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Sample records for clinical care tool

  1. Visual Impairment/lntracranial Pressure Risk Clinical Care Data Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Baalen, Mary; Mason, Sara S.; Taiym, Wafa; Wear, Mary L.; Moynihan, Shannan; Alexander, David; Hart, Steve; Tarver, William

    2014-01-01

    Prior to 2010, several ISS crewmembers returned from spaceflight with changes to their vision, ranging from a mild hyperopic shift to frank disc edema. As a result, NASA expanded clinical vision testing to include more comprehensive medical imaging, including Optical Coherence Tomography and 3 Tesla Brain and Orbit MRIs. The Space and Clinical Operations (SCO) Division developed a clinical practice guideline that classified individuals based on their symptoms and diagnoses to facilitate clinical care. For the purposes of clinical surveillance, this classification was applied retrospectively to all crewmembers who had sufficient testing for classification. This classification is also a tool that has been leveraged for researchers to identify potential risk factors. In March 2014, driven in part by a more comprehensive understanding of the imaging data and increased imaging capability on orbit, the SCO Division revised their clinical care guidance to outline in-flight care and increase post-flight follow up. The new clinical guidance does not include a classification scheme

  2. Use of dependency and prioritization tools by clinical nurse specialists in palliative care: an exploratory study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bracken, Mairéad

    2011-12-01

    The principal aim was to assess the utility of three needs assessment\\/dependency tools for use in community-based palliative care services. Specific objectives were to assess a sample of patients receiving specialist palliative care community nursing using these tools, to assess the predictive ability of each tool, and to explore the utility of prioritizing and measuring patient dependency from a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) perspective.

  3. Can district nurses and care home staff improve bowel care for older people using a clinical benchmarking tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Claire; L Davies, Sue; Norton, Christine; Fader, Mandy; Morris, Jackie; Wells, Mandy; Gage, Heather

    2013-12-01

    A quasi-experimental study tested a clinical benchmarking tool (Essence of Care) to improve bowel-related care for older people living in six care homes. In the intervention care homes, district nurses and care home staff used the clinical benchmarking tool to discuss and plan how to improve bowel care for residents. In the control care homes, staff were provided with detailed information about the residents and continence services contact details. The intervention was acceptable to care home and district nursing staff, and possible to incorporate into existing working patterns. The study did not demonstrate a significant reduction in bowel-related problems, although there was evidence in one care home of reduction in episodes of avoidable faecal incontinence. At an individual level of care, there were observable benefits, and examples of person-centred care were prompted through participating in the intervention and improved staff awareness. Clinical benchmarking tools can be used to structure discussion between district nurses and care home staff to review and plan care for residents. However, it takes time to achieve change and embedding this kind of approach requires either robust pre-existing working relationships or the involvement of a facilitator.

  4. Pregnancy outcomes in Ghana : Relavance of clinical decision making support tools for frontline providers of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amoakoh-Coleman, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ghana’s slow progress towards attaining millennium development goal 5 has been associated with gaps in quality of care, particularly quality of clinical decision making for clients. This thesis reviews the relevance and effect of clinical decision making support tools on pregnancy outcomes. Relevanc

  5. Pregnancy outcomes in Ghana : Relavance of clinical decision making support tools for frontline providers of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amoakoh-Coleman, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ghana’s slow progress towards attaining millennium development goal 5 has been associated with gaps in quality of care, particularly quality of clinical decision making for clients. This thesis reviews the relevance and effect of clinical decision making support tools on pregnancy outcomes. Relevanc

  6. The intelligent clinical laboratory as a tool to increase cancer care management productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the causes of cancer, early detection, prevention or treatment need accurate, comprehensive, and timely cancer data. The clinical laboratory provides important cancer information needed for physicians which influence clinical decisions regarding treatment, diagnosis and patient monitoring. Poor communication between health care providers and clinical laboratory personnel can lead to medical errors and wrong decisions in providing cancer care. Because of the key impact of laboratory information on cancer diagnosis and treatment the quality of the tests, lab reports, and appropriate lab management are very important. A laboratory information management system (LIMS) can have an important role in diagnosis, fast and effective access to cancer data, decrease redundancy and costs, and facilitate the integration and collection of data from different types of instruments and systems. In spite of significant advantages LIMS is limited by factors such as problems in adaption to new instruments that may change existing work processes. Applications of intelligent software simultaneously with existing information systems, in addition to remove these restrictions, have important benefits including adding additional non-laboratory-generated information to the reports, facilitating decision making, and improving quality and productivity of cancer care services. Laboratory systems must have flexibility to change and have the capability to develop and benefit from intelligent devices. Intelligent laboratory information management systems need to benefit from informatics tools and latest technologies like open sources. The aim of this commentary is to survey application, opportunities and necessity of intelligent clinical laboratory as a tool to increase cancer care management productivity.

  7. Augmenting Predictive Modeling Tools with Clinical Insights for Care Coordination Program Design and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tracy L; Brewer, Daniel; Estacio, Raymond; Vlasimsky, Tara; Durfee, Michael J; Thompson, Kathy R; Everhart, Rachel M; Rinehart, Deborath J; Batal, Holly

    2015-01-01

    The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) awarded Denver Health's (DH) integrated, safety net health care system $19.8 million to implement a "population health" approach into the delivery of primary care. This major practice transformation builds on the Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) and Wagner's Chronic Care Model (CCM) to achieve the "Triple Aim": improved health for populations, care to individuals, and lower per capita costs. This paper presents a case study of how DH integrated published predictive models and front-line clinical judgment to implement a clinically actionable, risk stratification of patients. This population segmentation approach was used to deploy enhanced care team staff resources and to tailor care-management services to patient need, especially for patients at high risk of avoidable hospitalization. Developing, implementing, and gaining clinical acceptance of the Health Information Technology (HIT) solution for patient risk stratification was a major grant objective. In addition to describing the Information Technology (IT) solution itself, we focus on the leadership and organizational processes that facilitated its multidisciplinary development and ongoing iterative refinement, including the following: team composition, target population definition, algorithm rule development, performance assessment, and clinical-workflow optimization. We provide examples of how dynamic business intelligence tools facilitated clinical accessibility for program design decisions by enabling real-time data views from a population perspective down to patient-specific variables. We conclude that population segmentation approaches that integrate clinical perspectives with predictive modeling results can better identify high opportunity patients amenable to medical home-based, enhanced care team interventions.

  8. Clinical audit, a valuable tool to improve quality of care: General methodology and applications in nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Pasquale; Dal Canton, Antonio

    2014-11-06

    Evaluation and improvement of quality of care provided to the patients are of crucial importance in the daily clinical practice and in the health policy planning and financing. Different tools have been developed, including incident analysis, health technology assessment and clinical audit. The clinical audit consist of measuring a clinical outcome or a process, against well-defined standards set on the principles of evidence-based medicine in order to identify the changes needed to improve the quality of care. In particular, patients suffering from chronic renal diseases, present many problems that have been set as topics for clinical audit projects, such as hypertension, anaemia and mineral metabolism management. Although the results of these studies have been encouraging, demonstrating the effectiveness of audit, overall the present evidence is not clearly in favour of clinical audit. These findings call attention to the need to further studies to validate this methodology in different operating scenarios. This review examines the principle of clinical audit, focusing on experiences performed in nephrology settings.

  9. A CIS (Clinical Information System) Quality Evaluation Tool for Nursing Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon Ah

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a tool to evaluate the quality of a clinical information system (CIS) conceived by nurses and conduct a pilot test with the developed tool as an initial assessment. CIS quality is required for successful implementation in information technology (IT) environments. The study started with the realization that…

  10. The Nijmegen decision tool for chronic low back pain. Development of a clinical decision tool for secondary or tertiary spine care specialists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda L van Hooff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Western Europe, low back pain has the greatest burden of all diseases. When back pain persists, different medical specialists are involved and a lack of consensus exists among these specialists for medical decision-making in Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP. OBJECTIVE: To develop a decision tool for secondary or tertiary spine care specialists to decide which patients with CLBP should be seen by a spine surgeon or by other non-surgical medical specialists. METHODS: A Delphi study was performed to identify indicators predicting the outcome of interventions. In the preparatory stage evidence from international guidelines and literature were summarized. Eligible studies were reviews and longitudinal studies. Inclusion criteria: surgical or non-surgical interventions and persistence of complaints, CLBP-patients aged 18-65 years, reported baseline measures of predictive indicators, and one or more reported outcomes had to assess functional status, quality of life, pain intensity, employment status or a composite score. Subsequently, a three-round Delphi procedure, to reach consensus on candidate indicators, was performed among a multidisciplinary panel of 29 CLBP-professionals (>five years CLBP-experience. The pre-set threshold for general agreement was ≥70%. The final indicator set was used to develop a clinical decision tool. RESULTS: A draft list with 53 candidate indicators (38 with conclusive evidence and 15 with inconclusive evidence was included for the Delphi study. Consensus was reached to include 47 indicators. A first version of the decision tool was developed, consisting of a web-based screening questionnaire and a provisional decision algorithm. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first clinical decision tool based on current scientific evidence and formal multidisciplinary consensus that helps referring the patient for consultation to a spine surgeon or a non-surgical spine care specialist. We expect that this tool considerably helps

  11. Bioinformatics Methods and Tools to Advance Clinical Care. Findings from the Yearbook 2015 Section on Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soualmia, L F; Lecroq, T

    2015-08-13

    To summarize excellent current research in the field of Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics with application in the health domain and clinical care. We provide a synopsis of the articles selected for the IMIA Yearbook 2015, from which we attempt to derive a synthetic overview of current and future activities in the field. As last year, a first step of selection was performed by querying MEDLINE with a list of MeSH descriptors completed by a list of terms adapted to the section. Each section editor has evaluated separately the set of 1,594 articles and the evaluation results were merged for retaining 15 articles for peer-review. The selection and evaluation process of this Yearbook's section on Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics yielded four excellent articles regarding data management and genome medicine that are mainly tool-based papers. In the first article, the authors present PPISURV a tool for uncovering the role of specific genes in cancer survival outcome. The second article describes the classifier PredictSNP which combines six performing tools for predicting disease-related mutations. In the third article, by presenting a high-coverage map of the human proteome using high resolution mass spectrometry, the authors highlight the need for using mass spectrometry to complement genome annotation. The fourth article is also related to patient survival and decision support. The authors present datamining methods of large-scale datasets of past transplants. The objective is to identify chances of survival. The current research activities still attest the continuous convergence of Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics, with a focus this year on dedicated tools and methods to advance clinical care. Indeed, there is a need for powerful tools for managing and interpreting complex, large-scale genomic and biological datasets, but also a need for user-friendly tools developed for the clinicians in their daily practice. All the recent research and

  12. The Computerized Medical Record as a Tool for Clinical Governance in Australian Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Christine; Hall, Sally; Travaglia, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Background Computerized medical records (CMR) are used in most Australian general practices. Although CMRs have the capacity to amalgamate and provide data to the clinician about their standard of care, there is little research on the way in which they may be used to support clinical governance: the process of ensuring quality and accountability that incorporates the obligation that patients are treated according to best evidence. Objective The objective of this study was to explore the capability, capacity, and acceptability of CMRs to support clinical governance. Methods We conducted a realist review of the role of seven CMR systems in implementing clinical governance, developing a four-level maturity model for the CMR. We took Australian primary care as the context, CMR to be the mechanism, and looked at outcomes for individual patients, localities, and for the population in terms of known evidence-based surrogates or true outcome measures. Results The lack of standardization of CMRs makes national and international benchmarking challenging. The use of the CMR was largely at level two of our maturity model, indicating a relatively simple system in which most of the process takes place outside of the CMR, and which has little capacity to support benchmarking, practice comparisons, and population-level activities. Although national standards for coding and projects for record access are proposed, they are not operationalized. Conclusions The current CMR systems can support clinical governance activities; however, unless the standardization and data quality issues are addressed, it will not be possible for current systems to work at higher levels. PMID:23939340

  13. Exploring Systems That Support Good Clinical Care in Indigenous Primary Health-care Services: A Retrospective Analysis of Longitudinal Systems Assessment Tool Data from High-Improving Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Cindy; Carlisle, Karen; Larkins, Sarah; Thompson, Sandra Claire; Tsey, Komla; Matthews, Veronica; Bailie, Ross

    2017-01-01

    Continuous Quality Improvement is a process for raising the quality of primary health care (PHC) across Indigenous PHC services. In addition to clinical auditing using plan, do, study, and act cycles, engaging staff in a process of reflecting on systems to support quality care is vital. The One21seventy Systems Assessment Tool (SAT) supports staff to assess systems performance in terms of five key components. This study examines quantitative and qualitative SAT data from five high-improving Indigenous PHC services in northern Australia to understand the systems used to support quality care. High-improving services selected for the study were determined by calculating quality of care indices for Indigenous health services participating in the Audit and Best Practice in Chronic Disease National Research Partnership. Services that reported continuing high improvement in quality of care delivered across two or more audit tools in three or more audits were selected for the study. Precollected SAT data (from annual team SAT meetings) are presented longitudinally using radar plots for quantitative scores for each component, and content analysis is used to describe strengths and weaknesses of performance in each systems' component. High-improving services were able to demonstrate strong processes for assessing system performance and consistent improvement in systems to support quality care across components. Key strengths in the quality support systems included adequate and orientated workforce, appropriate health system supports, and engagement with other organizations and community, while the weaknesses included lack of service infrastructure, recruitment, retention, and support for staff and additional costs. Qualitative data revealed clear voices from health service staff expressing concerns with performance, and subsequent SAT data provided evidence of changes made to address concerns. Learning from the processes and strengths of high-improving services may be useful

  14. A Purchaser’s Guide to Clinical Preventive Services: A Tool to Improve Health Care Coverage for Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Phillips Campbell, MPH

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIn 2005, representatives from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention partnered with the National Business Group on Health and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to form a work group for developing A Purchaser’s Guide to Clinical Preventive Services: Moving Science into Coverage. This guide, designed as a tool for employers, describes recommended clinical preventive services for 46 conditions. The guide includes the scientific evidence and benefits language that employers need to include comprehensive clinical preventive services in their medical benefit plans.MethodsThe work group determined that the guide would address conditions that 1 affected a large percentage of the working population, 2 were costly to control, and 3 had well-defined and accepted recommendations for preventive services. Subject matter experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Business Group on Health, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality developed or reviewed statements of scientific evidence for 46 diseases and conditions.ResultsThe Purchaser’s Guide, written for an employer audience, includes descriptions for recommended clinical preventive services and their cost savings, syntheses of supporting evidence, strategies for prioritization, and recommendations to improve the delivery and use of preventive services. Twelve hundred copies were sent to more than 275 members of the National Business Group on Health and other purchasers of health care; training sessions on the Guide were held for 228 business leaders, health benefit consultants, and health plan administrators; and an online version was created through the Web sites of the National Business Group on Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The online version has received more than 260,000 hits since its release.ConclusionIn 2007, the National Business Group on Health reported that some Fortune 500 companies will be

  15. Point of Care Tools im Vergleich des Universitätsklinikums Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE: UpToDate, ClinicalResource@Ovid/Clin-eguide und Dynamed / Point of Care Tools in comparison at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf: UpToDate, ClinicalResource@Ovid and Dynamed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menn, Elke

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Point of Care Tools are used for clinical decision making – UpToDate is also used in continuing medical education. These databases compile only evidence-based knowledge which is updated regularly. Using Point of Care Tools promises to improve clinical outcomes. UpToDate has been used at the University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf for the last four years. In a recent trial the use of ClinicalResource@Ovid/Clin-eguide and Dynamed has been evaluated in comparison with UpToDate.

  16. An electronic clinical decision support tool to assist primary care providers in cardiovascular disease risk management: development and mixed methods evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, David P; Joshi, Rohina; Webster, Ruth J; Groenestein, Patrick; Usherwood, Tim P; Heeley, Emma; Turnbull, Fiona M; Lipman, Alexandra; Patel, Anushka A

    2009-12-17

    Challenges remain in translating the well-established evidence for management of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk into clinical practice. Although electronic clinical decision support (CDS) systems are known to improve practitioner performance, their development in Australian primary health care settings is limited. Study aims were to (1) develop a valid CDS tool that assists Australian general practitioners (GPs) in global CVD risk management, and (2) preliminarily evaluate its acceptability to GPs as a point-of-care resource for both general and underserved populations. CVD risk estimation (based on Framingham algorithms) and risk-based management advice (using recommendations from six Australian guidelines) were programmed into a software package. Tool validation: Data from 137 patients attending a physician's clinic were analyzed to compare the tool's risk scores with those obtained from an independently programmed algorithm in a separate statistics package. The tool's management advice was compared with a physician's recommendations based on a manual review of the guidelines. Field test: The tool was then tested with 21 GPs from eight general practices and three Aboriginal Medical Services. Customized CDS-based recommendations were generated for 200 routinely attending patients (33% Aboriginal) using information extracted from the health record by a research assistant. GPs reviewed these recommendations during each consultation. Changes in CVD risk factor measurement and management were recorded. In-depth interviews with GPs were conducted. Validation testing: the tool's risk assessment algorithm correlated very highly with the independently programmed version in the separate statistics package (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.999). For management advice, there were only two cases of disagreement between the tool and the physician. Field test: GPs found 77% (153/200) of patient outputs easy to understand and agreed with screening and prescribing

  17. The perception of the clinical relevance of the MDS-Home Care(C) tool by trainers in general practice in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duyver, Corentin; Van Houdt, Sabine; De Lepeleire, Jan; Dory, Valerie; Degryse, Jean-Marie

    2010-12-01

    comprehensive geriatric assessment has been advocated as an effective way to first identify multidimensional needs and second to establish priorities for organizing an individual health care plan for community-dwelling elderly. This paper reports on the perception of an internationally evaluated assessment system for use in community care programmes, the Minimal Data Set-Home Care (MDS-HC), by a group of experienced GP trainers. the primary study aim was to determine the perception of a standardized home care assessment system (MDS-HC) by GP trainers in terms of acceptability, perceived clinical relevance, care planning empowerment and valorization of the GP. sixty-five first-year GP trainees were educated about the MDS-HC and the use of a first version of an electronic interface. Each trainee included two elderly patients, based on strict inclusion criteria. Prior to the assessment, GP trainers and trainees were invited to complete together a basic medical record on the basis of their knowledge of the included patients. Next, the collected data, covering the multiple domains by MDS-HC, were introduced in the electronic interface by the trainee. Based on the collected data for each patient, a series of clinical assessment protocols (CAP's) were generated. Afterwards, these CAP's were critically discussed with the trainer. To investigate how the application of the MDS-HC was perceived, a 21 Likert-type item scale was drawn up based on four dimensions regarding the tool. the perception questionnaire had a good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.93). The first version of the electronic interface was considered not 'user-friendly' enough and the introduction of data time-consuming. The perception of the GP's about the overall clinical relevance of the MDS-HC was found to have little added value for the GP in the establishment of a personal management plan. many developments in health care result in an increasing demand for a standardized home care assessment

  18. Evidence-Based Recommendations for Short- and Long-Term Management of Uninvestigated Dyspepsia in Primary Care: An Update of the Canadian Dyspepsia Working Group (CanDys) Clinical Management Tool

    OpenAIRE

    van Zanten, Sander JO Veldhuyzen; Bradette, Marc; Chiba, Naoki; Armstrong, David; Barkun, Alan; Flook, Nigel; Thomson, Alan; Bursey, Ford

    2005-01-01

    The present paper is an update to and extension of the previous systematic review on the primary care management of patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia (UD). The original publication of the clinical management tool focused on the initial four- to eight-week assessment of UD. This update is based on new data from systematic reviews and clinical trials relevant to UD. There is now direct clinical evidence supporting a test-and-treat approach in patients with nondominant heartburn dyspepsia s...

  19. Development and evaluation of the feasibility and effects on staff, patients, and families of a new tool, the Psychosocial Assessment and Communication Evaluation (PACE), to improve communication and palliative care in intensive care and during clinical uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Irene J; Koffman, Jonathan; Hopkins, Philip; Prentice, Wendy; Burman, Rachel; Leonard, Sara; Rumble, Caroline; Noble, Jo; Dampier, Odette; Bernal, William; Hall, Sue; Morgan, Myfanwy; Shipman, Cathy

    2013-10-01

    There are widespread concerns about communication and support for patients and families, especially when they face clinical uncertainty, a situation most marked in intensive care units (ICUs). Therefore, we aimed to develop and evaluate an interventional tool to improve communication and palliative care, using the ICU as an example of where this is difficult. Our design was a phase I-II study following the Medical Research Council Guidance for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions and the (Methods of Researching End-of-life Care (MORECare) statement. In two ICUs, with over 1900 admissions annually, phase I modeled a new intervention comprising implementation training and an assessment tool. We conducted a literature review, qualitative interviews, and focus groups with 40 staff and 13 family members. This resulted in the new tool, the Psychosocial Assessment and Communication Evaluation (PACE). Phase II evaluated the feasibility and effects of PACE, using observation, record audit, and surveys of staff and family members. Qualitative data were analyzed using the framework approach. The statistical tests used on quantitative data were t-tests (for normally distributed characteristics), the χ2 or Fisher's exact test (for non-normally distributed characteristics) and the Mann-Whitney U-test (for experience assessments) to compare the characteristics and experience for cases with and without PACE recorded. PACE provides individualized assessments of all patients entering the ICU. It is completed within 24 to 48 hours of admission, and covers five aspects (key relationships, social details and needs, patient preferences, communication and information status, and other concerns), followed by recording of an ongoing communication evaluation. Implementation is supported by a training program with specialist palliative care. A post-implementation survey of 95 ICU staff found that 89% rated PACE assessment as very or generally useful. Of 213 family members

  20. PCATool: primary care assessment tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Henrique Norman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade (RBMFC  encerra o ano de 2013 com uma edição em comemoração ao nascimento da Dra. Barbara Starfield em 18 de dezembro (18/12/1932 - 10/6/2011. A foto da capa, intitulada  “Desayuno en Buitrago de Lozoya” retrata a amizade entre Barbara Starfield, seu marido Neil “Tony” Holtzman e Juan Gérvas e Mercedes Pérez Fernández (autora da foto, na qual desfrutam e compartilham a vida à mesa. A mesa também faz referência a uma característica marcante de Starfield: a de nutriz (do latim nuctrix, que possui a capacidade de nutrir; que sustenta. Como  afirmou seu marido Tony: - “Ela fez isso por meio de sua pesquisa, sua paixão altruísta e sua orientação àqueles que se preocupam com as pessoas, a justiça e a verdade”1.O editorial especial para esta edição foi escrito pelo Dr. Juan Gérvas e reflete a importância de se avaliar a qualidade da atenção primária à saúde (APS a fim de que ela possa, continuamente,  se fortalecer. Em decorrência disso, todos os artigos desta edição versam sobre o Instrumento de Avaliação da Atenção Primária, em inglês Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCATool, sua validação, adaptação e aplicação para a APS2. Starfield e colaboradores desenvolveram, no The Johns Hopkins Populations Care Policy Center for the Underserved Populations, o PCATool, instrumento que permite mensurar a presença e a extensão dos atributos essenciais e derivados da APS3. Os quatro atributos essenciais da APS: a acesso de primeiro contato; b continuidade do cuidado; c abrangência  (comprehensiveness; e d coordenação dos cuidados são subcomponentes do acesso e, portanto, a qualidade dos serviços passa pela melhoria de estruturas e processos (efetividade que garantam o acesso tanto no nível individual – atendendo os indivíduos e suas necessidades em saúde – como no nível populacional, em que o acesso volta-se à dimensão ética da

  1. Sequential simulation (SqS) of clinical pathways: a tool for public and patient engagement in point-of-care diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddy, Jeremy R; Weldon, Sharon-Marie; Ralhan, Shvaita; Painter, Tim; Hanna, George B; Kneebone, Roger; Bello, Fernando

    2016-09-13

    Public and patient engagement (PPE) is fundamental to healthcare research. To facilitate effective engagement in novel point-of-care tests (POCTs), the test and downstream consequences of the result need to be considered. Sequential simulation (SqS) is a tool to represent patient journeys and the effects of intervention at each and subsequent stages. This case study presents a process evaluation of SqS as a tool for PPE in the development of a volatile organic compound-based breath test POCT for the diagnosis of oesophagogastric (OG) cancer. Three 3-hour workshops in central London. 38 members of public attended a workshop, 26 (68%) had no prior experience of the OG cancer diagnostic pathway. Clinical pathway SqS was developed from a storyboard of a patient, played by an actor, noticing symptoms of oesophageal cancer and following a typical diagnostic pathway. The proposed breath testing strategy was then introduced and incorporated into a second SqS to demonstrate pathway impact. Facilitated group discussions followed each SqS. Evaluation was conducted through pre-event and postevent questionnaires, field notes and analysis of audiovisual recordings. 38 participants attended a workshop. All participants agreed they were able to contribute to discussions and like the idea of an OG cancer breath test. Five themes emerged related to the proposed new breath test including awareness of OG cancer, barriers to testing and diagnosis, design of new test device, new clinical pathway and placement of test device. 3 themes emerged related to the use of SqS: participatory engagement, simulation and empathetic engagement, and why participants attended. SqS facilitated a shared immersive experience for participants and researchers that led to the coconstruction of knowledge that will guide future research activities and be of value to stakeholders concerned with the invention and adoption of POCT. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  2. Has the time come to use near-infrared spectroscopy as a routine clinical tool in preterm infants undergoing intensive care?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Gorm; Leung, Terence; Wolf, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Several instruments implementing spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to monitor tissue oxygenation are now approved for clinical use. The neonatal brain is readily assessible by NIRS and neurodevelopmental impairment is common in children who were in need of intensive care during...... the neonatal period. It is likely that an important part of the burden of this handicap is due to brain injury induced by hypoxia-ischaemia during intensive care. In particular, this is true for infants born extremely preterm. Thus, monitoring of cerebral oxygenation has considerable potential benefit...... relevant endpoint, such as death or neurodevelopmental handicap. We estimate that such a trial should recruit about 4000 infants to have the power to detect a reduction in brain injury by one-fifth. This illustrates the formidable task of providing first-grade evidence for the clinical value of diagnostic...

  3. Clinical informatics in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martich, G Daniel; Waldmann, Carl S; Imhoff, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Health care information systems have the potential to enable better care of patients in much the same manner as the widespread use of the automobile and telephone did in the early 20th century. The car and phone were rapidly accepted and embraced throughout the world when these breakthroughs occurred. However, the automation of health care with use of computerized information systems has not been as widely accepted and implemented as computer technology use in all other sectors of the global economy. In this article, the authors examine the need, risks, and rewards of clinical informatics in health care as well as its specific relationship to critical care medicine.

  4. The development of care management systems to achieve clinical integration.

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    Hill, M

    1998-01-01

    With development of managed care markets, health care delivery systems face increasing clinical and financial risk. For an integrated delivery system to survive, strategies for clinical integration and care management are essential. CareMap tools, collaborative practice groups, and case management serve as the foundation to accomplish care management over the health continuum. Coordination of care, within an institution and across traditional health settings, to achieve the best clinical and cost outcomes is the goal. The article discusses strategies for clinical integration, categories for measurement of performance, and the need to incorporate automated solutions into the strategic business plan.

  5. Primary Care Clinics and Accountable Care Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Ortiz PhD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Accountable Care Organization (ACO is one of the new models of health care delivery in the United States. To date, little is known about the characteristics of health care organizations that have joined ACOs. We report on the findings of a survey of primary care clinics, the objective of which was to investigate the opinions of clinic management about participation in ACOs and the characteristics of clinic organizational structure that may contribute to joining ACOs or be willing to do so. Methods: A 27-item survey questionnaire was developed and distributed by mail in 3 annual waves to all Rural Health Clinics (RHCs in 9 states. Two dependent variables—participation in ACOs and willingness to join ACOs—were created and analyzed using a generalized estimating equation approach. Results: A total of 257 RHCs responded to the survey. A small percentage (5.2% of the respondent clinics reported that they were participating in ACOs. Rural Health Clinics in isolated areas were 78% less likely to be in ACOs (odds ratio = 0.22, P = .059. Nonprofit RHCs indicated a higher willingness to join an ACO than for-profit RHCs (B = 1.271, P = .054. There is a positive relationship between RHC size and willingness to join an ACO (B = 0.402, P = .010. Conclusion: At this early stage of ACO development, many RHC personnel are unfamiliar with the ACO model. Rural providers’ limited technological and human resources, and the lack of ACO development in rural areas, may delay or prevent their participation in ACOs.

