WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinical genetics conference

  1. Disability rights in dialogue with clinical genetics conference, May 31 to June 2, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The issue of prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion has been hotly debated in the medical, genetic counselling, feminist, parents, disability rights and bio-ethics literature, each of the various positions critiquing each other. People from the disability rights community in particular have began to articulate a critical view of the practice of widespread prenatal diagnosis with intent to abort because the pregnancy might result in a child with a disability. Unfortunately, people from the various disciplines and perspectives, such as bioethics, disability rights, feminism and so forth, by and large, have tended only to write for themselves and their colleagues. Few people have crossed disciplines to try to talk to people with other views. The rapid advances of genome research have continued to produce new prenatal tests, raising many complex ethical questions regarding the applications of prenatal testing. But the widely disparate positions of the various factions has made it difficult to move toward formulation of public policy change necessary to encompass these new genetic technologies. Genetic counselling is in the front lines of the controversial social and ethical issues arising from prenatal diagnosis, in its interface between medical science and the consumer of services. The primary intent of the conference was to invite and facilitate productive dialogue between individuals and groups of people who have traditionally not interacted as a result of their disparate views on these issues and to learn from this process, emphasizing the involvement of people with disabilities and people who work in clinical genetics.

  2. The 50th Annual Maize Genetics Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cone, Karen

    2014-03-26

    The 50th Annual Maize Genetics Conference was held February 27 - March 2, 2008 at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Washington, D.C. As the golden anniversary of the Conference and coinciding with the release of a draft of the maize genome sequence, this was a special meeting. To publicize this unique occasion, meeting organizers hosted a press conference, which was attended by members of the press representing science and non-science publications, and an evening reception at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, where the draft sequence was announced and awards were presented to Dr. Mary Clutter and Senator Kit Bond to thank them for their outstanding contributions to maize genetics and genomics research. As usual, the Conference provided an invigorating forum for exchange of recent research results in many areas of maize genetics, e.g., cytogenetics, development, molecular genetics, transposable element biology, biochemical genetics, and genomics. Results were shared via both oral and poster presentations. Invited talks were given by four distinguished geneticists: Vicki Chandler, University of Arizona; John Doebley, University of Wisconsin; Susan Wessler, University of Georgia; and Richard Wilson, Washington University. There were 46 short talks and 241 poster presentations. The Conference was attended by over 500 participants. This included a large number of first-time participants in the meeting and an increasingly visible presence by individuals from underrepresented groups. Although we do not have concrete counts, there seem to be more African American, African and Hispanic/Latino attendees coming to the meeting than in years past. In addition, this meeting attracted many participants from outside the U.S. Student participation continues to be hallmark of the spirit of free exchange and cooperation characteristic of the maize genetics community. With the generous support provided by DOE, USDA NSF, and corporate/private donors, organizers were

  3. Gordon Research Conference on Genetic Toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Project Director Penelope Jeggo

    2003-02-15

    Genetic toxicology represents a study of the genetic damage that a cell can incur, the agents that induce such damage, the damage response mechanisms available to cells and organisms, and the potential consequences of such damage. Genotoxic agents are abundant in the environment and are also induced endogenously. The consequences of such damage can include carcinogenesis and teratogenesis. An understanding of genetic toxicology is essential to carry out risk evaluations of the impact of genotoxic agents and to assess how individual genetic differences influence the response to genotoxic damage. In recent years, the importance of maintaining genomic stability has become increasingly recognized, in part by the realization that failure of the damage response mechanisms underlies many, if not all, cancer incidence. The importance of these mechanisms is also underscored by their remarkable conservation between species, allowing the study of simple organisms to provide significant input into our understanding of the underlying mechanisms. It has also become clear that the damage response mechanisms interface closely with other aspects of cellular metabolism including replication, transcription and cell cycle regulation. Moreover, defects in many of these mechanisms, as observed for example in ataxia telangiectasia patients, confer disorders with associated developmental abnormalities demonstrating their essential roles during growth and development. In short, while a decade ago, a study of the impact of DNA damage was seen as a compartmentalized area of cellular research, it is now appreciated to lie at the centre of an array of cellular responses of crucial importance to human health. Consequently, this has become a dynamic and rapidly advancing area of research. The Genetic Toxicology Gordon Research Conference is biannual with an evolving change in the emphasis of the meetings. From evaluating the nature of genotoxic chemicals, which lay at the centre of the early

  4. The second international conference "genetics of aging and longevity".

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.N. Anisimov; A. Bartke; N. Barzilai; M.A. Batin; M.V. Blagosklonny; H. Brown-Borg; Y. Budovskaya; J. Campisi; B. Friguet; V. Fraifeld; C. Franceschi; D. Gems; V. Gladyshev; V. Gorbunova; A.V. Gudkov; B. Kennedy; M. Konovalenko; B. Kraemer; A. Moskalev; I. Petropoulos; E. Pasyukova; S. Rattan; B. Rogina; A. Seluanov; M. Shaposhnikov; R. Shmookler Reis; N. Tavernarakis; J. Vijg; A. Yashin; P. Zimniak

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing revolution in aging research was manifested by the Second International Conference "Genetics of Aging and Longevity" (Moscow, April 22-25, 2012). The Conference goal was to identify the most promising areas of genetics, life expectancy, and aging, including: the search for longevity gene

  5. Clinical Genetic Testing in Gastroenterology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Russell P; Chung, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Rapid advances in genetics have led to an increased understanding of the genetic determinants of human disease, including many gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Coupled with a proliferation of genetic testing services, this has resulted in a clinical landscape where commercially available genetic tests for GI disorders are now widely available. In this review, we discuss the current status of clinical genetic testing for GI illnesses, review the available testing options, and briefly discuss indications for and practical aspects of such testing. Our goal is to familiarize the practicing gastroenterologist with this rapidly changing and important aspect of clinical care. PMID:27124700

  6. Feline genetics: clinical applications and genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A

    2010-11-01

    DNA testing for domestic cat diseases and appearance traits is a rapidly growing asset for veterinary medicine. Approximately 33 genes contain 50 mutations that cause feline health problems or alterations in the cat's appearance. A variety of commercial laboratories can now perform cat genetic diagnostics, allowing both the veterinary clinician and the private owner to obtain DNA test results. DNA is easily obtained from a cat via a buccal swab with a standard cotton bud or cytological brush, allowing DNA samples to be easily sent to any laboratory in the world. The DNA test results identify carriers of the traits, predict the incidence of traits from breeding programs, and influence medical prognoses and treatments. An overall goal of identifying these genetic mutations is the correction of the defect via gene therapies and designer drug therapies. Thus, genetic testing is an effective preventative medicine and a potential ultimate cure. However, genetic diagnostic tests may still be novel for many veterinary practitioners and their application in the clinical setting needs to have the same scrutiny as any other diagnostic procedure. This article will review the genetic tests for the domestic cat, potential sources of error for genetic testing, and the pros and cons of DNA results in veterinary medicine. Highlighted are genetic tests specific to the individual cat, which are a part of the cat's internal genome. PMID:21147473

  7. Feline genetics: clinical applications and genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A

    2010-11-01

    DNA testing for domestic cat diseases and appearance traits is a rapidly growing asset for veterinary medicine. Approximately 33 genes contain 50 mutations that cause feline health problems or alterations in the cat's appearance. A variety of commercial laboratories can now perform cat genetic diagnostics, allowing both the veterinary clinician and the private owner to obtain DNA test results. DNA is easily obtained from a cat via a buccal swab with a standard cotton bud or cytological brush, allowing DNA samples to be easily sent to any laboratory in the world. The DNA test results identify carriers of the traits, predict the incidence of traits from breeding programs, and influence medical prognoses and treatments. An overall goal of identifying these genetic mutations is the correction of the defect via gene therapies and designer drug therapies. Thus, genetic testing is an effective preventative medicine and a potential ultimate cure. However, genetic diagnostic tests may still be novel for many veterinary practitioners and their application in the clinical setting needs to have the same scrutiny as any other diagnostic procedure. This article will review the genetic tests for the domestic cat, potential sources of error for genetic testing, and the pros and cons of DNA results in veterinary medicine. Highlighted are genetic tests specific to the individual cat, which are a part of the cat's internal genome.

  8. Clinical Genetic Testing in Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Mefford, Heather C.

    2015-01-01

    New technologies for mutation detection in the human genome have greatly increased our understanding of epilepsy genetics. Application of genomic technologies in the clinical setting allows for more efficient genetic diagnosis in some patients; therefore, it is important to understand the types of tests available and the types of mutations that can be detected. Making a genetic diagnosis improves overall patient care by enhancing prognosis and recurrence risk counseling and informing treatmen...

  9. Measuring the Effectiveness of a Genetic Counseling Supervision Training Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzinger, Carrie L; He, Hua; Wusik, Katie

    2016-08-01

    Genetic counselors who receive formal training report increased confidence and competence in their supervisory roles. The effectiveness of specific formal supervision training has not been assessed previously. A day-long GC supervision conference was designed based on published supervision competencies and was attended by 37 genetic counselors. Linear Mixed Model and post-hoc paired t-test was used to compare Psychotherapy Supervisor Development Scale (PSDS) scores among/between individuals pre and post conference. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) model and post-hoc McNemar's test was used to determine if the conference had an effect on GC supervision competencies. PSDS scores were significantly increased 1 week (p competencies, attendees were more likely to agree they were able to perform them after the conference than before. These effects remained significant 6 months later. For the three remaining competencies, the majority of supervisors agreed they could perform these before the conference; therefore, no change was found. This exploratory study showed this conference increased the perceived confidence and competence of the supervisors who attended and increased their self-reported ability to perform certain supervision competencies. While still preliminary, this supports the idea that a one day conference on supervision has the potential to impact supervisor development.

  10. The use of online discussions for post-clinical conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkstresser, Kristie

    2016-01-01

    Nurse educators, at every level of pre-licensure nursing education, are charged with developing critical thinking skills within their students. Post-clinical conference is one teaching strategy that nurse educators can employ to help promote the development of critical thinking skills in pre-licensure nursing students. However, traditional face-to-face post-clinical conference is marred with issues and concerns, as identified in the nursing education literature. An alternative to face-to-face post-clinical conference, asynchronous online learning environment, mitigates the issues and concerns associated with traditional post-clinical conference. Adult learning theory supports the use of asynchronous online learning environment because the asynchronous online learning environment promotes student-centered teaching strategy in place of teacher-centered learning, which by its nature traditional face-to-face post-clinical conference tends to support. PMID:26159285

  11. Ethical dilemmas in clinical genetics.

    OpenAIRE

    Young, I D

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a survey of medical and paramedical opinion relating to various difficult ethical issues in clinical genetics. These include the confidentiality of the doctor-patient relationship, prenatal diagnosis and termination, and Huntington's chorea. It is suggested that this method provides a useful means of assessing what is ethically acceptable in contemporary society.

  12. The Application of Clinical Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurer MH

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Martin H MaurerDepartment of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; Mariaberg Hospital for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Gammertingen, GermanyIn 2012, The Application of Clinical Genetics enters its fifth year of publication. The journal has had a change of Editor-in-Chief: Dr David H Tegay stepped down and I was appointed to serve as the new Editor-in-Chief. As his successor, I thank Dr Tegay for his great work for the journal. I hope I can continue his successful editorial contributions. Moreover, I thank the many reviewers for their sustained support of the journal.The Application of Clinical Genetics is dedicated to open access publishing – as all Dove Press journals are. This means that authors will be charged for the publication process, but the acceptance of a manuscript is based solely on its scientific quality. This is what I will be responsible for as Editor-in-Chief. The team at Dove Press is a constant help with all administrative duties concerning peer reviewal, and I want to express my thanks for their prompt and reliable help. The field of clinical genetics is facing new challenges with the broad availability of large-scale screening methods for gene mutations, such as high-throughput sequencing and biochips. This means that ethical issues regarding the handling of genetic information must be addressed, both for the individual and for society.1–3 For example, sequencing of cell-free, fetal nucleic acids in the maternal blood to locate fetal aneuploidy, especially trisomy 21, may become broadly available soon, with even faster results than conventional methods such as amniocentesis.

  13. 8th International Conference on Genetic and Evolutionary Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Chin-Yu; Lin, Chun-Wei; Pan, Jeng-Shyang; Snasel, Vaclav; Abraham, Ajith

    2015-01-01

    This volume of Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing contains accepted papers presented at ICGEC 2014, the 8th International Conference on Genetic and Evolutionary Computing. The conference this year was technically co-sponsored by Nanchang Institute of Technology in China, Kaohsiung University of Applied Science in Taiwan, and VSB-Technical University of Ostrava. ICGEC 2014 is held from 18-20 October 2014 in Nanchang, China. Nanchang is one of is the capital of Jiangxi Province in southeastern China, located in the north-central portion of the province. As it is bounded on the west by the Jiuling Mountains, and on the east by Poyang Lake, it is famous for its scenery, rich history and cultural sites. Because of its central location relative to the Yangtze and Pearl River Delta regions, it is a major railroad hub in Southern China. The conference is intended as an international forum for the researchers and professionals in all areas of genetic and evolutionary computing.

  14. 7th International Conference on Genetic and Evolutionary Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Krömer, Pavel; Snášel, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and Evolutionary Computing This volume of Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing contains accepted papers presented at ICGEC 2013, the 7th International Conference on Genetic and Evolutionary Computing. The conference this year was technically co-sponsored by The Waseda University in Japan, Kaohsiung University of Applied Science in Taiwan, and VSB-Technical University of Ostrava. ICGEC 2013 was held in Prague, Czech Republic. Prague is one of the most beautiful cities in the world whose magical atmosphere has been shaped over ten centuries. Places of the greatest tourist interest are on the Royal Route running from the Powder Tower through Celetna Street to Old Town Square, then across Charles Bridge through the Lesser Town up to the Hradcany Castle. One should not miss the Jewish Town, and the National Gallery with its fine collection of Czech Gothic art, collection of old European art, and a beautiful collection of French art. The conference was intended as an international forum for the res...

  15. 9th International Conference on Genetic and Evolutionary Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Jerry; Pan, Jeng-Shyang; Tin, Pyke; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Genetic and Evolutionary Computing

    2016-01-01

    This volume of Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing contains accepted papers presented at ICGEC 2015, the 9th International Conference on Genetic and Evolutionary Computing. The conference this year was technically co-sponsored by Ministry of Science and Technology, Myanmar, University of Computer Studies, Yangon, University of Miyazaki in Japan, Kaohsiung University of Applied Science in Taiwan, Fujian University of Technology in China and VSB-Technical University of Ostrava. ICGEC 2015 is held from 26-28, August, 2015 in Yangon, Myanmar. Yangon, the most multiethnic and cosmopolitan city in Myanmar, is the main gateway to the country. Despite being the commercial capital of Myanmar, Yangon is a city engulfed by its rich history and culture, an integration of ancient traditions and spiritual heritage. The stunning SHWEDAGON Pagoda is the center piece of Yangon city, which itself is famous for the best British colonial era architecture. Of particular interest in many shops of Bogyoke Aung San Market,...

  16. Meeting Report: The 24th Fungal Genetics Conference at Asilomar, California, USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jian-Ping

    2007-01-01

    @@ The 24th Fungal Genetics Conference was recently held at the Asilomar Conference Center in the coastal town of Pacific Grove, Monterey County, California, USA, between March 20th and 25th, 2007. At this conference, there were 750 participants representing 33 countries, with the number of participants reaching the maximum holding capacity of the conference center. About 200 people were on the waiting list and could not attend the meeting because of space limitations.

  17. Conference scene: pharmacogenomics: from cell to clinic (part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siest, Gérard; Medeiros, Rui; Melichar, Bohuslav; Stathopoulou, Maria; Van Schaik, Ron Hn; Cacabelos, Ramon; Abt, Peter Meier; Monteiro, Carolino; Gurwitz, David; Queiroz, Jao; Mota-Filipe, Helder; Ndiaye, Ndeye Coumba; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    Second International ESPT Meeting Lisbon, Portugal, 26-28 September 2013 The second European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Theranostics (ESPT) conference was organized in Lisbon, Portugal, and attracted 250 participants from 37 different countries. The participants could listen to 50 oral presentations, participate in five lunch symposia and were able to view 83 posters and an exhibition. Part 1 of this Conference Scene was presented in the previous issue of Pharmacogenomics. This second part will focus on: clinical implementation of pharmacogenomics tests; transporters and pharmacogenomics; stem cells and other new tools for pharmacogenomics and drug discovery; from system pharmacogenomics to personalized medicine; and, finally, we will discuss the Posters and Awards that were presented at the conference.

  18. Twenty-second Fungal Genetics Conference - Asilomar, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan D. Walton

    2003-06-30

    The purpose of the Twenty Second Fungal Genetics Conference is to bring together scientists and students who are interested in genetic approaches to studying the biology of filamentous fungi. It is intended to stimulate thinking and discussion in an atmosphere that supports interactions between scientists at different levels and in different disciplines. Topics range from the basic to the applied. Filamentous fungi impact human affairs in many ways. In the environment they are the most important agents of decay and nutrient turnover. They are used extensively in the food industry for the production of food enzymes such as pectinase and food additives such as citric acid. They are used in the production of fermented foods such as alcoholic drinks, bread, cheese, and soy sauce. More than a dozen species of mushrooms are used as foods directly. Many of our most important antibiotics, such as penicillin, cyclosporin, and lovastatin, come from fungi. Fungi also have many negative impacts on human health and economics. Fungi are serious pathogens in immuno-compromised patients. Fungi are the single largest group of plant pathogens and thus a serious limit on crop productivity throughout the world. Many fungi are allergenic, and mold contamination of residences and commercial buildings is now recognized as a serious public health threat. As decomposers, fungi cause extensive damage to just about all natural and synthetic materials.

  19. CLINICAL, RADIOLOGICAL AND GENETIC ASPECTS OF LEUKODYSTROPHIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laszlo, A.; Elpeleg, On; Horvath, K.; Jakobs, C.; Kobor, J.; Gal, A.; Barsi, P.; Kelemen, A.; Saracz, J.; Svekus, A.; Tegzes, A.; Voeroes, E.

    2010-01-01

    The authors summarize the pathomechanism of the myelination process, the clinical, radiological and the genetical aspects of the leukodystrophies, as in 18q deletion syndrome, adrenoleukodysrtophy, metachromatic leukodystrophy, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher leukodystrophy, Alexander disease and olivo-ponto-c

  20. 76 FR 72957 - 4th Annual Trauma Spectrum Conference: Bridging the Gap Between Research and Clinical Practice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health 4th Annual Trauma Spectrum Conference: Bridging the Gap... Annual Trauma Spectrum Conference: Bridging the Gap Between Research and Clinical Practice of... conference information, visit the Trauma Spectrum Conference Web site at...

  1. Consensus Conference on Clinical Management of pediatric Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Elena; Neri, Iria; Ricci, Giampaolo; Baldo, Ermanno; Barone, Maurizio; Belloni Fortina, Anna; Bernardini, Roberto; Berti, Irene; Caffarelli, Carlo; Calamelli, Elisabetta; Capra, Lucetta; Carello, Rossella; Cipriani, Francesca; Comberiati, Pasquale; Diociaiuti, Andrea; El Hachem, Maya; Fontana, Elena; Gruber, Michaela; Haddock, Ellen; Maiello, Nunzia; Meglio, Paolo; Patrizi, Annalisa; Peroni, Diego; Scarponi, Dorella; Wielander, Ingrid; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2016-01-01

    The Italian Consensus Conference on clinical management of atopic dermatitis in children reflects the best and most recent scientific evidence, with the aim to provide specialists with a useful tool for managing this common, but complex clinical condition. Thanks to the contribution of experts in the field and members of the Italian Society of Pediatric Allergology and Immunology (SIAIP) and the Italian Society of Pediatric Dermatology (SIDerP), this Consensus statement integrates the basic principles of the most recent guidelines for the management of atopic dermatitis to facilitate a practical approach to the disease. The therapeutical approach should be adapted to the clinical severity and requires a tailored strategy to ensure good compliance by children and their parents. In this Consensus, levels and models of intervention are also enriched by the Italian experience to facilitate a practical approach to the disease.

  2. International conference. The problems of radiation genetics at the turn of the century. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information concerning International conference: The problems of radiation genetics at the turn of the century - held in Moscow, November, 2000, is presented. The conference is dedicated to the memory of Timofeev-Resovsky (centenary of birth). Analysis of the development of concepts of the radiation genetics founder concerning study of genetic radiation effects on plants, animals and man is given. Molecular-genetic mechanisms of radiation mutagenesis are considered. Problems related to the analysis of delayed genetic radiation effects on the different types. Populations and regularities in radiation-induced mutagenesis at cellular, tissue and body levels are discussed. Great attention is paid to the genetic consequences for population, flora and fauna of Chernobyl and Kyshtym accidents, nuclear explosions at Semipalatinsk test site and other emergency radiation situations

  3. June 6—7, 2011 Clinical Trials Conference: New Challenges & Opportunities | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn Javascript on. June 6–7, 2011 Clinical Trials Conference: New Challenges & Opportunities Past Issues / Spring 2011 ... pressing issues in clinical trials, including: Support the Clinical Trials Conference If you or your organization would like ...

  4. Technical conference of the section 'Genetic Engineering and Environmental Protection'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference was held on 13 November 2000 by the GSF Research Centre for Ecology and Health on behalf of the Bavarian State Minister of Regional Development and the Environment. It was attended by about 50 scientists working in this field and 50 representatives of universities and other scientific institutions, who presented new findings of their research projects. (orig.)

  5. Palmoplantar keratodermas: clinical and genetic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Has, Cristina; Technau-Hafsi, Kristin

    2016-02-01

    Palmoplantar keratodermas comprise a diverse group of acquired and hereditary disorders marked by excessive thickening of the epidermis of palms and soles. Early onset and positive family history suggest a genetic cause. While hereditary forms of palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) may represent the sole or dominant clinical feature, they may also be associated with other ectodermal defects or extracutaneous manifestations. In recent years, much progress has been made in deciphering the genetic basis of PPK, which has led to the emergence of new disorders and syndromes. The elucidation of disease mechanisms has opened new avenues for specific therapies, increasingly sparking interest in this field. Given the high heterogeneity with respect to clinical features, genetic defects, and disease mechanisms, the classification of PPK is based on various criteria. These include extent of disease manifestations, morphology of palmoplantar skin involvement, inheritance patterns, and molecular pathogenesis. Though not always feasible, the clinical distinction of various PPK entities is based on fine-tuned criteria or clues. Remarkably, apparently distinct disorders have been shown to be allelic, as they are caused by mutations in the same gene. By contrast, similar clinical pictures may result from mutations in different genes. Because of this complexity, mutation analysis is required to determine the precise type of PPK. The best-defined entities are described in this review. PMID:26819106

  6. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: clinical and genetic aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D’Auria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a rare, genetically heterogeneous disease, characterized by ciliary disfunction and impaired mucociliary clearance, resulting in a range of clinical manifestations such as chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, chronic rhino-sinusitis, chronic otitis media, situs viscerum inversus in almost 40-50% of cases and male infertility. The triad situs viscerum inversus, bronchiectasis and sinusitis is known as Kartagener syndrome. Up to now little is known about genetic, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of primary motile ciliary diseases in children: for this reason, diagnosis is generally delayed and almost all treatments for PCD are not based on randomized studies but extrapolated from cystic fibrosis guidelines. The aim of this review is to propose to pediatricians a summary of current clinical and diagnostic evidence to obtain better knoledwge of this condition. The earlier diagnosis and the right treatment are both crucial to improve the prognosis of PCD.

  7. Clinical Genetic Testing of Periodic Fever Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Marcuzzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodic fever syndromes (PFSs are a wide group of autoinflammatory diseases. Due to some clinical overlap between different PFSs, differential diagnosis can be a difficult challenge. Nowadays, there are no universally agreed recommendations for most PFSs, and near half of patients may remain without a genetic diagnosis even after performing multiple-gene analyses. Molecular analysis of periodic fevers’ causative genes can improve patient quality of life by providing early and accurate diagnosis and allowing the administration of appropriate treatment. In this paper we focus our discussion on effective usefulness of genetic diagnosis of PFSs. The aim of this paper is to establish how much can the diagnostic system improve, in order to increase the success of PFS diagnosis. The mayor expectation in the near future will be addressed to the so-called next generation sequencing approach. Although the application of bioinformatics to high-throughput genetic analysis could allow the identification of complex genotypes, the complexity of this definition will hardly result in a clear contribution for the physician. In our opinion, however, to obtain the best from this new development a rule should always be kept well in mind: use genetics only to answer specific clinical questions.

  8. Currently Clinical Views on Genetics of Wilson′s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chen

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Clinical genetics studies are necessary to understand the mechanism underlying WD at the molecular level from the genotype to the phenotype. Clinical genetics research benefits newly emerging medical treatments including stem cell transplantation and gene therapy for WD patients.

  9. An everlasting role of genetics and genomics in public health: a meeting report of ACGA-HKSMG International Conference on Genetic and Genomic Medicine 2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wai-Yee Chan; Stephen T.S.Lam; Bai-Lin Wu

    2009-01-01

    @@ The Association of Chinese Geneticists in America (ACGA) and the Hong Kong Society of Medical Genetics (HKSMG) held their first joint Conference on Genetic and Genomic Medicine in Hong Kong from June 9-11 in 2008at the Cheung Kung Hai Conference Center, William MW Mong Block, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, the University of Hong Kong.

  10. Making a difference: education at the 10th International Conference on Zebrafish Development and Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Lara D; Liang, Jennifer O; Pickart, Michael A; Pierret, Chris; Tomasciewicz, Henry G

    2012-12-01

    Scientists, educators, and students met at the 10th International Conference on Zebrafish Development and Genetics during the 2-day Education Workshop, chaired by Dr. Jennifer Liang and supported in part by the Genetics Society of America. The goal of the workshop was to share expertise, to discuss the challenges faced when using zebrafish in the classroom, and to articulate goals for expanding the impact of zebrafish in education.

  11. Immunochip SNP array identifies novel genetic variants conferring susceptibility to candidaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Vinod; Cheng, Shih-Chin; Johnson, Melissa D.; Smeekens, Sanne P.; Wojtowicz, Agnieszka; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos; Karjalainen, Juha; Franke, Lude; Withoff, Sebo; Plantinga, Theo S.; de Veerdonk, Frank L. van; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Sokol, Harry; Bauer, Hermann; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Marchetti, Oscar; Perfect, John R.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Netea, Mihai G.

    2014-01-01

    Candidaemia is the fourth most common cause of bloodstream infection, with a high mortality rate of up to 40%. Identification of host genetic factors that confer susceptibility to candidaemia may aid in designing adjunctive immunotherapeutic strategies. Here we hypothesize that variation in immune g

  12. FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2002-02-01

    The 2001 meeting entitled ''Genetic Recombination and Genome Rearrangements'' was held July 21-26 in Snowmass, Colorado. The goal of the meeting was to bring together scientists using diverse approaches to study all aspects of genetic recombination. This goal was achieved by integrating talks covering the genetics, biochemistry and structural biology of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and nonhomologous recombination. The format of the meeting consisted of a keynote address on the opening evening, two formal plenary sessions on each of the four full meeting days, a single afternoon workshop consisting of short talks chosen from among submitted abstracts, and afternoon poster sessions on each of the four full meeting days. The eight plenary session were entitled: (1) Recombination Mechanisms, (2) Prokaryotic Recombination, (3) Repair and Recombination, (4) Site-specific Recombination and Transposition, (5) Eukaryotic Recombination I, (6) Genome Rearrangements, (7) Meiosis, and (8) Eukaryotic Recombination II. Each session included a mix of genetic, biochemical and structural talks; talks were limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of very lively, general discussion. Much of the data presented in the plenary sessions was unpublished, thus providing attendees with the most up-to-date knowledge of this rapidly-moving field.

  13. PREFACE: XVII Congress of Bioengineering and VI Clinical Engineering Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Darío

    2011-09-01

    SABI 2009 was the XVII Biennial Congress of the Argentinean Bioengineering Society (SABI - www.sabi.org.ar), celebrated along with the VI Clinical Engineering Conference. It took place in Rosario, the second city of Argentina, located on the west bank of the Paraná, one of the world's most important rivers. This city, with its 150 year history and one million inhabitants, is characterized by a strong enterprising spirit. It is the agroindustrial leader of Argentina, with cereal ports recognized to be among the most active in the world, and its cereal stock exchange competes with Chicago's in international cereal pricing. Demographically Rosario presents a European profile, and there are seven national and private higher level universities in the area. SABI 2009 was the first time the Congress was celebrated in Rosario. Usually the Congress is organized by the Bioengineering Society in cooperation with a university with an undergraduate program, which Rosario lacks. To meet the needs of this exceptional case, a young local institution was asked to coordinate the Congress, the Rosario Technological Center (www.polotecnologico.net). This organization gathers together around 100 companies that produce technology, with a large number focused on IT, but those focused on biotechnology also stand out. The Center is also integrated with relevant public and government bodies. Traditionally, bioengineering has been related to human health applications, with less emphasis on applications significant to agrotechnology, an area in which Rosario is growing as an economic force. In order to address this oversight, the Congress formulated its main goals for integrating and synergizing bioengineering and biotechnology, particularly bioengineering and agrotechnology. This initiative has produced promising results. The importance of the Congress was reflected in the high number of participants - including researchers, professionals and students - from abroad, with participants from

  14. Clinical and genetic heterogeneity of erythrokeratoderma variabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common, John E A; O'Toole, Edel A; Leigh, Irene M; Thomas, Anna; Griffiths, William A D; Venning, Vanessa; Grabczynska, Sophie; Peris, Zdravko; Kansky, Aleksej; Kelsell, David P

    2005-11-01

    The skin disease erythrokeratoderma variabilis (EKV) has been shown to be associated with mutations in GJB3 and GJB4 encoding connexin (Cx)31 and Cx30.3, respectively. Gap junctions composed of Cx proteins are intracellular channels providing a mechanism of synchronized cellular response facilitating metabolic and electronic functions of the cell. In the skin, Cx31 and Cx30.3 are expressed in the stratum granulosum of the epidermis with a suggested role in late keratinocyte differentiation. Molecular investigations of GJB3 and GJB4 were performed in five pedigrees and three sporadic cases of EKV. Mutational analyzes revealed disease-associated Cx31 or Cx30.3 mutations in only three probands of which two were novel mutations and one was a recurrent mutation. These genetic studies further demonstrate the heterogeneous nature of the erythrokeratodermas as not all individuals that were clinically diagnosed with EKV harbor Cx31 or Cx30.3 mutations.

  15. [Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis: physiopathology, clinical manifestations and genetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Yudith; Santos, José L; Smalley, Susan V; Maiz, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, caused by genetic deficiency of the 27-hydroxylase enzyme (encoded by CYP27A1). It plays a key role in cholesterol metabolism, especially in bile acid synthesis and in the 25-hydroxylation of vitamin D3 in the liver. Its deficiency causes reduced bile acid synthesis and tissue accumulation of cholestanol. Clinical manifestations are related to the presence of cholestanol deposits and include tendon xanthomas, premature cataracts, chronic diarrhea, progressive neurologic impairment and less frequently coronary heart disease, early onset osteoporosis and abnormalities in the optic disk and retina. An early diagnosis and treatment with quenodeoxycholic acid may prevent further complications, mainly neurological manifestations. This review summarizes cholesterol metabolism related to bile acid synthesis, physiopathology, biochemistry and treatment of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis. PMID:25427019

  16. Paragangliomas/Pheochromocytomas: Clinically Oriented Genetic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute Martins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paragangliomas are rare neuroendocrine tumors that arise in the sympathetic or parasympathetic nervous system. Sympathetic paragangliomas are mainly found in the adrenal medulla (designated pheochromocytomas but may also have a thoracic, abdominal, or pelvic localization. Parasympathetic paragangliomas are generally located at the head or neck. Knowledge concerning the familial forms of paragangliomas has greatly improved in recent years. Additionally to the genes involved in the classical syndromic forms: VHL gene (von Hippel-Lindau, RET gene (Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2, and NF1 gene (Neurofibromatosis type 1, 10 novel genes have so far been implicated in the occurrence of paragangliomas/pheochromocytomas: SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2, TMEM127, MAX, EGLN1, HIF2A, and KIF1B. It is currently accepted that about 35% of the paragangliomas cases are due to germline mutations in one of these genes. Furthermore, somatic mutations of RET, VHL, NF1, MAX, HIF2A, and H-RAS can also be detected. The identification of the mutation responsible for the paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma phenotype in a patient may be crucial in determining the treatment and allowing specific follow-up guidelines, ultimately leading to a better prognosis. Herein, we summarize the most relevant aspects regarding the genetics and clinical aspects of the syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma aiming to provide an algorithm for genetic testing.

  17. Genetic transformation of deciduous fruit trees conferring resistance against diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long breeding cycles make cultivar development a lengthy process in deciduous fruit species. Gene transfer is, accordingly, a goal with significant commercial value. In many plant species, especially in woody plants, a prerequisite for genetic engineering is the ability to regenerate plants from transformed cells. Development of single cell regeneration is the first step towards exploration of gene transfer techniques. In this investigation media for plum and apple leaf disk regeneration were developed. Transformation experiments were performed. The vector EHA105 containing the gus-intron gene was found to be effective for gene transfer. Induction of the virG genes with aceto-syringone did not enhance transformation. Cefotaxime that was supplemented in the plum selection medium to suppress the Agrobacterium vector seriously inhibited leaf disk regeneration. However, in applies it was not detrimental. With further apple transformation experiments, factors such as preculturing, age of leaves, sucrose and cefotaxime concentrations did not increase the transformation efficiency of the marker gene. The harpin protein, essential for the pathogenicity of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae which incites bacterial canker of stone fruit, ws amplified and cloned into an expression vector. The fusion protein was purified. This will be used in future studies to elucidate the host-pathogen interaction, and to identify antibacterial genes. (author)

  18. 13th AINSE radiation biology conference: conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The forty one papers presented at this conference covered the areas of radiation induced lesions, apoptosis, genetics and radiobiological consequences of low level radiation exposure, clinical applications of radiation, mammalian cells radiosensitivity and radiation-activated proteins

  19. Live surgery at conferences - Clinical benefits and ethical dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip-Watson, Joanna; Khan, Shahid A A; Hadjipavlou, Marios; Rane, Abhay; Knoll, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Live surgical broadcasts (LSBs) are becoming increasingly popular in urological conferences. These activities can provide excellent training opportunities, as they allow the audience to view an operation conducted by world-renowned surgeons, and have the ability to interact with them in real time. However, several ethical considerations have been raised with this practice, which the participating surgeons and conference organisers must appreciate and address carefully. In this article we highlight the ethical considerations related to LSBs and advise on how these should be addressed. We also present the latest recommendations made by the European Association of Urology Live Surgery Committee and discuss alternatives to LSB.

  20. Live surgery at conferences - Clinical benefits and ethical dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip-Watson, Joanna; Khan, Shahid A A; Hadjipavlou, Marios; Rane, Abhay; Knoll, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Live surgical broadcasts (LSBs) are becoming increasingly popular in urological conferences. These activities can provide excellent training opportunities, as they allow the audience to view an operation conducted by world-renowned surgeons, and have the ability to interact with them in real time. However, several ethical considerations have been raised with this practice, which the participating surgeons and conference organisers must appreciate and address carefully. In this article we highlight the ethical considerations related to LSBs and advise on how these should be addressed. We also present the latest recommendations made by the European Association of Urology Live Surgery Committee and discuss alternatives to LSB. PMID:26019946

  1. A Case Based Approach to Clinical Genetics of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm/Dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Betti; Nistri, Stefano; Sticchi, Elena; De Cario, Rosina; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Pepe, Guglielmina

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection (TAAD) is a potential lethal condition with a rising incidence. This condition may occur sporadically; nevertheless, it displays familial clustering in >20% of the cases. Family history confers a six- to twentyfold increased risk of TAAD and has to be considered in the identification and evaluation of patients needing an adequate clinical follow-up. Familial TAAD recognizes a number of potential etiologies with a significant genetic heterogeneity, in either syndromic or nonsyndromic forms of the manifestation. The clinical impact and the management of patients with TAAD differ according to the syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of the manifestation. The clinical management of TAAD patients varies, depending on the different forms. Starting from the description of patient history, in this paper, we summarized the state of the art concerning assessment of clinical/genetic profile and therapeutic management of TAAD patients. PMID:27314043

  2. A Case Based Approach to Clinical Genetics of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm/Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betti Giusti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection (TAAD is a potential lethal condition with a rising incidence. This condition may occur sporadically; nevertheless, it displays familial clustering in >20% of the cases. Family history confers a six- to twentyfold increased risk of TAAD and has to be considered in the identification and evaluation of patients needing an adequate clinical follow-up. Familial TAAD recognizes a number of potential etiologies with a significant genetic heterogeneity, in either syndromic or nonsyndromic forms of the manifestation. The clinical impact and the management of patients with TAAD differ according to the syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of the manifestation. The clinical management of TAAD patients varies, depending on the different forms. Starting from the description of patient history, in this paper, we summarized the state of the art concerning assessment of clinical/genetic profile and therapeutic management of TAAD patients.

  3. A Case Based Approach to Clinical Genetics of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm/Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Betti; Nistri, Stefano; Sticchi, Elena; De Cario, Rosina; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Pepe, Guglielmina

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection (TAAD) is a potential lethal condition with a rising incidence. This condition may occur sporadically; nevertheless, it displays familial clustering in >20% of the cases. Family history confers a six- to twentyfold increased risk of TAAD and has to be considered in the identification and evaluation of patients needing an adequate clinical follow-up. Familial TAAD recognizes a number of potential etiologies with a significant genetic heterogeneity, in either syndromic or nonsyndromic forms of the manifestation. The clinical impact and the management of patients with TAAD differ according to the syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of the manifestation. The clinical management of TAAD patients varies, depending on the different forms. Starting from the description of patient history, in this paper, we summarized the state of the art concerning assessment of clinical/genetic profile and therapeutic management of TAAD patients. PMID:27314043

  4. Genetic Barriers to Resistance and Impact on Clinical Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luber Andrew D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of drug resistance and cross-resistance continues to pose a challenge to successful long-term antiretroviral therapy despite the availability of new antiretroviral agents. The genetic barrier to resistance of a regimen does not directly correlate with its effectiveness. For some regimens with a low genetic barrier to resistance, however, the emergence of only 1 or 2 key resistance mutations may confer drug resistance not only to that regimen but also to other agents, thereby limiting subsequent treatment options. In addition to the genetic barrier to resistance, factors such as efficacy, safety, tolerability, convenience, and adherence must be considered when choosing a regimen.

  5. PREFACE: XVII Congress of Bioengineering and VI Clinical Engineering Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Darío

    2011-09-01

    SABI 2009 was the XVII Biennial Congress of the Argentinean Bioengineering Society (SABI - www.sabi.org.ar), celebrated along with the VI Clinical Engineering Conference. It took place in Rosario, the second city of Argentina, located on the west bank of the Paraná, one of the world's most important rivers. This city, with its 150 year history and one million inhabitants, is characterized by a strong enterprising spirit. It is the agroindustrial leader of Argentina, with cereal ports recognized to be among the most active in the world, and its cereal stock exchange competes with Chicago's in international cereal pricing. Demographically Rosario presents a European profile, and there are seven national and private higher level universities in the area. SABI 2009 was the first time the Congress was celebrated in Rosario. Usually the Congress is organized by the Bioengineering Society in cooperation with a university with an undergraduate program, which Rosario lacks. To meet the needs of this exceptional case, a young local institution was asked to coordinate the Congress, the Rosario Technological Center (www.polotecnologico.net). This organization gathers together around 100 companies that produce technology, with a large number focused on IT, but those focused on biotechnology also stand out. The Center is also integrated with relevant public and government bodies. Traditionally, bioengineering has been related to human health applications, with less emphasis on applications significant to agrotechnology, an area in which Rosario is growing as an economic force. In order to address this oversight, the Congress formulated its main goals for integrating and synergizing bioengineering and biotechnology, particularly bioengineering and agrotechnology. This initiative has produced promising results. The importance of the Congress was reflected in the high number of participants - including researchers, professionals and students - from abroad, with participants from

  6. Adducted thumbs : A clinical clue to genetic diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, J. M. A.; Schrander-Stumpel, C. T. R. M.; Blezer, M. M. J.; Weber, J. W.; Schrander, J. J. P.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M. E.; Bakker, J. A.; Stegmann, A. P. A.; Vos, Y. J.; Frints, S. G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Adducted thumbs are an uncommon congenital malformation. It can be an important clinical clue in genetic syndromes, e. g. the L1 syndrome. A retrospective survey was performed including patients with adducted thumbs referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics between 1985 and 2011 by perinatolog

  7. Genetic engineering in insects: Cloning and transformation of genes conferring resistance to insecticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic engineering and transformation offer the possibility of modifying the genetic material of insects. These techniques will make it possible, for example, to transfer genes conferring resistance to insecticides into the genome of beneficial species, or to develop new methods of combating insect pests and disease carrying insects. We cloned two genes which contain the code for proteins that detoxify insecticides. The first, esterase B1 from Culex quinquefasciatus, is amplified approximately 250 times in Californian mosquitoes resistant to organic phosphate insecticides. A second esterase gene was cloned from bacteria which break down various organic phosphates. Experiments are in progress to transfer these genes to Drosophila and beneficial insects. These same genes could also serve as selection markers for the purpose of developing transformation techniques for different insects whose genome one wishes to modify using genetic engineering techniques. (author). 5 refs

  8. Biomarkers in Clinical Trials--SMi Conference. 23-24 September 2009, London, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Glenda

    2009-11-01

    The Biomarkers in Clinical Trials conference, held in London, included topics covering new developments in the field of biomarkers. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the definition of biomarkers, the use of biomarkers to support decisions in drug development and to improve treatment outcomes, and the aims of the Biomarkers Consortium. A case study of the investigational drug selumetinib (AstraZeneca plc) is also discussed.

  9. Genetics and the clinical approach to paragangliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, K-M; Talat, N; Galata, G; Aylwin, S; Izatt, L; Eisenhofer, G; Barthel, A; Bornstein, S R

    2014-12-01

    This study analyses new information on gene mutations in paragangliomas and puts them into a clinical context. A suspicion of malignancy is critical to determine the workup and surgical approach in adrenal (A-PGL) and extra-adrenal (E-PGL) paragangliomas (PGLs). Malignancy rates vary with location, family history, and gene tests results. Currently there is no algorithm incorporating the above information for clinical use. A sum of 1,821 articles were retrieved from PubMed using the search terms "paraganglioma genetics". Thirty-seven articles were selected of which 9 were analyzed. It was found that 599/2,487 (24%) patients affected with paragangliomas had a germline mutation. Of these 30.2% were mutations in SDHB, 25% VHL, 19.4% RET, 18.4% SDHD, 5.0% NF1, and 2.0% SDHC genes. A family history was positive in 18.1-64.3% of patients. Adrenal PGLs accounted for 55.1% in mutation (+) and 81.0% in mutation (-) patients (RR 1.2, p < 0.0001). Bilateral A-PGLs accounted for 56.4% in mutation (+) and 3.2% in mutation (-) patients (RR 8.7, p < 0.0001). E-PGL were found in 33.6% of mut+ and 17.3% of mut- (RR 1.7, p < 0.0001). In mutation (+) patients PGLs malignancy varied with location, adrenal (6.4%) thoraco-abdominal E-PGL (38%), H & N E-PGL (10%). Malignancy rates were 8.2% in mutation (-) and lower in mutation (+) PGLs except for SDHB 36.5% and SDHC 8.3%. Exclusion of a mutation lowered the probability of malignancy significantly in E-PGL (RR 0.03 (95% CI 0.1-0.6); p < 0.001). Mutation analysis provides valuable preoperative information to assess the risk of malignancy in A-PG and E-PGLs and should be considered in the work up of all E-PGL lesions. PMID:25014332

  10. Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva: Clinical and Genetic Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pignolo Robert J

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP is a severely disabling heritable disorder of connective tissue characterized by congenital malformations of the great toes and progressive heterotopic ossification that forms qualitatively normal bone in characteristic extraskeletal sites. The worldwide prevalence is approximately 1/2,000,000. There is no ethnic, racial, gender, or geographic predilection to FOP. Children who have FOP appear normal at birth except for congenital malformations of the great toes. During the first decade of life, sporadic episodes of painful soft tissue swellings (flare-ups occur which are often precipitated by soft tissue injury, intramuscular injections, viral infection, muscular stretching, falls or fatigue. These flare-ups transform skeletal muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, and aponeuroses into heterotopic bone, rendering movement impossible. Patients with atypical forms of FOP have been described. They either present with the classic features of FOP plus one or more atypical features [FOP plus], or present with major variations in one or both of the two classic defining features of FOP [FOP variants]. Classic FOP is caused by a recurrent activating mutation (617G>A; R206H in the gene ACVR1/ALK2 encoding Activin A receptor type I/Activin-like kinase 2, a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP type I receptor. Atypical FOP patients also have heterozygous ACVR1 missense mutations in conserved amino acids. The diagnosis of FOP is made by clinical evaluation. Confirmatory genetic testing is available. Differential diagnosis includes progressive osseous heteroplasia, osteosarcoma, lymphedema, soft tissue sarcoma, desmoid tumors, aggressive juvenile fibromatosis, and non-hereditary (acquired heterotopic ossification. Although most cases of FOP are sporadic (noninherited mutations, a small number of inherited FOP cases show germline transmission in an autosomal dominant pattern. At present, there is no definitive

  11. Clinical applications of schizophrenia genetics: genetic diagnosis, risk, and counseling in the molecular era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costain G

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gregory Costain1,2, Anne S Bassett1–41Clinical Genetics Research Program, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 2Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, 3Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine and Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network, 4Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Schizophrenia is a complex neuropsychiatric disease with documented clinical and genetic heterogeneity, and evidence for neurodevelopmental origins. Driven by new genetic technologies and advances in molecular medicine, there has recently been concrete progress in understanding some of the specific genetic causes of this serious psychiatric illness. In particular, several large rare structural variants have been convincingly associated with schizophrenia, in targeted studies over two decades with respect to 22q11.2 microdeletions, and more recently in large-scale, genome-wide case-control studies. These advances promise to help many families afflicted with this disease. In this review, we critically appraise recent developments in the field of schizophrenia genetics through the lens of immediate clinical applicability. Much work remains in translating the recent surge of genetic research discoveries into the clinic. The epidemiology and basic genetic parameters (such as penetrance and expression of most genomic disorders associated with schizophrenia are not yet well characterized. To date, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is the only established genetic subtype of schizophrenia of proven clinical relevance. We use this well-established association as a model to chart the pathway for translating emerging genetic discoveries into clinical practice. We also propose new directions for research involving general genetic risk prediction and counseling in schizophrenia.Keywords: schizophrenia, genetics, 22q11 deletion syndrome, copy number variation, genetic counseling, genetic predisposition to disease

  12. Epileptic syndromes: From clinic to genetic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Tafakhori

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Studies have demonstrated that genetic factors have a strong role in etiology of epilepsy. Mutations in genes encoding ion channels, neurotransmitters and other proteins involved in the neuronal biology have been recognized in different types of this disease. Moreover, some chromosomal aberration including ring chromosomes will result in epilepsy. In this review, we intend to highlight the role of molecular genetic in etiology of epilepsy syndromes, inspect the most recent classification of International League against Epilepsy and discuss the role of genetic counseling and genetic testing in management of epilepsy syndromes. Furthermore, we emphasize on collaboration of neurologists and geneticists to improve diagnosis and management.

  13. Epileptic syndromes: From clinic to genetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafakhori, Abbas; Aghamollaii, Vajiheh; Faghihi-Kashani, Sara; Sarraf, Payam; Habibi, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Studies have demonstrated that genetic factors have a strong role in etiology of epilepsy. Mutations in genes encoding ion channels, neurotransmitters and other proteins involved in the neuronal biology have been recognized in different types of this disease. Moreover, some chromosomal aberration including ring chromosomes will result in epilepsy. In this review, we intend to highlight the role of molecular genetic in etiology of epilepsy syndromes, inspect the most recent classification of International League against Epilepsy and discuss the role of genetic counseling and genetic testing in management of epilepsy syndromes. Furthermore, we emphasize on collaboration of neurologists and geneticists to improve diagnosis and management.

  14. The Clinical Genetics of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kommu Sashi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and the second highest cause of cancer-related mortality in the U.K. A genetic component in predisposition to prostate cancer has been recognized for decades. One of the strongest epidemiological risk factors for prostate cancer is a positive family history. The hunt for the genes that predispose to prostate cancer in families has been the focus of many research groups worldwide for the past 10 years. Both epidemiological and twin studies support a role for genetic predisposition to prostate cancer. Familial cancer loci have been found, but the genes that cause familial prostate cancer remain largely elusive. Unravelling the genetics of prostate cancer is challenging and is likely to involve the analysis of numerous predisposition genes. Current evidence supports the hypothesis that excess familial risk of prostate cancer could be due to the inheritance of multiple moderate-risk genetic variants. Although research on hereditary prostate cancer has improved our knowledge of the genetic aetiology of the disease, a lot of questions still remain unanswered. This article explores the current evidence that there is a genetic component to the aetiology of prostate cancer and attempts to put into context the diverse findings that have been shown to be possibly associated with the development of hereditary prostate cancer. Linkage searches over the last decade are summarised. It explores issues as to why understanding the genetics of prostate cancer has been so difficult and why despite this, it is still a major focus of research. Finally, current and future management strategies of men with Hereditary Prostate Cancer (HPC are discussed.

  15. Currently Clinical Views on Genetics of Wilson′s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Chen; Bo Shen; Jia-Jia Xiao; Rong Wu; Sarah Jane Duff Canning; Xiao-Ping Wang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to review the research on clinical genetics of Wilson′s disease (WD). Data Sources: We searched documents from PubMed and Wanfang databases both in English and Chinese up to 2014 using the keywords WD in combination with genetic, ATP7B gene, gene mutation, genotype, phenotype. Study Selection: Publications about the ATP7B gene and protein function associated with clinical features were selected. Results: Wilson′s disease, also named hepat...

  16. Changes in Emotion Work at Interdisciplinary Conferences Following Clinical Supervision in a Palliative Outpatient Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I describe changes in emotion work at weekly interdisciplinary conferences in a palliative1 outpatient ward following clinical supervision (CS). I conceive emotions as constantly negotiated in interaction, and I researched the similarity between how this is done during CS and at ...... conclude that CS enhances professional development and may prevent burnout in palliative care....

  17. Currently Clinical Views on Genetics of Wilson's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Chen; Bo Shen; Jia-Jia Xiao; Rong Wu; Sarah Jane Duff Canning; Xiao-Ping Wang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:The objective of this study was to review the research on clinical genetics of Wilson's disease (WD).Data Sources:We searched documents from PubMed and Wanfang databases both in English and Chinese up to 2014 using the keywords WD in combination with genetic,ATP7B gene,gene mutation,genotype,phenotype.Study Selection:Publications about the ATP7B gene and protein function associated with clinical features were selected.Results:Wilson's disease,also named hepatolenticular degeneration,is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by abnormal copper metabolism caused by mutations to the copper-transporting gene A TP7B.Decreased biliary copper excretion and reduced incorporation of copper into apoceruloplasmin caused by defunctionalization of ATP7B protein lead to accumulation of copper in many tissues and organs,including liver,brain,and cornea,finally resulting in liver disease and extrapyramidal symptoms.It is the most common genetic neurological disorder in the onset of adolescents,second to muscular dystrophy in China.Early diagnosis and medical therapy are of great significance for improving the prognosis of WD patients.However,diagnosis of this disease is usually difficult because of its complicated phenotypes.In the last 10 years,an increasing number of clinical studies have used molecular genetics techniques.Improved diagnosis and prediction of the progression of this disease at the molecular level will aid in the development of more individualized and effective interventions,which is a key to transition from molecular genetic research to the clinical study.Conclusions:Clinical genetics studies are necessary to understand the mechanism underlying WD at the molecular level from the genotype to the phenotype.Clinical genetics research benefits newly emerging medical treatments including stem cell transplantation and gene therapy for WD patients.

  18. Genetics of Cystic Fibrosis: Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Marie E

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common life-shortening autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). Almost 2000 variants in the CFTR gene have been identified. The mutational classes are based on the functional consequences on CFTR. New therapies are being developed to target mutant CFTR and restore CFTR function. Understanding specific CF genotypes is essential for providing state-of-the art care to patients. In addition to the variation in CFTR genotype, there are several modifier genes that contribute to the respiratory phenotype.

  19. The genetic landscape of Alzheimer disease: clinical implications and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cauwenberghe, Caroline; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Sleegers, Kristel

    2016-01-01

    The search for the genetic factors contributing to Alzheimer disease (AD) has evolved tremendously throughout the years. It started from the discovery of fully penetrant mutations in Amyloid precursor protein, Presenilin 1, and Presenilin 2 as a cause of autosomal dominant AD, the identification of the ɛ4 allele of Apolipoprotein E as a strong genetic risk factor for both early-onset and late-onset AD, and evolved to the more recent detection of at least 21 additional genetic risk loci for the genetically complex form of AD emerging from genome-wide association studies and massive parallel resequencing efforts. These advances in AD genetics are positioned in light of the current endeavor directing toward translational research and personalized treatment of AD. We discuss the current state of the art of AD genetics and address the implications and relevance of AD genetics in clinical diagnosis and risk prediction, distinguishing between monogenic and multifactorial AD. Furthermore, the potential and current limitations of molecular reclassification of AD to streamline clinical trials in drug development and biomarker studies are addressed. Genet Med 18 5, 421–430. PMID:26312828

  20. Genetic basis of Cowden syndrome and its implications for clinical practice and risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gammon A

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Amanda Gammon,1 Kory Jasperson,1,2 Marjan Gammon11Huntsman Cancer Institute Family Cancer Assessment Clinic Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2Ambry Genetics Medical Affairs Aliso Viejo, CA USAAbstract: Cowden syndrome (CS is an often difficult to recognize hereditary cancer predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN. In addition to conferring increased cancer risks, CS also predisposes individuals to developing hamartomatous growths in many areas of the body. Due to the rarity of CS, estimates vary on the penetrance of certain phenotypic features, such as macrocephaly and skin findings (trichilemmomas, mucocutaneous papules, as well as the conferred lifetime cancer risks. To address this variability, separate clinical diagnostic criteria and PTEN testing guidelines have been created to assist clinicians in the diagnosis of CS. As knowledge of CS increases, making larger studies of affected patients possible, these criteria continue to be refined. Similarly, the management guidelines for cancer screening and risk reduction in patients with CS continue to be updated. This review will summarize the current literature on CS to assist clinicians in staying abreast of recent advances in CS knowledge, diagnostic approaches, and management.Keywords: Cowden syndrome, PTEN gene, hereditary cancer, genetic counseling

  1. Autism--genetics, electrophysiology and clinical syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop-Jordanova, Nada; Plasevska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    Autism is a severe and the most heritable developmental disorder, whose pathogenesis is still largely unknown. The rising incidence of autism in the last decade has increased the scientific interest and research. More than a thousand papers concerned with information about the etiology of this "static disorder of the immature brain" can be found on Pub Med. The aim of this paper is to give a review of published genetic chromosomal anomalies associated with autistic spectrum disorders, as well as to discuss common syndromes associated with autistic traits. In addition, some of our own findings in genetics, as well as in quantitative electroencephalography and neurofeedback training in autistic children, will be presented and discussed. Generally, the subsequent analyses indicate that the causes of autism include fewer common single-gene mutations and chromosomal abnormalities, as well as multiple interacting genes of weak effect. Genome-wide linkage analysis has identified several susceptibility loci and positional and functional candidate genes which appear to represent possible risks of the autistic spectrum. Electrophysiological findings showed high delta/theta activity in frontal-central regions, while in 25% high beta activity was detected as a result of anxiety. Neurofeedback is a promising therapy for symptom mitigation.

  2. Wide disparity of clinical genetics services and EU rare disease research funding across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Sally Ann; Borg, Isabella

    2016-04-01

    The origins of clinical genetics services vary throughout Europe with some emerging from paediatric medicine and others from an academic laboratory setting. In 2011, the cross-border patients' rights directive recommended the creation of European Research Networks (ERNs) to improve patient care throughout EU. In 2013, the EU recommendation on the care for rare diseases came into place. The process of designating EU centres of expertise in rare diseases is being implemented to allow centres to enter ERNs. Hence, this is an opportune time to reflect on the current status of genetic services and research funding throughout Europe as 80 % of rare diseases have a genetic origin. Our aims were to determine (a) whether EU countries are prepared in terms of appropriate clinical genetic staffing to fulfil the European Union Committee of Experts on Rare Diseases (EUCERD) criteria that will allow national centres to be designated as centres of expertise, (b) which EU countries are successful in grant submissions to EU rare disease research funding and (c) country of origin of researchers from the EU presenting their research work as a spoken presentation at the European Society of Human Genetics annual conference. Our results show there is wide disparity of staffing levels per head of population in clinical genetics units throughout Europe. EU rare disease research funding is not being distributed equitably and the opportunity to present research is skewed with many countries not achieving spoken presentations despite abstract submissions. Inequity in the care of patients with rare diseases exists in Europe. Many countries will struggle to designate centres of expertise as their staffing mix and levels will not meet the EUCERD criteria which may prevent them from entering ERNs. The establishment of a small number of centres of expertise centrally, which is welcome, should not occur at the expense of an overall improvement in EU rare disease patient care. Caution should be

  3. Adducted thumbs: a clinical clue to genetic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, J M A; Schrander-Stumpel, C T R M; Blezer, M M J; Weber, J W; Schrander, J J P; Rubio-Gozalbo, M E; Bakker, J A; Stegmann, A P A; Vos, Y J; Frints, S G M

    2013-03-01

    Adducted thumbs are an uncommon congenital malformation. It can be an important clinical clue in genetic syndromes, e.g. the L1 syndrome. A retrospective survey was performed including patients with adducted thumbs referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics between 1985 and 2011 by perinatologists, (child) neurologists or paediatricians, in order to evaluate current knowledge on the genetic etiology of adducted thumbs. Twenty-five patients were included in this survey. Additional features were observed in 88% (22/25). In 25% (4/16) of the patients with adducted thumbs and congenital hydrocephalus L1CAM gene mutations were identified. One patient had a mosaic 5p13 duplication. Recommendations are made concerning the evaluation and genetic workup of patients with adducted thumbs. PMID:23220544

  4. Biotinidase deficiency: clinical and genetic studies of 38 Brazilian patients

    OpenAIRE

    Borsatto, Taciane; Sperb-Ludwig, Fernanda; Pinto, Louise LC; De Luca, Gisele R; Carvalho, Francisca L; De Souza, Carolina FM; De Medeiros, Paula FV; Charles M. Lourenço; Filho, Reinaldo LO; Neto, Eurico C.; Bernardi, Pricila; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Schwartz, Ida VD

    2014-01-01

    Background Biotinidase deficiency (BD) is an inborn error of metabolism in which some genetic variants correlate with the level of enzyme activity. Biotinidase activity, however, may be artifactually low due to enzyme lability, premature birth, and jaundice; this hinders both phenotypic classification and the decision to implement therapy. This study sought to characterize the clinical and genetic profile of a sample of Brazilian patients exhibiting reduced biotinidase activity. Methods This ...

  5. Carney complex: Clinical and genetic 2010 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzosi, D; Vignaux, O; Dupin, N; Bertherat, J

    2010-12-01

    First described in the mid 1980s, Carney complex is a rare dominantly heritable multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome that affects endocrine glands as the adrenal cortex, the pituitary and the thyroid. It is associated with many other nonendocrine tumors, including cardiac myxomas, testicular tumors, melanotic schwannoma, breast myxomatosis, and abnormal pigmentation or myxomas of the skin. The Carney complex gene 1 was identified 10 years ago as the regulatory subunit 1A of protein kinase A (PRKAR1A) located at 17q22-24. An inactivating heterozygous germ line mutation of PRKAR1A is observed in about two-thirds of Carney complex patients. This last decade many progresses have been done in the knowledge of this rare disease and its genetics. This review outlines the current state of this knowledge on Carney complex. PMID:20850710

  6. Challenges of Identifying Clinically Actionable Genetic Variants for Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonia C. Carter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in genomic medicine have the potential to change the way we treat human disease, but translating these advances into reality for improving healthcare outcomes depends essentially on our ability to discover disease- and/or drug-associated clinically actionable genetic mutations. Integration and manipulation of diverse genomic data and comprehensive electronic health records (EHRs on a big data infrastructure can provide an efficient and effective way to identify clinically actionable genetic variants for personalized treatments and reduce healthcare costs. We review bioinformatics processing of next-generation sequencing (NGS data, bioinformatics infrastructures for implementing precision medicine, and bioinformatics approaches for identifying clinically actionable genetic variants using high-throughput NGS data and EHRs.

  7. Oligocone trichromacy: clinical and molecular genetic investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mette K G; Christoffersen, Nynne L B; Sander, Birgit;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the phenotype and genotype of patients with a diagnosis of oligocone trichromacy (OT). METHODS: Six unrelated patients had a detailed ophthalmic examination including color vision testing, a Goldmann visual field test, fundus photography, and full-field electroretinography (ff...... of congenital nystagmus, and subjectively normal or near-normal color vision; five patients reported photophobia. Clinical examinations revealed largely normal fundi, normal Goldmann visual field results with the IV/4e target, and normal color discrimination or mild color vision deficiency. Electrophysiological...

  8. Investigating genetic discrimination in Australia: a large-scale survey of clinical genetics clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S; Treloar, S; Barlow-Stewart, K; Stranger, M; Otlowski, M

    2008-07-01

    We report first results from the Australian Genetic Discrimination Project of clinical genetics services clients' perceptions and experiences regarding alleged differential treatment associated with having genetic information. Adults (n = 2667) who had presented from 1998 to 2003 regarding predictive or presymptomatic testing for designated mature-onset conditions were surveyed; 951/1185 respondents met inclusion criteria for current asymptomatic status. Neurological conditions and familial cancers were primary relevant conditions for 87% of asymptomatic respondents. Specific incidents of alleged negative treatment, reported by 10% (n = 93) of respondents, occurred in life insurance (42%), employment (5%), family (22%), social (11%) and health (20%) domains. Respondents where neuro-degenerative conditions were relevant were more likely overall to report incidents and significantly more likely to report incidents in the social domain. Most incidents in the post-test period occurred in the first year after testing. Only 15% of respondents knew where to complain officially if treated negatively because of genetics issues. Recommendations include the need for increased community and clinical education regarding genetic discrimination, for extended clinical genetics sector engagement and for co-ordinated monitoring, research and policy development at national levels in order for the full benefits of genetic testing technology to be realised. PMID:18492091

  9. Genetic relatedness of Trichomonas vaginalis reference and clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Denise C; Mena, Leandro; Lushbaugh, William B; Meade, John C

    2010-12-01

    We have determined the metronidazole susceptibility status of 20 Trichomonas vaginalis isolates from American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) and assessed the level of genetic relatedness in these isolates using 32 additional T. vaginalis clinical isolates for comparison. These ATCC isolates are commonly used as reference strains in T. vaginalis research and this information provides a rational basis for selection of reference strains for use in comparative studies of T. vaginalis phenotypic and clinical characteristics. PMID:21118935

  10. Drug resistance. K13-propeller mutations confer artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straimer, Judith; Gnädig, Nina F; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Duru, Valentine; Ramadani, Arba Pramundita; Dacheux, Mélanie; Khim, Nimol; Zhang, Lei; Lam, Stephen; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Fairhurst, Rick M; Ménard, Didier; Fidock, David A

    2015-01-23

    The emergence of artemisinin resistance in Southeast Asia imperils efforts to reduce the global malaria burden. We genetically modified the Plasmodium falciparum K13 locus using zinc-finger nucleases and measured ring-stage survival rates after drug exposure in vitro; these rates correlate with parasite clearance half-lives in artemisinin-treated patients. With isolates from Cambodia, where resistance first emerged, survival rates decreased from 13 to 49% to 0.3 to 2.4% after the removal of K13 mutations. Conversely, survival rates in wild-type parasites increased from ≤0.6% to 2 to 29% after the insertion of K13 mutations. These mutations conferred elevated resistance to recent Cambodian isolates compared with that of reference lines, suggesting a contemporary contribution of additional genetic factors. Our data provide a conclusive rationale for worldwide K13-propeller sequencing to identify and eliminate artemisinin-resistant parasites.

  11. Clinical and genetic basis of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Victor Sgobbi de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis represents the most common neurodegenerative disease leading to upper and lower motor neuron compromise. Although the vast majority of cases are sporadic, substantial gain has been observed in the knowledge of the genetic forms of the disease, especially of familial forms. There is a direct correlation between the profile of the mutated genes in sporadic and familial forms, highlighting the main role ofC9orf72 gene in the clinical forms associated with frontotemporal dementia spectrum. The different genes related to familial and sporadic forms represent an important advance on the pathophysiology of the disease and genetic therapeutic perspectives, such as antisense therapy. The objective of this review is to signal and summarize clinical and genetic data related to familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  12. Clinical, biochemical and genetic heterogeneity in lysosomal storage diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractThe history of lysosomal storage diseases dates back to the end of the last century when the first clinical reports appeared of patients suffering from these genetic, metabolic disorders (Tay, 1881; Gaucher, 1882; Sachs, 1887; Fabry, 1898). About seventy years wouid pass before the term

  13. Genetic characteristics of Japanese clinical Listeria monocytogenes isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko Miya

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes causes foodborne illnesses through consumption of ready-to-eat foods. Although 135-201annual listeriosis cases have been estimated in Japan, the details regarding the clinical isolates such as infection source, virulence level, and other genetic characteristics, are not known. In order to uncover the trends of listeriosis in Japan and use the knowledge for prevention measures to be taken, the genetic characteristics of the past human clinical isolates needs to be elucidated. For this purpose, multilocus tandem-repeat sequence analysis (MLTSA and multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (MVLST were used in this study. The clinical isolates showed a variety of genetically distant genotypes, indicating they were from sporadic cases. However, the MVLST profiles of 7 clinical isolates were identical to those of epidemic clone (EC I isolates, which have caused several serious outbreaks in other countries, suggesting the possibility that they have strong virulence potential and originated from a single outbreak. Moreover, 6 Japanese food isolates shared their genotypes with ECI isolates, indicating that there may be risks for listeriosis outbreak in Japan. This is the first investigational study on genetic characteristics of Japanese listeriosis isolates. The listeriosis cases happened in the past are presumably sporadic, but it is still possible that some isolates with strong virulence potential have caused listeriosis outbreaks, and future listeriosis risks also exist.

