominal magnetic resonance imaging; Schnelle Abdomenbildgebung in der Magnetresonanztomografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budjan, J.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Riffel, P. [University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2016-06-15

    Abdominal imaging is the driving force that necessitates the development of numerous techniques for accelerated image acquisition in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Today, numerous techniques are available that enable rapid, high spatial resolution acquisition for both T1 and T2 weighted images. These techniques open new opportunities in the detection and classification of numerous pathologies in the abdomen. However, there is still ongoing progress in the development of fast and ultrafast sequences and promising techniques are currently close to clinical application. With these 4D-technologies, MRI is becoming the central imaging modality for dynamic, motion-compensated imaging of the parenchymal abdominal organs such as liver, pancreas and kidney.

  4. Reconstruction magnetic resonance neurography in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Kazumoto; Sugiyama, Atsuhiko; Ito, Sho-ichi; Misawa, Sonoko; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Mitsuma, Satsuki; Iwai, Yuta; Watanabe, Keisuke; Shimada, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Suhara, Tetsuya; Yokota, Hajime; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-02-01

    To study distribution and patterns of nerve hypertrophy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), magnetic resonance neurography with 3-dimensional reconstruction of short tau inversion recovery images was performed in 33 patients. This technique clearly showed longitudinal morphological changes from the cervical roots to the nerve trunks in the proximal arm. Nerve enlargement was detected in 88% of the patients. According to the clinical subtype of CIDP, typical CIDP patients showed symmetric and root-dominant hypertrophy, whereas Lewis-Sumner syndrome patients had multifocal fusiform hypertrophy in the nerve trunks. The patterns of nerve hypertrophy presumably reflect the different pathophysiology of each CIDP subtype.

  5. Biological effects of exposure to magnetic resonance imaging: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Formica Domenico; Silvestri Sergio

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The literature on biological effects of magnetic and electromagnetic fields commonly utilized in magnetic resonance imaging systems is surveyed here. After an introduction on the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging and the electric and magnetic properties of biological tissues, the basic phenomena to understand the bio-effects are described in classical terms. Values of field strengths and frequencies commonly utilized in these diagnostic systems are reported in order to a...

  6. Ferromagnetic resonance of particulate magnetic recording tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzelmann, U.

    1990-08-01

    The room-temperature ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra of γ-Fe2O3, CrO2, and barium ferrite particulate magnetic recording tapes have been measured at microwave frequencies of 9.35 and 35 GHz for various orientations of the static and high-frequency magnetic fields with respect to the tape. For CrO2 tapes, the influence of the width of the angular distribution of the particle orientations on the FMR spectra has been studied from the nearly isotropic case up to the highly oriented case. Hysteretic behavior for a CrO2 tape as well as the effect of tape calendering for a γ-Fe2O3 tape has been observed by FMR. Experimental results are found to be in reasonable agreement with results of theoretical calculations based on a model of an ellipsoidal single-domain particle with both shape and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Magnetostatic interaction inside the magnetic film has been introduced by expressing the total magnetostatic energy as a combination of a part dependent on particle shape and a part dependent on the shape of the tape. As a result of a comparison of experimental data with calculated data from the model, the magnetocrystalline easy axis of the CrO2 particles is found to be parallel with the particle axis.

  7. Multidataset Refinement Resonant Diffraction, and Magnetic Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attfield, J Paul

    2004-01-01

    The scope of Rietveld and other powder diffraction refinements continues to expand, driven by improvements in instrumentation, methodology and software. This will be illustrated by examples from our research in recent years. Multidataset refinement is now commonplace; the datasets may be from different detectors, e.g., in a time-of-flight experiment, or from separate experiments, such as at several x-ray energies giving resonant information. The complementary use of x rays and neutrons is exemplified by a recent combined refinement of the monoclinic superstructure of magnetite, Fe3O4, below the 122 K Verwey transition, which reveals evidence for Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) charge ordering. Powder neutron diffraction data continue to be used for the solution and Rietveld refinement of magnetic structures. Time-of-flight instruments on cold neutron sources can produce data that have a high intensity and good resolution at high d-spacings. Such profiles have been used to study incommensurate magnetic structures such as FeAsO4 and β-CrPO4. A multiphase, multidataset refinement of the phase-separated perovskite (Pr0.35Y0.07Th0.04Ca0.04Sr0.5)MnO3 has been used to fit three components with different crystal and magnetic structures at low temperatures.

  8. Role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinical value of diffusion-weight- ed imaging (DWI) for the diagnosis of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EHCC) by comparing the diagnostic sensitivity of DWI and magnetic resonance cholan-giopancreatography (MRCP). METHODS: Magnetic resonance imaging examination was performed in 56 patients with suspected EHCC. T1- weighted imaging, T2-weighted imaging, MRCP and DWI sequence, DWI using single-shot spin-echo echoplanar imaging sequence with different b values (100, 300, 500, 800 and 1...

  9. Magnetic resonance tracking of fluorescent nanodiamond fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shames, A. I.; Osipov, V. Yu; Boudou, J. P.; Panich, A. M.; von Bardeleben, H. J.; Treussart, F.; Vul', A. Ya

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques (electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)) are used for tracking the multi-stage process of the fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) produced by high-energy electron irradiation, annealing, and subsequent nano-milling. Pristine commercial high pressure and high temperature microdiamonds (MDs) with mean size 150 μm contain ~5  ×  1018 spins/g of singlet (S = 1/2) substitutional nitrogen defects P1, as well as sp3 C-C dangling bonds in the crystalline lattice. The half-field X-band EPR clearly shows (by the appearance of the intense ‘forbidden’ g = 4.26 line) that high-energy electron irradiation and annealing of MDs induce a large amount (~5  ×  1017 spins/g) of triplet (S = 1) magnetic centers, which are identified as negatively charged nitrogen vacancy defects (NV-). This is supported by EPR observations of the ‘allowed’ transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the triplet state. After progressive milling of the fluorescent MDs down to an ultrasubmicron scale (≤100 nm), the relative abundance of EPR active NV- defects in the resulting fluorescent NDs (FND) substantially decreases and, vice versa, the content of C-inherited singlet defects correlatively increases. In the fraction of the finest FNDs (mean particle size dried supernatant of ultracentrifuged aqueous dispersion of FNDs, the NV- content is found to be reduced by one order of magnitude whereas the singlet defects content increases up to ~2  ×  1019 spins/g. In addition, another triplet-type defect, which is characterized by the g = 4.00 ‘forbidden’ line, appears. On reduction of the particle size below the 20 nm limit, the ‘allowed’ EPR lines become practically unobservable, whereas the ‘forbidden’ lines remain as a reliable fingerprint of the presence of NV- centers in small ND systems. The same size reduction causes the disappearance of the characteristic hyperfine satellites in the

  10. Dose verification of a clinical intensity-modulated radiation therapy eye case by the magnetic resonance imaging of N-isopropylacrylamide gel dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Li; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung; Chiang, Chih-Ming; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Hsieh, Ling-Ling

    2014-11-01

    In this study, N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel, together with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was used to measure the relative three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution of an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) eye case. The gels were enclosed in cylindrical acrylic vessels with 10 cm outer diameter and 10 cm length. The gels were subsequently irradiated by delivering 5 Gy of a prescribed dose with a 6 MV linear accelerator using five fields. The 3D maps of the proton relaxation rate R2 were obtained using a 1.5 T MRI system correlated with the dose. The treatment planning system (TPS) data and NIPAM gel dosimeter data were compared with the experimental results in the form of relative dose distributions, including isodose curves, dose profiles, and gamma index maps. Results indicated that the linear relationship of the R2-dose for NIPAM gel dosimeters reached 0.999 within the dose range of 0 Gy to 12 Gy. Comparison of planar dose distributions among the gel dosimeters and TPS showed that the isodose lines corresponded to selected planes in the axial plane. For the 50% to 110% dose analysis, the maximum dose differences varied from 4.04% to 13.53%. Gamma evaluation of the planar dose profile resulted in pass rates of 96.84%, 83.16%, and 53.42% when the acceptance criteria of 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, and 1%/1 mm, respectively, were used in the axial plane. Overall, the results showed that NIPAM polymer gel dosimeters can serve as a high-resolution, accurate, 3D tool for IMRT dose distribution verification.