  6. Concept mapping: a tool for improving patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberdeen, Suzanne

    2015-07-29

    This article reviews the use of concept mapping as a person-centred problem-solving aid to assessment, risk management, care evaluation and care planning for nurses. Concept maps are diagrams that are used to organise, represent and create knowledge, and provide a useful framework for critical analysis and problem solving. Concept mapping is discussed and demonstrated in relation to improving the quality of care for patients and as a tool for clinical leadership and teamwork. The benefits of concept mapping for patients' wellbeing and safety, staff satisfaction and team learning are evidenced.

  7. Conversations in end-of-life care: communication tools for critical care practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Sarah E; Long-Sutehall, Tracy; Coombs, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Communication skills are the key for quality end-of-life care including in the critical care setting. While learning general, transferable communication skills, such as therapeutic listening, has been common in nursing education, learning specific communication tools, such as breaking bad news, has been the norm for medical education. Critical care nurses may also benefit from learning communication tools that are more specific to end-of-life care. We conducted a 90-min interactive workshop at a national conference for a group of 78 experienced critical care nurses where we presented three communication tools using short didactics. We utilized theatre style and paired role play simulation. The Ask-Tell-Ask, Tell Me More and Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation (SBAR) tools were demonstrated or practiced using a case of a family member who feels that treatment is being withdrawn prematurely for the patient. The audience actively participated in debriefing the role play to maximize learning. The final communication tool, SBAR, was practiced using an approach of pairing with another member of the audience. At the end of the session, a brief evaluation was completed by 59 nurses (80%) of the audience. These communication tools offer nurses new strategies for approaching potentially difficult and emotionally charged conversations. A case example illustrated strategies for applying these skills to clinical situations. The three tools assist critical care nurses to move beyond compassionate listening to knowing what to say. Ask-Tell-Ask reminds nurses to carefully assess concerns before imparting information. Tell Me More provides a tool for encouraging dialogue in challenging situations. Finally, SBAR can assist nurses to distill complex and often long conversations into concise and informative reports for colleagues. © 2011 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care © 2011 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  8. Educational Outreach with an Integrated Clinical Tool for Nurse-Led Non-communicable Chronic Disease Management in Primary Care in South Africa: A Pragmatic Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairall, Lara R; Folb, Naomi; Timmerman, Venessa; Lombard, Carl; Steyn, Krisela; Bachmann, Max O; Bateman, Eric D; Lund, Crick; Cornick, Ruth; Faris, Gill; Gaziano, Thomas; Georgeu-Pepper, Daniella; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Levitt, Naomi S

    2016-11-01

    In many low-income countries, care for patients with non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and mental health conditions is provided by nurses. The benefits of nurse substitution and supplementation in NCD care in high-income settings are well recognised, but evidence from low- and middle-income countries is limited. Primary Care 101 (PC101) is a programme designed to support and expand nurses' role in NCD care, comprising educational outreach to nurses and a clinical management tool with enhanced prescribing provisions. We evaluated the effect of the programme on primary care nurses' capacity to manage NCDs. In a cluster randomised controlled trial design, 38 public sector primary care clinics in the Western Cape Province, South Africa, were randomised. Nurses in the intervention clinics were trained to use the PC101 management tool during educational outreach sessions delivered by health department trainers and were authorised to prescribe an expanded range of drugs for several NCDs. Control clinics continued use of the Practical Approach to Lung Health and HIV/AIDS in South Africa (PALSA PLUS) management tool and usual training. Patients attending these clinics with one or more of hypertension (3,227), diabetes (1,842), chronic respiratory disease (1,157) or who screened positive for depression (2,466), totalling 4,393 patients, were enrolled between 28 March 2011 and 10 November 2011. Primary outcomes were treatment intensification in the hypertension, diabetes, and chronic respiratory disease cohorts, defined as the proportion of patients in whom treatment was escalated during follow-up over 14 mo, and case detection in the depression cohort. Primary outcome data were analysed for 2,110 (97%) intervention and 2,170 (97%) control group patients. Treatment intensification rates in intervention clinics were not superior to those in the control clinics (hypertension: 44% in the intervention group versus 40% in the control group, risk ratio [RR] 1.08 [95% CI 0.94 to 1

  9. Educational Outreach with an Integrated Clinical Tool for Nurse-Led Non-communicable Chronic Disease Management in Primary Care in South Africa: A Pragmatic Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara R Fairall

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In many low-income countries, care for patients with non-communicable diseases (NCDs and mental health conditions is provided by nurses. The benefits of nurse substitution and supplementation in NCD care in high-income settings are well recognised, but evidence from low- and middle-income countries is limited. Primary Care 101 (PC101 is a programme designed to support and expand nurses' role in NCD care, comprising educational outreach to nurses and a clinical management tool with enhanced prescribing provisions. We evaluated the effect of the programme on primary care nurses' capacity to manage NCDs.In a cluster randomised controlled trial design, 38 public sector primary care clinics in the Western Cape Province, South Africa, were randomised. Nurses in the intervention clinics were trained to use the PC101 management tool during educational outreach sessions delivered by health department trainers and were authorised to prescribe an expanded range of drugs for several NCDs. Control clinics continued use of the Practical Approach to Lung Health and HIV/AIDS in South Africa (PALSA PLUS management tool and usual training. Patients attending these clinics with one or more of hypertension (3,227, diabetes (1,842, chronic respiratory disease (1,157 or who screened positive for depression (2,466, totalling 4,393 patients, were enrolled between 28 March 2011 and 10 November 2011. Primary outcomes were treatment intensification in the hypertension, diabetes, and chronic respiratory disease cohorts, defined as the proportion of patients in whom treatment was escalated during follow-up over 14 mo, and case detection in the depression cohort. Primary outcome data were analysed for 2,110 (97% intervention and 2,170 (97% control group patients. Treatment intensification rates in intervention clinics were not superior to those in the control clinics (hypertension: 44% in the intervention group versus 40% in the control group, risk ratio [RR] 1.08 [95% CI 0

  10. Building a global health education network for clinical care and research. The benefits and challenges of distance learning tools. Lessons learned from the Hopkins Center for Clinical Global Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Robert C; McKenzie-White, Jane; Gupta, Amita

    2011-06-01

    Expanding the capacity for clinical care and health research is a global priority and a global challenge. The Johns Hopkins Center for Clinical Global Health Education (CCGHE) was established in 2005 to provide access to high-quality training to health care providers in resource-limited settings. The CCGHE made a strategic decision to develop, use, and evaluate distance learning platforms to achieve its mission. In the initial years of this new program, several lessons have been learned that may be helpful to other programs considering the use of distance learning programs to expand global health clinical and research capacity.

  11. Correlations of clinical assessment tools with written examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Jeong; Sunwoo, Sung

    2009-03-01

    Despite the goal of medical education, which is 'training to be a primary care physician,' only written examinations (WEs) generally have been used to assess medical student ability. We assessed clinical competence using the CPX (clinical performance examination), PA (portfolio assessment), VMA (video-monitoring assessment), CGD (case group discussion), and PCP (primary clinical practice) during students' clerkships in family medicine and correlated these clinical assessment tools with WEs. Also, we correlated these tools with each other to determine the feasibility of each as a replacement of the other tools. Thirty-nine fourth year students at University of Ulsan College of Medicine took part in their clerkship in family medicine for 2 weeks during the first session of 2005. They took 1 CPX, 2 VMAs, 6 CGDs, and 2 PCPs and were required to submit their portfolios at the end of the clerkship. We evaluated the correlations of these tools and WEs by the overall scores of each class year and in each subject. The CPX, VMA, and PCP showed no significant correlation,while PA showed strong correlation with 4th year students' overall WEs. The CGD showed strong correlation with all overall scores and with almost all subjects. In addition, the PA correlated significantly with CGD. New clinical assessment tools, such as CPX, PA, and VMA, have no significant correlation with WE, even though these tools closely correspond with real clinical practice. Therefore, these tools should be considered as complementary instruments to better assess clinical competence.

  12. ClinicalKey: a point-of-care search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Emily

    2013-01-01

    ClinicalKey is a new point-of-care resource for health care professionals. Through controlled vocabulary, ClinicalKey offers a cross section of resources on diseases and procedures, from journals to e-books and practice guidelines to patient education. A sample search was conducted to demonstrate the features of the database, and a comparison with similar tools is presented.

  13. Requirements for clinical information modelling tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Jódar-Sánchez, Francisco; Kalra, Dipak

    2015-07-01

    This study proposes consensus requirements for clinical information modelling tools that can support modelling tasks in medium/large scale institutions. Rather than identify which functionalities are currently available in existing tools, the study has focused on functionalities that should be covered in order to provide guidance about how to evolve the existing tools. After identifying a set of 56 requirements for clinical information modelling tools based on a literature review and interviews with experts, a classical Delphi study methodology was applied to conduct a two round survey in order to classify them as essential or recommended. Essential requirements are those that must be met by any tool that claims to be suitable for clinical information modelling, and if we one day have a certified tools list, any tool that does not meet essential criteria would be excluded. Recommended requirements are those more advanced requirements that may be met by tools offering a superior product or only needed in certain modelling situations. According to the answers provided by 57 experts from 14 different countries, we found a high level of agreement to enable the study to identify 20 essential and 21 recommended requirements for these tools. It is expected that this list of identified requirements will guide developers on the inclusion of new basic and advanced functionalities that have strong support by end users. This list could also guide regulators in order to identify requirements that could be demanded of tools adopted within their institutions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mobile technologies as a health care tool

    CERN Document Server

    Arslan, Pelin

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a state-of-the-art overview of the available and emerging mobile technologies and explores how these technologies can serve as support tools in enhancing user participation in health care and promoting well-being in the daily lives of individuals, thereby reducing the burden of chronic disease on the health care system. The analysis is supported by presentation of a variety of case studies on the ways in which mobile technologies can be used to increase connectivity with health care providers and relevant others in order to promote healthy lifestyles and improve service provision. Detailed information is also provided on a sample project in which a set of tools has been used by teens at risk of obesity to record their sociopsychological environment and everyday health routines. Specifically, it is evaluated whether video diaries, created using a mobile platform and shared in real time via a social network, assist subjects in confronting obesity as a chronic disease. The book will be of inte...

  15. The experience sampling method as an mHealth tool to support self-monitoring, self-insight, and personalized health care in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Os, Jim; Verhagen, Simone; Marsman, Anne; Peeters, Frenk; Bak, Maarten; Marcelis, Machteld; Drukker, Marjan; Reininghaus, Ulrich; Jacobs, Nele; Lataster, Tineke; Simons, Claudia; Lousberg, Richel; Gülöksüz, Sinan; Leue, Carsten; Groot, Peter C; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Delespaul, Philippe

    2017-06-01

    The experience sampling method (ESM) builds an intensive time series of experiences and contexts in the flow of daily life, typically consisting of around 70 reports, collected at 8-10 random time points per day over a period of up to 10 days. With the advent of widespread smartphone use, ESM can be used in routine clinical practice. Multiple examples of ESM data collections across different patient groups and settings are shown and discussed, varying from an ESM evaluation of a 6-week randomized trial of mindfulness, to a twin study on emotion dynamics in daily life. Research shows that ESM-based self-monitoring and feedback can enhance resilience by strengthening the capacity to use natural rewards. Personalized trajectories of starting or stopping medication can be more easily initiated and predicted if sensitive feedback data are available in real time. In addition, personalized trajectories of symptoms, cognitive abilities, symptoms impacting on other symptoms, the capacity of the dynamic system of mental health to "bounce back" from disturbance, and patterns of environmental reactivity yield uniquely personal data to support shared decision making and prediction in clinical practice. Finally, ESM makes it possible to develop insight into previous implicit patterns of thought, experience, and behavior, particularly if rapid personalized feedback is available. ESM enhances clinical practice and research. It is empowering, providing co-ownership of the process of diagnosis, treatment evaluation, and routine outcome measurement. Blended care, based on a mix of face-to-face and ESM-based outside-the-office treatment, may reduce costs and improve outcomes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The Healthy Aging Brain Care (HABC Monitor: validation of the Patient Self-Report Version of the clinical tool designed to measure and monitor cognitive, functional, and psychological health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monahan PO

    2014-12-01

    scores of 0.Conclusion: The Self-Report HABC Monitor demonstrates good reliability and validity as a clinically practical multidimensional tool for measuring symptoms. The tool can be used along with its caregiver version to provide useful feedback (via monitoring of symptoms for modifying care plans. Determining the validity of HABC Monitor scores from patients who self-report a perfect cognitive score of 0 requires cognitive function test results (eg, Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status or Mini Mental State Examination or Caregiver Report HABC Monitor scores or further clinical examination to rule out the possibility that the patient is denying or unaware of their cognitive symptoms. Keywords: symptoms, monitor, validation, cognitive, psychological, functional

  17. SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry - a tool for improving the quality of diagnostics, treatment and care of dementia patients in clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Religa

    Full Text Available The Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem was developed with the aim to improve the quality of diagnostic work-up, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden.SveDem is an internet based quality registry where several indicators can be followed over time. It includes information about the diagnostic work-up, medical treatment and community support (www.svedem.se. The patients are diagnosed and followed-up yearly in specialist units, primary care centres or in nursing homes.The database was initiated in May 2007 and covers almost all of Sweden. There were 28 722 patients registered with a mean age of 79.3 years during 2007-2012. Each participating unit obtains continuous online statistics from its own registrations and they can be compared with regional and national data. A report from SveDem is published yearly to inform medical and care professionals as well as political and administrative decision-makers about the current quality of diagnostics, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden.SveDem provides knowledge about current dementia care in Sweden and serves as a framework for ensuring the quality of diagnostics, treatment and care across the country. It also reflects changes in quality dementia care over time. Data from SveDem can be used to further develop the national guidelines for dementia and to generate new research hypotheses.

  18. SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry – A Tool for Improving the Quality of Diagnostics, Treatment and Care of Dementia Patients in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Religa, Dorota; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Cermakova, Pavla; Edlund, Ann-Katrin; Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Granqvist, Nicklas; Hallbäck, Anne; Kåwe, Kerstin; Farahmand, Bahman; Kilander, Lena; Mattsson, Ulla-Britt; Nägga, Katarina; Nordström, Peter; Wijk, Helle; Wimo, Anders; Winblad, Bengt; Eriksdotter, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background The Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem) was developed with the aim to improve the quality of diagnostic work-up, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden. Methods SveDem is an internet based quality registry where several indicators can be followed over time. It includes information about the diagnostic work-up, medical treatment and community support (www.svedem.se). The patients are diagnosed and followed-up yearly in specialist units, primary care centres or in nursing homes. Results The database was initiated in May 2007 and covers almost all of Sweden. There were 28 722 patients registered with a mean age of 79.3 years during 2007–2012. Each participating unit obtains continuous online statistics from its own registrations and they can be compared with regional and national data. A report from SveDem is published yearly to inform medical and care professionals as well as political and administrative decision-makers about the current quality of diagnostics, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden. Conclusion SveDem provides knowledge about current dementia care in Sweden and serves as a framework for ensuring the quality of diagnostics, treatment and care across the country. It also reflects changes in quality dementia care over time. Data from SveDem can be used to further develop the national guidelines for dementia and to generate new research hypotheses. PMID:25695768

  19. The Integrated Medical Model: A Decision Support Tool for In-flight Crew Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Doug

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the development of an Integrated Medical Model (IMM) decision support tool for in-flight crew health care safety. Clinical methods, resources, and case scenarios are also addressed.

  20. Demand management: another marketing tool or a way to quality care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, M J; Harris, J M

    1998-05-01

    Demand management tools are population-based strategies used to control costs and improve utilization of services by assisting health consumers in maintaining their health and seeking appropriate health care. These tools are increasingly used by health care delivery systems and, in the US, by fiscal intermediaries, such as insurance companies. If these tools are not properly applied, there is a clear possibility that their use may lead a reduction of health care services with no improvement in clinical, humanistic, or economic outcomes. Demand management effectiveness has not been rigorously examined by the medical industry or academia. Before adopting or purchasing demand management technologies, health care systems should examine them carefully to determine how the tools were developed and who they were intended to serve. Once implemented, careful tracking of population outcomes is as necessary with these technologies as with any other technologies that can affect health care.

  1. Center to Advance Palliative Care palliative care clinical care and customer satisfaction metrics consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David E; Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    Data collection and analysis are vital for strategic planning, quality improvement, and demonstration of palliative care program impact to hospital administrators, private funders and policymakers. Since 2000, the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) has provided technical assistance to hospitals, health systems and hospices working to start, sustain, and grow nonhospice palliative care programs. CAPC convened a consensus panel in 2008 to develop recommendations for specific clinical and customer metrics that programs should track. The panel agreed on four key domains of clinical metrics and two domains of customer metrics. Clinical metrics include: daily assessment of physical/psychological/spiritual symptoms by a symptom assessment tool; establishment of patient-centered goals of care; support to patient/family caregivers; and management of transitions across care sites. For customer metrics, consensus was reached on two domains that should be tracked to assess satisfaction: patient/family satisfaction, and referring clinician satisfaction. In an effort to ensure access to reliably high-quality palliative care data throughout the nation, hospital palliative care programs are encouraged to collect and report outcomes for each of the metric domains described here.

  2. The use and effectiveness of electronic clinical decision support tools in the ambulatory/primary care setting: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Bryan

    2008-07-01

    Conclusion Although there is validation that CDSS has the potential to produce statistically significant improvement in outcomes, there is much variability among the types and methods of CDSS implementation and resulting effectiveness. As CDSS will likely continue to be at the forefront of the march toward effective standards-based care, more work needs to be done to determine effective implementation strategies for the use of CDSS across multiple settings and patient populations.

  3. Development of a decision support tool to facilitate primary care management of patients with abnormal liver function tests without clinically apparent liver disease [HTA03/38/02]. Abnormal Liver Function Investigations Evaluation (ALFIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Frank M

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver function tests (LFTs are routinely performed in primary care, and are often the gateway to further invasive and/or expensive investigations. Little is known of the consequences in people with an initial abnormal liver function (ALF test in primary care and with no obvious liver disease. Further investigations may be dangerous for the patient and expensive for Health Services. The aims of this study are to determine the natural history of abnormalities in LFTs before overt liver disease presents in the population and identify those who require minimal further investigations with the potential for reduction in NHS costs. Methods/Design A population-based retrospective cohort study will follow up all those who have had an incident liver function test (LFT in primary care to subsequent liver disease or mortality over a period of 15 years (approx. 2.3 million tests in 99,000 people. The study is set in Primary Care in the region of Tayside, Scotland (pop approx. 429,000 between 1989 and 2003. The target population consists of patients with no recorded clinical signs or symptoms of liver disease and registered with a GP. The health technologies being assessed are LFTs, viral and auto-antibody tests, ultrasound, CT, MRI and liver biopsy. The study will utilise the Epidemiology of Liver Disease In Tayside (ELDIT database to determine the outcomes of liver disease. These are based on hospital admission data (Scottish Morbidity Record 1, dispensed medication records, death certificates, and examination of medical records from Tayside hospitals. A sample of patients (n = 150 with recent initial ALF tests or invitation to biopsy will complete questionnaires to obtain quality of life data and anxiety measures. Cost-effectiveness and cost utility Markov model analyses will be performed from health service and patient perspectives using standard NHS costs. The findings will also be used to develop a computerised clinical decision

  4. A conceptual framework of clinical nursing care in intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Celestino da Silva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to propose a conceptual framework for clinical nursing care in intensive care.Method: descriptive and qualitative field research, carried out with 21 nurses from an intensive care unit of a federal public hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic and lexical content analysis, supported by Alceste software.Results: the characteristics of clinical intensive care emerge from the specialized knowledge of the interaction, the work context, types of patients and nurses characteristic of the intensive care and care frameworks.Conclusion: the conceptual framework of the clinic's intensive care articulates elements characteristic of the dynamics of this scenario: objective elements regarding technology and attention to equipment and subjective elements related to human interaction, specific of nursing care, countering criticism based on dehumanization.

  5. A conceptual framework of clinical nursing care in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção; Apostolidis, Thémistoklis; Brandão, Marcos Antônio Gomes

    2015-01-01

    to propose a conceptual framework for clinical nursing care in intensive care. descriptive and qualitative field research, carried out with 21 nurses from an intensive care unit of a federal public hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic and lexical content analysis, supported by Alceste software. the characteristics of clinical intensive care emerge from the specialized knowledge of the interaction, the work context, types of patients and nurses characteristic of the intensive care and care frameworks. the conceptual framework of the clinic's intensive care articulates elements characteristic of the dynamics of this scenario: objective elements regarding technology and attention to equipment and subjective elements related to human interaction, specific of nursing care, countering criticism based on dehumanization.

  6. Auditing in intensive care: comparison of two tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endacott, R

    This article addresses some of the practical aspects of auditing in the intensive care setting by comparing two audit tools. An overview of each tool is provided together with a description of how it was used. Recommendations for auditing in intensive care are given.

  7. Meta-analysis of screening and case finding tools for depression in cancer: Evidence based recommendations for clinical practice on behalf of the Depression in Cancer Care consensus group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, A. J.; Meader, N.; Davies, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To examine the validity of screening and case-finding tools used in the identification of depression as defined by an ICD10/DSM-IV criterion standard. Methods: We identified 63 studies involving 19 tools (in 33 publications) designed to help clinicians identify depression in cancer...... as cases. The main cautions are the reliance on DSM-IV definitions of major depression, the large number of small studies and the paucity of data for many tools in specific settings. Conclusions: Although no single tool could be offered unqualified support, several tools are likely to improve upon...... unassisted clinical recognition. In clinical practice, all tools should form part of an integrated approach involving further follow-up, clinical assessment and evidence based therapy. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  8. NIRS in clinical neurology - a 'promising' tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrig, Hellmuth

    2014-01-15

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has become a relevant research tool in neuroscience. In special populations such as infants and for special tasks such as walking, NIRS has asserted itself as a low resolution functional imaging technique which profits from its ease of application, portability and the option to co-register other neurophysiological and behavioral data in a 'near natural' environment. For clinical use in neurology this translates into the option to provide a bed-side oximeter for the brain, broadly available at comparatively low costs. However, while some potential for routine brain monitoring during cardiac and vascular surgery and in neonatology has been established, NIRS is largely unknown to clinical neurologists. The article discusses some of the reasons for this lack of use in clinical neurology. Research using NIRS in three major neurologic diseases (cerebrovascular disease, epilepsy and headache) is reviewed. Additionally the potential to exploit the established position of NIRS as a functional imaging tool with regard to clinical questions such as preoperative functional assessment and neurorehabilitation is discussed.

  9. Integrated planning tool for optimisation in municipal home care

    OpenAIRE

    Røhne, Mette; Sandåker, Torjus; Ausen, Dag; Grut, Lisbet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The objective is to improve collaboration and enhance quality of care services in municipal, home care services by implementing and developing an integrated planning tool making use of optimisation technology for better decision support. The project will through piloting and action based research establish knowledge on change in work processes to improve collaboration and efficiency. Context: A planning tool called Spider has been piloted in home care in Horten municipality since 201...

  10. Integrated planning tool for optimisation in municipal home care

    OpenAIRE

    Røhne, Mette; Sandåker, Torjus; Ausen, Dag; Grut, Lisbet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The objective is to improve collaboration and enhance quality of care services in municipal, home care services by implementing and developing an integrated planning tool making use of optimisation technology for better decision support. The project will through piloting and action based research establish knowledge on change in work processes to improve collaboration and efficiency. Context: A planning tool called Spider has been piloted in home care in Horten municipality since 201...

  11. A JAVA-based multimedia tool for clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maojo, V; Herrero, C; Valenzuela, F; Crespo, J; Lazaro, P; Pazos, A

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a specific language for the representation of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) and Windows C++ and platform independent JAVA applications for multimedia presentation and edition of electronically stored CPGs. This approach facilitates translation of guidelines and protocols from paper to computer-based flowchart representations. Users can navigate through the algorithm with a friendly user interface and access related multimedia information within the context of each clinical problem. CPGs can be stored in a computer server and distributed over the World Wide Web, facilitating dissemination, local adaptation, and use as a reference element in medical care. We have chosen the Agency for Health Care and Policy Research's heart failure guideline to demonstrate the capabilities of our tool.

  12. Accurate cloud-based smart IMT measurement, its validation and stroke risk stratification in carotid ultrasound: A web-based point-of-care tool for multicenter clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Luca; Banchhor, Sumit K; Suri, Harman S; Londhe, Narendra D; Araki, Tadashi; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Viskovic, Klaudija; Shafique, Shoaib; Laird, John R; Gupta, Ajay; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-08-01

    This study presents AtheroCloud™ - a novel cloud-based smart carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) measurement tool using B-mode ultrasound for stroke/cardiovascular risk assessment and its stratification. This is an anytime-anywhere clinical tool for routine screening and multi-center clinical trials. In this pilot study, the physician can upload ultrasound scans in one of the following formats (DICOM, JPEG, BMP, PNG, GIF or TIFF) directly into the proprietary cloud of AtheroPoint from the local server of the physician's office. They can then run the intelligent and automated AtheroCloud™ cIMT measurements in point-of-care settings in less than five seconds per image, while saving the vascular reports in the cloud. We statistically benchmark AtheroCloud™ cIMT readings against sonographer (a registered vascular technologist) readings and manual measurements derived from the tracings of the radiologist. One hundred patients (75 M/25 F, mean age: 68±11 years), IRB approved, Toho University, Japan, consisted of Left/Right common carotid artery (CCA) artery (200 ultrasound scans), (Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan) were collected using a 7.5MHz transducer. The measured cIMTs for L/R carotid were as follows (in mm): (i) AtheroCloud™ (0.87±0.20, 0.77±0.20); (ii) sonographer (0.97±0.26, 0.89±0.29) and (iii) manual (0.90±0.20, 0.79±0.20), respectively. The coefficient of correlation (CC) between sonographer and manual for L/R cIMT was 0.74 (P<0.0001) and 0.65 (P<0.0001), while, between AtheroCloud™ and manual was 0.96 (P<0.0001) and 0.97 (P<0.0001), respectively. We observed that 91.15% of the population in AtheroCloud™ had a mean cIMT error less than 0.11mm compared to sonographer's 68.31%. The area under curve for receiving operating characteristics was 0.99 for AtheroCloud™ against 0.81 for sonographer. Our Framingham Risk Score stratified the population into three bins as follows: 39% in low-risk, 70.66% in medium-risk and 10.66% in high-risk bins

  13. Evidence-Based Recommendations for Short- and Long-Term Management of Uninvestigated Dyspepsia in Primary Care: An Update of the Canadian Dyspepsia Working Group (CanDys Clinical Management Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander JO Veldhuyzen van Zanten

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is an update to and extension of the previous systematic review on the primary care management of patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia (UD. The original publication of the clinical management tool focused on the initial four- to eight-week assessment of UD. This update is based on new data from systematic reviews and clinical trials relevant to UD. There is now direct clinical evidence supporting a test-and-treat approach in patients with nondominant heartburn dyspepsia symptoms, and head-to-head comparisons show that use of a proton pump inhibitor is superior to the use of H2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs in the initial treatment of Helicobacter pylori-negative dyspepsia patients. Cisapride is no longer available as a treatment option and evidence for other prokinetic agents is lacking. In patients with long-standing heartburn-dominant (ie, gastroesophageal reflux disease and nonheartburn-dominant dyspepsia, a once-in-a-lifetime endoscopy is recommended. Endoscopy should also be considered in patients with new-onset dyspepsia that develops after the age of 50 years. Conventional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetylsalicylic acid and cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors can all cause dyspepsia. If their use cannot be discontinued, cotherapy with either a proton pump inhibitor, misoprostol or high-dose H2RAs is recommended, although the evidence is based on ulcer data and not dyspepsia data. In patients with nonheartburn-dominant dyspepsia, noninvasive testing for H pylori should be performed and treatment given if positive. When starting nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for a prolonged course, testing and treatment with H2RAs are advised if patients have a history of previous ulcers or ulcer bleeding.