  14. [Hereditary optic neuropathies: clinical and molecular genetic characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanakova, N A; Sheremet, N L; Loginova, A N; Chukhrova, A L; Poliakov, A V

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a review of literature on hereditary optic neuropathies: Leber mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathy, autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive optic neuropathies, X-linked optic atrophy. Clinical and molecular genetic characteristics are covered. Isolated optic neuropathies, as well as hereditary optic disorders, being a part of a complex syndromic disease are described.

  15. Genetic Architecture of clinical mastitis traits in dairy cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahana, Goutam; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Lund, Mogens Sandø

    2012-01-01

    investigate the genetic architecture of clinical mastitis and somatic cell score traits in dairy cattle using a high density (HD) SNP panel. Mastitis, an inflammation of the mammary gland most commonly caused by bacterial infection, is a frequent disease in dairy cattle. Clinical mastitis and somatic cell...... mixed model analysis. After Bonferroni correction 12, 372 SNP exhibited genome-wide significant associations with mastitis related traits. A total 61 QTL regions on 22 chromosomes associated with mastitis related traits were identified. The SNP with highest effect explained 5.6% of the variance...... of the predicted breeding values for the first lactation clinical mastitis...

  16. Report on the 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeul Hong; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Jung Shin; Seong, Jinsil; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lim, Ho Yeong; Won, Jong-Ho; Park, Kyong Hwa; Cho, Kyung Sam

    2013-04-01

    The 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012) in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association, was held on June 13 to 15 (3 days) 2012 at COEX Convention and Exhibition Center in Seoul, Korea. ACOS has a 20-year history starting from the first conference in Osaka, Japan, which was chaired by Prof. Tetsuo Taguchi and the ACOS conferences have since been conducted in Asian countries every 2 years. Under the theme of "Work Together to Make a Difference for Cancer Therapy in Asia", the 10th ACOS was prepared to discuss various subjects through a high-quality academic program, exhibition, and social events. The ACOS 2012 Committee was composed of the ACOS Organizing Committee, Honorary Advisors, Local Advisors, and ACOS 2012 Organizing Committee. The comprehensive academic program had a total of 92 sessions (3 Plenary Lectures, 1 Award Lectures, 1 Memorial Lectures, 9 Special Lectures, 15 Symposia, 1 Debate & Summary Sessions, 1 Case Conferences, 19 Educational Lectures, 1 Research & Development Session, 18 Satellite Symposia, 9 Meet the Professors, 14 Oral Presentations) and a total 292 presentations were delivered throughout the entire program. Amongst Free Papers, 462 research papers (110 oral presentations and 352 poster presentations) were selected to be presented. This conference was the largest of all ACOS conferences in its scale with around 1,500 participants from 30 countries. Furthermore, despite strict new financial policies and requirements governing fundraising alongside global economic stagnation, a total of 14 companies participated as sponsors and an additional 35 companies purchased 76 exhibition booths. Lastly, the conference social events provided attendees with a variety of opportunities to experience and enjoy Korea's rich culture and traditions during the Opening Ceremony, Welcome Reception, Invitee Dinner, Banquet, and Closing Ceremony. Overall, ACOS 2012 reinforced and promoted

  17. Genetic variants at 20p11 confer risk to androgenetic alopecia in the Chinese Han population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA is a well-characterized type of progressive hair loss commonly seen in men, with different prevalences in different ethnic populations. It is generally considered to be a polygenic heritable trait. Several susceptibility genes/loci, such as AR/EDA2R, HDAC9 and 20p11, have been identified as being involved in its development in European populations. In this study, we aim to validate whether these loci are also associated with AGA in the Chinese Han population. METHODS: We genotyped 16 previously reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with 445 AGA cases and 546 healthy controls using the Sequenom iPlex platform. The trend test was used to evaluate the association between these loci and AGA in the Chinese Han population. Conservatively accounting for multiple testing by the Bonferroni correction, the threshold for statistical significance was P ≤ 3.13 × 10(-3. RESULTS: We identified that 5 SNPs at 20p11 were significantly associated with AGA in the Chinese Han population (1.84 × 10(-11 ≤ P ≤ 2.10 × 10(-6. CONCLUSIONS: This study validated, for the first time, that 20p11 also confers risk for AGA in the Chinese Han population and implicated the potential common genetic factors for AGA shared by both Chinese and European populations.

  18. Genetic studies in chronic kidney disease: interpretation and clinical applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witasp, Anna; Nordfors, Louise; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Luttropp, Karin; Lindholm, Bengt; Schalling, Martin; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The tools of modern molecular biology are evolving rapidly, resulting in vastly more efficient approaches to illuminating human genetic variations and their effects on common multifactorial disorders such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, candidate gene association studies and genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have generated novel genetic variants in previously unrecognized biological pathways, highlighting disease mechanisms with a potential role in CKD etiology, morbidity and mortality. Nephrologists now need to find ways to make use of these advancements and meet the increasingly stringent requirements for valid study design, data handling and interpretation of genetic studies. Adding to our prior article in this journal, which introduced the basics of genotype-phenotype association studies in CKD, this second article focuses on how to ascertain robust and reproducible findings by applying adequate methodological and statistical approaches to genotype-phenotype studies in CKD populations. Moreover, this review will briefly discuss genotype-based risk prediction, pharmacotherapy, drug target identification and individualized treatment solutions, specifically highlighting potentially important findings in CKD patients. This increased knowledge will hopefully facilitate the exciting transition from conventional clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. However, before this can be accomplished, unsolved issues regarding the complex human genetic architecture as well technical and clinically oriented obstacles will have to be overcome. Additionally, new policies and standardized risk evaluations for genetic testing in the clinical setting will have to be established to guarantee that CKD patients are provided with high-quality genotype-guided counseling that will help to improve their poor outcomes.

  19. The Expanding Clinical Spectrum of Genetic Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shbarou, Rolla; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric epileptic encephalopathies represent a clinically challenging and often devastating group of disorders that affect children at different stages of infancy and childhood. With the advances in genetic testing and neuroimaging, the etiologies of these epileptic syndromes are now better defined. The various encephalopathies that are reviewed in this article include the following: early infantile epileptic encephalopathy or Ohtahara syndrome, early myoclonic encephalopathy, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, West syndrome, severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (Dravet syndrome), Landau-Kleffner syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-wave during sleep. Their clinical features, prognosis as well as underlying genetic etiologies are presented and updated. PMID:27544470

  20. Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes and Clinical Utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar Dorajoo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A large proportion of heritability of type 2 diabetes (T2D has been attributed to inherent genetics. Recent genetic studies, especially genome-wide association studies (GWAS, have identified a multitude of variants associated with T2D. It is thus reasonable to question if these findings may be utilized in a clinical setting. Here we briefly review the identification of risk loci for T2D and discuss recent efforts and propose future work to utilize these loci in clinical setting—for the identification of individuals who are at particularly high risks of developing T2D and for the stratification of specific health-care approaches for those who would benefit most from such interventions.

  1. Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes and Clinical Utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Liu, Jianjun; Boehm, Bernhard O.

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of heritability of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been attributed to inherent genetics. Recent genetic studies, especially genome-wide association studies (GWAS), have identified a multitude of variants associated with T2D. It is thus reasonable to question if these findings may be utilized in a clinical setting. Here we briefly review the identification of risk loci for T2D and discuss recent efforts and propose future work to utilize these loci in clinical setting—for the identification of individuals who are at particularly high risks of developing T2D and for the stratification of specific health-care approaches for those who would benefit most from such interventions. PMID:26110315

  2. Hereditary anaemias: genetic basis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment*

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    The hereditary anaemias present a major genetic health problem that contributes considerably to childhood mortality and morbidity in many developing countries. This article summarizes recent scientific and technical advances in knowledge concerning the genes involved and their interaction to produce major haemoglobinopathies, the clinical pictures of these conditions, and their diagnostic criteria. Though there is no definitive cure, supportive treatment for the haemoglobinopathies has improv...

  3. [Clinical features and genetics of the ichthyosis vulgaris group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traupe, H; Happle, R

    1980-12-11

    Combined application of clinical, genetic and histological criteria in general allows a definite diagnosis of autosomal dominant ichthyosis vulgaris and of X-linked recessive ichthyosis. For differential diagnosis, the following rare syndromes should be considered: ichthyosis bullosa: Refsum syndrome; Jung-Vogel syndrome; ichthyosis with corneal opacity, pili torti and alopecia; ichthyosis with deafness, pili torti and dental anomalies; and ichthyosis with hepatosplenomegaly and cerebellar degeneration.

  4. Epidemiological, clinical and genetic aspects of neurofibromatoses in Northern Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Pöyhönen, M. (Minna)

    1999-01-01

    Abstract A population-based study to investigate the epidemiological, genetic and clinical features of neurofibromatoses (NF) in Northern Finland was carried out between 1989–1996. The area concerned was that served by Oulu University Hospital, with a total population of 733 037. A total of 197 patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), five with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) and eight with segmental neurofibromatosis (NF5) fulfilling the diagnostic criteria were identified among s...

  5. Genetic Relatedness of Trichomonas vaginalis Reference and Clinical Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelius, Denise C.; Mena, Leandro; Lushbaugh, William B.; Meade, John C.

    2010-01-01

    We have determined the metronidazole susceptibility status of 20 Trichomonas vaginalis isolates from American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) and assessed the level of genetic relatedness in these isolates using 32 additional T. vaginalis clinical isolates for comparison. These ATCC isolates are commonly used as reference strains in T. vaginalis research and this information provides a rational basis for selection of reference strains for use in comparative studies of T. vaginalis phenotypic a...

  6. Dopa-responsive dystonia--clinical and genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijemanne, Subhashie; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD) encompasses a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders that typically manifest as limb-onset, diurnally fluctuating dystonia and exhibit a robust and sustained response to levodopa treatment. Autosomal dominant GTP cyclohydrolase 1 deficiency, also known as Segawa disease, is the most common and best-characterized condition that manifests as DRD, but a similar presentation can be seen with genetic abnormalities that lead to deficiencies in tyrosine hydroxylase, sepiapterin reductase or other enzymes that are involved in the biosynthesis of dopamine. In rare cases, DRD can result from conditions that do not affect the biosynthesis of dopamine; single case reports have shown that DRD can be a manifestation of hereditary spastic paraplegia type 11, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 and ataxia telangiectasia. This heterogeneity of conditions that underlie DRD frequently leads to misdiagnosis, which delays the appropriate treatment with levodopa. Correct diagnosis at an early stage requires use of the appropriate diagnostic tests, which include a levodopa trial, genetic testing (including whole-exome sequencing), cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitter analysis, the phenylalanine loading test, and enzyme activity measurements. The selection of tests for use depends on the clinical presentation and level of complexity. This Review presents the common and rarer causes of DRD and their clinical features, and considers the most appropriate approaches to ensure early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26100751

  7. Updates from the Sixth International Congress 'Psoriasis: from Gene to Clinic', the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London, U.K., 1-3 December 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, K; Burden, A D

    2012-10-01

    The 15 years between the First International Congress 'Psoriasis: from Gene to Clinic' and the Sixth Congress held in London from 1 to 3 December 2011 have seen extraordinary progress in the sciences that are relevant to psoriasis and therapeutics that have transformed its treatment. Over this time, 'Psoriasis: from Gene to Clinic' has emerged as the premier conference for clinicians and scientists interested in this field. Its popularity is attested to by the 450 registered delegates from the U.K. and around the world, which necessitated a change of venue to the excellent facilities of the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre. Although the content has evolved over the years, the structure of this 3-day conference has remained similar. The first day was given to genetics, comorbidities and outcome measures. Immunology and immunity were covered on the second day and therapeutics on the third. The stature of the three keynote lecturers and eight invited speakers was truly world class and their presentations were interspersed with 23 free communications. Here we review highly selected personal highlights of the meeting that we hope will be of general interest.

  8. Cellular robustness conferred by genetic crosstalk underlies resistance against chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Zoey; Eng, Ru Jun; Sajiki, Kenichi; Lim, Kim Kiat; Tang, Ming Yi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Chen, Ee Sin

    2013-01-01

    Doxorubicin is an anthracycline antibiotic that is among one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agents in the clinical setting. The usage of doxorubicin is faced with many problems including severe side effects and chemoresistance. To overcome these challenges, it is important to gain an understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms with regards to the mode of action of doxorubicin. To facilitate this aim, we identified the genes that are required for doxorubicin resistance in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We further demonstrated interplay between factors controlling various aspects of chromosome metabolism, mitochondrial respiration and membrane transport. In the nucleus we observed that the subunits of the Ino80, RSC, and SAGA complexes function in the similar epistatic group that shares significant overlap with the homologous recombination genes. However, these factors generally act in synergistic manner with the chromosome segregation regulator DASH complex proteins, possibly forming two major arms for regulating doxorubicin resistance in the nucleus. Simultaneous disruption of genes function in membrane efflux transport or the mitochondrial respiratory chain integrity in the mutants defective in either Ino80 or HR function resulted in cumulative upregulation of drug-specific growth defects, suggesting a rewiring of pathways that synergize only when the cells is exposed to the cytotoxic stress. Taken together, our work not only identified factors that are required for survival of the cells in the presence of doxorubicin but has further demonstrated that an extensive molecular crosstalk exists between these factors to robustly confer doxorubicin resistance.

  9. Cellular robustness conferred by genetic crosstalk underlies resistance against chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoey Tay

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin is an anthracycline antibiotic that is among one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agents in the clinical setting. The usage of doxorubicin is faced with many problems including severe side effects and chemoresistance. To overcome these challenges, it is important to gain an understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms with regards to the mode of action of doxorubicin. To facilitate this aim, we identified the genes that are required for doxorubicin resistance in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We further demonstrated interplay between factors controlling various aspects of chromosome metabolism, mitochondrial respiration and membrane transport. In the nucleus we observed that the subunits of the Ino80, RSC, and SAGA complexes function in the similar epistatic group that shares significant overlap with the homologous recombination genes. However, these factors generally act in synergistic manner with the chromosome segregation regulator DASH complex proteins, possibly forming two major arms for regulating doxorubicin resistance in the nucleus. Simultaneous disruption of genes function in membrane efflux transport or the mitochondrial respiratory chain integrity in the mutants defective in either Ino80 or HR function resulted in cumulative upregulation of drug-specific growth defects, suggesting a rewiring of pathways that synergize only when the cells is exposed to the cytotoxic stress. Taken together, our work not only identified factors that are required for survival of the cells in the presence of doxorubicin but has further demonstrated that an extensive molecular crosstalk exists between these factors to robustly confer doxorubicin resistance.

  10. Genetically engineered livestock for agriculture: a generation after the first transgenic animal research conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James D; Maga, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    At the time of the first Transgenic Animal Research Conference, the lack of knowledge about promoter, enhancer and coding regions of genes of interest greatly hampered our efforts to create transgenes that would express appropriately in livestock. Additionally, we were limited to gene insertion by pronuclear microinjection. As predicted then, widespread genome sequencing efforts and technological advancements have profoundly altered what we can do. There have been many developments in technology to create transgenic animals since we first met at Granlibakken in 1997, including the advent of somatic cell nuclear transfer-based cloning and gene editing. We can now create new transgenes that will express when and where we want and can target precisely in the genome where we want to make a change or insert a transgene. With the large number of sequenced genomes, we have unprecedented access to sequence information including, control regions, coding regions, and known allelic variants. These technological developments have ushered in new and renewed enthusiasm for the production of transgenic animals among scientists and animal agriculturalists around the world, both for the production of more relevant biomedical research models as well as for agricultural applications. However, even though great advancements have been made in our ability to control gene expression and target genetic changes in our animals, there still are no genetically engineered animal products on the market for food. World-wide there has been a failure of the regulatory processes to effectively move forward. Estimates suggest the world will need to increase our current food production 70 % by 2050; that is we will have to produce the total amount of food each year that has been consumed by mankind over the past 500 years. The combination of transgenic animal technology and gene editing will become increasingly more important tools to help feed the world. However, to date the practical benefits of

  11. Genetically engineered livestock for agriculture: a generation after the first transgenic animal research conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James D; Maga, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    At the time of the first Transgenic Animal Research Conference, the lack of knowledge about promoter, enhancer and coding regions of genes of interest greatly hampered our efforts to create transgenes that would express appropriately in livestock. Additionally, we were limited to gene insertion by pronuclear microinjection. As predicted then, widespread genome sequencing efforts and technological advancements have profoundly altered what we can do. There have been many developments in technology to create transgenic animals since we first met at Granlibakken in 1997, including the advent of somatic cell nuclear transfer-based cloning and gene editing. We can now create new transgenes that will express when and where we want and can target precisely in the genome where we want to make a change or insert a transgene. With the large number of sequenced genomes, we have unprecedented access to sequence information including, control regions, coding regions, and known allelic variants. These technological developments have ushered in new and renewed enthusiasm for the production of transgenic animals among scientists and animal agriculturalists around the world, both for the production of more relevant biomedical research models as well as for agricultural applications. However, even though great advancements have been made in our ability to control gene expression and target genetic changes in our animals, there still are no genetically engineered animal products on the market for food. World-wide there has been a failure of the regulatory processes to effectively move forward. Estimates suggest the world will need to increase our current food production 70 % by 2050; that is we will have to produce the total amount of food each year that has been consumed by mankind over the past 500 years. The combination of transgenic animal technology and gene editing will become increasingly more important tools to help feed the world. However, to date the practical benefits of

  12. Highlights From the Third Annual Mayo Clinic Conference on Systems Engineering and Operations Research in Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Kamath, Janine R. A.; Osborn, John B; Roger, Véronique L; Rohleder, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    In August 2010, the Third Annual Mayo Clinic Conference on Systems Engineering and Operations Research in Health Care was held. The continuing mission of the conference is to gather a multidisciplinary group of systems engineers, clinicians, administrators, and academic professors to discuss the translation of systems engineering methods to more effective health care delivery. Education, research, and practice were enhanced via a mix of formal presentations, tutorials, and informal gatherings...

  13. Cranial suture biology and dental development: genetic and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coster, P J; Mortier, G; Marks, L A; Martens, L C

    2007-09-01

    Premature fusion of the calvarial bones at the sutures, or craniosynostosis (CS), is a relatively common birth defect (1:2000-3000) frequently associated with limb deformity. Patients with CS may present oral defects, such as cleft soft palate, hypodontia, hyperdontia, and delayed tooth eruption, but also unusual associations of major dental anomalies such as taurodontism, microdontia, multiple dens invaginatus, and dentin dysplasia. The list of genes that are involved in CS includes those coding for the different fibroblast growth factor receptors and a ligand of ephrin receptors, but also genes encoding transcription factors, such as MSX2 and TWIST. Most of these genes are equally involved in odontogenesis, providing a pausible explanation for clinical associations of CS with dental agenesis or tooth malformations. On the basis of the present knowledge on genes and transcription factors that are involved in craniofacial morphogenesis, and from dental clinics of CS syndromes, the molecular mechanisms that control suture formation and suture closure are expected to play key roles in patterning events and development of teeth. The purpose of this article is to review and merge the recent advances in the field of suture research at the genetic and cellular levels with those of tooth development, and to apply them to the dental clinics of CS syndromes. These new perspectives and future challenges in the field of both dental clinics and molecular genetics, more in particular the identification of possible candidate genes involved in both CS and dental defects, are discussed.

  14. Melanoma: From Melanocyte to Genetic Alterations and Clinical Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corine Bertolotto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic melanoma remained for decades without any effective treatment and was thus considered as a paradigm of cancer resistance. Recent progress with understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying melanoma initiation and progression revealed that melanomas are genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous tumors. This recent progress has allowed for the development of treatment able to improve for the first time the overall disease-free survival of metastatic melanoma patients. However, clinical responses are still either too transient or limited to restricted patient subsets. The complete cure of metastatic melanoma therefore remains a challenge in the clinic. This review aims to present the recent knowledge and discoveries of the molecular mechanisms involved in melanoma pathogenesis and their exploitation into clinic that have recently facilitated bench to bedside advances.

  15. Clinical and genetic characteristics of craniosynostosis in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessenyei, Beáta; Nagy, Andrea; Szakszon, Katalin; Mokánszki, Attila; Balogh, Erzsébet; Ujfalusi, Anikó; Tihanyi, Mariann; Novák, László; Bognár, László; Oláh, Éva

    2015-12-01

    Craniosynostosis, the premature closure of cranial sutures, is a common craniofacial disorder with heterogeneous etiology and appearance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical and molecular characteristics of craniosynostoses in Hungary, including the classification of patients and the genetic analysis of the syndromic forms. Between 2006 and 2012, 200 patients with craniosynostosis were studied. Classification was based on the suture(s) involved and the associated clinical features. In syndromic cases, genetic analyses, including mutational screening of the hotspot regions of the FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, and TWIST1 genes, karyotyping and FISH study of TWIST1, were performed. The majority (88%) of all patients with craniosynostosis were nonsyndromic. The sagittal suture was most commonly involved, followed by the coronal, metopic, and lambdoid sutures. Male, twin gestation, and very low birth weight were risk factors for craniosynostosis. Syndromic craniosynostosis was detected in 24 patients. In 17 of these patients, Apert, Crouzon, Pfeiffer, Muenke, or Saethre-Chotzen syndromes were identified. In one patient, multiple-suture craniosynostosis was associated with achondroplasia. Clinical signs were not typical for any particular syndrome in six patients. Genetic abnormalities were detected in 18 syndromic patients and in 8 relatives. In addition to 10 different, known mutations in FGFR1,FGFR2 or FGFR3, one novel missense mutation, c.528C>G(p.Ser176Arg), was detected in the TWIST1 gene of a patient with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. Our results indicate that detailed clinical assessment is of paramount importance in the classification of patients and allows indication of targeted molecular testing with the highest possible diagnostic yield. PMID:26289989

  16. Impact of genetic polymorphisms on clinical response to antithrombotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kena J Lanham

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Kena J Lanham1,2, Julie H Oestreich3, Steven P Dunn1,2, Steven R Steinhubl41Pharmacy Services, UK HealthCare, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA; 2Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA; 3Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, University of Nebraska, Omaha, Nebraska, USA; 4The Medicines Company, Zurich, Switzerland and The Geisinger Clinic, Danville, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: Antithrombotic therapy, including anticoagulants as well as antiplatelet drugs, is an important component in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Variability in response to such medications, of which pharmacogenetic response is a major source, can decrease or enhance the benefits expected. This review is a comprehensive assessment of the literature published to date on the effects of genetic polymorphisms on the actions of a variety of antithrombotic medications, including warfarin, clopidogrel, prasugrel, and aspirin. Literature evaluating surrogate markers in addition to the impact of pharmacogenetics on clinical outcomes has been reviewed. The results of the studies are conflicting as to what degree pharmacogenetics will affect medication management in cardiovascular disease. Additional research is necessary to discover, characterize, and prospectively evaluate genetic and non-genetic factors that impact antithrombotic treatment in order to maximize the effectiveness and limit the harmful effects of these valuable agents.Keywords: aspirin, warfarin, clopidogrel, prasugrel, pharmacogenetic, antithrombotic, antiplatelet

  17. Beyond clinical utility: The multiple values of DTC genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrini, Mauro; Prainsack, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    One point of consensus in the otherwise very controversial discussion about the benefits and dangers of DTC genetics in the health domain is the lack of substantial clinical utility. At the same time, both the empirical and conceptual literature indicate that health-related DTC tests can have value and utility outside of the clinic. We argue that a broader and multi-faceted conceptualization of utility and value would enrich the ethical and social discussion of DTC testing in several ways: First, looking at ways in which DTC testing can have personal and social value for users - in the form of entertainment, learning, or a way to relate to others - can help to explain why people still take DTC tests, and will, further down the line, foster a more nuanced understanding of secondary and tertiary uses of DTC test results (which could very well unearth new ethical and regulatory challenges). Second, considering the economic value and broader utility of DTC testing foregrounds wider social and political aspects than have been dominant in the ethical and regulatory debates surrounding DTC genetics so far. These wider political aspects include the profound power asymmetries that characterize the collection and use of personal genetic data in many contexts.

  18. Beyond clinical utility: The multiple values of DTC genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Turrini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One point of consensus in the otherwise very controversial discussion about the benefits and dangers of DTC genetics in the health domain is the lack of substantial clinical utility. At the same time, both the empirical and conceptual literature indicate that health-related DTC tests can have value and utility outside of the clinic. We argue that a broader and multi-faceted conceptualization of utility and value would enrich the ethical and social discussion of DTC testing in several ways: First, looking at ways in which DTC testing can have personal and social value for users – in the form of entertainment, learning, or a way to relate to others – can help to explain why people still take DTC tests, and will, further down the line, foster a more nuanced understanding of secondary and tertiary uses of DTC test results (which could very well unearth new ethical and regulatory challenges. Second, considering the economic value and broader utility of DTC testing foregrounds wider social and political aspects than have been dominant in the ethical and regulatory debates surrounding DTC genetics so far. These wider political aspects include the profound power asymmetries that characterize the collection and use of personal genetic data in many contexts.

  19. [Basal cell carcinoma. Molecular genetics and unusual clinical features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifenberger, J

    2007-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common human cancer. Its incidence is steadily increasing. The development of basal cell carcinoma is linked to genetic factors, including the individual skin phototype, as well as the cumulative exposure to UVB. The vast majority of basal cell carcinomas are sporadic tumors, while familial cases associated with certain hereditary syndromes are less common. At the molecular level, basal cell carcinomas are characterized by aberrant activation of sonic hedgehog signaling, usually due to mutations either in the ptch or smoh genes. In addition, about half of the cases carry mutations in the tp53 tumor suppressor gene, which are often UVB-associated C-->T transition mutations. Clinically, basal cell carcinomas may show a high degree of phenotypical variability. In particular, tumors occurring in atypical locations, showing an unusual clinical appearance, or imitating other skin diseases may cause diagnostic problems. This review article summarizes the current state of the art concerning the etiology, predisposition and molecular genetics of basal cell carcinoma. In addition, examples of unusual clinical manifestations are illustrated. PMID:17440702

  20. Focus on PCSK9 Inhibitors: From Genetics to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatine, Marc S; Underberg, James A; Koren, Michael; Baum, Seth J

    2016-10-01

    Elevation of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is an important cause of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Over the years, clinical outcome studies with LDL-C lowering agents have revealed that reducing LCL-C levels is effective in reducing rates of major ASCVD events. Although secondary factors play a role in clinical expression, severe lipid disorders often have a strong genetic component. Genetic revelations have provided novel targets for improving LDL-C management in high-risk individuals. Most recently, researchers have explored how the inhibition of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) alters LDL metabolism and lowers LDL-C levels to achieve lipid goals and potentially reduce ASCVD risk in patients with severe lipid disorders, including familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). This CMHC Spotlight article summarizes the clinical evidence demonstrating the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of PCSK9 inhibitors in lowering LDL-C levels. Reductions in LDL-C levels by PCSK9 inhibitors alone in patients who are statin intolerant or combined with maximally tolerated statins in patients with severe lipid disorders demonstrate the potential for reduced morbidity and mortality associated with ASCVD. PMID:27422124

  1. Medical genetics is playing an important role in the public health care in China Conference Report for The International Conference of Medical Genetics 2004, Beijing (ICMG 2004, Beijing)%医学遗传学在中国公共卫生事业中发挥重要作用--北京2004医学遗传学国际学术研讨会报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Jian CHEN; Nanbert Zhong

    2005-01-01

    The International Conference of Medical Genetics 2004 (ICMG2004) was held at Peking University Health Science Center on July 14-18, 2004. This conference is a part of the series that have been organized by the North American Association of Chinese Medical Geneticists (NAACMG) and the Chinese Medical Genetics Association (CMGA) and was initialized by the year of 2000 at Nanjing (ICMG2000, Nanjing). The mission of the series is to promote research, education, and clinical practice on medical genetics in China as well as in south Asian countries. This year, more than 200 participants from Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, England, and United States attended the ICMG2004. The conference opened with a remark addressed by Dr. Qi-de Han, the Vice Chairman of the Standing Committee of National Congress, who is the Director of Peking University Health Science Center and the Executive President of Peking University. Dr. Owen Rennet, Scientific Director of NICHD, NIH, gave a keynote speech at the opening session. Six sessions, chaired by Drs. Virginia Anderson, Wai-Yee Chan, Tian-jian Chen, Jiang Gu, Jian Han, Tao-Sheng Huang, Marilyn Li, Gary Lu, Ming Qi, Bai-Lin Wu, Nanbert Zhong, Chun-Yan Zhou, have covered various aspects of medical genetics with focus on birth defect, which is different from the main focus of neurogenetic disorders at ICMG2000. These aspects include inborn error of metabolism, intervention of birth defects, prenatal diagnosis and newborn screening, chromosome abnormalities, molecular basis of genetic disorders, environmental factors and birth defects, and genetic counseling and clinical management.

  2. Observations from the Mayo Clinic National Conference on Medicine and the Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Jane C; Lanier, William L

    2002-12-01

    In September 2002, the Mayo Clinic National Conference on Medicine and the Media convened to consider the accurate, timely, and responsible reporting of medical news to the public. The more than 500 participants included medical and health journalists, scientific journal editors, physicians and other health care professionals, industry representatives, government officials, institutional public information officers, public relations professionals, patients, and representatives of patient advocacy groups. The goal of the conference was to bring together all facets of the medical news dissemination process with the hope of identifying ways to serve the public more effectively. Several key observations emerged: Medical news reports may be confusing because the underlying scientific issues are unresolved and open to multiple interpretations. People who are ill have different information needs than the rest of the public. Journalists' primary concern is accurate, clear reporting, with secondary concern for a story's consequences. Journalists consider themselves primarily reporters rather than educators, but the public expects reporting to contain an educational element. Financial and other more subtle interests may influence the quality and content of scientific news releases, presentations in scientific journals, and stories covered by print and broadcast news media. Full disclosure of commercial support and affiliations, peer review of study reports, and formal guidelines for conduct may limit inappropriate financial influence. PMID:12479517

  3. Clinical, serological and genetic predictors of inflammatory bowel disease course

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurent Beaugerie; Harry Sokol

    2012-01-01

    Patients with extensive or complicated Crohn's disease (CD) at diagnosis should be treated straightaway with immunosuppressive therapy according to the most recent guidelines.In patients with localized and uncomplicated CD at diagnosis,early use of immunosuppressive therapy is debated for preventing disease progression and limiting the disabling clinical impact.In this context,there is a need for predictors of benign or unfavourable subsequent clinical course,in order to avoid over-treating with risky drugs those patients who would have experienced spontaneous mid-term asymptomatic disease without progression towards irreversible intestinal lesions.At diagnosis,an age below 40 years,the presence of perianal lesions and the need for treating the first flare with steroids have been consistently associated with an unfavourable subsequent 5-year or 10-year clinical course.The positive predictive value of unfavourable course in patients with 2 or 3 predictors ranges between 0.75 and 0.95 in population-based and referral centre cohorts.Consequently,the use of these predictors can be integrated into the elements that influence individual decisions.In the CD postoperative context,keeping smoking and history of prior resection are the strongest predictors of disease symptomatic recurrence.However,these clinical predictors alone are not as reliable as severity of early postoperative endoscopic recurrence in clinical practice.In ulcerative colitis (UC),extensive colitis at diagnosis is associated with unfavourable clinical course in the first 5 to 10 years of the disease,and also with long-term colectomy and colorectal inflammation-associated colorectal cancer.In patients with extensive UC at diagnosis,a rapid step-up strategy aiming to achieve sustained deep remission should therefore be considered.At the moment,no reliable serological or genetic predictor of inflammatory bowel disease clinical course has been identified.

  4. Translating colorectal cancer genetics into clinically useful biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley-Bunker, A; Walker, L C; Currie, M J; Pearson, J; Eglinton, T

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health problem worldwide accounting for over a million deaths annually. While many patients with Stage II and III CRC can be cured with combinations of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, this is morbid costly treatment and a significant proportion will suffer recurrence and eventually die of CRC. Increased understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CRC has the potential to identify high risk patients and target therapy more appropriately. Despite increased understanding of the molecular events underlying CRC development, established molecular techniques have only produced a limited number of biomarkers suitable for use in routine clinical practice to predict risk, prognosis and response to treatment. Recent rapid technological developments, however, have made genomic sequencing of CRC more economical and efficient, creating potential for the discovery of genetic biomarkers that have greater diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic capabilities for the management of CRC. This paper reviews the current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CRC, and summarizes molecular biomarkers that surgeons will encounter in current clinical use as well as those under development in clinical and preclinical trials. New molecular technologies are reviewed together with their potential impact on the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CRC and their potential clinical utility in classification, diagnosis, prognosis and targeting of therapy. PMID:26990814

  5. Genetic diversity of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical and non clinical samples in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendary, M M; Solyman, S M; Azab, M M; Mahmoud, N F; Hanora, A M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the increasing incidence of diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) has been noted in the university hospitals of El-Sharkia and Assuit governorates - Egypt. Therefore, we studied the genetic relatedness of multidrug resistant S. aureus isolates from different sources in the above mentioned governorates. One hundred and fifty six S. aureus isolates were divided into 5 different groups, 1 non clinical isolates from different food products and 4 different clinical isolates of human and animal sources in the 2 different governorates. Epidemiological characteristics of 156 S. aureus isolates were determined by phenotypic methods including quantitative antibiogram typing and biofilm production. Genetic typing of 35 multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates (7 from each group) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence, virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene profiles was done. The genetic relatedness of the highest virulent strain from each group was detected based on different single locus sequence typing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). S. aureus strains isolated from different sources and geographical areas showed high diversity. The genetic typing revealed different sequence types and different sequences of coa and spa genes. S. aureus isolates were found highly diverse in Egypt. PMID:27609475

  6. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (UCMD: Clinical and Genetic Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita BOZORGMEHR

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Bozorgmehr B, Kariminejad A, Nafissi Sh, Jebelli B, Andoni U, Gartioux C, Ledeuil C, Allamand Y, Richard P, Kariminejad MH. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (UCMD:Clinical and Genetic Correlations. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Summer; 7(3: 15-22.  Objective:Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD corresponds to the severe end of the clinical spectrum of neuromuscular disorders caused by mutations in the genes encoding collagen VI (COL VI. We studied four unrelated families with six affected children that had typical UCMD with dominant and recessive inheritance.Materials & MethodsFour unrelated Iranian families with six affected children with typical UCMD were analyzed for COLVI secretion in skin fibroblast culture and the secretion of COLVI in skin fibroblast culture using quantitative RT–PCR (Q-RT-PCR, and mutation identification was performed by sequencing of complementary DNA.ResultsCOL VI secretion was altered in all studied fibroblast cultures. Two affected sibs carried a homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 12 of COL6A2, while another patient had a large heterozygous deletion in exon 5-8 of COL6A2. The two other affected sibs had homozygote mutation in exon 24 of COL6A2, and the last one was homozygote in COL6A1.ConclusionIn this study, we found out variability in clinical findings and genetic inheritance among UCMD patients, so that the patient with complete absence of COLVI was severely affected and had a large heterozygous deletion in COL6A2. In contrast, the patients with homozygous deletion had mild to moderate decrease in the secretion of COL VI and were mildly tomoderately affected.References1. Voit T. Congenital Muscular Dystrophies Brain Dev 1998;20(2: 65-74.2. Ullrich OZ Ges. Scleroatonic Muscular Dystrophy. NeurolPsychiatr 1930;126:171-201.3. Ullrich O. Monatsschr. Kinderheilkd 1930;47:502-10.4. Mercuri E, Yuva Y, Brown SC, Brockington M, Kinali M, Jungbluth H, et al. Collagen VI involvement in

  7. Triploid pregnancies, genetic and clinical features of 158 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Mette W; Niemann, Isa; Rasmussen, Anders A;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to analyze the correlation between the genetic constitution and the phenotype in triploid pregnancies. STUDY DESIGN: One hundred fifty-eight triploid pregnancies were identified in hospitals in Western Denmark from April 1986 to April 2010. Clinical data...... than MMP cases (P cases, the possible karyotypes had similar frequencies, whereas, in PPM cases, 43% had the karyotype 69, XXX, 51% had the karyotype 69, XXY, and 6% had the karyotype 69, XYY. Molar phenotype was seen only in PPM cases. However, PPM cases with a nonmolar phenotype were...... also seen. For both parental genotypes, various fetal phenotypes were seen at autopsy. Levels of human chorionic gonadotropin in maternal serum were low in MMP cases and varying in PPM cases, some being as low as in the MMP cases. CONCLUSION: In a triploid pregnancy, suspicion of hydatidiform mole...

  8. Hereditary cancer predisposition in children: genetic basis and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahm, Brigitte; Malkin, David

    2006-11-01

    Although cancer predisposition syndromes are rare and malignancies arising in this context account for only 1-10% of childhood tumors, studies performed in affected patients and their families have been of unique value for the understanding of cancer development. Three classes of genes (tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes and stability genes) have been identified and shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of familial, as well as sporadic tumors. Cancer has long been recognized as a genetic disease of somatic cells. Despite improved understanding of the molecular basis of predisposition to cancer and better diagnostic tools, the care of these patients and their families remains a major challenge for the clinician. Medical, psychological, ethical and legal issues have to be considered. This review focuses on examples of each class of inherited cancer predisposition syndromes with special implications for patients in the pediatric age group, including retinoblastoma predisposition, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia disorders and Fanconi anemia. The genetic basis of cancer predisposition is discussed as well as the major concepts and controversies in the clinical management of these patients and their families. PMID:16642469

  9. Clinical Characteristics and Genetic Variability of Human Rhinovirus in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Montero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV is a leading cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI in young children and infants worldwide and has a high impact on morbidity and mortality in this population. Initially, HRV was classified into two species: HRV-A and HRV-B. Recently, a species called HRV-C and possibly another species, HRV-D, were identified. In Mexico, there is little information about the role of HRV as a cause of ARI, and the presence and importance of species such as HRV-C are not known. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and genetic variability of HRV in Mexican children. Genetic characterization was carried out by phylogenetic analysis of the 5′-nontranslated region (5′-NTR of the HRV genome. The results show that the newly identified HRV-C is circulating in Mexican children more frequently than HRV-B but not as frequently as HRV-A, which was the most frequent species. Most of the cases of the three species of HRV were in children under 2 years of age, and all species were associated with very mild and moderate ARI.

  10. Update on clinical trials: genetic targets in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Bora; Cream, Leah V; Harvey, Harold A

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women in United States. From data of American Cancer Society from 2007 reported total of 178,480 women diagnosed with breast cancer. The death rate from breast cancer has decreased in North America over time, but still accounts for second highest cancer death, following lung cancer. Breast cancer is staged based on tumor size, nodal involvement, and distant metastasis like any other solid tumors. However clinical staging is not the only important factor in management of breast cancer. Various molecular features divides breast cancer into many subgroups - that act differently, and respond differently from therapy. Thus the focus of breast cancer treatment has evolved focusing on specific targets. The most important biologic markers in subtyping of breast cancer so far are hormone receptor positivity and HER2/neu protein expression. Five molecular subtypes using intrinsic gene set include Basal mRNA, HER2 + mRNA, Luminal AmRNA, Luminal B mRNA, and Normal-like mRNA. In addition, better understanding of genetic target of breast cancer has given us arsenal of personalized, and more effective treatment approach.This review will focus on examples that highlight several mechanism of tumorigenesis, giving us not just understanding of gene pathways and the molecular biology, that could lead us to therapeutic target. Several important molecular targets have been investigated in preclinical and clinical trials, others are yet to be explored. We will also describe genetic mechanisms discovery related to overcoming resistance to current targeted therapies in breast cancer, including hormone receptor expression and HER 2- neu amplification. We will also review other exciting developments in understanding of breast cancer, the tumor microenvironment and cancer stem cells, and targeting agents in that area. PMID:23288634

  11. Genetic Polymorphisms in the Fat Mass and Obesity-Associated Gene Confers Risk of Obesity in Iraqi Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shatha Ramadhanzaidan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Obesity is strongly influenced by genetic factors, with an estimated heritability of 60% BMI. Genetic susceptibility to the common form of obesity appears to be polygenic. Although theoretical analyses emphasized the power of genetic association study in common polygenic diseases, the search for genes conferring the risk of obesity has thus far not been very successful. Approach: In this research, DNA was extracted from 100 individuals who diagnosed as diabetes mellitus and have obesity referred to Al-Kindy research and therapeutic unit and in Baghdad 40 subject used as control. Thirty cycles of PCR were performed on exons 2 and 3 of the FSHâ gene, which encode for the translated FSH â protein. Results: For each exon, 30 cycles of PCR were performed at 95°C for 1 min, 55°C for 30sec and 72°C for 30 sec. Samples were subjected to sequencing and the results showed that the signals were poor and there is no capability to analyze so, we were recommended to do cloning the fragment of DNA to gain good signals. We did not observe significant association between rs9939609 and type 2 diabetes. Conclusion: Two SNPs (rs16952777 and rs1107355 in LD block 1 were nominally associated with type 2 diabetes. SNPs in the same block were also nominally associated with fasting glucose concentrations in no diabetic subjects (control subject. However, none of these associations remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing.

  12. Citing conduct, individualizing symptoms: Accomplishing autism diagnosis in clinical case conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turowetz, Jason

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, I examine how clinicians at a clinic for developmental disabilities in the United States determine whether children being evaluated for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) showed symptoms of that condition. Drawing on a convenience sample of 61 audio and video recorded case conferences from two time periods (1985 and 2011-15), and combining Conversation Analysis with insights from Actor Network Theory, I find that clinicians describe (via a representational practice called "citation") children's conduct in ways that advance diagnostic claims. More specifically, they portray key actants in the assessment process in patterned ways: the test instrument is represented as a neutral tool of measurement, the clinician as administrator and instructor; and the child as the focal figure whose conduct is made to appear independent of the other participants and suggestive of diagnostic symptoms. These tacit representational conventions conform to and reproduce the assumptions of standardized testing, according to which clinicians and tests are to be neutral arbiters of the child's abilities, and thereby provide for objective, warrantable findings. At the same time, however, by designing representations around the child's symptomatic conduct in this way, clinicians may minimize or elide their own contributions, and those of the test instrument, to the child's performance, and thereby make the child alone appear responsible for what are, in fact, interactionally-occasioned behaviors. PMID:26318210

  13. Genetic counsellors in Sweden: their role and added value in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestoff, Rebecka; Ingvoldstad, Charlotta; Skirton, Heather

    2016-03-01

    Genetic testing is becoming more commonplace in general and specialist health care and should always be accompanied by genetic counselling, according to Swedish law. Genetic counsellors are members of the multi-disciplinary team providing genetic counselling. This study examined the role and added value of genetic counsellors in Sweden, using a cross-sectional on-line survey. The findings showed that the genetic counsellors added value in the clinical setting by acting as the 'spider-in-the-web' regarding case management, having a more holistic, ethical and psychological perspective, being able to offer continuous support and build a relationship with the patient, and being more accessible than medical geneticists. The main difference between a genetic counsellor and medical geneticist was that the doctor had the main medical responsibility. Thus genetic counsellors in Sweden contribute substantially to the care of patients in the clinical genetic setting.

  14. The mecA homolog mecC confers resistance against β-lactams in Staphylococcus aureus irrespective of the genetic strain background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballhausen, Britta; Kriegeskorte, André; Schleimer, Nina; Peters, Georg; Becker, Karsten

    2014-07-01

    In staphylococci, methicillin resistance is mediated by mecA-encoded penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a), which has a low affinity for beta-lactams. Recently, a novel PBP2a homolog was described as being encoded by mecC, which shares only 70% similarity to mecA. To prove that mecC is the genetic determinant that confers methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus, a mecC knockout strain was generated. The S. aureus ΔmecC strain showed considerably reduced oxacillin and cefoxitin MICs (0.25 and 4 μg/ml, respectively) compared to those of the corresponding wild-type methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain (8 and 16 μg/ml, respectively). Complementing the mutant in trans with wild-type mecC restored the resistance to oxacillin and cefoxitin. By expressing mecC and mecA in different S. aureus clonal lineages, we found that mecC mediates resistance irrespective of the genetic strain background, yielding oxacillin and cefoxitin MIC values comparable to those with mecA. In addition, we showed that mecC expression is inducible by oxacillin, which supports the assumption that a functional beta-lactam-dependent regulatory system is active in MRSA strains possessing staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type XI. In summary, we showed that mecC is inducible by oxacillin and mediates beta-lactam resistance in SCCmec type XI-carrying strains as well as in different S. aureus genetic backgrounds. Furthermore, our results could explain the comparatively low MICs for clinical mecC-harboring S. aureus isolates. PMID:24752255

  15. Communication of genetic information by other health professionals: the role of the genetic counsellor in specialist clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Rosie; Murphy, Anne Marie; Treacy, Eileen; Lynch, Sally Ann; Thirlaway, Kathryn; Lambert, Debby

    2011-04-01

    Many children with chronic genetic diseases are followed by specialty clinics that provide genetic information as part of the care. Health services restrictions in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) can make the wait for an appointment with a genetic counsellor long. We examined whether genetic information was being adequately understood when presented by medical, but non-genetics staff to long term patients, using our national metabolic service as an example. The aim was to inform health professionals about the need or role of a genetic counsellor in a specialist setting. A questionnaire was used to assess knowledge among parents and patients affected by galactosaemia and Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD). Twenty seven families with galactosemia and 10 with MSUD were interviewed in clinic. Comparative analysis showed significant differences in knowledge between parents of children with galactosemia and adult patients (p=0.001) and between ethnicities (p>0.05). While parents are well informed, the majority expressed a wish for more information about the condition and its transmission. Adult patients with galactosemia and parents from certain ethnic backgrounds could especially benefit from genetic counselling. This study highlights the need for a genetic counsellor in specialist clinics.

  16. Hamartomatous polyps - a clinical and molecular genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie

    2016-08-01

    Hamartomatous polyps (HPs) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are rare compared to other types of GI polyps, yet they are the most common type of polyp in children. The symptoms are usually rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, obstipation, anaemia, and/or small bowel obstruction. The polyps are typically removed concurrently with endoscopy when located in the colon, rectum, or stomach, whereas polyps in the small bowel are removed during push-enteroscopy, device-assisted enteroscopy, or by surgery. HPs can be classified as juvenile polyps or Peutz-Jeghers polyps based on their histopathological appearance. Patients with one or a few juvenile polyps are usually not offered clinical follow-up as the polyp(s) are considered not to harbour any malignant potential. Nevertheless, it is important to note that juvenile polyps and HPs are also found in patients with hereditary hamartomatous polyposis syndromes (HPS). Patients with HPS have an increased risk of cancer, recurrences of polyps, and extraintestinal complications. The syndromes are important to diagnose, as patients should be offered surveillance from childhood or early adolescence. The syndromes include juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and the PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome. Currently, the HPS diagnoses are based on clinical criteria and are often assisted with genetic testing as candidate genes have been described for each syndrome. This thesis is based on six scientific papers. The overall aim of the studies was to expand the knowledge on clinical course and molecular genetics in patients with HPs and HPS, and to investigate research participants' attitude towards the results of extensive genetic testing.   Paper I: In the first paper we investigated the occurrence, anatomic distribution, and other demographics of juvenile polyps in the colon and rectum in Denmark in 1995-2014. Based on the Danish Pathology Data Bank we found that 1772 patients had 2108 JPs examined in the period, and we

  17. International conference on clinical PET and molecular nuclear medicine (IPET 2007). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is organizing its first international conference on 'Clinical PET and Molecular Nuclear Medicine'. Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past two decades. Today, imaging is at a crossroad, with molecular targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Observing molecular interactions in the living body by the radiotracer technique has become known as 'molecular nuclear medicine'. Molecular nuclear medicine techniques analyze cellular biochemistry and its relationship to disease processes expressed in tissue and organ dysfunction, for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. People can often have similar manifestations of disease, but no two patients will be the same. Functional radionuclide imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) provide excellent opportunities to follow the pathology in individual patients and therefore provide a means for tailored clinical management. These also provide the means to assess the response to treatment in a safe and non-invasive manner. Changes at molecular and cellular levels provide vital clues for evaluating the effectiveness of chosen clinical treatment plans. This information is expected to have a major impact on understanding disease, disease detection, individualised treatment, and drug development. Recently, considerable attention has been drawn to nuclear medicine with the visualization of biochemical processes in vivo such as PET studies with 18F-FDG in many different organs and in cancerous tissues. With the arrival of PET/CT systems there is a new era of accurate mapping of disease processes. Today, 18F-FDG is the most useful PET tracer for the detection, staging, treatment planning and management of cancer. There is mounting evidence for its competitive advantage over conventional techniques in major medical areas including oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Nuclear medicine is

  18. 8th Argentinean Bioengineering Society Conference (SABI 2011) and 7th Clinical Engineering Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschino, Gustavo Javier; Ballarin, Virginia L.

    2011-12-01

    In September 2011, the Eighteenth Edition of the Argentinean Bioengineering Society Conference (SABI 2011) and Seventh Clinical Engineering Meeting were held in Mar del Plata, Argetina. The Mar del Plata SABI Regional and the School of Engineering of the Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata invited All bioengineers, engineers, physicists, mathematicians, biologists, physicians and health professionals working in the field of Bioengineering to participate in this event. The overall objectives of the Conference were: To provide discussion of scientific research results in Bioengineering and Clinical Engineering. To promote technological development experiences. To strengthen the institutional and scientific communication links in the area of Bioengineering, mainly between Universities of Latin America. To encourage students, teachers, researchers and professionals to establish exchanges of experiences and knowledge. To provide biomedical engineering technology solutions to the society and contributing ideas for low cost care. Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE SABI 2011 Chair Dra Virginia L Ballarin Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Co-Chair Dra Teresita R Cuadrado Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Local Comittee Dr Gustavo Abraham Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Josefina Ballarre Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dr Eduardo Blotta Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Agustina Bouchet Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Marcel Brun Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Silvia Ceré Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Mariela Azul Gonzalez Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Lucia Isabel Passoni Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Juan Ignacio Pastore Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Adriana Scandurra Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE

  19. Clinical genetic research 3: Genetics ELSI (Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues) research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullman, Daryl; Etchegary, Holly

    2015-01-01

    ELSI (Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues) is a widely used acronym in the bioethics literature that encompasses a broad range of research areas involved in examining the various impacts of science and technology on society. In Canada, GE3LS (Genetics, Ethical, Economic, Environmental, Legal, Social issues) is the term used to describe ELSI studies. It is intentionally more expansive in that GE3LS explicitly brings economic and environmental issues under its purview. ELSI/GE3LS research has become increasingly important in recent years as there has been a greater emphasis on "translational research" that moves genomics from the bench to the clinic. The purpose of this chapter is to outline a range of ELSI-related work that might be conducted as part of a large scale genetics or genomics research project, and to provide some practical insights on how a scientific research team might incorporate a strong and effective ELSI program within its broader research mandate. We begin by describing the historical context of ELSI research and the development of GE3LS research in the Canadian context. We then illustrate how some ELSI research might unfold by outlining a variety of research questions and the various methodologies that might be employed in addressing them in an area of ELSI research that is encompassed under the term "public engagement." We conclude with some practical pointers about how to build an effective ELSI/GE3LS team and focus within a broader scientific research program.

  20. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab in Trichoplusia ni Is Conferred by a Novel Genetic Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaozhao; Kain, Wendy; Cassidy, Douglas; Wang, Ping

    2015-08-01

    The resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin Cry2Ab in a greenhouse-originated Trichoplusia ni strain resistant to both Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab was characterized. Biological assays determined that the Cry2Ab resistance in the T. ni strain was a monogenic recessive trait independent of Cry1Ac resistance, and there existed no significant cross-resistance between Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in T. ni. From the dual-toxin-resistant T. ni strain, a strain resistant to Cry2Ab only was isolated, and the Cry2Ab resistance trait was introgressed into a susceptible laboratory strain to facilitate comparative analysis of the Cry2Ab resistance with the susceptible T. ni strain. Results from biochemical analysis showed no significant difference between the Cry2Ab-resistant and -susceptible T. ni larvae in midgut proteases, including caseinolytic proteolytic activity and zymogram profile and serine protease activities, in midgut aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase activity, and in midgut esterases and hemolymph plasma melanization activity. For analysis of genetic linkage of Cry2Ab resistance with potential Cry toxin receptor genes, molecular markers for the midgut cadherin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and aminopeptidase N (APN) genes were identified between the original greenhouse-derived dual-toxin-resistant and the susceptible laboratory T. ni strains. Genetic linkage analysis showed that the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni was not genetically associated with the midgut genes coding for the cadherin, ALP, and 6 APNs (APN1 to APN6) nor associated with the ABC transporter gene ABCC2. Therefore, the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni is conferred by a novel but unknown genetic mechanism. PMID:26025894

  1. Genetic counselors: translating genomic science into clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Robin L.; Hampel, Heather L.; Mandell, Jessica B.; Marks, Joan H.

    2003-01-01

    In a time of emerging genetic tests and technologies, genetic counselors are faced with the challenge of translating complex genomic data into information that will aid their client’s ability to learn about, understand, make, and cope with decisions relating to genetic diagnoses. The first of two companion articles in this issue examines the role of the genetic counselor, particularly in counseling individuals at risk for or diagnosed with breast cancer, in an era of high-tech health care and...

  2. Mitochondrial diseases: an overview of genetics, pathogenesis, clinical features and an approach to diagnosis and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhal N

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Defects in structures or functions of mitochondria, mainly involving the oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial biogenesis and other metabolic pathways have been shown to be associated with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. The ubiquitous nature of mitochondria and their unique genetic features contribute to the clinical, biochemical and genetic heterogenecity of mitochondrial diseases. This article focuses on the recent advances in the field of mitochondrial disorders with respect to the consequences for an advanced clinical and genetic diagnostics. In addition, an overview on recently identified genetic defects and their pathogenic molecular mechanisms are given.

  3. Hereditary multiple exostoses: from genetics to clinical syndrome and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhoenacker, Filip M.; Hul, Wim van; Wuyts, Wim; Willems, P.J.; Schepper, Arthur M. de

    2001-12-01

    Objective: To give an overview of genetic, clinical and radiological aspects in two families over four generations with known hereditary multiple exostoses (HME). Methods and material: After linkage analysis in both families to localize the defective gene, mutation analysis was performed in these genes to identify the underlying mutation. In the 31 affected individuals, location, number and morphology and evolution of exostosis, evolution of remodeling defects at the metaphysis, and the extent of possible complications were evaluated on clinical and imaging (plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) data over a lifetime period. Results and conclusions: Both families demonstrate the gene defect in the same EXT-2 gene locus on chromosome 11p. Exostoses are preferentially located in the lower extremity (hip, knee and lower leg), humerus, and forearm. Any other bone may be involved, except for the calvaria of the skull and the mandible. Exostoses are rather sessile than pedunculated. Exostosis is rarely present at birth but develops gradually and may persist to grow slowly after closure of the growth plates. Preferential expression of the remodeling defect was seen in the hip, distal femur (trumpet-shaped metaphysis) and forearm (shortening of the ulna with secondary bowing of the radius and development of a pseudo-Madelung deformity). These radiological manifestations start at the age of 4-5 years and become more obvious as the enchondral bone formation progresses with age. Reported complications in these families consist of local entrapment phenomenons (vessel, tendon, nerve), frictional bursitis, and sarcomatous transformation. MRI was able to suggest these complications and is the imaging technique of choice in the evaluation of symptomatic exostoses.

  4. Attitudes towards abortion among trainees in obstetrics/gynecology and clinical genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Marie Diness; Diness, Birgitte Rode; Norup, Michael Slott

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to provide knowledge about attitudes towards abortion among Danish physicians in training in the specialties of obstetrics/gynecology and clinical genetics. The study was a questionnaire survey among trainees in these specialties. Ninety-six responded. Trainees in clinical genetics...... negative feelings associated with abortion-related work and require support in handling and coping with these challenges....

  5. LMNA cardiomyopathy: cell biology and genetics meet clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Lu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes A-type nuclear lamins (intermediate filament proteins expressed in most differentiated somatic cells, cause a diverse range of diseases, called laminopathies, that selectively affect different tissues and organ systems. The most prevalent laminopathy is cardiomyopathy with or without different types of skeletal muscular dystrophy. LMNA cardiomyopathy has an aggressive clinical course with higher rates of deadly arrhythmias and heart failure than most other heart diseases. As awareness among physicians increases, and advances in DNA sequencing methods make the genetic diagnosis of LMNA cardiomyopathy more common, cardiologists are being faced with difficult questions regarding patient management. These questions concern the optimal use of intracardiac cardioverter defibrillators to prevent sudden death from arrhythmias, and medical interventions to prevent heart damage and ameliorate heart failure symptoms. Data from a mouse model of LMNA cardiomyopathy suggest that inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways are beneficial in preventing and treating cardiac dysfunction; this basic research discovery needs to be translated to human patients.

  6. Clinical and genetic features of ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundey, S. [Birmingham Maternity Hospital (United Kingdom). Clinical Genetics Unit

    1994-12-01

    There are several variants of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T): classical A-T with marked radiation sensitivity; classical A-T with intermediate levels of radiation sensitivity; mild A-T with intermediate levels of radiation sensitivity; A-T without telangiectasia; A-T without oculomoto apraxia; and A-T with microcephaly. These disorders are probably caused by different allelic mutations, because affected sibs resemble the index patients, and because there is an association of certain haplo-types of 11q22-23 with specific phenotypes. The Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome, with its lack of ataxia, seems on clinical grounds to be a different disorder. Although A-T is almost always inherited as an autosomal recessive, there are some unusual features; an unexpectedly low parental consanguinity rate, an incidence in sibs that is < 0.25, and occurrence of disease in many different races and in the offspring of mixed race unions. Moreover, looking at haplotypes from 63 UK patients, there is a remarkably low incidence of homozygosity. An autosomal recessive condition that is deficient in parental consanguinity, and in homozygosity for the region around the gene, can be explained by J.H. Edwards` hypothesis that homozygosity for alleles at a neighbouring locus are lethal early in embryogenesis. Other possible mechanisms to explain the unusual genetic features are discussed. (author).

  7. Clinical genetic testing for familial melanoma in Italy: a cooperative study

    OpenAIRE

    W.Bruno, P.Ghiorzo, L.Battistuzzi, P.A.Ascierto, M.Barile, S.Gargiulo, F.Gensini, S.Gliori, M.Guida, M.Lombardo, S.Manoukian, C.Menin, S.Nasti, P.Origone, B.Pasini,L. Pastorino, B.Peissel, M.A.Pizzichetta, P.Queirolo, M.Rodolfo, A.Romanini, M.C.Scaini, A.Testori, M.G.Tibiletti, D.Turchetti, S.A.Leachman, G.Bianchi Scarrà; IMI, Italian Melanoma Intergroup

    2009-01-01

    Background: The Italian Society of Human Genetics’ (SIGU) recommendations on genetic counseling and testing for hereditary melanoma state that clinical genetic testing can be offered to Italian melanoma families with at least two affected members. Objective: In the framework of a cooperative study, we sought to establish the frequency of cyclindependent kinase inhibitor 2A mutations in melanoma families that underwent clinical genetic counseling and testing in accordance with t...

  8. Twenty-Seventh Fungal Genetics Conference, Asilomar, CA, March 12-17, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, Jonathan

    2013-03-17

    This meeting brings together ~900 international scientists to discuss the latest research on fungal genetics. Sessions of particular relevance to DOE include lignocellulose degradation, cellulose conversion to fermentable sugars, fermentation of sugars to fuel molecules. Other sessions cover fungal diseases of biomass crops (miscanthus, corn, switchgrass, etc.).

  9. Transfer of Clostridium difficile Genetic Elements Conferring Resistance to Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin B (MLSB) Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbanti, Fabrizio; Wasels, François; Spigaglia, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Molecular analysis is an important tool to investigate Clostridium difficile resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB). In particular, the protocols described in this chapter have been designed to investigate the genetic organization of erm(B)-containing elements and to evaluate the capability of these elements to transfer in C. difficile recipient strains using filter mating assay. PMID:27507342

  10. Genetic diversity confers colony-level benefits due to individual immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    One aspect that influences colony-level disease resistance is polyandry, or multiple mating of the queen. Honeybee queens mate with 12 drones (males) on average (but up to 40þ), which creates a high level of intracolony genetic diversity [3]. The adaptive benefit of polyandry has several non-mutuall...

  11. Clinical Considerations of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Monogenic Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokun Hu

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore factors contribute to the success of PGD cycles for monogenic diseases.During a 3-year period (January 2009 to December 2012, 184 consecutive ICSI-PGD cycles for monogenic diseases reaching the ovum pick-up and fresh embryo-transfer stage performed at the Reproductive Medicine Center of The First Affiliated Hospital Of Sun Yat-sen University were evaluated.ICSI was performed on 2206 metaphase II oocytes, and normal fertilization and cleavage rates were 83.4% (1840/2206 and 96.2% (1770/1840, respectively. In the present study, 60.5% (181/299 of day 3 good-quality embryos developed into good-quality embryos on day 4 after biopsy. Collectively, 42.9% clinical pregnancy rate (79/184 and 28.5% implantation rate (111/389 were presented. In the adjusted linear regression model, the only two significant factors affecting the number of genetically unaffected embryos were the number of biopsied embryos (coefficient: 0.390, 95%CI 0.317-0.463, P = 0.000 and basal FSH level (coefficient: 0.198, 95%CI 0.031-0.365, P = 0.021. In the adjusted binary logistic regression model, the only two significant factors affecting pregnancy outcome were the number of genetically available transferable embryos after PGD (adjusted OR 1.345, 95% CI 1.148-1.575, P = 0.000 and number of oocyte retrieved (adjusted OR 0.934, 95% CI 0.877-0.994, P = 0.031.There should be at least four biopsied embryos to obtain at least one unaffected embryos in a PGD system for patients with single gene disorder and under the condition of basal FSH level smaller than 8.0mmol/L. Moreover, if only a low number (< 4 of biopsied embryos are available on day 3, the chance of unaffected embryos for transfer was small, with poor outcome.

  12. Moyamoya disease and syndromes: from genetics to clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guey S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Stéphanie Guey,1,3 Elisabeth Tournier-Lasserve,1,2 Dominique Hervé,1,3 Manoelle Kossorotoff4 1Inserm UMR-S1161, Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; 2AP-HP, Groupe hospitalier Lariboisière-Saint-Louis, Service de génétique neurovasculaire, Paris, France; 3Service de Neurologie, Centre de Référence des maladies Vasculaires Rares du Cerveau et de l'Œil (CERVCO, Groupe Hospitalier Saint-Louis Lariboisière-Fernand Widal, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France; 4Pediatric Neurology Department, French Center for Pediatric Stroke, University Hospital Necker-Enfants Malades, AP-HP Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France Abstract: Moyamoya angiopathy is characterized by a progressive stenosis of the terminal portion of the internal carotid arteries and the development of a network of abnormal collateral vessels. This chronic cerebral angiopathy is observed in children and adults. It mainly leads to brain ischemic events in children, and to ischemic and hemorrhagic events in adults. This is a rare condition, with a marked prevalence gradient between Asian countries and Western countries. Two main nosological entities are identified. On the one hand, moyamoya disease corresponds to isolated moyamoya angiopathy, defined as being “idiopathic” according to the Guidelines of the Research Committee on the Pathology and Treatment of Spontaneous Occlusion of the Circle of Willis. This entity is probably multifactorial and polygenic in most patients. On the other hand, moyamoya syndrome is a moyamoya angiopathy associated with an underlying condition and forms a very heterogeneous group with various clinical presentations, various modes of inheritance, and a variable penetrance of the cerebrovascular phenotype. Diagnostic and evaluation techniques rely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA conventional angiography, and cerebral hemodynamics measurements

  13. Evaluation of a novel electronic genetic screening and clinical decision support tool in prenatal clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Emily A; Lin, Bruce K; Doksum, Teresa; Drohan, Brian; Edelson, Vaughn; Dolan, Siobhan M; Hughes, Kevin; O'Leary, James; Vasquez, Lisa; Copeland, Sara; Galvin, Shelley L; DeGroat, Nicole; Pardanani, Setul; Gregory Feero, W; Adams, Claire; Jones, Renee; Scott, Joan

    2014-07-01

    "The Pregnancy and Health Profile" (PHP) is a free prenatal genetic screening and clinical decision support (CDS) software tool for prenatal providers. PHP collects family health history (FHH) during intake and provides point-of-care risk assessment for providers and education for patients. This pilot study evaluated patient and provider responses to PHP and effects of using PHP in practice. PHP was implemented in four clinics. Surveys assessed provider confidence and knowledge and patient and provider satisfaction with PHP. Data on the implementation process were obtained through semi-structured interviews with administrators. Quantitative survey data were analyzed using Chi square test, Fisher's exact test, paired t tests, and multivariate logistic regression. Open-ended survey questions and interviews were analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. Of the 83% (513/618) of patients that provided feedback, 97% felt PHP was easy to use and 98% easy to understand. Thirty percent (21/71) of participating physicians completed both pre- and post-implementation feedback surveys [13 obstetricians (OBs) and 8 family medicine physicians (FPs)]. Confidence in managing genetic risks significantly improved for OBs on 2/6 measures (p values ≤0.001) but not for FPs. Physician knowledge did not significantly change. Providers reported value in added patient engagement and reported mixed feedback about the CDS report. We identified key steps, resources, and staff support required to implement PHP in a clinical setting. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report on the integration of patient-completed, electronically captured and CDS-enabled FHH software into primary prenatal practice. PHP is acceptable to patients and providers. Key to successful implementation in the future will be customization options and interoperability with electronic health records.