  11. Correlation of X-Ray Computed Tomography with Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Methods for Pre-Clinical Measurement of Adipose and Lean Tissues in Living Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew N. Metzinger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous obesity studies have coupled murine models with non-invasive methods to quantify body composition in longitudinal experiments, including X-ray computed tomography (CT or quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (QMR. Both microCT and QMR have been separately validated with invasive techniques of adipose tissue quantification, like post-mortem fat extraction and measurement. Here we report a head-to-head study of both protocols using oil phantoms and mouse populations to determine the parameters that best align CT data with that from QMR. First, an in vitro analysis of oil/water mixtures was used to calibrate and assess the overall accuracy of microCT vs. QMR data. Next, experiments were conducted with two cohorts of living mice (either homogenous or heterogeneous by sex, age and genetic backgrounds to assess the microCT imaging technique for adipose tissue segmentation and quantification relative to QMR. Adipose mass values were obtained from microCT data with three different resolutions, after which the data were analyzed with different filter and segmentation settings. Strong linearity was noted between the adipose mass values obtained with microCT and QMR, with optimal parameters and scan conditions reported herein. Lean tissue (muscle, internal organs was also segmented and quantified using the microCT method relative to the analogous QMR values. Overall, the rigorous calibration and validation of the microCT method for murine body composition, relative to QMR, ensures its validity for segmentation, quantification and visualization of both adipose and lean tissues.

  12. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F. Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space. PMID:26981483

  13. Indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography in patients with lymphedema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohrmann, Christian [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 55, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany)]. E-mail: lohrmann@mrs1.ukl.uni-freiburg.de; Foeldi, Etelka [Foeldi Clinic for Lymphology, Hinterzarten, Roesslehofweg 2-6, D-79856 Hinterzarten (Germany); Langer, Mathias [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 55, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of indirect magnetic resonance (MR) lymphangiography with intracutaneous injection of gadodiamide, a commercially available, non-ionic, extracellular paramagnetic contrast agent for the detection of lymphatic vessels in patients with lymphedema. Materials and methods: In 2005, three patients with lymphedema of the lower extremities (1 primary, 2 secondary) were referred by the Foeldi Clinic for Lymphology for indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography. 4.5 mL of gadodiamide and 0.5 mL of mepivacainhydrochloride 1% were injected intracutaneously into the dorsal aspect of each foot. MR imaging was performed with a 1.5-T system equipped with high-performance gradients. For indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography, a 3D Fast Low Angle Shot (FLASH) sequence (TR/TE: 5.1/1.23; flip angle: 25; matrix: 448 x 448; bandwidth: 330 Hz/pixel; 6/8 rectangular field of view with a maximum dimension of 500 mm; slices: 88; voxel size: 2.0 mm x 1.0 mm x 1.0 mm; acquisition time: 0 min 31 s) was used. Results: Indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography depicted lymphatic vessels of the lower and upper leg, and inguinal lymph nodes in all three patients. After 5 min of contrast material application, concomitant venous enhancement was detected. Collateral vessels with dermal back-flow were seen in two patients. A lymphocele in the inguinal region with the afferent lymphatic vessel was depicted in one patient. Conclusion: In the presented small study group, indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography was technically feasible, and no complications were observed after intracutaneous injection of gadodiamide. Visualizing the lymphatic vessels and accompanying complications non-invasively and without the use of radiation, the presented method has the capability to become a routine diagnostic imaging tool in patients with primary and secondary lymphedema. The method is not able to characterize lymph node morphology, but could provide additional

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeab, Dhafer A., E-mail: dhafer_ahmed@yahoo.co [Department of Radiology, St Mary' s Campus, Imperial College NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Dick, Elizabeth; Sergot, Antoni A.; Sundblon, Lauren; Gedroyc, Wady [Department of Radiology, St Mary' s Campus, Imperial College NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel (MR Enterography, or MRE) is becoming increasingly popular as the first imaging modality for the diagnosis and follow-up of small bowel diseases. The inherent advantages of MRI, including excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability and lack of ionising radiation are well known. In addition, the use of luminal contrast agents in MRE has the added advantage of demonstrating the lumen and the wall directly, something not possible to achieve with conventional small bowel barium follow-through imaging. This review will highlight recent technical advances to this low cost, simple technique which is easily achievable in all hospitals. It will also review normal and abnormal radiological findings and highlight the value of this technique to both the clinician and patient alike in the investigation of small bowel disease.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscholakoff, D; Higgins, C B

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a completely noninvasive technique for the evaluation of the cardiovascular system. With a multi-section technique and the spin echo pulse sequence the entire heart can be examined within six to ten minutes. All our cardiac MR studies were performed with electrocardiographic (ECG) gating, to obtain adequate resolution of the cardiac structures. With this technique, patients and animals with a variety of cardiac abnormalities were studied. The examined pathologic conditions included acute and chronic myocardial infarctions and their complications, hypertrophic and congestive cardiomyopathies, congenital heart diseases and pericardial diseases. MRI offers an enormous potential for cardiovascular diagnosis, even beyond the demonstration of pathoanatomy, because of the capability for direct tissue characterization and blood flow measurements.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao (Kitakyushu City Yahata Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.).

  17. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Steven L; Burton, Martha W

    2002-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging of language builds on almost 150 years of study in neurology, psychology, linguistics, anatomy, and physiology. In recent years, there has been an explosion of research using functional imaging technology, especially positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to understand the relationship between brain mechanisms and language processing. These methods combine high-resolution anatomic images with measures of language-specific brain activity to reveal neural correlates of language processing. This article reviews some of what has been learned about the neuroanatomy of language from these imaging techniques. We first discuss the normal case, organizing the presentation according to the levels of language, encompassing words (lexicon), sound structure (phonemes), and sentences (syntax and semantics). Next, we delve into some unusual language processing circumstances, including second languages and sign languages. Finally, we discuss abnormal language processing, including developmental and acquired dyslexia and aphasia.

  18. [Gastric magnetic resonance study (methods, semiotics)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stashuk, G A

    2003-01-01

    The paper shows the potentialities of gastric study by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The methodic aspects of gastric study have been worked out. The MRI-semiotics of the unchanged and tumor-affected wall of the stomach and techniques in examining patients with gastric cancer of various sites are described. Using the developed procedure, MRI was performed in 199 patients, including 154 patients with gastric pathology and 45 control individuals who had no altered gastric wall. Great emphasis is placed on the role of MRI in the diagnosis of endophytic (diffuse) gastric cancer that is of priority value in its morphological structure. MRI was found to play a role in the diagnosis of the spread of a tumorous process both along the walls of the stomach and to its adjacent anatomic structures.

  19. Quantum information processing and nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Cummins, H K

    2001-01-01

    as spectrometer pulse sequence programs. Quantum computers are information processing devices which operate by and exploit the laws of quantum mechanics, potentially allowing them to solve problems which are intractable using classical computers. This dissertation considers the practical issues involved in one of the more successful implementations to date, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Techniques for dealing with systematic errors are presented, and a quantum protocol is implemented. Chapter 1 is a brief introduction to quantum computation. The physical basis of its efficiency and issues involved in its implementation are discussed. NMR quantum information processing is reviewed in more detail in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 considers some of the errors that may be introduced in the process of implementing an algorithm, and high-level ways of reducing the impact of these errors by using composite rotations. Novel general expressions for stabilising composite rotations are presented in Chapter 4 and a new class o...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic cervical injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhng, S. K.; Lee, K. S.; Sohn, K. J.; Choi, S. S.; Won, J. J. [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iri (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cevical injuries. MRI studies of 34 patients with cervical spinal injuries were analyzed retrospectively. All MRI scans were obtained with an 1.0T superconductive MRI scanner (Siemens Magnetom 42SPE) and their findings were analyzed regarding the spinal cord, bony spine, ligaments, and intervertebral disks. A variety of abnormal findings were detected: 25 cord abnormalities including cord compression (15 cases), cord edema (4 cases), syringomyelia (4 cases), myelomalacia (1 case), and hemorrhagic contusion (1 case), 18 ligamentous injuries, 22 disk herniations (9 post-traumatic, 13 chronic degenerative), 11 spine fractures, and 4 subluxations. MRI is useful in evaluating the spinal cord itself, in depicting ligamentous injuries, in establishing the presence of disc herniation, and in assessing the alignment of cervical spine.

  1. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: patient safety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroletti, Elio; Corbucci, Giorgio

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is widely used in medicine. In cardiology, it is used to assess congenital or acquired diseases of the heat: and large vessels. Unless proper precautions are taken, it is generally advisable to avoid using this technique in patients with implanted electronic stimulators, such as pacemakers and defibrillators, on account of the potential risk of inducing electrical currents on the endocardial catheters, since these currents might stimulate the heart at a high frequency, thereby triggering dangerous arrhythmias. In addition to providing some basic information on pacemakers, defibrillators and MRI, and on the possible physical phenomena that may produce harmful effects, the present review examines the indications given in the literature, with particular reference to coronary stents, artificial heart valves and implantable cardiac stimulators.