  14. Clinical issues in post-abortion care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappiello, Joyce D; Beal, Margaret W; Simmonds, Katherine E

    2011-05-01

    This article provides an overview of the clinical issues in post-abortion care, including types of abortion procedures, expected post-abortion course, possible complications, and the components of the post-abortion visit. By providing follow-up care to their patients, NPs can increase continuity of care and promote successful contraceptive use.

  15. Clinical Decision Support Systems: A Useful Tool in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolostoumpis G.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of supporting in decision – making shows an increase in recent years. Based on mathematic simulation tools, knowledge databases, processing methods, medical data and methods, artificial intelligence for coding of the available knowledge and for resolving complex problems arising into clinical practice. Aim: the aim of this review is to present the development of new methods and modern services, in clinical practice and the emergence in their implementation. Data and methods: the methodology that was followed included research of articles that referred to health sector and modern technologies, at the electronic data bases “pubmed” and “medline”. Results: Is a useful tool for medical experts using characteristics and medical data used by the doctors. Constitute innovation for the medical community, and ensure the support of clinical decisions with an overall way by providing a comprehensive solution in the light of the integration of computational decision support systems into clinical practice. Conclusions: Decision Support Systems contribute to improving the quality of health services with simultaneous impoundment of costs (i.e. avoid medical errors

  16. Uso da tecnologia como ferramenta de avaliação no cuidado clínico de recém-nascidos prematuros Use of technology as an evaluation tool of clinical care in preterm newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabel Mendes

    2006-10-01

    demonstrou ser um instrumento capaz de detectar variações de práticas que podem influenciar nos resultados clínicos e custos operacionais.OBJECTIVE: To assess the use of the Neonatal Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System (NTISS as a tool to quantify the use of technology in neonatal intensive care units, in order to detect discrepancies in the care provided to high-risk newborn infants. METHODS: Prospective, descriptive, observational study about the use of technology in two neonatal intensive care units (one public and one private. The NTISS was calculated on a daily basis up to the discharge or death of preterm newborns with gestational age equal to or less than 32 weeks. We gathered data about prenatal clinical conditions, birth characteristics, and conditions on admission to the intensive care unit, as well as about the morbidities developed during the hospital stay. The risks of preterm newborns were adjusted by means of the Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology, Perinatal Extension, Version II (SNAPPE-II. Student's t test, chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and the Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon's test were used for the descriptive analysis. The study was approved by the local Research and Ethics Committee. RESULTS: We assessed 44 newborn infants from the public intensive care unit and 52 from the private one. On admission, the severity score (SNAPPE-II and the overall NTISS were statistically similar in both care units. The curve for the use of technology showed a gradual and progressive decreasing pattern in both care units up to the 31st day. Thereafter, there was a continuous downward trend in the private care unit, but a significant increase in the overall NTISS in the public care unit. The patients from the public care unit developed more morbidities than those from the private unit. CONCLUSION: Patients with similar clinical pictures can be treated with different levels of technological resources. This may have a direct impact on morbidities and on healthcare

  17. The National Single Assessment Tool (SAT) a pilot study in older persons care-survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott-Scales, L; Beaton, D; McMahon, F; Vereker, N; McCormack, B; Coen, R F; O'Keefe, S T

    2013-01-01

    Following a consultation and review process, the interRAI suite of assessment tools was chosen as the most suitable instrument for assessment of the care needs of older people in Ireland. We used previously validated questionnaires to examine the usability, practicality and acceptability of these tools to professionals, carers and clients in rural and urban acute, long-term care and community settings. Of the 45 professionals, 42-44 (93-98%) agreed or strongly agreed with 14 of 15 positive statements regarding the acceptability, clinical value and ease of use of the interRAl tools; 39 (87%) felt the terminology was consistent and familiar, although 35 (78%) felt some areas would require further explanation. Responses from carers (n = 15) and clients (n = 68) were similarly overwhelmingly positive regarding the experience of being assessed using these tools. These results support the clinical utility and practicality of using this approach to assess older people in Irish clinical practice.

  18. Diabetes care tool puts kids in control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Elaine

    2015-07-08

    The nursing team in the children’s diabetes service at Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust has developed an app and website to help children and young people with type 1 diabetes manage the condition. The initiative focuses on using social media to increase peer support. The team were runners up in the 2015 Nursing Standard Excellence in Diabetes Specialist Nursing Award, sponsored by Sanofi Diabetes.

  19. Developing and implementing an oral care policy and assessment tool.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stout, Michelle

    2012-01-09

    Oral hygiene is an essential aspect of nursing care. Poor oral care results in patients experiencing pain and discomfort, puts individuals at risk of nutritional deficiency and infection, and has an adverse effect on quality of life. This article describes how an oral care policy and assessment tool were updated to ensure the implementation of evidence-based practice at one hospital in the Republic of Ireland.

  20. Introduction of Asthma APGAR tools improve asthma management in primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Bertram, Susan; Wollan, Peter

    2008-08-31

    Primary care asthma management is often not compatible with national evidence-based guidelines. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility and impact of the Asthma APGAR tools to enhance implementation of asthma guideline-compatible management in primary care practices. Twenty-four primary care practices across the US. This is a mixed methods study. Quantitative data were used to assess changes in guideline recommended asthma management including use of daily controller therapy, planned care visits, and education and information documentation before and after implementation of the Asthma APGAR. Qualitative data from focus group sessions were used to assess health care professional and patient perceived usability and value of the Asthma APGAR tools during office visits for asthma. Implementing the Asthma APGAR tools in the 24 practices was associated with enhanced asthma visit-related medical record documentation including significant increases in recording of activity limitations due to asthma and asthma symptom frequency, asthma medication nonadherence, asthma triggers, and the patients' perceived response to therapy (p < 0.01 for each item). Some care processes also increased significantly including assessment of inhaler technique and prescribing of daily controller therapy among patients with persistent asthma. Focus groups of patients and of clinical staff reported that the Asthma APGAR tools were easy to use, "made sense" and "improved care" was given and received. The Asthma APGAR tools are feasible to implement in primary care practices and their implementation is associated with increased guideline-compliant asthma management.

  1. Development and Validation of the Tibetan Primary Care Assessment Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhua Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To develop a primary care assessment tool in Tibetan area and assess the primary care quality among different healthcare settings. Methods. Primary care assessment tool-Tibetan version (PCAT-T was developed to measure seven primary care domains. Data from a cross-sectional survey of 1386 patients was used to conduct validity and reliability analysis of PCAT-T. Analysis of variance was used to conduct comparison of primary care quality among different healthcare settings. Results. A 28-item PCAT-T was constructed which included seven multi-item scales and two single-item scales. All of multi-item scales achieved good internal consistency and item-total correlations. Scaling assumptions tests were well satisfied. The full range of possible scores was observed for all scales, except first contact and continuity. Compared with prefecture hospital (77.42 and county hospital (82.01, township health center achieved highest primary care quality total score (86.64. Conclusions. PCAT-T is a valid and reliable tool to measure patients' experience of primary care in the Tibet Autonomous Region. Township health center has the best primary care performance compared with other healthcare settings, and township health center should play a key role in providing primary care in Tibet.

  2. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Jill C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access health care in our urgent care clinic. The relevance of understanding the motivation driving this patient population is especially pertinent given recent trends towards universal healthcare and the unclear impact it may have on the demands of urgent care. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of patients seeking care at an urgent care clinic (UCC within a large acute care safety-net urban hospital over a six-week period. Survey data included demographics, social and economic information, reasons that patients chose a UCC, previous primary care exposure, reasons for delaying care, and preventive care needs. Results A total of 1, 006 patients were randomly surveyed. Twenty-five percent of patients identified Spanish as their preferred language. Fifty-four percent of patients reported choosing the UCC due to not having to make an appointment, 51.2% because it was convenient, 43.9% because of same day test results, 42.7% because of ability to get same-day medications and 15.1% because co-payment was not mandatory. Lack of a regular physician was reported by 67.9% of patients and 57.2% lacked a regular source of care. Patients reported delaying access to care for a variety of reasons. Conclusion Despite a common belief that patients seek care in the urgent care setting primarily for economic reasons, this study suggests that patients choose the urgent care setting based largely on convenience and more timely care. This information is especially applicable to

  3. Caring during clinical practice: Midwives’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmajapi E. Chokwe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring forms the core of nursing and midwifery. Despite caring being an important emotional aspect of midwifery and nursing, there are general public complaints about uncaring behaviour in midwifery. Therefore, there is a need to explore caring from midwives’ point of view with the hope of identifying solutions and recommendations for midwifery practice. Furthermore, the study aimed to stimulate debate and discussion about the caring behaviour of midwives.Objective: To explore caring during clinical practice as perceived and experienced by midwives.Method: The study was contextual, exploratory and qualitative. The participants were midwives working in state and private hospitals in Tshwane,South Africa where BTech II and III midwifery learners were allocated for work integrated learning (WIL. Data collection was carried out through self-report using a questionnaire and focus group. Questionnaires were distributed to 40 midwives at private and state hospitals in Tshwane. This was followed by two focus group sessions to ensure that data is enriched. The hermeneutic interpretive approach was used to analyse data, and analysis continued until saturation.Results: Themes of caring and uncaring related to patient care and midwives emerged. Thefindings illustrated that the midwives had excellent theoretical knowledge of caring, but someof them did not display caring behaviour during clinical practice.Conclusion: Some of the midwives did not display caring behaviour. Implication for practicewas provided based on the research findings. Recommendations included measures of improving caring behaviours during midwifery practice.

  4. A point of care clinical documentation system for hospice care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyusuk; Bell, Ralph; Lee, Dennis

    2006-02-01

    This article identifies two areas of hospice care that may benefit the most from a point-of-care (POC) clinical documentation system: documentation for recertification and symptom/pain management. Applications as solutions for the hospice POC clinical documentation system need two documentation support tools: (1) knowledge-based external or internal reference data available to physicians or medical staff right at the bedside and (2) assisting medical staff in filling out electronic forms for clinical measurements by providing real-time prompts, clues, alerts, or other types of feedback, along with the common features such as pre-defined values in specific fields. Our study may encourage more software vendors to include clinical documentation support tools in their solutions.

  5. Tools for primary care management of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Alice L; Munkholm, Pia; Andrews, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    are helpful but they are not designed for the primary care setting. Few non-expert IBD management tools or guidelines exist compared with those used for other chronic diseases such as asthma and scant data have been published regarding the usefulness of such tools including IBD action plans and associated......Healthcare systems throughout the world continue to face emerging challenges associated with chronic disease management. Due to the likely increase in chronic conditions in the future it is now vital that cooperation and support between specialists, generalists and primary health care physicians...... affected by IBD in their caseload, the proportion of patients with IBD-related healthcare issues cared for in the primary care setting appears to be widespread. Data suggests however, that primary care physician's IBD knowledge and comfort in management is suboptimal. Current treatment guidelines for IBD...

  6. Medical informatics: an essential tool for health sciences research in acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man; Pickering, Brian W; Smith, Vernon D; Hadzikadic, Mirsad; Gajic, Ognjen; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2009-10-01

    Medical Informatics has become an important tool in modern health care practice and research. In the present article we outline the challenges and opportunities associated with the implementation of electronic medical records (EMR) in complex environments such as intensive care units (ICU). We share our initial experience in the design, maintenance and application of a customized critical care, Microsoft SQL based, research warehouse, ICU DataMart. ICU DataMart integrates clinical and administrative data from heterogeneous sources within the EMR to support research and practice improvement in the ICUs. Examples of intelligent alarms -- "sniffers", administrative reports, decision support and clinical research applications are presented.

  7. Evaluation of clinical information modeling tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Austin, Tony; Moreno-Conde, Jesús; Parra-Calderón, Carlos L; Kalra, Dipak

    2016-11-01

    Clinical information models are formal specifications for representing the structure and semantics of the clinical content within electronic health record systems. This research aims to define, test, and validate evaluation metrics for software tools designed to support the processes associated with the definition, management, and implementation of these models. The proposed framework builds on previous research that focused on obtaining agreement on the essential requirements in this area. A set of 50 conformance criteria were defined based on the 20 functional requirements agreed by that consensus and applied to evaluate the currently available tools. Of the 11 initiative developing tools for clinical information modeling identified, 9 were evaluated according to their performance on the evaluation metrics. Results show that functionalities related to management of data types, specifications, metadata, and terminology or ontology bindings have a good level of adoption. Improvements can be made in other areas focused on information modeling and associated processes. Other criteria related to displaying semantic relationships between concepts and communication with terminology servers had low levels of adoption. The proposed evaluation metrics were successfully tested and validated against a representative sample of existing tools. The results identify the need to improve tool support for information modeling and software development processes, especially in those areas related to governance, clinician involvement, and optimizing the technical validation of testing processes. This research confirmed the potential of these evaluation metrics to support decision makers in identifying the most appropriate tool for their organization. Los Modelos de Información Clínica son especificaciones para representar la estructura y características semánticas del contenido clínico en los sistemas de Historia Clínica Electrónica. Esta investigación define, prueba y valida

  8. Using geographic information system tools to improve access to MS specialty care in Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpepper, William J; Cowper-Ripley, Diane; Litt, Eric R; McDowell, Tzu-Yun; Hoffman, Paul M

    2010-01-01

    Access to appropriate and timely healthcare is critical to the overall health and well-being of patients with chronic diseases. In this study, we used geographic information system (GIS) tools to map Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and their access to MS specialty care. We created six travel-time bands around VHA facilities with MS specialty care and calculated the number of VHA patients with MS who resided in each time band and the number of patients who lived more than 2 hours from the nearest specialty clinic in fiscal year 2007. We demonstrate the utility of using GIS tools in decision-making by providing three examples of how patients' access to care is affected when additional specialty clinics are added. The mapping technique used in this study provides a powerful and valuable tool for policy and planning personnel who are evaluating how to address underserved populations and areas within the VHA healthcare system.

  9. Creation of complexity assessment tool for patients receiving home care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leopoldina de Castro Villas Bôas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To create and validate a complexity assessment tool for patients receiving home care from a public health service. METHOD A diagnostic accuracy study, with estimates for the tool's validity and reliability. Measurements of sensitivity and specificity were considered when producing validity estimates. The resulting tool was used for testing. Assessment by a specialized team of home care professionals was used as the gold standard. In the tool's reliability study, the authors used the Kappa statistic. The tool's sensitivity and specificity were analyzed using various cut-off points. RESULTS On the best cut-off point-21-with the gold standard, a sensitivity of 75.5% was obtained, with the limits of confidence interval (95% at 68.3% and 82.8% and specificity of 53.2%, with the limits of confidence interval (95% at 43.8% and 62.7%. CONCLUSION The tool presented evidence of validity and reliability, possibly helping in service organization at patient admission, care type change, or support during the creation of care plans.

  10. Integrative care for the management of low back pain: use of a clinical care pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legendre Claire G

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the treatment of chronic back pain, it has been theorized that integrative care plans can lead to better outcomes than those achieved by monodisciplinary care alone, especially when using a collaborative, interdisciplinary, and non-hierarchical team approach. This paper describes the use of a care pathway designed to guide treatment by an integrative group of providers within a randomized controlled trial. Methods A clinical care pathway was used by a multidisciplinary group of providers, which included acupuncturists, chiropractors, cognitive behavioral therapists, exercise therapists, massage therapists and primary care physicians. Treatment recommendations were based on an evidence-informed practice model, and reached by group consensus. Research study participants were empowered to select one of the treatment recommendations proposed by the integrative group. Common principles and benchmarks were established to guide treatment management throughout the study. Results Thirteen providers representing 5 healthcare professions collaborated to provide integrative care to study participants. On average, 3 to 4 treatment plans, each consisting of 2 to 3 modalities, were recommended to study participants. Exercise, massage, and acupuncture were both most commonly recommended by the team and selected by study participants. Changes to care commonly incorporated cognitive behavioral therapy into treatment plans. Conclusion This clinical care pathway was a useful tool for the consistent application of evidence-based care for low back pain in the context of an integrative setting. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00567333

  11. Development of a clinical information tool for the electronic medical record: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Barbara A; Tannery, Nancy H; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Fiorillo, Anthony B

    2010-07-01

    What is the process of developing a clinical information tool to be embedded in the electronic health record of a very large and diverse academic medical center? The development took place at the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System. The clinical information tool developed is a search box with subject tabs to provide quick access to designated full-text information resources. Each subject tab offers a federated search of a different pool of resources. Search results are organized "on the fly" into meaningful categories using clustering technology and are directly accessible from the results page. After more than a year of discussion and planning, a clinical information tool was embedded in the academic medical center's electronic health record. The library successfully developed a clinical information tool, called Clinical-e, for use at the point of care. Future development will refine the tool and evaluate its impact and effectiveness.

  12. Perioperative Care Coordination Measurement: A Tool to Support Care Integration of Pediatric Surgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Lynne R; Ziniel, Sonja I; Antonelli, Richard C

    2016-03-01

    The relationship of care coordination activities and outcomes to resource utilization and personnel costs has been evaluated for a number of pediatric medical home practices. One of the first tools designed to evaluate the activities and outcomes for pediatric care coordination is the Care Coordination Measurement Tool (CCMT). It has become widely used as an instrument for health care providers in both primary and subspecialty care settings. This tool enables the user to stratify patients based on acuity and complexity while documenting the activities and outcomes of care coordination. We tested the feasibility of adapting the CCMT to a pediatric surgical population at Boston Children's Hospital. The tool was used to assess the preoperative care coordination activities. Care coordination activities were tracked during the interval from the date the patient was scheduled for a surgical or interventional procedure through the day of the procedure. A care coordination encounter was defined as any task, whether face to face or not, supporting the development or implementation of a plan of care. Data were collected to enable analysis of 5675 care coordination encounters supporting the care provided to 3406 individual surgical cases (patients). The outcomes of care coordination, as documented by the preoperative nursing staff, included the elaboration of the care plan through patient-focused communication among specialist, facilities, perioperative team, and primary care physicians in 80.5% of cases. The average time spent on care coordination activities increased incrementally by 30 minutes with each additional care coordination encounter for a surgical case. Surgical cases with 1 care coordination encounter took an average of 35.7 minutes of preoperative care coordination, whereas those with ≥4 care coordination encounters reported an average of 121.6 minutes. We successfully adapted and implemented the CCMT for a pediatric surgical population and measured nonface

  13. Development of an obstetrics triage tool for clinical pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covvey, J R; Grant, J; Mullen, A B

    2015-06-25

    Obstetrics services are a high-throughput and high-risk environment poised for pharmacist involvement, but determining how to ideally allocate services is difficult. There is recent interest in the development of tools for service prioritization, but none are specifically targeted to obstetrics. Therefore, the aim of this study was (i) to conduct a practice audit surveying the demographics of patients attending obstetrics wards at a high-capacity maternity hospital; and (ii) to evaluate a triage tool developed to prioritize pharmacy services. A retrospective case review of women discharged after birth admissions was undertaken at a hospital in National Health Service (NHS) Scotland during June 2014. Demographic and admission data were collected, as well as pharmacist interventions and missed opportunities in patient care on post-natal wards. A pharmacy triage tool was developed and retrospectively applied to each case to ascertain a risk category that would trigger and target pharmacist review. Interventions/opportunities were classified as either clinical (medication related) or administrative (potential for error development). One hundred and seventy-five cases were reviewed with a median age of 29 years old. Eighty-six patients (49·1%) were retrospectively classified with elevated risk using the triage tool. A total of 117 charts (66·9%) were identified with missed opportunities for pharmacist intervention, which was significantly greater among patients classified as higher risk (75·6 vs. 58·4%, P = 0·017). Compared to low-risk patients, patients with a higher-risk classification had lower rates of administrative missed opportunities (55·4 vs. 80·8%, P = 0·015), but numerically higher rates of clinical (26·2 vs. 9·6%, p=NS) and mixed clinical/administrative (18·5 vs. 9·6%, p=NS) missed opportunities, although this failed to reach statistical significance. Evaluation of a triage tool for obstetric services demonstrated potential for prioritizing

  14. Quality of care at retail clinics for 3 common conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrank, William H; Krumme, Alexis A; Tong, Angela Y; Spettell, Claire M; Matlin, Olga S; Sussman, Andrew; Brennan, Troyen A; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2014-10-01

    Evaluation of quality of care across retail clinics in a geographically diverse population has not been undertaken to date. We sought to evaluate and compare the quality of care for otitis media, pharyngitis, and urinary tract infection received in retail medical clinics in CVS pharmacies ("MinuteClinics" [MCs]), ambulatory care facilities (ACFs), and emergency departments (EDs). We used 14 measures constructed from RAND Corporation's Quality Assurance Tools and guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Our cohort was drawn from Aetna medical and prescription claims, 2009-2012. Members were matched on visit date, condition, and propensity score. Generalized estimating equations were used to compare quality across clinic type, overall, and by index condition. We matched 75,886 episodes of care, of which 20,153 were eligible for at least 1 quality measure. MCs performed better than EDs and ACFs in 7 measures. In a multivariable model, MCs performed better than ACFs and EDs across all quality measures ([OR 0.42; 95% CI, 0.40-0.45; P < .0001; ACF vs MC] [OR 0.29; 95% CI, 0.27-0.31; P < .0001; ED vs MC]). Results for each condition were significant at P < .0001. Quality of care for these conditions based on widely accepted objective measures was superior in MinuteClinics compared with ACFs and EDs.

  15. Development and validation of a new tool for the assessment and spiritual care of palliative care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Enric; Oliver, Amparo; Galiana, Laura; Barreto, Pilar; Pascual, Antonio; Gomis, Clara; Barbero, Javier

    2014-06-01

    Spiritual assessment tools and interventions based on holistic approaches are needed to promote healing. Such tools must be adapted to the wide cultural backgrounds of contemporary Western society. To develop and validate a new brief measure, simultaneously featuring clinical applicability and adequate psychometric properties. The tool uses six initial questions to establish a climate of trust with patients before they complete an eight-item, five-point Likert scale. The questionnaire is based on a model of spirituality generated by the Spanish Society of Palliative Care (SECPAL) Task Force on Spiritual Care (Grupo de Espiritualidad de la SECPAL), which aims to recognize, share, and assess the spiritual resources and needs of palliative care patients. Multidisciplinary professionals from 15 palliative care teams across Spain interviewed 108 patients using the Grupo de Espiritualidad de la SECPAL questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analysis techniques were used to study the new tool factor structure and reliability. Additionally, concurrent criterion validity coefficients were estimated considering spiritual well-being, anxiety, depression, resilience, and symptoms. Descriptive statistics on questionnaire applicability were reported. Analyses supported a three-factor structure (intrapersonal, interpersonal, transpersonal) with an underlying second-order factor representing a spirituality construct. Adequate reliability results and evidence for construct validity were obtained. The new questionnaire, based on empirical research and bedside experience, showed good psychometric properties and clinical applicability. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development and validation of a Clinical Assessment Tool for Nursing Education (CAT-NE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skúladóttir, Hafdís; Svavarsdóttir, Margrét Hrönn

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a valid assessment tool to guide clinical education and evaluate students' performance in clinical nursing education. The development of the Clinical Assessment Tool for Nursing Education (CAT-NE) was based on the theory of nursing as professional caring and the Bologna learning outcomes. Benson and Clark's four steps of instrument development and validation guided the development and assessment of the tool. A mixed-methods approach with individual structured cognitive interviewing and quantitative assessments was used to validate the tool. Supervisory teachers, a pedagogical consultant, clinical expert teachers, clinical teachers, and nursing students at the University of Akureyri in Iceland participated in the process. This assessment tool is valid to assess the clinical performance of nursing students; it consists of rubrics that list the criteria for the students' expected performance. According to the students and their clinical teachers, the assessment tool clarified learning objectives, enhanced the focus of the assessment process, and made evaluation more objective. Training clinical teachers on how to assess students' performances in clinical studies and use the tool enhanced the quality of clinical assessment in nursing education.

  17. Disparities in HIV clinic care across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffery V.; Laut, Kamilla Grønborg; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although advances in HIV medicine have yielded increasingly better treatment outcomes in recent years, HIV-positive people with access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) still face complex health challenges. The EuroSIDA Study Group surveyed its clinics to explore regional differences...... in clinic services. Methods: The EuroSIDA study is a prospective observational cohort study that began enrolling patients in 1994. In early 2014, we conducted a 59-item survey of the 98 then-active EuroSIDA clinics. The survey covered HIV clinical care and other aspects of patient care. The EuroSIDA East...... Europe study region (Belarus, Estonia, Lithuania, the Russian Federation and Ukraine) was compared to a "non-East Europe" study region comprised of all other EuroSIDA countries. Results: A larger proportion of clinics in the East Europe group reported deferring ART in asymptomatic patients until the CD4...

  18. Redesigning ambulatory care business processes supporting clinical care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, C; Sinkewich, M; Short, J; Callas, E

    1997-04-01

    The first step in redesigning the health care delivery process for ambulatory care begins with the patient and the business processes that support the patient. Patient-related business processes include patient access, service documentation, billing, follow-up, collection, and payment. Access is the portal to the clinical delivery and care management process. Service documentation, charge capture, and payment and collection are supporting processes to care delivery. Realigned provider networks now demand realigned patient business services to provide their members/customers/patients with improved service delivery at less cost. Purchaser mandates for cost containment, health maintenance, and enhanced quality of care have created an environment where every aspect of the delivery system, especially ambulatory care, is being judged. Business processes supporting the outpatient are therefore being reexamined for better efficiency and customer satisfaction. Many health care systems have made major investments in their ambulatory care environment, but have pursued traditional supporting business practices--such as multiple access points, lack of integrated patient appointment scheduling and registration, and multiple patient bills. These are areas that are appropriate for redesign efforts--all with the customer's needs and convenience in mind. Similarly, setting unrealistic expectations, underestimating the effort required, and ignoring the human elements of a patient-focused business service redesign effort can sabotage the very sound reasons for executing such an endeavor. Pitfalls can be avoided if a structured methodology, coupled with a change management process, are employed. Deloitte & Touche Consulting Group has been involved in several major efforts, all with ambulatory care settings to assist with the redesign of their business practices to consider the patient as the driver, instead of the institution providing the care.

  19. The enhancement of clinical competence through caring science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy-Malmberg, Rika; Hilli, Yvonne

    2014-12-01

    This theoretical research attempts to create a new basis for dialogue between two independent research fields that are connected by an inseparable link. The first, nursing science, is a body of professional knowledge, while the second, caring as an independent body of pure knowledge, conducts basic research with an aspiration towards applicability. This theoretical research uses the guidelines of the Buberian dialogue, which provides new meaning to the concept of clinical competence. The results emphasise the need to adopt abstract knowledge into the nursing field in order to improve the graduate's clinical capabilities. The combination of assessing clinical capability in a judgmental manner together with the dialogical humanistic approach of caring science may create a genuine platform and meeting event as a maturing process, which is intended to promote educational goals, which subsequently receive new meaning, that is, a different type of assessment. However, this assessment cannot be measured since a wide range of ethical moral aspects regarding both the student and the patient will have to be included. Nevertheless, this dialogue between nursing science and caring science can implement evidence on the basis of trust and can be used as a dialogical tool for evaluating clinical skills with the goal of empowering the educational field in nursing. Consequently, this clinical competence is called 'caring maturing means', and the goal is to convert the learning process into a meaningful event with the aim of improvement.