  14. The next controversy in genetic testing: clinical data as trade secrets?

    OpenAIRE

    Cook-Deegan, Robert; Conley, John M.; Evans, James P.; Vorhaus, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Sole-source business models for genetic testing can create private databases containing information vital to interpreting the clinical significance of human genetic variations. But incomplete access to those databases threatens to impede the clinical interpretation of genomic medicine. National health systems and insurers, regulators, researchers, providers and patients all have a strong interest in ensuring broad access to information about the clinical significance of variants discovered th...

  15. Genetics of schizophrenia: from animal models to clinical studies

    OpenAIRE

    Joober, Ridha; Boksa, Patricia; Benkelfat, Chawki; Rouleau, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Genetic epidemiological studies strongly suggest that additive and interactive genes, each with small effects, mediate the genetic vulnerability for schizophrenia. With the human genome working draft at hand, candidate gene (and ultimately large-scale genome-wide) association studies are gaining renewed interest in the effort to unravel the complex genetics of schizophrenia. In the absence of an unequivocally established biological theory for schizophrenia, identifying candidate genes to be t...

  16. Head and neck paragangliomas: clinical and molecular genetic classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offergeld, Christian; Brase, Christoph; Yaremchuk, Svetlana; Mader, Irina; Rischke, Hans Christian; Gläsker, Sven; Schmid, Kurt W; Wiech, Thorsten; Preuss, Simon F; Suárez, Carlos; Kopeć, Tomasz; Patocs, Attila; Wohllk, Nelson; Malekpour, Mahdi; Boedeker, Carsten C; Neumann, Hartmut P H

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck paragangliomas are tumors arising from specialized neural crest cells. Prominent locations are the carotid body along with the vagal, jugular, and tympanic glomus. Head and neck paragangliomas are slowly growing tumors, with some carotid body tumors being reported to exist for many years as a painless lateral mass on the neck. Symptoms depend on the specific locations. In contrast to paraganglial tumors of the adrenals, abdomen and thorax, head and neck paragangliomas seldom release catecholamines and are hence rarely vasoactive. Petrous bone, jugular, and tympanic head and neck paragangliomas may cause hearing loss. The internationally accepted clinical classifications for carotid body tumors are based on the Shamblin Class I-III stages, which correspond to postoperative permanent side effects. For petrous-bone paragangliomas in the head and neck, the Fisch classification is used. Regarding the molecular genetics, head and neck paragangliomas have been associated with nine susceptibility genes: NF1, RET, VHL, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2 (SDH5), and TMEM127. Hereditary HNPs are mostly caused by mutations of the SDHD gene, but SDHB and SDHC mutations are not uncommon in such patients. Head and neck paragangliomas are rarely associated with mutations of VHL, RET, or NF1. The research on SDHA, SDHAF2 and TMEM127 is ongoing. Multiple head and neck paragangliomas are common in patients with SDHD mutations, while malignant head and neck paraganglioma is mostly seen in patients with SDHB mutations. The treatment of choice is surgical resection. Good postoperative results can be expected in carotid body tumors of Shamblin Class I and II, whereas operations on other carotid body tumors and other head and neck paragangliomas frequently result in deficits of the cranial nerves adjacent to the tumors. Slow growth and the tendency of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas to be multifocal may justify less aggressive treatment strategies. PMID:22584701

  17. Head and neck paragangliomas: clinical and molecular genetic classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Offergeld

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck paragangliomas are tumors arising from specialized neural crest cells. Prominent locations are the carotid body along with the vagal, jugular, and tympanic glomus. Head and neck paragangliomas are slowly growing tumors, with some carotid body tumors being reported to exist for many years as a painless lateral mass on the neck. Symptoms depend on the specific locations. In contrast to paraganglial tumors of the adrenals, abdomen and thorax, head and neck paragangliomas seldom release catecholamines and are hence rarely vasoactive. Petrous bone, jugular, and tympanic head and neck paragangliomas may cause hearing loss. The internationally accepted clinical classifications for carotid body tumors are based on the Shamblin Class I-III stages, which correspond to postoperative permanent side effects. For petrous-bone paragangliomas in the head and neck, the Fisch classification is used. Regarding the molecular genetics, head and neck paragangliomas have been associated with nine susceptibility genes: NF1, RET, VHL, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2 (SDH5, and TMEM127. Hereditary HNPs are mostly caused by mutations of the SDHD gene, but SDHB and SDHC mutations are not uncommon in such patients. Head and neck paragangliomas are rarely associated with mutations of VHL, RET, or NF1. The research on SDHA, SDHAF2 and TMEM127 is ongoing. Multiple head and neck paragangliomas are common in patients with SDHD mutations, while malignant head and neck paraganglioma is mostly seen in patients with SDHB mutations. The treatment of choice is surgical resection. Good postoperative results can be expected in carotid body tumors of Shamblin Class I and II, whereas operations on other carotid body tumors and other head and neck paragangliomas frequently result in deficits of the cranial nerves adjacent to the tumors. Slow growth and the tendency of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas to be multifocal may justify less aggressive treatment strategies.

  18. Common variation in ISL1 confers genetic susceptibility for human congenital heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Stevens

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most common birth abnormality and the etiology is unknown in the overwhelming majority of cases. ISLET1 (ISL1 is a transcription factor that marks cardiac progenitor cells and generates diverse multipotent cardiovascular cell lineages. The fundamental role of ISL1 in cardiac morphogenesis makes this an exceptional candidate gene to consider as a cause of complex congenital heart disease. We evaluated whether genetic variation in ISL1 fits the common variant-common disease hypothesis. A 2-stage case-control study examined 27 polymorphisms mapping to the ISL1 locus in 300 patients with complex congenital heart disease and 2,201 healthy pediatric controls. Eight genic and flanking ISL1 SNPs were significantly associated with complex congenital heart disease. A replication study analyzed these candidate SNPs in 1,044 new cases and 3,934 independent controls and confirmed that genetic variation in ISL1 is associated with risk of non-syndromic congenital heart disease. Our results demonstrate that two different ISL1 haplotypes contribute to risk of CHD in white and black/African American populations.

  19. Genetic analysis of dilated cardiomyopathy--HLA and immunoglobulin genes may confer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, H; Kimura, A; Fukuta, S; Kusukawa, R; Kawamura, K; Nimura, Y; Nagano, M; Yasuda, H; Kawai, C; Sugimoto, T

    1992-10-01

    To identify genetic factors in the immune system which control the susceptibility to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), HLA class II DNA typing was performed in 61 Japanese patients, using PCR/SSO probe analyses. The frequencies of HLA-DQB1*0503 (15% vs 5%; RR = 3.06, chi 2 = 7.19) and DQB1*0604 (21% vs 10%; RR = 2.41, chi 2 = 6.20) were significantly increased and that of HLA-DQB1*0502 (RR = 1.74) was slightly increased in the DCM patients. The frequency of DQB1*0303 (16% vs 31%; RR = 0.44, chi 2 = 5.16) was significantly decreased in the patients. The increased HLA-DQB1 alleles have a histidine residue in common at the 30th codon for the HLA-DQ beta chain. Among the genetic markers studied by Southern blot analyses, IGLV (immunoglobulin lambda light chain, pV3.3) showed a strong association with DCM, i.e. A2/A2 genotype was found in 37.7% of patients whereas it was observed in only 18.9% of the control subjects (RR = 2.6, chi 2 = 7.77). The frequency of this genotype was higher in patients under age 45 years at the time of diagnosis (45.5%, RR = 3.6, chi 2 = 10.02). These results suggest that HLA and immunoglobulin genes are closely linked to susceptibility to DCM.

  20. The Genetic Analysis of an Acinetobacter johnsonii Clinical Strain Evidenced the Presence of Horizontal Genetic Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaña, Sabrina; Schramm, Sareda T. J.; Traglia, German Matías; Chiem, Kevin; Parmeciano Di Noto, Gisela; Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Vay, Carlos; Quiroga, Cecilia; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.; Iriarte, Andrés; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter johnsonii rarely causes human infections. While most A. johnsonii isolates are susceptible to virtually all antibiotics, strains harboring a variety of β-lactamases have recently been described. An A. johnsonii Aj2199 clinical strain recovered from a hospital in Buenos Aires produces PER-2 and OXA-58. We decided to delve into its genome by obtaining the whole genome sequence of the Aj2199 strain. Genome comparison studies on Aj2199 revealed 240 unique genes and a close relation to strain WJ10621, isolated from the urine of a patient in China. Genomic analysis showed evidence of horizontal genetic transfer (HGT) events. Forty-five insertion sequences and two intact prophages were found in addition to several resistance determinants such as blaPER-2, blaOXA-58, blaTEM-1, strA, strB, ereA, sul1, aacC2 and a new variant of blaOXA-211, called blaOXA-498. In particular, blaPER-2 and blaTEM-1 are present within the typical contexts previously described in the Enterobacteriaceae family. These results suggest that A. johnsonii actively acquires exogenous DNA from other bacterial species and concomitantly becomes a reservoir of resistance genes. PMID:27548264

  1. COMT genetic variation confers risk for psychotic and affective disorders: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lencz Todd

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation in the COMT gene has been implicated in a number of psychiatric disorders, including psychotic, affective and anxiety disorders. The majority of these studies have focused on the functional Val108/158Met polymorphism and yielded conflicting results, with limited studies examining the relationship between other polymorphisms, or haplotypes, and psychiatric illness. We hypothesized that COMT variation may confer a general risk for psychiatric disorders and have genotyped four COMT variants (Val158Met, rs737865, rs165599, and a SNP in the P2 promoter [-278A/G; rs2097603] in 394 Caucasian cases and 467 controls. Cases included patients with schizophrenia (n = 196, schizoaffective disorder (n = 62, bipolar disorder (n = 82, major depression (n = 30, and patients diagnosed with either psychotic disorder NOS or depressive disorder NOS (n = 24. Results SNP rs2097603, the Val/Met variant and SNP rs165599 were significantly associated (p = 0.004; p = 0.05; p = 0.035 with a broad "all affected" diagnosis. Haplotype analysis revealed a potentially protective G-A-A-A haplotype haplotype (-278A/G; rs737865; Val108/158Met; rs165599, which was significantly underrepresented in this group (p = 0.0033 and contained the opposite alleles of the risk haplotype previously described by Shifman et al. Analysis of diagnostic subgroups within the "all affecteds group" showed an association of COMT in patients with psychotic disorders as well as in cases with affective illness although the associated variants differed. The protective haplotype remained significantly underrepresented in most of these subgroups. Conclusion Our results support the view that COMT variation provides a weak general predisposition to neuropsychiatric disease including psychotic and affective disorders.

  2. Assessment of Genetics Knowledge and Skills in Medical Students: Insight for a Clinical Neurogenetics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Phillip L.; Pettiford, Jennifer M.; Combs, Susan E.; Heffron, Ari; Healton, Sean; Hovaguimian, Alexandra; Macri, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    The pace of discovery in biochemistry and genetics and its effect on clinical medicine places new curricular challenges in medical school education. We sought to evaluate students' understanding of neurogenetics and its clinical applications to design a pilot curriculum into the clinical neurology clerkship. We utilized a needs assessment and a…

  3. Genetics of Parkinson’s Disease - A Clinical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Myung Cheon

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Discovering genes following Medelian inheritance, such as autosomal dominant-synuclein and leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene, or autosomal recessive Parkin, P-TEN-induced putative kinase 1 gene and Daisuke-Junko 1 gene, has provided great insights into the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Genes found to be associated with PD through investigating genetic polymorphisms or via the whole genome association studies suggest that such genes could also contribute to an increased risk of PD in the general population. Some environmental factors have been found to be associated with genetic factors in at-risk patients, further implicating the role of gene-environment interactions in sporadic PD. There may be confusion for clinicians facing rapid progresses of genetic understanding in PD. After a brief review of PD genetics, we will discuss the insight of new genetic discoveries to clinicians, the implications of ethnic differences in PD genetics and the role of genetic testing for general clinicians managing PD patients.

  4. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency: a clinical-genetic overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abboud RT

    2011-03-01

    in patients with chronic irreversible airflow obstruction, especially in those with early onset of disease or positive family history. Testing is also recommended for immediate family members of those with AATD, asthmatics with persistent airflow obstruction, and infants and older subjects with unexplained liver disease. There are over 100 different AAT gene variants; most are rare and only some are associated with clinical disease.Keywords: AAT, AATD, ZZ, early onset emphysema, panacinar emphysema, neonatal jaundice and hepatitis, childhood liver disease, genetics of alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-antitrypsin laboratory testing and phenotyping

  5. The Noonan Syndrome--A Review of the Clinical and Genetic Features of 27 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Edith; Turner, Gillian

    1973-01-01

    Reviewed were clinical and genetic features of 27 cases of the Noonan Syndrome, a condition with characteristics such as webbing of the neck, short stature, frequent congential heart lesions, and chromosomal irregularities. (DB)

  6. A genetic marker allele conferring resistance to Ascaris suum in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skallerup, Per; Thamsborg, Stig M.; Jørgensen, Claus B.;

    2013-01-01

    Mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) has helped dissecting the genetics underlying the variation in resistance to helminth infections. In pigs, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP TXNIP and SNP ARNT), both on chromosome 4, have been reported to be associated with Ascaris suum worm burden...... of the AB genotype. We used different indicators of resistance (worm burden, faecal egg counts, number of liver white spots and A. suum-specific serum IgG antibody levels) of which the first two traits were considered core traits and the last two traits were associated traits. Pigs of the AA genotype had...... lower mean macroscopic worm burden (2.4 vs. 19.3), lower mean total worm burden (26.5 vs. 70.1) and excreted fewer A. suum eggs at week 8 p.i. (mean number of eggs/g faeces: 238 vs. 1259) than pigs of the AB genotype. However, none of these differences were significant (P- values of 0.06, 0.06 and 0...

  7. Clinical and genetic features of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundin, Catarina; Forestier, Erik; Klarskov Andersen, Mette;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Although previous studies have shown that DS-ALL differs clinically and genetically from non-DS-ALL, much remains to be elucidated as regards genetic and prognostic factors in DS-ALL. METHODS...

  8. Clinical genetic aspects of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia Theodora Josina Maria

    2012-01-01

    Dystrophinopathies include the well known Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). This thesis is a collection of several clinical and genetic studies on dystrophinopathies with implications for genetic counselling of patients and their families and for future therapy (

  9. Common genetic variants associated with telomere length confer risk for neuroblastoma and other childhood cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kyle M; Whitehead, Todd P; de Smith, Adam J; Smirnov, Ivan V; Park, Minsun; Endicott, Alyson A; Francis, Stephen S; Codd, Veryan; Samani, Nilesh J; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2016-06-01

    Aberrant telomere lengthening is an important feature of cancer cells in adults and children. In addition to somatic mutations, germline polymorphisms in telomere maintenance genes impact telomere length. Whether these telomere-associated polymorphisms affect risk of childhood malignancies remains largely unexplored. We collected genome-wide data from three groups with pediatric malignancies [neuroblastoma (N = 1516), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (N = 958) and osteosarcoma (N = 660)] and three control populations (N = 6892). Using case-control comparisons, we analyzed eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes definitively associated with interindividual variation in leukocyte telomere length (LTL) in prior genome-wide association studies: ACYP2, TERC, NAF1, TERT, OBFC1, CTC1, ZNF208 and RTEL1 Six of these SNPs were associated (P < 0.05) with neuroblastoma risk, one with leukemia risk and one with osteosarcoma risk. The allele associated with longer LTL increased cancer risk for all these significantly associated SNPs. Using a weighted linear combination of the eight LTL-associated SNPs, we observed that neuroblastoma patients were predisposed to longer LTL than controls, with each standard deviation increase in genotypically estimated LTL associated with a 1.15-fold increased odds of neuroblastoma (95%CI = 1.09-1.22; P = 7.9×10(-7)). This effect was more pronounced in adolescent-onset neuroblastoma patients (OR = 1.46; 95%CI = 1.03-2.08). A one standard deviation increase in genotypically estimated LTL was more weakly associated with osteosarcoma risk (OR = 1.10; 95%CI = 1.01-1.19; P = 0.017) and leukemia risk (OR = 1.07; 95%CI = 1.00-1.14; P = 0.044), specifically for leukemia patients who relapsed (OR = 1.19; 95%CI = 1.01-1.40; P = 0.043). These results indicate that genetic predisposition to longer LTL is a newly identified risk factor for neuroblastoma and potentially for other cancers of childhood. PMID:27207662

  10. Points to consider for prioritizing clinical genetic testing services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severin, Franziska; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C;

    2015-01-01

    , following the principles of accountability for reasonableness. We provide points to consider to stimulate this debate across the EU and to serve as a reference for improving patient management.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 24 September 2014; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.190....... of prioritization criteria would be desirable. A decision process following the accountability for reasonableness framework was undertaken, including a multidisciplinary EuroGentest/PPPC-ESHG workshop to develop shared prioritization criteria. Resources are currently too limited to fund all the beneficial genetic...

  11. Molecular genetics of pancreatic carcinogenesis and their clinical significance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottenhof, N.A.

    2012-01-01

    Like all types of cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic malignancy, is a disease of the genes and the genetic alterations that are involved in the development of PDAC have been under investigation for many years. The research described in this thesis focuses on

  12. Congenital hydrocephalus in clinical practice : A genetic diagnostic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, J. M. A.; Schrander-Stumpel, C. T. R. M.; Krapels, P. C.; de Die-Smulders, C. E. M.; van Lint, F. H. M.; Willekes, C.; Weber, J. W.; Gavilanes, A. W. D.; Macville, M. V. E.; Stegmann, A. P. A.; Engelen, J. J. M.; Bakker, J.; Vos, Y. J.; Frints, S. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus is a common and often disabling disorder. The etiology is very heterogeneous. Little is known about the genetic causes of congenital hydrocephalus. A retrospective survey was performed including patients with primary congenital hydrocephalus referred to the Department of Cli

  13. A Clinical Perspective on Ethical Issues in Genetic Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, R. H.; Van Langen, I. M.; Sijmons, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic testing is traditionally preceded by counselling to discuss its advantages and disadvantages with individuals so they can make informed decisions. The new technique of whole genome or exome sequencing, which is currently only used in research settings, can identify many gene mutations, inclu

  14. Genetics in endocrinology: genetic variation in deiodinases: a systematic review of potential clinical effects in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verloop, H.; Dekkers, O.M.; Peeters, R.P.; Schoones, J.W.; Smit, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Iodothyronine deiodinases represent a family of selenoproteins involved in peripheral and local homeostasis of thyroid hormone action. Deiodinases are expressed in multiple organs and thyroid hormone affects numerous biological systems, thus genetic variation in deiodinases may affect multiple clini

  15. Form Follows Function: A Model for Clinical Supervision of Genetic Counseling Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wherley, Colleen; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; Martyr, Meredith A; LeRoy, Bonnie S

    2015-10-01

    Supervision plays a vital role in genetic counselor training, yet models describing genetic counseling supervision processes and outcomes are lacking. This paper describes a proposed supervision model intended to provide a framework to promote comprehensive and consistent clinical supervision training for genetic counseling students. Based on the principle "form follows function," the model reflects and reinforces McCarthy Veach et al.'s empirically derived model of genetic counseling practice - the "Reciprocal Engagement Model" (REM). The REM consists of mutually interactive educational, relational, and psychosocial components. The Reciprocal Engagement Model of Supervision (REM-S) has similar components and corresponding tenets, goals, and outcomes. The 5 REM-S tenets are: Learning and applying genetic information are key; Relationship is integral to genetic counseling supervision; Student autonomy must be supported; Students are capable; and Student emotions matter. The REM-S outcomes are: Student understands and applies information to independently provide effective services, develop professionally, and engage in self-reflective practice. The 16 REM-S goals are informed by the REM of genetic counseling practice and supported by prior literature. A review of models in medicine and psychology confirms the REM-S contains supervision elements common in healthcare fields, while remaining unique to genetic counseling. The REM-S shows promise for enhancing genetic counselor supervision training and practice and for promoting research on clinical supervision. The REM-S is presented in detail along with specific examples and training and research suggestions.

  16. Experimental evolution, genetic analysis and genome re-sequencing reveal the mutation conferring artemisinin resistance in an isogenic lineage of malaria parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Hunt, Paul

    2010-09-16

    Background: Classical and quantitative linkage analyses of genetic crosses have traditionally been used to map genes of interest, such as those conferring chloroquine or quinine resistance in malaria parasites. Next-generation sequencing technologies now present the possibility of determining genome-wide genetic variation at single base-pair resolution. Here, we combine in vivo experimental evolution, a rapid genetic strategy and whole genome re-sequencing to identify the precise genetic basis of artemisinin resistance in a lineage of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi. Such genetic markers will further the investigation of resistance and its control in natural infections of the human malaria, P. falciparum.Results: A lineage of isogenic in vivo drug-selected mutant P. chabaudi parasites was investigated. By measuring the artemisinin responses of these clones, the appearance of an in vivo artemisinin resistance phenotype within the lineage was defined. The underlying genetic locus was mapped to a region of chromosome 2 by Linkage Group Selection in two different genetic crosses. Whole-genome deep coverage short-read re-sequencing (IlluminaSolexa) defined the point mutations, insertions, deletions and copy-number variations arising in the lineage. Eight point mutations arise within the mutant lineage, only one of which appears on chromosome 2. This missense mutation arises contemporaneously with artemisinin resistance and maps to a gene encoding a de-ubiquitinating enzyme.Conclusions: This integrated approach facilitates the rapid identification of mutations conferring selectable phenotypes, without prior knowledge of biological and molecular mechanisms. For malaria, this model can identify candidate genes before resistant parasites are commonly observed in natural human malaria populations. 2010 Hunt et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  17. Clinical Course, Genetic Etiology, and Visual Outcome in Cone and Cone-Rod Dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, Alberta A. H. J.; Phan, T. My Lan; Zekveld-Vroon, Renate C.; Leroy, Bart P.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Hoyng, Carel B.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Roosing, Susanne; Pott, Jan-Willem R.; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; van Moll-Ramirez, Norka; van Genderen, Maria M.; Boon, Camiel J. F.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; De Baere, Elfride; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Lotery, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical course, genetic etiology, and visual prognosis in patients with cone dystrophy (CD) and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD). Design: Clinic-based, longitudinal, multicenter study. Participants: Consecutive probands with CD (N = 98), CRD (N = 83), and affected relatives (N =

  18. Clinical course, genetic etiology, and visual outcome in cone and cone-rod dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, A.A.; Phan, T.M.; Zekveld-Vroon, R.C.; Leroy, B.P.; Born, L.I. van den; Hoyng, C.B.; Klaver, C.C.; Writing Committee for the Cone Disorders Study Group, C.; Roosing, S.; Pott, J.W.; Schooneveld, M.J. van; Moll-Ramirez, N. van; Genderen, M.M. van; Boon, C.J.F.; Hollander, A.I. den; Bergen, A.A.; Baere, E. de; Cremers, F.P.; Lotery, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical course, genetic etiology, and visual prognosis in patients with cone dystrophy (CD) and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD). DESIGN: Clinic-based, longitudinal, multicenter study. PARTICIPANTS: Consecutive probands with CD (N = 98), CRD (N = 83), and affected relatives (N =

  19. Association of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Clinical Features with European Population Genetic Substructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso-Perez, Elisa; Suarez-Gestal, Marian; Calaza, Manuel; Witte, Torsten; Papasteriades, Chryssa; Marchini, Maurizio; Migliaresi, Sergio; Kovacs, Attila; Ordi-Ros, Josep; Bijl, Marc; Santos, Maria Jose; Ruzickova, Sarka; Pullmann, Rudolf; Carreira, Patricia; Skopouli, Fotini N.; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Suarez, Ana; Blanco, Francisco J.; Gomez-Reino, Juan J.; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a very varied spectrum of clinical manifestations that could be partly determined by genetic factors. We aimed to determine the relationship between prevalence of 11 clinical features and age of disease onset with European population g

  20. Clinical and genetic spectrum in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2E

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semplicini, Claudio; Vissing, John; Dahlqvist, Julia R;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the clinical spectrum of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2E (LGMD2E) and to investigate whether genetic or biochemical features can predict the phenotype of the disease. METHODS: All LGMD2E patients followed in participating centers were included. A specific clinical protocol...

  1. Meier-Gorlin syndrome Clinical genetics and genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. de Munnik (Sonja); E.H. Hoefsloot (Elisabeth H.); J. Roukema (Jolt); J. Schoots (Jeroen); N.V.A.M. Knoers (Nine); H.G. Brunner; A.P. Jackson (Andrew); E. Bongers (Ernie)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMeier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a rare autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism disorder, characterized by microtia, patellar applasia/hypoplasia, and a proportionate short stature. Associated clinical features encompass feeding problems, congenital pulmonary emphysema, mammary hypoplasia

  2. Meier-Gorlin syndrome Clinical genetics and genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Munnik, Sonja A.; Hoefsloot, Elisabeth H.; Roukema, Jolt; Schoots, Jeroen; Knoers, Nine Vam; Brunner, Han G.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Bongers, Ernie Mhf

    2015-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a rare autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism disorder, characterized by microtia, patellar applasia/hypoplasia, and a proportionate short stature. Associated clinical features encompass feeding problems, congenital pulmonary emphysema, mammary hypoplasia in females a

  3. Adult-onset cerebellar Ataxia: a clinical and genetic Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Brusse (Esther)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCerebellar ataxias represent a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. Two main categories are distinguished: hereditary and sporadic ataxias. Sporadic ataxias may be symptomatic or idiopathic. The clinical classification of hereditary ataxias is nowadays being replaced by an

  4. Host genetics predict clinical deterioration in HCV-related cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Y King

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the epidermal growth factor (EGF, rs4444903, patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3, rs738409 genes, and near the interleukin-28B (IL28B, rs12979860 gene are linked to treatment response, fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in chronic hepatitis C. Whether these SNPs independently or in combination predict clinical deterioration in hepatitis C virus (HCV-related cirrhosis is unknown. We genotyped SNPs in EGF, PNPLA3, and IL28B from liver tissue from 169 patients with biopsy-proven HCV cirrhosis. We estimated risk of clinical deterioration, defined as development of ascites, encephalopathy, variceal hemorrhage, HCC, or liver-related death using Cox proportional hazards modeling. During a median follow-up of 6.6 years, 66 of 169 patients experienced clinical deterioration. EGF non-AA, PNPLA3 non-CC, and IL28B non-CC genotypes were each associated with increased risk of clinical deterioration in age, sex, and race-adjusted analysis. Only EGF non-AA genotype was independently associated with increased risk of clinical deterioration (hazard ratio [HR] 2.87; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-6.25 after additionally adjusting for bilirubin, albumin, and platelets. Compared to subjects who had 0-1 unfavorable genotypes, the HR for clinical deterioration was 1.79 (95%CI 0.96-3.35 for 2 unfavorable genotypes and 4.03 (95%CI 2.13-7.62 for unfavorable genotypes for all three loci (Ptrend<0.0001. In conclusion, among HCV cirrhotics, EGF non-AA genotype is independently associated with increased risk for clinical deterioration. Specific PNPLA3 and IL28B genotypes also appear to be associated with clinical deterioration. These SNPs have potential to identify patients with HCV-related cirrhosis who require more intensive monitoring for decompensation or future therapies preventing disease progression.

  5. DataGenno: building a new tool to bridge molecular and clinical genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio F Costa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fabricio F Costa1,2, Luciano S Foly1, Marcelo P Coutinho11DataGenno Interactive Research Ltd., Itaperuna, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Cancer Biology and Epigenomics Program, Children's Memorial Research Center, Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Clinical genetics is one of the most challenging fields in medicine, with thousands of children born every year with congenital defects that have no satisfactory diagnosis. There are more than 6,000 known single-gene disorders that can cause birth defects or diseases in approximately 1 in every 200 births. Clinical and molecular information on genetic diseases and syndromes are widespread in the literature, and there are few databases combining this information. Therefore, it is very challenging for health care professionals and researchers to translate the latest advances in science and medicine into effective clinical interventions and new treatments. In order to overcome this obstacle and promote networking, we are building DataGenno, an online medical and scientific portal. DataGenno has been developed to be a source of information on genetic diseases and syndromes for the needs of all heath care professionals and researchers. Our database will be able to integrate both clinical and molecular aspects of genetic diseases in a fully interactive environment. DataGenno’s system already contains clinical and molecular information for 300 diseases, with approximately 6,000 signs and symptoms of these diseases in a database combined with a search engine. Our main goal is to cover all genetic diseases described to date, providing not only clinical information such as morphological and anatomical features but also the most comprehensive molecular genetics/genomics features and available testing information. We are also developing ways to connect DataGenno’s portal with Electronic Health Records in order to improve the efficiency of patient care. Additionally

  6. Frequency and clinical significance of erythrocyte genetic abnormalities in Omanis.

    OpenAIRE

    White, J. M.; Christie, B S; Nam, D; S. Daar; Higgs, D R

    1993-01-01

    The frequencies of four malaria associated erythrocyte genetic abnormalities have been established in 1000 Omani subjects. They are: homozygous alpha+ thalassaemia (-alpha/-alpha) 0.45; high Hb A2 beta thalassaemia trait 0.015; sickle trait (Hb A/S) 0.061; and glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (Gd-): males 0.27, females 0.11. From our data the alpha+ (-alpha/) thal gene (confirmed by Southern blotting) is pandemic in this population. Moreover, in spite of the very high frequency of...

  7. Clinical and laboratory investigation of allergy to genetically modified foods.

    OpenAIRE

    Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Bernstein, I Leonard; Bucchini, Luca; Goldman, Lynn R.; Robert G Hamilton; Lehrer, Samuel; Rubin, Carol; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2003-01-01

    Technology has improved the food supply since the first cultivation of crops. Genetic engineering facilitates the transfer of genes among organisms. Generally, only minute amounts of a specific protein need to be expressed to obtain the desired trait. Food allergy affects only individuals with an abnormal immunologic response to food--6% of children and 1.5-2% of adults in the United States. Not all diseases caused by food allergy are mediated by IgE. A number of expert committees have advise...

  8. Facial emotion perception differs in young persons at genetic and clinical high-risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Christian G; Richard, Jan A; Brensinger, Colleen M; Borgmann-Winter, Karin E; Conroy, Catherine G; Moberg, Paul J; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Calkins, Monica E

    2014-05-15

    A large body of literature has documented facial emotion perception impairments in schizophrenia. More recently, emotion perception has been investigated in persons at genetic and clinical high-risk for psychosis. This study compared emotion perception abilities in groups of young persons with schizophrenia, clinical high-risk, genetic risk and healthy controls. Groups, ages 13-25, included 24 persons at clinical high-risk, 52 first-degree relatives at genetic risk, 91 persons with schizophrenia and 90 low risk persons who completed computerized testing of emotion recognition and differentiation. Groups differed by overall emotion recognition abilities and recognition of happy, sad, anger and fear expressions. Pairwise comparisons revealed comparable impairments in recognition of happy, angry, and fearful expressions for persons at clinical high-risk and schizophrenia, while genetic risk participants were less impaired, showing reduced recognition of fearful expressions. Groups also differed for differentiation of happy and sad expressions, but differences were mainly between schizophrenia and control groups. Emotion perception impairments are observable in young persons at-risk for psychosis. Preliminary results with clinical high-risk participants, when considered along findings in genetic risk relatives, suggest social cognition abilities to reflect pathophysiological processes involved in risk of schizophrenia. PMID:24582775

  9. Genetic regulation of heart valve development: Clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Phillip Hitz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac malformations, most commonly valve defects, are some of the predominant causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide. Up to a third of all patients with complex congenital heart defects and numerous syndromic conditions, as well as a significant amount of the general population, exhibit valve defects. These observations have not only major implications in infancy; they also have a major impact on the adult population and the growing number of adults with congenital malformations. Over recent years, a large number of Mendelian inheritance patterns and syndromic causes have been identified, shedding light on the importance of genes encoding components of the extracelluar matrix in valve disease. Nevertheless, we still know little about the genetic origin of sporadic and more complex family traits. It is unclear to what extent genetic variations play a role in disease pathogenesis and influences phenotypes rooted in early development. Such knowledge would be greatly beneficial for counseling and treatment of patients. Therefore, this review summarizes the findings in human non-syndromic and syndromic valve disease with a special focus on extracellular matrix proteins, and discusses them in the context of vertebrate valve development.

  10. Atlas of the clinical genetics of human dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, Jan; Frese, Karen S; Peil, Barbara;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Numerous genes are known to cause dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). However, until now technological limitations have hindered elucidation of the contribution of all clinically relevant disease genes to DCM phenotypes in larger cohorts. We now utilized next-generation sequencing to overcome thes...

  11. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about colorectal cancer clinical management: the pathologists expert review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirke, P; West, N P; Nagtegaal, I D

    2014-02-01

    Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last 20 years; however, a considerable variation still exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Large variation is also apparent between national guidelines and patterns of cancer care in Europe. Therefore, EURECCA, which is the acronym of European Registration of Cancer Care, is aiming at defining core treatment strategies and developing a European audit structure in order to improve the quality of care for all patients with colon and rectal cancer. In December 2012, the first multidisciplinary consensus conference about cancer of the colon and rectum was held. The expert panel consisted of representatives of European scientific organizations involved in cancer care of patients with colon and rectal cancer and representatives of national colorectal registries.

  12. A Semantic Web-based System for Mining Genetic Mutations in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Sambhawa; Jiang, Guoqian; Dasari, Surendra; Zimmermann, Michael T; Wang, Chen; Heflin, Jeff; Chute, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Textual eligibility criteria in clinical trial protocols contain important information about potential clinically relevant pharmacogenomic events. Manual curation for harvesting this evidence is intractable as it is error prone and time consuming. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a Semantic Web-based system that captures and manages mutation evidences and related contextual information from cancer clinical trials. The system has 2 main components: an NLP-based annotator and a Semantic Web ontology-based annotation manager. We evaluated the performance of the annotator in terms of precision and recall. We demonstrated the usefulness of the system by conducting case studies in retrieving relevant clinical trials using a collection of mutations identified from TCGA Leukemia patients and Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology. In conclusion, our system using Semantic Web technologies provides an effective framework for extraction, annotation, standardization and management of genetic mutations in cancer clinical trials.

  13. Clinical trial on the effect of regular tea drinking on iron accumulation in genetic haemochromatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kaltwasser, J; Werner, E; Schalk, K; Hansen, C.; Gottschalk, R; Seidl, C.

    1998-01-01

    Background—Black tea is known to be a potent inhibitor of intestinal absorption of non-haem iron at least in healthy subjects. 
Aims—To investigate this effect in patients with genetic haemochromatosis, and, more importantly, the effect of regular tea drinking on the accumulation of storage iron in these patients over one year. 
Patients—Investigations were carried out on 18 patients with clinically proven genetic haemochromatosis. For the study of storage iron accumulation, th...

  14. Inherited neuromyotonia: a clinical and genetic study of a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falace, Antonio; Striano, Pasquale; Manganelli, Fiore; Coppola, Antonietta; Striano, Salvatore; Minetti, Carlo; Zara, Federico

    2007-01-01

    Neuromyotonia is a disorder of peripheral nerve hyperexcitability characterized by myokymia, muscle cramps and stiffness, delayed muscle relaxation after contraction (pseudomyotonia), and hyperhidrosis, associated with well described spontaneous electromyographic features. It is usually an acquired disorder associated with autoantibodies against neuronal voltage-gated potassium channels. However, mutations of KCNA1, encoding the K(+) channel subunit hKv1.1, have been reported in rare families with neuromyotonia, and mutations in KCNQ2, encoding voltage-gated potassium M channel subunit, in families with benign neonatal seizures and myokymia. We report a three-generation family with inherited neuromyotonia without evidence of immunological involvement. Genetic study excluded mutations in KCNA1, KCNA2, KCNA6 and KCNQ2 genes. Our study does not completely exclude the involvement of other genes encoding ion channels subunits in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Further studies of familial cases will shed light on the molecular basis of inherited neuromyotonia. PMID:17140792

  15. [Clinical and molecular genetic analysis of hereditary optic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisov, S É; Sheremet, N L; Vorob'eva, O K; Eliseeva, É G; Chukhrova, A L; Loginova, A N; Khanakova, N A; Poliakov, A V

    2013-01-01

    DNA samples of 50 patients with optic neuropathy (ON) associated with congenital cataract were studied to find 3 major mt-DNA mutations (m.11778G>A, m.3460G>A, m.14484T>C), mutations in "hot" regions of OPA 1 gene (exons 8, 14, 15, 16, 18, 27, 28) and in the entire coding sequence of OPA3 gene for molecular genetic confirmation of diagnosis of hereditary Leber and autosomal dominant ON. Primary mutations of mtDNA responsible for hereditary Leber ON were found in 16 patients (32%). Pathogenic mutations of OPAl gene (c.869G>A and c. 2850delT) were identified in 2 patients (4%), these mutations were not found in the literature. OPA3 gene mutations were not revealed.

  16. A new recombinant factor VIII: from genetics to clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagostino, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Advances in recombinant technology and knowledge about coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) are building a platform for new therapeutic options in patients with hemophilia A. The development of turoctocog alfa, a novel, high-purity, third-generation, B-domain truncated recombinant FVIII, has been produced and formulated without the use of animal-derived or human serum-derived components, in the wake of understanding of the new biochemical characteristics of FVIII, namely its protein structure, and glycosylation and sulfating patterns. Culture conditions and a five-step purification process have been developed to optimize the safety of turoctocog alfa. The results of two pilot clinical trials using turoctocog alfa confirmed high safety levels, with no patient developing inhibitors during the period of observation. The purpose of this review is to describe briefly the molecular and biological properties of turoctocog alfa, together with details of its clinical development, with emphasis on the needs of patients with hemophilia A. PMID:25548513

  17. C9orf72-related disorders: expanding the clinical and genetic spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Victor Sgobbi de Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases represent a heterogeneous group of neurological conditions primarily involving dementia, motor neuron disease and movement disorders. They are mostly related to different pathophysiological processes, notably in family forms in which the clinical and genetic heterogeneity are lush. In the last decade, much knowledge has been acumulated about the genetics of neurodegenerative diseases, making it essential in cases of motor neuron disease and frontotemporal dementia the repeat expansions of C9orf72 gene. This review analyzes the main clinical, radiological and genetic aspects of the phenotypes related to the hexanucleotide repeat expansions (GGGGCC of C9orf72 gene. Future studies will aim to further characterize the neuropsychological, imaging and pathological aspects of the extra-motor features of motor neuron disease, and will help to provide a new classification system that is both clinically and biologically relevant.

  18. Connection between Genetic and Clinical Data in Bipolar Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling; Andreassen, Ole; Bennike, Bente;

    2012-01-01

    Complex diseases may be associated with combinations of changes in DNA, where the single change has little impact alone. In a previous study of patients with bipolar disorder and controls combinations of SNP genotypes were analyzed, and four large clusters of combinations were found...... to be significantly associated with bipolar disorder. It has now been found that these clusters may be connected to clinical data....

  19. Neurophysiology versus clinical genetics in Rett syndrome: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, Nicky; Smeets, Eric E; Julu, Peter; Witt-Engerström, Ingegerd; Pini, Giorgio; Bigoni, Stefania; Hansen, Stig; Apartopoulos, Flora; Delamont, Robert; van Roozendaal, Kees; Scusa, Maria F; Borelli, Paolo; Candel, Math; Curfs, Leopold

    2016-09-01

    Many studies have attempted to establish the genotype-phenotype correlation in Rett syndrome (RTT). Cardiorespiratory measurements provide robust objective data, to correlate with each of the different clinical phenotypes. It has important implications for the management and treatment of this syndrome. The aim of this study was to correlate the genotype with the quantitative cardiorespiratory data obtained by neurophysiological measurement combined with a clinical severity score. This international multicenter study was conducted in four European countries from 1999 to 2012. The study cohort consisted of a group of 132 well-defined RTT females aged between 2 and 43 years with extended clinical, molecular, and neurophysiological assessments. Diagnosis of RTT was based on the consensus criteria for RTT and molecular confirmation. Genotype-phenotype analyses of clinical features and cardiorespiratory data were performed after grouping mutations by the same type and localization or having the same putative biological effect on the MeCP2 protein, and subsequently on eight single recurrent mutations. A less severe phenotype was seen in females with CTS, p.R133C, and p.R294X mutations. Autonomic disturbances were present in all females, and not restricted to nor influenced by one specific group or any single recurrent mutation. The objective information from non-invasive neurophysiological evaluation of the disturbed central autonomic control is of great importance in helping to organize the lifelong care for females with RTT. Further research is needed to provide insights into the pathogenesis of autonomic dysfunction, and to develop evidence-based management in RTT. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27354166

  20. Neurophysiology versus clinical genetics in Rett syndrome: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, Nicky; Smeets, Eric E; Julu, Peter; Witt-Engerström, Ingegerd; Pini, Giorgio; Bigoni, Stefania; Hansen, Stig; Apartopoulos, Flora; Delamont, Robert; van Roozendaal, Kees; Scusa, Maria F; Borelli, Paolo; Candel, Math; Curfs, Leopold

    2016-09-01

    Many studies have attempted to establish the genotype-phenotype correlation in Rett syndrome (RTT). Cardiorespiratory measurements provide robust objective data, to correlate with each of the different clinical phenotypes. It has important implications for the management and treatment of this syndrome. The aim of this study was to correlate the genotype with the quantitative cardiorespiratory data obtained by neurophysiological measurement combined with a clinical severity score. This international multicenter study was conducted in four European countries from 1999 to 2012. The study cohort consisted of a group of 132 well-defined RTT females aged between 2 and 43 years with extended clinical, molecular, and neurophysiological assessments. Diagnosis of RTT was based on the consensus criteria for RTT and molecular confirmation. Genotype-phenotype analyses of clinical features and cardiorespiratory data were performed after grouping mutations by the same type and localization or having the same putative biological effect on the MeCP2 protein, and subsequently on eight single recurrent mutations. A less severe phenotype was seen in females with CTS, p.R133C, and p.R294X mutations. Autonomic disturbances were present in all females, and not restricted to nor influenced by one specific group or any single recurrent mutation. The objective information from non-invasive neurophysiological evaluation of the disturbed central autonomic control is of great importance in helping to organize the lifelong care for females with RTT. Further research is needed to provide insights into the pathogenesis of autonomic dysfunction, and to develop evidence-based management in RTT. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Combined clinical and genetic testing algorithm for cervical cancer diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Liou, Yu-Ligh; Zhang, Tao-Lan; Yan, Tian; Yeh, Ching-Tung; Kang, Ya-Nan; Cao, Lanqin; Wu, Nayiyuan; Chang, Chi-Feng; Wang, Huei-Jen; Yen, Carolyn; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Honghao

    2016-01-01

    Background Opportunistic screening in hospitals is widely used to effectively reduce the incidence rate of cervical cancer in China and other developing countries. This study aimed to identify clinical risk factor algorithms that combine gynecologic examination and molecular testing (paired box gene 1 (PAX1) or zinc finger protein 582 (ZNF582) methylation or HPV16/18) results to improve diagnostic accuracy. Methods The delta Cp of methylated PAX1 and ZNF582 was obtained via quantitative methy...

  2. Impact of genetic polymorphisms on clinical response to antithrombotics

    OpenAIRE

    Lanham, Kena J; Oestreich, Julie H; Dunn, Steven P.; et al

    2010-01-01

    Kena J Lanham1,2, Julie H Oestreich3, Steven P Dunn1,2, Steven R Steinhubl41Pharmacy Services, UK HealthCare, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA; 2Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA; 3Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, University of Nebraska, Omaha, Nebraska, USA; 4The Medicines Company, Zurich, Switzerland and The Geisinger Clinic, Danville, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: Antithrombot...

  3. Genetic variations of PIP4K2A confer vulnerability to poor antipsychotic response in severely ill schizophrenia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet Kaur

    incomplete responders with low severity (OR = 4.09, 95%-CI = 2.09-8.02. Our findings provide strong evidence that diplotype ATTGCT/ATTGCT of PIP4K2A gene conferred approximately three-times higher incomplete responsiveness towards antipsychotics in severely ill patients. These results are consistent with the known role of phosphatidyl-inositol-signaling elements in antipsychotic action and outcome. Findings have implication for future molecular genetic studies as well as personalized medicine. However more work is warranted to elucidate underlying causal biological pathway.

  4. Ectodermal dysplasias: a new clinical-genetic classification

    OpenAIRE

    Priolo, M; Lagana, C.

    2001-01-01

    The ectodermal dysplasias (EDs) are a large and complex nosological group of diseases, first described by Thurnam in 1848. In the last 10 years more than 170 different pathological clinical conditions have been recognised and defined as EDs, all sharing in common anomalies of the hair, teeth, nails, and sweat glands. Many are associated with anomalies in other organs and systems and, in some conditions, with mental retardation.
The anomalies affecting the epidermis and epidermal appendages ar...

  5. 1st international conference on the clinical use of tomotherapy, October 17-18, 2008 Munich. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, V.; Debus, J.; Geinitz, H.; Herfarth, K.; Hinkelbein, W.; Kneschaurek, P.; Krempien, R.; Kupelian, P.; Mackie, T.R.; Molls, M.; Noel, G.; Ozsahin, M.; Ramsey, C.; Schubert, K.; Sterzing, F.; Storme, G.; Stuschke, M.; Zach, K.

    2009-01-15

    The first international conference on the clinical use of tomotherapy was hosted by the Department of Radiation Oncology of the ''Technische Univer-sita't Munchen'' on October 17 and 18, 2008. Over 170 radiation oncologists and physicists from 16 countries discussed improved treatment options offered by the tomotherapy technology.Thirty-five presentations and twenty-one posters covered a variety of indications in different tumor entities as well as physics implementation and quality assurance of this new technique.Notable conference lectures included the presentation of a predictive model of tumor response in lung cancer based on daily MV-CT imaging. The model may allow determination of effective adaptive radiotherapy strategies early in the course of radiation treatment. New techniques were presented to further reduce treatment time and to decrease the dose outside the planning target volume (''dynamic jaws',' ''dynamic couch''). Treatment protocols were discussed including a study directed from the University Clinic Essen in a method for treating multiple brain metastases with a simultaneous integrated boost technique applying 10x5 Gy within the metastases. This strategy is going to be evaluated against whole-brain radiotherapy with 10 x 3 Gy in a randomized phase II trial. Another interesting concept was the use of tomotherapy to treat the whole abdominal volume for ovarian cancer while sparing liver, kidneys and bone marrow. Tomotherapy proved its feasibility in the treatment of mesothelioma, a clinically challenging disease in which therapy options were previously limited due to complications of organs at risk. Many presentations discussed the application of tomotherapy in complex cases including large-volume lymphoma where avoidance of critical structures may lead to a reduction of long-term late toxicity. Presentations of user groups from both the USA and Europe discussed how these groups have

  6. Rapid full-field OCT assessment of clinical tissue specimens (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalimier, Eugénie; Harms, Fabrice; Brossollet, Charles; Benoit, Emilie; Martins, Franck; Boccara, Claude A.

    2016-03-01

    FFOCT (Full Field Optical Coherence Tomography) is a novel optical technology that gives access to very high resolution tomography images of biological tissues within minutes, non-invasively. This makes it an attractive tool to bridge the gap between medical imaging modalities (MRI, ultrasound, CT) used for cancer lesion identification or targeting and histological diagnosis. Clinical tissue specimens, such as surgical cancer margins or biopsies, can potentially be assessed rapidly, by the clinician, in the aim to help him decide on the course of action. A fast FFOCT prototype was built, that provides 1cm2 images with 1 µm resolution in 1 minute, and can accommodate samples up to 50mm diameter. Specific work was carried out to implement a large sample holder, high-speed image acquisition system, optimized scanning, and accelerated GPU tiles stitching. Results obtained on breast, urology, and digestive tissues show the efficiency of the technique for the detection of cancer on clinical tissue specimens, and reinforce the clinical relevance of the technique. The technical and clinical results show that the fast FFOCT system can successfully be used for a fast assessment of cancer excision margins or biopsies providing a very valuable tool in the clinical environment.

  7. From bench to clinic and back: Perspective on the 1st IQPC Translational Research conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hörig Heidi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Translational Research (TR provides a set of tools and communication context for scientists and clinicians to optimize the drug discovery and development process. In the proceedings of a Princeton conference on this timely topic, the strengths and needs of this developing field were debated. Outcomes and key points from these discussions are summarized in this article which covers the topics of defining what we mean by translational research (both theoretically and in operational terms, ways in which to engender the TR mindset and embed it in organizations such as the pharmaceutical industry in order to optimize the impact of available technologies (including imaging methods, the scientific basis and under-pinnings of TR including genomics knowledge, information sharing, as well as examples of application to drug discovery and development. Importantly, it should be noted that collaborations and communications between the stakeholders in this field, namely academia, industry and regulatory authorities, must be strengthened in order for the promise of TR to be delivered as better therapies to patients.

  8. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  9. Clinical endpoints for developing pharmaceuticals to manage patients with sporadic or genetic risk of colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rial, Nathaniel S; Zell, Jason A.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Gerner, Eugene W.

    2012-01-01

    To reduce the morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer, current clinical practice focuses on screening for early detection and polypectomy as a form of secondary prevention, complemented with surgical interventions when appropriate. No pharmaceutical agent is currently approved for use in clinical practice for the management of patients with risk of colorectal cancer. This article will review earlier attempts to develop pharmaceuticals for use in managing patients with sporadic or genet...

  10. Clinical skin imaging using color spatial frequency domain imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Moy, Austin J.; Reichenberg, Jason; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-02-01

    Skin diseases are typically associated with underlying biochemical and structural changes compared with normal tissues, which alter the optical properties of the skin lesions, such as tissue absorption and scattering. Although widely used in dermatology clinics, conventional dermatoscopes don't have the ability to selectively image tissue absorption and scattering, which may limit its diagnostic power. Here we report a novel clinical skin imaging technique called color spatial frequency domain imaging (cSFDI) which enhances contrast by rendering color spatial frequency domain (SFD) image at high spatial frequency. Moreover, by tuning spatial frequency, we can obtain both absorption weighted and scattering weighted images. We developed a handheld imaging system specifically for clinical skin imaging. The flexible configuration of the system allows for better access to skin lesions in hard-to-reach regions. A total of 48 lesions from 31 patients were imaged under 470nm, 530nm and 655nm illumination at a spatial frequency of 0.6mm^(-1). The SFD reflectance images at 470nm, 530nm and 655nm were assigned to blue (B), green (G) and red (R) channels to render a color SFD image. Our results indicated that color SFD images at f=0.6mm-1 revealed properties that were not seen in standard color images. Structural features were enhanced and absorption features were reduced, which helped to identify the sources of the contrast. This imaging technique provides additional insights into skin lesions and may better assist clinical diagnosis.

  11. Fast full-field OCT assessment of clinical tissue specimens (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalimier, Eugénie; Harms, Fabrice; Brossolet, Charles; Benoit, Emilie; Martins, Franck; Boccara, Claude

    2016-03-01

    Full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT) offers a non-invasive method of obtaining images of biological tissues at ultrahigh resolution (1µm in all 3 directions) approaching traditional histological sections. Previous clinical studies have shown the high efficiency of this imaging technique for the detection of cancer on various organs. This promises great potential of the technique for an ex-vivo quick analysis of surgical resections or biopsy specimens, in the aim to help the surgeon/radiologist decide on the course of action. Here we will present some of the latest technical developments on a FFOCT system which can produce 1cm2 images with 1 µm resolution in 1 minute. Larger samples, up to 50mm diameter, can also be imaged. Details on the large sample handling, high-speed image acquisition, optimized scanning, and accelerated GPU tiles stitching will be given. Results on the clinical applications for breast, urology, and digestive tissues will also be given. They highlight the relevance of the system characteristics for the detection of cancer on ex-vivo specimens. FFOCT now appears clearly as a very fast and non-destructive imaging technique that provides a quick assessment of the tissue morphology. With the benefit of both new technical developments and clinical validation, it turned into a mature technique to be implemented in the clinical environment. In particular, the technique holds potential for the fast ex-vivo analysis of excision margins or biopsies in the operating room.

  12. Critical dosimetry measures and surrogate tools that can facilitate clinical success in PDT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Davis, Scott C.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Maytin, Edward V.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Palanisami, Akilan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy can be a highly complex treatment with more than one parameter to control, or in some cases it is easily implemented with little control other than prescribed drug and light values. The role of measured dosimetry as related to clinical adoption has not been as successful as it could have been, and part of this may be from the conflicting goals of advocating for as many measurements as possible for accurate control, versus companies and clinical adopters advocating for as few measurements as possible, to keep it simple. An organized approach to dosimetry selection is required, which shifts from mechanistic measurements in pre-clinical and early phase I trials, towards just those essential dose limiting measurements and a focus on possible surrogate measures in phase II/III trials. This essential and surrogate approach to dosimetry should help successful adoption of clinical PDT if successful. The examples of essential dosimetry points and surrogate dosimetry tools which might be implemented in phase II and higher trials are discussed for solid tissue PDT with verteporfin and skin lesion treatment with aminolevulinc acid.

  13. SIGEF Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Terceño-Gómez, Antonio; Ferrer-Comalat, Joan; Merigó-Lindahl, José; Linares-Mustarós, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected papers presented at the SIGEF conference, held at the Faculty of Economics and Business of the University of Girona (Spain), 06-08 July, 2015. This edition of the conference has been presented with the slogan “Scientific methods for the treatment of uncertainty in social sciences”. There are different ways for dealing with uncertainty in management. The book focuses on soft computing theories and their role in assessing uncertainty in a complex world. It gives a comprehensive overview of quantitative management topics and discusses some of the most recent developments in all the areas of business and management in soft computing including Decision Making, Expert Systems and Forgotten Effects Theory, Forecasting Models, Fuzzy Logic and Fuzzy Sets, Modelling and Simulation Techniques, Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms and Optimization and Control. The book might be of great interest for anyone working in the area of management and business economics and might be es...

  14. Creating an optical spectroscopy system for use in a primary care clinical setting (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshein, Adam; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Gould, Bradley; Wu, Wenli; Konda, Vani; Yang, Leslie W.; Koons, Ann; Feder, Seth; Valuckaite, Vesta; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    While there are a plethora of in-vivo spectroscopic techniques that have demonstrated the ability to detect a number of diseases in research trials, very few techniques have successfully become a fully realized clinical technology. This is primarily due to the stringent demands on a clinical device for widespread implementation. Some of these demands include: simple operation requiring minimal or no training, safe for in-vivo patient use, no disruption to normal clinic workflow, tracking of system performance, warning for measurement abnormality, and meeting all FDA guidelines for medical use. Previously, our group developed a fiber optic probe-based optical sensing technique known as low-coherence enhanced backscattering spectroscopy (LEBS) to quantify tissue ultrastructure in-vivo. Now we have developed this technique for the application of prescreening patients for colonoscopy in a primary care (PC) clinical setting. To meet the stringent requirements for a viable medical device used in a PC clinical setting, we developed several novel components including an automated calibration tool, optical contact sensor for signal acquisition, and a contamination sensor to identify measurements which have been affected by debris. The end result is a state-of-the-art medical device that can be realistically used by a PC physician to assess a person's risk for harboring colorectal precancerous lesions. The pilot study of this system shows great promise with excellent stability and accuracy in identifying high-risk patients. While this system has been designed and optimized for our specific application, the system and design concepts are universal to most in-vivo fiber optic based spectroscopic techniques.

  15. Genetic Manipulation of NK Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy: Techniques and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Mattias; Childs, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Given their rapid and efficient capacity to recognize and kill tumor cells, natural killer (NK) cells represent a unique immune cell to genetically reprogram in an effort to improve the outcome of cell-based cancer immunotherapy. However, technical and biological challenges associated with gene delivery into NK cells have significantly tempered this approach. Recent advances in viral transduction and electroporation have now allowed detailed characterization of genetically modified NK cells and provided a better understanding for how these cells can be utilized in the clinic to optimize their capacity to induce tumor regression in vivo. Improving NK cell persistence in vivo via autocrine IL-2 and IL-15 stimulation, enhancing tumor targeting by silencing inhibitory NK cell receptors such as NKG2A, and redirecting tumor killing via chimeric antigen receptors, all represent approaches that hold promise in preclinical studies. This review focuses on available methods for genetic reprograming of NK cells and the advantages and challenges associated with each method. It also gives an overview of strategies for genetic reprograming of NK cells that have been evaluated to date and an outlook on how these strategies may be best utilized in clinical protocols. With the recent advances in our understanding of the complex biological networks that regulate the ability of NK cells to target and kill tumors in vivo, we foresee genetic engineering as an obligatory pathway required to exploit the full potential of NK-cell based immunotherapy in the clinic.

  16. Effects of Anxiety on Novice Genetic Counseling Students' Experience of Supervised Clinical Rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Ian M; McCarthy Veach, Pat; Grier, Janelle E; Meister, Derek J; LeRoy, Bonnie S

    2016-08-01

    Supervised clinical experiences with patients comprise a critical component of genetic counseling student education. Previous research has found genetic counseling students tend to be more anxiety prone than the general population, and anxiety related to supervision has been found in genetic counseling and related fields. The present study investigated how anxiety affects the experience of supervision for genetic counseling students. Second year genetic counseling students were invited to participate through email invitations distributed via training directors of the 33 programs accredited at the time of the study by the American Board of Genetic Counseling. An initial online survey contained the trait scale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory to estimate anxiety proneness in this population and an invitation to participate in a 45-minute semi-structured phone interview focusing on students' experiences of supervision during their clinical rotations. High and low trait anxiety groups were created using STAI scores, and the groups' interview responses were compared using consensual qualitative research methodology (CQR; Hill 2012). The high anxiety group was more likely to describe problematic supervisory relationships, appreciate the supervisor's ability to help them when they get stuck in sessions, and feel their anxiety had a negative effect on their performance in general and in supervision. Common themes included supervisors' balancing support and guidance, the importance of feedback, ego-centric responses, and supervisors as focal points. The results of the present study are largely consistent with current literature. Further research findings and research, practice, and training recommendations are provided. PMID:27098419

  17. Anticipating clinical integration of genetically tailored tobacco dependence treatment: perspectives of primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Elyse R; Kleimann, Susan; Pelan, Julie A; Shields, Alexandra E

    2007-02-01

    Emerging research will likely make it possible to tailor pharmacological treatment for individuals with tobacco dependence by genotype. This study explored primary care physicians' attitudes about the strengths of and barriers to using genetic testing to match patients to optimal nicotine replacement therapy. Four focus groups (n=27) were conducted, and data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Physicians reported how likely they would be to offer patients a genetic test to tailor smoking treatment in response to three different scenarios that described characteristics of the genetic test based on published research. Respondents were on average 36 years of age; 59% were male and 67% were white. Physicians believed genetically tailored treatment may offer new hope to smokers trying to quit, yet they also noted several potential barriers to clinical integration. Barriers included erroneous assumptions by patients regarding the meaning of genetic test results, possible misinterpretation of information regarding racial differences in the prevalence of certain risk alleles, and potential discrimination against patients undergoing testing. Concerns increased dramatically when physicians were told that the same genotypes that would be identified to tailor smoking treatment also have been associated with increased risk of becoming addicted to nicotine, as well as other addictions and psychiatric disorders. Physicians were interested in the possibility of realizing improved smoking cessation outcomes through pharmacogenetic developments, but they also raised many concerns. Primary care physicians will need additional educational inputs and system support prior to integrating genetic testing for a common trait into their routine clinical practice. PMID:17365758

  18. Multiple trait genetic evaluation of clinical mastitis in three dairy cattle breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govignon-Gion, A; Dassonneville, R; Baloche, G; Ducrocq, V

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, a routine genetic evaluation on occurrence of clinical mastitis in three main dairy cattle breeds-- Montbéliarde (MO), Normande (NO) and Holstein (HO)--was implemented in France. Records were clinical mastitis events reported by farmers to milk recording technicians and the analyzed trait was the binary variable describing the occurrence of a mastitis case within the first 150 days of the first three lactations. Genetic parameters of clinical mastitis were estimated for the three breeds. Low heritability estimates were found: between 2% and 4% depending on the breed. Despite its low heritability, the trait exhibits genetic variation so efficient genetic improvement is possible. Genetic correlations with other traits were estimated, showing large correlations (often>0.50, in absolute value) between clinical mastitis and somatic cell score (SCS), longevity and some udder traits. Correlation with milk yield was moderate and unfavorable (ρ=0.26 to 0.30). High milking speed was genetically associated with less mastitis in MO (ρ=-0.14) but with more mastitis in HO (ρ=0.18). A two-step approach was implemented for routine evaluation: first, a univariate evaluation based on a linear animal model with permanent environment effect led to pre-adjusted records (defined as records corrected for all non-genetic effects) and associated weights. These data were then combined with similar pre-adjusted records for others traits in a multiple trait BLUP animal model. The combined breeding values for clinical mastitis obtained are the official (published) ones. Mastitis estimated breeding values (EBV) were then combined with SCSs EBV into an udder health index, which receives a weight of 14.5% to 18.5% in the French total merit index (ISU) of the three breeds. Interbull genetic correlations for mastitis occurrence were very high (ρ=0.94) with Nordic countries, where much stricter recording systems exist reflecting a satisfactory quality of phenotypes as reported by the

  19. Multiple trait genetic evaluation of clinical mastitis in three dairy cattle breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govignon-Gion, A; Dassonneville, R; Baloche, G; Ducrocq, V

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, a routine genetic evaluation on occurrence of clinical mastitis in three main dairy cattle breeds-- Montbéliarde (MO), Normande (NO) and Holstein (HO)--was implemented in France. Records were clinical mastitis events reported by farmers to milk recording technicians and the analyzed trait was the binary variable describing the occurrence of a mastitis case within the first 150 days of the first three lactations. Genetic parameters of clinical mastitis were estimated for the three breeds. Low heritability estimates were found: between 2% and 4% depending on the breed. Despite its low heritability, the trait exhibits genetic variation so efficient genetic improvement is possible. Genetic correlations with other traits were estimated, showing large correlations (often>0.50, in absolute value) between clinical mastitis and somatic cell score (SCS), longevity and some udder traits. Correlation with milk yield was moderate and unfavorable (ρ=0.26 to 0.30). High milking speed was genetically associated with less mastitis in MO (ρ=-0.14) but with more mastitis in HO (ρ=0.18). A two-step approach was implemented for routine evaluation: first, a univariate evaluation based on a linear animal model with permanent environment effect led to pre-adjusted records (defined as records corrected for all non-genetic effects) and associated weights. These data were then combined with similar pre-adjusted records for others traits in a multiple trait BLUP animal model. The combined breeding values for clinical mastitis obtained are the official (published) ones. Mastitis estimated breeding values (EBV) were then combined with SCSs EBV into an udder health index, which receives a weight of 14.5% to 18.5% in the French total merit index (ISU) of the three breeds. Interbull genetic correlations for mastitis occurrence were very high (ρ=0.94) with Nordic countries, where much stricter recording systems exist reflecting a satisfactory quality of phenotypes as reported by the

  20. 76 FR 18227 - Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... in the Federal Register of February 7, 2011 (76 FR 6623). In the notice, FDA requested public comment.... Background In the Federal Register of February 7, 2011 (76 FR 6623), FDA published a notice announcing a... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical...

  1. Use of Whole Genome Sequencing for Diagnosis and Discovery in the Cancer Genetics Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha B. Foley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the potential of whole-genome sequencing (WGS to improve patient diagnosis and care, the empirical value of WGS in the cancer genetics clinic is unknown. We performed WGS on members of two cohorts of cancer genetics patients: those with BRCA1/2 mutations (n = 176 and those without (n = 82. Initial analysis of potentially pathogenic variants (PPVs, defined as nonsynonymous variants with allele frequency < 1% in ESP6500 in 163 clinically-relevant genes suggested that WGS will provide useful clinical results. This is despite the fact that a majority of PPVs were novel missense variants likely to be classified as variants of unknown significance (VUS. Furthermore, previously reported pathogenic missense variants did not always associate with their predicted diseases in our patients. This suggests that the clinical use of WGS will require large-scale efforts to consolidate WGS and patient data to improve accuracy of interpretation of rare variants. While loss-of-function (LoF variants represented only a small fraction of PPVs, WGS identified additional cancer risk LoF PPVs in patients with known BRCA1/2 mutations and led to cancer risk diagnoses in 21% of non-BRCA cancer genetics patients after expanding our analysis to 3209 ClinVar genes. These data illustrate how WGS can be used to improve our ability to discover patients' cancer genetic risks.

  2. Alpha-mannosidosis - a review of genetic, clinical findings and options of treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Line; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Dali, Christine I.

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-mannosidosis (OMIM 248500) is a rare, autosomal recessive, multisystemic, progressive lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of alpha-mannosidase. It has been described in humans, cattle, domestic cats, mice and guinea pigs. In humans, alpha-mannosidosis results in progressive...... for alpha-mannosidosis. The pathology, genetics and clinical pictures, including impairments in the activity of daily living are discussed....

  3. Erythropoietin in the General Population : Reference Ranges and Clinical, Biochemical and Genetic Correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grote Beverborg, Niels; Verweij, Niek; Klip, IJsbrand T.; van der Wal, Haye H.; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Meer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Although erythropoietin has been used for decades in the treatment of anemia, data regarding endogenous levels in the general population are scarce. Therefore, we determined erythropoietin reference ranges and its clinical, biochemical and genetic associations in the general population. M

  4. The RD5000 Database: Facilitating Clinical, Genetic, and Therapeutic Studies on Inherited Retinal Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, R.A.C. van; Oomen, C.J.; Plomp, A.S.; Genderen, M.M. van; Klevering, B.J.; Schlingemann, R.O.; Klaver, C.C.; Born, L.I. van den; Cremers, F.P.M.; Group, R.D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited retinal diseases (IRDs) represent a clinical and genetic heterogeneous group of chorioretinal disorders. The frequency of persons affected by an IRD due to mutations in the same gene varies from 1 in 10,000 to less than 1 in a million. To perform meaningful genotype-phenotype analyses for

  5. Identification of Clinical and Genetic Parameters Associated with Hidradenitis Suppurativa in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, Ineke C; Koldijk, Marjolein J; Spekhorst, Lieke M; Vila, Arnau Vich; Weersma, Rinse K; Dijkstra, Gerard; Horváth, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) has recently been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The objective of this study is to investigate the prevalence of HS in IBD and to identify clinical and genetic parameters associated with HS in IBD. METHODS: A questionnaire, validated for H

  6. An experimental case-conference programme for obstetrics and gynaecology clinical students.

    OpenAIRE

    ten Have, H; Essed, G.