  2. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    adults where it is primaily found in wound healing, pregnancy and during the menstrual cycle. This thesis focus on the negative consequences of angiogenesis in cancer. It consists of a an initial overview followed by four manuscripts. The overview gives a short introduction to the process of angiogenesis......When a tumor reaches a certain size it can no longer rely on passive perfusion for nutrition. The tumor therefore emits signaling molecules which stimulating surrounding vessels to divide and grow towards the tumor, a process known as angiogenesis. Very little angiogenesis is present in healthy...... and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti...

  3. Stafne bone cavity--magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Yoram; Puterman, Max; Bodner, Lipa

    2006-07-01

    A case of Stafne bone cavity (SBC) affecting the body of the mandible of a 51-year-old female is reported. The imaging modalities included panoramic radiograph, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Panoramic radiograph and CT were able to determine the outline of the cavity and its three dimensional shape, but failed to precisely diagnose the soft tissue content of the cavity. MR imaging demonstrated that the bony cavity is filled with soft tissue that is continuous and identical in signal with that of the submandibular salivary gland. Based on the MR imaging a diagnosis of SBC was made and no further studies or surgical treatment were initiated. MR imaging should be considered the diagnostic technique in cases where SBC is suspected. Recognition of the lesion should preclude any further treatment or surgical exploration.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrugia, M.E. [Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.e.farrugia@doctors.org.uk; Bydder, G.M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, CA 92103-8226 (United States); Francis, J.M.; Robson, M.D. [OCMR, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Facial and tongue muscles are commonly involved in patients with neuromuscular disorders. However, these muscles are not as easily accessible for biopsy and pathological examination as limb muscles. We have previously investigated myasthenia gravis patients with MuSK antibodies for facial and tongue muscle atrophy using different magnetic resonance imaging sequences, including ultrashort echo time techniques and image analysis tools that allowed us to obtain quantitative assessments of facial muscles. This imaging study had shown that facial muscle measurement is possible and that useful information can be obtained using a quantitative approach. In this paper we aim to review in detail the methods that we applied to our study, to enable clinicians to study these muscles within the domain of neuromuscular disease, oncological or head and neck specialties. Quantitative assessment of the facial musculature may be of value in improving the understanding of pathological processes occurring within facial muscles in certain neuromuscular disorders.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with panhypopituitarism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzi Mucelli, R.S. [Ist. di Radiologia, Univ. di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy); Frezza, F. [Ist. di Radiologia, Univ. di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy); Magnaldi, S. [Ist. di Radiologia, Univ. di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy); Proto, G. [Servizio di Endocrinologia, Ospedale Civile di Udine (Italy)

    1992-02-01

    Primary panhypopituitarism consists of functional deficiency of the anterior pituitary lobe, which appears during infancy or adolescence. The magnetic resonance findings in 10 patients with a history of primary hypopituitarism are presented. The findings include: reduced pituitary size in all cases; partially (8 cases) or totally (2 cases) empty sella; thin (4 cases), partially visible (3 cases) or absent (2 cases) pituitary stalk; absence of the posterior lobe in 9 cases; bright spot corresponding to an ectopic posterior lobe in 8 cases. These findings are similar to those already reported in pituitary dwarfism and may help understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, which seems to be related to a pituitary stalk lesion. (orig.)

  6. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiozaki, Afonso Akio; Parga, Jose Rodrigues; Arteaga, Edmundo; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo [Sao Paulo Univ. (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao. Setor de Tomografia Computarizada e Ressonancia Magnetica Cardiovascular]. E-mail: rochitte@incor.usp.br; Kim, Raymond J. [Duke Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center, Durham, NC (United States); Tassi, Eduardo Marinho [Diagnosticos da America S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Sector of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography

    2007-03-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequent genetic cardiac disease that causes sudden death in young people, with an incidence of 1:500 adults. The routinely used criteria for worst prognosis have limited sensitivity and specificity. Thus, the estimated risk of evolving to dilated cardiomyopathy or sudden death is somewhat inaccurate, leading to management uncertainty of HCM patients. Therefore, an accurate noninvasive method for the diagnosis of HCM with prognostic value is of great importance. In the last years, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) emerged not only as a diagnostic tool, but also as a study with prognostic values, by characterizing myocardial fibrosis with great accuracy in HCM patients. Additionally, CMR identifies the types of hypertrophy, analyses the ventricular function, estimates the intraventricular gradient and allows the determination of differential diagnosis. Moreover, CMR can uniquely access myocardial fibrosis in HCM. (author)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of septic sacroiliitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrasegaran, K. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)); Saifuddin, A. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)); Coral, A. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)); Butt, W.P. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom))

    1994-05-01

    Five cases of septic sacroiliitis diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are presented. Imaging was performed between 2 and 14 days after onset of symptoms and consisted of varying combinations of coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), axial T2-weighted spin echo (SE), and coronal and axial pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted SE scans. Abnormalities included demonstration of sacroiliac joint effusions, bone oedema and adjacent inflammation as high signal on STIR and T2-weighted SE scans, and identification of abscesses in two cases as rim-enhancing lesions anterior to the joint on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted SE scans. The role of MRI and other forms of imaging in septic sacroiliitis is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Monitoring Locally Induced Hyperthermia with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Vogel (M.)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Magnetic resonance thermometry is a relatively new and unique technology for non-invasive monitoring of (local) therapeutic temperature changes that is not yet in common use. Temperature measurements using magnetic resonance heat thermometry can be performed in several

  9. Resonances and dipole moments in dielectric, magnetic, and magnetodielectric cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, A.; Arslanagic, Samel; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2011-01-01

    An eigenfunction solution to the problem of plane wave scattering by dielectric, magnetic, and magnetodielectric cylinders is used for a systematic investigation of their resonances. An overview of the resonances with electric and magnetic dipole moments, needed in, e.g., the synthesis...

  10. Observation of spin diffusion in zero-field magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, D.; Jarvie, T.P.; Sun, B.; Pines, A.

    1987-07-06

    We report the measurement of spin diffusion at zero field, observed by two-dimensional deuterium magnetic resonance of a polycrystalline sample. This demonstrates for the first time an appealing feature of pulsed zero-field magnetic resonance, namely the potential for structure determination in solids without the need for single crystals or oriented samples.

  11. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Motte, Louise; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Thomsen, Carsten;

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics...... of intraluminal thrombus specimens to the appearance on magnetic resonance imaging....

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance in environmental engineering: principles and applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lens, P.N.L.; Hemminga, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to applications in the field of environmental science and engineering. The underlying principles of high resolution solution and solid state NMR, relaxation time measure

  13. Compact electrically detected magnetic resonance setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eckardt

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR is a commonly used technique for the study of spin-dependent transport processes in semiconductor materials and electro-optical devices. Here, we present the design and implementation of a compact setup to measure EDMR, which is based on a commercially available benchtop electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectrometer. The electrical detection part uses mostly off-the-shelf electrical components and is thus highly customizable. We present a characterization and calibration procedure for the instrument that allowed us to quantitatively reproduce results obtained on a silicon-based reference sample with a “large-scale” state-of-the-art instrument. This shows that EDMR can be used in novel contexts relevant for semiconductor device fabrication like clean room environments and even glove boxes. As an application example, we present data on a class of environment-sensitive objects new to EDMR, semiconducting organic microcrystals, and discuss similarities and differences to data obtained for thin-film devices of the same molecule.

  14. [Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: diagnostic contribution of magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnet, O; de Seze, J; Soto-Ares, G; Tiberghien, F; Caparros-Lefebvre, D; Daems, C; Pasquier, F; Pruvo, J P; Destée, A; Vermesch, P

    2002-12-01

    Data regarding the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) are scarce. WKS usually combines a cerebellar syndrome, oculomotor disorder and confusion. The aim of this study was to determine more precisely the clinical presentation of WKS and the frequency and topography of MRI abnormalities. Furthermore, we try to assess the prognostic value of both clinical signs and MRI abnormalities. We retrospectively studied 25 patients with WKS in which an MRI was available. We assessed the initial clinical presentation and the outcome. We also analyzed the frequency and the location of MRI lesions. We then correlated clinical and MRI data with the clinical outcome. Eleven patients (44 p. 100) had the full WKS. Fourteen of the 25 patients (56 p. 100) had a poor evolution. The occurrence of full WKS was correlated with a poor outcome (p < 0.02). Signal abnormalities on T2-weighted images were found in the periacqueducal region, in the thalami or in the mamillar bodies in 16 cases (64 p. 100). There was a correlation between an hypersignal in at least one region and a poor clinical outcome (p < 0.02). Our study demonstrates the high frequency of brain MRI lesions in WKS and the correlation of both initial clinical signs and MRI abnormalities with a poor clinical outcome.