  20. The predictive and external validity of the STarT Back Tool in Danish primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsø, Lars; Kent, Peter; Albert, Hanne B;

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The STarT Back Tool (SBT) was recently translated into Danish and its concurrent validity described. This study tested the predictive validity of the Danish SBT. METHODS: Danish primary care patients (n = 344) were compared to a UK cohort. SBT subgroup validity for predicting high activity...... limitation at 3 months' follow-up was assessed using descriptive proportions, relative risks, AUC and odds ratios. RESULTS: The SBT had a statistically similar predictive ability in Danish primary care as in UK primary care. Unadjusted relative risks for poor clinical outcome on activity limitation...

  1. The digital portfolio: a tool for human resource management in health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Saranto, Kaija; Kivinen, Tuula; Kinnunen, Juha

    2002-11-01

    This article discusses the current situation of human resource management (HRM) in Finnish health care and charts the views of nurse directors (ward sisters and clinical nurse managers, n = 47) on the digital portfolio as a tool of HRM. The study is part of an evaluation research project; this article reports on the findings from nurse directors' perspective. The data were collected from three organizations in eastern Finland: a University Hospital, a Central Hospital and a Social and Health Centre. The nurse directors indicated a need for information on their staff's skills and competencies, but the area on which they had most information was on staff's formal education. They did not have access to systematic tools and methods for monitoring the continuous education of staff members. The digital portfolio can be used as a tool for HRM in health care, although the nurse directors did not realize it could provide a tool for sharing expertise through the units or wards.

  2. Disparities in HIV clinic care across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V; Laut, Kamilla Grønborg; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although advances in HIV medicine have yielded increasingly better treatment outcomes in recent years, HIV-positive people with access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) still face complex health challenges. The EuroSIDA Study Group surveyed its clinics to explore regional differences...... in clinic services. METHODS: The EuroSIDA study is a prospective observational cohort study that began enrolling patients in 1994. In early 2014, we conducted a 59-item survey of the 98 then-active EuroSIDA clinics. The survey covered HIV clinical care and other aspects of patient care. The EuroSIDA East.......0036). There was significantly less tuberculosis/HIV treatment integration in the East Europe group (27 % versus 84 % p 

  3. Chinese health care system and clinical epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuelian; Gregersen, Hans; Yuan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    China has gone through a comprehensive health care insurance reform since 2003 and achieved universal health insurance coverage in 2011. The new health care insurance system provides China with a huge opportunity for the development of health care and medical research when its rich medical resources are fully unfolded. In this study, we review the Chinese health care system and its implication for medical research, especially within clinical epidemiology. First, we briefly review the population register system, the distribution of the urban and rural population in China, and the development of the Chinese health care system after 1949. In the following sections, we describe the current Chinese health care delivery system and the current health insurance system. We then focus on the construction of the Chinese health information system as well as several existing registers and research projects on health data. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and challenges of the health care system in regard to clinical epidemiology research. China now has three main insurance schemes. The Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) covers urban employees and retired employees. The Urban Residence Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) covers urban residents, including children, students, elderly people without previous employment, and unemployed people. The New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS) covers rural residents. The Chinese Government has made efforts to build up health information data, including electronic medical records. The establishment of universal health care insurance with linkage to medical records will provide potentially huge research opportunities in the future. However, constructing a complete register system at a nationwide level is challenging. In the future, China will demand increased capacity of researchers and data managers, in particular within clinical epidemiology, to explore the rich resources. PMID:28356772

  4. The development and application of a new tool to assess the adequacy of the content and timing of antenatal care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downe Soo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current measures of antenatal care use are limited to initiation of care and number of visits. This study aimed to describe the development and application of a tool to assess the adequacy of the content and timing of antenatal care. Methods The Content and Timing of care in Pregnancy (CTP tool was developed based on clinical relevance for ongoing antenatal care and recommendations in national and international guidelines. The tool reflects minimal care recommended in every pregnancy, regardless of parity or risk status. CTP measures timing of initiation of care, content of care (number of blood pressure readings, blood tests and ultrasound scans and whether the interventions were received at an appropriate time. Antenatal care trajectories for 333 pregnant women were then described using a standard tool (the APNCU index, that measures the quantity of care only, and the new CTP tool. Both tools categorise care into 4 categories, from 'Inadequate' (both tools to 'Adequate plus' (APNCU or 'Appropriate' (CTP. Participants recorded the timing and content of their antenatal care prospectively using diaries. Analysis included an examination of similarities and differences in categorisation of care episodes between the tools. Results According to the CTP tool, the care trajectory of 10,2% of the women was classified as inadequate, 8,4% as intermediate, 36% as sufficient and 45,3% as appropriate. The assessment of quality of care differed significantly between the two tools. Seventeen care trajectories classified as 'Adequate' or 'Adequate plus' by the APNCU were deemed 'Inadequate' by the CTP. This suggests that, despite a high number of visits, these women did not receive the minimal recommended content and timing of care. Conclusions The CTP tool provides a more detailed assessment of the adequacy of antenatal care than the current standard index. However, guidelines for the content of antenatal care vary, and the tool does not at

  5. A quality assessment tool for markup-based clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalom, Erez; Shahar, Yuval; Taieb-Maimon, Meirav; Lunenfeld, Eitan

    2008-11-06

    We introduce a tool for quality assessment of procedural and declarative knowledge. We developed this tool for evaluating the specification of mark-up-based clinical GLs. Using this graphical tool, the expert physician and knowledge engineer collaborate to perform scoring, using pre-defined scoring scale, each of the knowledge roles of the mark-ups, comparing it to a gold standard. The tool enables scoring the mark-ups simultaneously at different sites by different users at different locations.

  6. Compassionate Care: Can it be Defined and Measured? The Development of the Compassionate Care Assessment Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Burnell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Compassion has not been universally defined or understood, nonetheless is recognized as a component of nursing excellence. If compassionate care is routine in health care delivery models, nursing behaviors and actions that exemplify compassion ought to be easily identifiable to patients. However, a standardized scale measuring compassionate care attributes has been notably absent.Objective: To address this gap and ascertain the importance of compassionate care to patients, a Compassionate Care Assessment Tool (CCAT© was formulated. This new tool, derived from a pilot study of two published surveys, combined the constructs of compassion and caring to generate 28 elements of compassionate care.Methodology: The CCAT© was administered to 250 hospitalized patients. Patients were asked to rate (a the importance of these items to compassionate care and (b the extent to which nurses made this type of care apparent to them.Results: Four categorical segments illustrated compassion from the patients’ perspective: the ability to establish meaningful connections, meet expectations, exhibit caring attributes, and function as a capable practitioner.Conclusions: The provision of compassionate care requires a holistic approach. Patients value nurses forming personal connections, serving as their advocates, and responding to their individual needs.

  7. Clinical Decision Support Tools for Selecting Interventions for Patients with Disabling Musculoskeletal Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gross, Douglas P; Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Shaw, William S;

    2016-01-01

    articles, 123 were considered relevant. Within this literature, there were 43 CDS tools located. These were classified into 3 main areas: computer-based tools/questionnaires (n = 8, 19 %), treatment algorithms/models (n = 14, 33 %), and clinical prediction rules/classification systems (n = 21, 49 %). Each...... the research question; (2) identifying relevant studies; (3) selecting studies for analysis; (4) charting the data; and (5) collating, summarizing and reporting results. We considered computer-based, and other available tools, such as algorithms, care pathways, rules and models. Since this research crosses...... rapidly advancing computer technologies, are under development and of potential interest to health care providers, case management organizations and funders of care. Based on the results of this scoping review, we conclude that these tools, models and systems should be subjected to further validation...

  8. Clinical swallowing assessment in intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovani, Aline Rodrigues; Moraes, Danielle Pedroni; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim de

    2013-01-01

    To report the results of the full clinical swallowing assessment in acute-care population in a large Brazilian teaching hospital. A prospective, descriptive clinical study was conducted during three months in a 30-bed adult clinical emergency ICU from a large Brazilian teaching hospital. Thirty-five patients consecutively referred to the Speech-Language Pathology Service according to our standard clinical practice were included. A full clinical swallowing assessment was completed and includes a Preliminary Assessment Protocol (PAP), a Dysphagia Risk Evaluation Protocol (DREP) and an Oral Feeding Transition Protocol (OFTP). In this study, the prevalence of OD in the ICU setting was of 63%, most of which were classified as moderate and moderate-severe (39%). Patients submitted to orotracheal intubation were very frequently referred to swallowing assessment (74%). The results of the statistical analyses revealed clinical indicators that could correctly classify patients as either having or not having OD on clinical tests. These include cough strength, coordination between breathing and speaking, dysphonia severity, and laryngeal elevation. Twenty six patients (74%) completed all protocols. Of these total, 38% were able to eat a regular diet. The practice with standardized protocols adds an important option for the management of oropharyngeal dysphagia in intensive care unit.

  9. Clinical Data Warehouse: An Effective Tool to Create Intelligence in Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Mahtab; Rahimi, Azin

    2017-09-21

    Clinical business intelligence tools such as clinical data warehouse enable health care organizations to objectively assess the disease management programs that affect the quality of patients' life and well-being in public. The purpose of these programs is to reduce disease occurrence, improve patient care, and decrease health care costs. Therefore, applying clinical data warehouse can be effective in generating useful information about aspects of patient care to facilitate budgeting, planning, research, process improvement, external reporting, benchmarking, and trend analysis, as well as to enable the decisions needed to prevent the progression or appearance of the illness aligning with maintaining the health of the population. The aim of this review article is to describe the benefits of clinical data warehouse applications in creating intelligence for disease management programs.

  10. Designing healthcare information technology to catalyse change in clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Lester

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The gap between best practice and actual patient care continues to be a pervasive problem in our healthcare system. Efforts to improve on this knowledge_performance gap have included computerised disease management programs designed to improve guideline adherence. However, current computerised reminder and decision support interventions directed at changing physician behaviour have had only a limited and variable effect on clinical outcomes. Further, immediate pay-for-performance financial pressures on institutions have created an environmentwhere disease management systems are often created under duress, appended to existing clinical systems and poorly integrated into the existing workflow, potentially limiting their realworld effectiveness. The authors present a review of disease management as well as a conceptual framework to guide the development of more effective health information technology (HIT tools for translating clinical information into clinical action.

  11. Otolaryngology Needs in a Free Clinic Providing Indigent Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Amanda; Sibert, Thomas; Zhao, Wei; Zarro, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    To determine the otolaryngology needs in a free clinic providing care to medically indigent patients, as perceived by the patients and health care providers. Cross-sectional survey. A survey was administered to patients and health care providers of a free clinic from September 2014 through January 2015 in an urban, inner-city location. One hundred and thirty-seven patients (35.8% male, age 50.8 ± 13.0 years) completed the survey. Mean household income was $29,838 ± $10,425; 32.1% spoke English; 54.7% were employed; 10.2% had health insurance; and 37.2% had seen a primary care provider outside of the free clinic. The top three otolaryngology symptoms among patients were sleep apnea/snoring (39.4%), heartburn/reflux (30.7%), and dizziness (29.9%). Eleven health care providers (45% male, age 50.5 ± 15.3 years, 63.6% physician, 36% nurse) completed the survey. Providers perceived the following otolaryngology complaints as the most prevalent, in descending order: cough, nasal congestion, reflux/heartburn, sore throat, and ear infection/otalgia. Providers felt that sleep apnea and hearing loss were the less common otolaryngology complaints, whereas surveyed patients indicated these symptoms with high frequency. The most requested diagnostic tool among patients and providers was chest X-rays. There are unmet otolaryngology needs in a free clinic. Medically indigent patients have significant barriers to accessing health care. Patient and provider perceptions of top otolaryngology complaints differed, but both identified access to chest X-rays as a major unmet need. Knowledge of patient perceptions may help providers elicit the breadth of otolaryngology complaints. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:1321-1326, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. From clinical integration to accountable care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Four key challenges to reforming health care organizations can be addressed by a clinical integration model patterned after Advocate Physician Partners (APP). These challenges are: predominance of small group practices, dominant fee-for-service reimbursement methods, weaknesses of the traditional hospital medical staff structure and a need to partner with commercial insurance companies. APP has demonstrated teamwork between 3800 physicians and hospitals to improve quality, patient safety and cost-effectiveness. Building on this model, an innovative contract with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois serves as a prototype for a commercial Accountable Care Organization. For this contract to succeed, APP must outperform the market competition. To accomplish this, APP has implemented strategies to reduce readmissions, avoid unnecessary admissions and emergency room visits, expand primary care access, and enhance quality and patient safety.

  13. Echocardiography as a Research and Clinical Tool in Veterinary Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, D G

    1982-01-01

    Echocardiography is the accepted term for the study of cardiac ultrasound. Although a relatively new tool for the study of the heart in man it has already found wide acceptance in the area of cardiac research and in the study of clinical cardiac disease. Animals had often been used in the early experiments with cardiac ultrasound, but only recently has echocardiography been used as a research and clinical tool in veterinary medicine. In this report echocardiography is used in the research of ...

  14. Clinical risk assessment in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Asefzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin′s Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA. Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN was in respiratory care "Ventilator′s alarm malfunction (no alarm" with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal "not washing the NG-Tube" with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care.

  15. Human Defensins: Potential Tools for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Wenghoefer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available As components of the innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides in the form of human defensins play an important role in host defense by serving as the epithelial layer’s biochemical barrier against local infections. Recent studies have shown these molecules to have far more additional cellular functions besides their antimicrobial activity. Defensins play a role in cell division, attraction and maturation of immune cells, differentiation and reorganization of epithelial tissues, wound healing and tumor suppression. This multitude of function makes human defensins appear to be excellent tools for therapeutic approaches. These antimicrobial peptides may be used directly as a remedy against bacterial and viral infections. Furthermore, the application of human defensins can be used to promote wound healing and epithelial reorganization. In particular, human β-defensins have a strong impact on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Human β-defensins have already been applied as a vaccination against HIV-1. Another potentially useful characteristic of defensins is their suitability as diagnostic markers in cancer therapy. In particular, α-defensins have already been used for this purpose. Human α-defensin-3, for example, has been described as a tumor marker for lymphocytes. High gene expression levels of α-defensin-3 and -4 have been detected in benign oral neoplasia, α-defensin-6 is considered to be a tumor marker for colon cancer.

  16. The Affordable Care Act, health care reform, prescription drug formularies and utilization management tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Brian L; Mullins, C Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (hence, Affordable Care Act, or ACA) was signed into law on March 23, 2010. Goals of the ACA include decreasing the number of uninsured people, controlling cost and spending on health care, increasing the quality of care provided, and increasing insurance coverage benefits. This manuscript focuses on how the ACA affects pharmacy benefit managers and consumers when they have prescriptions dispensed. PBMs use formularies and utilization control tools to steer drug usage toward cost-effective and efficacious agents. A logic model was developed to explain the effects of the new legislation. The model draws from peer-reviewed and gray literature commentary about current and future U.S. healthcare reform. Outcomes were identified as desired and undesired effects, and expected unintended consequences. The ACA extends health insurance benefits to almost 32 million people and provides financial assistance to those up to 400% of the poverty level. Increased access to care leads to a similar increase in overall health care demand and usage. This short-term increase is projected to decrease downstream spending on disease treatment and stunt the continued growth of health care costs, but may unintentionally exacerbate the current primary care physician shortage. The ACA eliminates limitations on insurance and increases the scope of benefits. Online health care insurance exchanges give patients a central location with multiple insurance options. Problems with prescription drug affordability and control utilization tools used by PBMs were not addressed by the ACA. Improving communication within the U.S. healthcare system either by innovative health care delivery models or increased usage of health information technology will help alleviate problems of health care spending and affordability.

  17. Appraisal tools for clinical practice guidelines: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Siering

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Clinical practice guidelines can improve healthcare processes and patient outcomes, but are often of low quality. Guideline appraisal tools aim to help potential guideline users in assessing guideline quality. We conducted a systematic review of publications describing guideline appraisal tools in order to identify and compare existing tools. METHODS: Among others we searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from 1995 to May 2011 for relevant primary and secondary publications. We also handsearched the reference lists of relevant publications. On the basis of the available literature we firstly generated 34 items to be used in the comparison of appraisal tools and grouped them into thirteen quality dimensions. We then extracted formal characteristics as well as questions and statements of the appraisal tools and assigned them to the items. RESULTS: We identified 40 different appraisal tools. They covered between three and thirteen of the thirteen possible quality dimensions and between three and 29 of the possible 34 items. The main focus of the appraisal tools were the quality dimensions "evaluation of evidence" (mentioned in 35 tools; 88%, "presentation of guideline content" (34 tools; 85%, "transferability" (33 tools; 83%, "independence" (32 tools; 80%, "scope" (30 tools; 75%, and "information retrieval" (29 tools; 73%. The quality dimensions "consideration of different perspectives" and "dissemination, implementation and evaluation of the guideline" were covered by only twenty (50% and eighteen tools (45% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Most guideline appraisal tools assess whether the literature search and the evaluation, synthesis and presentation of the evidence in guidelines follow the principles of evidence-based medicine. Although conflicts of interest and norms and values of guideline developers, as well as patient involvement, affect the trustworthiness of guidelines, they are currently

  18. Breast clinic triage tool: telephone assessment of new referrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Leila; Brennan, Meagan; Weissenberg, Leisha; Moore, Katrina

    2012-04-01

    Efficient systems to triage increasing numbers of new referrals to breast clinics are needed, to optimise the management of patients with cancer and benign disease. A tool was developed to triage the urgency of referrals and allocate the most appropriate clinician consultation (surgeon or breast physician (BP)). 259 consecutive new referrals were triaged using the tool. 100% new cancers and 256 (98.8%) referrals overall were triaged to both appropriate category of urgency and the appropriate clinician. This triage tool provides a simple method for assessing new referrals to a breast clinic and can be easily delivered by trained administrative staff by telephone.

  19. Clinical reasoning in nursing: teaching strategies and assessment tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emília Campos de Carvalho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To present the concept and development of teaching strategies and the assessment tools regarding clinical reasoning for accurate practice. Method: This is a theoretical reflection based on scientific studies. Results: Comprehension of the essential concepts of the thought process and its articulation with the different teaching strategies and the assessment tools which has allowed presenting ways to improve the process of diagnostic or therapeutic clinical reasoning. Conclusion: The use of new strategies and assessment tools should be encouraged in order to contribute to the development of skills that lead to safe and effective decision making.

  20. Electronic Health Record Tools to Care for At-Risk Older Drivers: A Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Colleen M; Salinas, Katherine; Eckstrom, Elizabeth

    2015-06-01

    Evaluating driving safety of older adults is an important health topic, but primary care providers (PCP) face multiple barriers in addressing this issue. The study's objectives were to develop an electronic health record (EHR)-based Driving Clinical Support Tool, train PCPs to perform driving assessments utilizing the tool, and systematize documentation of assessment and management of driving safety issues via the tool. The intervention included development of an evidence-based Driving Clinical Support Tool within the EHR, followed by training of internal medicine providers in the tool's content and use. Pre- and postintervention provider surveys and chart review of driving-related patient visits were conducted. Surveys included self-report of preparedness and knowledge to evaluate at-risk older drivers and were analyzed using paired t-test. A chart review of driving-related office visits compared documentation pre- and postintervention including: completeness of appropriate focused history and exam, identification of deficits, patient education, and reporting to appropriate authorities when indicated. Data from 86 providers were analyzed. Pre- and postintervention surveys showed significantly increased self-assessed preparedness (p < .001) and increased driving-related knowledge (p < .001). Postintervention charts showed improved documentation of correct cognitive testing, more referrals/consults, increased patient education about community resources, and appropriate regulatory reporting when deficits were identified. Focused training and an EHR-based clinical support tool improved provider self-reported preparedness and knowledge of how to evaluate at-risk older drivers. The tool improved documentation of driving-related issues and led to improved access to interdisciplinary care coordination. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2015.

  1. Information Technology: A Tool to Cut Health Care Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, Ravi; Maly, K. J.; Overstreet, C. M.; Foudriat, E. C.

    1996-01-01

    Old Dominion University embarked on a project to see how current computer technology could be applied to reduce the cost and or to improve the efficiency of health care services. We designed and built a prototype for an integrated medical record system (MRS). The MRS is written in Tool control language/Tool kit (Tcl/Tk). While the initial version of the prototype had patient information hard coded into the system, later versions used an INGRES database for storing patient information. Currently, we have proposed an object-oriented model for implementing MRS. These projects involve developing information systems for physicians and medical researchers to enhance their ability for improved treatment at reduced costs. The move to computerized patient records is well underway, several standards exist for laboratory records, and several groups are working on standards for other portions of the patient record.

  2. Patient satisfaction with health care services provided at HIV clinics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patient satisfaction with health care services provided at HIV clinics at Amana and ... with the general physical environment of the clinic and with services offered by ... Key words: Patient satisfaction, Antiretroviral therapy, HIV care services ...

  3. 5As Team obesity intervention in primary care: development and evaluation of shared decision-making weight management tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osunlana, A M; Asselin, J; Anderson, R; Ogunleye, A A; Cave, A; Sharma, A M; Campbell-Scherer, D L

    2015-08-01

    Despite several clinical practice guidelines, there remains a considerable gap in prevention and management of obesity in primary care. To address the need for changing provider behaviour, a randomized controlled trial with convergent mixed method evaluation, the 5As Team (5AsT) study, was conducted. As part of the 5AsT intervention, the 5AsT tool kit was developed. This paper describes the development process and evaluation of these tools. Tools were co-developed by the multidisciplinary research team and the 5AsT, which included registered nurses/nurse practitioners (n = 15), mental health workers (n = 7) and registered dieticians (n = 7), who were previously randomized to the 5AsT intervention group at a primary care network in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The 5AsT tool development occurred through a practice/implementation-oriented, need-based, iterative process during learning collaborative sessions of the 5AsT intervention. Feedback during tool development was received through field notes and final provider evaluation was carried out through anonymous questionnaires. Twelve tools were co-developed with 5AsT. All tools were evaluated as either 'most useful' or 'moderately useful' in primary care practice by the 5AsT. Four key findings during 5AsT tool development were the need for: tools that were adaptive, tools to facilitate interdisciplinary practice, tools to help patients understand realistic expectations for weight loss and shared decision-making tools for goal setting and relapse prevention. The 5AsT tools are primary care tools which extend the utility of the 5As of obesity management framework in clinical practice.

  4. GliomaPredict: a clinically useful tool for assigning glioma patients to specific molecular subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fine Howard A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in generating genome-wide gene expression data have accelerated the development of molecular-based tumor classification systems. Tools that allow the translation of such molecular classification schemas from research into clinical applications are still missing in the emerging era of personalized medicine. Results We developed GliomaPredict as a computational tool that allows the fast and reliable classification of glioma patients into one of six previously published stratified subtypes based on sets of extensively validated classifiers derived from hundreds of glioma transcriptomic profiles. Our tool utilizes a principle component analysis (PCA-based approach to generate a visual representation of the analyses, quantifies the confidence of the underlying subtype assessment and presents results as a printable PDF file. GliomaPredict tool is implemented as a plugin application for the widely-used GenePattern framework. Conclusions GliomaPredict provides a user-friendly, clinically applicable novel platform for instantly assigning gene expression-based subtype in patients with gliomas thereby aiding in clinical trial design and therapeutic decision-making. Implemented as a user-friendly diagnostic tool, we expect that in time GliomaPredict, and tools like it, will become routinely used in translational/clinical research and in the clinical care of patients with gliomas.

  5. Dementia Care: Confronting Myths in Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitch, Shirley M; Meadows, Charles; Patton-Tackett, Eva; Yingling, Kevin W

    2016-01-01

    Every day, patients with dementia, their families, and their physicians face the enormous challenges of this pervasive life-changing condition. Seeking help, often grasping at straws, victims, and their care providers are confronted with misinformation and myths when they search the internet or other sources. When Persons with Dementia (PWD) and their caregivers believe and/or act on false information, proper treatment may be delayed, and ultimately damage can be done. In this paper, we review commonly misunderstood issues encountered in caring for PWD. Our goal is to equip Primary Care Practitioners (PCPs) with accurate information to share with patients and families, to improve the outcomes of PWD to the greatest extent possible. While there are innumerable myths about dementia and its causes and treatments, we are going to focus on the most common false claims or misunderstandings which we hear in our Internal Medicine practice at Marshall Health. We offer suggestions for busy practitioners approaching some of the more common issues with patients and families in a clinic setting.

  6. Clinical Decision Support Tools for Selecting Interventions for Patients with Disabling Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Douglas P; Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Shaw, William S; Williams-Whitt, Kelly; Shaw, Nicola T; Hartvigsen, Jan; Qin, Ziling; Ha, Christine; Woodhouse, Linda J; Steenstra, Ivan A

    2016-09-01

    Purpose We aimed to identify and inventory clinical decision support (CDS) tools for helping front-line staff select interventions for patients with musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders. Methods We used Arksey and O'Malley's scoping review framework which progresses through five stages: (1) identifying the research question; (2) identifying relevant studies; (3) selecting studies for analysis; (4) charting the data; and (5) collating, summarizing and reporting results. We considered computer-based, and other available tools, such as algorithms, care pathways, rules and models. Since this research crosses multiple disciplines, we searched health care, computing science and business databases. Results Our search resulted in 4605 manuscripts. Titles and abstracts were screened for relevance. The reliability of the screening process was high with an average percentage of agreement of 92.3 %. Of the located articles, 123 were considered relevant. Within this literature, there were 43 CDS tools located. These were classified into 3 main areas: computer-based tools/questionnaires (n = 8, 19 %), treatment algorithms/models (n = 14, 33 %), and clinical prediction rules/classification systems (n = 21, 49 %). Each of these areas and the associated evidence are described. The state of evidentiary support for CDS tools is still preliminary and lacks external validation, head-to-head comparisons, or evidence of generalizability across different populations and settings. Conclusions CDS tools, especially those employing rapidly advancing computer technologies, are under development and of potential interest to health care providers, case management organizations and funders of care. Based on the results of this scoping review, we conclude that these tools, models and systems should be subjected to further validation before they can be recommended for large-scale implementation for managing patients with MSK disorders.

  7. The supportive care plan: a tool to improve communication in end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson-Hill, Jane; Hookey, Claire; Salt, Emily; O'Neill, Trish

    2009-05-01

    The End of Life Care Strategy (Department of Health, 2008a) states that acute hospitals need mechanisms in place to ensure that people who are approaching the end of life have their needs assessed, their wishes and preferences discussed, and an agreed set of actions reflecting these choices recorded in a care plan. The Supportive Care Plan was designed to encourage discussion of patients' preferences for end-of-life care, and to provide a tool for recording those preferences and communicating them to other healthcare professionals. Initial analysis of the results of a pre- and post-implementation audit of patient notes suggests that there has been an improvement in the documentation about preferred place of care and patient and family understanding of the illness. Fifty per cent of patients who died with a Supportive Care Plan in place died in their first choice of place of care and 22% in their second choice. Feedback from patients and relatives was positive. The main barriers to implementation were difficulties for staff in prognostication, especially for patients with a non-cancer diagnosis, and a reluctance from staff to initiate discussions that were perceived to be too time-consuming. There were also concerns about dealing with the emotions that such a discussion may generate in both patients and relatives.

  8. ProstaWeb: an online tool for predicting prostatic pathologies from Primary Care consultations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Pérez-Gil

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a tool to support and aid the diagnosis of prostate pathologies. Method: The database provided by a previous research project in which anthropometric, clinical and analytical variables are related to the development of predictive statistics algorithms that provide the probability of having a prostate or other pathology. Results: A diagnostic tool that performs with some precision the probability of having a prostatic pathology or another depending on the variables that the patient includes. Conclusions: Prostaweb is a useful and practical prostate diagnosis tool for the primary care physician. Although the hit rate is considerably high, it would still be necessary to construct models with more refined variables and perhaps with a larger number of patients, to increase the precision of the predictions. "

  9. Clinical decision support tools: analysis of online drug information databases

    OpenAIRE

    Seamon Matthew J; Polen Hyla H; Marsh Wallace A; Clauson Kevin A; Ortiz Blanca I

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Online drug information databases are used to assist in enhancing clinical decision support. However, the choice of which online database to consult, purchase or subscribe to is likely made based on subjective elements such as history of use, familiarity, or availability during professional training. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical decision support tools for drug information by systematically comparing the most commonly used online drug information datab...