    1989-01-01

    Since the founding of the University of Limburg (1974), in The Netherlands, an innovative medical curriculum has been guided by educational principles of problem-orientation, continuous assessment, student initiative and attitude development. The teaching of medical ethics was built into the preclinical curriculum from the start. However, the clinical years remained largely unaffected, and only recently has an effort been made to extend the educational philosophy to this more or less traditio...

  7. Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes: Insights into the Pathogenesis and Its Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With rapidly increasing prevalence, diabetes has become one of the major causes of mortality worldwide. According to the latest studies, genetic information makes substantial contributions towards the prediction of diabetes risk and individualized antidiabetic treatment. To date, approximately 70 susceptibility genes have been identified as being associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D at a genome-wide significant level (P<5×10-8. However, all the genetic loci identified so far account for only about 10% of the overall heritability of T2D. In addition, how these novel susceptibility loci correlate with the pathophysiology of the disease remains largely unknown. This review covers the major genetic studies on the risk of T2D based on ethnicity and briefly discusses the potential mechanisms and clinical utility of the genetic information underlying T2D.

  8. Clinical use of a portable dual microscope system for smartphone (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurachi, Cristina; Brognara, Gabriel; Gómez-García, Pablo A.; Carbinatto, Fernanda; Silva, Eduardo V.; Lombardi, Wellington; Inada, Natália M.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer is still one of the most relevant women cancer types, since the 5-year survival rate is of only around 68%. Prevention and early diagnosis are the best strategies to improve cervical cancer prognosis. Conventional diagnosis procedure in Gynecology is mainly based on the macroscopic clinical evaluation, Pap smear cytology, and biopsy, if needed. A portable microscope with dual configuration and its use for diagnosis in Gynecology is investigated. The microscope has interchangeable parts that allow its use for cytopathology smear samples or in situ endoscopic tissue interrogation, both using acriflavine as a nuclei marker. Patients of the Women Ambulatory of the School of Medicine (UNIARA, Araraquara, Brazil) were interrogated during the colposcopy examination. The cervix was initially cleaned using an acetic acid solution, and a 0.05% (wt/vol) acriflavine in saline solution was topically applied at the tissue surface using a cotton swab. Microendoscopy images were taken from clinically normal cervix mucosa and from detected lesions. An image processing is performed to evaluate the cell nuclei morphology and the cytoplasm/nuclei ratio. The Pap smear results and the histology analyses are taken as gold standard for the diagnosis. Preliminary results in 5 patients demonstrated the potential use of our microscope at the clinical setting.

  9. Clinical, biological and genetic analysis of anorchia in 26 boys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Brauner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anorchia is defined as the absence of testes in a 46,XY individual with a male phenotype. The cause is unknown. METHODS: We evaluated the clinical and biological presentation, and family histories of 26 boys with anorchia, and sequenced their SRY, NR5A1, INSL3, MAMLD1 genes and the T222P variant for LGR8. RESULTS: No patient had any associated congenital anomaly. At birth, testes were palpable bilaterally or unilaterally in 13 cases and not in 7; one patient presented with bilateral testicular torsion immediately after birth. The basal plasma concentrations of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH, n = 15, inhibin B (n = 7 and testosterone (n = 19 were very low or undetectable in all the patients evaluated, as were the increases in testosterone after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG, n = 12. The basal plasma concentrations of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH were increased in 20/25, as was that of luteinising hormone in 10/22 cases. Family members of 7/26 cases had histories of primary ovarian failure in the mother (n = 2, or sister 46,XX, together with fetal malformations of the only boy with microphallus and secondary foot edema (n = 1, secondary infertility in the father (n = 2, or cryptorchidism in first cousins (n = 2. The sequences of all the genes studied were normal. CONCLUSION: Undetectable plasma concentrations of AMH and inhibin B and an elevated plasma FSH, together with 46,XY complement are sufficient for diagnosis of anorchia. The hCG test is unnecessary. NR5A1 and other genes implicated in gonadal development and testicle descent were not mutated, which suggests that other genes involved in these developments contribute to the phenotypes.

  10. Improving Decision Making about Genetic Testing in the Clinic: An Overview of Effective Knowledge Translation Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, France; Robitaille, Hubert; Gane, Claire; Hébert, Jessica; Labrecque, Michel; Rousseau, François

    2016-01-01

    Background Knowledge translation (KT) interventions are attempts to change behavior in keeping with scientific evidence. While genetic tests are increasingly available to healthcare consumers in the clinic, evidence about their benefits is unclear and decisions about genetic testing are thus difficult for all parties. Objective We sought to identify KT interventions that involved decisions about genetic testing in the clinical context and to assess their effectiveness for improving decision making in terms of behavior change, increased knowledge and wellbeing. Methods We searched for trials assessing KT interventions in the context of genetic testing up to March 2014 in all systematic reviews (n = 153) published by two Cochrane review groups: Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) and Consumers and Communication. Results We retrieved 2473 unique trials of which we retained only 28 (1%). Two EPOC reviews yielded two trials of KT interventions: audit and feedback (n = 1) and educational outreach (n = 1). Both targeted health professionals and the KT intervention they assessed was found to be effective. Four Consumers and Communication reviews yielded 26 trials: decision aids (n = 15), communication of DNA-based disease risk estimates (n = 7), personalized risk communication (n = 3) and mobile phone messaging (n = 1). Among these, 25 trials targeted only health consumers or patients and the KT interventions were found to be effective in four trials, partly effective in seven, and ineffective in four. Lastly, only one trial targeted both physicians and patients and was found to be effective. Conclusions More research on the effectiveness of KT interventions regarding genetic testing in the clinical context may contribute to patients making informed value-based decisions and drawing the maximum benefit from clinical applications of genetic and genomic innovations. PMID:26938633

  11. Genetic Counseling Supervisors' Self-Efficacy for Select Clinical Supervision Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Sabra Ledare; Veach, Pat McCarthy; MacFarlane, Ian M; LeRoy, Bonnie S; Callanan, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    Supervision is a primary instructional vehicle for genetic counseling student clinical training. Approximately two-thirds of genetic counselors report teaching and education roles, which include supervisory roles. Recently, Eubanks Higgins and colleagues published the first comprehensive list of empirically-derived genetic counseling supervisor competencies. Studies have yet to evaluate whether supervisors possess these competencies and whether their competencies differ as a function of experience. This study investigated three research questions: (1) What are genetic counselor supervisors' perceptions of their capabilities (self-efficacy) for a select group of supervisor competencies?, (2) Are there differences in self-efficacy as a function of their supervision experience or their genetic counseling experience, and 3) What training methods do they use and prefer to develop supervision skills? One-hundred thirty-one genetic counselor supervisors completed an anonymous online survey assessing demographics, self-efficacy (self-perceived capability) for 12 goal setting and 16 feedback competencies (Scale: 0-100), competencies that are personally challenging, and supervision training experiences and preferences (open-ended). A MANOVA revealed significant positive effects of supervision experience but not genetic counseling experience on participants' self-efficacy. Although mean self-efficacy ratings were high (>83.7), participant comments revealed several challenging competencies (e.g., incorporating student's report of feedback from previous supervisors into goal setting, and providing feedback about student behavior rather than personal traits). Commonly preferred supervision training methods included consultation with colleagues, peer discussion, and workshops/seminars.

  12. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy statement update: genetic testing for cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-15

    As the leading organization representing cancer specialists involved in patient care and clinical research, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) reaffirms its commitment to integrating cancer risk assessment and management, including molecular analysis of cancer predisposition genes, into the practice of oncology and preventive medicine. The primary goal of this effort is to foster expanded access to, and continued advances in, medical care provided to patients and families affected by hereditary cancer syndromes. The 1996 ASCO Statement on Genetic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility set forth specific recommendations relating to clinical practice, research needs, educational opportunities, requirement for informed consent, indications for genetic testing, regulation of laboratories, and protection from discrimination, as well as access to and reimbursement for cancer genetics services. In updating this Statement, ASCO endorses the following principles: Indications for Genetic Testing: ASCO recommends that genetic testing be offered when 1) the individual has personal or family history features suggestive of a genetic cancer susceptibility condition, 2) the test can be adequately interpreted, and 3) the results will aid in diagnosis or influence the medical or surgical management of the patient or family members at hereditary risk of cancer. ASCO recommends that genetic testing only be done in the setting of pre- and post-test counseling, which should include discussion of possible risks and benefits of cancer early detection and prevention modalities. Special Issues in Testing Children for Cancer Susceptibility: ASCO recommends that the decision to offer testing to potentially affected children should take into account the availability of evidence-based risk-reduction strategies and the probability of developing a malignancy during childhood. Where risk-reduction strategies are available or cancer predominantly develops in childhood, ASCO believes that

  13. Molecular genetic characterisation of the Asc locus of tomato conferring resistance to the fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biezen, E.A. van der; Overduin, B.; Kneppers, T.J.A.; Mesbah, L.A.; Nijkamp, H.J.J.; Hille, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Alternaria stem canker disease of tomato is caused by the fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici and its host-selective AAL-toxins. Resistance to the pathogen and insensitivity to the toxins are conferred by the Asc locus on chromosome 3L. Sensitivity to AAL-toxins is a relative

  14. First clinical pilot study with intravascular polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiger, Martin; Karanasos, Antonios; Ren, Jian; Lippok, Norman; Shishkov, Milen; Daemen, Joost; Van Mieghem, Nicolas; Diletti, Roberto; Valgimigli, Marco; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; de Jaegere, Peter; Zijlstra, Felix; van Soest, Gijs; Nadkarni, Seemantini; Regar, Evelyn; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-02-01

    Polarization sensitive (PS) OCT measures the polarization states of the light backscattered by tissue and provides measures of tissue birefringence and depolarization in addition to the structural OCT signal. Ex vivo studies have demonstrated that birefringence is increased in tissue rich in collagen and with elevated smooth muscle cell content. Preliminary data further suggests that depolarization can identify regions of macrophage infiltration, lipid, and irregularly arranged collagen fibers. These are important aspects of the mechanical integrity and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques. To evaluate the potential of PS-OCT in the clinical setting, we combined our custom PS-OCT system with commercially available OCT catheters (Fastview, Terumo Corporation) and performed a pilot study in 30 patients, scheduled to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on the grounds of stable or unstable angina. A total of 82 pullbacks in 39 vessels were performed, either in the native coronary arteries or post procedure. Comparing consecutive pullbacks of the same coronary artery, we found excellent agreement between the polarization features in the repeat pullbacks, validating the repeatability and robustness of PS-OCT in the clinical in vivo setting. In addition we observed that the birefringence and depolarization features vary significantly across lesions with identical structural OCT appearance, suggesting morphological subtypes. This first human pilot study proved the feasibility and robustness of intravascular PS-OCT. PS-OCT achieves improved tissue characterization and may help in identifying high-risk plaques, with the potential to ultimately improve risk stratification and help guiding PCI.

  15. Prostate cancer risk-associated genetic markers and their potential clinical utility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfeng Xu; Jielin Sun; S Lilly Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common cancers among men in Western developed countries and its incidence has increased considerably in many other parts of the world,including China.The etiology of PCa is largely unknown but is thought to be multifactorial,where inherited genetics plays an important role.In this article,we first briefly review results from studies of familial aggregation and genetic susceptibility to PCa.We then recap key findings of rare and high-penetrance PCa susceptibility genes from linkage studies in PCa families.We devote a significant portion of this article to summarizing discoveries of common and low-penetrance PCa risk-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genetic association studies in PCa cases and controls,especially those from genome-wide association studies (GWASs).A strong focus of this article is to review the literature on the potential clinical utility of these implicated genetic markers.Most of these published studies described PCa risk estimation using a genetic score derived from multiple risk-associated SNPs and its utility in determining the need for prostate biopsy.Finally,we comment on the newly proposed concept of genetic score; the notion is to treat it as a marker for genetic predisposition,similar to family history,rather than a diagnostic marker to discriminate PCa patients from non-cancer patients.Available evidence to date suggests that genetic score is an objective and better measurement of inherited risk of PCa than family history.Another unique feature of this article is the inclusion of genetic association studies of PCa in Chinese and Japanese populations.

  16. Special conference of the American Association for Cancer Research on molecular imaging in cancer: linking biology, function, and clinical applications in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luker, Gary D

    2002-04-01

    The AACR Special Conference on Molecular Imaging in Cancer: Linking Biology, Function, and Clinical Applications In Vivo, was held January 23-27, 2002, at the Contemporary Hotel, Walt Disney World, Orlando, FL. Co-Chairs David Piwnica-Worms, Patricia Price and Thomas Meade brought together researchers with diverse expertise in molecular biology, gene therapy, chemistry, engineering, pharmacology, and imaging to accelerate progress in developing and applying technologies for imaging specific cellular and molecular signals in living animals and humans. The format of the conference was the presentation of research that focused on basic and translational biology of cancer and current state-of-the-art techniques for molecular imaging in animal models and humans. This report summarizes the special conference on molecular imaging, highlighting the interfaces of molecular biology with animal models, instrumentation, chemistry, and pharmacology that are essential to convert the dreams and promise of molecular imaging into improved understanding, diagnosis, and management of cancer.

  17. Genetic variant in CD44 confer susceptibility to acute skin reaction in breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterogeneity in toxicity to normal tissue is observed in 10% of cancer patients after radiotherapy (RT) which limits the therapeutic outcome. Response to RT is manifested from alterations in gene of vivid pathways involving DNA damage-repair, inflammatory cytokine, cell cycle regulation, antioxidant response etc. Therefore, the common sequence variants in these radioresponsive genes may modify the severity of normal tissue toxicity and identification of the same may have clinical relevance as a predictive biomarker. The present study was aimed to evaluate the potential modifying role of genetic variants in NFE2L2, OGG1, NEIL3, RAD17, PTTG1, REV3L, ALAD, CD44, RAD9A, LIG3, SH3GL1, BAXS, XRCC1, MAD2L2 and TGFBR3 on the individual susceptibility to RT induced acute skin reactions. All the 132 breast cancer patients were treated with a total dose of 50 Gy in case of mastectomy and 60 Gy in breast conservation surgery. The severity of skin damage was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria and the toxicity scores were dichotomized as non-over-responders (NOR; RTOG<2) and over-responders (NOR;RTOG>2) for analysis. Out of the 132 subjects, 44 were ORs. Among the 20 studied SNPs of indicated genes, the rs8193 (CD44) polymorphism lying in the miRNA binding site was significantly (p<0.05) associated with the RT induced adverse skin reactions. The non-coding CD44 3'-UTR serves as a competitor for miRNA binding and subsequently inactivates miRNA functions, by freeing the target mRNAs from being repressed. Therefore, though the role of CD44 in radiosensitivity is unknown, the change in the miRNA binding to CD44mRNA transcripts may regulate expression of several genes involved in pathophysiology of normal tissue radiosensitivity leading to the observed outcome. (author)

  18. The next controversy in genetic testing: clinical data as trade secrets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Deegan, Robert; Conley, John M; Evans, James P; Vorhaus, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Sole-source business models for genetic testing can create private databases containing information vital to interpreting the clinical significance of human genetic variations. But incomplete access to those databases threatens to impede the clinical interpretation of genomic medicine. National health systems and insurers, regulators, researchers, providers and patients all have a strong interest in ensuring broad access to information about the clinical significance of variants discovered through genetic testing. They can create incentives for sharing data and interpretive algorithms in several ways, including: promoting voluntary sharing; requiring laboratories to share as a condition of payment for or regulatory approval of laboratory services; establishing - and compelling participation in - resources that capture the information needed to interpret the data independent of company policies; and paying for sharing and interpretation in addition to paying for the test itself. US policies have failed to address the data-sharing issue. The entry of new and established firms into the European genetic testing market presents an opportunity to correct this failure. PMID:23150081

  19. A Clinical, Neuropathological and Genetic Study of Homozygous A467T POLG-Related Mitochondrial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajakulendran, Sanjeev; Pitceathly, Robert D. S.; Taanman, Jan-Willem; Costello, Harry; Sweeney, Mary G.; Woodward, Cathy E.; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Holton, Janice L.; Jacques, Thomas S.; Harding, Brian N.; Fratter, Carl; Hanna, Michael G.; Rahman, Shamima

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the nuclear gene POLG (encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase gamma) are an important cause of mitochondrial disease. The most common POLG mutation, A467T, appears to exhibit considerable phenotypic heterogeneity. The mechanism by which this single genetic defect results in such clinical diversity remains unclear. In this study we evaluate the clinical, neuropathological and mitochondrial genetic features of four unrelated patients with homozygous A467T mutations. One patient presented with the severe and lethal Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome, which was confirmed on neuropathology, and was found to have a depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Of the remaining three patients, one presented with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), one with a phenotype in the Myoclonic Epilepsy, Myopathy and Sensory Ataxia (MEMSA) spectrum and one with Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy, Dysarthria and Ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). All three had secondary accumulation of multiple mtDNA deletions. Complete sequence analysis of muscle mtDNA using the MitoChip resequencing chip in all four cases demonstrated significant variation in mtDNA, including a pathogenic MT-ND5 mutation in one patient. These data highlight the variable and overlapping clinical and neuropathological phenotypes and downstream molecular defects caused by the A467T mutation, which may result from factors such as the mtDNA genetic background, nuclear genetic modifiers and environmental stressors. PMID:26735972

  20. A Clinical, Neuropathological and Genetic Study of Homozygous A467T POLG-Related Mitochondrial Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Rajakulendran

    Full Text Available Mutations in the nuclear gene POLG (encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase gamma are an important cause of mitochondrial disease. The most common POLG mutation, A467T, appears to exhibit considerable phenotypic heterogeneity. The mechanism by which this single genetic defect results in such clinical diversity remains unclear. In this study we evaluate the clinical, neuropathological and mitochondrial genetic features of four unrelated patients with homozygous A467T mutations. One patient presented with the severe and lethal Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome, which was confirmed on neuropathology, and was found to have a depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. Of the remaining three patients, one presented with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS, one with a phenotype in the Myoclonic Epilepsy, Myopathy and Sensory Ataxia (MEMSA spectrum and one with Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy, Dysarthria and Ophthalmoplegia (SANDO. All three had secondary accumulation of multiple mtDNA deletions. Complete sequence analysis of muscle mtDNA using the MitoChip resequencing chip in all four cases demonstrated significant variation in mtDNA, including a pathogenic MT-ND5 mutation in one patient. These data highlight the variable and overlapping clinical and neuropathological phenotypes and downstream molecular defects caused by the A467T mutation, which may result from factors such as the mtDNA genetic background, nuclear genetic modifiers and environmental stressors.

  1. Corneal tissue water content mapping with THz imaging: preliminary clinical results (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Shijun; Bajwa, Neha; Deng, Sophie X.; Taylor, Zachary; Grundfest, Warren

    2016-03-01

    Well-regulated corneal water content is critical for ocular health and function and can be adversely affected by a number of diseases and injuries. Current clinical practice limits detection of unhealthy corneal water content levels to central corneal thickness measurements performed by ultrasound or optical coherence tomography. Trends revealing increasing or decreasing corneal thickness are fair indicators of corneal water content by individual measurements are highly inaccurate due to the poorly understood relationship between corneal thickness and natural physiologic variation. Recently the utility of THz imaging to accuarately measure corneal water content has been explored on with rabbit models. Preliminary experiments revealed that contact with dielectric windows confounded imaging data and made it nearly impossible to deconvolve thickness variations due to contact from thickness variations due to water content variation. A follow up study with a new optical design allowed the acquisition of rabbit data and the results suggest that the observed, time varying contrast was due entirely to the water dynamics of the cornea. This paper presents the first ever in vivo images of human cornea. Five volunteers with healthy cornea were recruited and their eyes were imaged three times over the course of a few minutes with our novel imaging system. Noticeable changes in corneal reflectivity were observed and attributed to the drying of the tear film. The results suggest that clinically compatible, non-contact corneal imaging is feasible and indicate that signal acquired from non-contact imaging of the cornea is a complicated coupling of stromal water content and tear film.

  2. Autism and genetics: Clinical approach and association study with two markers of HRAS gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herault, J.; Petit, E.; Cherpi, C. [Laboratoire de Biochimie Medicale, Tours (France)] [and others

    1995-08-14

    Twin studies and familial aggregation studies indicate that genetic factors could play a role in infantile autism. In an earlier study, we identified a possible positive association between autism and a c-Harvey-ras (HRAS) oncogene marker at the 3{prime} end of the coding region. In an attempt to confirm this finding, we studied a larger population, well-characterized clinically and genetically. We report a positive association between autism and two HRAS markers, the 3{prime} marker used in the initial study and an additional marker in exon 1. 46 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Premature ovarian failure (POF) syndrome: towards the molecular clinical analysis of its genetic complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassnacht, W; Mempel, A; Strowitzki, T; Vogt, P H

    2006-01-01

    The Premature Ovarian Failure (POF) syndrome is a very heterogeneous clinical disorder due probably to the complex genetic networks controlling human folliculogenesis. Clinical subgroups of POF patients whose aetiology of ovarian failure is based on the same genetic factors are therefore difficult to establish. Some experimental evidence suggests that these genes might be clustered on the female sex chromosome in the POF1 and POF2 loci. This review is aimed to present an overview of the actual structural changes of the X chromosome causing POF, and to present a number of X and autosomal female fertility genes which are probably key genes in human folliculogenesis and are therefore prominent POF candidate genes. Towards the molecular analysis of their functional contribution to the genetic aetiology of POF in the clinic, an interdisciplinary scheme for their diagnostic analysis is presented in a pilot study focussed on chromosome analyses and the expression analysis of some major POF candidate genes (DAZL, DBX, FOXL2, INHalpha, GDF9, USP9X) in the leukocytes of 101 POF patients. It starts with a comprehensive and significantly improved clinical diagnostic program for this large and heterogeneous patient group.

  4. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  5. Management of Two Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia Patients According to Clinical and Genetic Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüfekçi, Özlem; Ören, Hale; Demir Yenigürbüz, Fatma; Gözmen, Salih; Karapınar, Tuba Hilkay; İrken, Gülersu

    2015-06-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare clonal myeloproliferative disorder of childhood. Major progress has been achieved in diagnosis and the understanding of the pathogenesis of JMML by identifying the genetic pathologies that occur in patients. Mutations of RAS, NF1, PTPN11, and CBL are found in approximately 80% of JMML patients. Distinct clinical features have been reported to be associated with specific gene mutations. The advent of genomic studies and recent identification of novel genetic mutations in JMML are important not only in diagnosis but also in the management and prognosis of the disease. Herein, we present 2 patients with JMML harboring different mutations, NRAS and c-CBL, respectively, with distinct clinical features and different therapeutic approaches.

  6. The genetic diversity of clinical isolates of Malassezia pachydermatis from dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, T; Kano, R; Nakamura, Y; Watanabe, S; Hasegawa, A

    2001-08-01

    Molecular investigation of 110 clinical isolates of non-lipid-dependent Malassezia pachydermatis from dogs and cats was carried out by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and chitin synthase 2 (CHS2) gene sequence analyses. The RAPD analysis indicated that the clinical isolates of M. pachydermatis constituted four distinct genetic types (A, B, C and D). Moreover, the results from CHS2 gene analysis completely agreed with those from the RAPD analyses. The clinical isolates of M. pachydermatis were obtained from normal external ears, lesions of atopic dermatitis, flea allergic dermatitis, otitis externa, pyoderma and seborrheic dermatitidis in dogs and cats. Type A consisted of 93 clinical isolates as well as the ex-neotype strain of M. pachydermatis. The isolates of type A M. pachydermatis originated from lesions of all kinds of diseases. They were predominant on dog and cat skin. The other types, B, C, and D were isolated mainly from otitis externa. PMID:11556762

  7. Host and viral genetic correlates of clinical definitions of HIV-1 disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Casado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Various patterns of HIV-1 disease progression are described in clinical practice and in research. There is a need to assess the specificity of commonly used definitions of long term non-progressor (LTNP elite controllers (LTNP-EC, viremic controllers (LTNP-VC, and viremic non controllers (LTNP-NC, as well as of chronic progressors (P and rapid progressors (RP. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We re-evaluated the HIV-1 clinical definitions, summarized in Table 1, using the information provided by a selected number of host genetic markers and viral factors. There is a continuous decrease of protective factors and an accumulation of risk factors from LTNP-EC to RP. Statistical differences in frequency of protective HLA-B alleles (p-0.01, HLA-C rs9264942 (p-0.06, and protective CCR5/CCR2 haplotypes (p-0.02 across groups, and the presence of viruses with an ancestral genotype in the "viral dating" (i.e., nucleotide sequences with low viral divergence from the most recent common ancestor support the differences among principal clinical groups of HIV-1 infected individuals. CONCLUSIONS: A combination of host genetic and viral factors supports current clinical definitions that discriminate among patterns of HIV-1 progression. The study also emphasizes the need to apply a standardized and accepted set of clinical definitions for the purpose of disease stratification and research.

  8. Retinoma and Phthisis Bulbi of Retinoblastoma 1.Clinical and Genetic Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    Retinoma and phthisis bulbi of retinoblastoma are rare entitiesfound in retinoblastoma patients and their relatives.Eleven cases of phthisisbulbi of retinoblastoma and 9 cases of retinoma were identified from 1966 to1991 in our center.The clinic data show that retinoma and phthisis bulbi areclosely related to the retinoblastoma gene.Enucleation should be carried outas soon as possible without hesitation for the phthisis of eyes with retinoblas-toma.Genetic counseling and frequent observation should be p...

  9. Clinical and genetic investigation of families with type II Waardenburg syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yong; YANG, FUWEI; ZHENG, HEXIN; Zhou, Jianda; ZHU, GANGHUA; HU, PENG; Wu, Weijing

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type II in three families, in order to provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Relevant clinical examinations were conducted on the probands of the three pedigrees. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of paired box 3 (PAX3), microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF),...

  10. Erythropoietin in the General Population: Reference Ranges and Clinical, Biochemical and Genetic Correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Niels Grote Beverborg; Niek Verweij; Klip, IJsbrand T.; Haye H van der Wal; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Pim van der Harst; Peter van der Meer

    2015-01-01

    Background Although erythropoietin has been used for decades in the treatment of anemia, data regarding endogenous levels in the general population are scarce. Therefore, we determined erythropoietin reference ranges and its clinical, biochemical and genetic associations in the general population. Methods We used data from 6,777 subjects enrolled in the Prevention of REnal and Vascular ENd-stage Disease (PREVEND) study. Fasting venous blood samples were obtained in the morning from all partic...

  11. Integrating clinical features and genetic lesions in the risk assessment of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena, Chiara; Gallì, Anna; Such, Esperanza; Meggendorfer, Manja; Germing, Ulrich; Rizzo, Ettore; Cervera, Jose; Molteni, Elisabetta; Fasan, Annette; Schuler, Esther; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Lopez-Pavia, Maria; Zibellini, Silvia; Kuendgen, Andrea; Travaglino, Erica; Sancho-Tello, Reyes; Catricalà, Silvia; Vicente, Ana I.; Haferlach, Torsten; Haferlach, Claudia; Sanz, Guillermo F.; Cazzola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm with variable clinical course. To predict the clinical outcome, we previously developed a CMML-specific prognostic scoring system (CPSS) based on clinical parameters and cytogenetics. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that accounting for gene mutations would further improve risk stratification of CMML patients. We therefore sequenced 38 genes to explore the role of somatic mutations in disease phenotype and clinical outcome. Overall, 199 of 214 (93%) CMML patients carried at least 1 somatic mutation. Stepwise linear regression models showed that these mutations accounted for 15% to 24% of variability of clinical phenotype. Based on multivariable Cox regression analyses, cytogenetic abnormalities and mutations in RUNX1, NRAS, SETBP1, and ASXL1 were independently associated with overall survival (OS). Using these parameters, we defined a genetic score that identified 4 categories with significantly different OS and cumulative incidence of leukemic evolution. In multivariable analyses, genetic score, red blood cell transfusion dependency, white blood cell count, and marrow blasts retained independent prognostic value. These parameters were included into a clinical/molecular CPSS (CPSS-Mol) model that identified 4 risk groups with markedly different median OS (from >144 to 18 months, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.69) and cumulative incidence of leukemic evolution (from 0% to 48% at 4 years, HR = 3.84) (P < .001). The CPSS-Mol fully retained its ability to risk stratify in an independent validation cohort of 260 CMML patients. In conclusion, integrating conventional parameters and gene mutations significantly improves risk stratification of CMML patients, providing a robust basis for clinical decision-making and a reliable tool for clinical trials. PMID:27385790

  12. The clinical and genetic features of the COPD asthma overlap syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael; McDonald, Merry-Lynn; Beaty, Terri; Ramsdell, Joe; Bhatt, Surya; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Make, Barry J.; Crapo, James D.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with COPD and asthma are an important but poorly characterized group. The genetic determinants of COPD-asthma overlap have not been studied. Objective Identify clinical features and genetic risk factors for COPD-asthma overlap. Methods Subjects were current or former smoking non-Hispanic whites (NHW) or African-Americans (AA) with COPD. Overlap subjects reported a history of physician-diagnosed asthma before the age of 40. We compared clinical and radiographic features between COPD and overlap subjects. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in the NHW and AA populations, and combined these results in a meta-analysis. Results More women and African Americans reported a history of asthma. Overlap subjects had more severe and more frequent respiratory exacerbations, less emphysema, and greater airway wall thickness compared to subjects with COPD alone. The NHW GWAS identified SNPs in CSMD1 (rs11779254, P=1.57×10−6) and SOX5(rs59569785, P=1.61×10−6) and the meta-analysis identified SNPs in the gene GPR65 (rs6574978, P=1.18×10−7) associated with COPD-asthma overlap. Conclusions Overlap subjects have more exacerbations, less emphysema and more airway disease for any degree of lung function impairment compared to COPD alone. We identified novel genetic variants associated with this syndrome. COPD-asthma overlap is an important syndrome and may require distinct clinical management. PMID:24876173

  13. Genetic Testing as a New Standard for Clinical Diagnosis of Color Vision Deficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, Candice; Neitz, Maureen; Neitz, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The genetics underlying inherited color vision deficiencies is well understood: causative mutations change the copy number or sequence of the long (L), middle (M), or short (S) wavelength sensitive cone opsin genes. This study evaluated the potential of opsin gene analyses for use in clinical diagnosis of color vision defects. Methods We tested 1872 human subjects using direct sequencing of opsin genes and a novel genetic assay that characterizes single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the MassArray system. Of the subjects, 1074 also were given standard psychophysical color vision tests for a direct comparison with current clinical methods. Results Protan and deutan deficiencies were classified correctly in all subjects identified by MassArray as having red–green defects. Estimates of defect severity based on SNPs that control photopigment spectral tuning correlated with estimates derived from Nagel anomaloscopy. Conclusions The MassArray assay provides genetic information that can be useful in the diagnosis of inherited color vision deficiency including presence versus absence, type, and severity, and it provides information to patients about the underlying pathobiology of their disease. Translational Relevance The MassArray assay provides a method that directly analyzes the molecular substrates of color vision that could be used in combination with, or as an alternative to current clinical diagnosis of color defects.

  14. Association of systemic lupus erythematosus clinical features with European population genetic substructure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Alonso-Perez

    Full Text Available Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease with a very varied spectrum of clinical manifestations that could be partly determined by genetic factors. We aimed to determine the relationship between prevalence of 11 clinical features and age of disease onset with European population genetic substructure. Data from 1413 patients of European ancestry recruited in nine countries was tested for association with genotypes of top ancestry informative markers. This analysis was done with logistic regression between phenotypes and genotypes or principal components extracted from them. We used a genetic additive model and adjusted for gender and disease duration. Three clinical features showed association with ancestry informative markers: autoantibody production defined as immunologic disorder (P = 6.8×10(-4, oral ulcers (P = 6.9×10(-4 and photosensitivity (P = 0.002. Immunologic disorder was associated with genotypes more common in Southern European ancestries, whereas the opposite trend was observed for photosensitivity. Oral ulcers were specifically more common in patients of Spanish and Portuguese self-reported ancestry. These results should be taken into account in future research and suggest new hypotheses and possible underlying mechanisms to be investigated. A first hypothesis linking photosensitivity with variation in skin pigmentation is suggested.

  15. Genetic basis of Cowden syndrome and its implications for clinical practice and risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Amanda; Jasperson, Kory; Champine, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Cowden syndrome (CS) is an often difficult to recognize hereditary cancer predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN). In addition to conferring increased cancer risks, CS also predisposes individuals to developing hamartomatous growths in many areas of the body. Due to the rarity of CS, estimates vary on the penetrance of certain phenotypic features, such as macrocephaly and skin findings (trichilemmomas, mucocutaneous papules), as well as the conferred lifetime cancer risks. To address this variability, separate clinical diagnostic criteria and PTEN testing guidelines have been created to assist clinicians in the diagnosis of CS. As knowledge of CS increases, making larger studies of affected patients possible, these criteria continue to be refined. Similarly, the management guidelines for cancer screening and risk reduction in patients with CS continue to be updated. This review will summarize the current literature on CS to assist clinicians in staying abreast of recent advances in CS knowledge, diagnostic approaches, and management. PMID:27471403

  16. Genetic factors that affect nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A systematic clinical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severson, Tyler J; Besur, Siddesh; Bonkovsky, Herbert L

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate roles of genetic polymorphisms in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) onset, severity, and outcome through systematic literature review. METHODS: The authors conducted both systematic and specific searches of PubMed through December 2015 with special emphasis on more recent data (from 2012 onward) while still drawing from more historical data for background. We identified several specific genetic polymorphisms that have been most researched and, at this time, appear to have the greatest clinical significance on NAFLD and similar hepatic diseases. These were further investigated to assess their specific effects on disease onset and progression and the mechanisms by which these effects occur. RESULTS: We focus particularly on genetic polymorphisms of the following genes: PNPLA3, particularly the p. I148M variant, TM6SF2, particularly the p. E167K variant, and on variants in FTO, LIPA, IFNλ4, and iron metabolism, specifically focusing on HFE, and HMOX-1. We discuss the effect of these genetic variations and their resultant protein variants on the onset of fatty liver disease and its severity, including the effect on likelihood of progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. While our principal focus is on NAFLD, we also discuss briefly effects of some of the variants on development and severity of other hepatic diseases, including hepatitis C and alcoholic liver disease. These results are briefly discussed in terms of clinical application and future potential for personalized medicine. CONCLUSION: Polymorphisms and genetic factors of several genes contribute to NAFLD and its end results. These genes hold keys to future improvements in diagnosis and management. PMID:27547017

  17. Marked overlap of four genetic syndromes with dyskeratosis congenita confounds clinical diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walne, Amanda J.; Collopy, Laura; Cardoso, Shirleny; Ellison, Alicia; Plagnol, Vincent; Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Patıroglu, Turkan; Akar, Haluk; Godfrey, Keith; Carter, Tina; Marafie, Makia; Vora, Ajay; Sundin, Mikael; Vulliamy, Thomas; Tummala, Hemanth; Dokal, Inderjeet

    2016-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita is a highly pleotropic genetic disorder. This heterogeneity can lead to difficulties in making an accurate diagnosis and delays in appropriate management. The aim of this study was to determine the underlying genetic basis in patients presenting with features of dyskeratosis congenita and who were negative for mutations in the classical dyskeratosis congenita genes. By whole exome and targeted sequencing, we identified biallelic variants in genes that are not associated with dyskeratosis congenita in 17 individuals from 12 families. Specifically, these were homozygous variants in USB1 (8 families), homozygous missense variants in GRHL2 (2 families) and identical compound heterozygous variants in LIG4 (2 families). All patients had multiple somatic features of dyskeratosis congenita but not the characteristic short telomeres. Our case series shows that biallelic variants in USB1, LIG4 and GRHL2, the genes mutated in poikiloderma with neutropenia, LIG4/Dubowitz syndrome and the recently recognized ectodermal dysplasia/short stature syndrome, respectively, cause features that overlap with dyskeratosis congenita. Strikingly, these genes also overlap in their biological function with the known dyskeratosis congenita genes that are implicated in telomere maintenance and DNA repair pathways. Collectively, these observations demonstrate the marked overlap of dyskeratosis congenita with four other genetic syndromes, confounding accurate diagnosis and subsequent management. This has important implications for establishing a genetic diagnosis when a new patient presents in the clinic. Patients with clinical features of dyskeratosis congenita need to have genetic analysis of USB1, LIG4 and GRHL2 in addition to the classical dyskeratosis congenita genes and telomere length measurements. PMID:27612988

  18. Diagnostic outcome following routine genetics clinic referral for the assessment of global developmental delay.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shahdadpuri, R

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the diagnostic yield following a routine genetics clinic referral for the assessment of global developmental delay. Detailed retrospective review of 119 complete consecutive case notes of patients referred to one single clinical geneticist over a 14 month time period was undertaken (n = 119; 54 males, 65 females). The age at initial review ranged from 2 months to 37 years 3 months (mean 8 y 3 mo [SD 7 y 10 mo]). We made a diagnosis in 36\\/119 (30%); 21\\/36 were new diagnoses and 15\\/36 were confirmations of diagnoses. We removed a wrong diagnostic label in 8\\/119 (7%). In 3\\/8 we were able to achieve a diagnosis but in 5\\/8 no alternative diagnosis was reached. We had a better diagnostic rate where the patients were dysmorphic (odds ratio [OR] 1.825; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.065 to 3.128, p = 0.044). In the majority, the diagnosis was made by clinical examination only. Molecular diagnosis was reached in seven cases. Five cases were confirmed by cytogenetic analysis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a diagnosis in three cases. This study confirms the importance of a clinical genetics assessment in the investigation of global developmental delay.

  19. Genetic counselors' (GC) knowledge, awareness, understanding of clinical next-generation sequencing (NGS) genomic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, P M; Ruth, K; Matro, J M; Rainey, K L; Fang, C Y; Wong, Y N; Daly, M B; Hall, M J

    2015-12-01

    Genomic tests are increasingly complex, less expensive, and more widely available with the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS). We assessed knowledge and perceptions among genetic counselors pertaining to NGS genomic testing via an online survey. Associations between selected characteristics and perceptions were examined. Recent education on NGS testing was common, but practical experience limited. Perceived understanding of clinical NGS was modest, specifically concerning tumor testing. Greater perceived understanding of clinical NGS testing correlated with more time spent in cancer-related counseling, exposure to NGS testing, and NGS-focused education. Substantial disagreement about the role of counseling for tumor-based testing was seen. Finally, a majority of counselors agreed with the need for more education about clinical NGS testing, supporting this approach to optimizing implementation.

  20. Genetic Risk Assessment for Women with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: Referral Patterns and Outcomes in a University Gynecologic Oncology Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Petzel, Sue v.; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Bensend, Tracy; Leininger, Anna; Argenta, Peter A.; Geller, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about genetic service utilization and ovarian cancer. We identified the frequency and outcome of genetic counseling referral, predictors of referral, and referral uptake for ovarian cancer patients. Using pathology reports, we identified all epithelial ovarian cancer patients seen in a university gynecologic oncology clinic (1/04–8/06). Electronic medical records (EMR) were used to document genetic service referral, time from diagnosis-to-referral, point-in-treatment at referr...

  1. Frequency of CFTR, SPINK1, and Cathepsin B Gene Mutation in North Indian Population: Connections between Genetics and Clinical Data

    OpenAIRE

    Shweta Singh; Gourdas Choudhuri; Sarita Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Genetic mutations and polymorphisms have been correlated with chronic pancreatitis (CP). This study aims to investigate the association of genetic variants of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK-1) genes and Cathepsin B gene polymorphisms with CP and to associate genetic backgrounds with clinical phenotypes. Methods. 150 CP patients and 150 normal controls were enrolled consecutively. We analyzed SPINK-1 N34S...

  2. Clinical and genetic heterogeneity in hereditary spastic paraplegias: From SPG1 to SPG72 and still counting

    OpenAIRE

    Klebe, Stephan; Stevanin, Giovanni; Depienne, Christel

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are genetically determined neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive weakness and spasticity of lower limbs, and are among the most clinically and genetically heterogeneous human diseases. All modes of inheritance have been described, and the recent technological revolution in molecular genetics has led to the identification of 76 different spastic gait disease-loci with 59 corresponding spastic paraplegia genes. Aut...

  3. Characterization of Clinical and Genetic Risk Factors Associated with Dyslipidemia after Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyuki Numakura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the prevalence of dyslipidemia in a Japanese cohort of renal allograft recipients and investigated clinical and genetic characteristics associated with having the disease. In total, 126 patients that received renal allograft transplants between February 2002 and August 2011 were studied, of which 44 recipients (34.9% were diagnosed with dyslipidemia at 1 year after transplantation. Three clinical factors were associated with a risk of having dyslipidemia: a higher prevalence of disease observed among female than male patients P=0.021 and treatment with high mycophenolate mofetil P=0.012 and prednisolone P=0.023 doses per body weight at 28 days after transplantation. The genetic association between dyslipidemia and 60 previously described genetic polymorphisms in 38 putative disease-associated genes was analyzed. The frequency of dyslipidemia was significantly higher in patients with the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1 Bcl1 G allele than in those with the CC genotype P=0.001. A multivariate analysis revealed that the NR3C1 Bcl1 G allele was a significant risk factor for the prevalence of dyslipidemia (odds ratio = 4.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.8–12.2. These findings may aid in predicting a patient’s risk of developing dyslipidemia.

  4. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services.

  5. The genetic basis of intradural spinal tumors and its impact on clinical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsy, Michael; Guan, Jian; Sivakumar, Walavan; Neil, Jayson A; Schmidt, Meic H; Mahan, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    Genetic alterations in the cells of intradural spinal tumors can have a significant impact on the treatment options, counseling, and prognosis for patients. Although surgery is the primary therapy for most intradural tumors, radiochemothera-peutic modalities and targeted interventions play an ever-evolving role in treating aggressive cancers and in addressing cancer recurrence in long-term survivors. Recent studies have helped delineate specific genetic and molecular differences between intradural spinal tumors and their intracranial counterparts and have also identified significant variation in therapeutic effects on these tumors. This review discusses the genetic and molecular alterations in the most common intradural spinal tumors in both adult and pediatrie patients, including nerve sheath tumors (that is, neurofibroma and schwannoma), meningioma, ependymoma, astrocytoma (that is, low-grade glioma, anaplastic astrocytoma, and glioblastoma), hemangioblastoma, and medulloblastoma. It also examines the genetics of metastatic tumors to the spinal cord, arising either from the CNS or from systemic sources. Importantly, the impact of this knowledge on therapeutic options and its application to clinical practice are discussed.

  6. Genetic diagnosis in clinical psychiatry: A case report of a woman with a 47, XXX karyotype and Fragile X syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Vandersteen, Anthony M.; David Moore; Celia Donaghue; Neil MacFarlane; Dragana Josifova

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives: A recent report highlighted the importance of considering a chromosomal abnormality in the differential diagnosis of adult clinical psychiatry. This case report illustrates the importance of considering Fragile X syndrome, an X-linked genetic disorder associated with psychiatric morbidities. Methods: A 45 years old woman was referred to the clinical genetics department by her psychiatrist for investigation of her gross obesity, hyperphagia, learning difficulties and...

  7. Familial paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia: clinical and genetic analysis of a Taiwanese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Tu-Hsueh; Lin, Juei-Jueng; Lai, Szu-Chia; Wu-Chou, Yah-Huei; Chen, An-Chih; Yueh, Kuo-Chu; Chen, Rou-Shayn; Lu, Chin-Song

    2012-12-15

    Paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD) is a rare disorder in autosomal dominant inheritance. The clinical features and genetic findings of PNKD, rarely described in the Asians, were mostly delineated from European families. The present study characterized the clinical and genetic findings of a Taiwanese PNKD family. The clinical features of our five patients in successive three generations included onset age less than 10 years, attack duration between 3 min and 4h, and a variety of aura symptoms. The attacks were provoked not by sudden action but by emotional stress, caffeine, fatigue, heavy exercise and sleep deprivation. Sleep could abolish or diminish the attack and the attacks responded well to clonazepam. Sequencing the whole coding region of PNKD/MR-1 gene identified a heterozygous c.20 C>T (p.Ala7Val) mutation which was clearly segregated in the five affected patients. Comparing our patients with previously reported 18 families with PNKD/MR-1 mutations, the majority of the patients exhibited quite similar manifestations in attack patterns and precipitating factors. The recurrent conservative mutations in different ethnicities indicate importance in the pathogenesis of PNKD.

  8. Genetic mapping, marker assisted selection and allelic relationships for the Pu 6 gene conferring rust resistance in sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulos, Mariano; Vergani, Pablo Nicolas; Altieri, Emiliano

    2014-09-01

    Rust resistance in the sunflower line P386 is controlled by Pu 6 , a gene which was reported to segregate independently from other rust resistant genes, such as R 4 . The objectives of this work were to map Pu 6 , to provide and validate molecular tools for its identification, and to determine the linkage relationship of Pu 6 and R 4 . Genetic mapping of Pu 6 with six markers covered 24.8 cM of genetic distance on the lower end of linkage Group 13 of the sunflower consensus map. The marker most closely linked to Pu 6 was ORS316 at 2.5 cM in the distal position. ORS316 presented five alleles when was assayed with a representative set of resistant and susceptible lines. Allelism test between Pu 6 and R 4 indicated that both genes are linked at a genetic distance of 6.25 cM. This is the first confirmation based on an allelism test that at least two members of the R adv /R 4 /R 11 / R 13a /R 13b /Pu 6 cluster of genes are at different loci. A fine elucidation of the architecture of this complex locus will allow designing and constructing completely new genomic regions combining genes from different resistant sources and the elimination of the linkage drag around each resistant gene.

  9. The clinical and genetic features of COPD-asthma overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael; McDonald, Merry-Lynn; Beaty, Terri; Ramsdell, Joe; Bhatt, Surya; van Beek, Edwin J R; Make, Barry J; Crapo, James D; Silverman, Edwin K; Hersh, Craig P

    2014-08-01

    Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma are an important but poorly characterised group. The genetic determinants of COPD and asthma overlap have not been studied. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features and genetic risk factors for COPD and asthma overlap. Subjects were current or former smoking non-Hispanic whites or African-Americans with COPD. Overlap subjects reported a history of physician-diagnosed asthma before the age of 40 years. We compared clinical and radiographic features between COPD and overlap subjects. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in the non-Hispanic whites and African-American populations, and combined these results in a meta-analysis. More females and African-Americans reported a history of asthma. Overlap subjects had more severe and more frequent respiratory exacerbations, less emphysema and greater airway wall thickness compared to subjects with COPD alone. The non-Hispanic white GWAS identified single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes CSMD1 (rs11779254, p=1.57 × 10(-6)) and SOX5 (rs59569785, p=1.61 × 10(-6)) and the meta-analysis identified single nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene GPR65 (rs6574978, p=1.18 × 10(-7)) associated with COPD and asthma overlap. Overlap subjects have more exacerbations, less emphysema and more airway disease for any degree of lung function impairment compared to COPD alone. We identified novel genetic variants associated with this syndrome. COPD and asthma overlap is an important syndrome and may require distinct clinical management. PMID:24876173

  10. Clinical and genetic factors associated with suicide in mood disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antypa, Niki; Souery, Daniel; Tomasini, Mario; Albani, Diego; Fusco, Federica; Mendlewicz, Julien; Serretti, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Suicidality is a continuum ranging from ideation to attempted and completed suicide, with a complex etiology involving both genetic heritability and environmental factors. The majority of suicide events occur in the context of psychiatric conditions, preeminently major depression and bipolar disorder. The present study investigates clinical factors associated with suicide in a sample of 553 mood disorder patients, recruited within the 'Psy Pluriel' center, Centre Européen de Psychologie Médicale, and the Department of Psychiatry of Erasme Hospital (Brussels). Furthermore, genetic association analyses examining polymorphisms within COMT, BDNF, MAPK1 and CREB1 genes were performed in a subsample of 259 bipolar patients. The presence or absence of a previous suicide attempt and of current suicide risk were assessed. A positive association with suicide attempt was reported for younger patients, females, lower educated, smokers, those with higher scores on depressive symptoms and higher functional disability and those with anxiety comorbidity and familial history of suicidality in first- and second-degree relatives. Anxiety disorder comorbidity was the stronger predictor of current suicide risk. No associations were found with polymorphisms within COMT and BDNF genes, whereas significant associations were found with variations in rs13515 (MAPK1) and rs6740584 (CREB1) polymorphisms. From a clinical perspective, our study proposes several clinical characteristics, such as increased depressive symptomatology, anxiety comorbidity, functional disability and family history of suicidality, as correlates associated with suicide. Genetic risk variants in MAPK1 and CREB1 genes might be involved in a dysregulation of inflammatory and neuroplasticity pathways and are worthy of future investigation. PMID:26626456

  11. Population distribution of Beta-lactamase conferring resistance to third-generation cephalosporins in human clinical Enterobacteriaceae in the Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido M Voets

    Full Text Available There is a global increase in infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae with plasmid-borne β-lactamases that confer resistance to third-generation cephalosporins. The epidemiology of these bacteria is not well understood, and was, therefore, investigated in a selection of 636 clinical Enterobacteriaceae with a minimal inhibitory concentration >1 mg/L for ceftazidime/ceftriaxone from a national survey (75% E. coli, 11% E. cloacae, 11% K. pneumoniae, 2% K. oxytoca, 2% P. mirabilis. Isolates were investigated for extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs and ampC genes using microarray, PCR, gene sequencing and molecular straintyping (Diversilab and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST. ESBL genes were demonstrated in 512 isolates (81%; of which 446 (87% belonged to the CTX-M family. Among 314 randomly selected and sequenced isolates, bla(CTX-M-15 was most prevalent (n = 124, 39%, followed by bla(CTX-M-1 (n = 47, 15%, bla(CTX-M-14 (n = 15, 5%, bla(SHV-12 (n = 24, 8% and bla(TEM-52 (n = 13, 4%. Among 181 isolates with MIC ≥16 mg/L for cefoxitin plasmid encoded AmpCs were detected in 32 and 27 were of the CMY-2 group. Among 102 E. coli isolates with MIC ≥16 mg/L for cefoxitin ampC promoter mutations were identified in 29 (28%. Based on Diversilab genotyping of 608 isolates (similarity cut-off >98% discriminatory indices of bacteria with ESBL and/or ampC genes were 0.994, 0.985 and 0.994 for E. coli, K. pneumoniae and E. cloacae, respectively. Based on similarity cut-off >95% two large clusters of E. coli were apparent (of 43 and 30 isolates and 21 of 21 that were typed by belonged to ST131 of which 13 contained bla(CTX-M-15. Our findings demonstrate that bla(CTX-M-15 is the most prevalent ESBL and we report a larger than previously reported prevalence of ampC genes among Enterobacteriaceae responsible for resistance to third-generation cephalosporins.

  12. Clinical implementation of genetic testing in medicine: a US regulatory science perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesko, Lawrence J; Schmidt, Stephan

    2014-04-01

    Heterogeneity of treatment effects in unselected patient populations has stimulated various strategic approaches to reduce variability and uncertainty and improve individualization of drug selection and dosing. The rapid growth of DNA sequencing and related technologies has ramped up progress in interpreting germline and somatic mutations and has begun to reshape medicine, especially in oncology. Over the past decade, regulatory agencies realized that they needed to be proactive and not reactive if personalized medicine was to become a reality. The US Food and Drug Administration, in particular, took steps to nurture the field through peer-reviewed publications, co-sponsoring public workshops and issuing guidance for industry. The following two major approaches to personalized medicine were taken: (i) encouragement of de novo co-development of drug-genetic test combinations by industry; and (ii) retrospective assessment of legacy genetic data for the purpose of updating drug labels. The former strategy has been more successful in getting new targeted therapies to the marketplace with successful adoption, while the latter, as evidenced by the low adoption rate of pharmacogenetic testing, has been less successful. This reflection piece makes clear that several important things need to happen to make personalized medicine diffuse in more geographical areas and among more therapeutic specialties. The debate over clinical utility of genetic tests needs to be resolved with consensus on evidentiary standards. Physicians, as gatekeepers of prescription medicines, need to increase their knowledge of genetics and the application of the information to patient care. An infrastructure needs to be developed to make access to genetic tests and decision-support tools available to primary practitioners and specialists outside major medical centres and metropolitan areas. PMID:24286486

  13. Clinical and genetic heterogeneity in hereditary haemochromatosis: association between lymphocyte counts and expression of iron overload

    OpenAIRE

    Porto, G.; CARDOSO, C.S.; Gordeuk, V; Cruz, E.; Fraga, J.; Areias, J; Oliveira, J. C.; Bravo, F. (Federico); GANGAIDZO, I.T.; MACPHAIL, A.P.; GOMO, Z.A.; MOYO, V.M.; Melo, G.; Silva, C.; JUSTICA, B.

    2001-01-01

    Eur J Haematol. 2001 Aug;67(2):110-8. Clinical and genetic heterogeneity in hereditary haemochromatosis: association between lymphocyte counts and expression of iron overload. Porto G, Cardoso CS, Gordeuk V, Cruz E, Fraga J, Areias J, Oliveira JC, Bravo F, Gangaidzo IT, MacPhail AP, Gomo ZA, Moyo VM, Melo G, Silva C, Justiça B, de Sousa M. Haematology, Santo António General Hospital, Porto, Portugal. Abstract To identify a new marker of expression of diseas...

  14. Genetic variation in plant CYP51s confers resistance against voriconazole, a novel inhibitor of brassinosteroid-dependent sterol biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Rozhon

    Full Text Available Brassinosteroids (BRs are plant steroid hormones with structural similarity to mammalian sex steroids and ecdysteroids from insects. The BRs are synthesized from sterols and are essential regulators of cell division, cell elongation and cell differentiation. In this work we show that voriconazole, an antifungal therapeutic drug used in human and veterinary medicine, severely impairs plant growth by inhibiting sterol-14α-demethylation and thereby interfering with BR production. The plant growth regulatory properties of voriconazole and related triazoles were identified in a screen for compounds with the ability to alter BR homeostasis. Voriconazole suppressed growth of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and of a wide range of both monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. We uncover that voriconazole toxicity in plants is a result of a deficiency in BRs that stems from an inhibition of the cytochrome P450 CYP51, which catalyzes a step of BR-dependent sterol biosynthesis. Interestingly, we found that the woodland strawberry Fragaria vesca, a member of the Rosaceae, is naturally voriconazole resistant and that this resistance is conferred by the specific CYP51 variant of F. vesca. The potential of voriconazole as a novel tool for plant research is discussed.

  15. The effects of socioeconomic status, clinical factors, and genetic ancestry on pulmonary tuberculosis disease in northeastern Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie N Young

    Full Text Available Diverse socioeconomic and clinical factors influence susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB disease in Mexico. The role of genetic factors, particularly those that differ between the parental groups that admixed in Mexico, is unclear. The objectives of this study are to identify the socioeconomic and clinical predictors of the transition from latent TB infection (LTBI to pulmonary TB disease in an urban population in northeastern Mexico, and to examine whether genetic ancestry plays an independent role in this transition. We recruited 97 pulmonary TB disease patients and 97 LTBI individuals from a public hospital in Monterrey, Nuevo León. Socioeconomic and clinical variables were collected from interviews and medical records, and genetic ancestry was estimated for a subset of 142 study participants from 291,917 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. We examined crude associations between the variables and TB disease status. Significant predictors from crude association tests were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. We also compared genetic ancestry between LTBI individuals and TB disease patients at 1,314 SNPs in 273 genes from the TB biosystem in the NCBI BioSystems database. In crude association tests, 12 socioeconomic and clinical variables were associated with TB disease. Multivariable logistic regression analyses indicated that marital status, diabetes, and smoking were independently associated with TB status. Genetic ancestry was not associated with TB disease in either crude or multivariable analyses. Separate analyses showed that LTBI individuals recruited from hospital staff had significantly higher European genetic ancestry than LTBI individuals recruited from the clinics and waiting rooms. Genetic ancestry differed between individuals with LTBI and TB disease at SNPs located in two genes in the TB biosystem. These results indicate that Monterrey may be structured with respect to genetic ancestry, and that genetic

  16. Biofilm formation and genetic diversity of Salmonella isolates recovered from clinical, food, poultry and environmental sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Amruta; Rawool, Deepak B; Doijad, Swapnil; Poharkar, Krupali; Mohan, Vysakh; Barbuddhe, Sukhadeo B; Kolhe, Rahul; Kurkure, Nitin V; Kumar, Ashok; Malik, S V S; Balasaravanan, T

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, Salmonella isolates (n=40) recovered from clinical, food, poultry and environmental sources were characterized for serotype identification, genetic diversity and biofilm formation capability. Serotype identification using multiplex PCR assay revealed six isolates to be Salmonella Typhimurium, 14 as Salmonella Enteritidis, 11 as Salmonella Typhi, and the remaining nine isolates unidentified were considered as other Salmonella spp. Most of the Salmonella isolates (85%) produced biofilm on polystyrene surfaces as assessed by microtitre plate assay. About 67.5% isolates were weak biofilm producers and 17.5% were moderate biofilm producers. There was no significant difference in biofilm-forming ability among the Salmonella isolates recovered from different geographical regions or different sources. Among the genetic methods, Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC) PCR revealed greater discriminatory power (DI, 0.943) followed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) (DI, 0.899) and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR (DI, 0.873). However, composite analysis revealed the highest discrimination index (0.957). Greater discrimination of S. Typhimurium and S. Typhi was achieved using PFGE, while ERIC PCR was better for S. Enteritidis and other Salmonella serotypes. A strong positive correlation (r=0.992) was observed between biofilm formation trait and clustered Salmonella isolates in composite genetic analysis.

  17. Clinical and genetic spectra in a series of Chinese patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; He, Jin; Li, Jin-Jing; Ni, Wang; Wu, Zhi-Ying; Chen, Wan-Jin; Wang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical features and frequencies of genetic subtypes in a series of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease from Eastern China. Patients were divided into three subtypes, CMT1, CMT2 and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP), according to their electrophysiological manifestations. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis (MLPA) was performed to detect duplications/deletions in the PMP22 gene. The coding regions and splice sites of the GJB1, MPZ, MFN2 and GDAP-1 genes were determined by direct sequencing. Among the 148 patients in the study, 37.2% of the cases had mutations in genes assessed. The mutation detection rate was higher in patients with family histories than in spontaneous cases. PMP22 duplication (13.5%) was predominant in this group of patients, followed by PMP22 deletion (11.5%), and point mutations in GJB1 (8.8%), MPZ (2.0%) and MFN2 (0.7%). Three novel mutations (c.151T>C and c.310 A>G in GJB1 and c.1516 C>G in MFN2) were detected. A small deletion in PMP22 exon 4 was detected in a patient with severe CMT1. Genetic tests have great value in CMT patients with family histories. The frequency of PMP22 duplications was lower in Asian patients than in others. We suggest that genetic testing strategies in CMT patients should be primarily based on electromyography data.

  18. Comprehensive genetic testing in the clinical evaluation of 1119 patients with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan-Heggen, Christina M; Bierer, Amanda O; Shearer, A Eliot; Kolbe, Diana L; Nishimura, Carla J; Frees, Kathy L; Ephraim, Sean S; Shibata, Seiji B; Booth, Kevin T; Campbell, Colleen A; Ranum, Paul T; Weaver, Amy E; Black-Ziegelbein, E Ann; Wang, Donghong; Azaiez, Hela; Smith, Richard J H

    2016-04-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans, affecting 1 in 500 newborns. Due to its genetic heterogeneity, comprehensive diagnostic testing has not previously been completed in a large multiethnic cohort. To determine the aggregate contribution inheritance makes to non-syndromic hearing loss, we performed comprehensive clinical genetic testing with targeted genomic enrichment and massively parallel sequencing on 1119 sequentially accrued patients. No patient was excluded based on phenotype, inheritance or previous testing. Testing resulted in identification of the underlying genetic cause for hearing loss in 440 patients (39%). Pathogenic variants were found in 49 genes and included missense variants (49%), large copy number changes (18%), small insertions and deletions (18%), nonsense variants (8%), splice-site alterations (6%), and promoter variants (<1%). The diagnostic rate varied considerably based on phenotype and was highest for patients with a positive family history of hearing loss or when the loss was congenital and symmetric. The spectrum of implicated genes showed wide ethnic variability. These findings support the more efficient utilization of medical resources through the development of evidence-based algorithms for the diagnosis of hearing loss. PMID:26969326

  19. The Impact on Genetic Testing of Mutational Patterns of CFTR Gene in Different Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina M; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Testino, Giancarlo; Truglio, Gessica; Strom, Roberto; Quattrucci, Serena

    2016-07-01

    More than 2000 sequence variations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene are known. The marked genetic heterogeneity, poor functional characterization of the vast majority of sequence variations, and an uncertain genotype-phenotype relationship complicate the definition of mutational search strategies. We studied the effect of the marked genetic heterogeneity detected in a case series comprising 610 patients of cystic fibrosis (CF), grouped in different clinical macrocategories, on the operative characteristics of the genetic test designed to fully characterize CF patients. The detection rate in each clinical macrocategory and at each mutational step was found to be influenced by genetic heterogeneity. The definition of a single mutational panel that is suitable for all clinical macrocategories proved impossible. Only for classic CF with pancreas insufficiency did a reduced number of mutations yield a detection rate of diagnostic value. All other clinical macrocategories required an extensive genetic search. The search for specific mutational classes appears to be useful only in specific CF clinical forms. A flowchart defining a mutational search that may be adopted for different CF clinical forms, optimized in respect to those already available, is proposed. The findings also have consequences for carrier screening strategies.

  20. Colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes: Genetic determinism, clinical presentation and recommendations for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buecher, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal adenomatous polyposis constitutes a diverse group of disorders with different modes of inheritance. Molecular diagnosis of this condition has become more complex. In fact, somatic mosaicism for APC mutations now appears to be more frequent than previously thought and rare germline alterations of this gene may be implicated in patients tested negative for "classical" APC mutations (point mutations and large genomic rearrangements). Moreover, the knowledge concerning several aspects of the MUTYH-associated polyposis has improved since its first description in 2002 and germline mutations in new genes have recently been implicated in some cases of unexplained adenomatous polyposis. Genetic testing in probands and their relatives should be conducted in the context of pre- and post-test genetic counseling. The recent advent of New Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques affords the opportunity to rapidly screen patients for a comprehensive panel of colorectal cancer susceptibility genes in a cost-effective fashion. This type of approach will probably replace the classical sequential approach based on clinical presumptive diagnoses in the near future. The risk of colorectal cancer is very high in affected patients in the absence of appropriate care. Clinical management is complex and should be provided in centers with special expertise in these diseases. This review focuses on the various colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes with special attention to more innovative and important aspects. PMID:26805944

  1. Functional Assessment of Genetic Variants with Outcomes Adapted to Clinical Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenot, Pierre; Ben Yamin, Barbara; Fourrière, Lou; Lescure, Aurianne; Boudier, Thomas; Del Nery, Elaine; Chauchereau, Anne; Goldgar, David E; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Nicolas, Alain; Millot, Gaël A

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the medical effect of an ever-growing number of human variants detected is a long term challenge in genetic counseling. Functional assays, based on in vitro or in vivo evaluations of the variant effects, provide essential information, but they require robust statistical validation, as well as adapted outputs, to be implemented in the clinical decision-making process. Here, we assessed 25 pathogenic and 15 neutral missense variants of the BRCA1 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility gene in four BRCA1 functional assays. Next, we developed a novel approach that refines the variant ranking in these functional assays. Lastly, we developed a computational system that provides a probabilistic classification of variants, adapted to clinical interpretation. Using this system, the best functional assay exhibits a variant classification accuracy estimated at 93%. Additional theoretical simulations highlight the benefit of this ready-to-use system in the classification of variants after functional assessment, which should facilitate the consideration of functional evidences in the decision-making process after genetic testing. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the system with the classification of siRNAs tested for human cell growth inhibition in high throughput screening. PMID:27272900

  2. Functional Assessment of Genetic Variants with Outcomes Adapted to Clinical Decision-Making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Thouvenot

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the medical effect of an ever-growing number of human variants detected is a long term challenge in genetic counseling. Functional assays, based on in vitro or in vivo evaluations of the variant effects, provide essential information, but they require robust statistical validation, as well as adapted outputs, to be implemented in the clinical decision-making process. Here, we assessed 25 pathogenic and 15 neutral missense variants of the BRCA1 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility gene in four BRCA1 functional assays. Next, we developed a novel approach that refines the variant ranking in these functional assays. Lastly, we developed a computational system that provides a probabilistic classification of variants, adapted to clinical interpretation. Using this system, the best functional assay exhibits a variant classification accuracy estimated at 93%. Additional theoretical simulations highlight the benefit of this ready-to-use system in the classification of variants after functional assessment, which should facilitate the consideration of functional evidences in the decision-making process after genetic testing. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the system with the classification of siRNAs tested for human cell growth inhibition in high throughput screening.