  15. Pattern recognition on brain magnetic resonance imaging in alpha dystroglycanopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Parayil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha dystroglycanopathies are heterogeneous group of disorders both phenotypically and genetically. A subgroup of these patients has characteristic brain imaging findings. Four patients with typical imaging findings of alpha dystroglycanopathy are reported. Phenotypic features included: global developmental delay, contractures, hypotonia and oculomotor abnormalities in all. Other manifestations were consanguinity (3, seizures (3, macrocephaly (1, microcephaly (3, retinal changes (2 and hypogenitalism (2. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain revealed polymicrogyria, white matter changes, pontine hypoplasia, and subcortical cerebellar cysts in all the patients, ventriculomegaly, callosal abnormalities, and absent septum pellucidum in two and Dandy -Walker variant malformation in three. Magnetic resonace imaging of the first cousin of one the patient had the same characteristic imaging features. Brain imaging findings were almost identical despite heterogeneity in clinical presentation and histopathological features. Pattern recognition of MR imaging features may serve as a clue to the diagnosis of alpha dystroglycanopathy.

  16. Plasma-induced magnetic responses during nonlinear dynamics of magnetic islands due to resonant magnetic perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Seiya, E-mail: n-seiya@kobe-kosen.ac.jp [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2194 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) produce magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas. Self-healing (annihilation) of RMP-induced magnetic islands has been observed in helical systems, where a possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by plasma flows, which is well known in tokamaks. Thus, fundamental physics of RMP shielding is commonly investigated in both tokamaks and helical systems. In order to check this mechanism, detailed informations of magnetic island phases are necessary. In experiments, measurement of radial magnetic responses is relatively easy. In this study, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands, behavior of radial magnetic fields during the self-healing is investigated. It is confirmed that flips of radial magnetic fields are typically observed during the self-healing. Such behavior of radial magnetic responses is also observed in LHD experiments.

  17. Torque-mixing magnetic resonance spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losby, Joseph; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Grandmont, Dylan T.; Diao, Zhu; Belov, Miro; Burgess, Jacob A.; Compton, Shawn R.; Hiebert, Wayne K.; Vick, Doug; Mohammad, Kaveh; Salimi, Elham; Bridges, Gregory E.; Thomson, Douglas J.; Freeman, Mark R.

    2016-10-01

    An optomechanical platform for magnetic resonance spectroscopy will be presented. The method relies on frequency mixing of orthogonal RF fields to yield a torque amplitude (arising from the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment, in analogy to magnetic resonance detection by electromagnetic induction) on a miniaturized resonant mechanical torsion sensor. In contrast to induction, the method is fully broadband and allows for simultaneous observation of the equilibrium net magnetic moment alongside the associated magnetization dynamics. To illustrate the method, comprehensive electron spin resonance spectra of a mesoscopic, single-crystal YIG disk at room temperature will be presented, along with situations where torque spectroscopy can offer complimentary information to existing magnetic resonance detection techniques. The authors are very grateful for support from NSERC, CRC, AITF, and NINT. Reference: Science 350, 798 (2015).

  18. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Nikhil [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)], E-mail: nikhil_ms26@yahoo.co.in; Kakar, Arun K. [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Chowdhury, Veena [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Gulati, Praveen [MR Centre, A-23 Green Park, New Delhi (India); Shankar, L. Ravi [Department of Radioiodine Uptake and Imaging, Institute of Nucler Medicine and Allied Sciences (INMAS), Timarpur, New Delhi (India); Vindal, Anubhav [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)

    2007-12-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of solitary thyroid nodules and its correlation with histopathology. Materials and methods: In this study, magnetic resonance spectroscopy was carried out on 26 patients having solitary thyroid nodules. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was performed on a 1.5 T super conductive system with gradient strength of 33 mTs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done after MRS. All 26 patients underwent surgery either because of cytopathologically proven malignancy or because of cosmetic reasons. Findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared with histopathology of thyroid specimens. Results and conclusion: It was seen that presence or absence of choline peak correlates very well with presence or absence of malignant foci with in the nodule (sensitivity = 100%; specificity = 88.88%). These results indicate that magnetic resonance spectroscopy may prove to be an useful diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid.

  19. Clinical outcome and imaging changes after intraarticular (IA) application of etanercept or methylprednisolone in rheumatoid arthritis: Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound-Doppler show no effect of IA injections in the wrist after 4 weeks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M.; Boesen, L.; Jensen, K.E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To assess the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) changes in the wrist of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 4 weeks after an US guided intraarticular (IA) injection. Methods. Contrast enhanced MRI and US-Doppler were performed at baseline and 4 weeks after IA......-29) in the total group was unchanged after 4 weeks (p = 0.13), whereas MRI erosion score increased in the total group from baseline, 17.88 (range 7-40), to 4 weeks, 18.25 (range 7-40) (p .... Conclusion. In contrast to the clinical evaluation, imaging measures of relevance for the estimation of inflammation, US-Doppler, US RI, MRI synovitis, and bone-marrow edema did not change 4 weeks after a single IA injection of either methylprednisolone or etanercept in the wrist. Within the same period...

  20. Experiments in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong; Lu, Wei; Choi, J.-H.; Chia, H. J.; Mirsaidov, U. M.; Guchhait, S.; Cambou, A. D.; Cardenas, R.; Park, K.; Markert, J. T.

    2006-03-01

    We report our group's effort in the construction of an 8-T, ^3 He cryostat based nuclear magnetic resonance force microscope (NMRFM). The probe has two independent 3-D of piezoelectric x-y-z positioners for precise positioning of a fiber optic interferometer and a sample/gradient-producing magnet with respect to a micro-cantilever. The piezoelectric positioners have a very uniform controllable step size with virtually no backlash. A novel RF tuning circuit board design is implemented which allows us to simply swap out one RF component board with another for experiments involving different nuclear species. We successfully fabricated and are characterizing 50μm x50μm x0.2μm double torsional oscillators. We have also been characterizing ultrasoft cantilevers whose spring constant is on the order of 10-4 N/m. We also report NMRFM data for ammonium dihydrogen phosphate(ADP) at room temperature using our 1.2-T system. Observed features include the correct shift of the NMR peak with carrier frequency, increases in signal amplitude with both RF field strength and frequency modulation amplitude, and signal oscillation (spin nutation) as a function of tipping RF pulse length. Experiments in progress on NH4MgF3 (at 1.2 T) and MgB2 (at 8.1 T) will also be briefly reviewed. Robert A. Welch Foundation grant No.F-1191 and the National Science Foundation grant No. DMR-0210383.

  1. Electric and magnetic dipole couplings in split ring resonator metamaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Jing; Sun Guang-Yong; and Zhu Wei-Ren

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,the electric and the magnetic dipole couplings between the outer and the inner rings of a single split ring resonator (SRR) are investigated.We numerically demonstrate that the magnetic resonance frequency can be substantially modified by changing the couplings of the electric and magnetic dipoles,and give a theoretical expression of the magnetic resonance frequency.The results in this work are expected to be conducive to a deeper understanding of the SRR and other similar metamaterials,and provide new guidance for complex metamaterials design with a tailored electromagnetic response.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging markers for early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Silvia; Ciurleo, Rosella; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Barresi, Marina; De Salvo, Simona; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Bramanti, Alessia; Lanzafame, Pietro; Bramanti, Placido

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective and progressive degeneration, as well as loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. In PD, approximately 60-70% of nigrostriatal neurons are degenerated and 80% of content of the striatal dopamine is reduced before the diagnosis can be established according to widely accepted clinical diagnostic criteria. This condition describes a stage of disease called “prodromal”, where non-motor symptoms, such as olfactory dysfunction, constipation, rapid eye movement behaviour disorder, depression, precede motor sign of PD. Detection of prodromal phase of PD is becoming an important goal for determining the prognosis and choosing a suitable treatment strategy. In this review, we present some non-invasive instrumental approaches that could be useful to identify patients in the prodromal phase of PD or in an early clinical phase, when the first motor symptoms begin to be apparent. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and advanced MRI techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging, diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging and functional MRI, are useful to differentiate early PD with initial motor symptoms from atypical parkinsonian disorders, thus, making easier early diagnosis. Functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging techniques can show abnormalities in the olfactory system in prodromal PD. PMID:25745453

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging markers for early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvia Marino; Rosella Ciurleo; Giuseppe Di Lorenzo; Marina Barresi; Simona De Salvo; Sabrina Giacoppo; Alessia Bramanti; Pietro Lanzafame; Placido Bramanti

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective and progressive degeneration, as well as loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. In PD, approximately 60-70% of nigrostriatal neurons are degenerated and 80% of content of the striatal dopamine is reduced before the diagnosis can be established according to widely accepted clinical diagnostic criteria. This condition describes a stage of disease called "prodromal", where non-motor symptoms, such as olfactory dysfunction, constipation, rapid eye movement behaviour disorder, depression, precede motor sign of PD. Detection of prodromal phase of PD is becoming an important goal for determining the prognosis and choosing a suitable treatment strategy. In this review, we present some non-invasive instrumental approaches that could be useful to identify patients in the prodromal phase of PD or in an early clinical phase, when the first motor symptoms begin to be apparent. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and advanced MRI techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging, diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging and functional MRI, are useful to differentiate early PD with initial motor symptoms from atypical parkinsonian disorders, thus, making easier early diagnosis. Functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging techniques can show abnormalities in the olfactory system in prodromal PD.