  10. A Multi-Center Prospective Derivation and Validation of a Clinical Prediction Tool for Severe Clostridium difficile Infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Na, Xi

    2015-04-23

    Prediction of severe clinical outcomes in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is important to inform management decisions for optimum patient care. Currently, treatment recommendations for CDI vary based on disease severity but validated methods to predict severe disease are lacking. The aim of the study was to derive and validate a clinical prediction tool for severe outcomes in CDI.

  11. Antenatal care in practice: an exploratory study in antenatal care clinics in the Kilombero Valley, south-eastern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kessy Flora

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of antenatal care for reducing maternal morbidity and improving newborn survival and health is widely acknowledged. Yet there are worrying gaps in knowledge of the quality of antenatal care provided in Tanzania. In particular, determinants of health workers' performance have not yet been fully understood. This paper uses ethnographic methods to document health workers' antenatal care practices with reference to the national Focused Antenatal Care guidelines and identifies factors influencing health workers' performance. Potential implications for improving antenatal care provision in Tanzania are discussed. Methods Combining different qualitative techniques, we studied health workers' antenatal care practices in four public antenatal care clinics in the Kilombero Valley, south-eastern Tanzania. A total of 36 antenatal care consultations were observed and compared with the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines. Participant observation, informal discussions and in-depth interviews with the staff helped to identify and explain health workers' practices and contextual factors influencing antenatal care provision. Results The delivery of antenatal care services to pregnant women at the selected antenatal care clinics varied widely. Some services that are recommended by the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines were given to all women while other services were not delivered at all. Factors influencing health workers' practices were poor implementation of the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines, lack of trained staff and absenteeism, supply shortages and use of working tools that are not consistent with the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines. Health workers react to difficult working conditions by developing informal practices as coping strategies or "street-level bureaucracy". Conclusions Efforts to improve antenatal care should address shortages of trained staff through expanding training opportunities, including health worker

  12. Breadth of Coverage, Ease of Use, and Quality of Mobile Point-of-Care Tool Information Summaries: An Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Emily; Emani, Vamsi K; Ren, Jinma

    2016-10-12

    With advances in mobile technology, accessibility of clinical resources at the point of care has increased. The objective of this research was to identify if six selected mobile point-of-care tools meet the needs of clinicians in internal medicine. Point-of-care tools were evaluated for breadth of coverage, ease of use, and quality. Six point-of-care tools were evaluated utilizing four different devices (two smartphones and two tablets). Breadth of coverage was measured using select International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes if information on summary, etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis was provided. Quality measures included treatment and diagnostic inline references and individual and application time stamping. Ease of use covered search within topic, table of contents, scrolling, affordance, connectivity, and personal accounts. Analysis of variance based on the rank of score was used. Breadth of coverage was similar among Medscape (mean 6.88), Uptodate (mean 6.51), DynaMedPlus (mean 6.46), and EvidencePlus (mean 6.41) (P>.05) with DynaMed (mean 5.53) and Epocrates (mean 6.12) scoring significantly lower (PUpToDate and DynaMedPlus allow for search within a topic. All point-of-care tools have remote access with the exception of UpToDate and Essential Evidence Plus. All tools except Medscape covered criteria for quality evaluation. Overall, there was no significant difference between the point-of-care tools with regard to coverage on common topics used by internal medicine clinicians. Selection of point-of-care tools is highly dependent on individual preference based on ease of use and cost of the application.

  13. Validation of a clinical assessment tool for spinal anaesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Breen, D

    2011-07-01

    There is a need for a procedure-specific means of assessment of clinical performance in anaesthesia. The aim of this study was to devise a tool for assessing the performance of spinal anaesthesia, which has both content and construct validity.

  14. Diabetes care may be improved with Steno Quality Assurance Tool--a self-assessment tool in diabetes management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre-Christensen, Ulla; Nielsen, Annemette Anker; Binder, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Assurance Tool (SQAT). Data was entered for an initial 3 months period. Subsequently data were analyzed by the users, who designed plans to improve indicator status and set goals for the upcoming period. A second data entry period followed after 7-9 months. RESULTS: QA data was analyzed from 4487 T2DM...... patients (baseline) and 4440 (follow-up). The average examination frequency per clinic of the following indicators increased significantly: lipid examination (72-87%) (p=0.007), foot examination (80-94%) (p=0.02), HbA1c investigation (59-77%) (p=0.006), and urine albumin excretion investigation (72-87%) (p.......002). CONCLUSION: Quality of diabetes care can be improved by applying SQAT, a QA self-surveillance software that enables documentation of changes in process and outcome indicators....

  15. Oral mucosal precancer and cancer: A helpful discriminating clinical tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Crispian; Sciubba, James J; Bagan, Jose V

    2015-09-01

    The authors have collaborated with many colleagues in several countries in formulating a useful and practical clinical tool for evaluating oral mucosal findings on routine examination. Consideration of several factors including history, evolution of positive findings and clinical information allows placement of examination results into one of three categories which are graded by a color scheme along a spectrum of concerns (green to red, or no concern to serious concern). Afforded to the clinician is a straightforward grading system as a starting point for office end clinic use for all patients.

  16. Trial analytics--a tool for clinical trial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Anindya; Das, Suman

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged timelines and large expenses associated with clinical trials have prompted a new focus on improving the operational efficiency of clinical trials by use of Clinical Trial Management Systems (CTMS) in order to improve managerial control in trial conduct. However, current CTMS systems are not able to meet the expectations due to various shortcomings like inability of timely reporting and trend visualization within/beyond an organization. To overcome these shortcomings of CTMS, clinical researchers can apply a business intelligence (BI) framework to create Clinical Research Intelligence (CLRI) for optimization of data collection and analytics. This paper proposes the usage of an innovative and collaborative visualization tool (CTA) as CTMS "add-on" to help overwhelm these deficiencies of traditional CTMS, with suitable examples.

  17. Patients and nursing staff views of using the education needs assessment tool in rheumatology clinics: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardware, Bernadette; Johnson, Dawn; Hale, Claire; Ndosi, Mwidimi; Adebajo, Adewale

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the usability of the educational needs assessment tool in clinical practice, from a practitioner and patient perspective and to establish whether patients perceive that they are getting an equally good or equally inadequate education service for their needs. The educational needs assessment tool was developed to enable patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis to assess their education needs prior to a consultation with a health professional. The educational needs assessment tool has been translated into nine languages and measurement properties have been established, however, its usability in clinical practice has not been studied. A qualitative study embedded into a multicentre RCT in which patients had been randomised into either educational needs assessment tool-focused education (Experimental Group) or usual care (control group). Both groups were seen by a clinical nurse specialist. Sixteen patients and four clinical nurse specialists were recruited from the Rheumatology Outpatient Departments of three Acute Hospitals within the U K. Data were collected by interviews with patients and clinical nurse specialist. Analysis followed the Framework approach. Patients and clinical nurse specialist found completion of the educational needs assessment tool straightforward, comprehensive and easy to use. Completing the educational needs assessment tool helped patients to focus on what they needed to know from the clinical nurse specialist. Patients in both the control group and the experimental group felt supported and reassured by their clinical nurse specialist and perceived that they received a good and adequate education provision. This study provides useful insights into the ability of the educational needs assessment tool to assess the educational needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in routine clinical practice. The educational needs assessment tool would be useful as a structured guide for nurses when assessing and meeting individual patient

  18. Formative assessment and design of a complex clinical decision support tool for pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sundas; McCullagh, Lauren; Press, Anne; Kharche, Manish; Schachter, Andy; Pardo, Salvatore; McGinn, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Electronic health record (EHR)-based clinical decision support (CDS) tools are rolled out with the urgency to meet federal requirements without time for usability testing and refinement of the user interface. As part of a larger project to design, develop and integrate a pulmonary embolism CDS tool for emergency physicians, we conducted a formative assessment to determine providers' level of interest and input on designs and content. This was a study to conduct a formative assessment of emergency medicine (EM) physicians that included focus groups and key informant interviews. The focus of this study was twofold, to determine the general attitude towards CDS tool integration and the ideal integration point into the clinical workflow. To accomplish this, we first approached EM physicians in a focus group, then, during key informant interviews, we presented workflow designs and gave a scenario to help the providers visualise how the CDS tool works. Participants were asked questions regarding the trigger location, trigger words, integration into their workflow, perceived utility and heuristic of the tool. Results from the participants' survey responses to trigger location, perceived utility and efficiency, indicated that the providers felt the tool would be more of a hindrance than an aid. However, some providers commented that they had not had exposure to CDS tools but had used online calculators, and thought the tools would be helpful at the point-of-care if integrated into the EHR. Furthermore, there was a preference for an order entry wireframe. This study highlights several factors to consider when designing CDS tools: (1) formative assessment of EHR functionality and clinical environment workflow, (2) focus groups and key informative interviews to incorporate providers' perceptions of CDS and workflow integration and/or (3) the demonstration of proposed workflows through wireframes to help providers visualise design concepts.

  19. Thermography based prescreening software tool for veterinary clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Rohini; Umbaugh, Scott E.; Mishra, Deependra; Lama, Norsang; Alvandipour, Mehrdad; Umbaugh, David; Marino, Dominic J.; Sackman, Joseph

    2017-05-01

    Under development is a clinical software tool which can be used in the veterinary clinics as a prescreening tool for these pathologies: anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) disease, bone cancer and feline hyperthyroidism. Currently, veterinary clinical practice uses several imaging techniques including radiology, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). But, harmful radiation involved during imaging, expensive equipment setup, excessive time consumption and the need for a cooperative patient during imaging, are major drawbacks of these techniques. In veterinary procedures, it is very difficult for animals to remain still for the time periods necessary for standard imaging without resorting to sedation - which creates another set of complexities. Therefore, clinical application software integrated with a thermal imaging system and the algorithms with high sensitivity and specificity for these pathologies, can address the major drawbacks of the existing imaging techniques. A graphical user interface (GUI) has been created to allow ease of use for the clinical technician. The technician inputs an image, enters patient information, and selects the camera view associated with the image and the pathology to be diagnosed. The software will classify the image using an optimized classification algorithm that has been developed through thousands of experiments. Optimal image features are extracted and the feature vector is then used in conjunction with the stored image database for classification. Classification success rates as high as 88% for bone cancer, 75% for ACL and 90% for feline hyperthyroidism have been achieved. The software is currently undergoing preliminary clinical testing.

  20. Clinical audit of structured pharmaceutical care plans recorded within a hospital pharmaceutical care service

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Marit Bergheim

    2008-01-01

    Background Pharmaceutical care as a health care service has already made its mark and been shown to make an important contribution to the health care system. However, there is still a demand from the NHS among others, that pharmacist to a greater extent must document their provision of pharmaceutical care. Tested out in this project, is the application of a Care Issue Categorisation System. Aims To compare two clinical settings in terms of the profile of pharmaceutical care deli...

  1. Evaluation of a novel electronic genetic screening and clinical decision support tool in prenatal clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Emily A; Lin, Bruce K; Doksum, Teresa; Drohan, Brian; Edelson, Vaughn; Dolan, Siobhan M; Hughes, Kevin; O'Leary, James; Vasquez, Lisa; Copeland, Sara; Galvin, Shelley L; DeGroat, Nicole; Pardanani, Setul; Gregory Feero, W; Adams, Claire; Jones, Renee; Scott, Joan

    2014-07-01

    "The Pregnancy and Health Profile" (PHP) is a free prenatal genetic screening and clinical decision support (CDS) software tool for prenatal providers. PHP collects family health history (FHH) during intake and provides point-of-care risk assessment for providers and education for patients. This pilot study evaluated patient and provider responses to PHP and effects of using PHP in practice. PHP was implemented in four clinics. Surveys assessed provider confidence and knowledge and patient and provider satisfaction with PHP. Data on the implementation process were obtained through semi-structured interviews with administrators. Quantitative survey data were analyzed using Chi square test, Fisher's exact test, paired t tests, and multivariate logistic regression. Open-ended survey questions and interviews were analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. Of the 83% (513/618) of patients that provided feedback, 97% felt PHP was easy to use and 98% easy to understand. Thirty percent (21/71) of participating physicians completed both pre- and post-implementation feedback surveys [13 obstetricians (OBs) and 8 family medicine physicians (FPs)]. Confidence in managing genetic risks significantly improved for OBs on 2/6 measures (p values ≤0.001) but not for FPs. Physician knowledge did not significantly change. Providers reported value in added patient engagement and reported mixed feedback about the CDS report. We identified key steps, resources, and staff support required to implement PHP in a clinical setting. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report on the integration of patient-completed, electronically captured and CDS-enabled FHH software into primary prenatal practice. PHP is acceptable to patients and providers. Key to successful implementation in the future will be customization options and interoperability with electronic health records.

  2. The Certified Clinical Nurse Leader in Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine M; Shatto, Bobbi J; Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Crecelius, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Challenges of the current health system in the United States call for collaboration of health care professionals, careful utilization of resources, and greater efficiency of system processes. Innovations to the delivery of care include the introduction of the clinical nurse leader role to provide leadership at the point of care, where it is needed most. Clinical nurse leaders have demonstrated their ability to address needed changes and implement improvements in processes that impact the efficiency and quality of patient care across the continuum and in a variety of settings, including critical care. This article describes the role of the certified clinical nurse leader, their education and skill set, and outlines outcomes that have been realized by their efforts. Specific examples of how clinical nurse leaders impact critical care nursing are discussed.

  3. The Seamless Transfer-of-Care Protocol: a randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of an electronic transfer-of-care communication tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okoniewska Barbara M

    2012-11-01

    evaluation will assess the cost per life saved, cost per readmission avoided and cost per QALY gained with the TOC communication tool compared to traditional dictation summaries. Discussion This paper outlines the study protocol for a randomized controlled trial evaluating an electronic transfer-of-care communication tool, with sufficient statistical power to assess the impact of the tool on the significant outcomes of post-discharge death or readmission. The study findings will inform health systems around the world on the potential benefits of such tools, and the value for money associated with their widespread implementation. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01402609.

  4. Clinical and regulatory protocols for the management of impaired vision in the public health care network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayter Silva Paula

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To describe the procedures used in developing Clinical and Regulatory Protocols for primary care teams to use in the management of the most common scenarios of impaired vision in Southern Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective review of 1.333 referral forms from all primary care practitioners was performed in Ribeirão Preto city, during a 30-day period. The major ophthalmic diagnostic categories were evaluated from those referrals forms. The Clinical and Regulatory Protocols development process was held afterwards and involved scientific cooperation between a university and the health care system, in the form of workshops attended by primary care practitioners and regulatory system team members composed of health care administrators, ophthalmologists, and professors of ophthalmology and social medicine. RESULTS: The management of impaired vision was chosen as the theme, since it accounted for 43.6% of the ophthalmology-related referrals from primary care providers of Ribeirão Preto. The Clinical and Regulatory Protocols developed involve distinctive diagnostic and therapeutic interventions that can be performed at the primary care level and in different health care settings. The most relevant clinical and regulatory interventions were expressed as algorithms in order to facilitate the use of the Clinical and Regulatory Protocols by health care practitioners. CONCLUSIONS: These Clinical and Regulatory Protocols could represent a useful tool for health systems with universal access, as well as for health care networks based on primary care and for regulatory system teams. Implementation of these Clinical and Regulatory Protocols can minimize the disparity between the needs of patients with impaired vision and the treatment modalities offered, resulting in a more cooperative health care network.

  5. Podometrics as a Potential Clinical Tool for Glomerular Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masao; Wickman, Larysa; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Wiggins, Roger C

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease culminating in end-stage kidney disease is a major public health problem costing in excess of $40 billion per year with high morbidity and mortality. Current tools for glomerular disease monitoring lack precision and contribute to poor outcome. The podocyte depletion hypothesis describes the major mechanisms underlying the progression of glomerular diseases, which are responsible for more than 80% of cases of end-stage kidney disease. The question arises of whether this new knowledge can be used to improve outcomes and reduce costs. Podocytes have unique characteristics that make them an attractive monitoring tool. Methodologies for estimating podocyte number, size, density, glomerular volume and other parameters in routine kidney biopsies, and the rate of podocyte detachment from glomeruli into urine (podometrics) now have been developed and validated. They potentially fill important gaps in the glomerular disease monitoring toolbox. The application of these tools to glomerular disease groups shows good correlation with outcome, although data validating their use for individual decision making is not yet available. Given the urgency of the clinical problem, we argue that the time has come to focus on testing these tools for application to individualized clinical decision making toward more effective progression prevention.

  6. The development and initial validation of a clinical tool for patients' preferences on patient participation--The 4Ps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldh, Ann Catrine; Luhr, Kristina; Ehnfors, Margareta

    2015-12-01

    To report on the development and initial testing of a clinical tool, The Patient Preferences for Patient Participation tool (The 4Ps), which will allow patients to depict, prioritize, and evaluate their participation in health care. While patient participation is vital for high quality health care, a common definition incorporating all stakeholders' experience is pending. In order to support participation in health care, a tool for determining patients' preferences on participation is proposed, including opportunities to evaluate participation while considering patient preferences. Exploratory mixed methods studies informed the development of the tool, and descriptive design guided its initial testing. The 4Ps tool was tested with 21 Swedish researcher experts (REs) and patient experts (PEs) with experience of patient participation. Individual Think Aloud interviews were employed to capture experiences of content, response process, and acceptability. 'The 4Ps' included three sections for the patient to depict, prioritize, and evaluate participation using 12 items corresponding to 'Having Dialogue', 'Sharing Knowledge', 'Planning', and 'Managing Self-care'. The REs and PEs considered 'The 4Ps' comprehensible, and that all items corresponded to the concept of patient participation. The tool was perceived to facilitate patient participation whilst requiring amendments to content and layout. A tool like The 4Ps provides opportunities for patients to depict participation, and thus supports communication and collaboration. Further patient evaluation is needed to understand the conditions for patient participation. While The 4Ps is promising, revision and testing in clinical practice is required. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. MLBCD: a machine learning tool for big clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Predictive modeling is fundamental for extracting value from large clinical data sets, or "big clinical data," advancing clinical research, and improving healthcare. Machine learning is a powerful approach to predictive modeling. Two factors make machine learning challenging for healthcare researchers. First, before training a machine learning model, the values of one or more model parameters called hyper-parameters must typically be specified. Due to their inexperience with machine learning, it is hard for healthcare researchers to choose an appropriate algorithm and hyper-parameter values. Second, many clinical data are stored in a special format. These data must be iteratively transformed into the relational table format before conducting predictive modeling. This transformation is time-consuming and requires computing expertise. This paper presents our vision for and design of MLBCD (Machine Learning for Big Clinical Data), a new software system aiming to address these challenges and facilitate building machine learning predictive models using big clinical data. The paper describes MLBCD's design in detail. By making machine learning accessible to healthcare researchers, MLBCD will open the use of big clinical data and increase the ability to foster biomedical discovery and improve care.

  8. Primary Care Collaborative Memory Clinics: Building Capacity for Optimized Dementia Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda; Hillier, Loretta M; Molnar, Frank; Borrie, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, primary care collaborative memory clinics (PCCMCs) are being established to build capacity for person-centred dementia care. This paper reflects on the significance of PCCMCs within the system of care for older adults, supported with data from ongoing evaluation studies. Results highlight timelier access to assessment with a high proportion of patients being managed in primary care within a person-centred approach to care. Enhancing primary care capacity for dementia care with interprofessional and collaborative care will strengthen the system's ability to respond to increasing demands for service and mitigate the growth of wait times to access geriatric specialist assessment.

  9. Clinical update: communication issues and advance care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Crystal Dea; Reynolds, Ashley M

    2013-11-01

    To provide a clinical update on practical strategies to enhance the quality of communication in the palliative and end-of-life medical care settings. Published articles, textbooks, reports, and clinical experience. The components of effective and compassionate care throughout the advanced illness trajectory require thoughtful and strategic communication with patients, families, and members of the health care team. Unfortunately, few health care professionals are formally trained in communication skills. Nurses who possess self-awareness and are skilled in effective communication practices are integral to the provision of high-quality palliative care for patients and families coping with advanced malignancies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical assessment tools identify functional deficits in fragility fracture patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ames TD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tyler D Ames,1 Corinne E Wee,1 Khoi M Le,1 Tiffany L Wang,1 Julie Y Bishop,2 Laura S Phieffer,2 Carmen E Quatman2 1The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 2Department of Orthopaedics, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA Purpose: To identify inexpensive, noninvasive, portable, clinical assessment tools that can be used to assess functional performance measures that may put older patients at risk for falls such as balance, handgrip strength, and lumbopelvic control.Patients and methods: Twenty fragility fracture patients and 21 healthy control subjects were evaluated using clinical assessment tools (Nintendo Wii Balance Board [WBB], a handheld dynamometer, and an application for the Apple iPod Touch, the Level Belt that measure functional performance during activity of daily living tasks. The main outcome measurements were balance (WBB, handgrip strength (handheld dynamometer, and lumbopelvic control (iPod Touch Level Belt, which were compared between fragility fracture patients and healthy controls.Results: Fragility fracture patients had lower scores on the vertical component of the WBB Torso Twist task (P=0.042 and greater medial–lateral lumbopelvic sway during a 40 m walk (P=0.026 when compared to healthy controls. Unexpectedly, the fracture patients had significantly higher scores on the left leg (P=0.020 and total components (P=0.010 of the WBB Single Leg Stand task as well as less faults during the left Single Leg Stand task (P=0.003.Conclusion: The clinical assessment tools utilized in this study are relatively inexpensive and portable tools of performance measures capable of detecting differences in postural sway between fragility fracture patients and controls. Keywords: fall risk, geriatric fracture, Nintendo Wii Balance Board, Level Belt, fragility fracture

  11. Retail clinic utilization associated with lower total cost of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Andrew; Dunham, Lisette; Snower, Kristen; Hu, Min; Matlin, Olga S; Shrank, William H; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Brennan, Troyen

    2013-04-01

    To better understand the impact of retail clinic use on a patient's annual total cost of care. A propensity score matched-pair, cohort design was used to analyze healthcare spending patterns among CVS Caremark employees in the year following a visit to a MinuteClinic, the retail clinics inside CVS pharmacies. De-identified medical and pharmacy claims for CVS Caremark employees and their dependents who received care at a retail clinic between June 1, 2009, and May 31, 2010, were matched to those of subjects who received care elsewhere. High-dimensional propensity score and greedy matching techniques were used to create a 1-to-1 matched cohort that was analyzed using generalized linear regression models. Individuals using a retail clinic had a lower total cost of care (-$262; 95% confidence interval, -$510 to -$31; P = .025) in the year following their clinic visit than individuals who received care in other settings. This savings was primarily due to lower medical expenses at physicians' offices ($77 savings, P = .008) and hospital inpatient care ($121 savings, P = .049). The 6022 retail clinic users also had 142 (12%) fewer emergency department visits (P = .01), though this was not related to significant cost savings. This study found that retail clinic use was associated with lower overall total cost of care compared with that at alternative sites. Savings may extend beyond the retail clinic visit itself to other types of medical utilization.

  12. Clinical reasoning in nursing: teaching strategies and assessment tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Emília Campos de; Oliveira-Kumakura, Ana Railka de Souza; Morais, Sheila Coelho Ramalho Vasconcelos

    2017-01-01

    To present the concept and development of teaching strategies and the assessment tools regarding clinical reasoning for accurate practice. This is a theoretical reflection based on scientific studies. Comprehension of the essential concepts of the thought process and its articulation with the different teaching strategies and the assessment tools which has allowed presenting ways to improve the process of diagnostic or therapeutic clinical reasoning. The use of new strategies and assessment tools should be encouraged in order to contribute to the development of skills that lead to safe and effective decision making. Apresentar o conceito de raciocínio clínico, seu desenvolvimento, as estratégias para seu ensino e os instrumentos de avaliação para uma prática acurada. Trata-se de uma reflexão teórica fundamentada em estudos científicos. A compreensão dos conceitos essenciais do processo de pensamento e sua articulação com as diferentes estratégias de ensino e com os instrumentos de avaliação permitiram exemplificar meios de aprimorar o processo de raciocínio clínico diagnóstico ou terapêutico. A utilização de novas estratégias e instrumentos de avaliação deve ser estimulado para contribuir com o desenvolvimento das habilidades que culminam na tomada de decisão segura e eficaz.

  13. Tools in a clinical information system supporting clinical trials at a Swiss University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Michael; Bucklar, Guido; Blaser, Jürg

    2014-12-01

    Issues concerning inadequate source data of clinical trials rank second in the most common findings by regulatory authorities. The increasing use of electronic clinical information systems by healthcare providers offers an opportunity to facilitate and improve the conduct of clinical trials and the source documentation. We report on a number of tools implemented into the clinical information system of a university hospital to support clinical research. In 2011/2012, a set of tools was developed in the clinical information system of the University Hospital Zurich to support clinical research, including (1) a trial registry for documenting metadata on the clinical trials conducted at the hospital, (2) a patient-trial-assignment-tool to tag patients in the electronic medical charts as participants of specific trials, (3) medical record templates for the documentation of study visits and trial-related procedures, (4) online queries on trials and trial participants, (5) access to the electronic medical records for clinical monitors, (6) an alerting tool to notify of hospital admissions of trial participants, (7) queries to identify potentially eligible patients in the planning phase as trial feasibility checks and during the trial as recruitment support, and (8) order sets to facilitate the complete and accurate performance of study visit procedures. The number of approximately 100 new registrations per year in the voluntary trial registry in the clinical information system now matches the numbers of the existing mandatory trial registry of the hospital. Likewise, the yearly numbers of patients tagged as trial participants as well as the use of the standardized trial record templates increased to 2408 documented trial enrolments and 190 reports generated/month in the year 2013. Accounts for 32 clinical monitors have been established in the first 2 years monitoring a total of 49 trials in 16 clinical departments. A total of 15 months after adding the optional feature of

  14. Randomised clinical trial of early specialist palliative care plus standard care versus standard care alone in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groenvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Damkier, Anette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Beneficial effects of early palliative care have been found in advanced cancer, but the evidence is not unequivocal. AIM: To investigate the effect of early specialist palliative care among advanced cancer patients identified in oncology departments. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: The Danish...... Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01348048) is a multicentre randomised clinical trial comparing early referral to a specialist palliative care team plus standard care versus standard care alone. The planned sample size was 300. At five oncology departments, consecutive patients...

  15. Creation of minimum standard tool for palliative care in India and self-evaluation of palliative care programs using it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Rajagopal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is important to ensure that minimum standards for palliative care based on available resources are clearly defined and achieved. Aims: (1 Creation of minimum National Standards for Palliative Care for India. (2 Development of a tool for self-evaluation of palliative care organizations. (3 Evaluation of the tool in India. In 2006, Pallium India assembled a working group at the national level to develop minimum standards. The standards were to be evaluated by palliative care services in the country. Materials and Methods: The working group prepared a "standards" document, which had two parts - the first composed of eight "essential" components and the second, 22 "desirable" components. The working group sent the document to 86 hospice and palliative care providers nationwide, requesting them to self-evaluate their palliative care services based on the standards document, on a modified Likert scale. Results: Forty-nine (57% palliative care organizations responded, and their self-evaluation of services based on the standards tool was analyzed. The majority of the palliative care providers met most of the standards identified as essential by the working group. A variable percentage of organizations had satisfied the desirable components of the standards. Conclusions: We demonstrated that the "standards tool" could be applied effectively in practice for self-evaluation of quality of palliative care services.