  3. Clinical and Genetic Aspects of Sporadic Non-Medullar Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Rumjanzeva

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of somatic mutations in sporadic thyroid cancer is unclear today. Probably they coming out as aetiological factors in carcinogenesis as well as, respectfully to many authors, can to participate in TC pathogenesis and to determine the clinical course and prognosis of the disease. For today as main oncogenes taking part in initiation of thyroid malignant tumors are considered: RET/PTC, TRK, PTEN, P53, RAS, MET, PPARγ. By means of genetic investigations scientists are trying to solve problems with thyroid cancer differentiated diagnostics (cytokeratin-19, cytokeratin-20, mesothelial cells antigen (Hector Battifora MEsotelial (cell or HBME-1, loss of heterozigitoty (LOH in short arm of 3 chromosome (gene VHL -von Hippel Lindau, 3р26. Recently in foreign literature appeared reports of activated mutations in gene BRAF which most frequently are occurred in melanoma and papillary TC. Prognosis of thyroid cancer may reflected by the LOH as a biological breakage as well as changes of tumor suppressive gene P53 which fraught with decrease of disease prognosis. Thus, both researchers and clinicians have many questions concerning the role of genome, particularly in order to precise of genetic abnormality influence on tumor growth and therefore for assessment of clinical prognosis and with aim to chose adequate treatment tactic in each case.

  4. Antimicrobial resistance, virulence determinants and genetic profiles of clinical and nonclinical Enterococcus cecorum from poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C R; Kariyawasam, S; Borst, L B; Frye, J G; Barrett, J B; Hiott, L M; Woodley, T A

    2015-02-01

    Enterococcus cecorum has been implicated as a possible cause of disease in poultry. However, the characteristics that contribute to pathogenesis of Ent. cecorum in poultry have not been defined. In this study, Ent. cecorum from carcass rinsates (n = 75) and diseased broilers and broiler breeders (n = 30) were compared based upon antimicrobial resistance phenotype, the presence of virulence determinants and genetic relatedness using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Of the 16 antimicrobials tested, Ent. cecorum from carcass rinsates and clinical cases were resistant to ten and six of the antimicrobials, respectively. The majority of Ent. cecorum from carcass rinsates was resistant to lincomycin (54/75; 72%) and tetracycline (46/75; 61.3%) while the highest level of resistance among clinical Ent. cecorum was to tetracycline (22/30; 73.3%) and erythromycin (11/30; 36.7%). Multidrug resistance (resistance to ≥2 antimicrobials) was identified in Ent. cecorum from carcass rinsates (53/75; 70.7%) and diseased poultry (18/30; 60%). Of the virulence determinants tested, efaAfm was present in almost all of the isolates (104/105; 99%). Using PFGE, the majority of clinical isolates clustered together; however, a few clinical isolates grouped with Ent. cecorum from carcass rinsates. These data suggest that distinguishing the two groups of isolates is difficult based upon the characterization criteria used.

  5. Genetic and Clinical Predictors of Deep Brain Stimulation in Young-Onset Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Gian D.; Hall, Deborah; Ouyang, Bichun; Phelps, Jessica; Alcalay, Roy; Pauciulo, Michael W.; Nichols, William C.; Clark, Lorraine; Mejia-Santana, Helen; Blasucci, Lucia; Goetz, Christopher G.; Comella, Cynthia; Colcher, Amy; Gan-Or, Ziv; Rouleau, Guy A.; Marder, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Objective In a cohort of patients with young-onset Parkinson's disease (PD), the authors assessed (1) the prevalence of genetic mutations in those who enrolled in deep brain stimulation (DBS) programs compared with those who did not enroll DBS programs and (2) specific genetic and clinical predictors of DBS enrollment. Methods Subjects were participants from 3 sites (Columbia University, Rush University, and the University of Pennsylvania) in the Consortium on Risk for Early Onset Parkinson's Disease (CORE-PD) who had an age at onset < 51 years. The analyses presented here focus on glucocerebrosidase (GBA), leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), and parkin (PRKN) mutation carriers. Mutation carrier status, demographic data, and disease characteristics in individuals who did and did not enroll in DBS were analyzed. The association between mutation status and DBS placement was assessed in logistic regression models. Results Patients who had PD with either GBA, LRRK2, or PRKN mutations were more common in the DBS group (n = 99) compared with the non-DBS group (n = 684; 26.5% vs. 16.8%, respectively; P = 0.02). In a multivariate logistic regression model, GBA mutation status (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.0–4.3; P = 0.05) was associated with DBS surgery enrollment. However, when dyskinesia was included in the multivariate logistic regression model, dyskinesia had a strong association with DBS placement (odds ratio, 3.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.9–7.3; P < 0.0001), whereas the association between GBA mutation status and DBS placement did not persist (P = 0.25). Conclusions DBS populations are enriched with genetic mutation carriers. The effect of genetic mutation carriers on DBS outcomes warrants further exploration.

  6. Investigating the genetic background of bovine digital dermatitis using improved definitions of clinical status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpke, K; Gomez, A; Dunbar, K A; Swalve, H H; Döpfer, D

    2015-11-01

    Bovine digital dermatitis (DD) is an increasing claw health problem in all cattle production systems worldwide. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of an improved scoring of the clinical status for DD via M-scores accounting for the dynamics of the disease; that is, the transitions from one stage to another. The newly defined traits were then subjected to a genetic analysis to determine the genetic background for susceptibility to DD. Data consisted of 6,444 clinical observations from 729 Holstein heifers in a commercial dairy herd, collected applying the M-score system. The M-score system is a classification scheme for stages of DD that allows a macroscopic scoring based on clinical inspections of the bovine foot, thus it describes the stages of lesion development. The M-scores were used to define new DD trait definitions with different complexities. Linear mixed models and logistic models were used to identify fixed environmental effects and to estimate variance components. In total, 68% of all observations showed no DD status, whereas 11% were scored as infectious for and affected by DD, and 21% of all observations exhibited an affected but noninfectious status. For all traits, the probability of occurrence and clinical status were associated with age at observation and period of observation. Risk of becoming infected increased with age, and month of observation significantly affected all traits. Identification of the optimal month concerning DD herd status was consistent for all trait definitions; the last month of the trial was identified. In contrast, months exhibiting the highest least squares means of transformed scores differed depending on trait definition. In this respect, traits that can distinguish between healthy, infectious, and noninfectious stages of DD can account for the infectious potential of the herd and can serve as an alert tool. Estimates of heritabilities of traits studied ranged between 0.19 (±0.11) and 0.52 (±0

  7. Clinical and genetic study of spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 in East Asian population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yan; YU Long; ZHENG Hui-min; GUAN Yang-tai

    2010-01-01

    Background Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is known as an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia; patients with genetically confirmed diagnoses of SCA7 have increased rapidly in recent years.However, SCA7 is a rare subtype of SCA, and most data available about SCA7 are those of white people.The aim of the present study was to systematically review the prevalence and clinical and genetic aspects of SCA7 patients in East Asian population.Methods A search for publications on SCA7 was performed by using the "PubMed" database with the published language limited in English.Publications mainly focusing on the prevalence of SCA7 in patients with SCA and the clinical and genetic features of SCA7 patients were fully reviewed and analyzed.Results The prevalence of SCA7 in SCA patients ranged from 0 to 7.7%, which was similar to those reported previously.The clinical manifestations were typically present at the 30's of its victims (median, 29 years; interquartile range (IQR),19.5-36.5 years), and the symptoms appeared 15 years ((15.17±4.22) years) earlier on average in the offspring than in the parents.Gait ataxia and visual impairment were both found in all patients of whom the clinical features were described.Mutant SCA7 alleles contained 40-100 CAG repeats, with a median of 47 repeats (IQR, 44.5-50.0); and the offspring had 13 more repeats on average compared with their parents (12.62±19.03).A strong negative correlation was found between CAG repeat size and the onset age of patients (r=-0.739, P=0.000).In addition, no significant difference was found in CAG repeat sizes between patients with visual impairment as the initial symptom and those with gait disturbance as their initial symptom (P=0.476).Conclusions The prevalence of SCA7 in SCA patients, the age at onset and CAG repeats of SCA7 patients in East Asia are consistent with those of white people.However, larger population study is needed to assess the correlation between the CAG repeat size and initial symptoms

  8. Clinical, radiologic, and genetic features of Korean patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Hee Lee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available &lt;B&gt;Purpose:&lt;/B&gt; Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome is rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by &lt;I&gt;N&lt;/I&gt;-acetylgalactosamine- 6-sulfatase (GALNS deficiency. Only a few MPS IVA cases have been reported in the Korean literature; there is a paucity of research about clinical or radiologic findings for this disorder. Therefore, we studied clinical findings, radiological features, and genetic data of Korean MPS IVA patients for determining factors that may allow early diagnosis and that may thus improve the patients’ quality of life. &lt;B&gt;Method:&lt;/B&gt; MPS IVA was confirmed via assay for enzymatic activity of leukocytes in 10 patients. The &lt;I&gt;GALNS&lt;/I&gt; gene was analyzed. Patients’ charts were retrospectively reviewed for obtaining clinical features and evaluated for radiological skeletal surveys, echocardiography, pulmonary function test, and ophthalmologic test results. &lt;B&gt;Result:&lt;/B&gt; Nine patients had severe clinical phenotype, and 1 had an intermediate phenotype, on the basis of clinical phenotype criteria. Radiologic findings indicated skeletal abnormalities in all patients, especially in the hips and extremities. Eight patients had an odontoid hypoplasia, and 1 showed mild atlantoaxial subluxation and cord myelopathy. Genetic analysis indicated 10 different &lt;I&gt;GALNS&lt;/I&gt; mutations. Two mutations, c.451C&gt;A and c.1000C&gt;T, account for 37.5% (6/16 and 25% (4/16 of all mutations in this samples, respectively. &lt;B&gt;Conclusion:&lt;/B&gt; An understanding of the clinical and radiological features involved in MPS IVA may allow early diagnosis of MPS IVA. Adequate evaluations and therapy in the early stages may improve the quality of life of patients suffering from skeletal abnormalities and may reduce life-threatening effects of

  9. Genetic microheterogeneity and phenotypic variation of Helicobacter pylori arginase in clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spadafora Domenico

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical isolates of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori display a high level of genetic macro- and microheterogeneity, featuring a panmictic, rather than clonal structure. The ability of H. pylori to survive the stomach acid is due, in part, to the arginase-urease enzyme system. Arginase (RocF hydrolyzes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea, and urease hydrolyzes urea to carbon dioxide and ammonium, which can neutralize acid. Results The degree of variation in arginase was explored at the DNA sequence, enzyme activity and protein expression levels. To this end, arginase activity was measured from 73 minimally-passaged clinical isolates and six laboratory-adapted strains of H. pylori. The rocF gene from 21 of the strains was cloned into genetically stable E. coli and the enzyme activities measured. Arginase activity was found to substantially vary (>100-fold in both different H. pylori strains and in the E. coli model. Western blot analysis revealed a positive correlation between activity and amount of protein expressed in most H. pylori strains. Several H. pylori strains featured altered arginase activity upon in vitro passage. Pairwise alignments of the 21 rocF genes plus strain J99 revealed extensive microheterogeneity in the promoter region and 3' end of the rocF coding region. Amino acid S232, which was I232 in the arginase-negative clinical strain A2, was critical for arginase activity. Conclusion These studies demonstrated that H. pylori arginase exhibits extensive genotypic and phenotypic variation which may be used to understand mechanisms of microheterogeneity in H. pylori.

  10. Genetic and physical fine-mapping of the Sc locus conferring indica-japonica hybrid sterility in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Cunyi; CHEN Zhongzheng; ZHUANG Chuxiong; MEI Mantong; LIU Yaoguang

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid sterility is a major hindrance to utilizing the heterosis in indica-japonica hybrids. To isolate a gene Sc conferring the hybrid sterility, the locus was mapped using molecular markers and an F2 population derived from a cross between near isogenic lines. A primary linkage analysis showed that Sc was linked closely with 4 markers on chromosome 3, on which the genetic distance between a marker RG227 and Sc was 0.07 cM. Chromosome walking with a rice TAC genomic library was carried out using RG227 as a starting probe, and a contig of ca. 320 kb covering the Sc locus was constructed. Two TAC clones, M45E14 and M90J01 that might cover the Sc locus, were partially sequenced. By searching the rice sequence databases with sequences of the TACs and RG227 a japonica rice BAC sequence, OSJNBb0078P24 was identified. By comparing the TAC and BAC sequences, six new PCR-based markers were developed. With these markers the Sc locus was further mapped to a region of 46 kb. The results suggest that the BAC OSJNBb0078P24 and TAC M45E14 contain the Sc gene. Six ORFs were predicted in the focused 46-kb region.

  11. Laser confers less embryo exposure than acid tyrode for embryo biopsy in preimplantation genetic diagnosis cycles: a randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Marcelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We compared two methods of zona pellucida drilling. 213 embryos were biopsied with acid Tyrode. Each biopsy took 3 minutes and the entire procedure ~29 minutes. 5% of blastomeres lysed, 49% of embryos became blastocyst and 36% of patients became pregnant. 229 embryos were biopsied with laser. Each biopsy took 30 seconds and the entire procedure ~7 minutes. 2.5% of blastomeres lysed, 50.6% of embryos became blastocyst and 47% of patients became pregnant. We can conclude that laser can be used for embryo biopsy. Reduction of embryo exposure and of removed blastomeres is associated with increased blastocysts available for transfer and a better clinical outcome.

  12. Genetic risk score does not correlate with body mass index of Latina women in a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, Kimberly R; Karp, Sharon M; Gesell, Sabina B; Dietrich, Mary S; Morgan, Thomas M; Barkin, Shari L

    2011-10-01

    Obesity disproportionately affects Latina women. Common genetic variants are convincingly associated with body mass index (BMI) and may be used to create genetic risk scores (GRS) for obesity that could define genetically influenced forms of obesity and alter response to clinical trial interventions. The objective of this study was (1) to identify the frequency and effect size of common obesity genetic variants in Latina women; (2) to determine the clinical utility of a GRS for obesity with Latina women participating in a community-based clinical trial. DNA from 85 Latina women was genotyped for eight genetic variants previously associated with BMI in Caucasians, but not yet assessed in Latina populations. The main outcome measure was the correlation of GRS (sum of eight risk alleles) with BMI, waist circumference, and percent body fat. A majority (83%) of participants had a BMI ≥25. Frequency of loci near FTO, MC4R, and GNPDA2 were lower in Latinas than Caucasians. Association of each locus with BMI was lower in Latinas compared to Caucasians with no significant correlations with BMI. We conclude that an eight locus GRS has no clinical utility for explaining obesity or predicting response to intervention in Latina women participating in a clinical trial.

  13. Familial acromegaly: a specific clinical entity--further evidence from the genetic study of a three-generation family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlian, P; Giraud, S; Lahlou, N; Roger, M; Blin, C; Holler, C; Lenoir, G; Sallandre, J; Calender, A; Turpin, G

    1995-10-01

    Familial acromegaly is a very rare inherited disorder, characterized by the clustering within a single family of several related cases with somatotroph adenomas and acromegaly. The causes of these dominantly inherited pituitary tumours remain unknown. Although these families have a clinical presentation distinct from that of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1), the question of this syndrome as being linked to the MEN-1 locus has remained open. Our aim was to study a three-generation family with cases of acromegaly in a mother and her son, to explore better the clinical presentation of the disease, its pattern of inheritance and to test the hypothesis of a genetic linkage to the MEN-1 locus using closely linked polymorphic genetic markers. The refined analysis of 15 unaffected relatives revealed miscellaneous non-specific endocrine dysfunctions and the presence of multiple lipomata, as noted previously in some cases. Moreover, the notion of acromegalo-gigantism in the maternal grandmother and an incomplete penetrance appeared even more typical, suggesting that familial acromegaly is a specific clinical entity. Finally, under the hypotheses assumed for segregation analysis, no clinical, biological or genetic evidence of linkage to the MEN-1 locus could be retained in this family. However, these conclusions were limited because of incomplete penetrance and uncertain definition of the carrier status. Therefore, we conclude that further identification of the genetic predisposition to familial acromegaly might be obtained from the combined molecular genetic analysis of several families presenting with the same clinical features. PMID:7581969

  14. 9. international mouse genome conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA copy number, but not haplogroup, confers a genetic susceptibility to leprosy in Han Chinese from Southwest China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, an unculturable pathogen with an exceptionally eroded genome. The high level of inactivation of gene function in M. leprae, including many genes in its metabolic pathways, has led to a dependence on host energy production and nutritional products. We hypothesized that host cellular powerhouse--the mitochondria--may affect host susceptibility to M. leprae and the onset of clinical leprosy, and this may be reflected by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA background and mtDNA copy number. METHODS: We analyzed the mtDNA sequence variation of 534 leprosy patients and 850 matched controls from Yunnan Province and classified each subject by haplogroup. mtDNA copy number, taken to be proportional to mtDNA content, was measured in a subset of these subjects (296 patients and 231 controls and 12 leprosy patients upon diagnosis. RESULTS: Comparison of matrilineal components of the case and control populations revealed no significant difference. However, measurement of mtDNA copy number showed that lepromatous leprosy patients had a significantly higher mtDNA content than controls (P = 0.008. Past medical treatments had no effect on the alteration of mtDNA copy number. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggested that mtDNA content, but not haplogroup, affects leprosy and this influence is limited to the clinical subtype of lepromatous leprosy.

  16. Linking restless legs syndrome with Parkinson's disease: clinical, imaging and genetic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeraully Tasneem

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Restless legs syndrome (RLS and Parkinson's disease (PD are both common neurological disorders. There has been much debate over whether an etiological link between these two diseases exists and whether they share a common pathophysiology. Evidence pointing towards a link includes response to dopaminergic agents in PD and RLS, suggestive of underlying dopamine dysfunction in both conditions. The extrastriatal dopaminergic system, in particular altered spinal dopaminergic modulation, may be variably involved in PD patients with RLS symptoms. In addition, there is now evidence that the nigrostriatal system, primarily involved in PD, is also affected in RLS. Furthermore, an association of RLS with the parkin mutation has been suggested. The prevalence of RLS has also been reported to be increased in other disorders of dopamine regulation. However, clinical association studies and functional imaging have produced mixed findings. Conflicting accounts of emergence of RLS and improvement in RLS symptoms after deep brain stimulation (DBS also contribute to the uncertainty surrounding the issue. Among the strongest arguments against a common pathophysiology is the role of iron in RLS and PD. While elevated iron levels in the substantia nigra contribute to oxidative stress in PD, RLS is a disorder of relative iron deficiency, with symptoms responding to replacement therapy. Recent ultrasonography studies have suggested that, despite overlapping clinical features, the mechanisms underlying idiopathic RLS and RLS associated with PD may differ. In this review, we provide a concise summary of the clinical, imaging and genetic evidence exploring the link between RLS and PD.

  17. International Conference on Rett Syndrome (4th, Vienna, Austria, October 2-5, 1986). Synopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Alan

    Presentations from speakers at a conference on Rett Syndrome are summarized. The presentations focused on Rett Syndrome's genetic basis and identification as a clinical syndrome, involving, among other things, mental subnormality, epilepsy, infantile spasms, hand stereotypes, and poor hand use. Also discussed were: Rett Syndrome's predictive…

  18. Genetic dissection of an exogenously induced biofilm in laboratory and clinical isolates of E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Amini

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms are a dominant feature of many human infections. However, developing effective strategies for controlling biofilms requires an understanding of the underlying biology well beyond what currently exists. Using a novel strategy, we have induced formation of a robust biofilm in Escherichia coli by utilizing an exogenous source of poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG polymer, a major virulence factor of many pathogens. Through microarray profiling of competitive selections, carried out in both transposon insertion and over-expression libraries, we have revealed the genetic basis of PNAG-based biofilm formation. Our observations reveal the dominance of electrostatic interactions between PNAG and surface structures such as lipopolysaccharides. We show that regulatory modulation of these surface structures has significant impact on biofilm formation behavior of the cell. Furthermore, the majority of clinical isolates which produced PNAG also showed the capacity to respond to the exogenously produced version of the polymer.

  19. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Syndromes: State of the Art on Genetic, Clinical, and Therapeutic Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Caso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes (MAISs are caused by innate immune system dysregulation leading to aberrant inflammasome activation and episodes of fever and involvement of skin, serous membranes, eyes, joints, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system, predominantly with a childhood onset. To date, there are twelve known MAISs: familial Mediterranean fever, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, familial cold urticaria syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome, CINCA syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, NLRP12-associated autoinflammatory disorder, Blau syndrome, early-onset sarcoidosis, PAPA syndrome, Majeed syndrome, and deficiency of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. Each of these conditions may manifest itself with more or less severe inflammatory symptoms of variable duration and frequency, associated with findings of increased inflammatory parameters in laboratory investigation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the main genetic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of MAISs and their most recent classification with the ultimate goal of increasing awareness of autoinflammation among various internal medicine specialists.

  20. Genetic variation of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and its clinical implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsung O. Cheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ Plasma lipids are controlled by genes and play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. Dysplipidemia is an important risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world. More than 14 million Americans are afflicted with clinically significant CAD.1 To illustrate the impact of CAD in developed countries, the medical and societal costs of CAD in the United States alone are in excess of $90 billion annually.1 More than 600 000 Americans each year develop new cardiac events, more than 10% of which occur in Americans <50 years of age.1 Identifying genetic predisposition to early onset of CAD could help in understanding basic disease mechanism, guiding targeted preventive efforts, and planning appropriate therapeutic strategies.

  1. Clinical and genetic analysis of hereditary and sporadic ataxia in central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, E; Forleo, P; Nacmias, B; Tedde, A; Latorraca, S; Piacentini, S; Parnetti, L; Gallai, V; Sorbi, S

    We have clinically and genetically evaluated 24 affected patients belonging to 22 Italian Friedreich ataxia (FA) families, 52 patients from 32 kindreds with proven autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA), 9 patients belonging to 5 families with autosomal recessive hereditary ataxia (ARCA) and 103 sporadic cases, 89 of which affected by idiopathic late onset cerebellar ataxia (ILOCA). Genotype-phenotype correlation analyses in FA patients have evidenced an inverse relationship between GAA repeat expansion length and age of onset, disease duration, and presence of cardiomyopathy. Among autosomal dominant types, spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) genotype has been found in 31% of our ADCA families, resulting the most frequent form of ataxia. Phenotypic analysis of the various SCA subtypes evidenced a marked heterogeneity of symptoms with a substantial overlap between different syndromes. PMID:11719273

  2. Clinical and genetic analysis of two Chinese families with benign familial neonatal convulsions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Haiyan; TANG Beisha; XIA Kun; CAO Guifang; SHEN Lu; JIANG Hong; PAN Qian; SONG Yanmin; CAI Fang

    2005-01-01

    Benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited epilepsy syndrome. Two voltagegated potassium channel genes, KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, have been identified as the genes responsible for BFNC. Here we report two Chinese families with clinical histories of typical BFNC. Using six microsatellite markers, two located at KCNQ2 locus and four at KCNQ3 locus, linkage analysis was performed in the two families, which excluded the linkage of BFNC to KCNQ3, but could not exclude the linkage to KCNQ2. Direct DNA sequencing of the KCNQ2 gene in the two families was performed, and two formerly unknown polymorphisms were identified, but no KCNQ2 mutation was found in the two families. Our study suggests the genetic heterogeneity in Chinese families with BFNC and proves the existence of a new gene locus for BFNC.

  3. The genetic basis of familial adenomatous polyposis and its implications for clinical practice and risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leoz ML

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Maria Liz Leoz, Sabela Carballal, Leticia Moreira, Teresa Ocaña, Francesc Balaguer Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Clínic, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBERehd, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain Abstract: Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP is an inherited disorder that represents the most common gastrointestinal polyposis syndrome. Germline mutations in the APC gene were initially identified as responsible for FAP, and later, several studies have also implicated the MUTYH gene as responsible for this disease, usually referred to as MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP. FAP and MAP are characterized by the early onset of multiple adenomatous colorectal polyps, a high lifetime risk of colorectal cancer (CRC, and in some patients the development of extracolonic manifestations. The goal of colorectal management in these patients is to prevent CRC mortality through endoscopic and surgical approaches. Individuals with FAP and their relatives should receive appropriate genetic counseling and join surveillance programs when indicated. This review is focused on the description of the main clinical and genetic aspects of FAP associated with germline APC mutations and MAP. Keywords: colorectal cancer, familial adenomatous polyposis, MAP, APC, MUTYH

  4. Clinical Presentation and Genetic Paradigm of Diffuse Infiltrating Retinoblastoma: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traine, Peter G; Schedler, Katharina J; Rodrigues, Eduardo B

    2016-04-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common childhood cancer. Thanks to modern technology and good medical access, mortality in Europe has decreased to about 5%. Diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma is a very rare subtype of this neoplasm and is characterized by its atypical growth pattern. Diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma may mimic other more innocuous diseases and may therefore be misdiagnosed. The purpose of this paper was to provide a short review of the main symptoms of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma presenting to the ophthalmologist and give a comparison to typical retinoblastoma. The second purpose was to set up a discussion of the genetic paradigm of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. It has often been described to occur sporadically; however, in the last years, it has been shown that it might be heritable. A literature search concerning diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma considering English, German and Spanish cases and case series identified 77 patients. Moreover, an overview of general data, main symptoms, clinical findings and initial working diagnoses or referral diagnoses is given. Males were significantly more often affected than females. Diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma can be heritable. Genetic analysis should be offered to the patient and relatives. Interdisciplinary medical follow-up care is needed to detect associated cancers. PMID:27239450

  5. Geographic tongue and psoriasis: clinical, histopathological, immunohistochemical and genetic correlation - a literature review*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciani, Bruna Lavinas Sayed; Domingos, Tábata Alves; Teixeira-Souza, Thays; dos Santos, Vanessa de Carla Batista; Gonzaga, Heron Fernando de Sousa; Cardoso-Oliveira, Juliana; Gripp, Alexandre Carlos; Dias, Eliane Pedra; Carneiro, Sueli

    2016-01-01

    Geographic tongue is a chronic, inflammatory, and immune-mediated oral lesion of unknown etiology. It is characterized by serpiginous white areas around the atrophic mucosa, which alternation between activity, remission and reactivation at various locations gave the names benign migratory glossitis and wandering rash of the tongue. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with frequent cutaneous involvement and an immunogenetic basis of great importance in clinical practice. The association between geographic tongue and psoriasis has been demonstrated in various studies, based on observation of its fundamental lesions, microscopic similarity between the two conditions and the presence of a common genetic marker, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) HLA-C*06. The difficulty however in accepting the diagnosis of geographic tongue as oral psoriasis is the fact that not all patients with geographic tongue present psoriasis. Some authors believe that the prevalence of geographic tongue would be much greater if psoriatic patients underwent thorough oral examination. This study aimed to develop a literature review performed between 1980 and 2014, in which consultation of theses, dissertations and selected scientific articles were conducted through search in Scielo and Bireme databases, from Medline and Lilacs sources, relating the common characteristics between geographic tongue and psoriasis. We observed that the frequency of oral lesions is relatively common, but to establish a correct diagnosis of oral psoriasis, immunohistochemical and genetic histopathological analyzes are necessary, thus highlighting the importance of oral examination in psoriatic patients and cutaneous examination in patients with geographic tongue. PMID:27579734

  6. Reward circuitry dysfunction in psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders and genetic syndromes: animal models and clinical findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dichter Gabriel S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review summarizes evidence of dysregulated reward circuitry function in a range of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders and genetic syndromes. First, the contribution of identifying a core mechanistic process across disparate disorders to disease classification is discussed, followed by a review of the neurobiology of reward circuitry. We next consider preclinical animal models and clinical evidence of reward-pathway dysfunction in a range of disorders, including psychiatric disorders (i.e., substance-use disorders, affective disorders, eating disorders, and obsessive compulsive disorders, neurodevelopmental disorders (i.e., schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, Tourette’s syndrome, conduct disorder/oppositional defiant disorder, and genetic syndromes (i.e., Fragile X syndrome, Prader–Willi syndrome, Williams syndrome, Angelman syndrome, and Rett syndrome. We also provide brief overviews of effective psychopharmacologic agents that have an effect on the dopamine system in these disorders. This review concludes with methodological considerations for future research designed to more clearly probe reward-circuitry dysfunction, with the ultimate goal of improved intervention strategies.

  7. Clinical evaluation of cardiovascular devices: principles, problems, and proposals for European regulatory reform. Report of a policy conference of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Alan G; Daubert, Jean-Claude; Van de Werf, Frans; Estes, N A Mark; Smith, Sidney C; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Vardas, Panos E; Komajda, Michel

    2011-07-01

    The European Commission announced in 2008 that a fundamental revision of the medical device directives is being considered in order to clarify and strengthen the current legal framework. The system for testing and approving devices in Europe was established >20 years ago as a 'New Approach' to a previously little-regulated industry. It is recognized by many that the regulatory system has not kept pace with technological advances and changing patterns of medical practice. New legislation will be drafted during 2011, but medical experts have been little involved in this important process. This context makes it an opportune time for a professional association to advise from both clinical and academic perspectives about changes which should be made to improve the safety and efficacy of devices used in clinical practice and to develop more appropriate systems for their clinical evaluation and post-marketing surveillance. This report summarizes how medical devices are regulated and it reviews some serious clinical problems that have occurred with cardiovascular devices. Finally, it presents the main recommendations from a Policy Conference on the Clinical Evaluation of Cardiovascular Devices that was held at the European Heart House in January 2011.

  8. Clinical associations of host genetic variations in the genes of cytokines in critically ill patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belopolskaya, O B; Smelaya, T V; Moroz, V V; Golubev, A M; Salnikova, L E

    2015-01-01

    Host genetic variations may influence a changing profile of biochemical markers and outcome in patients with trauma/injury. The objective of this study was to assess clinical associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes of cytokines in critically ill patients. A total of 430 patients were genotyped for SNPs in the genes of pro- (IL1B, IL6, IL8) and anti-inflammatory (IL4, IL10, IL13) cytokines. The main end-points were sepsis, mortality and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We evaluated the dynamic levels of bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, creatine kinase, creatinine and lactate dehydrogenase in five points of measurements (between 1 and 14 days after admission) and correlated them with SNPs. High-producing alleles of proinflammatory cytokines protected patients against sepsis (IL1B −511A and IL8 —251A) and mortality (IL1B −511A). High-producing alleles of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL4 —589T and IL13 431A (144Gln) were less frequent in ARDS patients. The carriers of IL6 —174C/C genotypes were prone to the increased levels of biochemical markers and acute kidney and liver insufficiency. Genotype-dependent differences in the levels of biochemical indicators gradually increased to a maximal value on the 14th day after admission. These findings suggest that genetic variability in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines may contribute to different clinical phenotypes in patients at high risk of critical illness. PMID:25619315

  9. Clinical outcome and genetic differences within a monophyletic Dengue virus type 2 population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige Chanditha; Chua, Rachel Choon Rong; Shi, Yuan; Thein, Tun Lin; Lee, Linda Kay; Lee, Kim Sung; Lye, David Chien; Ng, Lee Ching; Leo, Yee Sin

    2015-01-01

    The exact mechanisms of interplay between host and viral factors leading to severe dengue are yet to be fully understood. Even though previous studies have implicated specific genetic differences of Dengue virus (DENV) in clinical severity and virus attenuation, similar studies with large-scale, whole genome screening of monophyletic virus populations are limited. Therefore, in the present study, we compared 89 whole genomes of DENV-2 cosmopolitan clade III isolates obtained from patients diagnosed with dengue fever (DF, n = 58), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF, n = 30) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS, n = 1) in Singapore between July 2010 and January 2013, in order to determine the correlation of observed viral genetic differences with clinical outcomes. Our findings showed no significant difference between the number of primary and secondary infections that progressed to DHF and DSS (p>0.05) in our study cohort. Despite being highly homogenous, study isolates possessed 39 amino acid substitutions of which 10 substitutions were fixed in three main groups of virus isolates. None of those substitutions were specifically associated with DHF and DSS. Notably, two evolutionarily unique virus groups possessing C-P43T+NS1-S103T+NS2A-V83I+NS3-R337K+ NS3-I600T+ NS5-P136S and NS2A-T119N mutations were exclusively found in patients with DF, the benign form of DENV infections. Those mutants were significantly associated with mild disease outcome. These observations indicated that disease progression into DHF and DSS within our patient population was more likely to be due to host than virus factors. We hypothesize that selection for potentially less virulent groups of DENV-2 in our study cohort may be an evolutionary adaptation of viral strains to extend their survival in the human-mosquito transmission cycle.

  10. Clinical outcome and genetic differences within a monophyletic Dengue virus type 2 population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hapuarachchige Chanditha Hapuarachchi

    Full Text Available The exact mechanisms of interplay between host and viral factors leading to severe dengue are yet to be fully understood. Even though previous studies have implicated specific genetic differences of Dengue virus (DENV in clinical severity and virus attenuation, similar studies with large-scale, whole genome screening of monophyletic virus populations are limited. Therefore, in the present study, we compared 89 whole genomes of DENV-2 cosmopolitan clade III isolates obtained from patients diagnosed with dengue fever (DF, n = 58, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF, n = 30 and dengue shock syndrome (DSS, n = 1 in Singapore between July 2010 and January 2013, in order to determine the correlation of observed viral genetic differences with clinical outcomes. Our findings showed no significant difference between the number of primary and secondary infections that progressed to DHF and DSS (p>0.05 in our study cohort. Despite being highly homogenous, study isolates possessed 39 amino acid substitutions of which 10 substitutions were fixed in three main groups of virus isolates. None of those substitutions were specifically associated with DHF and DSS. Notably, two evolutionarily unique virus groups possessing C-P43T+NS1-S103T+NS2A-V83I+NS3-R337K+ NS3-I600T+ NS5-P136S and NS2A-T119N mutations were exclusively found in patients with DF, the benign form of DENV infections. Those mutants were significantly associated with mild disease outcome. These observations indicated that disease progression into DHF and DSS within our patient population was more likely to be due to host than virus factors. We hypothesize that selection for potentially less virulent groups of DENV-2 in our study cohort may be an evolutionary adaptation of viral strains to extend their survival in the human-mosquito transmission cycle.

  11. Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH: clinical manifestations, genetic heterogeneity and mutation continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Muhammad J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH is a rare disorder of neurogenic mitosis characterized by reduced head circumference at birth with variable degree of mental retardation. In MCPH patients, brain size reduced to almost one-third of its original volume due to reduced number of generated cerebral cortical neurons during embryonic neurogensis. So far, seven genetic loci (MCPH1-7 for this condition have been mapped with seven corresponding genes (MCPH1, WDR62, CDK5RAP2, CEP152, ASPM, CENPJ, and STIL identified from different world populations. Contribution of ASPM and WDR62 gene mutations in MCPH World wide is more than 50%. By and large, primary microcephaly patients are phenotypically indistinguishable, however, recent studies in patients with mutations in MCPH1, WDR62 and ASPM genes showed a broader clinical and/or cellular phenotype. It has been proposed that mutations in MCPH genes can cause the disease phenotype by disturbing: 1 orientation of mitotic spindles, 2 chromosome condensation mechanism during embryonic neurogenesis, 3 DNA damage-response signaling, 4 transcriptional regulations and microtubule dynamics, 5 certain unknown centrosomal mechanisms that control the number of neurons generated by neural precursor cells. Recent discoveries of mammalian models for MCPH have open up horizons for researchers to add more knowledge regarding the etiology and pathophysiology of MCPH. High incidence of MCPH in Pakistani population reflects the most probable involvement of consanguinity. Genetic counseling and clinical management through carrier detection/prenatal diagnosis in MCPH families can help reducing the incidence of this autosomal recessive disorder.

  12. Genetic relationships between clinical and non-clinical strains of Yersinia enterocolitica biovar 1A as revealed by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and multilocus restriction typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virdi Jugsharan S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic relationships among 81 strains of Y. enterocolitica biovar 1A isolated from clinical and non-clinical sources were discerned by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE and multilocus restriction typing (MLRT using six loci each. Such studies may reveal associations between the genotypes of the strains and their sources of isolation. Results All loci were polymorphic and generated 62 electrophoretic types (ETs and 12 restriction types (RTs. The mean genetic diversity (H of the strains by MLEE and MLRT was 0.566 and 0.441 respectively. MLEE (DI = 0.98 was more discriminatory and clustered Y. enterocolitica biovar 1A strains into four groups, while MLRT (DI = 0.77 identified two distinct groups. BURST (Based Upon Related Sequence Types analysis of the MLRT data suggested aquatic serotype O:6,30-6,31 isolates to be the ancestral strains from which, clinical O:6,30-6,31 strains might have originated by host adaptation and genetic change. Conclusion MLEE revealed greater genetic diversity among strains of Y. enterocolitica biovar 1A and clustered strains in four groups, while MLRT grouped the strains into two groups. BURST analysis of MLRT data nevertheless provided newer insights into the probable evolution of clinical strains from aquatic strains.

  13. Severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (Dravet syndrome: Clinical and genetic features of nine Turkish patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral Özmen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Mutations of the a-1 subunit sodium channel gene (SCN1A cause severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI. To date, over 300 mutations related to SMEI have been described. In the present study, we report new SCN1A mutations and the clinical features of SMEI cases. Materials and Methods: We studied the clinical and genetic features of nine patients diagnosed with SMEI at the Pediatric Neurology Department of Istanbul Medical Faculty. Results: Five patients had nonsense mutations, two had missense mutations, one had a splice site mutation and one had a deletion mutation of the SCN1A gene. Mutations at c.3705+5G splice site, p.trip153X nonsense mutation and deletion at c.2416_2946 have not been previously described. The seizures started following whole cell pertussis vaccination in all patients. The seizures ceased in one patient and continued in the other eight patients. Developmental regression was severe in three patients, with frequent status epilepticus. The type of mutation was not predictive for the severity of the disease. Two of the three patients with severe regression had nonsense and missense mutations. Conclusions : Dravet syndrome can be result of several different types of mutation in SCN1A gene. Onset of the seizures after pertussis vaccination is an important clue for the diagnosis and neuro- developmental delay should be expected in all patients.

  14. Clinical and genetic study of a Chinese family with spinocerebellar ataxia type 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Yan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia 7 (SCA7 is a rare disease, and only few SCA7 families have been reported, especially from East Asia. Clinical features of a genetically confirmed SCA7 Chinese family were evaluated. The onset of the disease varied from 4 years to 48 years, and the initial presenting feature was cerebellar ataxia or visual impairment, or both. There were abnormal findings on fundus photography, electroretinogram, flash visual evoked potential and oscillatory potentials. Abnormal mitochondria were also found in skeletal muscle or liver biopsies. The number of cytosine adenine guanine (CAG repeats ranged from 50 to 97, and the length of CAG repeat was inversely correlated with the age of onset (r=-0.867, P=0.025. Conclusion: The clinical manifestations and SCA7 gene of SCA7 patients were homogeneous in this study. Larger CAG repeats had not only resulted in earlier onset, but also related to the rapid progression and severity of the disease. Abnormal mitochondria may be a common finding in biopsy studies of various organs in SCA7 patients.

  15. Thrombocytopenia-absent radius (TAR) syndrome: a clinical genetic series of 14 further cases. impact of the associated 1q21.1 deletion on the genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houeijeh, Ali; Andrieux, Joris; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; David, Albert; Goldenberg, Alice; Bonneau, Dominique; Fouassier, Marc; Journel, Hubert; Martinovic, Jelana; Escande, Fabienne; Devisme, Louise; Bisiaux, Sophie; Chaffiotte, Caroline; Baux, Mathilde; Kerckaert, Jean-Pierre; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia-absent radius Syndrome (TAR) is a rare congenital malformation syndrome of complicated transmission. 1q21.1 deletion is necessary but not sufficient for its expression. We report the result of a French multicentric clinical study, and we emphasized on the role of the associated 1q21.1 deletion in the diagnosis and the genetic counselling of our patients. We gathered information on 14 patients presenting with TAR syndrome and referred for genetic counselling in six different university hospitals (8 foetuses, 1 child and 5 adults). Clinical or pathology details, as well as skeletal X-rays were analyzed. Genetic studies were performed by Array-CGH, and Quantitative Multiplex PCR. We demonstrated the very variable phenotypes of TAR syndrome. Female:male ratio was ∼2:1. All patients presented with bilateral radial aplasia/hypoplasia with preserved thumbs. Phocomelia and lower limb anomalies were present in 28% of the cases. We reported the first case of cystic hygroma on affected foetus. 1q21.1 deletions ranging from 330 to 1100 kb were identified in all affected patients. Most of them were inherited from one healthy parent (80%). The identification of a 1q21.1 deletion allowed confirmation of TAR syndrome diagnosis, particularly in foetuses and in atypical phenotypes. Additionally, it allowed accurate genetic counselling, especially when it occurred de novo. These findings allowed discussing the diagnostic criteria and management towards TAR syndrome.

  16. Study of Clinical and Genetic Risk Factors for Aspirin-induced Gastric Mucosal Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Wu; Ying Hu; Peng You; Yu-Jing Chi; Jian-Hua Zhou; Yuan-Yuan Zhang; Yu-Lan Liu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Current knowledge about clinical and genetic risk factors for aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury is not sufficient to prevent these gastric mucosal lesions.Methods:We recruited aspirin takers as the exposed group and healthy volunteers as the control group.The exposed group was categorized into two subgroups such as subgroup A as gastric mucosal injury diagnosed by gastroscopy,including erosion,ulcer or bleeding of the esophagus,stomach,or duodenum;subgroup B as no injury of the gastric mucosa was detected by gastroscopy.Clinical information was collected,and 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms were evaluated.Results:Among 385 participants,234 were in the aspirin-exposed group.According to gastroscopy,82 belonged to subgroup A,91 belonged to subgroup B,and gastroscopic results of 61 participants were not available.Using the Chi-square test and logistic regression,we found that peptic ulcer history (odds ratio [OR] =5.924,95% confidence intervals [CI]:2.115-16.592),dual anti-platelet medication (OR =3.443,95% CI:1.154-10.271),current Helicobacterpylori infection (OR =2.242,95% CI:1.032-4.870),male gender (OR =2.211,95% CI:1.027-4.760),GG genotype ofrs2243086 (OR =4.516,95% CI:1.180-17.278),and AA genotype ofrs 1330344 (OR =2.178,95% CI:1.016-4.669) were more frequent in subgroup A than subgroup B.In aspirin users who suffered from upper gastrointestinal bleeding,the frequency of the TT genotype ofrs2238631 and TT genotype ofrs2243100 was higher than in those without upper gastrointestinal bleeding.Conclusions:Peptic ulcer history,dual anti-platelet medication,H.pylori current infection,and male gender were possible clinical risk factors for aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury.GG genotype of rs2243086 and AA genotype of rs 1330344 were possible genetic risk factors.TT genotype ofrs2238631 and TT genotype of rs2243100 may be risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in aspirin users.

  17. Impact of HFE genetic testing on clinical presentation of hereditary hemochromatosis: new epidemiological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka Chandran

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is a common inherited disorder of iron metabolism in Northern European populations. The discovery of a candidate gene in 1996 (HFE, and of its main mutation (C282Y, has radically altered the way to diagnose this disease. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the HFE gene discovery on the clinical presentation and epidemiology of HH. Methods We studied our cohort of 415 patients homozygous for the C282Y allele and included in a phlebotomy program in a blood centre in western Brittany, France. Results In this cohort, 56.9% of the patients were male and 21.9% began their phlebotomy program before the implementation of the genetic test. A significant decrease in the sex ratio was noticed following implementation of this DNA test, from 3.79 to 1.03 (p -5, meaning that the proportion of diagnosed females relatives to males greatly increased. The profile of HH patients at diagnosis changed after the DNA test became available. Serum ferritin and iron values were lower and there was a reduced frequency of clinical signs displayed at diagnosis, particularly skin pigmentation (20.1 vs. 40.4%, OR = 0.37, p Conclusion This study highlights the importance of the HFE gene discovery, which has simplified the diagnosis of HH and modified its clinical presentation and epidemiology. This study precisely measures these changes. Enhanced diagnosis of HFE-related HH at an early stage and implementation of phlebotomy treatment are anticipated to maintain normal life expectancy for these patients.

  18. Preferences of cardiologists and clinical geneticists for the future organization of genetic care in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: A survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, E.; Schuurman, E.; Tan, H.L.; Hofman, N.; Bonsel, G.J.; Wilde, A.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    In view of the increasing demands for genetic counselling and DNA diagnostics in cardiogenetics, the roles of cardiologists and clinical geneticists in the delivery of care need to be redefined. We investigated the preferences of both groups of professionals with regard to the future allocation of s

  19. 76 FR 6623 - Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices... meeting. A notice in the Federal Register about last minute modifications that impact a previously... line/phone line to learn about possible modifications before coming to the meeting. Agenda: On March...

  20. Next-generation sequencing-based genome diagnostics across clinical genetics centers : implementation choices and their effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijenhoek, Terry; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Elferink, Martin; de Ligt, Joep; Kranendonk, Elcke; Santen, Gijs; Nijman, Isaac J.; Butler, Derek; Claes, Godelieve; Costessi, Adalberto; Dorlijn, Wim; van Eyndhoven, Winfried; Halley, Dicky J. J.; van den Hout, Mirjam C. G. N.; van Hove, Steven; Johansson, Lennart F.; Jongbloed, Jan D. H.; Kamps, Rick; Kockx, Christel E. M.; de Koning, Bart; Kriek, Marjolein; Deprez, Ronald Lekanne Dit; Lunstroo, Hans; Mannens, Marcel; Mook, Olaf R.; Nelen, Marcel; Ploem, Corrette; Rijnen, Marco; Saris, Jasper J.; Sinke, Richard; Sistermans, Erik; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon; Sleutels, Frank; van der Stoep, Nienke; van Tienhoven, Marianne; Vermaat, Martijn; Vogel, Maartje; Waisfisz, Quinten; Weiss, Janneke Marjan; van den Wijngaard, Arthur; van Workum, Wilbert; Ijntema, Helger; van der Zwaag, Bert; van IJcken, Wilfred F. J.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Veltman, Joris A.; Hennekam, Raoul; Cuppen, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Implementation of next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) technology into routine diagnostic genome care requires strategic choices. Instead of theoretical discussions on the consequences of such choices, we compared NGS-based diagnostic practices in eight clinical genetic centers in the Netherlands, b

  1. Non-inflammatory destructive periodontal disease: a clinical, microbiological, immunological and genetic investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Repeke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis comprises a group of multifactorial diseases in which periodontopathogens accumulate in dental plaque and trigger host chronic inflammatory and immune responses against periodontal structures, which are determinant to the disease outcome. Although unusual cases of non-inflammatory destructive periodontal disease (NIDPD are described, their pathogenesis remains unknown. A unique NIDPD case was investigated by clinical, microbiological, immunological and genetic tools. The patient, a non-smoking dental surgeon with excessive oral hygiene practice, presented a generalized bone resorption and tooth mobility, but not gingival inflammation or occlusion problems. No hematological, immunological or endocrine alterations were found. No periodontopathogens (A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, F. nucleatum and T. denticola or viruses (HCMV, EBV-1 and HSV-1 were detected, along with levels of IL-1β and TNF-a in GCF compatible with healthy tissues. Conversely ALP, ACP and RANKL GCF levels were similar to diseased periodontal sites. Genetic investigation demonstrated that the patient carried some SNPs, as well HLA-DR4 (*0404 and HLA-B27 alleles, considered risk factors for bone loss. Then, a less vigorous and diminished frequency of toothbrushing was recommended to the patient, resulting in the arrest of alveolar bone loss, associated with the return of ALP, ACP and RANKL in GCF to normality levels. In conclusion, the unusual case presented here is compatible with the previous description of NIDPD, and the results that a possible combination of excessive force and frequency of mechanical stimulation with a potentially bone loss prone genotype could result in the alveolar bone loss seen in NIDPD.

  2. Anderson-Fabry, the histrionic disease: from genetics to clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Cecchi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD is an Xlinked lysosomal storage disorder of glycosphingolipid catabolism, due to deficiency or absence of a galactosidase A (α-gal A enzyme. The disease may affect males and females, the latter with an average 10 years delay. Metabolites storage (mostly Gb3 and lyso-Gb3 leads to progressive cellular and multiorgan dysfunction, with either early and late onset variable clinical manifestations that usually reduce quality of life and life expectancy. Heart and kidney failure, stroke and sudden death are the most devastating complications. AFD is always been considered a very rare disease, although new epidemiologic data, based on newborn screening, showed that AFD prevalence is probably underestimated and much higher than previously reported, especially for late-onset atypical phenotypes. Currently, the diagnosis may be easier and simpler by evaluating α-gal A enzyme activity and genetic analysis for GLA gene mutations on dried blood spot. While a marked α-gal A deficiency leads to diagnosis of AFD in hemizygous males, the molecular analysis is mandatory in heterozygous females. However, referral to a center with an expert multidisciplinary team is highly advisable, in order to ensure careful management and treatment of patients, based also on accurate molecular and biochemical data interpretation. While long-term efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT in advanced stage is still debated, increasing evidence shows greater efficacy of early treatment initiation. Concomitant, organ-specific therapy is also needed. New treatment approaches, such as chemical chaperone therapy, alone or in combination with ERT, are currently under investigation. The present review illustrates the major features of the disease, focusing also on biochemical and genetic aspects.

  3. Erythropoietin in the general population: reference ranges and clinical, biochemical and genetic correlates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Grote Beverborg

    Full Text Available Although erythropoietin has been used for decades in the treatment of anemia, data regarding endogenous levels in the general population are scarce. Therefore, we determined erythropoietin reference ranges and its clinical, biochemical and genetic associations in the general population.We used data from 6,777 subjects enrolled in the Prevention of REnal and Vascular ENd-stage Disease (PREVEND study. Fasting venous blood samples were obtained in the morning from all participants from 2001-2003. Serum erythropoietin concentrations were measured using a fully automated chemiluminescent enzyme-labeled immunometric assay. A genome-wide association study was performed to identify genetic determinants.Mean age (± SD was 53 ± 12 years and 50% were female. Median (IQR erythropoietin concentrations were 7.6 (5.8-9.9 IU/L in men and 7.9 (6.0-10.6 IU/L in women. A strong positive correlation was found between erythropoietin and waist circumference, glucose and systolic blood pressure (all P < 0.05. In subjects with normal renal function there was a strong exponential relation between hemoglobin and erythropoietin, whereas in renal impairment (eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73m² this relation was linear (men or absent (women (P < 0.001 for interaction. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the HBS1L-MYB locus were shown to be related to erythropoietin levels (P < 9x10-21, more significantly than other erythrocyte parameters.We provide age-specific reference ranges for endogenous serum erythropoietin. Erythropoietin levels are positively associated with the components of the metabolic syndrome, except cholesterol. We show that even mild renal failure blunts erythropoietin production and propose the HBS1L-MYB locus as a regulator of erythropoietin.

  4. Genotype-phenotype correlations in a mountain population community with high prevalence of Wilson's disease: genetic and clinical homogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Relu Cocoş

    Full Text Available Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by more than 500 mutations in ATP7B gene presenting considerably clinical manifestations heterogeneity even in patients with a particular mutation. Previous findings suggested a potential role of additional genetic modifiers and environment factors on phenotypic expression among the affected patients. We conducted clinical and genetic investigations to perform genotype-phenotype correlation in two large families living in a socio-culturally isolated community with the highest prevalence of Wilson's disease ever reported of 1 ∶ 1130. Sequencing of ATP7B gene in seven affected individuals and 43 family members identified a common compound heterozygous genotype, H1069Q/M769H-fs, in five symptomatic and two asymptomatic patients and detected the presence of two out of seven identified single nucleotide polymorphisms in all affected patients. Symptomatic patients had similar clinical phenotype and age at onset (18 ± 1 years showing dysarthria and dysphagia as common clinical features at the time of diagnosis. Moreover, all symptomatic patients presented Kayser-Fleischer rings and lack of dystonia accompanied by unfavourable clinical outcomes. Our findings add value for understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations in Wilson's disease based on a multifamily study in an isolated population with high extent of genetic and environmental homogeneity as opposed to majority of reports. We observed an equal influence of presumed other genetic modifiers and environmental factors on clinical presentation and age at onset of Wilson's disease in patients with a particular genotype. These data provide valuable inferences that could be applied for predicting clinical management in asymptomatic patients in such communities.

  5. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 31. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the 12. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components, safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; fuel behaviour and performance; reactor safety; reactor engineering; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining and processing

  6. Novel APC mutations in Czech and Slovak FAP families: clinical and genetic aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesela Kamila

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis gene (APC result in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. FAP is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder predisposing to colorectal cancer. Typical FAP is characterized by hundreds to thousands of colorectal adenomatous polyps and by several extracolonic manifestations. An attenuated form of polyposis (AFAP is characterized by less than 100 adenomas and later onset of the disease. Methods Here, we analyzed the APC gene for germline mutations in 59 Czech and 15 Slovak FAP patients. In addition, 50 apparently APC mutation negative Czech probands and 3 probands of Slovak origin were screened for large deletions encompassing the APC gene. Mutation screening was performed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and/or protein truncation test. DNA fragments showing an aberrant electrophoretic banding pattern were sequenced. Screening for large deletions was performed by multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification. The extent of deletions was analyzed using following microsatellite markers: D5S299, D5S82, D5S134 and D5S346. Results In the set of Czech and Slovak patients, we identified 46 germline mutations among 74 unrelated probands. Total mutation capture is 62,2% including large deletions. Thirty seven mutations were detected in 49 patients presenting a classical FAP phenotype (75,5% and 9 mutations in 25 patients with attenuated FAP (36%. We report 20 novel germline APC mutations and 3 large deletions (6% encompassing the whole-gene deletions and/or exon 14 deletion. In the patients with novel mutations, correlations of the mutation localization are discussed in context of the classical and/or attenuated phenotype of the disease. Conclusion The results of the molecular genetic testing are used both in the establishment of the predictive diagnosis and in the clinical management of patients. In some cases this study has also shown the difficulty to classify clinically

  7. Identification of novel genetic Loci associated with thyroid peroxidase antibodies and clinical thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Marco; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio; Teumer, Alexander; Brown, Suzanne J; Jensen, Richard A; Rawal, Rajesh; Roef, Greet L; Plantinga, Theo S; Vermeulen, Sita H; Lahti, Jari; Simmonds, Matthew J; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Freathy, Rachel M; Shields, Beverley M; Pietzner, Diana; Nagy, Rebecca; Broer, Linda; Chaker, Layal; Korevaar, Tim I M; Plia, Maria Grazia; Sala, Cinzia; Völker, Uwe; Richards, J Brent; Sweep, Fred C; Gieger, Christian; Corre, Tanguy; Kajantie, Eero; Thuesen, Betina; Taes, Youri E; Visser, W Edward; Hattersley, Andrew T; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Hamilton, Alexander; Li, Wei; Homuth, Georg; Lobina, Monia; Mariotti, Stefano; Soranzo, Nicole; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Spielhagen, Christin; Ross, Alec; Arnold, Alice; van de Bunt, Martijn; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Heier, Margit; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Masciullo, Corrado; Galesloot, Tessel E; Lim, Ee M; Reischl, Eva; Leedman, Peter J; Lai, Sandra; Delitala, Alessandro; Bremner, Alexandra P; Philips, David I W; Beilby, John P; Mulas, Antonella; Vocale, Matteo; Abecasis, Goncalo; Forsen, Tom; James, Alan; Widen, Elisabeth; Hui, Jennie; Prokisch, Holger; Rietzschel, Ernst E; Palotie, Aarno; Feddema, Peter; Fletcher, Stephen J; Schramm, Katharina; Rotter, Jerome I; Kluttig, Alexander; Radke, Dörte; Traglia, Michela; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; He, Huiling; Franklyn, Jayne A; Tiller, Daniel; Vaidya, Bijay; de Meyer, Tim; Jørgensen, Torben; Eriksson, Johan G; O'Leary, Peter C; Wichmann, Eric; Hermus, Ad R; Psaty, Bruce M; Ittermann, Till; Hofman, Albert; Bosi, Emanuele; Schlessinger, David; Wallaschofski, Henri; Pirastu, Nicola; Aulchenko, Yurii S; de la Chapelle, Albert; Netea-Maier, Romana T; Gough, Stephen C L; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette; Frayling, Timothy M; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Linneberg, Allan; Räikkönen, Katri; Smit, Johannes W A; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; Walsh, John P; Meisinger, Christa; den Heijer, Martin; Visser, Theo J; Spector, Timothy D; Wilson, Scott G; Völzke, Henry; Cappola, Anne; Toniolo, Daniela; Sanna, Serena; Naitza, Silvia; Peeters, Robin P

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). As the possible causative genes of TPOAbs and AITD remain largely unknown, we performed GWAS meta-analyses in 18,297 individuals for TPOAb-positivity (1769 TPOAb-positives and 16,528 TPOAb-negatives) and in 12,353 individuals for TPOAb serum levels, with replication in 8,990 individuals. Significant associations (P<5×10(-8)) were detected at TPO-rs11675434, ATXN2-rs653178, and BACH2-rs10944479 for TPOAb-positivity, and at TPO-rs11675434, MAGI3-rs1230666, and KALRN-rs2010099 for TPOAb levels. Individual and combined effects (genetic risk scores) of these variants on (subclinical) hypo- and hyperthyroidism, goiter and thyroid cancer were studied. Individuals with a high genetic risk score had, besides an increased risk of TPOAb-positivity (OR: 2.18, 95% CI 1.68-2.81, P = 8.1×10(-8)), a higher risk of increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.26-1.82, P = 2.9×10(-6)), as well as a decreased risk of goiter (OR: 0.77, 95% CI 0.66-0.89, P = 6.5×10(-4)). The MAGI3 and BACH2 variants were associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, which was replicated in an independent cohort of patients with Graves' disease (OR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54, P = 1.2×10(-7) and OR: 1.25, 95% CI 1.12-1.39, P = 6.2×10(-5)). The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.10, P = 1.9×10(-3)). This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease. With these markers we identified a large subgroup in the general population with a substantially increased risk of TPOAbs. The results provide insight into why

  8. Identification of novel genetic Loci associated with thyroid peroxidase antibodies and clinical thyroid disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Medici

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease. As the possible causative genes of TPOAbs and AITD remain largely unknown, we performed GWAS meta-analyses in 18,297 individuals for TPOAb-positivity (1769 TPOAb-positives and 16,528 TPOAb-negatives and in 12,353 individuals for TPOAb serum levels, with replication in 8,990 individuals. Significant associations (P<5×10(-8 were detected at TPO-rs11675434, ATXN2-rs653178, and BACH2-rs10944479 for TPOAb-positivity, and at TPO-rs11675434, MAGI3-rs1230666, and KALRN-rs2010099 for TPOAb levels. Individual and combined effects (genetic risk scores of these variants on (subclinical hypo- and hyperthyroidism, goiter and thyroid cancer were studied. Individuals with a high genetic risk score had, besides an increased risk of TPOAb-positivity (OR: 2.18, 95% CI 1.68-2.81, P = 8.1×10(-8, a higher risk of increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.26-1.82, P = 2.9×10(-6, as well as a decreased risk of goiter (OR: 0.77, 95% CI 0.66-0.89, P = 6.5×10(-4. The MAGI3 and BACH2 variants were associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, which was replicated in an independent cohort of patients with Graves' disease (OR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54, P = 1.2×10(-7 and OR: 1.25, 95% CI 1.12-1.39, P = 6.2×10(-5. The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.10, P = 1.9×10(-3. This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease. With these markers we identified a large subgroup in the general population with a substantially increased risk of TPOAbs. The results provide insight into why

  9. Nostradamus conference

    CERN Document Server

    Rössler, Otto; Snášel, Václav; Abraham, Ajith; Corchado, Emilio; Nostradamus: Modern Methods of Prediction, Modeling and Analysis of Nonlinear Systems

    2013-01-01

    This proceeding book of Nostradamus conference (http://nostradamus-conference.org) contains accepted papers presented at this event in 2012. Nostradamus conference was held in the one of the biggest and historic city of Ostrava (the Czech Republic, http://www.ostrava.cz/en), in September 2012. Conference topics are focused on classical as well as modern methods for prediction of dynamical systems with applications in science, engineering and economy. Topics are (but not limited to): prediction by classical and novel methods, predictive control, deterministic chaos and its control, complex systems, modelling and prediction of its dynamics and much more.

  10. Atopic Dermatitis: Clinical Connotations, Especially a Focus on Concomitant Atopic Undertones in Immunocompromised/Susceptible Genetic and Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Khurana, Ananta; Mendiratta, Vibhu; Saxena, Deepti; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K; Chatterjee, Kingshuk

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an intriguing clinical entity. Its clinical connotations are varied, the updates of which are required to be done periodically. An attempt to bring its various facets have been made highlighting its clinical features keeping in view the major and the minor criteria to facilitate the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, complications, and associated dermatoses. The benefit of the current dissertation may percolate to the trainees in dermatology, in addition to revelations that atopic undertones in genetic susceptibility and metabolic disorder may provide substantive insight for the future in the understanding of thus far enigmatic etiopathogenesis of AD. PMID:27293243

  11. Frontotemporal Dementia: Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calendar of Events Fundraising Events Conferences Press Releases Genetics of FTD After receiving a diagnosis of FTD ... that recent advances in science have brought the genetics of FTD into much better focus. In 2012, ...

  12. Genetic diagnosis in clinical psychiatry: A case report of a woman with a 47, XXX karyotype and Fragile X syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony M. Vandersteen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: A recent report highlighted the importance of considering a chromosomal abnormality in the differential diagnosis of adult clinical psychiatry. This case report illustrates the importance of considering Fragile X syndrome, an X-linked genetic disorder associated with psychiatric morbidities. Methods: A 45 years old woman was referred to the clinical genetics department by her psychiatrist for investigation of her gross obesity, hyperphagia, learning difficulties and affective disorder. Results: Cytogenetic analysis revealed a 47,XXX karyotype. Molecular testing identified an expansion of approximately 580 repeats in the FRAXA gene carried on two of her three copies of the X chromosome. Clinical evaluation revealed features consistent with the Prader-Willi like phenotype of Fragile X syndrome. Conclusions: It is important to consider molecular and cytogenetic testing in patients with dysmorphic features, complex neuro-behavioural profile and/or psychotic disorders in order to establish a causative diagnosis, provide adequate counselling and initiate cascade screening where applicable.

  13. Germline Genetic Variation in an Organic Anion Transporter Polypeptide Associated With Methotrexate Pharmacokinetics and Clinical Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Lisa R.; Shimasaki, Noriko; Yang, Wenjian; Panetta, John C.; Cheng, Cheng; Pei, Deqing; Chan, Diana; Sparreboom, Alex; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Methotrexate plasma concentration is related to its clinical effects. Our aim was to identify the genetic basis of interindividual variability in methotrexate pharmacokinetics in children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients and Methods We performed a genome-wide analysis of 500,568 germline single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify how inheritance affects methotrexate plasma disposition among 434 children with ALL who received 3,014 courses of methotrexate at 2 to 5 g/m2. SNPs were validated in an independent cohort of 206 patients. Results Adjusting for age, race, sex, and methotrexate regimen, the most significant associations were with SNPs in the organic anion transporter polypeptide, SLCO1B1. Two SNPs in SLCO1B1, rs11045879 (P = 1.7 × 10−10) and rs4149081 (P = 1.7 × 10−9), were in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with each other (r2 = 1) and with a functional polymorphism in SLCO1B1, T521C (rs4149056; r2 > 0.84). rs11045879 and rs4149081 were validated in an independent cohort of 206 patients (P = .018 and P = .017), as were other SLCO1B1 SNPs residing in different LD blocks. SNPs in SLCO1B1 were also associated with GI toxicity (odds ratio, 15.3 to 16.4; P = .03 to .004). Conclusion A genome-wide interrogation identified inherited variations in a plausible, yet heretofore low-priority candidate gene, SLCO1B1, as important determinants of methotrexate's pharmacokinetics and clinical effects. PMID:19901119

  14. Genetic bases and clinical manifestations of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ 10) deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbats, Maria Andrea; Lunardi, Giada; Doimo, Mara; Trevisson, Eva; Salviati, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q(10) is a remarkable lipid involved in many cellular processes such as energy production through the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC), beta-oxidation of fatty acids, and pyrimidine biosynthesis, but it is also one of the main cellular antioxidants. Its biosynthesis is still incompletely characterized and requires at least 15 genes. Mutations in eight of them (PDSS1, PDSS2, COQ2, COQ4, COQ6, ADCK3, ADCK4, and COQ9) cause primary CoQ(10) deficiency, a heterogeneous group of disorders with variable age of onset (from birth to the seventh decade) and associated clinical phenotypes, ranging from a fatal multisystem disease to isolated steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) or isolated central nervous system disease. The pathogenesis is complex and related to the different functions of CoQ(10). It involves defective ATP production and oxidative stress, but also an impairment of pyrimidine biosynthesis and increased apoptosis. CoQ(10) deficiency can also be observed in patients with defects unrelated to CoQ(10) biosynthesis, such as RC defects, multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, and ataxia and oculomotor apraxia.Patients with both primary and secondary deficiencies benefit from high-dose oral supplementation with CoQ(10). In primary forms treatment can stop the progression of both SRNS and encephalopathy, hence the critical importance of a prompt diagnosis. Treatment may be beneficial also for secondary forms, although with less striking results.In this review we will focus on CoQ(10) biosynthesis in humans, on the genetic defects and the specific clinical phenotypes associated with CoQ(10) deficiency, and on the diagnostic strategies for these conditions.