  4. Association between preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, pain intensity and quantitative sensory testing in patients awaiting lumbar diskectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hegarty, Dominic

    2011-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers important information regarding the morphology, location and size of a herniated disc, which influences the decision to offer lumbar diskectomy (LD). This study aims to examine the association between clinical neurophysiologic indices including pain intensity and quantitative sensory testing (QST), and the degree of lumbar nerve root compromise depicted on magnetic resonance (MR) in patients awaiting LD.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in neurologic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Man Chung; Wan, Chu Wan; Myung, Ho Jin; Choi, Kil Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chang Beom; Oh, Chang Hyun; Cho, Zang Hee [Koear Advanced Institute of Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-02-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 0.15 Tesla resistive magnet developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science were performed in 27 patients with various neurologic diseases and compared with x-ray computed tomography (CT). The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the image quality, the diagnostic value and limitation, and the optimal pulse sequence of MR imagings with a resistive magnet. The MR images were obtained by using a variety of pulse sequence with spin echo technique including saturation recovery. T2-weighted spin echo, and/or inversion recovery with various pulse repetition (TR) and echo delay (TE) times. The MR imaging demonstrated the capability of detecting the lesions shown on CT in al cases and also detected an additional finding in one case (multiple sclerosis) which was not seen on CT. The MR imaging appeared to be more useful than CT in the evaluation of syringomyelia of spinal cord and white matter disease, while it failed to demonstrated small calcific lesion or inflammatory nodule (less than 1 cm) shown on CT and has shown somewhat poor contrast resolution in the case of meingloma. The spatial resolution of saturation recovery images was similar or superior to CT, whereas the contrast resolution of saturation recovery was inferior to CT. While the saturation recovery images have shown false negative findings in 5 patients (19%), the inversion recovery and T2-weighted spin echo have shown consistently positive findings. The inversive recovery and T2-weighted spin echo images demonstrated better contrast discrimination between normal and pathologic conditions than the saturation recovery images, but somewhat poorer spatial resolution. Authors suggest that the MR images of both the saturation recovery with 300/30 and T2-weighted spin echo with 1000/90 be used as a routine procedure and additional inversion recovery of 1300/300/30 sequence as a option if white matter disease is suspected.

  6. Controlling interactions between highly-magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic $^7$S$_3$ chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on Dysprosium and Erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  7. Waveguide volume probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a probe for use within the field of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). One embodiment relates to an RF probe for magnetic resonance imaging and/or spectroscopy comprising a conductive...... non-magnetic hollow waveguide having an internal volume and at least one open end, one or more capacitors and at least a first conductive non-magnetic wire, wherein said first conductive wire connects at least one of said one or more capacitors to opposite walls of one open end of the waveguide...... and wherein said first conductive wire and said one or more capacitors are located outside of said internal volume, wherein the internal volume of the hollow waveguide defines an imaging volume or sample volume....

  8. Control of Transport-barrier relaxations by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Leconte, M; Garbet, X; Benkadda, S

    2009-01-01

    Transport-barrier relaxation oscillations in the presence of resonant magnetic perturbations are investigated using three-dimensional global fluid turbulence simulations from first principles at the edge of a tokamak. It is shown that resonant magnetic perturbations have a stabilizing effect on these relaxation oscillations and that this effect is due mainly to a modification of the pressure profile linked to the presence of both residual residual magnetic island chains and a stochastic layer.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing, monitoring and prognostication in psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Sørensen, Inge Juul; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic systemic, inflammatory disease associated with skin psoriasis. PsA may be difficult to assess with clinical examination and blood tests because of its complex and multifaceted clinical presentation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can visualise all peripheral...

  10. Middle cerebellar peduncles:Magnetic resonance imaging and pathophysiologic correlate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Humberto Morales; Thomas Tomsick

    2015-01-01

    We describe common and less common diseases that can cause magnetic resonance signal abnormalities of middle cerebellar peduncles(MCP), offering a systematicapproach correlating imaging findings with clinical clues and pathologic mechanisms. Myelin abnormalities, different types of edema or neurodegenerative processes, can cause areas of abnormal T2 signal, variable enhancement, and patterns of diffusivity of MCP. Pathologies such as demyelinating disorders or certain neurodegenerative entities(e.g., multiple system atrophy or fragile X-associated tremor-ataxia syndrome) appear to have predilection for MCP. Careful evaluation of concomitant imaging findings in the brain or brainstem; and focused correlation with key clinical findings such as immunosuppression for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopahty; hypertension, post-transplant status or high dose chemotherapy for posterior reversible encephalopathy; electrolyte disorders for myelinolysis or suspected toxic-drug related encephalopathy; would yield an appropriate and accurate differential diagnosis in the majority of cases.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Gallbladder: Spectrum of Abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayes, K.M.; Oliveira, E.P.; Narra, V.R.; EL-Merhi, F.M.; Brown, J.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ of Michigan Health Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Various pathologies involving the gallbladder can manifest clinically, producing nonspecific clinical symptoms and making diagnosis difficult and challenging. Real-time sonography is the most widely used diagnostic study for the gallbladder and the primary screening examination of choice. With increasing use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), gallbladder pathology is frequently seen. Understanding the basic patterns of various disease manifestations and appearance on MRI is the key to making an accurate diagnosis. Given its inherent tissue contrast and contrast sensitivity, MRI in conjunction with MRCP can be a very valuable test in evaluating gallbladder pathology. Gallbladder pathology can be classified into congenital (such as absence), inflammatory (acute, hemorrhagic, and chronic cholecystitis), traumatic, benign (polyps) and malignant tumors (gallbladder carcinoma and lymphoma), and other disease processes can be seen in cholelithiasis, cholesterosis, thickened gallbladder wall, and Mirrizzi syndrome.

  12. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-25

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  13. Magnetic Field Gradient Waveform Monitoring for Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hui

    Linear magnetic field gradients have played a central role in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) since Fourier Transform MRI was proposed three decades ago. Their primary function is to encode spatial information into MR signals. Magnetic field gradients are also used to sensitize the image contrast to coherent and/or incoherent motion, to selectively enhance an MR signal, and to minimize image artifacts. Modern MR imaging techniques increasingly rely on the implementation of complex gradient waveforms for the manipulation of spin dynamics. However, gradient system infidelities caused by eddy currents, gradient amplifier imperfections and group delays, often result in image artifacts and other errors (e.g., phase and intensity errors). This remains a critical problem for a wide range of MRI techniques on modern commercial systems, but is of particular concern for advanced MRI pulse sequences. Measuring the real magnetic field gradients, i.e., characterizing eddy currents, is critical to addressing and remedying this problem. Gradient measurement and eddy current calibration are therefore a general topic of importance to the science of MRI. The Magnetic Field Gradient Monitor (MFGM) idea was proposed and developed specifically to meet these challenges. The MFGM method is the heart of this thesis. MFGM methods permit a variety of magnetic field gradient problems to be investigated and systematically remedied. Eddy current effects associated with MR compatible metallic pressure vessels were analyzed, simulated, measured and corrected. The appropriate correction of eddy currents may enable most MR/MRI applications with metallic pressure vessels. Quantitative imaging (1D/2D) with model pressure vessels was successfully achieved by combining image reconstruction with MFGM determined gradient waveform behaviour. Other categories of MR applications with metallic vessels, including diffusion measurement and spin echo SPI T2 mapping, cannot be realized solely by MFGM guided

  14. Non-resonant magnetic braking on JET and TEXTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Y.; Liang, Y.; Shaing, K.C.;

    2012-01-01

    The non-resonant magnetic braking effect induced by a non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation is investigated on JET and TEXTOR. The collisionality dependence of the torque induced by the n = 1, where n is the toroidal mode number, magnetic perturbation generated by the error field correction coil...

  15. Magnetic resonance techniques for investigation of multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Alex; Laule, Cornelia; Li, David K. B.; Meyers, Sandra M.; Russell-Schulz, Bretta; Vavasour, Irene M.