  16. Mathematical methods and tools for increasing the efficiency of health care organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Titov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Activities of medical organizations assume the processing and analyzing large volumes of information to solve diagnostic and treatment tasks and management problems. An effective solution, related to collecting, processing and storing of the medical information, practical managing of information flows, short-term and long-term planning, economical, statistical and financial analyzing requires the use of special tools.The purpose of this research is to determine the mathematical methods and to develop the tools for analyzing the efficiency of medical organization. The tools’ use will improve not only the efficiency of a single organization, but also the quality of the patient care in general.The material of this research is primary medical information, stored on Microsoft SQL Server. Information processing is carried out on the basis of economic and mathematical methods and methods of mathematical statistics and decision theory. It is proposed to use such tools as automated control system of medical services’ cost management and health care economist’s workstation. Further processing is carried out in Microsoft Excel using pivot tables and macros. The statistical package Statgraphics is used for analyzing the efficiency of the group of medical organizations. This article has considered three components of efficiency – clinical, organizational and economic. Cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted on the basis of economical and mathematical methods and methods of mathematical statistics and decision theory in areas of cost analysis and evaluation of the resources use. The mechanism of classifying the efficiency of the activity of medical organizations on the structure of the cost of services was offered. The use of the research results allowed to develop the software that has a practical experience of successful applying in a number of medical organizations. The feasibility of the tools ’use to improve the efficiency of health care

  17. Careful science? Bodywork and care practices in randomised clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Bønnelycke, Julie; Eriksen, Hanne Hellerup

    2013-01-01

    the focus to reflect everyday practices would foster better targeted public health campaigns. This article is based on our participation in FINE, a multidisciplinary Danish research project. The core methodology of FINE was a randomised controlled trial in which 61 moderately overweight men were put...... into different exercise groups. In this article we analyse the scientific work of the trial as representing entangled processes of bodywork, where data are extracted and objectified bodies are manipulated and care practices address the emotional, social and mundane aspects of the participants' everyday lives....... Care practices are an inherent part of producing scientific facts but they are removed from the recognised results of scientific practice and thus from common public health recommendations. However, knowledge about the strategic use of care practices in lifestyle interventions is important for public...

  18. Ethical issues of incorporating spiritual care into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzer Casarez, Rebecca L; Engebretson, Joan C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article was to analyse the scholarly discourse on the ethical issues of incorporating spirituality and religion into clinical practice. Spirituality is an important aspect of health care, yet the secularisation of health care presents ethical concerns for many health providers. Health providers may have conflicting views regarding if and how to offer spiritual care in the clinical setting. Discursive paper. The discourse analysis uncovered four themes: ethical concerns of omission; ethical concerns of commission; conditions under which health providers prefer to offer spiritual care; and strategies to integrate spiritual care. Ethical concerns of omission of spiritual care include lack of beneficence for not offering holistic care. Ethical concerns of commission are coercion and overstepping one's competence in offering spiritual care. Conditions under which providers are more likely to offer spiritual care are if the patient has a terminal illness, and if the patient requests spiritual care. Strategies for appropriate spiritual care include listening, and remaining neutral and sensitive to spiritual issues. Health providers must be aware of both the concerns of omission and commission. Aristotle's golden mean, an element of virtue ethics, supports a more moderate approach that can be achieved by avoiding the imposition of one's own personal beliefs of a religious persuasion or beliefs of extreme secularisation, and focusing on the beneficence to the patient. Relevance to clinical practice.  Key components for health providers in addressing spiritual concerns are self-reflection, provision of individualised care, cultural competency and communication. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. High throughput tools to access images from clinical archives for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Shawn N; Herrick, Christopher; Wang, Yanbing; Wang, Taowei David; Sack, Darren; Andriole, Katherine P; Wei, Jesse; Reynolds, Nathaniel; Plesniak, Wendy; Rosen, Bruce R; Pieper, Steven; Gollub, Randy L

    2015-04-01

    Historically, medical images collected in the course of clinical care have been difficult to access for secondary research studies. While there is a tremendous potential value in the large volume of studies contained in clinical image archives, Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) are designed to optimize clinical operations and workflow. Search capabilities in PACS are basic, limiting their use for population studies, and duplication of archives for research is costly. To address this need, we augment the Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) open source software, providing investigators with the tools necessary to query and integrate medical record and clinical research data. Over 100 healthcare institutions have installed this suite of software tools that allows investigators to search medical record metadata including images for specific types of patients. In this report, we describe a new Medical Imaging Informatics Bench to Bedside (mi2b2) module ( www.mi2b2.org ), available now as an open source addition to the i2b2 software platform that allows medical imaging examinations collected during routine clinical care to be made available to translational investigators directly from their institution's clinical PACS for research and educational use in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Omnibus Rule. Access governance within the mi2b2 module is customizable per institution and PACS minimizing impact on clinical systems. Currently in active use at our institutions, this new technology has already been used to facilitate access to thousands of clinical MRI brain studies representing specific patient phenotypes for use in research.

  20. A conceptual framework of clinical nursing care in intensive care1

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção; Apostolidis, Thémistoklis; Brandão, Marcos Antônio Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to propose a conceptual framework for clinical nursing care in intensive care. Method: descriptive and qualitative field research, carried out with 21 nurses from an intensive care unit of a federal public hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic and lexical content analysis, supported by Alceste software. Results: the characteristics of clinical intensive care emerge from the specialized knowledge of the interaction, the work context, types of patients and nurses characteristic of the intensive care and care frameworks. Conclusion: the conceptual framework of the clinic's intensive care articulates elements characteristic of the dynamics of this scenario: objective elements regarding technology and attention to equipment and subjective elements related to human interaction, specific of nursing care, countering criticism based on dehumanization. PMID:26487133

  1. Expectations outpace reality: physicians' use of care management tools for patients with chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Emily; Reschovsky, James

    2009-12-01

    Use of care management tools--such as group visits or patient registries--varies widely among primary care physicians whose practices care for patients with four common chronic conditions--asthma, diabetes, congestive heart failure and depression--according to a new national study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). For example, less than a third of these primary care physicians in 2008 reported their practices use nurse managers to coordinate care, and only four in 10 were in practices using registries to keep track of patients with chronic conditions. Physicians also used care management tools for patients with some chronic conditions but not others. Practice size and setting were strongly related to the likelihood that physicians used care management tools, with solo and smaller group practices least likely to use care management tools. The findings suggest that, along with experimenting with financial incentives for primary care physicians to adopt care management tools, policy makers might consider developing community-level care management resources, such as nurse managers, that could be shared among smaller physician practices.

  2. Development and psychometric testing of the clinical networks engagement tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Kent G.; Rabatach, Leora; Noseworthy, Tom W.; White, Deborah E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinical networks are being used widely to facilitate large system transformation in healthcare, by engagement of stakeholders throughout the health system. However, there are no available instruments that measure engagement in these networks. Methods The study purpose was to develop and assess the measurement properties of a multiprofessional tool to measure engagement in clinical network initiatives. Based on components of the International Association of Public Participation Spectrum and expert panel review, we developed 40 items for testing. The draft instrument was distributed to 1,668 network stakeholders across different governance levels (leaders, members, support, frontline stakeholders) in 9 strategic clinical networks in Alberta (January to July 2014). With data from 424 completed surveys (25.4% response rate), descriptive statistics, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, Pearson correlations, linear regression, multivariate analysis, and Cronbach alpha were conducted to assess reliability and validity of the scores. Results Sixteen items were retained in the instrument. Exploratory factor analysis indicated a four-factor solution and accounted for 85.7% of the total variance in engagement with clinical network initiatives: global engagement, inform (provided with information), involve (worked together to address concerns), and empower (given final decision-making authority). All subscales demonstrated acceptable reliability (Cronbach alpha 0.87 to 0.99). Both the confirmatory factor analysis and regression analysis confirmed that inform, involve, and empower were all significant predictors of global engagement, with involve as the strongest predictor. Leaders had higher mean scores than frontline stakeholders, while members and support staff did not differ in mean scores. Conclusions This study provided foundational evidence for the use of this tool for assessing engagement in clinical networks. Further work is necessary to evaluate

  3. Clinical guidelines, clinical pathways and protocols of care

    OpenAIRE

    Angélica Román

    2012-01-01

    The article points out that the importance of standardization of clinical practices has been established in clinical management, which helps solve the problems of variability by developing documents based on the available scientific evidence. The article claims that healthcare culture has increasingly recognized the importance of standardization of clinical practices and provides a conceptual difference between clinical practice guidelines, protocols and algorithms. Clinical pathways and clin...

  4. A Clinic Model: Post-Intensive Care Syndrome and Post-Intensive Care Syndrome-Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Elizabeth L; Bloom, Sarah L; Stollings, Joanna L; Camp, Mildred; Sevin, Carla M; Jackson, James C

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients surviving critical illness in the United States has increased with advancements in medicine. Post-intensive care syndrome and post-intensive care syndrome-family are terms developed by the Society of Critical Care Medicine in order to address the cognitive, psychological, and physical sequelae emerging in patients and their families after discharge from the intensive care unit. In the United Kingdom and Europe, intensive care unit follow-up clinics have been used to address the complications of post-intensive care syndrome for some time. However, the interprofessional clinic at Vanderbilt University Medical Center is among the first in the United States to address the wide variety of problems experienced by intensive care survivors and to provide patients and their families with care after discharge from the intensive care unit.

  5. Challenges and promises for translating computational tools into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Woo-Young; Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2016-10-01

    Computational modeling and associated methods have greatly advanced our understanding of cognition and neurobiology underlying complex behaviors and psychiatric conditions. Yet, no computational methods have been successfully translated into clinical settings. This review discusses three major methodological and practical challenges (A. precise characterization of latent neurocognitive processes, B. developing optimal assays, C. developing large-scale longitudinal studies and generating predictions from multi-modal data) and potential promises and tools that have been developed in various fields including mathematical psychology, computational neuroscience, computer science, and statistics. We conclude by highlighting a strong need to communicate and collaborate across multiple disciplines.

  6. Personal Digital Assistants as Point-of-Care Tools in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, Syeda S.; Wang, Jia; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Roos, Bernard A.

    2009-01-01

    This study used both survey and interview questionnaires. It was designed to assess the feasibility, usability, and utility of two point-of-care tools especially prepared with information relevant for dementia care by staff nurses in a small, a medium-sized, and a large nursing home in Florida. Twenty-five LPN or RN nurses were recruited for the…

  7. Developing a Multidisciplinary Team for Disorders of Sex Development: Planning, Implementation, and Operation Tools for Care Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Elizabeth Moran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of patients with disorders of sex development (DSD, multidisciplinary teams (MDTs represent a new standard of care. While DSDs are too complex for care to be delivered effectively without specialized team management, these conditions are often considered to be too rare for their medical management to be a hospital priority. Many specialists involved in DSD care want to create a clinic or team, but there is no available guidance that bridges the gap between a group of like-minded DSD providers who want to improve care and the formation of a functional MDT. This is an important dilemma, and one with serious implications for the future of DSD care. If a network of multidisciplinary DSD teams is to be a reality, those directly involved in DSD care must be given the necessary program planning and team implementation tools. This paper offers a protocol and set of tools to meet this need. We present a 6-step process to team formation, and a sample set of tools that can be used to guide, develop, and evaluate a team throughout the course of its operation.

  8. Developing a multidisciplinary team for disorders of sex development: planning, implementation, and operation tools for care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Mary Elizabeth; Karkazis, Katrina

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of patients with disorders of sex development (DSD), multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) represent a new standard of care. While DSDs are too complex for care to be delivered effectively without specialized team management, these conditions are often considered to be too rare for their medical management to be a hospital priority. Many specialists involved in DSD care want to create a clinic or team, but there is no available guidance that bridges the gap between a group of like-minded DSD providers who want to improve care and the formation of a functional MDT. This is an important dilemma, and one with serious implications for the future of DSD care. If a network of multidisciplinary DSD teams is to be a reality, those directly involved in DSD care must be given the necessary program planning and team implementation tools. This paper offers a protocol and set of tools to meet this need. We present a 6-step process to team formation, and a sample set of tools that can be used to guide, develop, and evaluate a team throughout the course of its operation.

  9. Critical care clinical trials: getting off the roller coaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Andrew J

    2012-09-01

    Optimizing care in the ICU is an important goal. The heightened severity of illness in patients who are critically ill combined with the tremendous costs of critical care make the ICU an ideal target for improvement in outcomes and efficiency. Incorporation of evidence-based medicine into everyday practice is one method to optimize care; however, intensivists have struggled to define optimal practices because clinical trials in the ICU have yielded conflicting results. This article reviews examples where such conflicts have occurred and explores possible causes of these discrepant data as well as strategies to better use critical care clinical trials in the future.

  10. Structural Vulnerability: Operationalizing the Concept to Address Health Disparities in Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgois, Philippe; Holmes, Seth M; Sue, Kim; Quesada, James

    2017-03-01

    The authors propose reinvigorating and extending the traditional social history beyond its narrow range of risk behaviors to enable clinicians to address negative health outcomes imposed by social determinants of health. In this Perspective, they outline a novel, practical medical vulnerability assessment questionnaire that operationalizes for clinical practice the social science concept of "structural vulnerability." A structural vulnerability assessment tool designed to highlight the pathways through which specific local hierarchies and broader sets of power relationships exacerbate individual patients' health problems is presented to help clinicians identify patients likely to benefit from additional multidisciplinary health and social services. To illustrate how the tool could be implemented in time- and resource-limited settings (e.g., emergency department), the authors contrast two cases of structurally vulnerable patients with differing outcomes. Operationalizing structural vulnerability in clinical practice and introducing it in medical education can help health care practitioners think more clearly, critically, and practically about the ways social structures make people sick. Use of the assessment tool could promote "structural competency," a potential new medical education priority, to improve understanding of how social conditions and practical logistics undermine the capacities of patients to access health care, adhere to treatment, and modify lifestyles successfully. Adoption of a structural vulnerability framework in health care could also justify the mobilization of resources inside and outside clinical settings to improve a patient's immediate access to care and long-term health outcomes. Ultimately, the concept may orient health care providers toward policy leadership to reduce health disparities and foster health equity.

  11. [Clinical case: Complicated grief in primary care. Care plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruymán Brito-Brito, Pedro; Rodríguez-Ramos, Mercedes; Pérez-García-Talavera, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    This is the case of a 61-year-old patient woman that visits her nurse in Primary Health Care to get the control of blood pressure and glycemia. In the last two years has suffered the loss of her husband and of two brothers beside having lived through other vital stressful events that have taken her to a situation of complicated grief. The care plan is realized using the M. Gordon assessment system and standardized languages NANDA, NOC and NIC. The principal aims were the improvement of the depression level and the improvement in the affliction resolution. As suggested interventions were proposed to facilitate the grief and the derivation to a mental health unit. A follow-up of the patient was realized in nursing consultation at Primary health care to weekly intervals, in the beginning, and monthly, later. The evaluation of the care plan reflects an improvement in the criteria of Prigerson's complicated grief; an increase of the recreative activities; the retreat of the mourning that still she was guarding; as well as an improvement in the control of the blood pressure numbers. The attention of nurses before a case of complicated grief turns out to be complex. Nevertheless the suitable accomplishment of certain interventions orientated to facilitating the grief, with a follow-up in consultation, shows the efficiency. The difficulty in the boarding of the psychosocial problems meets increased at the moment of are necessary the nursing diagnostics adapted for every individual case. The work in group between nurses could improves the consensus.

  12. Criteria for clinical audit of women friendly care and providers' perception in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Broek Nynke

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are two dimensions of quality of maternity care, namely quality of health outcomes and quality as perceived by clients. The feasibility of using clinical audit to assess and improve the quality of maternity care as perceived by women was studied in Malawi. Objective We sought to (a establish standards for women friendly care and (b explore attitudinal barriers which could impede the proper implementation of clinical audit. Methods We used evidence from Malawi national guidelines and World Health Organisation manuals to establish local standards for women friendly care in three districts. We equally conducted a survey of health care providers to explore their attitudes towards criterion based audit. Results The standards addressed different aspects of care given to women in maternity units, namely (i reception, (ii attitudes towards women, (iii respect for culture, (iv respect for women, (v waiting time, (vi enabling environment, (vii provision of information, (viii individualised care, (ix provision of skilled attendance at birth and emergency obstetric care, (x confidentiality, and (xi proper management of patient information. The health providers in Malawi generally held a favourable attitude towards clinical audit: 100.0% (54/54 agreed that criterion based audit will improve the quality of care and 92.6% believed that clinical audit is a good educational tool. However, there are concerns that criterion based audit would create a feeling of blame among providers (35.2%, and that manager would use clinical audit to identify and punish providers who fail to meet standards (27.8%. Conclusion Developing standards of maternity care that are acceptable to, and valued by, women requires consideration of both the research evidence and cultural values. Clinical audit is acceptable to health professionals in Malawi although there are concerns about its negative implications to the providers.

  13. The application of design principles to innovate clinical care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Michael D; Duncan, Alan K; Armbruster, Ryan R; Montori, Victor M; Feyereisn, Wayne L; LaRusso, Nicholas F

    2009-01-01

    Clinical research centers that support hypothesis-driven investigation have long been a feature of academic medical centers but facilities in which clinical care delivery can be systematically assessed and evaluated have heretofore been nonexistent. The Institute of Medicine report "Crossing the Quality Chasm" identified six core attributes of an ideal care delivery system that in turn relied heavily on system redesign. Although manufacturing and service industries have leveraged modern design principles in new product development, healthcare has lagged behind. In this article, we describe a methodology utilized by our facility to study the clinical care delivery system that incorporates modern design principles.

  14. SERVQUAL: a tool for evaluating patient satisfaction with nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardina, S A

    1994-01-01

    Rising health care costs and competition among hospital facilities have resulted in the need to recognize patient satisfaction as an important indicator of quality care. Nurses provide the primary service to patients; therefore, their role is influential in overall satisfaction. Several instruments have been developed to measure patient satisfaction with nursing care; however, most of them focus only on patient perceptions. One such approach to evaluating patient satisfaction with nursing care involves an instrument, SERVQUAL, derived from a marketing service perspective. Adapting SERVQUAL for use in evaluating nursing care is the focus of this article. SERVQUAL assesses both patient perceptions and expectations of quality service and permits managers and clinicians to view the gaps between the two; thus, the overall areas of improvement in nursing services can be determined.

  15. Psychiatric home care: a new tool for crisis intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, A H

    1994-03-01

    The cost of psychiatric care has been rapidly increasing in recent years. Between 1984 and 1987, there was a 46 percent increase in psychiatric hospitals beds and a 60 percent increase in psychiatric units in general hospitals. This reflected a recognition by many health care systems that psychiatric patients were a good source of revenue. With this push toward more and more inpatient programs, crucial aspects of psychiatric care were left behind. Specifically, the limitations of inpatient therapy have not been recognized. Within the past five years, a new program has been developed and pioneered to use home care to prevent psychiatric hospitalizations and to also prevent the difficult transitions for psychiatric patients. Over a two-year period, this program was studied for its impact on the quality and cost of psychiatric care.

  16. Enhanced clinical pharmacy service targeting tools: risk-predictive algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hajji, Feras W D; Scullin, Claire; Scott, Michael G; McElnay, James C

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the value of using a mix of clinical pharmacy data and routine hospital admission spell data in the development of predictive algorithms. Exploration of risk factors in hospitalized patients, together with the targeting strategies devised, will enable the prioritization of clinical pharmacy services to optimize patient outcomes. Predictive algorithms were developed using a number of detailed steps using a 75% sample of integrated medicines management (IMM) patients, and validated using the remaining 25%. IMM patients receive targeted clinical pharmacy input throughout their hospital stay. The algorithms were applied to the validation sample, and predicted risk probability was generated for each patient from the coefficients. Risk threshold for the algorithms were determined by identifying the cut-off points of risk scores at which the algorithm would have the highest discriminative performance. Clinical pharmacy staffing levels were obtained from the pharmacy department staffing database. Numbers of previous emergency admissions and admission medicines together with age-adjusted co-morbidity and diuretic receipt formed a 12-month post-discharge and/or readmission risk algorithm. Age-adjusted co-morbidity proved to be the best index to predict mortality. Increased numbers of clinical pharmacy staff at ward level was correlated with a reduction in risk-adjusted mortality index (RAMI). Algorithms created were valid in predicting risk of in-hospital and post-discharge mortality and risk of hospital readmission 3, 6 and 12 months post-discharge. The provision of ward-based clinical pharmacy services is a key component to reducing RAMI and enabling the full benefits of pharmacy input to patient care to be realized. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Communicating Nursing Care Using the Health Level Seven Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 Care Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matney, Susan A; Dolin, Gay; Buhl, Lindy; Sheide, Amy

    2016-03-01

    A care plan provides a patient, family, or community picture and outlines the care to be provided. The Health Level Seven Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture (C-CDA) Release 2 Care Plan Document is used to structure care plan data when sharing the care plan between systems and/or settings. The American Nurses Association has recommended the use of two terminologies, Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) for assessments and outcomes and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) for problems, procedures (interventions), outcomes, and observation findings within the C-CDA. This article describes C-CDA, introduces LOINC and SNOMED CT, discusses how the C-CDA Care Plan aligns with the nursing process, and illustrates how nursing care data can be structured and encoded within a C-CDA Care Plan.

  18. A Mobile Clinical Decision Support Tool for Pediatric Cardiovascular Risk-Reduction Clinical Practice Guidelines: Development and Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Widespread application of research findings to improve patient outcomes remains inadequate, and failure to routinely translate research findings into daily clinical practice is a major barrier for the implementation of any evidence-based guideline. Strategies to increase guideline uptake in primary care pediatric practices and to facilitate adherence to recommendations are required. Objective Our objective was to operationalize the US National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents into a mobile clinical decision support (CDS) system for healthcare providers, and to describe the process development and outcomes. Methods To overcome the difficulty of translating clinical practice guidelines into a computable form that can be used by a CDS system, we used a multilayer framework to convert the evidence synthesis into executable knowledge. We used an iterative process of design, testing, and revision through each step in the translation of the guidelines for use in a CDS tool to support the development of 4 validated modules: an integrated risk assessment; a blood pressure calculator; a body mass index calculator; and a lipid management instrument. Results The iterative revision process identified several opportunities to improve the CDS tool. Operationalizing the integrated guideline identified numerous areas in which the guideline was vague or incorrect and required more explicit operationalization. Iterative revisions led to workable solutions to problems and understanding of the limitations of the tool. Conclusions The process and experiences described provide a model for other mobile CDS systems that translate written clinical practice guidelines into actionable, real-time clinical recommendations. PMID:28270384

  19. The use of a family history risk assessment tool within a community health care system: views of primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Carol A; Powell, Karen Potter; Hahn, Susan Estabrooks; Blanton, Susan H; Bogacik, Jessica; Henrich, Vincent C

    2012-10-01

    Primary care providers (PCPs) offered input regarding the incorporation of a family health history (FHH) risk assessment tool into a community health care system (CHCS). Sixteen PCPs participated in one of three focus groups. Perceived impediments included the lack of standard screening guidelines, effective screening tests, genetic counseling resources, and services for high-risk patients. The PCPs were concerned about their level of expertise, the cost of preventive health care, and genetic discrimination. They also were concerned about the use of a FHH tool by oncologists within the CHCS because of communication gaps between oncologists and PCPs, lack of clarity regarding follow-up and legal liability, and reimbursement issues. To integrate a FHH tool into a CHCS, PCPs will need consultation and referral services, evidence-based recommendations, and "just-in-time" educational resources. Oncologists who use the tool will need to develop a streamlined communication system with PCPs, establish clearly defined roles, and ensure patient follow-up.

  20. Economic evaluation as a decision-making tool in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araja D.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available For the assessment of the health care system efficiency result-oriented indicators should be exploited much more actively as without specific indicators oriented to the evaluation of the patient’s health outcomes it is impossible to acquire reasonable evidence for the effectiveness of the functioning of the health care system that has the decisive role for further decisions in the age of the evidence-based medicine. The main groups of the treatment results’ indicators are clinical, economic and patient-reported outcomes (PROs, and all these groups of outcomes should be considered to make the most objective economic evaluation. This research has been determined to investigate applying of PROs as a relatively new tool in evaluation of the health care in Latvia. The results of the scientific publications review show that the positive trend in using of the PROs in Latvia is observed, but the involvement of patients in treatment’ process assessment is not enough active yet. The relevant problems and possible suggestions for improvement of this process are discussed in the article.

  1. Effect of crew resource management on diabetes care and patient outcomes in an inner-city primary care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cathy R; Hepworth, Joseph T; Buerhaus, Peter I; Dittus, Robert; Speroff, Theodore

    2007-08-01

    Diabetes care in our inner-city primary care clinic was suboptimal, despite provider education and performance feedback targeting improved adherence to evidence-based clinical guidelines. A crew resource management (CRM) intervention (communication and teamwork, process and workflow organisation, and standardised information debriefings) was implemented to improve diabetes care and patient outcomes. To assess the effect of the CRM intervention on adherence to evidence-based diabetes care standards, work processes, standardised clinical communication and patient outcomes. Time-series analysis was used to assess the effect on the delivery of standard diabetes services and patient outcomes among medically indigent adults (n = 619). The CRM principles were translated into useful process redesign and standardised care approaches. Significant improvements in microalbumin testing and associated patient outcome measures were attributed to the intervention. The CRM approach provided tools for management that, in the short term, enabled reorganisation and prevention of service omissions and, in the long term, can produce change in the organisational culture for continuous improvement.

  2. Effect of crew resource management on diabetes care and patient outcomes in an inner‐city primary care clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cathy R; Hepworth, Joseph T; Buerhaus, Peter I; Dittus, Robert; Speroff, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Background Diabetes care in our inner‐city primary care clinic was suboptimal, despite provider education and performance feedback targeting improved adherence to evidence‐based clinical guidelines. A crew resource management (CRM) intervention (communication and teamwork, process and workflow organisation, and standardised information debriefings) was implemented to improve diabetes care and patient outcomes. Objective To assess the effect of the CRM intervention on adherence to evidence‐based diabetes care standards, work processes, standardised clinical communication and patient outcomes. Methods Time‐series analysis was used to assess the effect on the delivery of standard diabetes services and patient outcomes among medically indigent adults (n = 619). Results The CRM principles were translated into useful process redesign and standardised care approaches. Significant improvements in microalbumin testing and associated patient outcome measures were attributed to the intervention. Conclusions The CRM approach provided tools for management that, in the short term, enabled reorganisation and prevention of service omissions and, in the long term, can produce change in the organisational culture for continuous improvement. PMID:17693668

  3. Clinical decision support tools: analysis of online drug information databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seamon Matthew J

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Online drug information databases are used to assist in enhancing clinical decision support. However, the choice of which online database to consult, purchase or subscribe to is likely made based on subjective elements such as history of use, familiarity, or availability during professional training. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical decision support tools for drug information by systematically comparing the most commonly used online drug information databases. Methods Five commercially available and two freely available online drug information databases were evaluated according to scope (presence or absence of answer, completeness (the comprehensiveness of the answers, and ease of use. Additionally, a composite score integrating all three criteria was utilized. Fifteen weighted categories comprised of 158 questions were used to conduct the analysis. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square were used to summarize the evaluation components and make comparisons between databases. Scheffe's multiple comparison procedure was used to determine statistically different scope and completeness scores. The composite score was subjected to sensitivity analysis to investigate the effect of the choice of percentages for scope and completeness. Results The rankings for the databases from highest to lowest, based on composite scores were Clinical Pharmacology, Micromedex, Lexi-Comp Online, Facts & Comparisons 4.0, Epocrates Online Premium, RxList.com, and Epocrates Online Free. Differences in scope produced three statistical groupings with Group 1 (best performers being: Clinical Pharmacology, Micromedex, Facts & Comparisons 4.0, Lexi-Comp Online, Group 2: Epocrates Premium and RxList.com and Group 3: Epocrates Free (p Conclusion Online drug information databases, which belong to clinical decision support, vary in their ability to answer questions across a range of categories.

  4. Health profiles of foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ab Rahman, Norazida; Sivasampu, Sheamini; Mohamad Noh, Kamaliah; Khoo, Ee Ming

    2016-01-01

    .... Little is known about the health profiles of foreign population in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed description of the health problems presented by foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia...