  15. Clinical, biochemical, and genetic spectrum of seven new patients with NFU1 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe eAhting

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of the mitochondrial energy metabolism are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. An increasingly recognized subgroup is caused by defective mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, with defects in 13 genes being linked to human disease to date. Mutations in three of them, NFU1, BOLA3, and IBA57 affect the assembly of mitochondrial [4Fe-4S] proteins leading to an impairment of diverse mitochondrial metabolic pathways and ATP production. Patients with defects in these three genes present with lactic acidosis, hyperglycinemia, and reduced activities of respiratory chain complexes I and II, the four lipoic acid-dependent 2-oxoacid dehydrogenases, and the glycine cleavage system (GCS. To date, 5 different NFU1 pathogenic variants have been reported in 15 patients from 12 families. We report on 7 new patients from 5 families carrying compound heterozygous or homozygous pathogenic NFU1 mutations identified by candidate gene screening and exome sequencing. 6 out of 8 different disease alleles were novel and functional studies were performed to support the pathogenicity of 5 of them. Characteristic clinical features included fatal infantile encephalopathy and pulmonary hypertension leading to death within the first 6 months of life in 6 out of 7 patients. Laboratory investigations revealed combined defects of PDHc (5 out of 5 and respiratory chain complexes I and II+III (4 out of 5 in skeletal muscle and/or fibroblasts as well as elevated lactate (5 out of 6 and glycine levels (7 out of 7. Our study adds to the definition of the phenotypic spectrum associated with NFU1 mutations and might contribute to the diagnostic workup of future patients

  16. Clinical and genetic investigation of families with type II Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Fuwei; Zheng, Hexin; Zhou, Jianda; Zhu, Ganghua; Hu, Peng; Wu, Weijing

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type II in three families, in order to provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Relevant clinical examinations were conducted on the probands of the three pedigrees. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of paired box 3 (PAX3), microphthalmia‑associated transcription factor (MITF), sex‑determining region Y‑box 10 (SOX10) and snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. The heterozygous mutation, c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene was detected in the proband and all patients of pedigree 1; however, no pathological mutation of the relevant genes (MITF, SNAI2, SOX10 or PAX3) was detected in pedigrees 2 and 3. The heterozygous mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene is therefore considered the disease‑causing mutation in pedigree 1. However, there are novel disease‑causing genes in Waardenburg syndrome type II, which require further research. PMID:26781036

  17. Update on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Research: From Clinical to Genetic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Kuivaniemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a dilatation of the abdominal aorta with a diameter of at least 3.0 cm. AAAs are often asymptomatic and are discovered as incidental findings in imaging studies or when the AAA ruptures leading to a medical emergency. AAAs are more common in males than females, in individuals of European ancestry, and in those over 65 years of age. Smoking is the most important environmental risk factor. In addition, a positive family history of AAA increases the person’s risk for AAA. Interestingly, diabetes has been shown to be a protective factor for AAA in many large studies. Hallmarks of AAA pathogenesis include inflammation, vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis, extracellular matrix degradation, and oxidative stress. Autoimmunity may also play a role in AAA development and progression. In this Outlook paper, we summarize our recent studies on AAA including clinical studies related to surgical repair of AAA and genetic risk factor and large-scale gene expression studies. We conclude with a discussion on our research projects using large data sets available through electronic medical records and biobanks.

  18. Genetic studies of DRD4 and clinical response to neuroleptic medications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, J.L.; Petronis, A.; Gao, J. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic drug that, like most other medications, is effective for some people and not for others. This variable response across individuals is likely significantly determined by genetic factors. An important candidate gene to investigate in clozapine response is the dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4). The D4 receptor has a higher affinity for clozapine than any of the other dopamine receptors. Furthermore, recent work by our consortium has shown a remarkable level of variability in the part of the gene coding for the third cytoplasmic loop. We have also identified polymorphisms in the upstream 5{prime} putative regulatory region and at two other sites. These polymorphisms were typed in a group of treatment-resistant schizophrenia subjects who were subsequently placed on clozapine (n = 60). In a logistic regression analysis, we compared genotype at the DRD4 polymorphism to response versus non-response to clozapine. Neither the exon-III nor any of the 5{prime} polymorphisms alone significantly predicted response; however, when the information from these polymorphisms was combined, more predictive power was obtained. In a correspondence analysis of the four DRD4 polymorphisms vs. response, we were able to predict 76% of the variance in response. Refinement of the analyses will include assessment of subfactors involved in clinical response phenotype and incorporation of the debrisoquine metabolizing locus (CYP2D6) into the prediction algorithm.

  19. GLUT-1 DEFICIENCY: FROM PATHOPHYSILOGY AND GENETICS TO ABROAD CLINICAL SPECTRUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor Arsov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The classical GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT-1 DS, De Vivo disease was described over 2 decades ago as a metabolic encephalopathy characterized by developmental delay, secondary microcephaly paroxysmal neurological symptoms (epilepsy and movement disorders. The biochemical parameters of this disease, used in diagnosis, are low levels of glucose in the cerebrospinal fluid, normal level of glucose in the blood and consequent low ratio of cerebrospinal fluid vs. blood glucose levels (<40-45%. So far, more than 200 cases of the classical GLUT-1 DS have been described in the literature. Genetic research demonstrated that this disease is caused by mutations in SLC2A1 gene coding for GLUT-1, a transporter of glucose across the blood brain barrier. Over the last few years the clinical spectrum of GLUT-1 deficiencywas expanded to include other rare diseases such as paroxysmal exertional dyskinesia and early-onset absence epilepsy, but also some more common diseases such as idiopathic generalised epilepsy (1-2%. GLUT-1 deficiency is an important pathophysiological basis of these diseases as early diagnosis (aided by DNA mutation testing and treatment (ketogenic diet could lead to improved disease outcomes.

  20. Closing the loop: an interactive action-research conference format for delivering updated medical information while eliciting Latina patient/family experiences and psychosocial needs post-genetic cancer risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Deborah J; Deri, Julia; Ricker, Charité; Perez, Martin A; Ogaz, Raquel; Feldman, Nancy; Viveros, Lori A; Paz, Benjamin; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Blazer, Kathleen R

    2012-09-01

    A patient/family-centered conference was conducted at an underserved community hospital to address Latinas' post-genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) medical information and psychosocial support needs, and determine the utility of the action research format. Latinas seen for GCRA were recruited to a half-day conference conducted in Spanish. Content was partly determined from follow-up survey feedback. Written surveys, interactive discussions, and Audience Response System (ARS) queries facilitated the participant-healthcare professional action research process. Analyses included descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. The 71 attendees (41 patients and 27 relatives/friends) were primarily non-US born Spanish-speaking females, mean age 43 years. Among patients, 73 % had a breast cancer history; 85 % had BRCA testing (49 % BRCA+). Nearly all (96 %) attendees completed the conference surveys and ARS queries; ≥48 % participated in interactive discussions. Most (95 %) agreed that the format met their personal interests and expectations and provided useful information and resources. Gaps/challenges identified in the GCRA process included pre-consult anxiety, uncertainty about reason for referral and expected outcomes, and psychosocial needs post-GCRA, such as absorbing and disseminating risk information to relatives and concurrently coping with a recent cancer diagnosis. The combined action research and educational conference format was innovative and effective for responding to continued patient information needs and addressing an important data gap about support needs of Latina patients and family members following genetic cancer risk assessment. Findings informed GCRA process improvements and provide a basis for theory-driven cancer control research. PMID:22678665

  1. Closing the loop: an interactive action-research conference format for delivering updated medical information while eliciting Latina patient/family experiences and psychosocial needs post-genetic cancer risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Deborah J; Deri, Julia; Ricker, Charité; Perez, Martin A; Ogaz, Raquel; Feldman, Nancy; Viveros, Lori A; Paz, Benjamin; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Blazer, Kathleen R

    2012-09-01

    A patient/family-centered conference was conducted at an underserved community hospital to address Latinas' post-genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) medical information and psychosocial support needs, and determine the utility of the action research format. Latinas seen for GCRA were recruited to a half-day conference conducted in Spanish. Content was partly determined from follow-up survey feedback. Written surveys, interactive discussions, and Audience Response System (ARS) queries facilitated the participant-healthcare professional action research process. Analyses included descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. The 71 attendees (41 patients and 27 relatives/friends) were primarily non-US born Spanish-speaking females, mean age 43 years. Among patients, 73 % had a breast cancer history; 85 % had BRCA testing (49 % BRCA+). Nearly all (96 %) attendees completed the conference surveys and ARS queries; ≥48 % participated in interactive discussions. Most (95 %) agreed that the format met their personal interests and expectations and provided useful information and resources. Gaps/challenges identified in the GCRA process included pre-consult anxiety, uncertainty about reason for referral and expected outcomes, and psychosocial needs post-GCRA, such as absorbing and disseminating risk information to relatives and concurrently coping with a recent cancer diagnosis. The combined action research and educational conference format was innovative and effective for responding to continued patient information needs and addressing an important data gap about support needs of Latina patients and family members following genetic cancer risk assessment. Findings informed GCRA process improvements and provide a basis for theory-driven cancer control research.

  2. Clinical and genetic challenges in a family with history of childhood polyp, aortopathy, and clinical diagnosis of hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia (HHT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiyska, Tanya; Nossikoff, Alexander; Kratunkov, Pencho; Hachmerian, Mary; Angelova, Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia (HHT) is a genetic disorder, characterized by abnormal vessel formation and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The so-called “Curaçao criteria” are most commonly employed for the purposes of clinical diagnosis. However, children may not exhibit the full magnitude of symptoms and the Curaçao criteria appear to be less sensitive in this setting. We describe a family, in which two members were clinically diagnosed with HHT and referred for genetic testing. As there were phenotypic features suggesting the high likelihood of combined syndrome of juvenile polyposis with hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia (JPHT), we proceeded with genetic testing of SMAD4 gene as initial step, which revealed a novel frameshift mutation. This case shows the variety of challenges that clinicians and genetic laboratories may face in complex cases such as combined JPHT syndrome. Knowledge of the syndrome features is of paramount importance as they could frequently point at the most appropriate gene to be tested. PMID:27212857

  3. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains conference summaries of the international conference on radioactive waste management of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: storage and disposal; hydrogeology and geochemistry; transportation; buffers and backfill; public attitudes; tailings; site investigations and geomechanics; concrete; economics; licensing; matrix materials and container design; durability of fuel; biosphere modelling; radioactive waste processing; and, future options

  4. [Biochemical, clinical and genetic analysis of various aminoacidopathies (non-ketotic hyperglycemia, maple syrup urine disease, histidinemia, tyrosinemia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    László, A; Nagy, I; Szücs, L; Havass, Z; Sztriha, L; Svékus, A; Veres, E

    1992-11-29

    The genetical types were classified according to the clinical findings and biochemical results in cases of 13 newborn/children suffering from various aminoacidopathies. The genetical types were: 3 neonatal and 4 infantile types were found out of 7 non-ketotic disease (MSUD) patient was infantile type with 9.1 per cent keto acid decarboxylase activity in leukocyte homogenate. Among the 3 histidinemic patients 1 was severe neonatal type and 2 cases were chronic types. The 2 treated tyrosinemic children proved to be type III. (chronic with rickets).

  5. 10. international mouse genome conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  6. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie; Payot, Sophie

    2015-06-15

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut. PMID:25862227

  7. A novel 1050nm handheld OCT imaging system for pediatric retinoblastoma patients: technology development and clinical study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Moll, Annette C.; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical coherence tomography system specifically developed and validated for clinical imaging of retinoblastoma tumors in pediatric patients. The existing treatment options for this malignant tumor of the retina aim at reduction of tumor (re)growth risks, and vision preservation. The choice of optimal treatment strongly depends on skilled and detailed clinical assessment. Due to the limitations of the existing real-time diagnostic tools the patients at risk are periodically monitored with retinal imaging to confirm the absence of new tumor seedings. Three-dimensional visualization of tissue layer and microvasculature at improved axial and lateral resolution of interference-based OCT imaging provides sensitivity for detection of vital tumor tissue concurrent with local treatment. Our METC-approved system accommodates for the range of optical parameters of infants' eyes, and uses the 1050nm wavelength to access the deeper choroid layers of retina. The prototype is designed for patients in supine position under general anesthesia, where ergonomic handheld module is connected to fiber-based optical setup via umbilical cord. The system conforms to clinical safety requirements, including fully isolated low-voltage electric circuit. Focusing is performed with a mechanically tunable lens, where resolution is 6 µm axially, and varies with focusing at 10-18µm laterally. We will present optical design, performance limitations, and results of the ongoing clinical study, including the increased OCT diagnostic sensitivity in three dimensions in comparison with the established clinical imaging modalities. We will discuss images of early, active, and treated tumors, as well as follow-up on patients after local and systemic treatments.

  8. Clinical Genetic Testing for the Cardiomyopathies and Arrhythmias: A Systematic Framework for Establishing Clinical Validity and Addressing Genotypic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, John; Tahiliani, Jackie; Johnson, Nicole Marie; Aguilar, Sienna; Beltran, Daniel; Daly, Amy; Decker, Emily; Haverfield, Eden; Herrera, Blanca; Murillo, Laura; Nykamp, Keith; Topper, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing have made large, diagnostic gene panels affordable and efficient. Broad adoption of such panels has begun to deliver on the promises of personalized medicine, but has also brought new challenges such as the presence of unexpected results, or results of uncertain clinical significance. Genetic analysis of inherited cardiac conditions is particularly challenging due to the extensive genetic heterogeneity underlying cardiac phenotypes, and the overlapping, variable, and incompletely penetrant nature of their clinical presentations. The design of effective diagnostic tests and the effective use of the results depend on a clear understanding of the relationship between each gene and each considered condition. To address these issues, we developed simple, systematic approaches to three fundamental challenges: (1) evaluating the strength of the evidence suggesting that a particular condition is caused by pathogenic variants in a particular gene, (2) evaluating whether unusual genotype/phenotype observations represent a plausible expansion of clinical phenotype associated with a gene, and (3) establishing a molecular diagnostic strategy to capture overlapping clinical presentations. These approaches focus on the systematic evaluation of the pathogenicity of variants identified in clinically affected individuals, and the natural history of disease in those individuals. Here, we applied these approaches to the evaluation of more than 100 genes reported to be associated with inherited cardiomyopathies and arrhythmias including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia or cardiomyopathy, long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and to a set of related syndromes such as Noonan Syndrome and Fabry disease. These approaches provide a framework for delivering meaningful and accurate genetic test results to individuals with hereditary

  9. Re-conceptualizing risk in genetic counseling: implications for clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, Jehannine C.

    2010-01-01

    Risk communication is an important component of genetic counseling. However, many authors have noted that after genetic counseling, subjective risk frequently does not match the objective risk provided by the counselor. This inevitably leads to the conclusion that the risk communication process was not “effective”. There has been much discussion about how this problem can be better addressed, such that our clients recall numeric risks more accurately after genetic counseling. This article dra...

  10. The emerging role of epigenetics in pulmonary arterial hypertension: an important avenue for clinical trials (2015 Grover Conference Series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Jessica H; Ryan, John J

    2016-09-01

    Epigenetics is an emerging field of research and clinical trials in cancer therapy that also has applications for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), as there is evidence that epigenetic control of gene expression plays a significant role in PAH. The three types of epigenetic modification include DNA methylation, histone modification, and RNA interference. All three have been shown to be involved in the development of PAH. Currently, the enzymes that perform these modifications are the primary targets of neoplastic therapy. These targets are starting to be explored for therapies in PAH, mostly in animal models. In this review we summarize the basics of each type of epigenetic modification and the known sites and molecules involved in PAH, as well as current targets and prospects for clinical trials. PMID:27683604

  11. GENetic and clinical Predictors Of treatment response in Depression: the GenPod randomised trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Donovan Michael

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most effective pharmacological treatments for depression inhibit the transporters that reuptake serotonin (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors – SSRIs and noradrenaline (Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors – NaRIs into the presynaptic terminal. There is evidence to suggest that noradrenaline and serotonin enhancing drugs work through separate mechanisms to produce their clinical antidepressant action. Although most of the current evidence suggests there is little difference in overall efficacy between SSRIs and NaRIs, there are patients who respond to one class of compounds and not another. This suggests that treatment response could be predicted by genetic and/or clinical characteristics. Firstly, this study aims to investigate the influence of a polymorphism (SLC6A4 in the 5HT transporter in altering response to SSRI medication. Secondly, the study will investigate whether those with more severe depression have a better response to NaRIs than SSRIs. Methods/design The GenPod trial is a multi-centre randomised controlled trial. GPs referred patients aged between 18–74 years presenting with a new episode of depression, who did not have any medical contraindications to antidepressant medication and who had no history of psychosis or alcohol/substance abuse. Patients were interviewed to ascertain their suitability for the study. Eligible participants (with a primary diagnosis of depression according to ICD10 criteria and a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score > 14 were randomised to receive one of two antidepressant treatments, either the SSRI Citalopram or the NaRI Reboxetine, stratified according to severity. The final number randomised to the trial was 601. Follow-up assessments took place at 2, 6 and 12 weeks following randomisation. Primary outcome was measured at 6 weeks by the BDI. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis and will use multiple regression models to compare treatments

  12. Dementia in SPG4 hereditary spastic paraplegia: clinical, genetic, and neuropathologic evidence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, S

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive impairment and dementia has been reported in autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) linked to the SPG4 locus. There has only been one postmortem examination described; not all accept that progressive cognitive decline is a feature of this disorder. OBJECTIVE: A family with SPG4-HSP known to have a deletion of exon 17 in the spastin gene (SPG4delEx17) was cognitively assessed over a 7-year period. The index family member died and a postmortem examination was performed. METHODS: Thirteen family members older than 40 years were clinically and cognitively assessed using the Cambridge Cognitive Assessment over a 7-year period. The presence of SPG4delEx17 was assessed; a neuropathologic examination of the brain of the index family member was performed. RESULTS: Cognitive decline occurred in 6 of the 13 family members and in all 4 older than 60 years. Two genetic deletions were identified: SPG4delEx17 in 12 of the 13 family members and a deletion of SPG6 (SPG6del) in 5. Eight individuals had the SPG4delEx17 deletion only; 4 had evidence of progressive cognitive impairment. Four family members had both SPG4delEx17 and SPG6del; 2 of these had cognitive impairment. One family member with the SPG6del alone had neither HSP nor cognitive impairment. The index case with both deletions died with dementia; the brain showed widespread ubiquitin positivity within the neocortex and white matter. CONCLUSION: Cognitive decline and dementia is a feature of SPG4-HSP due to a deletion of exon 17 of the spastin gene.

  13. Characterization and genetic variability of feed-borne and clinical animal/human Aspergillus fumigatus strains using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Gabriela A; Coelho, Irene; Reynoso, María M; Soleiro, Carla; Cavaglieri, Lilia R

    2015-09-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, the major etiological agent of human and animal aspergillosis, is a toxigenic fungus largely regarded as a single species by macroscopic and microscopic features. However, molecular studies have demonstrated that several morphologically identified A. fumigatus strains might be genetically distinct. This work was aimed to apply PCR-restriction length fragment polymorphisms (PCR-RFLP) and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) molecular markers to characterize a set of feed-borne and clinical A. fumigatus sensu lato strains isolated from Argentina and Brazil and to determine and compare their genetic variability. All A. fumigatus strains had the same band profile and those typical of A. fumigatus sensu stricto positive controls by PCR-RFLP. Moreover, all Argentinian and Brazilian strains typified by RAPD showed similar band patterns to each other and to A. fumigatus sensu stricto reference strains regardless of their isolation source (animal feeds or human/animal clinical cases) and geographic origin. Genetic similarity coefficients ranged from 0.61 to 1.00, but almost all isolates showed 78% of genetic similarly suggesting that genetic variability was found at intraspecific level. Finally, benA sequencing confirmed its identification as A. fumigatus sensu stricto species. These results suggest that A. fumigatus sensu stricto is a predominant species into Aspergillus section Fumigati found in animal environments as well as in human/animal clinical cases, while other species may be rarely isolated. The strains involved in human and animal aspergillosis could come from the environment where this fungus is frequently found. Rural workers and animals would be constantly exposed.

  14. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains conference summaries of the 28. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the 9. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: power reactors; fuel cycles; nuclear power and public understanding; future trends; applications of nuclear technology; CANDU reactors; operational enhancements; design of small reactors; accident behaviour in fuel channels; fuel storage and waste management; reactor commissioning/decommissioning; nuclear safety experiments and modelling; the next generation reactors; advances in nuclear engineering education in Canada; safety of small reactors; current position and improvements of fuel channels; current issues in nuclear safety; and radiation applications - medical and industrial

  15. Consensus conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annika Porsborg; Lassen, Jesper

    Our results point to significant national variation both in terms of the perceived aim of consensus conferences, expectations to conference outcomes, conceptions of the roles of lay people and experts, and in terms of the way in which the role of public deliberation is interpreted. Interestingly......, the differing perceptions are each in their own way rooted in an argument for democratic legitimacy. We therefore argue that national interpretations of consensus conferences, and of their ability to functions as a tool for public participation, depend to a great extent on the dominant ideals of democratic...

  16. Conference Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Since the first IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (Paris, March 2002) and the Second Conference (Rio de Janeiro, May 2005), progress has continued in most countries and world regions to attract girls to physics and advance women into leadership roles, and many working groups have formed. The Third Conference (Seoul, October 2008), with 283 attendees from 57 countries, was dedicated to celebrating the physics achievements of women throughout the world, networking toward new international collaborations, building each participant's capacity for career success, and aiding the formation of active regional working groups to advance women in physics. Despite the progress, women remain a small minority of the physics community in most countries.

  17. Integration of genetic and clinical risk factors improves prognostication in relapsed childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Julie A E; Enshaei, Amir; Parker, Catriona A; Sutton, Rosemary; Kuiper, Roland P; Erhorn, Amy; Minto, Lynne; Venn, Nicola C; Law, Tamara; Yu, Jiangyan; Schwab, Claire; Davies, Rosanna; Matheson, Elizabeth; Davies, Alysia; Sonneveld, Edwin; den Boer, Monique L; Love, Sharon B; Harrison, Christine J; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Revesz, Tamas; Saha, Vaskar; Moorman, Anthony V

    2016-08-18

    Somatic genetic abnormalities are initiators and drivers of disease and have proven clinical utility at initial diagnosis. However, the genetic landscape and its clinical utility at relapse are less well understood and have not been studied comprehensively. We analyzed cytogenetic data from 427 children with relapsed B-cell precursor ALL treated on the international trial, ALLR3. Also we screened 238 patients with a marrow relapse for selected copy number alterations (CNAs) and mutations. Cytogenetic risk groups were predictive of outcome postrelapse and survival rates at 5 years for patients with good, intermediate-, and high-risk cytogenetics were 68%, 47%, and 26%, respectively (P www.clinicaltrials.org as #ISCRTN45724312. PMID:27229005

  18. Clinical, immunological and genetic features in eleven Algerian patients with major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djidjik Réda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presenting processed antigens to CD4+ lymphocytes during the immune response involves major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. MHC class II genes transcription is regulated by four transcription factors: CIITA, RFXANK, RFX5 and RFXAP. Defects in these factors result in major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency, a primary combined immunodeficiency frequent in North Africa. Autosomal recessive mutations in the RFXANK gene have been reported as being the principal defect found in North African patients with this disorder. In this paper, we describe clinical, immunological and genetic features of 11 unrelated Algerian patients whose monocytes display a total absence of MHC class II molecules. They shared mainly the same clinical picture which included protracted diarrhoea and respiratory tract recurrent infections. Genetic analysis revealed that 9 of the 11 patients had the same RFXANK founder mutation, a 26 bp deletion (named I5E6-25_I5E6+1, also known as 752delG26. Immunological and genetic findings in our series may facilitate genetic counselling implementation for Algerian consanguineous families. Further studies need to be conducted to determine 752delG26 heterozygous mutation frequency in Algerian population.

  19. PHYSICS FOR HEALTH: CONFERENCE

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    ICTR-PHE 2016 - International Conference on Translational Research in Radio-Oncology and Physics for Health -, co organized by CERN, aims at developing new strategies to better diagnose and treat cancer, by uniting biology and physics with clinics. Through the various sessions and symposia, the scientific programme offers the delegates the opportunity to discuss, in a friendly atmosphere, the latest progress in physics breakthroughs for health applications. The third edition of this conference took place at CICG (Centre International de Conférence Genève) from 15 to 19 Feb 2016.

  20. Genetic and Epigenetic Factors at COL2A1 and ABCA4 Influence Clinical Outcome in Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    OpenAIRE

    JAMIESON, S.E.; de Roubaix, L. A.; Cortina-Borja, M.; Tan, H K; Mui, E. J.; Cordell, H J; Kirisits, M. J.; Miller, E. N.; Peacock, C. S.; Hargrave, A. C.; Coyne, J J; Boyer, K.; Bessieres, M H; Buffolano, W.; Ferret, N

    2008-01-01

    Background: Primary Toxoplasma gondii infection during pregnancy can be transmitted to the fetus. At birth, infected infants may have intracranial calcification, hydrocephalus, and retinochoroiditis, and new ocular lesions can occur at any age after birth. Not all children who acquire infection in utero develop these clinical signs of disease. Whilst severity of disease is influenced by trimester in which infection is acquired by the mother, other factors including genetic predisposition may ...

  1. Dysfunctional Attitudes and Affective Responses to Daily Stressors: Separating Cognitive, Genetic, and Clinical Influences on Stress Reactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, Christopher C.; Slavich, George M.; Hammen, Constance

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research examining diathesis-stress models of emotional disorders, it remains unclear whether dysfunctional attitudes interact with stressful experiences to shape affect on a daily basis and, if so, how clinical and genetic factors influence these associations. To address these issues, we conducted a multi-level daily diary study that examined how dysfunctional attitudes and stressful events relate to daily fluctuations in negative and positive affect in 1...

  2. An epidemiological, clinical and genetic survey of Neurofibromatosis type 1 in children under sixteen years of age

    OpenAIRE

    McKeever, Karl; Shepherd, Charles W; Crawford, Hilda; Morrison, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    Aim To identify all cases of Neurofibromatosis type 1 in Northern Ireland under 16 years of age, document age, modes of presentation and any complications that occurred. Methods All cases of Neurofibromatosis type 1 in children less than 16 years of age were identified from the records in the Department of Medical Genetics. From the records and by direct contact with the patient's parents the relevant clinical information was obtained. Results Seventy-five children aged sixteen years or less ...

  3. Familial disorders of sexual differentiation: a clinical and molecular genetic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L.M. Boehmer (Annemie)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractSexual determination and differentiation are series of events starting with the establishment of genetic sex at fertilization, proceeding with the translation of genetic sex into gonadal sex, and culminating in the translation of gonadal sex into body sex. This three-step model is still

  4. A review on experimental and clinical genetic associations studies on fear conditioning, extinction and cognitive-behavioral treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdorf, T B; Kalisch, R

    2011-09-20

    Fear conditioning and extinction represent basic forms of associative learning with considerable clinical relevance and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. There is considerable inter-individual variation in the ability to acquire and extinguish conditioned fear reactions and the study of genetic variants has recently become a focus of research. In this review, we give an overview of the existing genetic association studies on human fear conditioning and extinction in healthy individuals and of related studies on cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) and exposure, as well as pathology development after trauma. Variation in the serotonin transporter (5HTT) and the catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT) genes has consistently been associated with effects in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Interesting new findings, which however require further replication, have been reported for genetic variation in the dopamine transporter (DAT1) and the pituitary adenylate cyclase 1 receptor (ADCYAP1R1) genes, whereas the current picture is inconsistent for variation in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene. We end with a discussion of the findings and their limitations, as well as future directions that we hope will aid the field to develop further.

  5. A Duty To Warn Relatives in Clinical Genetics: Arguably ‘Fair just and reasonable’ in English Law?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C; Ploem, M C; Hennekam, R C M; Kaye, J

    2016-01-01

    The use of ‘next-generation’ genetic sequencing technology that allows the sequencing of large parts, or even the entirety, of a patient’s genome is advancing rapidly in the UK and around the world. This is set to greatly increase the level of health information that will be of relevance to relatives and the latest medical guidance advises that there is a professional duty to consider warning a patient’s relatives of a serious genetic risk in limited circumstances. However, the High Court in ABC v St George’s Healthcare NHS Trust [2015] EWHC 1394 (QB), recently found that a legal duty on the part of doctors to warn a patient’s daughter of a genetic risk of Huntington’s Disease without the patient’s consent, was not even ‘reasonably arguable’ and would not be ‘fair, just and reasonable’. This article considers the courts’ approach to a duty of care towards ‘third parties’ in this context and concludes that some form of a duty of care to genetic relatives in clinical genetics is at very least arguably ‘fair, just and reasonable’. PMID:27478488

  6. Conference Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ CHINA MAGNETICS 2006 Intertech-Pira has announced that its conference "China Magnetics 2006" will be held on September 19-21, 2006 at the Sofitel Shanghai Hotel in Shanghai, China. This event is expected to attract over 150 attendees.

  7. [Genetics and genetic counseling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzi, Claudia; Liut, Francesca; Dallera, Nadia; Mazza, Cinzia; Magistroni, Riccardo; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent genetic disease, characterized by progressive development of bilateral renal cysts. Two causative genes have been identified: PKD1 and PKD2. ADPKD phenotype is highly variable. Typically, ADPKD is an adult onset disease. However, occasionally, ADPKD manifests as very early onset disease. The phenotypic variability of ADPKD can be explained at three genetic levels: genic, allelic and gene modifier effects. Recent advances in molecular screening for PKD gene mutations and the introduction of the new next generation sequencing (NGS)- based genotyping approach have generated considerable improvement regarding the knowledge of genetic basis of ADPKD. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the genetics of ADPKD, focusing on new insights in genotype-phenotype correlation and exploring novel clinical approach to genetic testing. Evaluation of these new genetic information requires a multidisciplinary approach involving a nephrologist and a clinical geneticist. PMID:27067213

  8. Genetic polymorphisms of the human cytomegalovirus UL144 gene in colorectal cancer and its association with clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Pai; Jiang, Jeng-Kai; Chan, Chia-Hao; Teo, Wan-Huai; Yang, Chih-Yung; Chen, Yen-Chung; Chou, Teh-Ying; Lin, Chi-Hung; Chan, Yu-Jiun

    2015-12-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has been increasingly detected in colorectal cancer (CRC), and genetic polymorphisms in HCMV affect its pathogenesis. This study aimed to investigate HCMV genetic polymorphisms in CRC and its correlation with the clinical outcomes. We performed PCR and sequencing of a viral immunomodulatory gene, UL144, in clinical isolates and CRC specimens. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences were aligned, and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. The clinical, pathological and survival data were compared among tumours with different UL144 genotypes. HCMV was detected in 49 (47.8 %) of the tumour specimens. Genotype A predominated in 43 samples (22/43; 51.2 %) with successful sequencing, followed by genotype B (13/43; 30.2 %) and genotype C (8/43; 18.6 %). The genotypic distribution was similar to that of the clinical isolates and those reported in other Asian populations. The amino acid sequence of genotype B was the most conserved. For stage II and III CRC patients with HCMV-positive tumours, disease-free survival (DFS) varied among the three major genotypes (P50.0046). The presence of genotype B virus in the tumours was associated with a shorter DFS and independently predicted tumour recurrence in a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model (hazard ratio, 5.79; 95 % confidence interval, 1.30–25.81; P50.021). By reverse transcription PCR, tumour samples with genotype B viruses had the highest rate of UL144 expression. Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms of HCMV UL144 are associated with clinical outcome in CRC and that HCMV may play an immunomodulatory role in the tumour microenvironment of CRC. PMID:26450180

  9. Genomic profiling of lung adenocarcinoma patients reveals therapeutic targets and confers clinical benefit when standard molecular testing is negative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sun Min; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Hye Ryun; Ali, Siraj M.; Greenbowe, Joel R.; Shim, Hyo Sup; Chang, Hyun; Lim, Seungtaek; Paik, Soonmyung; Cho, Byoung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Identification of clinically relevant oncogenic drivers in advanced cancer is critical in selecting appropriate targeted therapy. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based clinical cancer gene assay, we performed comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) of advanced cases of lung adenocarcinoma. Methods: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors from 51 lung adenocarcinoma patients whose tumors previously tested negative for EGFR/KRAS/ALK by conventional methods were collected, and CGP was performed via hybridization capture of 4,557 exons from 287 cancer-related genes and 47 introns from 19 genes frequently rearranged in cancer. Results: Genomic profiles of all 51 cases were obtained, with a median coverage of 564x and a total of 190 individual genomic alterations (GAs). GAs per specimen was a mean of 3.7 (range 0-10).Cancer genomes are characterized by 50% (80/190) non-synonymous base substitutions, 15% (29/190) insertions or deletion, and 3% (5/190) splice site mutation. TP53 mutation was the most common GAs (15%, n=29/190), followed by CDKN2A homozygous loss (5%, n=10/190), KRAS mutation (4%, n=8/190), EGFR mutation (4%, n=8/190) and MDM2 amplification (2%, n=5/190). As per NCCN guidelines, targetable GAs were identified in 16 patients (31%) (BRAF mutation [n=1], EGFR mutation [n=8], ERBB2 mutation [n=4], MET amplification [n=1], KIF5B-RET rearrangement [n=2], CCDC6-RET rearrangement [n=1], CD74-ROS1 rearrangement [n=1], EZR-ROS1 rearrangement [n=5], and SLC34A2-ROS1 rearrangement [n=1]). Conclusion: Fifty eight percent of patients wild type by standard testing for EGFR/KRAS/ALK have GAs identifiable by CGP that suggest benefit from target therapy. CGP used when standard molecular testing for NSCLC is negative can reveal additional avenues of benefit from targeted therapy. PMID:26992220

  10. Genetic characteristics, clinical spectrum, and incidence of neonatal diabetes in the Emirate of AbuDhabi, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Asma; Habeb, Abdelhadi; Kaplan, Walid; Attia, Salima; Hadi, Suha; Osman, Amani; Al-Jubeh, Jamal; Flanagan, Sarah; DeFranco, Elisa; Ellard, Sian

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) can be transient (TNDM) or permanent (PNDM). Data on NDM from the Gulf region are limited to few studies on PNDM.The objective of this study was to describe the genetic and clinical spectrum of NDM and estimate its incidence in AbuDhabi, capital of the United Arab Emirate (UAE). Patients were identified from the pediatric diabetes clinics and sequencing of known NDM genes was conducted in all families. Twenty-five patients were identified. Incidence during 1985-2013 was 1:29,241 Live births. Twenty-three out of twenty-five had PNDM (incidence 1:31,900) and 2/25 had TNDM (incidence 1:350,903). Eleven out of twenty-five had extra-pancreatic features and three had pancreatic aplasia. The genetic cause was detected in 21/25 (84%). Of the PNDM patients, nine had recessive EIF2AK3 mutations, six had homozygous INS mutations, two with deletion of the PTF1A enhancer, one was heterozygous for KCNJ11 mutation, one harboured a novel ABCC8 variant, and 4/21 without mutations in all known PNDM genes. One TNDM patient had a 6q24 methylation defect and another was homozygous for the INS c-331C>G mutation. This mutation also caused permanent diabetes with variable age of onset from birth to 18 years. The parents of a child with Wolcott-Rallison syndrome had a healthy girl following pre-implantation genetic diagnosis. The child with KCNJ11 mutation was successfully switched from insulin to oral sulphonylurea. The incidence of PNDM in Abu Dhabi is among the highest in the world and its spectrum is different from Europe and USA. In our cohort, genetic testing has significant implications for the clinical management. PMID:26463504

  11. Genetic characteristics, clinical spectrum, and incidence of neonatal diabetes in the Emirate of AbuDhabi, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Asma; Habeb, Abdelhadi; Kaplan, Walid; Attia, Salima; Hadi, Suha; Osman, Amani; Al-Jubeh, Jamal; Flanagan, Sarah; DeFranco, Elisa; Ellard, Sian

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) can be transient (TNDM) or permanent (PNDM). Data on NDM from the Gulf region are limited to few studies on PNDM.The objective of this study was to describe the genetic and clinical spectrum of NDM and estimate its incidence in AbuDhabi, capital of the United Arab Emirate (UAE). Patients were identified from the pediatric diabetes clinics and sequencing of known NDM genes was conducted in all families. Twenty-five patients were identified. Incidence during 1985-2013 was 1:29,241 Live births. Twenty-three out of twenty-five had PNDM (incidence 1:31,900) and 2/25 had TNDM (incidence 1:350,903). Eleven out of twenty-five had extra-pancreatic features and three had pancreatic aplasia. The genetic cause was detected in 21/25 (84%). Of the PNDM patients, nine had recessive EIF2AK3 mutations, six had homozygous INS mutations, two with deletion of the PTF1A enhancer, one was heterozygous for KCNJ11 mutation, one harboured a novel ABCC8 variant, and 4/21 without mutations in all known PNDM genes. One TNDM patient had a 6q24 methylation defect and another was homozygous for the INS c-331C>G mutation. This mutation also caused permanent diabetes with variable age of onset from birth to 18 years. The parents of a child with Wolcott-Rallison syndrome had a healthy girl following pre-implantation genetic diagnosis. The child with KCNJ11 mutation was successfully switched from insulin to oral sulphonylurea. The incidence of PNDM in Abu Dhabi is among the highest in the world and its spectrum is different from Europe and USA. In our cohort, genetic testing has significant implications for the clinical management.

  12. Non-genetic risk factors and their influence on the management of patients in the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Teresa; Soto, Immaculada; Astermark, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The development of inhibitors is the most serious iatrogenic complication affecting patients with haemophilia. This complication is associated with impaired vital or functional prognosis, reduced quality of life and increased cost of treatment. The reasons why some patients develop antibodies to factor replacement and others do not remain unclear. It is however clear that inhibitor development results from a complex multifactorial interaction between genetic and non-genetic risk factors. Environmental influences implicated in increasing the risk of inhibitor formation can be viewed as modifiable risk factors. Therefore, identification of the non-genetic risk factors may offer the possibility of personalising haemophilia therapy by modifying treatment strategies in high-risk patients in the critical early phase of factor VIII exposure. In this article, we review the non-genetic factors reported as well as the potential impact of danger signals and the different scores for inhibitor development risk stratification.

  13. Systematic review of 20 clinical pathological conference articles on tuberculosis%20篇结核病临床病理讨论系统回顾分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何权瀛; 邹黎

    2005-01-01

    目的探讨结核病误诊的原因.方法手工检索近20年发表在中华结核和呼吸杂志等五种中华级杂志上的20篇有关结核病误诊的临床病理讨论(clinical pathological conference, CPC)文章,并逐一登记患者的临床特征、最后病理诊断、应吸取的教训等.结果 20例结核病中急性粟粒性结核13例,占65.0%;大量使用糖皮质激素引起结核活动、播散共8例,占40.0%.结论临床医生必须高度重视结核病的诊断,以期减少结核病漏诊.

  14. Risk assessment models in genetics clinic for array comparative genomic hybridization: Clinical information can be used to predict the likelihood of an abnormal result in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Rachel M; Mercurio, Laura; Kanter, Rebecca; Doyle, Richard; Abuelo, Dianne; Morrow, Eric M; Shur, Natasha

    2013-03-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) testing can diagnose chromosomal microdeletions and duplications too small to be detected by conventional cytogenetic techniques. We need to consider which patients are more likely to receive a diagnosis from aCGH testing versus patients that have lower likelihood and may benefit from broader genome wide scanning. We retrospectively reviewed charts of a population of 200 patients, 117 boys and 83 girls, who underwent aCGH testing in Genetics Clinic at Rhode Island hospital between 1 January/2008 and 31 December 2010. Data collected included sex, age at initial clinical presentation, aCGH result, history of seizures, autism, dysmorphic features, global developmental delay/intellectual disability, hypotonia and failure to thrive. aCGH analysis revealed abnormal results in 34 (17%) and variants of unknown significance in 24 (12%). Patients with three or more clinical diagnoses had a 25.0% incidence of abnormal aCGH findings, while patients with two or fewer clinical diagnoses had a 12.5% incidence of abnormal aCGH findings. Currently, we provide families with a range of 10-30% of a diagnosis with aCGH testing. With increased clinical complexity, patients have an increased probability of having an abnormal aCGH result. With this, we can provide individualized risk estimates for each patient.

  15. Risk assessment models in genetics clinic for array comparative genomic hybridization: Clinical information can be used to predict the likelihood of an abnormal result in patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Rachel M.; Mercurio, Laura; Kanter, Rebecca; Doyle, Richard; Abuelo, Dianne; Morrow, Eric M.; Shur, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) testing can diagnose chromosomal microdeletions and duplications too small to be detected by conventional cytogenetic techniques. We need to consider which patients are more likely to receive a diagnosis from aCGH testing versus patients that have lower likelihood and may benefit from broader genome wide scanning. We retrospectively reviewed charts of a population of 200 patients, 117 boys and 83 girls, who underwent aCGH testing in Genetics Clinic at Rhode Island hospital between 1 January/2008 and 31 December 2010. Data collected included sex, age at initial clinical presentation, aCGH result, history of seizures, autism, dysmorphic features, global developmental delay/intellectual disability, hypotonia and failure to thrive. aCGH analysis revealed abnormal results in 34 (17%) and variants of unknown significance in 24 (12%). Patients with three or more clinical diagnoses had a 25.0% incidence of abnormal aCGH findings, while patients with two or fewer clinical diagnoses had a 12.5% incidence of abnormal aCGH findings. Currently, we provide families with a range of 10–30% of a diagnosis with aCGH testing. With increased clinical complexity, patients have an increased probability of having an abnormal aCGH result. With this, we can provide individualized risk estimates for each patient. PMID:27625836

  16. A systematic approach to assessing the clinical significance of genetic variants

    OpenAIRE

    Duzkale, H; Shen, J; McLaughlin, H; Alfares, A; Kelly, MA; Pugh, TJ; Funke, BH; Rehm, HL; Lebo, MS

    2013-01-01

    Molecular genetic testing informs diagnosis, prognosis, and risk assessment for patients and their family members. Recent advances in low-cost, high-throughput DNA sequencing and computing technologies have enabled the rapid expansion of genetic test content, resulting in dramatically increased numbers of DNA variants identified per test. To address this challenge, our laboratory has developed a systematic approach to thorough and efficient assessments of variants for pathogenicity determinat...

  17. Clinical research of genetically modified dendritic cells in combination with cytokine-induced killer cell treatment in advanced renal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a malignant disease that demonstrates resistance to standard chemotherapeutic agents. Yet Active immunization using genetically modified dendritic cells holds promise for the adjuvant treatment of malignancies to eradicate or control residual disease. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are a heterogeneous population of effector CD8+ T cells with diverse TCR specificities, possessing non-MHC-restricted cytolytic activities against tumor cells. Clinical studies have confirmed benefit and safety of CIK cell-based therapy for patients with malignancies. This clinical trial was conducted to evaluate efficacy and safety of genetically modified dendritic cells in combination with Cytokine-Induced Killer Cell (gmDCs-CIK) treatment of patients with RCC. 28 patients with advanced renal cancer were admitted to Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical Sciences from December 2010 to March 2012 and treated by gmDCs-CIK. Clinical efficacy and safety between pre- and post-treatment were compared. This analysis showed an objective response rate (ORR) of 39% and a disease control rate (DCR) of as 75%. There is no significant relationship between clinical efficacy and whether metastasis occurred or not (P > 0.05). There is no significant relationship between ORR and cycles of treatment (P > 0.05), but DCR was significantly related with cycles of treatment (P < 0.05). No clinically significant side effects were observed. There were no significant changes of T cell subsets including CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+ CD25+ Treg cells except Th1 in peripheral blood between day 30 after immunotherapy and 1 day before immunotherapy in 11 patients. DC-CIK is feasible and effective in treating advanced renal cancer and thus provides a new approach. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01924156. Registration date: August 14, 2013

  18. Clinical experience using the tethered capsule-based spectrally encoded confocal microendoscopy for diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Dukho; Alali, Sanaz; Kang, DongKyun; Tabatabaie, Nima; Lu, Weina; Grant, Catriona N.; Soomro, Amna R.; Nishioka, Norman S.; Rosenberg, Mireille; Hesterberg, Paul E.; Yuan, Qian; Garber, John J.; Katz, Aubrey J.; Shreffler, Wayne G.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-03-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is caused by food allergies, and defined by histological presence of eosinophil cells in the esophagus. The current gold standard for EoE diagnosis is endoscopy with pinch biopsy to detect more than 15 eosinophils/ High power field (HPF). Biopsy examinations are expensive, time consuming and are difficult to tolerate for patients. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a high-speed reflectance confocal microscopy technology capable of imaging individual eosinophils as highly scattering cells (diameter between 8 µm to 15 µm) in the epithelium. Our lab has developed a tethered SECM capsule that can be swallowed by unsedated patients. The capsule acquires large area confocal images, equivalent to more than 30,000 HPFs, as it traverses through the esophagus. In this paper, we present the outcome of a clinical study using the tethered SECM capsule for diagnosing EoE. To date, 32 subjects have been enrolled in this study. 88% of the subjects swallowed the capsules without difficulty and of those who swallowed the capsule, 95% preferred the tethered capsule imaging procedure to sedated endoscopic biopsy. Each imaging session took about 12 ± 2.4 minutes during which 8 images each spanning of 24 ± 5 cm2 of the esophagus were acquired. SECM images acquired from EoE patients showed abundant eosinophils as highly scattering cells in squamous epithelium. Results from this study suggest that the SECM capsule has the potential to become a less-invasive, cost-effective tool for diagnosing EoE and monitoring the response of this disease to therapy.

  19. Genetic modifiers of sickle cell anemia in the BABY HUG cohort: influence on laboratory and clinical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Vivien A; Luo, Zhaoyu; Flanagan, Jonathan M; Howard, Thad A; Thompson, Bruce W; Wang, Winfred C; Kutlar, Abdullah; Ware, Russell E

    2013-07-01

    The recently completed BABY HUG trial investigated the safety and efficacy of hydroxyurea in infants with sickle cell anemia (SCA). To investigate the effects of known genetic modifiers, genomic DNA on 190 randomized subjects were analyzed for alpha thalassemia, beta-globin haplotype, polymorphisms affecting endogenous fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels (XmnI, BCL11A, and HBS1L-MYB), UGT1A1 promoter polymorphisms, and the common G6PD A(-) mutation. At study entry, infants with alpha thalassemia trait had significantly lower mean corpuscular volume, total bilirubin, and absolute reticulocyte count. Beta-globin haplotypes associated with milder disease had significantly higher hemoglobin and %HbF. BCL11A and XmnI polymorphisms had significant effects on baseline HbF, while UGT1A1 promoter polymorphisms significantly influenced baseline serum bilirubin. At study exit, subjects randomized to placebo still exhibited laboratory effects of alpha thalassemia and other modifiers, while those assigned hydroxyurea had treatment effects that exceeded most genetic influences. The pain phenotype was influenced by HbF modifiers in both treatment groups. These data document that genetic polymorphisms do modify laboratory and clinical phenotypes even in very young patients with SCA. The hydroxyurea effects are more potent, however, indicating that treatment criteria should not be limited to certain genetic subsets, and supporting the use of hydroxyurea for all young patients with SCA. PMID:23606168

  20. Maximising the efficiency of clinical screening programmes: balancing predictive genetic testing with a right not to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurman, Agnes G; van der Kolk, Dorina M; Verkerk, Marian A; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V; Plantinga, Mirjam; van Langen, Irene M

    2015-09-01

    We explored the dilemma between patients' right not to know their genetic status and the efficient use of health-care resources in the form of clinical cancer screening programmes. Currently, in the Netherlands, 50% risk carriers of heritable cancer syndromes who choose not to know their genetic status have access to the same screening programmes as proven mutation carriers. This implies an inefficient use of health-care resources, because half of this group will not carry the familial mutation. At the moment, only a small number of patients are involved; however, the expanding possibilities for genetic risk profiling means this issue must be addressed because of potentially adverse societal and financial impact. The trade-off between patients' right not to know their genetic status and efficient use of health-care resources was discussed in six focus groups with health-care professionals and patients from three Dutch university hospitals. Professionals prefer patients to undergo a predictive DNA test as a prerequisite for entering cancer screening programmes. Professionals prioritise treating sick patients or proven mutation carriers over screening untested individuals. Participation in cancer screening programmes without prior DNA testing is, however, supported by most professionals, as testing is usually delayed and relatively few patients are involved at present. Reducing the number of 50% risk carriers undergoing screening is expected to be achieved by: offering more psychosocial support, explaining the iatrogenic risks of cancer screening, increasing out-of-pocket costs, and offering a less stringent screening programme for 50% risk carriers. PMID:25564039

  1. Maximising the efficiency of clinical screening programmes: balancing predictive genetic testing with a right not to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurman, Agnes G; van der Kolk, Dorina M; Verkerk, Marian A; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V; Plantinga, Mirjam; van Langen, Irene M

    2015-01-01

    We explored the dilemma between patients' right not to know their genetic status and the efficient use of health-care resources in the form of clinical cancer screening programmes. Currently, in the Netherlands, 50% risk carriers of heritable cancer syndromes who choose not to know their genetic status have access to the same screening programmes as proven mutation carriers. This implies an inefficient use of health-care resources, because half of this group will not carry the familial mutation. At the moment, only a small number of patients are involved; however, the expanding possibilities for genetic risk profiling means this issue must be addressed because of potentially adverse societal and financial impact. The trade-off between patients' right not to know their genetic status and efficient use of health-care resources was discussed in six focus groups with health-care professionals and patients from three Dutch university hospitals. Professionals prefer patients to undergo a predictive DNA test as a prerequisite for entering cancer screening programmes. Professionals prioritise treating sick patients or proven mutation carriers over screening untested individuals. Participation in cancer screening programmes without prior DNA testing is, however, supported by most professionals, as testing is usually delayed and relatively few patients are involved at present. Reducing the number of 50% risk carriers undergoing screening is expected to be achieved by: offering more psychosocial support, explaining the iatrogenic risks of cancer screening, increasing out-of-pocket costs, and offering a less stringent screening programme for 50% risk carriers. PMID:25564039

  2. Mendel conference

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected accepted papers of Mendel conference that has been held in Brno, Czech Republic in June 2015. The book contents three chapters which represent recent advances in soft computing including intelligent image processing and bio-inspired robotics.: Chapter 1: Evolutionary Computing, and Swarm intelligence, Chapter 2: Neural Networks, Self-organization, and Machine Learning, and Chapter3: Intelligent Image Processing, and Bio-inspired Robotics. The Mendel conference was established in 1995, and it carries the name of the scientist and Augustinian priest Gregor J. Mendel who discovered the famous Laws of Heredity. In 2015 we are commemorating 150 years since Mendel's lectures, which he presented in Brno on February and March 1865. The main aim of the conference was to create a periodical possibility for students, academics and researchers to exchange their ideas and novel research methods.  .

  3. Conference Notification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Roskill Information Services and Metal Events Ltd areorganizing the 2nd International Rare Earths Conference,which will be held at the Conrad Hotel in Hong Kong onFebruary 28 to March 2 2006.The program is structured tocover all the main aspects of the rare earths industry,including development of Chinese rare earth industry; trendsin rare earths demand; potential constraints on supply;research on potential capacity of rare earths supply chain.Global rare earths consumers will attend the conference.Registra...

  4. Clinical and Genetic Characteristics of Mexican Patients with Juvenile Presentation of Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul E. Piña-Aguilar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC is a rare lysosomal disease with a protean presentation, ranging from a fatal neonatal course with visceromegaly to an adult presentation with only neurological or psychiatric symptomatology. In this report we describe the genetic and clinical characteristics of 3 Mexican patients from different families with juvenile presentation of NPC. Clinical examination, imaging of central nervous and gastrointestinal system, and EEG were performed. Genetic studies include sequencing and deletion/duplication analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 genes. All patients presented with cognitive impairment, ataxia, and supranuclear vertical gaze palsy; one case had gelastic cataplexy. Also they developed epilepsy and cortical atrophy and two patients had thinning of corpus callosum. The 3 patients were compound heterozygotes for NPC1 sequence variants, including 5 missense and 1 nonsense mutations: p.P1007A and p.F1087L in Case 1; p.Q921P and p.G992R in Case 2; and p.R348* and p.V1165M in case 3. Mexican patients with juvenile NPC presented with a variable clinical phenotype and compound heterozygosity. This suggests a relative high frequency of mutation carriers as it is reported for European population. Consequently, clinicians should consider NPC as a diagnosis possibility in any adolescent or young adult patient with juvenile dementia and/or ataxia, even in absence of gelastic cataplexy and supranuclear vertical gaze palsy.

  5. Clinical and genetic factors associated with progression of geographic atrophy lesions in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Grassmann

    Full Text Available Worldwide, age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a serious threat to vision loss in individuals over 50 years of age with a pooled prevalence of approximately 9%. For 2020, the number of people afflicted with this condition is estimated to reach 200 million. While AMD lesions presenting as geographic atrophy (GA show high inter-individual variability, only little is known about prognostic factors. Here, we aimed to elucidate the contribution of clinical, demographic and genetic factors on GA progression. Analyzing the currently largest dataset on GA lesion growth (N = 388, our findings suggest a significant and independent contribution of three factors on GA lesion growth including at least two genetic factors (ARMS2_rs10490924 [P < 0.00088] and C3_rs2230199 [P < 0.00015] as well as one clinical component (presence of GA in the fellow eye [P < 0.00023]. These correlations jointly explain up to 7.2% of the observed inter-individual variance in GA lesion progression and should be considered in strategy planning of interventional clinical trials aimed at evaluating novel treatment options in advanced GA due to AMD.

  6. Clinical Research and Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meetings, Conferences & Events Partnering & Donating to the NICHD Staff Directory ... Clinical Research Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Clinical research is research that directly involves a ...

  7. Conference Hopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Annual conference outlines tasks for 2010 to solidify China’s economic recovery through rational investment and increasing consumptionc hina will adhere to a consistent and stable economic strategy, putting in place a proactive fiscal policy and an accommodative monetary policy for the 2010 fiscal year-the macro-economic course mapped out during China’s Central

  8. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers presented at this conference cover the fields of thermalhydraulics, nuclear plant design and operation, licensing, decontamination, restoration and dismantling of nuclear power facilities, services to the nuclear industry, new applications of nuclear technology, reactor physics and fuel cycles, accelerator-breeders, fusion research and lasers

  9. Evaluation of the Dutch BRCA1/2 clinical genetic center referral criteria in an unselected early breast cancer population

    OpenAIRE

    van den Broek, Alexandra J.; de Ruiter, Karen; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Verhoef, Senno; Schmidt, Marjanka K.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the diagnostic value of the Dutch Clinical Genetic Center (CGC) referral guidelines for BRCA1/2 mutation testing in 903 early breast cancer patients, unselected for family history, diagnosed in a cancer hospital before the age of 50 years in 1974–2002; most prevalent Dutch pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutations had been analyzed on coded DNA in a research setting. Forty-nine (5.4%) of the patients were proven to be BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We found that 78% and 69% of BRCA...

  10. Genetic diversity of Trichomonas vaginalis clinical isolates from Henan province in central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Meng; Liu, Hui Li

    2015-07-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellated protozoan parasite that infects the human urogenital tract, causing the most common non-viral, sexually transmitted disease worldwide. In this study, genetic variants of T. vaginalis were identified in Henan Province, China. Fragments of the small subunit of nuclear ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) were amplified from 32 T. vaginalis isolates obtained from seven regions of Henan Province. Overall, 18 haplotypes were determined from the 18S rRNA sequences. Each sampled population and the total population displayed high haplotype diversity (Hd), accompanied by very low nucleotide diversity (Pi). In these molecular genetic variants, 91.58% genetic variation was derived from intra-regions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed no correlation between phylogeny and geographic distribution. Demographic analysis supported population expansion of T. vaginalis isolates from central China. Our findings showing moderate-to-high genetic variations in the 32 isolates of T. vaginalis provide useful knowledge for monitoring changes in parasite populations for the development of future control strategies.

  11. Genetic parameters of pathogen-specific incidence of clinical mastitis in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de Y.; Barkema, H.W.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate heritabilities for and genetic correlations among different pathogen-specific mastitis traits. The traits were unspecific mastitis, which is all mastitis treatments regardless of the causative pathogen as well as mastitis caused by Streptococcus dysgalacti

  12. Genetic diversity of Trichomonas vaginalis clinical isolates from Henan province in central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Meng; Liu, Hui Li

    2015-07-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellated protozoan parasite that infects the human urogenital tract, causing the most common non-viral, sexually transmitted disease worldwide. In this study, genetic variants of T. vaginalis were identified in Henan Province, China. Fragments of the small subunit of nuclear ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) were amplified from 32 T. vaginalis isolates obtained from seven regions of Henan Province. Overall, 18 haplotypes were determined from the 18S rRNA sequences. Each sampled population and the total population displayed high haplotype diversity (Hd), accompanied by very low nucleotide diversity (Pi). In these molecular genetic variants, 91.58% genetic variation was derived from intra-regions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed no correlation between phylogeny and geographic distribution. Demographic analysis supported population expansion of T. vaginalis isolates from central China. Our findings showing moderate-to-high genetic variations in the 32 isolates of T. vaginalis provide useful knowledge for monitoring changes in parasite populations for the development of future control strategies. PMID:26103990

  13. How will insights from genetics translate to clinical practice in inflammatory bowel disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Festen, E. A. M.; Weersma, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease, consisting of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gut, which arises through an excessive immune response to the normal gut flora in a genetically susceptible host. The disease affects predominantly young adults and due to its c

  14. A standardized framework for the validation and verification of clinical molecular genetic tests.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattocks, C.J.; Morris, M.A.; Matthijs, G.; Swinnen, E.; Corveleyn, A.; Dequeker, E.; Muller, C.R.; Pratt, V.; Wallace, A.

    2010-01-01

    The validation and verification of laboratory methods and procedures before their use in clinical testing is essential for providing a safe and useful service to clinicians and patients. This paper outlines the principles of validation and verification in the context of clinical human molecular gene

  15. Macronodular Adrenal Hyperplasia due to Mutations in an Armadillo Repeat Containing 5 (ARMC5) Gene: A Clinical and Genetic Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucz, Fabio R.; Zilbermint, Mihail; Lodish, Maya B.; Szarek, Eva; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Sinaii, Ninet; Berthon, Annabel; Libé, Rossella; Assié, Guillaume; Espiard, Stéphanie; Drougat, Ludivine; Ragazzon, Bruno; Bertherat, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Context: Inactivating germline mutations of the probable tumor suppressor gene, armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5), have recently been identified as a genetic cause of macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (MAH). Objective: We searched for ARMC5 mutations in a large cohort of patients with MAH. The clinical phenotype of patients with and without ARMC5 mutations was compared. Methods: Blood DNA from 34 MAH patients was genotyped using Sanger sequencing. Diurnal serum cortisol measurements, plasma ACTH levels, urinary steroids, 6-day Liddle's test, adrenal computed tomography, and weight of adrenal glands at adrenalectomy were assessed. Results: Germline ARMC5 mutations were found in 15 of 34 patients (44.1%). In silico analysis of the mutations indicated that seven (20.6%) predicted major implications for gene function. Late-night cortisol levels were higher in patients with ARMC5-damaging mutations compared with those without and/or with nonpathogenic mutations (14.5 ± 5.6 vs 6.7 ± 4.3, P < .001). All patients carrying a pathogenic ARMC5 mutation had clinical Cushing's syndrome (seven of seven, 100%) compared with 14 of 27 (52%) of those without or with mutations that were predicted to be benign (P = .029). Repeated-measures analysis showed overall higher urinary 17-hydroxycorticosteroids and free cortisol values in the patients with ARMC5-damaging mutations during the 6-day Liddle's test (P = .0002). Conclusions: ARMC5 mutations are implicated in clinically severe Cushing's syndrome associated with MAH. Knowledge of a patient's ARMC5 status has important clinical implications for the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome and genetic counseling of patients and their families. PMID:24601692

  16. Microbicides 2006 conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGowan Ian

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current HIV/AIDS statistics show that women account for almost 60% of HIV infections in Sub-Saharan Africa. HIV prevention tools such as male and female condoms, abstinence and monogamy are not always feasible options for women due to various socio-economic and cultural factors. Microbicides are products designed to be inserted in the vagina or rectum prior to sex to prevent HIV acquisition. The biannual Microbicides conference took place in Cape Town, South Africa from 23–26 April 2006. The conference was held for the first time on the African continent, the region worst affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The conference brought together a record number of 1,300 scientists, researchers, policy makers, healthcare workers, communities and advocates. The conference provided an opportunity for an update on microbicide research and development as well as discussions around key issues such as ethics, acceptability, access and community involvement. This report discusses the current status of microbicide research and development, encompassing basic and clinical science, social and behavioural science, and community mobilisation and advocacy activities.

  17. The genetic variation in Monocarboxylic acid transporter 2 (MCT2) has functional and clinical relevance with male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinu Lee; Dong Ryul Lee; Suman Lee

    2014-01-01

    Monocarboxylic acid transporter 2(MCT2) transports pyruvate and lactate outside and inside of sperms, mainly as energy sources and plays roles in the regulation of spermatogenesis. We investigated the association among genetic variations in theMCT2 gene, male infertility andMCT2 expression levels in sperm. The functional and genetic signiifcance of the intron 2(+28201A>G, rs10506398) and 3’ untranslated region(UTR) single nucleotide polymorphism(SNP)(+2626G>A, rs10506399) of MCT2 variants were investigated. Two MCT2 polymorphisms were associated with male infertility(n=471,PA) had a strong association with the oligoasthenoteratozoospermia(OAT) group. The+2626GG type had an almost 2.4‑fold higher sperm count than that of the+2626AA type(+2626GG; 66×106vs+2626AA; 27×106, P<0.0001). The MCT2‑3’ UTR SNP may be important for expression, as it is located at the MCT23’ UTR. The average MCT2 protein amount in sperm of the+2626GG type was about two times higher than that of the+2626AA type. The results suggest that genetic variation in MCT2 has functional and clinical relevance with male infertility.

  18. The genetic variation in Monocarboxylic acid transporter 2 (MCT2 has functional and clinical relevance with male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinu Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Monocarboxylic acid transporter 2 (MCT2 transports pyruvate and lactate outside and inside of sperms, mainly as energy sources and plays roles in the regulation of spermatogenesis. We investigated the association among genetic variations in the MCT2 gene, male infertility and MCT2 expression levels in sperm. The functional and genetic significance of the intron 2 (+28201A > G, rs10506398 and 3' untranslated region (UTR single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP (+2626G > A, rs10506399 of MCT2 variants were investigated. Two MCT2 polymorphisms were associated with male infertility (n = 471, P A had a strong association with the oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT group. The +2626GG type had an almost 2.4-fold higher sperm count than that of the +2626AA type (+2626GG; 66 × 10 6 vs +2626AA; 27 × 10 6 , P < 0.0001. The MCT2-3' UTR SNP may be important for expression, as it is located at the MCT2 3' UTR. The average MCT2 protein amount in sperm of the +2626GG type was about two times higher than that of the +2626AA type. The results suggest that genetic variation in MCT2 has functional and clinical relevance with male infertility.

  19. The Molecular Genetics of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Genomic Mechanisms, Neuroimmunopathology, and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Guerra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs have become increasingly common in recent years. The discovery of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and accompanying copy number variations within the genome has increased our understanding of the architecture of the disease. These genetic and genomic alterations coupled with epigenetic phenomena have pointed to a neuroimmunopathological mechanism for ASD. Model animal studies, developmental biology, and affective neuroscience laid a foundation for dissecting the neural pathways impacted by these disease-generating mechanisms. The goal of current autism research is directed toward a systems biological approach to find the most basic genetic and environmental causes to this severe developmental disease. It is hoped that future genomic and neuroimmunological research will be directed toward finding the road toward prevention, treatment, and cure of ASD.

  20. Clinical, histological, and genetic features of fourth ventricle ependymoma in the elderly. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takuro; Inamasu, Joji; Kanai, Ryuichi; Sasaki, Hikaru; Shinoda, Jun; Hirose, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    A 71-year-old woman presented with a rare case of geriatric ependymoma originating from the fourth ventricle manifesting as progressive gait and memory disturbance. Imaging studies revealed an extraaxial mass in the fourth ventricle protruding into the right cerebellomedullary cistern, with concomitant obstructive hydrocephalus. Surgery achieved subtotal removal since the tumor tightly adhered to the right vestibular area of the fourth ventricular floor. The histological diagnosis was ependymoma, which was also confirmed by comparative genetic hybridization. Although she developed severe laryngeal edema and worsening of the hydrocephalus postoperatively which required additional treatment, she recovered with residual mild gait disturbance, and was transferred to a rehabilitation facility. Fourth ventricle ependymoma in the elderly is rare. Comparative genetic hybridization may be important in the diagnosis of geriatric ependymoma and in the choice for adjuvant therapy as well as in estimating the prognosis for patients with rare types of ependymoma. PMID:22976148

  1. Genetic, epidemiological, and clinical aspects of hereditary pancreatitis: a population-based cohort study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brusgaard, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    regulator gene (CFTR) and serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 gene (SPINK1) mutations with patients who retained the diagnosis of true idiopathic pancreatitis (tIP) after genetic testing for HP, SPINK1, and CFTR mutations. METHODS: Patients with PUO were identified in the Danish National Registry of...... Patients or were referred by clinicians. DNA from blood was analyzed for cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1), SPINK1, and CFTR mutations. Considering the diagnosis of HP, a pedigree was drawn for each patient. RESULTS: A genetic mutation was found in 40% of 122 patients with PUO. After testing first......-degree relatives of the 18 initially identified HP patients, 38 HP patients in total were identified, and 28 patients had SPINK1-CFTR mutations. Among HP patients, no p.N29I mutations were found and the p.A16V mutation was more frequent than previously reported, 45 and 32% had exocrine and endocrine insufficiency...

  2. The Molecular Genetics of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Genomic Mechanisms, Neuroimmunopathology, and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have become increasingly common in recent years. The discovery of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and accompanying copy number variations within the genome has increased our understanding of the architecture of the disease. These genetic and genomic alterations coupled with epigenetic phenomena have pointed to a neuroimmunopathological mechanism for ASD. Model animal studies, developmental biology, and affective neuroscience laid a foundation for dissecting th...

  3. Oral and Craniofacial Clinical Signs Associated to Genetic Conditions in Human Identification Part I: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ayoub, Fouad; Aoun, Nicole; el Husseini, Hassan; Jassar, Houssam; Sayah, Fida; Salameh, Ziad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Forensic dentistry is one of the most reliable methods used in human identification when other technique as fingerprint, DNA, visual identification cannot be used. Genetic disorders have several manifestations that can target the intra-oral cavity, the cranio-facial area or any location in the human body. Materials and Methods: A literature search of the scientific database (Medline and Science Direct) for the years 1990 to 2014 was carried out to find out all the available papers...