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common neurological disease which can cause loss of vision and balance, muscle weakness, impaired speech, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction and even paralysis. The key pathological processes in MS are inflammation, edema, myelin loss, axonal loss and gliosis. Unfortunately, the cause of MS is still not understood and there is currently no cure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important clinical and research tool for MS. 'Conventional' MRI images of MS brain reveal bright lesions, or plaques, which demark regions of severe tissue damage. Conventional MRI has been extremely valuable for the diagnosis and management of people who have MS and also for the assessment of therapies designed to reduce inflammation and promote repair. While conventional MRI is clearly valuable, it lack pathological specificity and, in some cases, sensitivity to non-lesional pathology. Advanced MR techniques have been developed to provide information that is more sensitive and specific than what is available with clinical scanning. Diffusion tensor imaging and magnetization transfer provide a general but non-specific measure of the pathological state of brain tissue. MR spectroscopy provides concentrations of brain metabolites which can be related to specific pathologies. Myelin water imaging was designed to assess brain myelination and has proved useful for measuring myelin loss in MS. To combat MS, it is crucial that the pharmaceutical industry finds therapies which can reverse the neurodegenerative processes which occur in the disease. The challenge for magnetic resonance researchers is to design imaging techniques which can provide detailed pathological information relating to the mechanisms of MS therapies. This paper briefly describes the pathologies of MS and demonstrates how MS-associated pathologies can be followed using both conventional and advanced MR imaging protocols.

  16. Purcell factor of Mie resonators featuring electric and magnetic modes

    CERN Document Server

    Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    We present a modal approach to compute the Purcell factor in Mie resonators exhibiting both electric and magnetic resonances. The analytic expressions of the normal modes are used to calculate the effective volumes. We show that important features of the effective volume can be predicted thanks to the translation-addition coefficients of a displaced dipole. Using our formalism, it is easy to see that, in general, the Purcell factor of Mie resonators is not dominated by a single mode, but rather by a large superposition. Finally we consider a silicon resonator homogeneously doped with electric dipolar emitters, and we show that the average electric Purcell factor dominates over the magnetic one.

  17. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  18. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  19. Antepartum pelvimetry by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshiba, Hisato; Kikuchi, Noriko; Ogino, Yoshio [Kyoto Second Red Cross Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2001-09-01

    Evaluation of the pelvis by pelvimetry plays an important role in selecting patients for possible vaginal delivery. However, x-ray pelvimetry involves the disadvantage of fetal exposure to ionizing radiation. The clear advantage of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pelvimetry is that this procedure is free from ionizing radiation. Measurements with MRI are as reliable as those with x-ray pelvimetry and the contrast of MRI is even better. MRI shows soft-tissue structures as well as bone. The use of this scanning technique is contraindicated for patients with pacemakers. But, pacemakers are rarely encountered in young pregnant women. In our department, 203 patients underwent antepartum pelvimetry with MRI during the last 5 years. T1-weighted mediosagittal images were used for measurement of the obstetric conjugate (OC) and to determine whether a straight sacrum can be recognized. Data were compared between patients who had undergone cesarean section due to cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) and patients who experienced vaginal delivery. OC and OC-biparietal diameter were significantly different between the two groups. MRI can be further used for the diagnosis of CPD and to select patients for whom planned vaginal delivery is appropriate. (author)

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebellopontine angle lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratiksha Yadav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebellopontine angle (CPA tumors are usually benign, and they are divided into extra-axial, intra-axial, extradural, and petrous axis tumors. CPA pathologies can be asymptomatic or it may present with vertigo, tinnitus, or unilateral hearing loss depending upon the site of tumor origin and displacement of the neurovascular structure. Aim and Objectives: To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI aided with contrast-enhanced MRI as an imaging modality for diagnosis of CPA lesions. Materials and Methods: Analysis of 36 patients of CPA lesions over a period of 2 years was done. MRI was performed on Siemens 1.5 Tesla MAGNETOM Avanto Machine. Conclusion: There are spectrums of pathologies, which can present with these symptoms, which includes tumors, vascular malformations, and vascular loop compressing vestibulocochlear nerve or mastoid pathology so it is important to investigate the patient by MRI. Contrast-enhanced MRI is the most sensitive investigation in the evaluation of the CPA lesions, its characteristic, and its extent.

  1. NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE STUDIES OF URANOCENES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luke, Wayne D.; Streitwieser, Jr., Andrew

    1979-12-01

    In the past several years a substantial amount of work has been devoted toward evaluation of the contact and pseudocontact contributions to the observed isotropic shifts in H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of uranium(IV) organometallic compounds. One reason for interest in this area arises from using the presence of contact shifts as a prcbe for covalent character in the uranium carbon bonds in these compounds. Several extensive {sup 1}H NNR studies on Cp{sub 3} U-X compounds and less extensive studies on uranocenes have been reported. Interpretation of these results suggests that contact shifts-contribute significantly to the observed isotropic shifts. Their presence has been taken as indicative of covalent character of metal carbon bonds in these systems, but agreement is not complete. In this paper we shall review critically the work reported on uranocenes in the light of recent results and report recent work on attempted separation of the observed isotropic shifts in alkyluranocenes into contact and pseudocontact components.

  2. Constraining groundwater modeling with magnetic resonance soundings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Marie; Favreau, Guillaume; Nazoumou, Yahaya; Cappelaere, Bernard; Massuel, Sylvain; Legchenko, Anatoly

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) is a noninvasive geophysical method that allows estimating the free water content and transmissivity of aquifers. In this article, the ability of MRS to improve the reliability of a numerical groundwater model is assessed. Thirty-five sites were investigated by MRS over a ∼5000 km(2) domain of the sedimentary Continental Terminal aquifer in SW Niger. Time domain electromagnetic soundings were jointly carried out to estimate the aquifer thickness. A groundwater model was previously built for this section of the aquifer and forced by the outputs from a distributed surface hydrology model, to simulate the observed long-term (1992 to 2003) rise in the water table. Uncertainty analysis had shown that independent estimates of the free water content and transmissivity values of the aquifer would facilitate cross-evaluation of the surface-water and groundwater models. MRS results indicate ranges for permeability (K = 1 × 10(-5) to 3 × 10(-4) m/s) and for free water content (w = 5% to 23% m(3) /m(3) ) narrowed by two orders of magnitude (K) and by ∼50% (w), respectively, compared to the ranges of permeability and specific yield values previously considered. These shorter parameter ranges result in a reduction in the model's equifinality (whereby multiple combinations of model's parameters are able to represent the same observed piezometric levels), allowing a better constrained estimate to be derived for net aquifer recharge (∼22 mm/year).

  3. Statistical normalization techniques for magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell T. Shinohara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While computed tomography and other imaging techniques are measured in absolute units with physical meaning, magnetic resonance images are expressed in arbitrary units that are difficult to interpret and differ between study visits and subjects. Much work in the image processing literature on intensity normalization has focused on histogram matching and other histogram mapping techniques, with little emphasis on normalizing images to have biologically interpretable units. Furthermore, there are no formalized principles or goals for the crucial comparability of image intensities within and across subjects. To address this, we propose a set of criteria necessary for the normalization of images. We further propose simple and robust biologically motivated normalization techniques for multisequence brain imaging that have the same interpretation across acquisitions and satisfy the proposed criteria. We compare the performance of different normalization methods in thousands of images of patients with Alzheimer's disease, hundreds of patients with multiple sclerosis, and hundreds of healthy subjects obtained in several different studies at dozens of imaging centers.

  4. Neural network segmentation of magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Blaise

    1990-07-01

    Neural networks are well adapted to the task of grouping input patterns into subsets which share some similarity. Moreover once trained they can generalize their classification rules to classify new data sets. Sets of pixel intensities from magnetic resonance (MR) images provide a natural input to a neural network by varying imaging parameters MR images can reflect various independent physical parameters of tissues in their pixel intensities. A neural net can then be trained to classify physically similar tissue types based on sets of pixel intensities resulting from different imaging studies on the same subject. A neural network classifier for image segmentation was implemented on a Sun 4/60 and was tested on the task of classifying tissues of canine head MR images. Four images of a transaxial slice with different imaging sequences were taken as input to the network (three spin-echo images and an inversion recovery image). The training set consisted of 691 representative samples of gray matter white matter cerebrospinal fluid bone and muscle preclassified by a neuroscientist. The network was trained using a fast backpropagation algorithm to derive the decision criteria to classify any location in the image by its pixel intensities and the image was subsequently segmented by the classifier. The classifier''s performance was evaluated as a function of network size number of network layers and length of training. A single layer neural network performed quite well at

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pediatric Elbow Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudas, T.; Hurme, T.; Mattila, K.; Svedstroem, E. [Univ. of Turku, (Finland). Depts. of Radiology and Pediatric Surgery