  5. Embedded performance validity testing in neuropsychological assessment: Potential clinical tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickards, Tyler A; Cranston, Christopher C; Touradji, Pegah; Bechtold, Kathleen T

    2017-01-31

    The article aims to suggest clinically-useful tools in neuropsychological assessment for efficient use of embedded measures of performance validity. To accomplish this, we integrated available validity-related and statistical research from the literature, consensus statements, and survey-based data from practicing neuropsychologists. We provide recommendations for use of 1) Cutoffs for embedded performance validity tests including Reliable Digit Span, California Verbal Learning Test (Second Edition) Forced Choice Recognition, Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test Combination Score, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test Failure to Maintain Set, and the Finger Tapping Test; 2) Selecting number of performance validity measures to administer in an assessment; and 3) Hypothetical clinical decision-making models for use of performance validity testing in a neuropsychological assessment collectively considering behavior, patient reporting, and data indicating invalid or noncredible performance. Performance validity testing helps inform the clinician about an individual's general approach to tasks: response to failure, task engagement and persistence, compliance with task demands. Data-driven clinical suggestions provide a resource to clinicians and to instigate conversation within the field to make more uniform, testable decisions to further the discussion, and guide future research in this area.

  6. Validation of Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire: A New Tool to Study Nurse Practitioner Practice Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Chaplin, William F; Shaffer, Jonathan A

    2017-04-01

    Favorable organizational climate in primary care settings is necessary to expand the nurse practitioner (NP) workforce and promote their practice. Only one NP-specific tool, the Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire (NP-PCOCQ), measures NP organizational climate. We confirmed NP-PCOCQ's factor structure and established its predictive validity. A crosssectional survey design was used to collect data from 314 NPs in Massachusetts in 2012. Confirmatory factor analysis and regression models were used. The 4-factor model characterized NP-PCOCQ. The NP-PCOCQ score predicted job satisfaction (beta = .36; p organizational climate in their clinics. Further testing of NP-PCOCQ is needed.

  7. Is the presence of a validated malnutrition screening tool associated with better nutritional care in hospitalized patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglseer, Doris; Halfens, Ruud J G; Lohrmann, Christa

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the association between the use of clinical guidelines and the use of validated screening tools, evaluate the nutritional screening policy in hospitals, and examine the association between the use of validated screening tools and the prevalence of malnutrition and nutritional interventions in hospitalized patients. This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study. Data were collected using a standardized questionnaire on three levels: institution (presence of a guideline for malnutrition), department (use of a validated screening tool), and patient (e.g., malnutrition prevalence). In all, 53 hospitals with 5255 patients participated. About 45% of the hospitals indicated that they have guidelines for malnutrition. Of the departments surveyed, 38.6% used validated screening tools as part of a standard procedure. The nutritional status of 74.5% of the patients was screened during admission, mostly on the basis of clinical observation and patient weight. A validated screening tool was used for 21.2% of the patients. Significant differences between wards with and without validated screening tools were found with regard to malnutrition prevalence (P = 0.002) and the following interventions: referral to a dietitian (P malnutrition screening tools is associated with better nutritional care and lower malnutrition prevalence rates in hospitalized patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Qualitative Research in Palliative Care: Applications to Clinical Trials Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Christopher T; Tadmor, Avia; Fujisawa, Daisuke; MacDonald, James J; Gallagher, Emily R; Eusebio, Justin; Jackson, Vicki A; Temel, Jennifer S; Greer, Joseph A; Hagan, Teresa; Park, Elyse R

    2017-08-01

    While vast opportunities for using qualitative methods exist within palliative care research, few studies provide practical advice for researchers and clinicians as a roadmap to identify and utilize such opportunities. To provide palliative care clinicians and researchers descriptions of qualitative methodology applied to innovative research questions relative to palliative care research and define basic concepts in qualitative research. Body: We describe three qualitative projects as exemplars to describe major concepts in qualitative analysis of early palliative care: (1) a descriptive analysis of clinician documentation in the electronic health record, (2) a thematic content analysis of palliative care clinician focus groups, and (3) a framework analysis of audio-recorded encounters between patients and clinicians as part of a clinical trial. This study provides a foundation for undertaking qualitative research within palliative care and serves as a framework for use by other palliative care researchers interested in qualitative methodologies.

  9. Evaluation of the Newton Pen-Pad as a tool for collecting clinical research data at the bed-side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, A M; Delisle, E; Champagne, S; Théroux, P

    1996-01-01

    A protocol for the study of practice variation between Quebec Intensive Care Units in the treatment of myocardial infarction by thrombolysis was coded into the Newton Pen-Pad. This tool for the direct recording of clinical data was tested in the working environment by research nurses of 4 different teaching hospitals. Data was sent directly from the pen-pad by telecommunication to the information coordinating center. The results of this evaluation confirm the reliability and robustness of this approach which promises to be an important tool for applied clinical research.

  10. 20. Integrating Cannabis Into Clinical Care

    OpenAIRE

    Abrams, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Focus Areas: Integrative Approaches to Care, Mental Health, Alleviating Pain Cannabis is now available to patients as a medicine in 18 states and the District of Columbia. Unfortunately, due to the long-standing prohibition, most providers have little information regarding the medicinal use of this versatile botanical. The history of cannabis as medicine will be reviewed. This presentation will summarize the main components of the plant and their pharmacologic effects, highlighting the entour...

  11. Memory Complaints Associated with Seeking Clinical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Pires

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment relies on the presence of memory complaints. However, memory complaints are very frequent in healthy people. The objective of this study was to determine the severity and type of memory difficulties presented by elderly patients who seek for clinical help, as compared to the memory difficulties reported by subjects in the community. Assessment of subjective memory complaints was done with the subjective memory complaints scale (SMC. The mini-mental state examination was used for general cognitive evaluation and the geriatric depression scale for the assessment of depressive symptoms. Eight-hundred and seventy-one nondemented subjects older than 50 years were included. Participants in the clinical setting had a higher total SMC score (10.3±4.2 than those in the community (5.1±3.0. Item 3 of the SMC, Do you ever forget names of family members or friends? contributed significantly more to the variance of the total SMC score in the clinical sample (18% as compared to the community sample (11%. Forgetting names of family members or friends plays an important role in subjective memory complaints in the clinical setting. This symptom is possibly perceived as particularly worrisome and likely drives people to seek for clinical help.

  12. Assessment of Measurement Tools of Observation Rate of Nursing Handover Standards in Clinical Wards of Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadi Amini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives : In health centers, clinical information of patient is transferred among care staffs regularly. One of the common cases in information transferring is during the time of nurses’ handover in hospital which performing it correctly will help schedule patient care, providing safety and facilitating exact transferring of information. The aim of this study is investigating validity and reliability of assessment of observance rate of shift handover in clinical wards checklist. Material and Methods : In order to determine the reliability of checklist, two experts panel meetings were held with the presence of 10 experts in clinical field that in those meetings the reliability was investigated with discussion and consensus of participants. Checklist validity was investigated through pilot study in 4 wards of 4 hospitals and calculated by Kronbach- alpha method with 28 cases of shifts handover in morning, noon, and night shift. Results : In studying reliability, the primary checklist was divided into two checklists: patient handover, equipments and ward handover that included 27 and 72 items, respectively. The reliability of patient handover checklist was verified with 0.9155 Kronbach-alpha and that of equipments and ward handover was verified with 0.8779 Kronbach-alpha. Conclusion : Verifying checklists by mentioned scientific and statistical methods showed that these are very powerful instruments that can be used as one of the assessment tools of shift handover in clinical wards to be used towards promoting received services by customers of healthcare system.

  13. A review of analytics and clinical informatics in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpao, Allan F; Ahumada, Luis M; Gálvez, Jorge A; Rehman, Mohamed A

    2014-04-01

    Federal investment in health information technology has incentivized the adoption of electronic health record systems by physicians and health care organizations; the result has been a massive rise in the collection of patient data in electronic form (i.e. "Big Data"). Health care systems have leveraged Big Data for quality and performance improvements using analytics-the systematic use of data combined with quantitative as well as qualitative analysis to make decisions. Analytics have been utilized in various aspects of health care including predictive risk assessment, clinical decision support, home health monitoring, finance, and resource allocation. Visual analytics is one example of an analytics technique with an array of health care and research applications that are well described in the literature. The proliferation of Big Data and analytics in health care has spawned a growing demand for clinical informatics professionals who can bridge the gap between the medical and information sciences.

  14. Teaching the Tools of Pharmaceutical Care Decision-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Brian E.

    1994-01-01

    A method of decision-analysis in pharmaceutical care that integrates epidemiology and economics is presented, including an example illustrating both the deceptive nature of medical decision making and the power of decision analysis. Principles in determining both general and specific probabilities of interest and use of decision trees for…

  15. Pharmaceutical care in surgical patients: Tools for measurement and intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, M.

    2015-01-01

    Assessing and improving the quality of pharmaceutical care is a major issue in hospitals nowadays. Medication safety strategies are being developed and widely introduced in hospitals to reduce medication-related harm. Surgical patients are at risk for medication-related harm, also called adverse

  16. Development of a clinically applicable tool for bone density assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Oral Imaging Center, Faculty of Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); St John' s Hospital, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Genk (Belgium); Dobbelaer, B. de; Suetens, P. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Medical Image Computing (PSI), Faculty of Engineering, Leuven (Belgium); Nackaerts, O.; Yan, B.; Jacobs, R. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Oral Imaging Center, Faculty of Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Loubele, M. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Oral Imaging Center, Faculty of Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Medical Image Computing (PSI), Faculty of Engineering, Leuven (Belgium); Politis, C.; Vrielinck, L. [St John' s Hospital, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Genk (Belgium); Schepers, S. [St John' s Hospital, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Genk (Belgium); University of Gent, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Gent (Belgium); Lambrichts, I. [University of Hasselt, Department of Morphology, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Horner, K.; Devlin, H. [University of Manchester, School of Dentistry, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    To assess the accuracy and reliability of new software for radiodensitometric evaluations. A densitometric tool developed by MevisLab {sup registered} was used in conjunction with intraoral radiographs of the premolar region in both in vivo and laboratory settings. An aluminum step wedge was utilized for comparison of grey values. After computer-aided segmentation, the interproximal bone between the premolars was assessed in order to determine the mean grey value intensity of this region and convert it to a thickness in aluminum. Evaluation of the tool was determined using bone mineral density (BMD) values derived from decalcified human bone specimens as a reference standard. In vivo BMD data was collected from 35 patients as determined with dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The intra and interobserver reliability of this method was assessed by Bland and Altman Plots to determine the precision of this tool. In the laboratory study, the threshold value for detection of bone loss was 6.5%. The densitometric data (mm Al eq.) was highly correlated with the jaw bone BMD, as determined using dual X-ray absorptiometry (r=0.96). For the in vivo study, the correlations between the mm Al equivalent of the average upper and lower jaw with the lumbar spine BMD, total hip BMD and femoral neck BMD were 0.489, 0.537 and 0.467, respectively (P<0.05). For the intraobserver reliability, a Bland and Altman plot showed that the mean difference {+-}1.96 SD were within {+-}0.15 mm Al eq. with the mean difference value small than 0.003 mm Al eq. For the interobserver reliability, the mean difference {+-}1.96 SD were within {+-}0.11 mm Al eq. with the mean difference of 0.008 mm Al eq. A densitometric software tool has been developed, that is reliable for bone density assessment. It now requires further investigation to evaluate its accuracy and clinical applicability in large scale studies. (orig.)

  17. Teaching About Health Care Disparities in the Clinical Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Leonor; Irby, David M.; Harleman, Elizabeth; Fernandez, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    Clinical teachers often observe interactions that may contribute to health care disparities, yet may hesitate to teach about them. A pedagogical model could help faculty structure teaching about health care disparities in the clinical setting, but to our knowledge, none have been adapted for this purpose. In this paper, we adapt an established model, Time-Effective Strategies for Teaching (TEST), to the teaching of health care disparities. We use several case scenarios to illustrate the core components of the model: diagnose the learner, teach rapidly to the learner’s need, and provide feedback. The TEST model is straightforward, easy to use, and enables the incorporation of teaching about health care disparities into routine clinical teaching. PMID:20352501

  18. Memory complaints associated with seeking clinical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pires, C.; Silva, D.; Maroco, J.; Ginó, S.; Mendes, T.; Schmand, B.A.; Guerreiro, M.; de Mendonça, A.

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment relies on the presence of memory complaints. However, memory complaints are very frequent in healthy people. The objective of this study was to determine the severity and type of memory difficulties presented by elderly patients who seek for clinical help, as c

  19. Clinical Decision Support in Pediatric Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Roukema (Jolt)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe overall aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate and optimize the diagnostic process of (febrile) children presenting to the hospital emergency department (ed), and to study aspects of this process as a base for clinical decision support systems. We discussed

  20. Family meetings in palliative care: Multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Hanlon Brendan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Support for family carers is a core function of palliative care. Family meetings are commonly recommended as a useful way for health care professionals to convey information, discuss goals of care and plan care strategies with patients and family carers. Yet it seems there is insufficient research to demonstrate the utlility of family meetings or the best way to conduct them. This study sought to develop multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines for conducting family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting based on available evidence and consensus based expert opinion. Methods The guidelines were developed via the following methods: (1 A literature review; (2 Conceptual framework; (3 Refinement of the guidelines based on feedback from an expert panel and focus groups with multidisciplinary specialists from three palliative care units and three major teaching hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Results The literature review revealed that no comprehensive exploration of the conduct and utility of family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting has occurred. Preliminary clinical guidelines were developed by the research team, based on relevant literature and a conceptual framework informed by: single session therapy, principles of therapeutic communication and models of coping and family consultation. A multidisciplinary expert panel refined the content of the guidelines and the applicability of the guidelines was then assessed via two focus groups of multidisciplinary palliative care specialists. The complete version of the guidelines is presented. Conclusion Family meetings provide an opportunity to enhance the quality of care provided to palliative care patients and their family carers. The clinical guidelines developed from this study offer a framework for preparing, conducting and evaluating family meetings. Future research and clinical implications are outlined.

  1. Clinical decision support tools for osteoporosis disease management: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Monika; Straus, Sharon E

    2008-12-01

    Studies indicate a gap between evidence and clinical practice in osteoporosis management. Tools that facilitate clinical decision making at the point of care are promising strategies for closing these practice gaps. To systematically review the literature to identify and describe the effectiveness of tools that support clinical decision making in osteoporosis disease management. Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and EBM Reviews (CDSR, DARE, CCTR, and ACP J Club), and contact with experts in the field. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in any language from 1966 to July 2006 investigating disease management interventions in patients at risk for osteoporosis. Outcomes included fractures and bone mineral density (BMD) testing. Two investigators independently assessed articles for relevance and study quality, and extracted data using standardized forms. Of 1,246 citations that were screened for relevance, 13 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Reported study quality was generally poor. Meta-analysis was not done because of methodological and clinical heterogeneity; 77% of studies included a reminder or education as a component of their intervention. Three studies of reminders plus education targeted to physicians and patients showed increased BMD testing (RR range 1.43 to 8.67) and osteoporosis medication use (RR range 1.60 to 8.67). A physician reminder plus a patient risk assessment strategy found reduced fractures [RR 0.58, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37 to 0.90] and increased osteoporosis therapy (RR 2.44, CI 1.43 to 4.17). Multi-component tools that are targeted to physicians and patients may be effective for supporting clinical decision making in osteoporosis disease management.

  2. The contribution of undergraduate palliative care education: does it influence the clinical patient's care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Carlos; Rodríguez-Núñez, Alfredo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this 2-year systematic review is to understand how learner assessment and curriculum evaluation of education in palliative care is being undertaken and to examine whether current undergraduate education influences the clinical patient's care. Almost half of the 30 studies reviewed used a qualitative approach to evaluate learning experiences. Only three of them were controlled studies and a further one was a cohort study.When students openly express themselves, they agree that there is 'something' deep as regards the core or the essence of medical practice or nursing. They feel that they become better professionals and better prepared for the patients, not only in terms of end of life care, but also as regards care, irrespective of the phase of the disease.The inclusion of palliative care in undergraduate education is a way of providing knowledge, skill, and competences about palliative care (especially communication) and also improving attitudes toward caring in advanced disease and at the end of life. Different methods of experiential learning, even brief experiences, which bring students into close contact with palliative care clinical cases or patients, are providing better results. From research studies, there is only indirect evidence that palliative care training at university leads to better clinical care of patients. In the future, long-term cohort or controlled studies might answer that question.

  3. [Impact of Lean methodology to improve care processes and levels of satisfaction in patient care in a clinical laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morón-Castañeda, L H; Useche-Bernal, A; Morales-Reyes, O L; Mojica-Figueroa, I L; Palacios-Carlos, A; Ardila-Gómez, C E; Parra-Ardila, M V; Martínez-Nieto, O; Sarmiento-Echeverri, N; Rodríguez, C A; Alvarado-Heine, C; Isaza-Ruget, M A

    2015-01-01

    The application of the Lean methodology in health institutions is an effective tool to improve the capacity and workflow, as well as to increase the level of satisfaction of patients and employees. To optimise the time of outpatient care in a clinical laboratory, by implementing a methodology based on the organisation of operational procedures to improve user satisfaction and reduce the number of complaints for delays in care. A quasi-experimental before and after study was conducted between October 2011 to September 2012. XBar and S charts were used to observe the mean service times and standard deviation. The user satisfaction was assessed using service questionnaires. A reduction of 17 minutes was observed in the time of patient care from arrival to leaving the laboratory, and a decrease of 60% in complaints of delay in care. Despite the high staff turnover and 38% increase in the number of patients seen, a culture of empowerment and continuous improvement was acquired, as well as greater efficiency and productivity in the care process, which was reflected by maintaining standards 12 months after implementation. Lean is a viable methodology for clinical laboratory procedures, improving their efficiency and effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Care paths as a tool for integration and change

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Planelles, Mª Concepción; Jover, Roberto Jorge; Ruíz Palomar, José Manuel; Calvo, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic diseases are currently a significant health problem, conditioning the patient into a progressive deterioration and gradual autonomy loss.The study focuses on the organization of health service systems , in order to achieve a better preventive control and management of chronic disease treatment.Our route, incorporates risk stratification, considering the natural course of Diabetes Mellitus, Primary Care’s prominence, the cooperation between health care areas and support f...

  5. Integration of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Betty R; Temel, Jennifer S; Temin, Sarah; Alesi, Erin R; Balboni, Tracy A; Basch, Ethan M; Firn, Janice I; Paice, Judith A; Peppercorn, Jeffrey M; Phillips, Tanyanika; Stovall, Ellen L; Zimmermann, Camilla; Smith, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based recommendations to oncology clinicians, patients, family and friend caregivers, and palliative care specialists to update the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) provisional clinical opinion (PCO) on the integration of palliative care into standard oncology care for all patients diagnosed with cancer. Methods ASCO convened an Expert Panel of members of the ASCO Ad Hoc Palliative Care Expert Panel to develop an update. The 2012 PCO was based on a review of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) by the National Cancer Institute Physicians Data Query and additional trials. The panel conducted an updated systematic review seeking randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, as well as secondary analyses of RCTs in the 2012 PCO, published from March 2010 to January 2016. Results The guideline update reflects changes in evidence since the previous guideline. Nine RCTs, one quasiexperimental trial, and five secondary analyses from RCTs in the 2012 PCO on providing palliative care services to patients with cancer and/or their caregivers, including family caregivers, were found to inform the update. Recommendations Inpatients and outpatients with advanced cancer should receive dedicated palliative care services, early in the disease course, concurrent with active treatment. Referral of patients to interdisciplinary palliative care teams is optimal, and services may complement existing programs. Providers may refer family and friend caregivers of patients with early or advanced cancer to palliative care services.

  6. Rural nurse specialists: clinical practice and the politics of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    2008-01-01

    Doctor flight from rural areas is an international phenomenon that places great pressure on primary health care delivery. In New Zealand, the response to these empty doctors' surgeries has been the introduction of nurse-led rural health clinics that have attracted controversy both in the media and from urban-based doctors over whether such nurse-led care is a direct substitution of medical care. This article analyzes the reflections of nurses working in some of these clinics who suggest that their situation is more complex than a direct substitution of labor. Although the nurses indicate some significant pressures moving them closer to the work of doctoring, they actively police this cross-boundary work and labor simultaneously to shore up their nursing identities. My own conclusions support their assertions. I argue that it is the maintenance of a holistic professional habitus that best secures their professional identity as nurses while they undertake the cross-boundary tasks of primary rural health care. There are clear professional benefits and disadvantages for the nurses in these situations, which make the positions highly politicized. These recurring divisions of labor within medical care giving and the elaboration of new types of care worker form an appropriate although neglected topic of study for anthropologists. The study of the social organization of clinical medicine is much enriched by paying closer attention to its interaction with allied health professions and their associated understandings of "good" care.

  7. The normativity of clinical health care: perspectives on moral realism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nortvedt, Per

    2012-06-01

    The paper argues that a particular version of moral realism constitutes an important basis for ethics in medicine and health care. Moral realism is the position that moral value is a part of the fabric of relational and interpersonal reality. But even though moral values are subject to human interpretations, they are not themselves the sole product of these interpretations. Moral values are not invented but discovered by the subject. Moral realism argues that values are open to perception and experience and that moral subjectivity must be portrayed in how moral values are discovered and perceived by the human subject. Moral values may exist independent of the particular subject's interpretative evaluations as a part of reality. This epistemological point about normativity is particularly significant in medical care and in health care. The clinician perceives moral value in the clinical encounter in a way that is important for competent clinical understanding. Clinical understanding in medical care and health care bears on the encounter with moral values in the direct and embodied relations to patients, with their experiences of illness and their vulnerabilities. Good clinical care is then partly conditioned upon adequate understanding of such moral realities.

  8. Clinical audit system as a quality improvement tool in the management of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Chellappa; Maroju, Nanda Kishore; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Reddy, K Satyanarayana

    2016-11-01

    Quality improvement is recognized as a major factor that can transform healthcare management. This study is a clinical audit that aims at analysing treatment time as a quality indicator and explores the role of setting a target treatment time on reducing treatment delays. All newly diagnosed patients with breast cancer between September 2011 and August 2013 were included in the study. Clinical care pathway for breast cancer patients was standardized and the timeliness of care at each step of the pathway was calculated. Data collection was spread over three phases, baseline, audit cycle I, and audit cycle II. Each cycle was preceded by a quality improvement intervention, and followed by analysis. A total of 334 patients with breast cancer were included in the audit. The overall time from first visit to initiation of treatment was 66.3 days during the baseline period. This improved to 40.4 and 28.5 days at the end of Audit cycle I and II, respectively. The idealized target time of 28 days for initiating treatment was achieved in 5, 23.5, and 65.2% of patients in the baseline period, Audit cycle I, and Audit Cycle II, respectively. There was improvement noted across all steps of the clinical care pathway. This study confirms that audit is a powerful tool in quality improvement programs and helps achieve timely care. Gains achieved through an audit process may not be sustainable unless underlying patient factors and resource deficits are addressed. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Point-of-care testing in UK primary care : a survey to establish clinical needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, Philip J.; Van den Bruel, Ann; Jones, Caroline H. D.; Pluddemann, Annette; Heneghan, Carl; Thompson, Matthew J.; Price, Christopher P.; Howick, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Background. A number of point-of-care diagnostic tests are commercially available in the UK, however, not much is known regarding GPs’ desire for these tests or the clinical areas of interest. Objective. We sought to establish for which conditions point-of-care tests (POCTs) would be most helpful to

  10. Improving Diabetes Care in the Military Primary Care Clinic: Case Study Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-23

    required application of innovative and creative strategies to improve self- management . The cases are representative of some common themes within the patient with type 2 diabetes in a military primary care clinic....enabled patients to engage in self- management . Moreover, this study seeks to better understand how applying the ADA Standards of Care in a military

  11. Student specialty plans, clinical decision making, and health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert L; Romney, Crystal; Kano, Miria; Wright, Randy; Skipper, Betty; Getrich, Christina; Susman, Andrew L; Zyzanski, Stephen J

    2014-05-01

    Health care reform aims to increase evidence-based, cost-conscious, and patient-centered care. Family medicine is seen as central to these aims in part due to evidence of lower cost and comparable quality care compared with other specialties. We sought evidence that senior medical students planning family medicine residency differ from peers entering other fields in decision-making patterns relevant to these health care reform aims. We conducted a national, anonymous, internet-based survey of senior medical students. Students chose one of two equivalent management options for a set of patient vignettes based on preventive care, medication selection, or initial chronic disease management scenarios, representing in turn evidence-based care, cost-conscious care, and patient-centered care. We examined differences in student recommendations, comparing those planning to enter family medicine with all others using bivariate and weighted, multilevel, multivariable analyses. Among 4,656 surveys received from seniors at 84 participating medical schools, students entering family medicine were significantly more likely to recommend patient management options that were more cost conscious and more patient centered. We did not find a significant difference between the student groups in recommendations for evidence-based care vignettes. This study provides preliminary evidence suggesting that students planning to enter family medicine may already have clinical decision-making patterns that support health care reform goals to a greater extent than their peers. If confirmed by additional studies, this could have implications for medical school admission and training processes.

  12. Tools for primary care management of inflammatory bowel disease: do they exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Alice L; Munkholm, Pia; Andrews, Jane M

    2015-04-21

    Healthcare systems throughout the world continue to face emerging challenges associated with chronic disease management. Due to the likely increase in chronic conditions in the future it is now vital that cooperation and support between specialists, generalists and primary health care physicians is conducted. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one such chronic disease. Despite specialist care being essential, much IBD care could and probably should be delivered in primary care with continued collaboration between all stakeholders. Whilst most primary care physicians only have few patients currently affected by IBD in their caseload, the proportion of patients with IBD-related healthcare issues cared for in the primary care setting appears to be widespread. Data suggests however, that primary care physician's IBD knowledge and comfort in management is suboptimal. Current treatment guidelines for IBD are helpful but they are not designed for the primary care setting. Few non-expert IBD management tools or guidelines exist compared with those used for other chronic diseases such as asthma and scant data have been published regarding the usefulness of such tools including IBD action plans and associated supportive literature. The purpose of this review is to investigate what non-specialist tools, action plans or guidelines for IBD are published in readily searchable medical literature and compare these to those which exist for other chronic conditions.

  13. The Development and Validation of a Rapid Assessment Tool of Primary Care in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Mei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. With Chinese health care reform increasingly emphasizing the importance of primary care, the need for a tool to evaluate primary care performance and service delivery is clear. This study presents a methodology for a rapid assessment of primary care organizations and service delivery in China. Methods. The study translated and adapted the Primary Care Assessment Tool-Adult Edition (PCAT-AE into a Chinese version to measure core dimensions of primary care, namely, first contact, continuity, comprehensiveness, and coordination. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess the validity and reliability of the Chinese Rapid Primary Care Assessment Tool (CR-PCAT. Eight community health centers in Guangdong province have been selected to participate in the survey. Results. A total of 1465 effective samples were included for data analysis. Eight items were eliminated following principal component analysis and reliability testing. The principal component analysis extracted five multiple-item scales (first contact utilization, first contact accessibility, ongoing care, comprehensiveness, and coordination. The tests of scaling assumptions were basically met. Conclusion. The standard psychometric evaluation indicates that the scales have achieved relatively good reliability and validity. The CR-PCAT provides a rapid and reliable measure of four core dimensions of primary care, which could be applied in various scenarios.

  14. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, D I

    2016-03-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects.