  4. Epigenetic understanding of gene-environment interactions in psychiatric disorders: a new concept of clinical genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Kubota Takeo; Miyake Kunio; Hirasawa Takae

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Epigenetics is a mechanism that regulates gene expression independently of the underlying DNA sequence, relying instead on the chemical modification of DNA and histone proteins. Although environmental and genetic factors were thought to be independently associated with disorders, several recent lines of evidence suggest that epigenetics bridges these two factors. Epigenetic gene regulation is essential for normal development, thus defects in epigenetics cause various rare congenital ...

  5. Clinical and Genetic Correlates of Exercise Performance in Young Children with Cystic Fibrosis1,2

    OpenAIRE

    McBride, Michael G.; Schall, Joan I.; Zemel, Babette S.; Stallings, Virginia A.; Ittenbach, Richard F.; Paridon, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Exercise performance in individuals with cystic fibrosis has been shown to be related to the degree of pulmonary dysfunction and undernutrition and genetic profile. The aim of this study was to examine these relationships in young children with cystic fibrosis. The participants were 64 children ages 8 to 11 years (M = 9.3, SD = 0.9) with cystic fibrosis and pancreatic insufficiency recruited from 13 different U.S. Cystic Fibrosis Centers. Assigned to one of three groups by Δ...

  6. The Bile Salt Export Pump: Clinical and Experimental Aspects of Genetic and Acquired Cholestatic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Ping; Soroka, Carol J.; Boyer, James L.

    2010-01-01

    The primary transporter responsible for bile salt secretion is the bile salt export pump (BSEP, ABCB11), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, which is located at the bile canalicular apical domain of hepatocytes. In humans, BSEP deficiency results in several different genetic forms of cholestasis, which include progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC2), benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (BRIC2), as well as other acquired forms of cholestasi...

  7. Genetic diversity of Trichomonas vaginalis clinical isolates from Henan province in central China

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Meng; Liu, Hui Li

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellated protozoan parasite that infects the human urogenital tract, causing the most common non-viral, sexually transmitted disease worldwide. In this study, genetic variants of T. vaginalis were identified in Henan Province, China. Fragments of the small subunit of nuclear ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) were amplified from 32 T. vaginalis isolates obtained from seven regions of Henan Province. Overall, 18 haplotypes were determined from the 18S rRNA sequences. Each s...

  8. Genetic principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, D

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses the basic principles of genetics, including the classification of genetic disorders and a consideration of the rules and mechanisms of inheritance. The most common pitfalls in clinical genetic diagnosis are described, with emphasis on the problem of the negative or misleading family history.

  9. Clinical characteristics and genetic analysis of three pediatric patients with idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨世伟

    2013-01-01

    Objective Restrictive cardiomyopathy(RCM) is rare in children,and little is known about the molecular basis of RCM.The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and myopathological characteristics and to detect

  10. Danish retinoblastoma patients 1943-2013 - genetic testing and clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Pernille A; Urbak, Steen F; Funding, Mikkel;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In heritable retinoblastoma there is a 50% risk of transmitting the RB1 mutation, and offspring carriers have more than 90% risk of developing retinoblastoma. Today, all newly diagnosed retinoblastoma patients in Denmark are screened for mutations in RB1, as opposed to only a minority...... to offspring and elevated risk of second primary cancers, we recommend information and access to genetic counseling and RB1 screening. This has ethical, psychological and possible economic consequences, and should be handled with caution...... of patients diagnosed before DNA testing was offered. Knowledge of heredity increases the chance of early diagnosis in offspring, leading to improved prognosis. We present data from the Danish retinoblastoma patients that emphasize the need for genetic counseling and RB1 screening in all untested......, the rate has been stable around 1 per 14 000 live births with 95% of the patients surviving their retinoblastoma. Stratifying data on the time of diagnosis and status of genetic testing, the number of screened patients gradually increased from 5% in the beginning of the period to 96% in the last five...

  11. Capillary electrophoresis analysis of conventional splicing assays: IARC analytical and clinical classification of 31 BRCA2 genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Acedo, Alberto; García-Casado, Zaida; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Tosar, Alicia; Romero, Atocha; Garre, Pilar; Llort, Gemma; Thomassen, Mads; Díez, Orland; Pérez-Segura, Pedro; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Velasco, Eladio A; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Rare sequence variants in "high-risk" disease genes, often referred as unclassified variants (UVs), pose a serious challenge to genetic testing. However, UVs resulting in splicing alterations can be readily assessed by in vitro assays. Unfortunately, analytical and clinical interpretation of these assays is often challenging. Here, we explore this issue by conducting splicing assays in 31 BRCA2 genetic variants. All variants were assessed by RT-PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis and direct sequencing. If assays did not produce clear-cut outputs (Class-2 or Class-5 according to analytical International Agency for Research on Cancer guidelines), we performed qPCR and/or minigene assays. The latter were performed with a new splicing vector (pSAD) developed by authors of the present manuscript (patent #P201231427 CSIC). We have identified three clinically relevant Class-5 variants (c.682-2A>G, c.7617+1G>A, and c.8954-5A>G), and 27 analytical Class-2 variants (not inducing splicing alterations). In addition, we demonstrate that rs9534262 (c.7806-14T>C) is a BRCA2 splicing quantitative trait locus.

  12. Genetic aberrations in small B-cell lymphomas and leukemias: molecular pathology, clinical relevance and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusz, Agata M; Bagg, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Small B-cell lymphomas and leukemias (SBCLs) are a clinically, morphologically, immunophenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of clonal lymphoid neoplasms, including entities such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), follicular lymphoma (FL), lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL), marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) and hairy cell leukemia (HCL). The pathogenesis of some of these lymphoid malignancies is characterized by distinct translocations, for example t(11;14) in the majority of cases of MCL and t(14;18) in most cases of FL, whereas other entities are associated with a variety of recurrent but nonspecific numeric chromosomal abnormalities, as exemplified by del(13q14), del(11q22), and +12 in CLL, and yet others such as LPL and HCL that lack recurrent or specific cytogenetic aberrations. The recent surge in next generation sequencing (NGS) technology has shed more light on the genetic landscape of SBCLs through characterization of numerous driver mutations including SF3B1 and NOTCH1 in CLL, ATM and CCND1 in MCL, KMT2D and EPHA7 in FL, MYD88 (L265P) in LPL, KLF2 and NOTCH2 in splenic MZL (SMZL) and BRAF (V600E) in HCL. The identification of distinct genetic lesions not only provides greater insight into the molecular pathogenesis of these disorders but also identifies potential valuable biomarkers for prognostic stratification, as well as specific targets for directed therapy. This review discusses the well-established and recently identified molecular lesions underlying the pathogenesis of SBCLs, highlights their clinical relevance and summarizes novel targeted therapies. PMID:27121112

  13. Genetic polymorphisms affecting susceptibility to mercury neurotoxicity in children: summary findings from the Casa Pia Children's Amalgam clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, James S; Heyer, Nicholas J; Russo, Joan E; Martin, Michael D; Farin, Federico M

    2014-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) is neurotoxic, and children may be particularly susceptible to this effect. A current major challenge is identification of children who may be uniquely susceptible to Hg toxicity because of genetic predisposition. We examined the possibility that common genetic variants that are known to affect neurologic functions or Hg handling in adults would modify the adverse neurobehavioral effects of Hg exposure in children. Three hundred thirty subjects who participated as children in the recently completed Casa Pia Clinical Trial of Dental Amalgams in Children were genotyped for 27 variants of 13 genes that are reported to affect neurologic functions and/or Hg disposition in adults. Urinary Hg concentrations, reflecting Hg exposure from any source, served as the Hg exposure index. Regression modeling strategies were employed to evaluate potential associations between allelic status for individual genes or combinations of genes, Hg exposure, and neurobehavioral test outcomes assessed at baseline and for 7 subsequent years during the clinical trial. Among boys, significant modification of Hg effects on neurobehavioral outcomes over a broad range of neurologic domains was observed with variant genotypes for 4 of 13 genes evaluated. Modification of Hg effects on a more limited number of neurobehavioral outcomes was also observed for variants of another 8 genes. Cluster analyses suggested some genes interacting in common processes to affect Hg neurotoxicity. In contrast, significant modification of Hg effects on neurobehavioral functions among girls with the same genotypes was substantially more limited. These observations suggest increased susceptibility to the adverse neurobehavioral effects of Hg among children, particularly boys, with genetic variants that are relatively common to the general human population. These findings advance public health goals to identify factors underlying susceptibility to Hg toxicity and may contribute to strategies for preventing

  14. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains summaries of 28 papers presented at the 27. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. These papers discuss the general situation of the Canadian nuclear industry and the CANDU reactor; dialogue with the public; the International Atomic Energy Agency; and economic goals and operating lessons. It also contains summaries of 70 papers presented at the 8. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, which discuss plant life extension; safety and the environment; reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; risk assessment; the CANDU spacer location and repositioning project; CANDU operations; safety research after Chernobyl; fuel channels; and nuclear technology developments. The individual papers are also available in INIS-mf--13673 (CNA), and INIS-mf--12909 (CNS). (L.L.)

  15. Frequency of CFTR, SPINK1, and Cathepsin B Gene Mutation in North Indian Population: Connections between Genetics and Clinical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Genetic mutations and polymorphisms have been correlated with chronic pancreatitis (CP. This study aims to investigate the association of genetic variants of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR and serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK-1 genes and Cathepsin B gene polymorphisms with CP and to associate genetic backgrounds with clinical phenotypes. Methods. 150 CP patients and 150 normal controls were enrolled consecutively. We analyzed SPINK-1 N34S and IVS3+2T>C gene mutations by PCR-restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP. The identification of DF508, G551D, G542X, R117H, and W1282X mutations was carried out by ARMS-PCR. S549N mutation, IVS8 polyTn polymorphism, and Cathepsin B Lec26Val were analysed by PCR-RFLP, nested PCR, and PCR-RFLP plus sequencing, respectively. Results. We found a significant association of SPINK1 (N34S gene polymorphism. IVS1−37T>C polymorphism shows linkage with 101A>G. 300 chromosomes belonging to the CFTR subgroup exhibited minor allele frequency of 0.04, 0.03, 0.03, 0.013, 0.006, and 0.02 for DF508, G452X, G551D, S549N, R117H, and IVS8 T5, respectively. Except for R117H and IVS8 T5 polymorphisms, all other mutations showed significant variation. Conclusion. Analysis of potential susceptibility variants is needed to support nature of the genes and environment in pancreatitis. This data may help establish genetic screening and prenatal setup for Indian population.

  16. Conference information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Thermag Ⅳ- The 4th International Conference on Magnetic Refrigeration at Room Temperature of IIR Refrigeration technology is widely used today. However, traditional vapor compression/expansion refrigeration technology has some disadvantages, such as low conversion efficiency of vapor compressor, and emission of the ozonosphere depletion gas and greenhouse effect gas, etc. Magnetic refrigeration is a new cooling technology with huge potential application prospect, characterized by high efficiency, energy saving and environmental friendly.

  17. Update on Genetic Susceptibility and Pathogenesis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Herlin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a multifactorial disease with a pathogenesis which remains inexplicable. However, genome-wide association studies brought forward within recent years have discovered several new susceptibility genes, and accumulating evidence supports genetic variability as playing a key role in JIA development. This review summarises the present knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA and non-HLA polymorphisms conferring disease susceptibility, and discusses the areas in JIA genetics, which are still to be investigated in order to apply JIA genetics in a clinical setting.

  18. Clinical and genetic characterization of pituitary gigantism: an international collaborative study in 208 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F; Petrossians, Patrick; Nachev, Emil; Lila, Anurag R; Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Lecumberri, Beatriz; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Salvatori, Roberto; Moraitis, Andreas G; Holdaway, Ian; Kranenburg-van Klaveren, Dianne J; Chiara Zatelli, Maria; Palacios, Nuria; Nozieres, Cecile; Zacharin, Margaret; Ebeling, Tapani; Ojaniemi, Marja; Rozhinskaya, Liudmila; Verrua, Elisa; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Filipponi, Silvia; Gusakova, Daria; Pronin, Vyacheslav; Bertherat, Jerome; Belaya, Zhanna; Ilovayskaya, Irena; Sahnoun-Fathallah, Mona; Sievers, Caroline; Stalla, Gunter K; Castermans, Emilie; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Sorkina, Ekaterina; Auriemma, Renata Simona; Mittal, Sachin; Kareva, Maria; Lysy, Philippe A; Emy, Philippe; De Menis, Ernesto; Choong, Catherine S; Mantovani, Giovanna; Bours, Vincent; De Herder, Wouter; Brue, Thierry; Barlier, Anne; Neggers, Sebastian J C M M; Zacharieva, Sabina; Chanson, Philippe; Shah, Nalini Samir; Stratakis, Constantine A; Naves, Luciana A; Beckers, Albert

    2015-10-01

    Despite being a classical growth disorder, pituitary gigantism has not been studied previously in a standardized way. We performed a retrospective, multicenter, international study to characterize a large series of pituitary gigantism patients. We included 208 patients (163 males; 78.4%) with growth hormone excess and a current/previous abnormal growth velocity for age or final height >2 s.d. above country normal means. The median onset of rapid growth was 13 years and occurred significantly earlier in females than in males; pituitary adenomas were diagnosed earlier in females than males (15.8 vs 21.5 years respectively). Adenomas were ≥10 mm (i.e., macroadenomas) in 84%, of which extrasellar extension occurred in 77% and invasion in 54%. GH/IGF1 control was achieved in 39% during long-term follow-up. Final height was greater in younger onset patients, with larger tumors and higher GH levels. Later disease control was associated with a greater difference from mid-parental height (r=0.23, P=0.02). AIP mutations occurred in 29%; microduplication at Xq26.3 - X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) - occurred in two familial isolated pituitary adenoma kindreds and in ten sporadic patients. Tumor size was not different in X-LAG, AIP mutated and genetically negative patient groups. AIP-mutated and X-LAG patients were significantly younger at onset and diagnosis, but disease control was worse in genetically negative cases. Pituitary gigantism patients are characterized by male predominance and large tumors that are difficult to control. Treatment delay increases final height and symptom burden. AIP mutations and X-LAG explain many cases, but no genetic etiology is seen in >50% of cases.

  19. Clinical and genetic characterization of pituitary gigantism: an international collaborative study in 208 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F; Petrossians, Patrick; Nachev, Emil; Lila, Anurag R; Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Lecumberri, Beatriz; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Salvatori, Roberto; Moraitis, Andreas G; Holdaway, Ian; Kranenburg-van Klaveren, Dianne J; Chiara Zatelli, Maria; Palacios, Nuria; Nozieres, Cecile; Zacharin, Margaret; Ebeling, Tapani; Ojaniemi, Marja; Rozhinskaya, Liudmila; Verrua, Elisa; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Filipponi, Silvia; Gusakova, Daria; Pronin, Vyacheslav; Bertherat, Jerome; Belaya, Zhanna; Ilovayskaya, Irena; Sahnoun-Fathallah, Mona; Sievers, Caroline; Stalla, Gunter K; Castermans, Emilie; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Sorkina, Ekaterina; Auriemma, Renata Simona; Mittal, Sachin; Kareva, Maria; Lysy, Philippe A; Emy, Philippe; De Menis, Ernesto; Choong, Catherine S; Mantovani, Giovanna; Bours, Vincent; De Herder, Wouter; Brue, Thierry; Barlier, Anne; Neggers, Sebastian J C M M; Zacharieva, Sabina; Chanson, Philippe; Shah, Nalini Samir; Stratakis, Constantine A; Naves, Luciana A; Beckers, Albert

    2015-10-01

    Despite being a classical growth disorder, pituitary gigantism has not been studied previously in a standardized way. We performed a retrospective, multicenter, international study to characterize a large series of pituitary gigantism patients. We included 208 patients (163 males; 78.4%) with growth hormone excess and a current/previous abnormal growth velocity for age or final height >2 s.d. above country normal means. The median onset of rapid growth was 13 years and occurred significantly earlier in females than in males; pituitary adenomas were diagnosed earlier in females than males (15.8 vs 21.5 years respectively). Adenomas were ≥10 mm (i.e., macroadenomas) in 84%, of which extrasellar extension occurred in 77% and invasion in 54%. GH/IGF1 control was achieved in 39% during long-term follow-up. Final height was greater in younger onset patients, with larger tumors and higher GH levels. Later disease control was associated with a greater difference from mid-parental height (r=0.23, P=0.02). AIP mutations occurred in 29%; microduplication at Xq26.3 - X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) - occurred in two familial isolated pituitary adenoma kindreds and in ten sporadic patients. Tumor size was not different in X-LAG, AIP mutated and genetically negative patient groups. AIP-mutated and X-LAG patients were significantly younger at onset and diagnosis, but disease control was worse in genetically negative cases. Pituitary gigantism patients are characterized by male predominance and large tumors that are difficult to control. Treatment delay increases final height and symptom burden. AIP mutations and X-LAG explain many cases, but no genetic etiology is seen in >50% of cases. PMID:26187128

  20. Scaling ethics up and down: moral craft in clinical genetics and in global health research

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper engages with the question of what it is to ‘do good medical ethics’ in two ways. It begins with an exploration of what it might mean to say that health professionals practise good medical ethics as part of practising good ethical medicine. Using the example of the Genethics Club, a well-established national ethics forum for genetics professionals in the UK, the paper develops an account of moral craftsmanship grounded in the concepts of shared moral commitments and practices, moral...

  1. Clinical and genetic features of variegate porphyria in a Chinese patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Acute porphyria is rare in orientals. We describe a Chinese woman with recurrent generalised tonic-clonic seizures and abdominal pain. Genomic DNA studies identified a heterozygous base substitution from guanine to adenine at nucleotide position 503, resulting in substitution of arginine by histidine at position 168 of the protein (R168H). This genetic abnormality is similar to the mutation reported in Caucasians with variegate porphyria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the English literature a Chinese patient with variegate porphyria with an identifiable mutation. A brief review of porphyria is presented.

  2. Antagonistic Pleiotropy at the Human "IL6" Promoter Confers Genetic Resilience to the Pro-Inflammatory Effects of Adverse Social Conditions in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Steven W.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Manu, Kavya; Telzer, Eva H.; Kiang, Lisa; Bower, Julienne E.; Irwin, Michael R.; Fuligni, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors tested the evolutionary genetic hypothesis that the functional form of an asymmetrically risky Gene x Environment interaction will differ as a function of age-related antagonistic pleiotropy (i.e., show opposite effects in young vs. old individuals). Previous studies have identified a polymorphism in the human "IL6" promoter…

  3. Genetic and epigenetic features in radiation sensitivity. Part II: implications for clinical practice and radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourguignon, Michel H. [Direction Generale de la Surete Nucleaire et de la Radioprotection, Paris Cedex 12 (France); CEA-DSV-DRM Hopital, Service de Recherches en Hemato-Immunologie, Saint Louis, Paris (France); Gisone, Pablo A.; Perez, Maria R.; Michelin, Severino; Dubner, Diana; Giorgio, Marina di [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Laboratorio de Radiopatologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Carosella, Edgardo D. [CEA-DSV-DRM Hopital, Service de Recherches en Hemato-Immunologie, Saint Louis, Paris (France)

    2005-03-01

    Recent progress especially in the field of gene identification and expression has attracted greater attention to the genetic and epigenetic susceptibility to cancer, possibly enhanced by ionising radiation. This issue is especially important for radiation therapists since hypersensitive patients may suffer from adverse effects in normal tissues following standard radiation therapy, while normally sensitive patients could receive higher doses of radiation, offering a better likelihood of cure for malignant tumours. Although only a small percentage of individuals are ''hypersensitive'' to radiation effects, all medical specialists using ionising radiation should be aware of the aforementioned progress in medical knowledge. The present paper, the second of two parts, reviews human disorders known or strongly suspected to be associated with hypersensitivity to ionising radiation. The main tests capable of detecting such pathologies in advance are analysed, and ethical issues regarding genetic testing are considered. The implications for radiation protection of possible hypersensitivity to radiation in a part of the population are discussed, and some guidelines for nuclear medicine professionals are proposed. (orig.)

  4. Genetic and epigenetic features in radiation sensitivity. Part II: implications for clinical practice and radiation protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguignon, Michel H; Gisone, Pablo A; Perez, Maria R; Michelin, Severino; Dubner, Diana; Giorgio, Marina Di; Carosella, Edgardo D

    2005-03-01

    Recent progress especially in the field of gene identification and expression has attracted greater attention to the genetic and epigenetic susceptibility to cancer, possibly enhanced by ionising radiation. This issue is especially important for radiation therapists since hypersensitive patients may suffer from adverse effects in normal tissues following standard radiation therapy, while normally sensitive patients could receive higher doses of radiation, offering a better likelihood of cure for malignant tumours. Although only a small percentage of individuals are "hypersensitive" to radiation effects, all medical specialists using ionising radiation should be aware of the aforementioned progress in medical knowledge. The present paper, the second of two parts, reviews human disorders known or strongly suspected to be associated with hypersensitivity to ionising radiation. The main tests capable of detecting such pathologies in advance are analysed, and ethical issues regarding genetic testing are considered. The implications for radiation protection of possible hypersensitivity to radiation in a part of the population are discussed, and some guidelines for nuclear medicine professionals are proposed. PMID:15692806

  5. Genetic testing of children for predisposition to mood disorders: anticipating the clinical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Jessica A; Kuzmich, Lili; Ormond, Kelly E; Gordon, Erynn; Christman, Michael F; Cho, Mildred K; Levinson, Douglas F

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale sequencing information may provide a basis for genetic tests for predisposition to common disorders. In this study, participants in the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative (N = 53) with a personal and/or family history of Major Depressive Disorder or Bipolar Disorder were interviewed based on the Health Belief Model around hypothetical intention to test one's children for probability of developing a mood disorder. Most participants (87 %) were interested in a hypothetical test for children that had high ("90 %") positive predictive value, while 51 % of participants remained interested in a modestly predictive test ("20 %"). Interest was driven by beliefs about effects of test results on parenting behaviors and on discrimination. Most participants favored testing before adolescence (64 %), and were reluctant to share results with asymptomatic children before adulthood. Participants anticipated both positive and negative effects of testing on parental treatment and on children's self-esteem. Further investigation will determine whether these findings will generalize to other complex disorders for which early intervention is possible but not clearly demonstrated to improve outcomes. More information is also needed about the effects of childhood genetic testing and sharing of results on parent-child relationships, and about the role of the child in the decision-making process. PMID:24651919

  6. Molecular aspects of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma : genetic alterations underlying clinical behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, Maria Sophia van (Marloes)

    2012-01-01

    The research described in the thesis is focused at identifying molecular aberrations contributing to the pathogenesis of CTCL. In search for differences in chromosomal alterations underlying the different clinical behavior and prognosis of patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (Sz

  7. Inherited infantile dilated cardiomyopathy in dogs: genetic, clinical, biochemical, and morphologic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alroy, J; Rush, J E; Freeman, L; Amarendhra Kumar, M S; Karuri, A; Chase, K; Sarkar, S

    2000-11-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy, a lethal disease characterized by left ventricular dilation and systolic dysfunction, is relatively common in humans and other mammals. Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) is a primary myocardial disease of unknown cause and can be a familial disorder. This report describes autosomal recessive IDCM in dogs. It occurs in Portuguese Water Dog (PWD) pups and is manifested by acute, vague clinical signs and sudden death. Affected pups have progressive reduction of fractional shortening that can be demonstrated by echocardiography prior to the development of clinical signs. Furthermore, these pups have low plasma taurine levels when consuming certain diets. Affected pups had dilation of the left ventricle and alterations in the sarcomere appearance, while immunohistochemical and biochemical studies demonstrate an increase in desmin, a cytoskeleton protein. The clinical and morphologic findings of IDCM in PWDs are distinct from those reported in adult IDCM. Finally, the clinical and echocardiographic manifestations were reversible in some pups following oral taurine supplementation for 2 months. These results suggest that IDCM in PWDs is correlated with low plasma taurine levels.

  8. Genetic markers predicting sulphonylurea treatment outcomes in type 2 diabetes patients: current evidence and challenges for clinical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganadan, N K; Huri, H Z; Vethakkan, S R; Hussein, Z

    2016-06-01

    The clinical response to sulphonylurea, an oral antidiabetic agent often used in combination with metformin to control blood glucose in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients, has been widely associated with a number of gene polymorphisms, particularly those involved in insulin release. We have reviewed the genetic markers of CYP2C9, ABCC8, KCNJ11, TCF7L2 (transcription factor 7-like 2), IRS-1 (insulin receptor substrate-1), CDKAL1, CDKN2A/2B, KCNQ1 and NOS1AP (nitric oxide synthase 1 adaptor protein) genes that predict treatment outcomes of sulphonylurea therapy. A convincing pattern for poor sulphonylurea response was observed in Caucasian T2DM patients with rs7903146 and rs1801278 polymorphisms of the TCF7L2 and IRS-1 genes, respectively. However, limitations in evaluating the available studies including dissimilarities in study design, definitions of clinical end points, sample sizes and types and doses of sulphonylureas used as well as ethnic variability make the clinical applications challenging. Future studies need to address these limitations to develop personalized sulphonylurea medicine for T2DM management. PMID:26810132

  9. Exploration and implementation for the construction of the quaternary teaching system of medical genetics including teaching, practice, research and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fengjuan, Zhou; Wenmei, Xie; Qiang, Wang; Xiaorong, Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Medical genetics, the connection between basic and clinical medicine, is a subject with strong applicability and plays important role in modern medical education system. Based on years of teaching experience and during the construction of state-level top quality course, our teaching team has established the quaternary teaching system of medical genetics which includes teaching, practice, research and clinical application. The four elements of the system interpenetrate, complement and reinforce each other. Specifically, classroom teaching is the basics which is further complemented by social practice, improved by research and promoted by clinical application. The quaternary teaching system provides a feasible way to integrate theoretical and clinical courses. After years of implementation, the teaching system has got great effects on the obvious improvement of research ability, social reputation and clinical service capacities of the research team.

  10. Genetic diversity of the VP1/VP2 gene of canine parvovirus type 2b amplified from clinical specimens in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira Cesar A. D.; Durigon Edison Luiz

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the genetic diversity in the VP1/VP2 gene of CPV type 2b isolates from symptomatic dogs in Brazil. A total of 21 isolates collected from 1990 through 1995 previously typed as CPV2b by PCR assay were studied. Overall we found a high degree of similarity among sequences from different CPV clinical isolates collected. Genetic analysis of this selected region gave no indication of a specific Brazilian parvovirus lineage.

  11. Genetic diversity of the VP1/VP2 gene of canine parvovirus type 2b amplified from clinical specimens in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Cesar A. D.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the genetic diversity in the VP1/VP2 gene of CPV type 2b isolates from symptomatic dogs in Brazil. A total of 21 isolates collected from 1990 through 1995 previously typed as CPV2b by PCR assay were studied. Overall we found a high degree of similarity among sequences from different CPV clinical isolates collected. Genetic analysis of this selected region gave no indication of a specific Brazilian parvovirus lineage.

  12. Conference Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is rapidly becoming a useful tool for simulating a variety of fluid flows. The 6. annual meeting of the Society in Quebec City discussed a wide variety of topics, organized into 15 sessions. Session titles included aerodynamics, shocks and detonations, geophysical and environmental flows, unsteady flows, multiphase flows, turbulence, natural convection, industrial applications, numerical techniques and simulations, heat and mass transfer, and moving boundary /interface problems. The use of CFD for mathematical modeling was demonstrated at this conference which included addresses by four guest speakers, 85 presentations, and 10 exhibits. refs., tabs., figs.

  13. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 113 papers presented at this conference covered the areas of 1) fuel design, development and production; 2) nuclear plant safety; 3) nuclear instrumentation; 4) public and regulatory matters; 5) developments and opportunities in fusion; 6) fuel behaviour under normal operating conditions; 7) nuclear plant design and operations; 8) materials science and technology; 9) nuclear power issues; 10) fusion technology; 11) fuel behaviour under accident conditions; 12) large scale fuel channel replacement programs; 13) thermalhydraulics experimental studies; 14) reactor physics and analysis; 15) applications of accelerators; 16) fission product release and severe fuel damage under accident conditions; 17) thermalhydraulics modeling and assessments; 18) waste management and the environment; and 20) new reactor concepts

  14. Clinical and Molecular Features of Laron Syndrome, A Genetic Disorder Protecting from Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, Anna; Kołodziej-Rzepa, Marta; Biesaga, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a rare, genetic disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The disease is caused by mutations of the growth hormone (GH) gene, leading to GH/insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF1) signalling pathway defect. Patients with LS have characteristic biochemical features, such as a high serum level of GH and low IGF1 concentration. Laron syndrome was first described by the Israeli physician Zvi Laron in 1966. Globally, around 350 people are affected by this syndrome and there are two large groups living in separate geographic regions: Israel (69 individuals) and Ecuador (90 individuals). They are all characterized by typical appearance such as dwarfism, facial phenotype, obesity and hypogenitalism. Additionally, they suffer from hypoglycemia, hypercholesterolemia and sleep disorders, but surprisingly have a very low cancer risk. Therefore, studies on LS offer a unique opportunity to better understand carcinogenesis and develop new strategies of cancer treatment. PMID:27381597

  15. Genetic analysis of clinical isolates of Leishmania major from Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilda Eslami, Rasoul Salehi, Sharifeh Khosravi & Monir Doudi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Leishmaniasis is a geographically widespread severe disease which includes visceralleishmaniasis (VL and cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL. There are 350 million people at risk in over 80 countries.In the Old World, CL is usually caused by Leishmania major, L. tropica, and L. aetiopica complex of which 90%of cases occur in Afghanistan, Algeria, Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Brazil and Peru. Recently, Eslami et al(2011 reported a novel TRYP6 gene encoding tryparedoxin peroxidase from an Iranian L. major strain exhibitinghomology with the related gene in a divergent genus of Kinetoplastida, the Crithidia. This prompted us toanalyze the mentioned gene in 100 isolates obtained from patients with suspected CL. Consequently, we analyzedinternal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 region, RNA polymerase II largest subunit (RPOIILS and the mitochondrialDNA polymerase beta (DPOLB.Methods: After obtaining samples from 100 patients, DNA extraction was performed and TRYP6 was analyzedusing conventional PCR. All samples harbouring TRYP6 with smaller size (555 bp were analysed based onthree other regions: ITS1, RPOIILS and DPOLB genes.Results: Results showed that 10% of the isolates have the same character as observed in our previous study. TheITS1-RFLP-PCR of this 10% isolates showed their similarity to the one from Crithidia fasciculata. RNApolymerase II largest subunit (RPOIILS showed genetic diversity but the mitochondrial DNA polymerase beta(DPOLB did not show any genetic diversity.Conclusion: This study might also help in solving the problems concerning Leishmaniasis outbreaks currentlyreported in Iran and some other endemic regions of the world.

  16. Correlation between genetic variability and virulence factors in clinical strains of Malassezia pachydermatis of animal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buommino, Elisabetta; Nocera, Francesca Paola; Parisi, Annamaria; Rizzo, Antonietta; Donnarumma, Giovanna; Mallardo, Karina; Fiorito, Filomena; Baroni, Adone; De Martino, Luisa

    2016-09-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis is a yeast belonging to the microbiota of the skin and mucous membranes of dog and cat, but it can also act as pathogen, causing dermatitis. The aim of this work was to evaluate the genetic variability of M. pachydermatis strains isolated from symptomatic dogs and cats and determine a correlation between genotype and phenotype. For this purpose eleven strains of M. pachydermatis were molecularly classified by nested-polymerase chain reaction (nested-PCR) based on ITS-1 and ITS-2 regions, specific for fungal rRNA genes. Furthermore, random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was applied for genetic typing of M. pachydermatis isolates identifying four different genotypes. Strains belonging to genotype 1 produced the highest amount of biofilm and phospholipase activity. The inflammatory response induced by M. pachydermatis strains in immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCat cells) was significantly different when we compared the results obtained from each strain. In particular, HaCat cells infected with the strains belonging to genotypes 1 and 2 triggered the highest levels of increase in TLR-2, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, COX-2 and MMP-9 expression. By contrast, cells infected with the strains of genotype 3 and those of genotype 4 did not significantly induce TLR-2 and cytokines. The results obtained might suggest a possible association between genotype and virulence factors expressed by M. pachydermatis strains. This highlights the need for a more accurate identification of the yeast to improve the therapeutic approach and to monitor the onset of human infections caused by this emergent zoonotic pathogen. PMID:27602421

  17. Antagonistic Pleiotropy at the Human IL6 Promoter Confers Genetic Resilience to the Pro-Inflammatory Effects of Adverse Social Conditions in Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Steven W.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Manu, Kavya; Telzer, Eva H; Kiang, Lisa; Bower, Julienne E.; Irwin, Michael R.; Fuligni, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors tested the evolutionary genetic hypothesis that the functional form of an asymmetrically risky Gene × Environment interaction will differ as a function of age-related antagonistic pleiotropy (i.e., show opposite effects in young vs. old individuals). Previous studies have identified a polymorphism in the human IL6 promoter (rs1800795; IL6 –174 G/C) that interacts with adverse socioenvironmental conditions to promote chronic inflammation in older adults (elevated C-reactive protein...

  18. A comparative clinical, pathological, biochemical and genetic study of fused in sarcoma proteinopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lashley, Tammaryn; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Bandopadhyay, Rina;

    2011-01-01

    familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and fused in sarcoma-positive neuronal inclusions have subsequently been demonstrated in neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease and atypical frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions. Here we provide clinical, imaging, morphological...... variant frontotemporal dementia, while the clinical presentation in neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease was more heterogeneous, including cases with motor neuron disease and extrapyramidal syndromes. Neuroimaging revealed atrophy of the frontal and anterior temporal lobes as well...... and shown to be more insoluble in the atypical frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions subgroup compared with neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease. There is considerable overlap and also significant differences in fused in sarcoma-positive pathology between the two...

  19. Genetic diversity of clinical isolates of Bacillus cereus using multilocus sequence typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruckler James M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus cereus is most commonly associated with foodborne illness (diarrheal and emetic but is also an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe and fatal infections. Several multilocus sequence typing (MLST schemes have recently been developed to genotype B. cereus and analysis has suggested a clonal or weakly clonal population structure for B. cereus and its close relatives B. anthracis and B. thuringiensis. In this study we used MLST to determine if B. cereus isolates associated with illnesses of varying severity (e.g., severe, systemic vs. gastrointestinal (GI illness were clonal or formed clonal complexes. Results A retrospective analysis of 55 clinical B. cereus isolates submitted to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention between 1954 and 2004 was conducted. Clinical isolates from severe infections (n = 27, gastrointestinal (GI illness (n = 18, and associated isolates from food (n = 10 were selected for analysis using MLST. The 55 isolates were diverse and comprised 38 sequence types (ST in two distinct clades. Of the 27 isolates associated with serious illness, 13 clustered in clade 1 while 14 were in clade 2. Isolates associated with GI illness were also found throughout clades 1 and 2, while no isolates in this study belonged to clade 3. All the isolates from this study belonging to the clade 1/cereus III lineage were associated with severe disease while isolates belonging to clade1/cereus II contained isolates primarily associated with severe disease and emetic illness. Only three STs were observed more than once for epidemiologically distinct isolates. Conclusion STs of clinical B. cereus isolates were phylogenetically diverse and distributed among two of three previously described clades. Greater numbers of strains will need to be analyzed to confirm if specific lineages or clonal complexes are more likely to contain clinical isolates or be associated with specific illness, similar to B. anthracis and

  20. Genetic testing for young-onset colorectal cancer: case report and evidence-based clinical guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yaolin; Boardman, Lisa A; Miller, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Young-onset colorectal cancer is clinicopathologically different from older-onset colorectal cancer and tends to occur in patients with hereditary germline conditions such as Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis. Case report. We describe the case of a 44-year-old man with a paternal history of colon polyps, a personal 2-year history of hematochezia, and a diagnosis of rectal cancer. Further clinical evaluation of the patient at our institution determined the cancer to ...

  1. Different clinical outcomes of Entamoeba histolytica in Malaysia: does genetic diversity exist?

    OpenAIRE

    Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Abdul Ghani, Mohamed Kamel; Azreen, Siti Nor; Salleh, Fatmah Md; Ghazali, Nuraffini; Bernadus, Mekadina; Moktar, Norhayati

    2013-01-01

    International audience The present study was conducted to investigate the clinical outcomes of Entamoeba histolytica infection in symptomatic and asymptomatic Orang Asli (aborigine) communities in Malaysia. Examination was performed on 500 stool samples obtained from Orang Asli communities in 3 different states using formalin-ether concentration, trichrome staining, and single-round PCR techniques. Out of 500 stool samples, single infection of E. histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Entamoeb...

  2. Practical aspects of genetic identification of hallucinogenic and other poisonous mushrooms for clinical and forensic purposes

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalczyk, Marek; Sekuła, Andrzej; Mleczko, Piotr; Olszowy, Zofia; Kujawa, Anna; Zubek, Szymon; Kupiec, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Aim To assess the usefulness of a DNA-based method for identifying mushroom species for application in forensic laboratory practice. Methods Two hundred twenty-one samples of clinical forensic material (dried mushrooms, food remains, stomach contents, feces, etc) were analyzed. ITS2 region of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) was sequenced and the sequences were compared with reference sequences collected from the National Center for Biotechnology Information gene bank (GenBank). Sporological ide...

  3. Clinical, histopathologic, and genetic investigation in two large families with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmgren, B; Lindskog, S; Elgadi, A; Norgren, S

    2004-04-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) type II, an inherited disorder affecting dentin, has been linked to mutations in the dentin sialophosphoprotein ( DSPP) gene on chromosome 4q21. The gene product is cleaved into two dentin-specific matrix proteins, dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein. The aim of this investigation was to study genotypes and phenotypes in two affected families with special reference to clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic manifestations. Seven affected members of Family A and five of Family B were documented clinically and radiographically; 14 and 10 teeth, respectively, were available for histopathologic investigation and prepared for ground sections, which were assessed semiquantitatively for dysplastic manifestations in the dentin according to the scoring system, dysplastic dentin score (DDS). Venous blood samples were collected from six affected and ten unaffected members of Family A, and from eight affected and six unaffected members of Family B. Genomic DNA was extracted and used for sequence analyses. The two families presented with different missense mutations. An Arg68Trp missense mutation in the DSP part of the gene was revealed in all six analyzed affected individuals in Family A. This mutation was not present in any of the ten healthy members. In Family B, an Ala15Val missense mutation involving the last residue of the signal peptide was found in all eight affected but in none of the six healthy members. The clinical and radiographic disturbances and DDS were more severe in Family B. The data indicate the presence of a genotype-phenotype correlation in DI type II.

  4. Genetic variants in matrix metalloproteinase genes as disposition factors for ovarian cancer risk, survival, and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Ye, Yuanqing; Lin, Jie; Meyer, Larissa; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong

    2015-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading female cancers in the United States. Challenges remain in early diagnosis of this deadly disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) family genes are paradoxically involved in cancer promotion and suppression. We hypothesize that genetic variants in MMP genes are associated with ovarian cancer development, so they could be potential markers for ovarian cancer diagnosis and prognosis. In this study of 417 ovarian cancer cases and 417 healthy controls, we genotyped a comprehensive panel of 266 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 23 MMP genes and analysed their associations with ovarian cancer risk, overall survival and treatment response in ovarian cancer cases who received platinum-based chemotherapy with surgery. In the analysis on 339 Caucasian cases and 349 Caucasian controls, 4 SNPs were significantly associated with cancer risk. The most significant association was observed for rs2292730 (OR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.39-2.96, P = 0.0002). Classification and regression tree analysis identified four terminal nodes with differential risk of ovarian cancer. Thirty-four SNPs were significantly associated with overall survival and four of which showed significant association with response to chemotherapy. Unfavourable genotype analysis of top SNPs on overall risk of death showed significant gene-dosage effect, survival tree analysis differentiated patients into distinct risk groups based on their genetic profiles with median survival times (MSTs) ranging from 17.7 to 151.7 months. In conclusion, our results suggest that genetic variants in MMP pathway genes may modulate the risk and clinical outcomes of ovarian cancer, both individually and jointly. PMID:25867973

  5. Infratentorial low-grade oligoastrocytoma with aggressive clinical behavior in an adult: a case report with genetic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Keisho; Toda, Masahiro; Sasaki, Hikaru; Kitamura, Yohei; Mikami, Shuji; Hirato, Junko; Inoue, Satoshi; Kawase, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2013-04-01

    Oligoastrocytoma preferentially arises in the cerebral hemisphere, and a cerebellar location is unusual. We report the case of a 35-year-old woman with an aggressive cerebellar tumor histopathologically diagnosed as oligoastrocytoma World Health Organization (WHO) grade II. After partial removal of the tumor, she underwent concomitant temozolomide (TMZ) therapy with local irradiation followed by additional TMZ monotherapy. However, her symptoms gradually worsened, and chronological magnetic resonance imaging showed remarkable tumor enlargement. In accordance with the aggressive clinical course, unfavorable genetic characteristics such as the gain of the entire chromosome 7, loss of 9p, absence of 1p/19q codeletion, absence of methylation of the O6-methylguanine-deoxyribonucleic acid methyltransferase promoter, and absence of the isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 mutation were observed. The present case illustrates that these molecular characteristics represent the biological features of gliomas more closely than the histopathological diagnosis and may also suggest that infratentorial gliomas arise through a distinct tumorigenic pathway from their supratentorial counterparts.

  6. A Novel Clinical Decision Support System Using Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm for the Assessment of Fetal Well-Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindhu Ravindran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel clinical decision support system is proposed in this paper for evaluating the fetal well-being from the cardiotocogram (CTG dataset through an Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm (IAGA and Extreme Learning Machine (ELM. IAGA employs a new scaling technique (called sigma scaling to avoid premature convergence and applies adaptive crossover and mutation techniques with masking concepts to enhance population diversity. Also, this search algorithm utilizes three different fitness functions (two single objective fitness functions and multi-objective fitness function to assess its performance. The classification results unfold that promising classification accuracy of 94% is obtained with an optimal feature subset using IAGA. Also, the classification results are compared with those of other Feature Reduction techniques to substantiate its exhaustive search towards the global optimum. Besides, five other benchmark datasets are used to gauge the strength of the proposed IAGA algorithm.

  7. Clinical, pathological and genetic study of a kindred of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yan-qing; GUO Ning; HUANG Fan; LI Ling; YAO Xiao-li; LI Xun-hua; ZHANG Cheng; LIANG Xiu-ling

    2005-01-01

    @@ The first description of a syndrome including stroke-like episodes, lactic acidaemia, and ragged red fibres, was reported by Shapira et al in 1975.1 Pavlakis et al2 described further cases, introduced the acronym MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes), and suggested that this represented a distinct mitochondrial disease phenotype. In 1990, Goto et al3 identified A3243G mutation in the transfer RNA (tRNA) leucine (UUR) gene in some patients with MELAS. Although this mutation has now been established to be the commonest mtDNA defect it is often misdiagnosed. Here we report a kindred of MELAS including a mother and a son. Clinical, pathological and genetic studies are proceeding.

  8. Genetic polymorphism in domain I of the apical membrane antigen-1 among Plasmodium knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Mun Yik; Wong, Shen Siang; Silva, Jeremy Ryan De; Lau, Yee Ling

    2015-12-01

    The simian malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is now recognized as a species that can cause human malaria. The first report of large scale human knowlesi malaria was in 2004 in Malaysia Borneo. Since then, hundreds of human knowlesi malaria cases have been reported in Southeast Asia. The present study investigates the genetic polymorphism of P. knowlesi DI domain of the apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1), a protein considered as a promising vaccine candidate for malaria. The DI domain of AMA-1 gene of P. knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia was amplified by PCR, cloned into Escherichia coli, then sequenced and analysed. Ninety-seven DI domain sequences were obtained. Comparison at the nucleotide level against P. knowlesi strain H as reference sequence showed 21 synonymous and 25 nonsynonymous mutations. Nonetheless, nucleotide sequence analysis revealed low genetic diversity of the DI domain, and it was under purifying (negative) selection. At the amino acid level, 26 different haplotypes were identified and 2 were predominant haplotypes (H1, H2) with high frequencies. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the 26 haplotypes could be clustered into 2 distinct groups (I and II). Members of the groups were basically derived from haplotypes H1 and H2, respectively.

  9. Advanced Genetic Testing Comes to the Pain Clinic to Make a Diagnosis of Paroxysmal Extreme Pain Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Cannon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe the use of an advanced genetic testing technique, whole exome sequencing, to diagnose a patient and their family with a SCN9A channelopathy. Setting. Academic tertiary care center. Design. Case report. Case Report. A 61-year-old female with a history of acute facial pain, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, and constipation was found to have a gain of function SCN9A mutation by whole exome sequencing. This mutation resulted in an SCN9A channelopathy that is most consistent with a diagnosis of paroxysmal extreme pain disorder. In addition to the patient being diagnosed, four siblings have a clinical diagnosis of SCN9A channelopathy as they have consistent symptoms and a sister with a known mutation. For treatment, gabapentin was ineffective and carbamazepine was not tolerated. Nontraditional therapies improved symptoms and constipation resolved with pelvic floor retraining with biofeedback. Conclusion. Patients with a personal and family history of chronic pain may benefit from a referral to Medical Genetics. Pelvic floor retraining with biofeedback should be considered for patients with a SCN9A channelopathy and constipation.

  10. Screening of CACNA1A and ATP1A2 genes in hemiplegic migraine: clinical, genetic, and functional studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreño, Oriel; Corominas, Roser; Serra, Selma Angèlica; Sintas, Cèlia; Fernández-Castillo, Noèlia; Vila-Pueyo, Marta; Toma, Claudio; Gené, Gemma G; Pons, Roser; Llaneza, Miguel; Sobrido, María-Jesús; Grinberg, Daniel; Valverde, Miguel Ángel; Fernández-Fernández, José Manuel; Macaya, Alfons; Cormand, Bru

    2013-01-01

    Hemiplegic migraine (HM) is a rare and severe subtype of autosomal dominant migraine, characterized by a complex aura including some degree of motor weakness. Mutations in four genes (CACNA1A, ATP1A2, SCN1A and PRRT2) have been detected in familial and in sporadic cases. This genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder is often accompanied by permanent ataxia, epileptic seizures, mental retardation, and chronic progressive cerebellar atrophy. Here we report a mutation screening in the CACNA1A and ATP1A2 genes in 18 patients with HM. Furthermore, intragenic copy number variant (CNV) analysis was performed in CACNA1A using quantitative approaches. We identified four previously described missense CACNA1A mutations (p.Ser218Leu, p.Thr501Met, p.Arg583Gln, and p.Thr666Met) and two missense changes in the ATP1A2 gene, the previously described p.Ala606Thr and the novel variant p.Glu825Lys. No structural variants were found. This genetic screening allowed the identification of more than 30% of the disease alleles, all present in a heterozygous state. Functional consequences of the CACNA1A-p.Thr501Met mutation, previously described only in association with episodic ataxia, and ATP1A2-p.Glu825Lys, were investigated by means of electrophysiological studies, cell viability assays or Western blot analysis. Our data suggest that both these variants are disease-causing. PMID:24498617

  11. NATO Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Lynn, W

    1975-01-01

    The contents of this volume involve selection, emendation and up-dating of papers presented at the NATO Conference "Mathe­ matical Analysis of Decision problems in Ecology" in Istanbul, Turkey, July 9-13, 1973. It was sponsored by the System Sciences Division of NATO directed by Dr. B. Bayraktar with local arrange­ ments administered by Dr. Ilhami Karayalcin, professor of the Department of Industrial Engineering at the Technical University of Istanbul. It was organized by A. Charnes, University professor across the University of Texas System, and Walter R.Lynn, Di­ rector of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell Unjversity. The objective of the conference was to bring together a group of leading researchers from the major sciences involved in eco­ logical problems and to present the current state of progress in research of a mathematical nature which might assist in the solu­ tion of these problems. Although their presentations are not herein recorded, the key­ note address of Dr....

  12. EGC Conferences

    CERN Document Server

    Ritschard, Gilbert; Pinaud, Bruno; Venturini, Gilles; Zighed, Djamel; Advances in Knowledge Discovery and Management

    This book is a collection of representative and novel works done in Data Mining, Knowledge Discovery, Clustering and Classification that were originally presented in French at the EGC'2012 Conference held in Bordeaux, France, on January 2012. This conference was the 12th edition of this event, which takes place each year and which is now successful and well-known in the French-speaking community. This community was structured in 2003 by the foundation of the French-speaking EGC society (EGC in French stands for ``Extraction et Gestion des Connaissances'' and means ``Knowledge Discovery and Management'', or KDM). This book is intended to be read by all researchers interested in these fields, including PhD or MSc students, and researchers from public or private laboratories. It concerns both theoretical and practical aspects of KDM. The book is structured in two parts called ``Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining'' and ``Classification and Feature Extraction or Selection''. The first part (6 chapters) deals with...

  13. The dawn of Aurora kinase research: from fly genetics to the clinic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar eCarmena

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aurora kinases comprise a family of highly conserved serine-threonine protein kinases that play a pivotal role in the regulation of cell cycle. Aurora kinases are not only involved in the control of multiple processes during cell division but also coordinate chromosomal and cytoskeletal events, contributing to the regulation of checkpoints and ensuring the smooth progression of the cell cycle.Because of their fundamental contribution to cell cycle regulation, Aurora kinases were originally identified in independent genetic screens designed to find genes involved in the regulation of cell division. The first aurora mutant was part of a collection of mutants isolated in C. Nusslein-Volhard’s laboratory. This collection was screened in D. M. Glover’s laboratory in search for mutations disrupting the centrosome cycle in embryos derived from homozygous mutant mothers. The mutants identified were given names related to the polar regions, and included not only aurora but also the equally famous polo. Ipl1, the only Aurora in yeast, was identified in a genetic screen looking for mutations that caused chromosome segregation defects. The discovery of a second Aurora-like kinase in mammals opened a new chapter in the research of Aurora kinases. The rat kinase AIM was found to be highly homologous to the fly and yeast proteins, but localised at the midzone and midbody and was proposed to have a role in cytokinesis. Homologs of the equatorial Aurora (Aurora B were identified in metazoans ranging from flies to humans. Xenopus Aurora B was found to be in a complex with the chromosomal passenger INCENP, and both proteins were shown to be essential in flies for chromosome structure, segregation, central spindle formation and cytokinesis. Fifteen years on, Aurora kinase research is an active field of research. After the successful introduction of the first anti-mitotic agents in cancer therapy, both Auroras have become the focus of attention as targets for

  14. Clinical and genetic characteristics of Chinese hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Lin Wang; Ying Yuan; Su-Zhan Zhang; Shan-Rong Cai; Yan-Qin Huang; Qiang Jiang; Shu Zheng

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical characteristics of Chinese hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families and to screen the germline mutations of human mismatch repair genes hMLH1 and hMSH2 in the probands.METHODS: Thirty-one independent Chinese HNPCC families were collected in Zhejiang Province. All of them met Chinese HNPCC criteria. Clinical data about patient gender, site of colorectal cancer, age of onset, history of multiple colorectal cancer, associated extracolonic cancer were recorded. PCR and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) were employed to screen the mutations. Sequencing analysis was used to find out the exact mutation site and characteristics of the samples showing abnormal DHPLC profiles.RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-six malignant neoplasms were found in 107 patients including 14 multiple cancers. One hundred and six of the 136 neoplasms (77.9%) were diagnosed as colorectal cancer, with an average age of onset at 48.57 ± 29.00 years. Gastric cancer was the most common extracolonic cancer (10.3%) in these families. Twenty-three different sequence variations in hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes were detected in these 17 families. Fifteen sequence variations were located in the exons, including 5 SNPs, 3 silent mutations, 3 missense mutations, 2 nonsense mutations and 2 frameshift mutations. The latter seven mutations seemed to be pathogenic.CONCLUSION: Germline mutations of hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes are identified in about one-third HNPCC kindreds fulfilling Chinese HNPCC criteria. Chinese HNPCC families have some particular clinical characteristics, such as a left-sided predominance, less synchronous or metachronous colorectal cancer, and frequent occurrence of gastric cancer.

  15. SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHY FROM NORTHERN IRAN: A CLINICAL AND GENETIC SPECTRUM OF TEN PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Salehi Omran

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveAutosomal recessive spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is, after cystic fibrosis, the second most common fatal monogenic disorder and the second most common hereditary neuromuscular disease after duchenne dystrophy. The disease is characterized by degeneration of anterior horn cells leading to progressiveparalysis with muscular atrophy. Depending on the clinical type (Werdnig- Hoffmann = type I, intermediate form = type II, Kugelberg-Welander = type III, some workers also have delineated an adult form of SMA (SMA type 4.SMA causes early death or increasing disability in childhood. The aim of this investigation was to describe the clinical findings of patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA with survival motor neuron (SMN gene deletion.Materials & methodsThis is a descriptive study conducted on 10 patients of SMA, confirmed by deletion of the SMN gene. All 10 patients had symmetrical muscle weakness, which was diffuse in those with onset of symptoms up to 1 months of age, and either proximal or predominant in lower limbs. Frequency determination of positive clinical and laboratory data was done according to revised diagnostic criteriaResultsIt was found that all patients with SMA had homozygous deletions of exons 7 and 8 of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene, which is one of the candidate genes identified within 5q13. Fasciculations, atrophy and decreased DTR were frequent findings. Laboratory metabolic tests and all brain CT scans were normal. EMG and NCV findings, all showed normal motor and Sensory NCV and denervation of muscles of upper and lower extremities were compatible with a diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy.ConclusionOur results confirm that SMN1 copy number analysis is an important parameter for identification of couples at risk of having a child affected with SMA and reduces unwarranted prenatal diagnosis for SMA.

  16. Clinical, haematological, and genetic studies of type 2 normal Hb A2 beta thalassaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Metaxotou-Mavromati, A; Kattamis, C; Matathia, L; Tzetis, M; Kanavakis, E

    1988-01-01

    The clinical and haematological phenotype as well as chain synthesis data were studied in 35 doubly heterozygous patients with either normal Hb A2 and Hb F, type 2 beta thalassaemia and beta (high A2) thalassaemia (26 patients), or type 2 and other rare beta or delta beta variants (nine patients). Patients doubly heterozygous for type 2 and beta zero or delta beta zero thalassaemia variants had no detectable Hb A, indicating that the type 2 normal A2 beta thalassaemia is primarily the result ...

  17. GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B disease: An update on genetic alterations and clinical findings

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B syndrome, both arising from beta-galactosidase (GLB1) deficiency, are very rare lysosomal storage diseases with an incidence of about 1:100,000- 1:200,000 live births worldwide. Here we report the beta-galactosidase gene (GLB1) mutation analysis of 21 unrelated GM1 gangliosidosis patients, and of 4 Morquio B patients, of whom two are brothers. Clinical features of the patients were collected and compared with those in literature. In silico ...

  18. Stüve-Wiedemann Syndrome: Update on Clinical and Genetic Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo Bertola, Débora; Honjo, Rachel S; Baratela, Wagner A R

    2016-04-01

    Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bowed long bones, joint restrictions, dysautonomia, and respiratory and feeding difficulties, leading to death in the neonatal period and infancy in several occasions. Since the first cases in 1971, much has been learned about this condition, including its molecular basis - mutations in the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor gene (LIFR) -, natural history and management possibilities. This review aims to highlight the clinical aspects, radiological features, molecular findings, and management strategies in Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome. PMID:27194968

  19. COMPARISON OF COUPLES REFERRED AND NOT REFERRED FOR GENETIC-COUNSELING IN A GENETIC CLINIC AFTER THE BIRTH OF A CHILD WITH A CONGENITAL ANOMALY - A STUDY IN A POPULATION IN THE NORTHEASTERN NETHERLANDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CORNEL, MC; VANESSEN, AJ; TENKATE, LP

    1992-01-01

    After the birth of a child with a congenital anomaly, parents have many questions about cause, prognosis, and recurrence risk. An important means of transmitting such information is referral to a genetic clinic. We were interested in knowing what determines whether or not parents are referred for ge

  20. Clinical trial perspective for adult and juvenile Huntington's disease using genetically-engineered mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Peter; Torrest, Audrey; Pollock, Kari; Dahlenburg, Heather; Annett, Geralyn; Nolta, Jan A; Fink, Kyle D

    2016-05-01

    Progress to date from our group and others indicate that using genetically-engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to secrete brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) supports our plan to submit an Investigational New Drug application to the Food and Drug Administration for the future planned Phase 1 safety and tolerability trial of MSC/BDNF in patients with Huntington's disease (HD). There are also potential applications of this approach beyond HD. Our biological delivery system for BDNF sets the precedent for adult stem cell therapy in the brain and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. The MSC/BDNF product could also be considered for studies of regeneration in traumatic brain injury, spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury. This work also provides a platform for our future gene editing studies, since we will again use MSCs to deliver the needed molecules into the central nervous system.

  1. The genetics of Leigh syndrome and its implications for clinical practice and risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhoy IS

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ilene S Ruhoy, Russell P Saneto Division of Pediatric Neurology, Seattle Children's Hospital/University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Leigh syndrome, also referred to as subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy, is a severe, early-onset neurodegenerative disorder that is relentlessly progressive and devastating to both the patient and the patient's family. Attributed to the ultimate failure of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, once it starts, the disease often results in the regression of both mental and motor skills, leading to disability and rapid progression to death. It is a mitochondrial disorder with both phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. The cause of death is most often respiratory failure, but there are a whole host of complications, including refractory seizures, that may further complicate morbidity and mortality. The symptoms may develop slowly or with rapid progression, usually associated with age of onset. Although the disease is usually diagnosed within the first year of life, it is important to note that recent studies reveal phenotypic heterogeneity, with some patients having evidence of in utero presentation and others having adult-onset symptoms.Keywords: mitochondrial disorder, neurodegeneration, multisystemic disease, oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial DNA, neuroimaging, seizures

  2. Clinical applications of MARSALA for preimplantation genetic diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yixin; Zhi, Xu; Zhu, Xiaohui; Huang, Jin; Lian, Ying; Li, Rong; Jin, Hongyan; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Wenxin; Nie, Yanli; Wei, Yuan; Liu, Zhaohui; Song, Donghong; Liu, Ping; Qiao, Jie; Yan, Liying

    2016-09-20

    Conventional PCR methods combined with linkage analysis based on short tandem repeats (STRs) or Karyomapping with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, have been applied to preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), an autosome recessive disorder. However, it has limitations in SMA diagnosis by Karyomapping, and these methods are unable to distinguish wild-type embryos with carriers effectively. Mutated allele revealed by sequencing with aneuploidy and linkage analyses (MARSALA) is a new method allowing embryo selection by a one-step next-generation sequencing (NGS) procedure, which has been applied in PGD for both autosome dominant and X-linked diseases in our group previously. In this study, we carried out PGD based on MARSALA for two carrier families with SMA affected children. As a result, one of the couples has given birth to a healthy baby free of mutations in SMA-causing gene. It is the first time that MARSALA was applied to PGD for SMA, and we can distinguish the embryos with heterozygous deletion (carriers) from the wild-type (normal) ones accurately through this NGS-based method. In addition, direct mutation detection allows us to identify the affected embryos (homozygous deletion), which can be regarded as probands for linkage analysis, in case that the affected family member is absent. In the future, the NGS-based MARSALA method is expected to be used in PGD for all monogenetic disorders with known pathogenic gene mutation. PMID:27599922

  3. Clinical trial perspective for adult and juvenile Huntington's disease using genetically-engineered mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Peter; Torrest, Audrey; Pollock, Kari; Dahlenburg, Heather; Annett, Geralyn; Nolta, Jan A; Fink, Kyle D

    2016-05-01

    Progress to date from our group and others indicate that using genetically-engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to secrete brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) supports our plan to submit an Investigational New Drug application to the Food and Drug Administration for the future planned Phase 1 safety and tolerability trial of MSC/BDNF in patients with Huntington's disease (HD). There are also potential applications of this approach beyond HD. Our biological delivery system for BDNF sets the precedent for adult stem cell therapy in the brain and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. The MSC/BDNF product could also be considered for studies of regeneration in traumatic brain injury, spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury. This work also provides a platform for our future gene editing studies, since we will again use MSCs to deliver the needed molecules into the central nervous system. PMID:27335539

  4. [From congenital glaucoma to chronic open angle glaucoma in adulthood: a clinical and genetic continuum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufier, Jean-Louis; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Kaplan, Josseline; Roche, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Congenital glaucoma, a true hydrocephalus of the eye, is defined by ocular hypertension resulting in buphthalmos in children up to three years old, the elasticity of the eye wall allowing its expansion. Juvenile glaucoma in teenagers and chronic glaucoma in adults do not alter the external aspect of the eye, as the eyeball has lost its elasticity. However, chronic ocular hypertension always causes ischemic excavation of the optic nerve head, leading to insidious amputation of the visual field and, potentially, blindness. Like most ophthalmological disorders, the different types of glaucoma have been shown to be genetically determined, and alterations in several genes have been identified. These altered genes can be expressed more or less early in life, suggesting a role of modifier genes. The role of CYP1B1 alterations in classic primary congenital glaucoma is well known, as is the role of PITX2, FOXC1, PAX6 and LOXC1 alterations in secondary congenital glaucoma due to iridogoniodysgenesis, and of MYOC alterations in the genesis of chronic glaucoma in adulthood. An outbred family carrying CYP1B1 mutations in the compound heterozygous state includes two sibs with primary congenital glaucoma and two others who developed chronic glaucoma in adulthood. PMID:24672985

  5. A new recombinant factor VIII: from genetics to clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santagostino E

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Elena Santagostino Angelo Bianchi Bonomi Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy Abstract: Advances in recombinant technology and knowledge about coagulation factor VIII (FVIII are building a platform for new therapeutic options in patients with hemophilia A. The development of turoctocog alfa, a novel, high-purity, third-generation, B-domain truncated recombinant FVIII, has been produced and formulated without the use of animal-derived or human serum-derived components, in the wake of understanding of the new biochemical characteristics of FVIII, namely its protein structure, and glycosylation and sulfating patterns. Culture conditions and a five-step purification process have been developed to optimize the safety of turoctocog alfa. The results of two pilot clinical trials using turoctocog alfa confirmed high safety levels, with no patient developing inhibitors during the period of observation. The purpose of this review is to describe briefly the molecular and biological properties of turoctocog alfa, together with details of its clinical development, with emphasis on the needs of patients with hemophilia A. Keywords: hemophilia A, recombinant factor VIII, turoctocog alfa, purification, inhibitor, safety

  6. 基因临床研究与应用的伦理探讨%Discussion on Ethics of Clinical Genetic Trials and Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白洁; 周萍; 薛迪

    2013-01-01

    Ethical issues of genetic clinical trials and clinical practice focus on the safety of recipients themselves and their offsprings as well as the security of entire human genome, and the rational management of genetic information. In clinical genetic trials and practice, basic principles as well as particular bioethical principles for genetics, such as reciprocity, mutuality, solidarity, citizenry and universality, should be followed. In order to provide information for policy making to facilitate the development of genetic technology in health care field, empirical studies on current status of clinical genetic trials and practice, physicians' cognition of genetic ethics and bioethics education in medical schools should be strengthened in China.%基因临床研究与应用的伦理问题主要是基因技术对接受者自身与其子代的安全性及对整个人类基因库的影响和基因信息的合理管理.在基因临床研究与应用中,除遵循生命伦理的基本原则外,还应遵循互惠性、相关性、一致性、公民性、普世性等特殊的伦理原则.我国应加强对基因临床研究与应用现况、临床医师基因伦理认知以及医学院校生命伦理教学状况的实证研究,为基因技术在我国医疗卫生领域的发展提供决策依据.

  7. Genetic and epigenetic factors at COL2A1 and ABCA4 influence clinical outcome in congenital toxoplasmosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarra E Jamieson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary Toxoplasma gondii infection during pregnancy can be transmitted to the fetus. At birth, infected infants may have intracranial calcification, hydrocephalus, and retinochoroiditis, and new ocular lesions can occur at any age after birth. Not all children who acquire infection in utero develop these clinical signs of disease. Whilst severity of disease is influenced by trimester in which infection is acquired by the mother, other factors including genetic predisposition may contribute. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In 457 mother-child pairs from Europe, and 149 child/parent trios from North America, we show that ocular and brain disease in congenital toxoplasmosis associate with polymorphisms in ABCA4 encoding ATP-binding cassette transporter, subfamily A, member 4. Polymorphisms at COL2A1 encoding type II collagen associate only with ocular disease. Both loci showed unusual inheritance patterns for the disease allele when comparing outcomes in heterozygous affected children with outcomes in affected children of heterozygous mothers. Modeling suggested either an effect of mother's genotype, or parent-of-origin effects. Experimental studies showed that both ABCA4 and COL2A1 show isoform-specific epigenetic modifications consistent with imprinting. CONCLUSIONS: These associations between clinical outcomes of congenital toxoplasmosis and polymorphisms at ABCA4 and COL2A1 provide novel insight into the molecular pathways that can be affected by congenital infection with this parasite.