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of pediatric elbow trauma with or without a visible fracture on radiography. Material and Methods: MRI was performed in the acute phase in 25 children with an elbow injury. Nine patients with an elbow effusion only on radiographs and 16 with a fracture or luxation seen on radiographs underwent subsequent MRI. No sedation was used. Results: MRI revealed eight occult fractures (89%) in seven out of nine patients who had only an effusion on radiographs. Based on MRI findings, septic arthritis was suspected in one patient. Two patients out of five with a supracondylar fracture on the radiograph had a cartilage lesion in the humerus. MRI depicted a 3-mm gap on the articular surface in two patients with a lateral condyle fracture, a more accurate fracture location in two patients than the radiographs, and an additional occult fracture in two patients. MRI showed a fracture not seen on radiographs in two of three patients with prior luxation. Conclusion: MRI is a sensitive and accurate method in the diagnosis of pediatric elbow injuries, especially when only an effusion is present on radiographs. Occult fractures are more common in pediatric patients with elbow injury than reported earlier.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in complex partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furune, Sunao; Negoro, Tamiko; Maehara, Mitsuo; Nomura, Kazushi; Miura, Kiyokuni; Takahashi, Izumi; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1989-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were performed on 45 patients with intractable complex partial seizures. MRI was performed with a superconducting whole-body scanner operating at 0.5 tesla (T) and 1.5 T. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 8 of 24 patients had abnormal CT, but 16 or 24 patients showed abnormal MRI. 1.5 T MRI detected more abnormality than 0.5 T MRI when CT was normal. In patients with frontal lobe epilepsy, 5 of 7 patients had normal CT and MRI. In 2 other patients, MRI demonstrated an arachnoid cyst and increased signal intensity area on the T2-weighted images which were not detected by CT. In patients with occipital lobe epilepsy, 5 of 6 patients show abnormal CT and MRI. In patients with tuberous sclerosis, MRI revealed some increased signal intensity areas on the T2-weighted images in the occipital and temporal lobe, which were not detected by CT. Most surface EEG foci corresponded with the side of MRI abnormality. These data indicate that MRI is more informative than CT in complex partial seizures. MRI is the imaging technique of choice in the diagnosis of complex partial seizures. (author).

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in retropharyngeal tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekbon, K.; Annell, K.; Traeff, J.; Torhall, J. (Soeder Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1994-08-01

    Seven consecutive patients with acute retropharyngeal tendinitis underwent plain X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine. All seven had marked soft tissue swelling anterior to C1 and C2 on plain X-ray, and soft tissue calcification at this level was present in five of them. On MRI, there was markedly increased signal intensity on T[sub 2]-weighted images in the acute phase and intermediate signal intensity on T[sub 1]-weighted images, anterior to the level of CI and C2, often extending as far down as C6. These changes correlated well with the soft tissue swelling seen on conventional X-ray of the cervical spine. The maximum mid-sagittal thickness of the soft issues was significantly greater in the tendinitis patients than in 12 control subjects free of symptoms from the pharynx or the cervical spine. Treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs rapidly alleviated symptoms, and at follow-up MRI showed regression or complete restitution of the changes. In conclusion, MRI can visualize the edematous changes in the longus colli muscle and adds useful diagnostic information in suspected cases of acute retropharyngeal tendinitis. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Magnetic resonance tomography of the knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Stefan; Kuruvilla, Yojena Chittazhathu Kurian; Ebner, Lukas [University Hospital, University of Berne, Department of Interventional, Pediatric and Diagnostic Radiology Inselspital, Berne (Switzerland); Endel, Gottfried [Main Association of Austrian Social Insurance Institutions, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in terms of sensitivity and specificity using a field strength of <1.0 T (T) versus ≥1.5 T for diagnosing or ruling out knee injuries or knee pathologies. The systematic literature research revealed more than 10,000 references, of which 1598 abstracts were reviewed and 87 full-text articles were retrieved. The further selection process resulted in the inclusion of four systematic reviews and six primary studies. No differences could be identified in the diagnostic performance of low- versus high-field MRI for the detection or exclusion of meniscal or cruciate ligament tears. Regarding the detection or grading of cartilage defects and osteoarthritis of the knee, the existing evidence suggests that high-field MRI is tolerably specific but not very sensitive, while there is literally no evidence for low-field MRI because only a few studies with small sample sizes and equivocal findings have been performed. We can recommend the use of low-field strength MRI systems in suspected meniscal or cruciate ligament injuries. This does, however, not apply to the diagnosis and grading of knee cartilage defects and osteoarthritis because of insufficient evidence. (orig.)

  9. Focal liver lesions: Practical magnetic resonance imagingapproach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread of cross-sectional imaging, a growthof incidentally detected focal liver lesions (FLL) hasbeen observed. A reliable detection and characterizationof FLL is critical for optimal patient management.Maximizing accuracy of imaging in the context ofFLL is paramount in avoiding unnecessary biopsies,which may result in post-procedural complications. Atremendous development of new imaging techniqueshas taken place during these last years. Nowadays,Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key rolein management of liver lesions, using a radiation-freetechnique and a safe contrast agent profile. MRI playsa key role in the non-invasive correct characterizationof FLL. MRI is capable of providing comprehensiveand highly accurate diagnostic information, withthe additional advantage of lack of harmful ionizingradiation. These properties make MRI the mainstay forthe noninvasive evaluation of focal liver lesions. In thispaper we review the state-of-the-art MRI liver protocol,briefly discussing different sequence types, the uniquecharacteristics of imaging non-cooperative patients anddiscuss the role of hepatocyte-specific contrast agents.A review of the imaging features of the most commonbenign and malignant FLL is presented, supplementedby a schematic representation of a simplistic practicalapproach on MRI.

  10. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging without contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martirosian, Petros; Graf, Hansjoerg; Schick, Fritz [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Section on Experimental Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Boss, Andreas; Schraml, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Claussen, Claus D. [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Principles of magnetic resonance imaging techniques providing perfusion-related contrast weighting without administration of contrast media are reported and analysed systematically. Especially common approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion imaging allowing quantitative assessment of specific perfusion rates are described in detail. The potential of ASL for perfusion imaging was tested in several types of tissue. After a systematic comparison of technical aspects of continuous and pulsed ASL techniques the standard kinetic model and tissue properties of influence to quantitative measurements of perfusion are reported. For the applications demonstrated in this paper a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion preparation approach followed by true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP) data recording was developed and implemented on whole-body scanners operating at 0.2, 1.5 and 3 T for quantitative perfusion measurement in various types of tissue. ASL imaging provides a non-invasive tool for assessment of tissue perfusion rates in vivo. Images recorded from kidney, lung, brain, salivary gland and thyroid gland provide a spatial resolution of a few millimetres and sufficient signal to noise ratio in perfusion maps after 2-5 min of examination time. Newly developed ASL techniques provide especially high image quality and quantitative perfusion maps in tissues with relatively high perfusion rates (as also present in many tumours). Averaging of acquisitions and image subtraction procedures are mandatory, leading to the necessity of synchronization of data recording to breathing in abdominal and thoracic organs. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of cystic periventricular leukomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoi, Nobuaki; Nomura, Junko; Nowatari, Masahiko; Ohta, Takeo; Kamohara, Takashi; Yashiro, Kimio (Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-08-01

    A study was performed to assess the values of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in evaluation and the follow up of patients with cystic periventricular leukomalacia. Ten patients selected for MR imaging were diagnosed as having periventricular cystic lesions based on US scans. The range of gestational ages was 27 to 32 weeks, and the range of birth weights was 927 to 2,046 g. Twenty MR examinations were carried out using a 0.5 T superconducting system (Resona; Yokogawa). On the first MR examinations, taken by 6 months of age, low signal intensity lesions within the periventricular white matter, moderate ventriculomegaly with irregularity of the ventricular wall and delayed myelination were observed. These were the MR findings observed in the subacute stage of PVL. On the second or the third MR examinations, taken after 12 months of age, increased signal intensity in periventricular white matter on T{sub 2} weighted images decreased volume of periventricular white matter and centrum semiovale and the ventriculomagaly with irregularity of ventricular wall were observed. However, progressions of myelination were proved to be not delayed in comparison with age matched controls. These were thought to be the MR findings of late stage of PVL. As the US findings of PVL have good correlation with pathologic changes revealed at autopsy, MR imaging can depict myelination and detect PVL lesion beyond the neonatal period. These observations demonstrate the value of the MR imaging for the follow up of the patients with PVL beyond the time of fontanel closure. (author).

  12. Endorectal magnetic resonance imaging in persistent hemospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Prando

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present the spectrum of abnormalities found at endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI, in patients with persistent hemospermia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A review of E-MRI findings observed in 86 patients with persistent hemospermia was performed and results compared with those reported in the literature. Follow-up was possible in 37 of 86 (43% patients with hemospermia. RESULTS: E-MRI showed abnormal findings in 52 of 86 (60% patients with hemospermia. These findings were: a hemorrhagic seminal vesicle and ejaculatory duct, isolated (n = 11 or 21% or associated with complicated midline prostatic cyst (n = 10 or 19.0%; b hemorrhagic chronic seminal vesiculitis, isolated (n = 14 or 27% or associated with calculi within dilated ejaculatory ducts (n = 2 or 4 %; c hemorrhagic seminal vesicle associated with calculi within dilated ejaculatory duct (n = 4 or 7.7% or within seminal vesicle (n = 4 or 7.7%; d non-complicated midline prostatic cyst (n = 6 or 11.5%; and e prostate cancer (n = 1 or 2%. Successful treatment was more frequent in patients with chronic inflammatory and/or obstructive abnormalities. CONCLUSION: E-MRI should be considered the modality of choice, for the evaluation of patients with persistent hemospermia.