  8. Clinical pathological and genetic analysis of 2 cases of mitochondrial myopathy presented as acute motor axonal neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou-min YIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The main clinical manifestations of mitochondrial myopathy are chronic limb weakness and muscular soreness. Subclinical peripheral nerve injury is also reported, but acute axonal neuropathy.like syndrome concurrent with lactic acidosis is rare. In this paper the clinical features of 2 patients presenting as acute lactic acidosis and sudden muscle weakness were analyzed. Pathological changes and genetic mutations were detected.  Methods Electromyography (EMG and muscle biopsy were performed. Modified Gomori trichrome (MGT and succinodehydrogenase (SDH staining were used to identify pathological changes. Changes of ultra microstructure of muscular tissue were observed under electron microscope. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA full length sequencing was performed using 24 pairs of partially overlapping primers.  Results EMG showed a coexistence of neurogenic and myogenic changes. Dramatic decrease of motor nerve amplitude and moderately reduced sensory nerve amplitude were observed but nerve conduction velocity was normal in both patients. Impressive ragged red fibers were seen on MGT staining. Electron microscope showed dramatic mitochondrial abnormalities in Case 1 and paracrystaline inclusions in Case 2. mtDNA sequencing showed 3243A > G mutation in Case 1 and 8344A > G mutation in Case 2. Conclusions Mitochondrial myopathy can present as metabolic crisis like acute lactic acidosis, dyspnea and acute motor axonal neuropathy.like syndrome. It is a life.threatening phenotype that needs more attention. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.06.007

  9. Clinical and genetic study of a juvenile-onset Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Ying

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant hereditary progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a distinct phenotype characterized by chorea, dementia, cognitive and affective impairment. There are selective neural cell loss and atrophy in the caudate and putamen. Dr. George Huntington firstly described the disease accurately and insightfully, which led to a widespread recognition of the inherited chorea that now bears his name. Huntington disease gene (IT15 locus on chromosome 4p16.3, and encompasses 67 exons with a trinucleotide repeat (CAG in the first exon. The CAG repeat length is highly polymorphic in the population and expanded on at least one chromosome of individuals with HD. Clinically, patient with HD are often onset in adulthood. Juvenile-onset HD is relatively rare. Adult-onset HD patients usually have a CAG expansion from 40 to 55 whereas those with juvenile-onset greater than 60 which are often inherited from the father. We investigated the clinical features of a juvenile-onset case with Huntington disease and dynamic mutation of his family. Methods The CAG repeats of IT15 gene were detected using polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis in 115 individuals with preliminary diagnosis as Huntington disease. The repeat numbers of some samples carried expanded or intermediate alleles were verified by the pMD18-T vector clone sequencing. Results Fragment analysis showed that one juvenile-onset case presenting with cognitive dysfunction and hypokinesis carried 15/68 CAG repeats of IT15. His father carried 17/37 and mother carried 15/17. Conclusion 1 The juvenile-onset case of HD presented with different clinical features compared with adult-onset cases. The typical signs of adult-onset cases include progressive chorea, rigidity and dementia. The most common sign of juvenile-onset Huntington disease is cognitive decline. 2 The dynamic mutation of IT15 gene expansion of the CAG repeats in the

  10. Genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium identified in clinical samples from cities in Brazil and Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago; Velásquez, Jorge Néstor; Cunha, Flavia de Souza; Pantano, María Laura; Sodré, Fernando Campos; da Silva, Sidnei; Astudillo, Osvaldo Germán; Peralta, José Mauro; Carnevale, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    The identification and characterisation of Cryptosporidiumgenotypes and subtypes are fundamental to the study of cryptosporidiosis epidemiology, aiding in prevention and control strategies. The objective was to determine the genetic diversity ofCryptosporidium in samples obtained from hospitals of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and Buenos Aires, Argentina. Samples were analysed by microscopy and TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays forCryptosporidium detection, genotyped by nested-PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the 18S rRNA gene and subtyped by DNA sequencing of the gp60 gene. Among the 89 samples from Rio de Janeiro, Cryptosporidium spp were detected in 26 by microscopy/TaqMan PCR. In samples from Buenos Aires,Cryptosporidium was diagnosed in 15 patients of the 132 studied. The TaqMan PCR and the nested-PCR-RFLP detected Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium hominis, and co-infections of both species. In Brazilian samples, the subtypes IbA10G2 and IIcA5G3 were observed. The subtypes found in Argentinean samples were IbA10G2, IaA10G1R4, IaA11G1R4, and IeA11G3T3, and mixed subtypes of Ia and IIa families were detected in the co-infections. C. hominis was the species more frequently detected, and subtype family Ib was reported in both countries. Subtype diversity was higher in Buenos Aires than in Rio de Janeiro and two new subtypes were described for the first time. PMID:26814641

  11. MUSME Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Eusebio

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of MUSME 2014, held at Huatulco in Oaxaca, Mexico, October 2014. Topics include analysis and synthesis of mechanisms; dynamics of multibody systems; design algorithms for mechatronic systems; simulation procedures and results; prototypes and their performance; robots and micromachines; experimental validations; theory of mechatronic simulation; mechatronic systems; and control of mechatronic systems. The MUSME symposium on Multibody Systems and Mechatronics was held under the auspices of IFToMM, the International Federation for Promotion of Mechanism and Machine Science, and FeIbIM, the Iberoamerican Federation of Mechanical Engineering. Since the first symposium in 2002, MUSME events have been characterised by the way they stimulate the integration between the various mechatronics and multibody systems dynamics disciplines, present a forum for facilitating contacts among researchers and students mainly in South American countries, and serve as a joint conference for the ...

  12. Hereditary rickets. How genetic alterations explain the biochemical and clinical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Anna; Gole, Evaggelia; Nicolaidou, Polyxeni

    2013-12-01

    The reemergence of vitamin D deficiency in the industrialized countries resurrects the "threat" of nutritional rickets, especially among pediatric populations, a fact that may lead to underdiagnosis of hereditary rickets. Today, hereditary rickets may be subdivided into two main groups according to their biochemical profile: the one associated with defects in vitamin D synthesis and action and the second associated with abnormal phosphorus metabolism. The classification of the patients in a particular group of hereditary rickets is determinative of the treatment to follow. This review, through the recent advances on vitamin D and P metabolism, discusses the molecular and biochemical defects associated to each group of inherited rickets, as well as the clinical phenotypes and the recommended therapeutic approaches.

  13. Clinical and genetic predictors of response to narrowband ultraviolet B for the treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: There is considerable variability in the number of exposures of narrowband ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) needed to clear psoriasis and in the duration of remission. OBJECTIVES: We assessed clinical parameters as predictors of the number of exposures needed to clear psoriasis and of the duration of remission. The influence of genetic polymorphisms of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) on treatment response was also evaluated. METHODS: This was a prospective study of 119 patients with chronic plaque psoriasis treated with NB-UVB until clearance was achieved. They were then followed for up to 1 year or until relapse occurred. The frequency of the Fok1, Apa1, Bsm1, Taq1 and rs4516035 polymorphisms of the VDR gene was assessed in 93 of the 119 patients. RESULTS: Of the 119 patients, 105 completed the course of phototherapy. Using an intention to treat analysis, 83% of the initial cohort (99 of 119 patients) achieved clearance, in a median of 26 exposures (interquartile range 19-35) with a median remission duration of 16 weeks (interquartile range 9-22). Factors significantly associated with a lower number of exposures to clearance included a lower baseline Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (P = 0.004), lower baseline Dermatology Life Quality Index (P = 0.047), female sex (P = 0.043), lower body weight (P = 0.008), and a higher number of previous courses of TL-01 (P = 0.005). The only clinical factor influencing remission duration was number of exposures (P = 0.0009), with a decreased remission duration in those who required a greater number of exposures to clear. The Taq1 VDR polymorphism (rs731236) also significantly predicted remission duration (P = 0.038). Patients homozygous for the C allele, which is associated with decreased activity of the VDR, had a shorter remission duration than those heterozygous for the allele (P = 0.026) and those homozygous for the T allele (P = 0.013). CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the fact that both genetic and clinical parameters

  14. Clinical, biochemical, and genetic features of non-classical 21-hydroxylase deficiency in Japanese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashimada, Kenichi; Ishii, Tomohiro; Nagasaki, Keisuke; Ono, Makoto; Tajima, Toshihiro; Yokota, Ichiro; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Non-classical 21-hydroxylase deficiency (NC21-OHD) is a mild form of 21-hydroxylase deficiency lacking apparent symptoms of androgen excess at birth. Most NC21-OHD cases are diagnosed after the onset of puberty, while a substantial number of patients are not diagnosed during childhood. Previous studies have reported ethnic differences in the prevalence of NC21-OHD. To date, the clinical features of NC21-OHD in Japanese children have not been systemically reported. Thus, we performed 3 independent analyses: retrospective analyses of newborn screening in 2 major Japanese cities (Sapporo and Niigata) and a national surveillance collecting clinical information from pediatric endocrinologists throughout the country. During the last 10 years, one case of NC21-OHD was diagnosed by newborn screening in each city, resulting in incidences of 2.0 (95% confidence interval = 0.0-5.9) and 2.1 (0.0-6.2) per 1,000,000 in Sapporo and Niigata, respectively. We collected information from 85% of the 135 Councilors of Japanese Society of Pediatric Endocrinology. Fifteen NC21-OHD patients were diagnosed during childhood, resulting in the estimated prevalence of 0.58 (0.28-1.1) per 1,000,000. Eleven patients were discovered by newborn screening, 7 patients developed hyperandrogenism symptoms (2-8 years of age, median 7), and 9 patients were treated with hydrocortisone at the time of the survey. Ten out of 13 patients showed compound heterozygosity for the P30L mutation of CYP21A2. Our study suggests that the prevalence/incidence of NC21-OHD is lower than that in Western countries, and that the age for initial onset of androgen excess symptoms varies during the prepubertal period.

  15. Tentative clinical diagnosis of Lujan-Fryns syndrome--A conglomeration of different genetic entities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackmann, Karl; Rump, Andreas; Haas, Stefan A; Lemke, Johannes R; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Tzschach, Andreas; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Albrecht, Beate; Kuechler, Alma; Ripperger, Tim; Kobelt, Albrecht; Oexle, Konrad; Tinschert, Sigrid; Schrock, Evelin; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Di Donato, Nataliya

    2016-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of Lujan-Fryns syndrome (LFS) comprises X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) with marfanoid habitus, distinct combination of minor facial anomalies and nasal speech. However the definition of syndrome was significantly broadened since the original report and implies ID with marfanoid habitus. Mutations of three genes (MED12, UPF3B, and ZDHHC9) have been reported in "broadly defined" LFS. We examined these genes in 28 individuals with a tentative clinical diagnosis of LFS but we did not identify any causative mutation. By molecular karyotyping we detected other disorders, i.e., Phelan-McDermid syndrome and 16p11.2 microduplication, each in one patient. One affected individual was carrier of a different recurrent duplication on 16p11.2 that has been reported several times to the DECIPHER and ISCA databases in individuals with autism, intellectual disability (ID), and developmental delay. It may represent a new duplication syndrome. We also identified previously unreported de novo duplication on chromosome 12p13.31 which we considered to be disease-causing. X-exome sequencing of four individuals revealed private or non-recurrent mutations in NKAP and LAS1L in one patient each. While LFS is defined as a form of XLID, there seem to be various conditions that have rather similar phenotypes. Therefore, the combination of ID and marfanoid habitus in a male patient is not sufficient for the diagnosis of LFS. We suggest that the diagnosis of LFS in patients with ID and marfanoid habitus should be made only in presence of specific facial features, nasal speech and obvious X-linked segregation of the disorder or an unambiguously pathogenic mutation in the MED12.

  16. A GENETIC STUDY TO DIFFERENTIAL HA/CA MRSA ISOLATED FROM CLINICAL CASES IN IRAQ HOSPITALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISRAA MOHAMED SAFI AL- KADMY

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has been a major cause of nosocomial infections since the 1960s . Currently, MRSA is divided into two subgroups: the healthcare associated MRSA (HA-MRSA and community associated MRSA(CA-MRSA, CA-MRSA infections have been increasing. The most common of these infections present in soft skin. The aim of this study to different between CA and HA MRSA in clinical isolates of Baghdad hospitals.Methods: clinical isolates were collected from patients with different infections, Simple laboratory testing followed by the complementary API Staph, followed by antibiotic sensitivity and D-test, and finally by using PCR technique, detection of this genes : mecA, PVL, SCCmec IV and V .Results: A total of 105 S.aureus found 104 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains, after a D-test , S.aureus divided to two group: CA and HA –MRSA, where the ratio of CA 18(17.1% out of 105 isolates, while HA reached 87(82.8%. MRSA was characterized by PCR amplification mecA gene, 104(99.04% isolates out of 105 gave positive result, all isolates of HA carry mecA gene, while 17 out of 18 isolates of CA carry mecA gene which was CA-MRSA and one isolates was CA-MSSA . All isolates 18(100% of CA gave positive result in risk factors PVL gene, while for detection of SCCmec IV 17 (94.4% out of 18 isolates of CA gave positive result, and finally two isolates of CA-MRSA gave positive result in SCCmec V gene .Conclusions: This is the first report in Iraq for the emergence of CA isolates especially CA-MRSA which is responsible for the majority of infection in soft tissue and skin abscesses , are likely to be sensitive to clindamycin.

  17. Preclinical Biosafety Evaluation of Genetically Modified Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Clinical Applications to Brainstem Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Ah; Yun, Jun-Won; Joo, Kyeung Min; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kwak, Pil Ae; Lee, Young Eun; You, Ji-Ran; Kwon, Euna; Kim, Woo Ho; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2016-06-15

    Stem-cell based gene therapy is a promising novel therapeutic approach for inoperable invasive tumors, including brainstem glioma. Previously, we demonstrated the therapeutic potential of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAT-MSC) genetically engineered to express a secreted form of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (sTRAIL) against brainstem glioma. However, safety concerns should be comprehensively investigated before clinical applications of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL. At first, we injected stereotactically low (1.2 × 10(5) cells/18 μL), medium (2.4 × 10(5)/18 μL), or high dose (3.6 × 10(5)/18 μL) of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL into the brainstems of immunodeficient mice reflecting the plan of the future clinical trial. Local toxicity, systemic toxicity, secondary tumor formation, and biodistribution of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL were investigated. Next, presence of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was confirmed in the brain and major organs at 4, 9, and 14 weeks in brainstem glioma-bearing mice. In the 15-week subchronic toxicity test, no serious adverse events in terms of body weight, food consumption, clinical symptom, urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry, organ weight, and histopathology were observed. In the 26-week tumorigenicity test, hAT-MSC.sTRAIL made no detectable tumors, whereas positive control U-87 MG cells made huge tumors in the brainstem. No remaining hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was observed in any organs examined, including the brainstem at 15 or 26 weeks. In brainstem glioma-bearing mice, injected hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was observed, but gradually decreased over time in the brain. The mRNA of human specific GAPDH and TRAIL was not detected in all major organs. These results indicate that the hAT-MSC.sTRAIL could be applicable to the future clinical trials in terms of biosafety.

  18. Preclinical Biosafety Evaluation of Genetically Modified Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Clinical Applications to Brainstem Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Ah; Yun, Jun-Won; Joo, Kyeung Min; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kwak, Pil Ae; Lee, Young Eun; You, Ji-Ran; Kwon, Euna; Kim, Woo Ho; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2016-06-15

    Stem-cell based gene therapy is a promising novel therapeutic approach for inoperable invasive tumors, including brainstem glioma. Previously, we demonstrated the therapeutic potential of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAT-MSC) genetically engineered to express a secreted form of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (sTRAIL) against brainstem glioma. However, safety concerns should be comprehensively investigated before clinical applications of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL. At first, we injected stereotactically low (1.2 × 10(5) cells/18 μL), medium (2.4 × 10(5)/18 μL), or high dose (3.6 × 10(5)/18 μL) of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL into the brainstems of immunodeficient mice reflecting the plan of the future clinical trial. Local toxicity, systemic toxicity, secondary tumor formation, and biodistribution of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL were investigated. Next, presence of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was confirmed in the brain and major organs at 4, 9, and 14 weeks in brainstem glioma-bearing mice. In the 15-week subchronic toxicity test, no serious adverse events in terms of body weight, food consumption, clinical symptom, urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry, organ weight, and histopathology were observed. In the 26-week tumorigenicity test, hAT-MSC.sTRAIL made no detectable tumors, whereas positive control U-87 MG cells made huge tumors in the brainstem. No remaining hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was observed in any organs examined, including the brainstem at 15 or 26 weeks. In brainstem glioma-bearing mice, injected hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was observed, but gradually decreased over time in the brain. The mRNA of human specific GAPDH and TRAIL was not detected in all major organs. These results indicate that the hAT-MSC.sTRAIL could be applicable to the future clinical trials in terms of biosafety. PMID:27151205

  19. Biofilm synthesis and its relationship with genetic characteristics in clinical methicillin-resistant staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Giormezis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus can cause a broad range of infections, including skin infections, pneumonia and bacteraemia. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS, mainly S. epidermidis, have also emerged as important pathogens, especially in immunocompromised patients or those with prosthetic devices, such as intravascular catheters or biomaterials. Of great importance in the initiation of these infections is the ability of staphylococci to adhere to various surfaces, such as host tissues and prosthetic devices and to form biofilm. The staphylococcal adhesins are encoded by a number of genes such as fnbA (S. aureus fibronectin binding protein A, sasG (S. aureus surface protein G, aap (S. epidermidis accumulation associated protein, bhp (Bap homologue protein and fbe (fibrinogen binding protein epidermidis. In this study, 106 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, 145 methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE and 70 non-epidermidis methicillin-resistant CNS (MR-CNS; 58 S. haemolyticus, 10 S. hominis and two S. lugdunensis were compared in terms of biofilm formation, antimicrobial resistance, clonal distribution and adhesin genes carriage. Isolates were classified into pulsotypes by PFGE and assigned to sequence types by MLST. In total, 121/321 isolates (37.7% produced biofilm and 219 (68.2% carried ica operon. The majority was multidrug resistant (94.7% and carried one or more adhesin genes. MRSE and all other MR-CNS prevailed in biofilm formation (P < 0.001 and antimicrobial resistance (P < 0.05 as compared to MRSA. MRSE also prevailed in ica carriage compared to the other methicillin-resistant staphylococci (P ≤ 0.007 Among MRSE, isolates from bacteraemias prevailed in biofilm formation (P = 0.031, whereas, strains from prosthetic device-associated infections carried more frequently aap (P = 0.003. Even though PFGE showed genetic diversity among MRSE, MLST revealed three major clones (ST2, ST5, ST16. MRSA isolates were less diverse, with five PFGE

  20. Identification of Novel Genetic Loci Associated with Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies and Clinical Thyroid Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Marco; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio;

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease...... as a decreased risk of goiter (OR: 0.77, 95% CI 0.66-0.89, P = 6.5×10(-4)). The MAGI3 and BACH2 variants were associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, which was replicated in an independent cohort of patients with Graves' disease (OR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54, P = 1.2×10(-7) and OR: 1.25, 95% CI 1.......12-1.39, P = 6.2×10(-5)). The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.10, P = 1.9×10(-3)). This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease...

  1. DNA methylation profiling identifies two splenic marginal zone lymphoma subgroups with different clinical and genetic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas, Alberto J; Rinaldi, Andrea; Mensah, Afua A; Kwee, Ivo; Cascione, Luciano; Robles, Eloy F; Martinez-Climent, Jose A; Oscier, David; Arcaini, Luca; Baldini, Luca; Marasca, Roberto; Thieblemont, Catherine; Briere, Josette; Forconi, Francesco; Zamò, Alberto; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Mollejo, Manuela; Facchetti, Fabio; Dirnhofer, Stephan; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Bhagat, Govind; Piris, Miguel A; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zucca, Emanuele; Rossi, Davide; Bertoni, Francesco

    2015-03-19

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma is a rare lymphoma. Loss of 7q31 and somatic mutations affecting the NOTCH2 and KLF2 genes are the commonest genomic aberrations. Epigenetic changes can be pharmacologically reverted; therefore, identification of groups of patients with specific epigenomic alterations might have therapeutic relevance. Here we integrated genome-wide DNA-promoter methylation profiling with gene expression profiling, and clinical and biological variables. An unsupervised clustering analysis of a test series of 98 samples identified 2 clusters with different degrees of promoter methylation. The cluster comprising samples with higher-promoter methylation (High-M) had a poorer overall survival compared with the lower (Low-M) cluster. The prognostic relevance of the High-M phenotype was confirmed in an independent validation set of 36 patients. In the whole series, the High-M phenotype was associated with IGHV1-02 usage, mutations of NOTCH2 gene, 7q31-32 loss, and histologic transformation. In the High-M set, a number of tumor-suppressor genes were methylated and repressed. PRC2 subunit genes and several prosurvival lymphoma genes were unmethylated and overexpressed. A model based on the methylation of 3 genes (CACNB2, HTRA1, KLF4) identified a poorer-outcome patient subset. Exposure of splenic marginal zone lymphoma cell lines to a demethylating agent caused partial reversion of the High-M phenotype and inhibition of proliferation. PMID:25612624

  2. The clinical and genetic correlates of MRI findings in myotonic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amplification of an unstable CTG trinucleotide repeat sequence in a protein kinase gene on chromosome 19 has recently been recognised as the molecular basis of myotonic dystrophy (DM), a multisystem disorder with a wide spectrum of muscular and extramuscular manifestations. The CTG expansion of 40 patients was assessed by direct genotype analysis of the white blood cell DNA and correlated with MRI of the brain and muscles, and with functional clinical data. Cerebral pathology on MRI consisted of diffuse atrophy (68 %), subcortical white matter lesions (65 %), wide Virchow-Robin spaces (38 %) and thickening of the skull (35 %). Cerebral atrophy and extent of white matter disease correlated significantly with mental retardation, duration of disease and CTG fragment amplification. MRI of the muscular system showed fatty degeneration of different degrees in neighbouring muscles causing a mosaic pattern of the thigh in 38 % and the calf in 44 %. Muscular changes on MRI were strongly correlated with muscular impairment but less strongly with CTG expansion. Changes on MRI reflect the stage of development of tissue pathology in DM, modified by defect of the DM gene. Pathology on MRI is strongly correlated with functional deficits. (orig.). With 8 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Clinical and Genetic Heterogeneity of the 15q13.3 Microdeletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassfurther, Ariane; Komini, Eleni; Fischer, Judith; Leipoldt, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The 15q13.3 microdeletion is a recurrent CNV, presumably mediated by NAHR between segmental duplications in chromosome 15. The 15q13.3 deletion and duplication are associated with a wide range of clinical manifestations, such as intellectual deficits, seizures, autism, language and developmental delay, neuropsychiatric impairments, and behavioral problems illustrating incomplete penetrance and expressivity. This study comprises an evaluation of 106 symptomatic patients carrying the heterozygous deletion, as well as of 21 patients carrying the duplication, who have been described in previous studies. The analysis shows considerable heterogeneity for the manifestation of different key symptoms and familiar occurrence. Furthermore, 8 new patients are introduced. Convoluted familiar connections give new insights into the complexity of symptomatic manifestation. In previous studies, different opinions have been expressed as to the nature and precise location of the deletion breakpoints. Here, we show that not CHRNA7 and CHRFAM7A, but rather FAM7A or GOLGA8, serve as breakpoint regions concerning our patients. The deletion is described as heterogeneous in size. However, we assume that not only different breakpoints but also the imprecision of aCGH analysis on chromosome 15 due to segmental duplications accounts for the variability in size. PMID:26997942

  4. The clinical and genetic correlates of MRI findings in myotonic dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, G. [Neuromuscular and Genetic Research Group, Department of Radiology, Justus Liebig University, Giessen (Germany); Damian, M.S. [Department of Neurology, University of Giessen (Germany); Koch, M. [Department of Human Genetics, University of Marburg (Germany); Schilling, G. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Giessen (Germany); Fach, B. [Department of Neurology, University of Giessen (Germany); Stoeppler, S. [Department of Neurology, University of Giessen (Germany)

    1996-10-01

    Amplification of an unstable CTG trinucleotide repeat sequence in a protein kinase gene on chromosome 19 has recently been recognised as the molecular basis of myotonic dystrophy (DM), a multisystem disorder with a wide spectrum of muscular and extramuscular manifestations. The CTG expansion of 40 patients was assessed by direct genotype analysis of the white blood cell DNA and correlated with MRI of the brain and muscles, and with functional clinical data. Cerebral pathology on MRI consisted of diffuse atrophy (68 %), subcortical white matter lesions (65 %), wide Virchow-Robin spaces (38 %) and thickening of the skull (35 %). Cerebral atrophy and extent of white matter disease correlated significantly with mental retardation, duration of disease and CTG fragment amplification. MRI of the muscular system showed fatty degeneration of different degrees in neighbouring muscles causing a mosaic pattern of the thigh in 38 % and the calf in 44 %. Muscular changes on MRI were strongly correlated with muscular impairment but less strongly with CTG expansion. Changes on MRI reflect the stage of development of tissue pathology in DM, modified by defect of the DM gene. Pathology on MRI is strongly correlated with functional deficits. (orig.). With 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Different clinical outcomes of Entamoeba histolytica in Malaysia: does genetic diversity exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Abdul Ghani, Mohamed Kamel; Azreen, Siti Nor; Salleh, Fatmah Md; Ghazali, Nuraffini; Bernadus, Mekadina; Moktar, Norhayati

    2013-04-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the clinical outcomes of Entamoeba histolytica infection in symptomatic and asymptomatic Orang Asli (aborigine) communities in Malaysia. Examination was performed on 500 stool samples obtained from Orang Asli communities in 3 different states using formalin-ether concentration, trichrome staining, and single-round PCR techniques. Out of 500 stool samples, single infection of E. histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Entamoeba moshkovskii was identified in 3.2%, 13.4%, and 1%, respectively. In addition, 10 samples had mixed infections with E. histolytica and E. dispar. Six samples containing E. dispar were also positive for E. moshkovskii, and only 2 samples had E. histolytica in association with E. dispar and E. moshkovskii. Seventeen E. histolytica-positive samples were from symptomatic subjects, whereas the remaining 11 samples came from asymptomatic subjects. These findings suggest a predominant distribution of pathogenic potential of E. histolytica strains in this community. Therefore, further studies on genotyping of E. histolytica is required, to find out association between E. histolytica genotype and the outcome of the infection.

  6. First successful reduction of clinical allergenicity of food by genetic modification: Mal d 1-silenced apples cause fewer allergy symptoms than the wild-type cultivar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubois, A. E. J.; Pagliarani, G.; Brouwer, R. M.;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic modification of allergenic foods such as apple has the potential to reduce their clinical allergenicity, but this has never been studied by oral challenges in allergic individuals. METHODS: We performed oral food challenges in 21 apple-allergic individuals with Elstar apples...... which had undergone gene silencing of the major allergen of apple, Mal d 1, by RNA interference. Downregulation of Mal d 1 gene expression in the apples was verified by qRT-PCR. Clinical responses to the genetically modified apples were compared to those seen with the wild-type Elstar using a visual...... analogue scale (VAS). RESULTS: Gene silencing produced two genetically modified apple lines expressing Mal d 1.02 and other Mal d 1 gene mRNA levels which were extensively downregulated, that is only 0.1-16.4% (e-DR1) and 0.2-9.9% (e-DR2) of those of the wild-type Elstar, respectively. Challenges...

  7. Determinants of HbA1c in nondiabetic Dutch adults : genetic loci and clinical and lifestyle parameters, and their interactions in the lifelines cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Hanneke; Stolk, R.P.; Nolte, I.M.; Kema, I.P.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.; Snieder, H.

    2013-01-01

    Jansen H, Stolk RP, Nolte IM, IP Kema, Wolffenbuttel BHR, Snieder H (University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands). Determinants of HbA1c in nondiabetic Dutch adults: genetic loci and clinical and lifestyle parameters, and their interactions in the LifeLin

  8. Design of the BRISC study : a multicentre controlled clinical trial to optimize the communication of breast cancer risks in genetic counselling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ockhuysen-Vermey, Caroline F.; Henneman, Lidewij; van Asperen, Christi J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Menko, Fred H.; Timmermans, Danielle R. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Understanding risks is considered to be crucial for informed decision-making. Inaccurate risk perception is a common finding in women with a family history of breast cancer attending genetic counseling. As yet, it is unclear how risks should best be communicated in clinical practice. Thi

  9. Genetic characterization of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coil O26 : H11 strains isolated from animal, food, and clinical samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krueger, Alejandra; Lucchesi, Paula M. A.; Mariel Sanso, A.; Etcheverria, Analia I.; Bustamante, Ana V.; Burgan, Julia; Fernandez, Luciana; Fernandez, Daniel; Leotta, Gerardo; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Padola, Nora L.; Rossen, John W. A.

    2015-01-01

    The Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) may cause serious illness in human. Here we analyze O26:H11 strains known to be among the most reported STEC strains causing human infections. Genetic characterization of strains isolated from animal, food, and clinical specimens in Argentina showed

  10. A Newfoundland cohort of familial and sporadic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients: clinical and genetic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Bridget A

    2012-08-01

    . Conclusion The proportion of familial cases in our cohort is higher than any previously reported estimate and we suggest that this is due to the fact that Newfoundland cohort is ethnically homogeneous and drawn from a founder population. In our patient collection, diagnosis with IPF prior to age 45 years predicted familial disease. In two of the three TERT mutation families, the pedigree appearance is consistent with genetic anticipation. In the other 25 FPF families negative for mutations in known PF genes, we did not identify other telomerase associated medical problems (bone marrow dysfunction, cirrhosis and we hypothesize that there are novel PF genes segregating in our population.

  11. Certified Genetic Counselors: A Crucial Clinical Resource in the Management of Patients with Suspected Hereditary Cancer Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catts, Zohra Ali-Khan; Hampel, Heather

    2015-10-01

    The role of the cancer genetic counselor in the management of patients with cancer is discussed in this article. This includes explaining what a genetic counselor is trained to do and how they are credentialed and licensed. In addition, the article explains who to refer for cancer genetic counseling. Once referred, the article describes what actually happens in a pretest and posttest cancer genetic counseling session. Use of a cancer genetic registry and how it can help in practice is discussed. Finally, several mechanisms for identifying a cancer genetic counselor at one's institution or nearby are outlined.

  12. [Clinical relevance of N-acetyltransferase type 2 (NAT2) genetic polymorphism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furet, Y; Bechtel, Y; Le Guellec, C; Bechtel, P R; Autret-Leca, E; Paintaud, G

    2002-01-01

    Polymorphic N-acetyltransferase (NAT2) is involved in the metabolism of several compounds relevant in pharmacology or toxicology, with diverse clinical consequences. Inter-ethnic variations in distribution of the acetylation phenotype are significant. The caffeine test is most often used to assess the acetylation phenotype and to identify rapid and slow acetylators. The NAT2 phenotype could account for the increased risk of certain side effects in slow acetylators treated with isoniazid (particularly peripheral neuropathies and lupus erythematosus), although therapeutic efficacy seems to be independent of the acetylation status. Hypersensibility reactions with sulfonamides (including Lyell and Stevens-Johnson syndromes) are more frequent in slow acetylators, who also show poor tolerance to sulfasalazine and dapsone. In contrast, myelotoxicity induced by amonafide is more frequent in rapid acetylators, probably because of increased production of a toxic metabolite of the drug. In carcinogenesis, NAT2 may play a protective role against bladder cancer, although studies have shown contradictory results. Slow acetylators may have a risk of developing primitive liver cancer. For lung cancer, data are not conclusive, but slow acetylation status may predispose to mesothelioma in subjects exposed to asbestos. No relation has been found between acetylation phenotype and breast cancer. Contradictory results were reported on its role in colorectal cancer. Non-smoking type 1 diabetics may be at increased risk of nephropathy if they are rapid acetylators. Parkinson's disease may be more frequent among slow acetylators, but again, data have shown contradictory results. Finally, a poor acetylator phenotype may predispose to atopic diseases. PMID:12611196

  13. Clinical and genetic characteristics of anti-gad positive type 2 diabetes in Japanese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADab) is considered to be a marker for the autoimmune process against pancreatic β cells. Indeed, nearly 70% of patients with type 1 diabetes is repoted to be GAD ab+. A subgroup of patients diagnosed as type 2 diabetes has GADab. Therefore, it is questioned whether GADab+ patients with type 2 diabetes represent a late onset of type 1 diabetes or a unique disease entity. Fifty five GADab+ patients with type 2 diabetes were compared with 137 GADab- patients. They were admitted to Abe Diabetes Clinic for the control of diabetes. The age at onset of these patients was >30 years, and did not require insulin therapy for at least 6 months from the disease onset. The GADab+ patients had lower urinary C-peptide concentrations (uCPR) [(47.8±48.9) μg/d vs (58.1±49.9) μg/d, P=0.034] than the GADab- patients. The GAD+ patients were assigned insulin therapy more often (81.8% vs 56.3%, P=0.0038) and earlier [(8.5±7.5)years vs (10.1±7.3) years, P=3.3×10-12] than the GAD- patients. The levels of uCPR were associated with the titers of GADab (r=0.32, P=0.038). Among the susceptible HLA alleles for type 1 diabetes, the frequencies of B54 and DRB1* 0405 alleles, but not B61 and DRB1*0901 alleles, were increased among GADab+ patients. There data suggest that the GADab+ type 2 diabetes has an autoimmune nature, although the extent of insulin dependency and the distribution of HLA susceptible alleles are different from type 1 diabetes.

  14. Clinical and genetic study on schizophrenia using cranial computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eighty patients with schizophrenia and 45 medical controls were examined by cranial computed tomography (CT). The schizophrenic group showed statistically significant differences with more severe widening of the lateral ventricles, the third ventricle and Sylvius fissure, and more severe atrophy in the frontal and parietal cortex than controls. The schizophrenic cases were classified into patients with or without any hereditary trait. The former group was further subdivided into 3 groups, i.e., patients with a horizontal transmission who have sibling with schizophrenia, patients with a vertical transmission who have parents or offspring with schizophrenia, and patients with both familial traits. More severe widening of the Sylvius fissure was seen in patients with a hereditary trait than in those without. The schizophrenic group, with a hereditary trait, demonstrated significantly longer duration of hospitalization, more negative symptoms and more severe widening of the lateral ventricles and the third ventricle in comparison with the schizophrenic group without any hereditary trait. The degree of the widening of the lateral ventricles seen in the subgroup with a horizontal transmission did not correlate with any other findings in CT. This means that the change is specific to this group. No significant correlation was seen between such clinical items as age and duration of illness, and widening of the lateral ventricles in the subgroup with a horizontal transmission. All this evidence implies that more advanced widening of the lateral ventricles and more serious negative symptoms exist constantly and not progressively at the point of onset in the subgroup with a horizontal transmission. (J.P.N.)

  15. Epidemiology, genetics and management of psoriatic arthritis 2013: focus on developments of who develops the disease, its clinical features, and emerging treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroon M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Haroon,1 Oliver FitzGerald,1 Robert Winchester2 1Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; 2Division of Rheumatology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The picture of elements comprising the genetic susceptibility to develop psoriatic arthritis, especially those involving human leukocyte antigen alleles, is emerging in much greater clarity because of improvements in the methods of psoriatic arthritis ascertainment and in the technology of genetic typing. This new knowledge suggests there is genetic heterogeneity in the psoriasis phenotype, and that there are several genetically and clinically different forms of psoriatic arthritis. These genetic studies on psoriatic arthritis further reinforce the relationship of psoriatic arthritis to the other spondyloarthritides, but also raise novel questions of whether the effect of certain susceptibility genes may differ among them. Considerable evidence indicates that the clinical features reflect a CD8 T lymphocyte-driven immune response is present that is characterized by clonal expansion and differentiation towards memory-effector phenotypes. With the aid of new classification criteria, the typical clinical features of psoriatic arthritis involving different joints, entheses, and their related compartments are being better defined as distinctive characteristics of psoriatic arthritis or of the spondyloarthritis group of disorders. In the evaluation of an individual with psoriatic arthritis, taking a patient-focused perspective is recommended, which has the potential to enhance their quality of life significantly. The choice of current and emerging therapeutic agents from an increasing realm of conventional and biologic agents is becoming much better rationalized and more firmly based on evidence from clinical trials. Keywords: psoriatic arthritis, genetic susceptibility, heterogeneity, classification

  16. 13th International Conference on Chlamydomonas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silflow, Carolyn D. [University of Minnesota

    2014-03-11

    The 13th International Conference on Chlamydomonas (EMBO Workshop on the Cell and Molecular Biology of Chlamydomonas) was held May 27 to June 1, 2008 in Hyeres, France. The conference was the biennial meeting for all researchers studying the green algal systems Chlamydomonas and Volvox. The conference brought together approximately 200 investigators from around the world (North America, Asia, Europe and Australia) representing different fields and disciplines (cell biology, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, plant physiology, genomics). It provided an opportunity for investigators from different countries to share methodologies and to discuss recent results with a focus on the Chlamydomonas experimental system.

  17. 临床医学专业学位试点工作阶段的问题和对策%Discussion of the questions and the related solutions in the experimental stage of conferring the clinical medical degrees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈地龙; 黄萌; 秦跃文; 徐永柱

    2000-01-01

    试行临床医学专业学位是我国医学学位与研究生教育改革的一项重大举措。笔者根据本校试点工作中出现的问题,提出了临床医学专业学位试点工作的若干对策。%Carrying out the conferring of the clinical medicial professional degrees is one of the important measures in the reform of the medical degree granting and postgraduate education in our country. We now put forward the following suggestions about the experimental granting of the professional degrees of clinical medicine in our school on the basis of our past experience in this respect.

  18. PHYSICS FOR HEALTH: CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Highlights of ICTR-PHE 2016 - International Conference on Translational Research in Radio-Oncology and Physics for Health -, co organized by CERN, aims at developing new strategies to better diagnose and treat cancer, by uniting biology and physics with clinics. Through the various sessions and symposia, the scientific programme offers the delegates the opportunity to discuss, in a friendly atmosphere, the latest progress in physics breakthroughs for health applications. The third edition of this conference took place at CICG (Centre International de Conférence Genève) from 15 to 19 Feb 2016.

  19. Features of 152 families eligible for the investigation of mutations in BRCA1 / 2, evaluated Onco genetics unit Clinics Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this study is to contribute to the characterization of familial breast cancer in our country. Patients and methods. We analyzed 152 families referred to the Hospital Unit Onco genetics Clinic, who had 3 or more cases of breast cancer (C M)(at least one diagnosed before age 50 years) (n = 92)or 2 cases with some sub-criterion (paternal transmission, C M bilateral C M male, ovarian cancer (O C), Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, a case diagnosed before 40 years) (n = 47)or 4 or more cases without regard to age at diagnosis (n = 4)or an single case diagnosed before age 35 (n = 9). The clinical data collection was conducted onco genetics the query was entered in which, among others, the presence or absence of nongenetic risk factors, personal and family history of breast, ovarian and other tumors and age of diagnosis. Results. 152 cases were selected indices, carrying 148 C M (bilateral n = 29)and 4 CO. The median age at diagnosis of C M developed in these patients was 48 years (range: 25-54). Twenty-three of the 151 patients had a second tumor extra mammary (ovary n = 7; melanoma n = 2, n = 3 cervix, colon n = 4, n = 1 sarcoma, ENT = 1, = 1 pancreas, kidney = 2, CBP = 1, esophagus = 1). Among the relatives of the relevant parent branch were 329 C M (25 bilateral, 2 male)diagnosed before 50 years in more than 60 % of cases and 22 ovarian cancers. Comparing the frequency of different tumor locations both branches parents. In the relevant parent branch, and the prevalence of C M and CO documented a higher frequency of prostate, stomach, pancreas and melanoma. It was possible to obtain information He r2 tumor expression, estrogen receptor (E R) and progesterone receptor (P R) in 25 patients, finding that 10 patients (0.40)had He r2 overexpression, 11 (0.46 R E and / / or P R positive, HER2 negative and 4 E R, P R and He r2 negative (0.16). Conclusions. The characteristics of the families studied, including the frequency of tumors extramamarios agrees with

  20. Identification of novel genetic markers associated with clinical phenotypes of systemic sclerosis through a genome-wide association strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Gorlova

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine, through a genome-wide association study (GWAS, the genetic components contributing to different clinical sub-phenotypes of systemic sclerosis (SSc. We considered limited (lcSSc and diffuse (dcSSc cutaneous involvement, and the relationships with presence of the SSc-specific auto-antibodies, anti-centromere (ACA, and anti-topoisomerase I (ATA. Four GWAS cohorts, comprising 2,296 SSc patients and 5,171 healthy controls, were meta-analyzed looking for associations in the selected subgroups. Eighteen polymorphisms were further tested in nine independent cohorts comprising an additional 3,175 SSc patients and 4,971 controls. Conditional analysis for associated SNPs in the HLA region was performed to explore their independent association in antibody subgroups. Overall analysis showed that non-HLA polymorphism rs11642873 in IRF8 gene to be associated at GWAS level with lcSSc (P = 2.32×10(-12, OR = 0.75. Also, rs12540874 in GRB10 gene (P = 1.27 × 10(-6, OR = 1.15 and rs11047102 in SOX5 gene (P = 1.39×10(-7, OR = 1.36 showed a suggestive association with lcSSc and ACA subgroups respectively. In the HLA region, we observed highly associated allelic combinations in the HLA-DQB1 locus with ACA (P = 1.79×10(-61, OR = 2.48, in the HLA-DPA1/B1 loci with ATA (P = 4.57×10(-76, OR = 8.84, and in NOTCH4 with ACA P = 8.84×10(-21, OR = 0.55 and ATA (P = 1.14×10(-8, OR = 0.54. We have identified three new non-HLA genes (IRF8, GRB10, and SOX5 associated with SSc clinical and auto-antibody subgroups. Within the HLA region, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1/B1, and NOTCH4 associations with SSc are likely confined to specific auto-antibodies. These data emphasize the differential genetic components of subphenotypes of SSc.

  1. Identification of Novel Genetic Markers Associated with Clinical Phenotypes of Systemic Sclerosis through a Genome-Wide Association Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Jun; Teruel, Maria; Diaz-Gallo, Lina-Marcela; Broen, Jasper C.; Vonk, Madelon C.; Simeon, Carmen P.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Vanthuyne, Marie; van 't Slot, Ruben; Italiaander, Annet; Ophoff, Roel A.; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Fonollosa, Vicente; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; González-Gay, Miguel A.; García-Hernández, Francisco J.; González-Escribano, María F.; Airo, Paolo; van Laar, Jacob; Worthington, Jane; Hesselstrand, Roger; Smith, Vanessa; de Keyser, Filip; Houssiau, Fredric; Chee, Meng May; Madhok, Rajan; Shiels, Paul G.; Westhovens, Rene; Kreuter, Alexander; de Baere, Elfride; Witte, Torsten; Padyukov, Leonid; Nordin, Annika; Scorza, Raffaella; Lunardi, Claudio; Lie, Benedicte A.; Hoffmann-Vold, Anna-Maria; Palm, Øyvind; García de la Peña, Paloma; Carreira, Patricia; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique; Lee, Annette T.; Gourh, Pravitt; Amos, Christopher I.; Wigley, Frederick M.; Hummers, Laura K.; Hummers, J.; Nelson, J. Lee; Riemekasten, Gabriella; Herrick, Ariane; Beretta, Lorenzo; Fonseca, Carmen; Denton, Christopher P.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Agarwal, Sandeep; Assassi, Shervin; Tan, Filemon K.; Arnett, Frank C.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Mayes, Maureen D.; Martin, Javier

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, through a genome-wide association study (GWAS), the genetic components contributing to different clinical sub-phenotypes of systemic sclerosis (SSc). We considered limited (lcSSc) and diffuse (dcSSc) cutaneous involvement, and the relationships with presence of the SSc-specific auto-antibodies, anti-centromere (ACA), and anti-topoisomerase I (ATA). Four GWAS cohorts, comprising 2,296 SSc patients and 5,171 healthy controls, were meta-analyzed looking for associations in the selected subgroups. Eighteen polymorphisms were further tested in nine independent cohorts comprising an additional 3,175 SSc patients and 4,971 controls. Conditional analysis for associated SNPs in the HLA region was performed to explore their independent association in antibody subgroups. Overall analysis showed that non-HLA polymorphism rs11642873 in IRF8 gene to be associated at GWAS level with lcSSc (P = 2.32×10−12, OR = 0.75). Also, rs12540874 in GRB10 gene (P = 1.27 × 10−6, OR = 1.15) and rs11047102 in SOX5 gene (P = 1.39×10−7, OR = 1.36) showed a suggestive association with lcSSc and ACA subgroups respectively. In the HLA region, we observed highly associated allelic combinations in the HLA-DQB1 locus with ACA (P = 1.79×10−61, OR = 2.48), in the HLA-DPA1/B1 loci with ATA (P = 4.57×10−76, OR = 8.84), and in NOTCH4 with ACA P = 8.84×10−21, OR = 0.55) and ATA (P = 1.14×10−8, OR = 0.54). We have identified three new non-HLA genes (IRF8, GRB10, and SOX5) associated with SSc clinical and auto-antibody subgroups. Within the HLA region, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1/B1, and NOTCH4 associations with SSc are likely confined to specific auto-antibodies. These data emphasize the differential genetic components of subphenotypes of SSc. PMID:21779181

  2. THE EFFECTS OF CLINICAL PATHOLOGICAL CONFERENCE IN ROTATION TRAINING OF GENERAL PRACTITIONER IN NEPHROLOGY DEPARTMENT%临床病理讨论会在全科医生肾脏科转岗培训中的效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海军

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of clinical pathological conference in rotation training of gen-eral practitioner in nephrology department to promote the realization of general practice training goal . Methods From August ,2009 to December ,2012 ,65 general practitioners from Linyi City People’s Hospi-tal who have accepted standardized training for general practitioners were enrolled .They actively participa-ted in clinical pathological conference in nephrology department one time a week .theory ,skills and medi-cal record writing At the end of rotation training ,the training effects were assessed in knowledge ,skills and writing medical history .Questionnaires were used to survey general practitioners’ evaluation of the mode of clinical pathological conference .Results The knowledge ,skills and medical record writing were all up to standard ,and the excellence rates were is 60 (92 .31% ) ,62 (95 .38% ) and 58/(89 .23% ) respective-ly .The survey results showed that the general practitioners gave high evaluation to the mode of clinical pathological conference ,and the mode can mobilize the initiative and enthusiasm and can improve the theo-retical and practical ability in the diagnosis and treatment of kidney diseases in community .Conclusion Clin-ical pathological conference has positive effect on general practitioners’ knowledge and practice skills and can help to ensure the realization of general medical teaching goal .%目的:探索临床病理讨论会模式在全科医生肾脏科轮岗培训中的应用效果,促进全科医学培养目标的实现。方法选择2009年8月~2012年12月在临沂市人民医院肾脏科接受规范化培训的全科医生65人,在肾脏科轮岗期间,每周进行1次临床病理讨论会,轮岗结束时考核理论、技能、病历书写等效果,问卷调查全科医生对临床-病理讨论会模式的评价。结果出科时理论、技能考核及病历书写成绩均合格

  3. Clinical biological and genetic heterogeneity of the inborn errors of pulmonary surfactant metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tredano, M; De Blic, J; Griese, M; Fournet, J C; Elion, J; Bahuau, M

    2001-02-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a multimolecular complex located at the air-water interface within the alveolus to which a range of physical (surface-active properties) and immune functions has been assigned. This complex consists of a surface-active lipid layer (consisting mainly of phospholipids), and of an aqueous subphase. From discrete surfactant sub-fractions one can isolate strongly hydrophobic surfactant proteins B (SP-B) and C (SP-C) as well as collectins SP-A and SP-D, which were shown to have specific structural, metabolic, or immune properties. Inborn or acquired abnormalities of the surfactant, qualitative or quantitative in nature, account for a number of human diseases. Beside hyaline membrane disease of the preterm neonate, a cluster of hereditary or acquired lung diseases has been characterized by periodic acid-Schiff-positive material filling the alveoli. From this heterogeneous nosologic group, at least two discrete entities presently emerge. The first is the SP-B deficiency, in which an essentially proteinaceous material is stored within the alveoli, and which represents an autosomal recessive Mendelian entity linked to the SFTPB gene (MIM 1786640). The disease usually generally entails neonatal respiratory distress with rapid fatal outcome, although partial or transient deficiencies have also been observed. The second is alveolar proteinosis, characterized by the storage of a mixed protein and lipid material, which constitutes a relatively heterogeneous clinical and biological syndrome, especially with regard to age at onset (from the neonate through to adulthood) as well as the severity of associated signs. Murine models, with a targeted mutation of the gene encoding granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (Csfgm) or the beta subunit of its receptor (II3rb1) support the hypothesis of an abnormality of surfactant turnover in which the alveolar macrophage is a key player. Apart from SP-B deficiency, in which a near-consensus diagnostic

  4. Hunter disease eClinic: interactive, computer-assisted, problem-based approach to independent learning about a rare genetic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldovan Laura

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer-based teaching (CBT is a well-known educational device, but it has never been applied systematically to the teaching of a complex, rare, genetic disease, such as Hunter disease (MPS II. Aim To develop interactive teaching software functioning as a virtual clinic for the management of MPS II. Implementation and Results The Hunter disease eClinic, a self-training, user-friendly educational software program, available at the Lysosomal Storage Research Group (http://www.lysosomalstorageresearch.ca, was developed using the Adobe Flash multimedia platform. It was designed to function both to provide a realistic, interactive virtual clinic and instantaneous access to supporting literature on Hunter disease. The Hunter disease eClinic consists of an eBook and an eClinic. The eClinic is the interactive virtual clinic component of the software. Within an environment resembling a real clinic, the trainee is instructed to perform a medical history, to examine the patient, and to order appropriate investigation. The program provides clinical data derived from the management of actual patients with Hunter disease. The eBook provides instantaneous, electronic access to a vast collection of reference information to provide detailed background clinical and basic science, including relevant biochemistry, physiology, and genetics. In the eClinic, the trainee is presented with quizzes designed to provide immediate feedback on both trainee effectiveness and efficiency. User feedback on the merits of the program was collected at several seminars and formal clinical rounds at several medical centres, primarily in Canada. In addition, online usage statistics were documented for a 2-year period. Feedback was consistently positive and confirmed the practical benefit of the program. The online English-language version is accessed daily by users from all over the world; a Japanese translation of the program is also available. Conclusions The

  5. Conference summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolo, R.

    ``Brown dwarfs come of age" was a stimulating conference attended by a large number of very active researchers, including many young students and post-docs who were largely responsible for the lively atmosphere that we enjoyed during the full meeting. Major theoretical and observational challenges currently faced in the study of brown dwarfs were reviewed. Key spectroscopic work is being conducted to determine atmospheric temperatures, surface gravities and metallicities, essential to understand the evolution of substellar objects. Research on ultracool atmospheres is extended down to temperatures typical of the atmosphere of the Earth. Characterisation of brown dwarfs at all wavelengths from X-ray to radio is ongoing and investigation of time domain phenomena reveal interesting new processes in cool atmospheres. In addition to talks on these topics, a large number of presentations addressed the formation and evolution of brown dwarfs, the lower end of the Initial Mass Function, the properties of substellar binaries, the angular momentum and disk evolution in very low-mass systems, results of large scale surveys aimed to find the lowest luminosity and coolest brown dwarfs, searches in star clusters delineating the evolution with age of the properties of brown dwarfs, binary searches and subsequent follow-up work enabling dynamical mass determinations. The excellent level of the review talks, oral and poster presentations and the work of the enthusiastic researchers that attended the meeting ensure a brilliant future for substellar research 18 years after the discovery of the first brown dwarfs.

  6. Clinical relevance of the biochemical, metabolic, and genetic factors that influence low-density lipoprotein heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiterovich, Peter O

    2002-10-17

    increased levels of free fatty acids in plasma, increased flux of free fatty acids back to the liver, enhanced production of TGs, decreased proteolysis of apo B-100, and increased VLDL production. Decreased removal of postprandial TGs often accompanies these metabolic abnormalities. Genes regulating the expression of the major players in this metabolic cascade, such as LPL, cholesterol ester transfer protein, and hepatic lipase, can modulate the expression of small, dense LDL but these are not the major defects. New candidates for major gene effects have been identified on chromosome 1. Regardless of their fundamental causes, small, dense LDL (compared with normal LDL) particles have a prolonged residence time in plasma, are more susceptible to oxidation because of decreased interaction with the LDL receptor, and enter the arterial wall more easily, where they are retained more readily. Small, dense LDL promotes endothelial dysfunction and enhanced production of procoagulants by endothelial cells. Both in animal models of atherosclerosis and in most human epidemiologic studies and clinical trials, small, dense LDL (particularly when present in increased numbers) appears more atherogenic than normal LDL. Treatment of patients with small, dense LDL particles (particularly when accompanied by low HDL and hypertriglyceridemia) often requires the use of combined lipid-altering drugs to decrease the number of particles and to convert them to larger, more buoyant LDL. The next critical step in further reduction of CAD will be the correct diagnosis and treatment of patients with small, dense LDL and the dyslipidemia that accompanies it. PMID:12419479

  7. Both baseline clinical factors and genetic polymorphisms influence the development of severe functional status in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Schiotis

    Full Text Available Functional severity in ankylosing spondylitis (AS patients is variable and difficult to predict early. The aim of our study was to assess whether a combination of baseline clinical factors and genetic markers may predict the development of severe functional status in AS. We performed a cross-sectional association study on AS patients included in the Spanish National Registry of Spondyloarthropathies--REGISPONSER. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI was standardized by adjusting for disease duration since the first symptoms (BASFI/t. We considered as severe functional status the values of BASFI/t in the top of the 60th (p60, 65th (p65, 70th (p70, and 75th (p75 percentile. We selected 384 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs distributed in 190 genes to be analyzed. The study cohort included 456 patients with mean age 50.8(± 10.5 years and with mean disease duration since first symptoms 24.7 (± 10.1 years. Older age at disease onset and neck pain at baseline showed statistical significant association with severe BASFI/t. Polymorphisms associated in the allele frequencies test with severe BASFI/t in all classifications were: rs2542151 (p60 [P = .04], p65 [P = .04], p70 [P = .001] and p75 [P = .001] and rs2254441 (p60 [P = .004], p65 [P = .02], p70 [P = .01] and p75 [P<.001].. Genotype association, after adjustment for covariates, found an association in three of the four patients' classifications for rs2542151 and in two of the classifications for rs2254441.Forward logistic regression did not identify any model with a good predictive power for severe functional development.In our study we identified clinical factors and 24 polymorphisms associated with development of severe functional status in AS patients. Validation of these results in other cohorts is required.

  8. International Conference on Health Informatics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of the International Conference on Health Informatics (ICHI). The conference was a new special topic conference initiative by the International Federation of Medical and Biological Engineering (IFMBE), held in Vilamoura, Portugal on 7-9 November, 2013. The main theme of the ICHI2013 was “Integrating Information and Communication Technologies with Biomedicine for Global Health”. The proceedings offer a unique forum to examine enabling technologies of sensors, devices and systems that optimize the acquisition, transmission, processing, storage, retrieval of biomedical and health information as well as to report novel clinical applications of health information systems and the deployment of m-Health, e-Health, u-Health, p-Health and Telemedicine.

  9. Genetic Diversity among Ciprofloxacin Resistant Enterococcus faecalis Isolated from Clinical Specimens with Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moinian M

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objective: Resistance to ciprofloxacin among Enterococcus faecalis (E.f isolates especially in UTI makes difficulties for treatment. In this study, the genetic diversity using PFGE method and detection of resistance genes including parC, gyrA , gyrB and parE among ciprofloxacin resistant E.f isolated from clinical specimens, are determined. Materials and methods: A total of 384 entreococcal isolates were collected from 6 hospitals and 3 private laboratories in Tehran and 50 ciprofloxacin resistant E.f isolates were obtained. Identification of species and resistance genes were done by PCR method. Antimicrobial and minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs tests were assayed with standard methods and finally genotyping was accomplished using PFGE method. Results: The range of ciprofloxacin MICs was 16 to 512 µg/ml. All of these isolates contained parC, 98 % gyrA , gyrB and 80 % parE genes. PFGE analysis, grouped 50 strains in 11 common types and 7 single types. The P4, P9 and P10 genotypes were shared between hospital and community isolates. Conclusion: According to these results the E.f isolates showed high clonal diversity. Because of the ciprofloxacin high MICs level among common pulsotypes we concluded that they have various distributions which may be due to highly transmission of resistant genes among enterococci. Indeed the colonized patients with these resistant isolates are reservoir for releasing of the resistant genes to community which requires more surveillance programs.

  10. 关注基因检测在临床实践中的伦理学问题%Ethical concerns about genetic testing in clinic practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓少丽; 陈鸣

    2016-01-01

    Clinic genetic testing have make rapid progress in recent years , and have been widely applicated in genetic disease diagnosis , infection disease diagnosis and personalized treatment .The aim of this article is to pay attention to the ethical issues raised by genetic testing .The important ethical problems are proposed accompany with prenatal , adolescent, and adult genetic testing respectively .We should adopt responsible best ethical practices in the provision of genetic testing , promote the widely application of gene detection in clinic orderly.%临床基因检测近年来进展迅速,在遗传病、感染性疾病诊断,个性化诊疗等方面应用广泛。本文旨在探讨在临床应用的基因检测技术带来的伦理问题,关注产前、未成年及成年人基因检测面临的主要伦理问题,并提出基因检测应遵循的伦理原则。希望通过该文引起医务工作者对基因检测伦理学的重视,推动基因检测在临床的有序应用。

  11. DYT1和DYT5的临床和遗传特征%Clinical and genetic features of DYT1 and DYT5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小竹; Nanbert ZHONG

    2006-01-01

    Dystonia is a syndrome which is characterized by sustained muscle contractions, producing twisting, repetitive, and patterned movements, or abnormal postures. According to genetic basis, dystonia is classified into 13 subtypes. We mainly discussed two subtypes, DYT1 and DYT5, in this review. Early-onset primary dystonia is caused by the mutation of DYT1 gene, which leads to TORSINA abnormal. GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH1)-deficient DRD(DYT5) is caused by the mutations of GCH1 gene. By genetic testing, we can confirm clinical diagnosis of each subtype and develop prenatal diagnosis for it.

  12. Clinical and genetic characterization of families with arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy provides novel insights into patterns of disease expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sen-Chowdhry, Srijita

    2007-04-03

    According to clinical-pathological correlation studies, the natural history of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia\\/cardiomyopathy is purported to progress from localized to global right ventricular dysfunction, followed by left ventricular (LV) involvement and biventricular pump failure. The inevitable focus on sudden death victims and transplant recipients may, however, have created a skewed perspective of a genetic disease. We hypothesized that unbiased representation of the spectrum of disease expression in arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia\\/cardiomyopathy would require in vivo assessment of families in a genetically heterogeneous population.

  13. Clinical and genetic features of International Collaborative Group-hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families and suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁瑛; 叶俊; 郑树

    2004-01-01

    Background Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPPC) is one of the most common genetic syndrome related with mutation of human mismatch repair genes. This study was to evaluate the clinical significance of suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (sHNPCC) criteria I and the clinical and genetic features of International Collaborative Group-HNPCC (ICG-HNPCC) and sHNPCC families.Methods Twenty-nine ICG-HNPCC families fulfilling the Amsterdam criteria and 34 sHNPCC families fulfilling the sHNPCC criteria I were collected. PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing analysis were employed to screen the germline mutations of the hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes in these families.Results The ICG group had more colorectal cancer (CRC) patients per family than did the suspected group (P0.05), mutation type, and mutation distribution. Comparison of the families with and without mutation showed no significant difference in CRC patients per family, Lynch classification, and tumor spectrum.Conclusions ICG-HNPCC and sHNPCC families that have similar clinical manifestations and genetic basis indicate a similar nature for cancer development. The application of sHNPCC criteria I will facilitate clinical diagnosis and treatment of small families.

  14. Conference this! Lead Pipers compare conference experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Board

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available As library travel budgets are increasingly slashed around the country, it’s a tough time for conference-going. In this group post, we compare notes about the conferences we’ve attended, which have been our favorites, and why. We hope this will generate creative ideas on good conferences (online or in-person to look forward to, and maybe offer [...

  15. First interactive conference of young scientists. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This interactive conference of young scientists was realised on the Internet. Conference proceeded in five sections: (1) Cellular metabolism, physiology, molecular biology and genetics; (2) Biotechnology and food technology; (3) The use of instrumental methods in the analysis of biologically important substances; (4) Ecology and environmental science; (5) Open section for students. Relevant papers were included into the database INIS.

  16. Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy: A report on clinical, biochemical, and genetic study in Gujarat population, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandava V Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In India, various groups have studied different regions to find out deletion pattern of dystrophin gene. We have investigated its deletion pattern among Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (D/BMD patients across Gujarat. Moreover, in this study we also correlate the same with reading frame rule. However, we too consider various clinicopathological features to establish as adjunct indices when deletion detection fails. Materials and Methods: In this pilot study, a total of 88 D/BMD patients consulting at our centers in Gujarat, India were included. All patients were reviewed on basis of their clinical characteristics, tested by three primer sets of 10-plex, 9-plex, and 7-plex polymerase chain reaction (PCR for genetic analysis; whereas, biochemical indices were measured using automated biochemical analyzers. Results: The diagnosis of D/BMD was confirmed by multiplex-PCR (M-PCR in D/BMD patients. A number of 65 (73.86% out of 88 patients showed deletion in dystrophin gene. The exon 50 (58.46% was the most frequent deletion found in our study. The mean age of onset of DMD and BMD was 4.09 ΁ 0.15 and 7.14 ΁ 0.55 years, respectively. In patients, mean creatine phosphokinase (CPK, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and myoglobin levels were elevated significantly (P < 0.05 in comparison to controls. Addition to CPK, LDH and myoglobin are good adjunct when deletion detection failed. These data are further in accordance with world literature when correlated with frame rule. Conclusion: The analysis has been carried out for the first time for a total of 88 D/BMD patients particularly from Gujarat, India. More research is essential to elucidate specific mutation pattern in association with management and therapies of proband.

  17. Risk factors for colorectal cancer in patients with multiple serrated polyps: a cross-sectional case series from genetics clinics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D Buchanan

    Full Text Available Patients with multiple serrated polyps are at an increased risk for developing colorectal cancer (CRC. Recent reports have linked cigarette smoking with the subset of CRC that develops from serrated polyps. The aim of this work therefore was to investigate the association between smoking and the risk of CRC in high-risk genetics clinic patients presenting with multiple serrated polyps.We identified 151 Caucasian individuals with multiple serrated polyps including at least 5 outside the rectum, and classified patients into non-smokers, current or former smokers at the time of initial diagnosis of polyposis. Cases were individuals with multiple serrated polyps who presented with CRC. Controls were individuals with multiple serrated polyps and no CRC. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to estimate associations between smoking and CRC with adjustment for age at first presentation, sex and co-existing traditional adenomas, a feature that has been consistently linked with CRC risk in patients with multiple serrated polyps. CRC was present in 56 (37% individuals at presentation. Patients with at least one adenoma were 4 times more likely to present with CRC compared with patients without adenomas (OR = 4.09; 95%CI 1.27 to 13.14; P = 0.02. For females, the odds of CRC decreased by 90% in current smokers as compared to never smokers (OR = 0.10; 95%CI 0.02 to 0.47; P = 0.004 after adjusting for age and adenomas. For males, there was no relationship between current smoking and CRC. There was no statistical evidence of an association between former smoking and CRC for both sexes.A decreased odds for CRC was identified in females with multiple serrated polyps who currently smoke, independent of age and the presence of a traditional adenoma. Investigations into the biological basis for these observations could lead to non-smoking-related therapies being developed to decrease the risk of CRC and colectomy in these patients.

  18. PBL教学法和CPC教学法在病理学实验课中的应用%Application of Problem-based Learning and Clinical Pathology Conference in Pathology Classroom Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娟; 胡晓松; 刘馨莲; 孙静; 李淑蓉

    2007-01-01

    病理学是一门联系基础医学和临床医学的桥梁课程,实验课是病理学教学中的重要环节,传统教学法不能充分调动学生学习的积极性,已难适应本科教学的要求.为此,作者在教学中开始尝试以问题为基础的学习法(problem-based learning,PBL)和临床病理讨论(clinical pathology conference,CPC),提高教学效果,培养学生的创造性和积极思考能力.

  19. Genetic variation in the Cytb gene of human cerebral Taenia solium cysticerci recovered from clinically and radiologically heterogeneous patients with neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Palafox-Fonseca

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NC is a clinically and radiologically heterogeneous parasitic disease caused by the establishment of larval Taenia solium in the human central nervous system. Host and/or parasite variations may be related to this observed heterogeneity. Genetic differences between pig and human-derived T. solium cysticerci have been reported previously. In this study, 28 cysticerci were surgically removed from 12 human NC patients, the mitochondrial gene that encodes cytochrome b was amplified from the cysticerci and genetic variations that may be related to NC heterogeneity were characterised. Nine different haplotypes (Ht, which were clustered in four haplogroups (Hg, were identified. Hg 3 and 4 exhibited a tendency to associate with age and gender, respectively. However, no significant associations were found between NC heterogeneity and the different T. solium cysticerci Ht or Hg. Parasite variants obtained from patients with similar NC clinical or radiological features were genetically closer than those found in groups of patients with a different NC profile when using the Mantel test. Overall, this study establishes the presence of genetic differences in the Cytb gene of T. solium isolated from human cysticerci and suggests that parasite variation could contribute to NC heterogeneity.

  20. Genetic variation in the Cytb gene of human cerebral Taenia solium cysticerci recovered from clinically and radiologically heterogeneous patients with neurocysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palafox-Fonseca, Héctor; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Bobes, Raúl José; Govezensky, Tzipe; Piñero, Daniel; Texco-Martínez, Laura; Fleury, Agnès; Proaño, Jefferson; Cárdenas, Graciela; Hernández, Marisela; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis

    2013-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NC) is a clinically and radiologically heterogeneous parasitic disease caused by the establishment of larval Taenia solium in the human central nervous system. Host and/or parasite variations may be related to this observed heterogeneity. Genetic differences between pig and human-derived T. solium cysticerci have been reported previously. In this study, 28 cysticerci were surgically removed from 12 human NC patients, the mitochondrial gene that encodes cytochrome b was amplified from the cysticerci and genetic variations that may be related to NC heterogeneity were characterised. Nine different haplotypes (Ht), which were clustered in four haplogroups (Hg), were identified. Hg 3 and 4 exhibited a tendency to associate with age and gender, respectively. However, no significant associations were found between NC heterogeneity and the different T. solium cysticerci Ht or Hg. Parasite variants obtained from patients with similar NC clinical or radiological features were genetically closer than those found in groups of patients with a different NC profile when using the Mantel test. Overall, this study establishes the presence of genetic differences in the Cytb gene of T. solium isolated from human cysticerci and suggests that parasite variation could contribute to NC heterogeneity. PMID:24271046