  13. Endorectal magnetic resonance imaging in persistent hemospermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prando, Adilson [Vera Cruz Hospital, Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging

    2008-03-15

    Objective: To present the spectrum of abnormalities found at endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI), in patients with persistent hemospermia. Materials and methods: A review of E-MRI findings observed in 86 patients with persistent hemospermia was performed and results compared with those reported in the literature. Follow-up was possible in 37 of 86 (43%) patients with hemospermia. Results: E-MRI showed abnormal findings in 52 of 86 (60%) patients with hemospermia. These findings were: a) hemorrhagic seminal vesicle and ejaculatory duct, isolated (n = 11 or 21%) or associated with complicated midline prostatic cyst (n = 10 or 19.0%); b) hemorrhagic chronic seminal vesiculitis, isolated (n = 14 or 27%) or associated with calculi within dilated ejaculatory ducts (n = 2 or 4 %); c) hemorrhagic seminal vesicle associated with calculi within dilated ejaculatory duct (n = 4 or 7.7%) or within seminal vesicle (n = 4 or 7.7%); d) non-complicated midline prostatic cyst (n = 6 or 11.5%); and e) prostate cancer (n = 1 or 2%). Successful treatment was more frequent in patients with chronic inflammatory and/or obstructive abnormalities. Conclusion: E-MRI should be considered the modality of choice, for the evaluation of patients with persistent hemospermia. (author)

  14. Segmentation of neuroanatomy in magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Andrew; Arridge, Simon R.; Barker, G. J.; Tofts, Paul S.

    1992-06-01

    Segmentation in neurological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is necessary for feature extraction, volume measurement and for the three-dimensional display of neuroanatomy. Automated and semi-automated methods offer considerable advantages over manual methods because of their lack of subjectivity, their data reduction capabilities, and the time savings they give. We have used dual echo multi-slice spin-echo data sets which take advantage of the intrinsically multispectral nature of MRI. As a pre-processing step, a rf non-uniformity correction is applied and if the data is noisy the images are smoothed using a non-isotropic blurring method. Edge-based processing is used to identify the skin (the major outer contour) and the eyes. Edge-focusing has been used to significantly simplify edge images and thus allow simple postprocessing to pick out the brain contour in each slice of the data set. Edge- focusing is a technique which locates significant edges using a high degree of smoothing at a coarse level and tracks these edges to a fine level where the edges can be determined with high positional accuracy. Both 2-D and 3-D edge-detection methods have been compared. Once isolated, the brain is further processed to identify CSF, and, depending upon the MR pulse sequence used, the brain itself may be sub-divided into gray matter and white matter using semi-automatic contrast enhancement and clustering methods.

  15. Poor quality of early evaluations of magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, L.S.; Chalmers, T.C.; McCally, M.; Berrier, J.; Sacks, H.S.

    1988-06-10

    To study the quality of early research on the clinical efficacy of diagnostic imaging with magnetic resonance, they assessed 54 evaluations published in the first four years after introduction of this modality using ten commonly accepted criteria of research methodology. The terms sensitivity, specificity, false-positive or false-negative, accuracy, and predictive values were used infrequently. 19% of the evaluations used three terms appropriately, 48% used one or two terms, and 33% used none. Data were presented appropriately for one or more of the five terms in 59% of evaluations. A gold standard comparison with the results of an independent procedure, such as surgical or autopsy findings, was presented in 22% of evaluations. Results of another imaging procedure were described in 63% of evaluations. Only one evaluation clearly described a prospective study design, although 11 evaluations apparently were planned in advance. Not one evaluation contained an appropriate statistical analysis of the distributions of quantitative readings, blinded image readers to diagnosis or other test results, measured observer error, or randomized the order of magnetic resonance imaging and other imaging procedures. The authors concludes that health care professionals paying for expensive innovative diagnostic technology should demand better research on diagnostic efficacy.

  16. Diagnosis of dorsal inter osseous pseudotumours by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peh, W.C.G.; Wong, L.L.S. [The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, (Hong Kong). Hand Surgery Division, Department of Diagnotic Radiology; Ip, W.Y. [The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, (Hong Kong). Hand Surgery Division, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

    1999-08-01

    Two middle-aged-patients each presenting with a progressively enlarging mass in the first dorsal web space of their hands are reported. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated the cause to be a hypertrophic first dorsal inter osseous muscle, with normal T1, T2 and post-gadopentetate dimeglumine signal characteristics. The ability of MRI to diagnose anatomical variants of hand muscles is important in the clinical management of patients with these pseudotumours. The usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluation of soft tissue tumours of the musculoskeletal system is now widely accepted. Its ability to maximize contrast between tumour and adjacent normal tissue in a multiplanar manner makes it the imaging modality of choice in pre-operative staging of soft tissue masses. In the hand and wrist, where benign tumours predominate, MRI may provide a specific diagnosis. We describe two cases in which MRI demonstrated the cause of a hand pseudotumour to be due to hypertrophy of the first dorsal inter osseous muscle. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 20 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-04-01

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed.

  18. 磁共振成像在产前胎儿颅脑疾病的临床应用价值%The Clinical Ctudy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Prenatal Fetal Brain Examination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓凡; 张旭; 朱凯; 曾立红; 王志伟; 刘鑫春; 王芳; 蔡静怡

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨磁共振成像在产前胎儿先天性颅脑疾病中的检测准确率及临床应用价值.材料和方法 25例超声检查诊断为胎儿颅脑畸形的孕妇行胎儿磁共振检查.由有经验的高职医师对胎儿MRI图像进行详细诊断,并将MRI结果与超声结果对比分析.该研究得到医院伦理委员会的批准,并取得孕妇的知情同意.结果 25例孕妇均为单胎,有12例确诊为胎儿颅脑异常.胎脑异常主要包括脑室扩大、胼胝体发育异常、后脑发育不良等.磁共振与超声检查准确率分别为100%、48%,两组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 磁共振成像技术能对孕妇宫腔内的胎儿进行多方位快速序列成像,能够准确检测出胎脑的正常与异常,具有非常高的临床应用价值.%Objective To discuss the detection accuracy and clinical value of the congenital brain diseases by magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and Methods 25 pregnant women clinically or ultrasound suspected of fetal problems or diagnostic uncertainty underwent MRI apply for our hospital. MRI images of the fetus were analyzed to the fetal position and congenital diseases diagnosis by experienced physicians, and compared to the ultrasound results. The study was approved by the hospital ethics committee, and informed consent of the pregnant women. Results 25 pregnant women are single births, 12 cases were diagnosed with fetal brain abnormalities. The fetal abnormalities type included oligohydramnios, hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and cerebellar hypoplasia. The accuracy of ultrasound and MRI were 48%, 100%, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05).Conclusions Magnetic resonance imaging techniques can accurately detect the performance of normal or abnormal with maternal intrauterine multidimensional imaging, it has a very high clinical value.

  19. Beam induced electron cloud resonances in dipole magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvey, J. R.; Hartung, W.; Makita, J.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    The buildup of low energy electrons in an accelerator, known as electron cloud, can be severely detrimental to machine performance. Under certain beam conditions, the beam can become resonant with the cloud dynamics, accelerating the buildup of electrons. This paper will examine two such effects: multipacting resonances, in which the cloud development time is resonant with the bunch spacing, and cyclotron resonances, in which the cyclotron period of electrons in a magnetic field is a multiple of bunch spacing. Both resonances have been studied directly in dipole fields using retarding field analyzers installed in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. These measurements are supported by both analytical models and computer simulations.

  20. Resonant Raman Scattering from Silicon Nanoparticles Enhanced by Magnetic Response

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, Pavel A; Milichko, Valentin A; Makarov, Sergey V; Mukhin, Ivan S; Samusev, Anton K; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of optical response with high-index dielectric nanoparticles is attributed to the excitation of their Mie-type magnetic and electric resonances. Here we study Raman scattering from crystalline silicon nanoparticles and reveal that magnetic dipole modes have much stronger effect on the scattering than electric modes of the same order. We demonstrate experimentally a 140-fold enhancement of Raman signal from individual silicon spherical nanoparticles at the magnetic dipole resonance. Our results confirm the importance of the optically-induced magnetic response of subwavelength dielectric nanoparticles for enhancing light-matter interactions.