  15. Development and psychometric testing of a tool to measure missed nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Williams, Reg Arthur

    2009-05-01

    In a qualitative study, medical-surgical and intensive care staff nurses reported that they did not complete a significant amount of nursing care on regular basis. Thus, it was determined that a quantitative tool was needed to measure the amount and type of missed nursing care and the reasons for missing care. The authors report the results of a psychometric evaluation of this tool (The Missed Nursing Care Survey [MISSCARE Survey]) to measure missed nursing care (part A) and the reasons for missed nursing care (part B). Two studies were conducted--study 1 (n = 459) and study 2 (n = 639). A sample of staff nurses was drawn from 35 medical-surgical, rehabilitation, and intensive care patient units in 4 acute care hospitals. Acceptability was high, with 85% of the respondents answering all items on the survey. Factor analysis with Varimax rotation resulted in a 3-factor solution for part 2 (communication, labor resources, and material resources). Cronbach alpha values ranged from 0.64 to 0.86. Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated a good fit of the data. Using a contrasting group approach, a comparison of nurse's perceptions of missed care on intensive care units versus rehabilitation units resulted, as hypothesized, in a significantly lower amount of missed care on intensive care units. Pearson correlation coefficient on a test-retest of the same subjects yielded a value of 0.87 on part A and 0.86 on part B. Although further validation of the MISSCARE Survey is needed, current evidence demonstrates that the tool meets stringent psychometric standards.

  16. Advancing LGBT Health Care Policies and Clinical Care Within a Large Academic Health Care System: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben, Mollie A; Shipherd, Jillian C; Topor, David; AhnAllen, Christopher G; Sloan, Colleen A; Walton, Heather M; Matza, Alexis R; Trezza, Glenn R

    2017-01-01

    Culturally competent health care is especially important among sexual and gender minority patients because poor cultural competence contributes to health disparities. There is a need to understand how to improve health care quality and delivery for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) veterans in particular, because they have unique physical and mental health needs as both LGBT individuals and veterans. The following article is a case study that focuses on the policy and clinical care practices related to LGBT clinical competency, professional training, and ethical provision of care for veteran patients in the VA Boston Healthcare System. We apply Betancourt et al.'s (2003) cultural competence framework to outline the steps that VA Boston Healthcare System took to increase cultural competency at the organizational, structural, and clinical level. By sharing our experiences, we aim to provide a model and steps for other health care systems and programs, including other VA health care systems, large academic health care systems, community health care systems, and mental health care systems, interested in developing LGBT health initiatives.

  17. Development of a clinical data warehouse from an intensive care clinical information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mul, Marleen; Alons, Peter; van der Velde, Peter; Konings, Ilse; Bakker, Jan; Hazelzet, Jan

    2012-01-01

    There are relatively few institutions that have developed clinical data warehouses, containing patient data from the point of care. Because of the various care practices, data types and definitions, and the perceived incompleteness of clinical information systems, the development of a clinical data warehouse is a challenge. In order to deal with managerial and clinical information needs, as well as educational and research aims that are important in the setting of a university hospital, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands, developed a data warehouse incrementally. In this paper we report on the in-house development of an integral part of the data warehouse specifically for the intensive care units (ICU-DWH). It was modeled using Atos Origin Metadata Frame method. The paper describes the methodology, the development process and the content of the ICU-DWH, and discusses the need for (clinical) data warehouses in intensive care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Quality assessment of randomized clinical trial in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Giulliano Peixoto; Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; Barbosa, Luciano Timbó; Duarte, José Lira

    2009-03-01

    A randomized clinical trial is a prospective study that compares the effect and value of interventions in human beings, of one or more groups vs. a control group. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of published randomized clinical trials in Intensive care in Brazil. All randomized clinical trials in intensive care found by manual search in Revista Brasileira de Terapia Intensiva from January 2001 to March 2008 were assessed to evaluate their description by the quality scale. Descriptive statistics and a 95 % confidence interval were used for the primary outcome. Our primary outcome was the randomized clinical trial quality. Our search found 185 original articles, of which 14 were randomized clinical trials. Only one original article (7.1%) showed good quality. There was no statistical significance between the collected data and the data shown in the hypothesis of this search. It can be concluded that in the sample of assessed articles 7% of the randomized clinical trials in intensive care published in a single intensive care journal in Brazil, present good methodological quality.

  19. [Clinical bioethics for primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-de Paz, L

    2013-01-01

    The clinical decision making process with ethical implications in the area of primary healthcare differs from other healthcare areas. From the ethical perspective it is important to include these issues in the decision making model. This dissertation explains the need for a process of bioethical deliberation for Primary Healthcare, as well as proposing a method for doing so. The decision process method, adapted to this healthcare area, is flexible and requires a more participative Healthcare System. This proposal involves professionals and the patient population equally, is intended to facilitate the acquisition of responsibility for personal and community health. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical pharmacology profile of care in Hepatology clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Rocha Passos

    Full Text Available Summary Since 2010, the Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology Division of the Central Institute of Hospital das Clínicas of the University of São Paulo Medical School (HC-FMUSP, in the Portuguese acronym has been developing specialized electives assistance activities in the Outpatient Specialty Clinic, Secondary Level, in São Paulo NGA-63 Várzea do Carmo. The objective of this study was to analyze the pharmacotherapeutic profile of patients. This is a cross-sectional and retrospective study in which patients were seen at the Hepatology sector and the results were submitted to descriptive statistics. During the study period, 492 patients were treated at the clinic, with a mean age of 58.9 years and frequency of 61.2% female and 74.8% living in São Paulo. This population was served by various other medical specialties (cardiology and endocrine among others and the major liver diagnoses were: chronic hepatitis B and C and fatty liver. Comorbidities were also identified, such as diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Most patients took their medication in the Basic Health Units. We found that 30% of patients use of more than five medications and the most prescribed were omeprazole 208 (42.3%, metformin 132 (26.8% and losartan 80 (16.3%. Because it is an adult/elderly population, with several comorbidities and polymedication, it is important to be aware of the rational use of medication. The multidisciplinary team is important in applying correct conducts for the safe use of medicines, to reduce the burden on health spending and improving the quality of life of patients.

  1. Evidence Based Dental Care: Integrating Clinical Expertise with Systematic Research

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Clinical dentistry is becoming increasingly complex and our patients more knowledgeable. Evidence-based care is now regarded as the “gold standard” in health care delivery worldwide. The basis of evidence based dentistry is the published reports of research projects. They are, brought together and analyzed systematically in meta analysis, the source for evidence based decisions. Activities in the field of evidence-based dentistry has increased tremendously in the 21st century, more and more p...

  2. The Brøset Violence Checklist: clinical utility in a secure psychiatric intensive care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, D E; Brown, A-M; Griffith, P

    2010-09-01

    Violence towards health-care workers, especially in areas such as mental health/psychiatry, has become increasingly common, with nursing staff suggesting that a fear of violence from their patients may affect the quality of care they provide. Structured clinical tools have the potential to assist health-care providers in identifying patients who have the potential to become violent or aggressive. The Brøset Violence Checklist (BVC), a six-item instrument that uses the presence or absence of three patient characteristics and three patient behaviours to predict the potential for violence within a subsequent 24-h period, was trialled for 3 months on an 11-bed secure psychiatric intensive care unit. Despite the belief on the part of some nurses that decisions related to risk for violence and aggression rely heavily on intuition, there was widespread acceptance of the tool. During the trial, use of seclusion decreased suggesting that staff were able to intervene before seclusion was necessary. The tool has since been implemented as a routine part of patient care on two units in a 92-bed psychiatric centre. Five-year follow-up data and implications for practice are presented.

  3. Fundamentals of randomized clinical trials in wound care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskes, Anne M; Brölmann, Fleur E; Sumpio, Bauer E;

    2012-01-01

    The care for chronic and acute wounds is a substantial problem around the world. This has led to a plethora of products to accelerate healing. Unfortunately, the quality of studies evaluating the efficacy of such wound care products is frequently low. Randomized clinical trials are universally...... acknowledged as the study design of choice for comparing treatment effects, as they eliminate several sources of bias. We propose a framework for the design and conduct of future randomized clinical trials that will offer strong scientific evidence for the effectiveness of wound care interventions. While...... randomization is a necessary feature of a robust comparative study, it is not sufficient to ensure a study at low risk of bias. Randomized clinical trials should also ensure adequate allocation concealment and blinding of outcome assessors, apply intention-to-treat analysis, and use patient-oriented outcomes...

  4. Physician experiences with clinical pharmacists in primary care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Gerardo; Lonowski, Sarah; Fu, Jeffrey; Chon, Janet S; Whitmire, Natalie; Vasquez, Carolina; Skootsky, Samuel A; Bell, Douglas S; Maranon, Richard; Mangione, Carol M

    2017-08-12

    Improving medication management is an important component of comprehensive care coordination for health systems. The Managing Your Medication for Education and Daily Support (MyMeds) medication management program at the University of California Los Angeles addresses medication management issues by embedding trained clinical pharmacists in primary care practice teams. The aim of this work was to examine and explore physician opinions about the clinical pharmacist program and identify common themes among physician experiences as well as barriers to integration of clinical pharmacists into primary care practice teams. We conducted a mixed quantitative-qualitative methods study consisting of a cross-sectional physician survey (n = 69) as well as semistructured one-on-one physician interviews (n = 13). Descriptive statistics were used to summarize survey responses, and standard qualitative content-analysis methods were used to identify major themes from the interviews. The survey response rate was 61%; 13 interviews were conducted. Ninety percent of survey respondents agreed or strongly agreed that having the pharmacist in the office makes management of the patient's medication more efficient, 93% agreed or strongly agreed that pharmacist recommendations are clinically helpful, 71% agreed or strongly agreed that having access to a pharmacist has increased their knowledge about medications they prescribe, and 75% agreed or strongly agreed that having a pharmacist as part of the primary care team has made their job easier. Qualitative interviews corroborated survey findings, and physicians highlighted the value of the clinical pharmacist's communication, team care and expanded roles, and medication management. Primary care physicians valued the integrated pharmacy program highly, particularly its features of strong communication, expanded roles, and medication management. Pharmacists were viewed as integral members of the health care team. Copyright © 2017 American

  5. A Prospective Validation Study of a Rainbow Model of Integrated Care Measurement Tool in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milawaty Nurjono

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The conceptual ambiguity of the integrated care concept precludes a full understanding of what constitutes a well-integrated health system, posing a significant challenge in measuring the level of integrated care. Most available measures have been developed from a disease-specific perspective and only measure certain aspects of integrated care. Based on the Rainbow Model of Integrated Care, which provides a detailed description of the complex concept of integrated care, a measurement tool has been developed to assess integrated care within a care system as a whole gathered from healthcare providers’ and managerial perspectives. This paper describes the methodology of a study seeking to validate the Rainbow Model of Integrated Care measurement tool within and across the Singapore Regional Health System. The Singapore Regional Health System is a recent national strategy developed to provide a better-integrated health system to deliver seamless and person-focused care to patients through a network of providers within a specified geographical region. Methods: The validation process includes the assessment of the content of the measure and its psychometric properties. Conclusion: If the measure is deemed to be valid, the study will provide the first opportunity to measure integrated care within Singapore Regional Health System with the results allowing insights in making recommendations for improving the Regional Health System and supporting international comparison.

  6. Care pathways models and clinical outcomes in Disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattin, Davide; Morganti, Laura; De Torres, Laura; Dolce, Giuliano; Arcuri, Francesco; Estraneo, Anna; Cardinale, Viviana; Piperno, Roberto; Zavatta, Elena; Formisano, Rita; D'Ippolito, Mariagrazia; Vassallo, Claudio; Dessi, Barbara; Lamberti, Gianfranco; Antoniono, Elena; Lanzillotti, Crocifissa; Navarro, Jorge; Bramanti, Placido; Corallo, Francesco; Zampolini, Mauro; Scarponi, Federico; Avesani, Renato; Salvi, Luca; Ferro, Salvatore; Mazza, Luigi; Fogar, Paolo; Feller, Sandro; De Nigris, Fulvio; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Buffoni, Mara; Pessina, Adriano; Corsico, Paolo; Leonardi, Matilde

    2017-08-01

    Patients with Disorders of consciousness, are persons with extremely low functioning levels and represent a challenge for health care systems due to their high needs of facilitating environmental factors. Despite a common Italian health care pathway for these patients, no studies have analyzed information on how each region have implemented it in its welfare system correlating data with patients' clinical outcomes. A multicenter observational pilot study was realized. Clinicians collected data on the care pathways of patients with Disorder of consciousness by asking 90 patients' caregivers to complete an ad hoc questionnaire through a structured phone interview. Questionnaire consisted of three sections: sociodemographic data, description of the care pathway done by the patient, and caregiver evaluation of health services and information received. Seventy-three patients were analyzed. Length of hospital stay was different across the health care models and it was associated with improvement in clinical diagnosis. In long-term care units, the diagnosis at admission and the number of caregivers available for each patient (median value = 3) showed an indirect relationship with worsening probability in clinical outcome. Caregivers reported that communication with professionals (42%) and the answer to the need of information were the most critical points in the acute phase, whereas presence of Non-Governmental Organizations (25%) and availability of psychologists for caregivers (21%) were often missing during long-term care. The 65% of caregivers reported they did not know the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. This study highlights relevant differences in analyzed models, despite a recommended national pathway of care. Future public health considerations and actions are needed to guarantee equity and standardization of the care process in all European countries.

  7. Leaders, leadership and future primary care clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Nadeem

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A strong and self confident primary care workforce can deliver the highest quality care and outcomes equitably and cost effectively. To meet the increasing demands being made of it, primary care needs its own thriving research culture and knowledge base. Methods Review of recent developments supporting primary care clinical research. Results Primary care research has benefited from a small group of passionate leaders and significant investment in recent decades in some countries. Emerging from this has been innovation in research design and focus, although less is known of the effect on research output. Conclusion Primary care research is now well placed to lead a broad re-vitalisation of academic medicine, answering questions of relevance to practitioners, patients, communities and Government. Key areas for future primary care research leaders to focus on include exposing undergraduates early to primary care research, integrating this early exposure with doctoral and postdoctoral research career support, further expanding cross disciplinary approaches, and developing useful measures of output for future primary care research investment.

  8. A survey of primary care resident attitudes toward continuity clinic patient handover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Kolade

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transfer of clinic patients from graduating residents to interns or junior residents occurs every year, affecting large numbers of patients. Breaches in care continuity may occur, with potential for risk to patient safety. Several guidelines have been developed for implementing standardized inpatient sign-outs, but no specific guidelines exist for outpatient handover. Methods: Residents in primary care programs – internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics – at a US academic medical center were invited to participate in an online survey. The invitation was extended approximately 2 years after electronic medical record (EMR rollout began at the institution. Results: Of 71 eligible residents, 22 (31% responded to the survey. Of these, 18 felt that handover of ambulatory patients was at least moderately important – but only one affirmed the existence of a system for handover. IM residents perceived that they had the highest proportion of high-risk patients (p=0.042; transition-of-care letters were more important to IM residents than other respondents (p=0.041. Conclusion: There is room for improvement in resident acknowledgement of handover processes in continuity clinics. In this study, IM residents attached greater importance to a specific handover tool than other primary care residents. Thus, the different primary care specialties may need to have different handover tools available to them within a shared EMR system.

  9. The feasibility and validity of care mapping in the clinical neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, Katie; Leigh, Andrew; Sheldrick, Russell; Surr, Claire; Hare, Dougal Julian

    2015-01-01

    Dementia Care Mapping (DCM) is an observational tool and process that is widely used in dementia care in measuring and improving person-centred care (PCC). DCM was previously piloted on a neurorehabilitation ward, where it was found to be feasible and acceptable in this setting. Following this, a new modified tool and accompanying manual were developed: Care Mapping - Neurorehabilitation (DCM-NR). The current study aimed to assess the feasibility and validity of DCM-NR by piloting its use in a range of clinical neuroscience settings. A mixed-methods design was used employing both quantitative and qualitative techniques. The new DCM-NR was found to be feasible for use both in terms of the suitability of its coding system and the implementation process. DCM-NR was shown to have a moderate level of concurrent validity with participants' self-report of PCC. Participants' subjective reports on their experiences of care provided validation for the areas of psychological need observed in DCM-NR. The results of this study indicate that DCM-NR is feasible and valid for use in a range of clinical neuroscience settings. Further longitudinal research is required to evaluate the impact of DCM-NR on PCC practices over time.

  10. Teaching and learning care--exploring nursing students' clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Heggen, Kristin M

    2010-01-01

    Care has always been a key element of nursing. This paper presents findings from research on the following issue: What opportunities and limitations do nursing students encounter when learning nursing care? The study has a qualitative design with field methodology and the study of documents. Six nursing students have been closely monitored during their clinical studies in hospitals, nursing homes and home-based nursing. The study shows that nursing students are likely to possess the potential to provide care for sick and unknown people. The motivation for their commitment to patients may contain an egoistical orientation and runs contrary to former ideals of the nurse's self-sacrificing altruism. Moreover the study shows that there is a potential in the clinical field and in the university college to reflective considerations on experience of care. While clinical practice often has focus on practical problem-solving and procedures, the college tends to focus on abstract theory. Both of these promote the privatisation and neglect of the students' experience of care. The paper concludes with a call for teaching and learning strategies targeting the use of nursing students' personal experience of care.

  11. Health care agreements as a tool for coordinating health and social services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Andreas; Strandberg-Larsen, Martin; Vrangbaek, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2007, a substantial reform changed the administrative boundaries of the Danish health care system and introduced health care agreements to be signed between municipal and regional authorities. To assess the health care agreements as a tool for coordinating health and social...... of general practitioners (n = 700/853). RESULTS: The health care agreements were considered more useful for coordinating care than the previous health plans. The power relationship between the regional and municipal authorities in drawing up the agreements was described as more equal. Familiarity...... with the agreements among general practitioners was higher, as was the perceived influence of the health care agreements on their work. DISCUSSION: Health care agreements with specific content and with regular follow-up and systematic mechanisms for organising feedback between collaborative partners exemplify...

  12. Care episode retrieval: distributional semantic models for information retrieval in the clinical domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Hans; Ginter, Filip; Marsi, Erwin; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Salakoski, Tapio; Salanterä, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    Patients' health related information is stored in electronic health records (EHRs) by health service providers. These records include sequential documentation of care episodes in the form of clinical notes. EHRs are used throughout the health care sector by professionals, administrators and patients, primarily for clinical purposes, but also for secondary purposes such as decision support and research. The vast amounts of information in EHR systems complicate information management and increase the risk of information overload. Therefore, clinicians and researchers need new tools to manage the information stored in the EHRs. A common use case is, given a--possibly unfinished--care episode, to retrieve the most similar care episodes among the records. This paper presents several methods for information retrieval, focusing on care episode retrieval, based on textual similarity, where similarity is measured through domain-specific modelling of the distributional semantics of words. Models include variants of random indexing and the semantic neural network model word2vec. Two novel methods are introduced that utilize the ICD-10 codes attached to care episodes to better induce domain-specificity in the semantic model. We report on experimental evaluation of care episode retrieval that circumvents the lack of human judgements regarding episode relevance. Results suggest that several of the methods proposed outperform a state-of-the art search engine (Lucene) on the retrieval task.

  13. Tracking the route to sustainability: a service evaluation tool for an advance care planning model developed for community palliative care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Jeanine; Street, Annette

    2012-08-01

    The study aim was to develop a service evaluation tool for an advance care planning model implemented in community palliative care. Internationally, advance care planning programmes usually measure success by completion rate of advance directives or plans. This outcome measure provides little information to assist nurse managers to embed advance care planning into usual care and measure their performance and quality over time. An evaluation tool was developed to address this need in Australian community palliative care services. Multisite action research approach. Three community palliative care services located in Victoria, Australia, participated. Qualitative and quantitative data collection strategies were used to develop the Advance Care Planning-Service Evaluation Tool. The Advance Care Planning-Service Evaluation Tool identified advance care planning progress over time across three stages of Establishment, Consolidation and Sustainability within previously established Model domains of governance, documentation, practice, education, quality improvement and community engagement. The tool was used by nurses either as a peer-assessment or self-assessment tool that assisted services to track their implementation progress as well as plan further change strategies. The Advance Care Planning-Service Evaluation Tool was useful to nurse managers in community palliative care. It provided a clear outline of service progress, level of achievement and provided clear direction for planning future changes. The Advance Care Planning-Service Evaluation Tool enables nurses in community palliative care to monitor, evaluate and plan quality improvement of their advance care planning model to improve end-of-life care. As the tool describes generic healthcare processes, there is potential transferability of the tool to other types of services. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Developing ambulatory care clinics: nurse practitioners as primary providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamper-Linden, C; Goetz-Kulas, J; Lake, R

    1983-12-01

    While hospitals evaluate ambulatory clinics as a revenue-generating service alternative, nursing executives develop new areas for nursing practice in nurse-managed clinics. The authors describe the five-year growth of a nurse-managed ambulatory clinic providing primary health care to those aged 55 and older. The discussion explains nurse practitioner leadership and practice, and accountability between professions. The concept and structure of services and marketing strategies are elated to the people served. Financial feasibility, cost containment, and other factors demonstrate the clinic's contribution to its sponsoring hospital.

  15. Sharing clinical information across care settings: the birth of an integrated assessment system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrard Jean-Claude

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population ageing, the emergence of chronic illness, and the shift away from institutional care challenge conventional approaches to assessment systems which traditionally are problem and setting specific. Methods From 2002, the interRAI research collaborative undertook development of a suite of assessment tools to support assessment and care planning of persons with chronic illness, frailty, disability, or mental health problems across care settings. The suite constitutes an early example of a "third generation" assessment system. Results The rationale and development strategy for the suite is described, together with a description of potential applications. To date, ten instruments comprise the suite, each comprising "core" items shared among the majority of instruments and "optional" items that are specific to particular care settings or situations. Conclusion This comprehensive suite offers the opportunity for integrated multi-domain assessment, enabling electronic clinical records, data transfer, ease of interpretation and streamlined training.

  16. Fundamentals of randomized clinical trials in wound care: reporting standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brölmann, Fleur E; Eskes, Anne M; Sumpio, Bauer E; Mayer, Dieter O; Moore, Zena; Agren, Magnus S; Hermans, Michel; Cutting, Keith; Legemate, Dink A; Vermeulen, Hester; Ubbink, Dirk T

    2013-01-01

    In wound care research, available high-level evidence according to the evidence pyramid is rare, and is threatened by a poor study design and reporting. Without comprehensive and transparent reporting, readers will not be able to assess the strengths and limitations of the research performed. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are universally acknowledged as the study design of choice for comparing treatment effects. To give high-level evidence the appreciation it deserves in wound care, we propose a step-by-step reporting standard for comprehensive and transparent reporting of RCTs in wound care. Critical reporting issues (e.g., wound care terminology, blinding, predefined outcome measures, and a priori sample size calculation) and wound-specific barriers (e.g., large diversity of etiologies and comorbidities of patients with wounds) that may prevent uniform implementation of reporting standards in wound care research are addressed in this article. The proposed reporting standards can be used as guidance for authors who write their RCT, as well as for peer reviewers of journals. Endorsement and application of these reporting standards may help achieve a higher standard of evidence and allow meta-analysis of reported wound care data. The ultimate goal is to help wound care professionals make better decisions for their patients in clinical practice.

  17. Clinical ethics and nursing: "yes" to caring, but "no" to a female ethics of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhse, Helga

    1995-07-01

    According to a contemporary school of thought there is a specific female approach to ethics which is based not on abstract "male" ethical principles or rules, but on "care". Nurses have taken a keen interest in these female approaches to ethics. Drawing on the views expounded by Carol Gilligan and Nel Noddings, nurses claim that a female "ethics of care" better captures their moral experiences than a traditional male "ethics of justice". This paper argues that "care" is best understood in a dispositional sense, that is, as sensitivity and responsiveness to the particularities of a situation and the needs of "concrete" others. While "care", in this sense, is necessary for ethics, it is not sufficient. Ethics needs "justice" as well as "care". If women and nurses excessively devalue principles and norms, they will be left without the theoretical tools to condemn some actions or practices, and to defend others. They will, like generations of nurses before them, be condemned to silence.

  18. The clinical conscientiousness index: a valid tool for exploring professionalism in the clinical undergraduate setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Martina; O'Flynn, Siun; McLachlan, John; Sawdon, Marina A

    2012-09-01

    The need to develop effective tools to measure professionalism continues to challenge medical educators; thus, as a follow-up to a recent examination of the "Conscientiousness Index" (CI, a novel measure of one facet of professionalism) in one setting with preclinical medical students, the authors aimed to investigate the validity of the CI as a proxy measure of professionalism in a different context and in the clinical phase of undergraduate medical education. In academic year 2009-2010, the authors collected data similar to those collected for the original preclinical study. In an effort to create a Clinical Conscientiousness Index (CCI) score, they collected the following information on 124 third-year medical students completing their clinical rotations: attendance, timeliness of assessment submissions, and completion of rotation evaluations. Then, they compared the resultant CCI scores with faculty views on professionalism and with formal assessments of students' professionalism (i.e., their portfolios and objective structured clinical examinations [OSCEs]). The authors demonstrate significant correlations between CCI scores and faculty views on professionalism (rS = 0.3; P = .001), and between CCI scores and OSCE score (rS = 0.237; P = .008), but not between CCI scores and portfolio assessment (rS = 0.084; P = .354). The authors also present relationships between CCI scores and demographics. The CCI is a practical, valid proxy measure of professionalism, achieving good correlation with faculty views on professionalism and clinical competency examinations, but not portfolio assessment, in one clinical undergraduate setting.

  19. Creating a system for performance improvement in cancer care: Cancer Care Ontario's clinical governance framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvalko, Katya M; Sherar, Michael; Sawka, Carol

    2009-10-01

    Good governance, clinician engagement, and clear accountabilities for achieving specific outcomes are crucial components for improving the quality of care at both an organizational and health system level. This article describes the benefits and results reported by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) in transforming from a direct provider of cancer services to an organization whose responsibilities include improving the quality of care across the province's cancer system. The significant challenges in establishing accountability in the absence of direct operational authority are discussed. Case examples illustrate how the structures and processes created through CCO's clinical governance framework achieved measurable improvements in cancer care outcomes. Challenges in establishing accountability were addressed through the creation of a clinical governance framework that integrated clinical accountability with administrative accountability in an ongoing performance improvement cycle. The performance improvement cycle includes four key steps: (1) the collection of system-level performance data and the development of quality indicators, (2) the synthesis of data, evidence, and expert opinion into clear clinical and organizational guidance, (3) knowledge transfer through a coordinated program of clinician engagement, and (4) a comprehensive system of performance management through the use of contractual agreements, financial incentives, and public reporting. CCO has succeeded in developing a clinical governance and performance improvement system that measures and improves access to care in the treatment phase of the care continuum. Future efforts will need to focus on expanding quality improvement initiatives to all phases of cancer care, measuring the appropriateness of care, and improving the measurement and management of the patient cancer care experience.

  20. Costing nursing care: using the clinical care classification system to value nursing intervention in an acute-care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Jacqueline; Saba, Virginia

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to combine an established methodology for coding nursing interventions and action types using the Clinical Care Classification System with a reliable formula (relative value units) to cost nursing services. Using a flat per-diem rate to cost nursing care greatly understates the actual costs and fails to address the high levels of variability within and across units. We observed nurses performing commonly executed nursing interventions and recorded these into an electronic database with corresponding Clinical Care Classification System codes. The duration of these observations was used to calculate intervention costs using relative value unit calculation formulas. The costs of the five most commonly executed interventions were nursing care coordination/manage-refer ($2.43), nursing status report/assess-monitor ($4.22), medication treatment/perform-direct ($6.33), physical examination/assess-monitor ($3.20), and universal precautions/perform-direct ($1.96). Future studies across a variety of nursing specialties and units are needed to validate the relative value unit for Clinical Care Classification System action types developed for use with the Clinical Care Classification System nursing interventions as a method to cost nursing care.

  1. Predicting cancer prognosis using interactive online tools: a systematic review and implications for cancer care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Borsika A; Gaglio, Bridget; Sanders, Tristan; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Dearing, James W; Bull, Sheana; Glasgow, Russell E; Marcus, Alfred

    2013-10-01

    Cancer prognosis is of keen interest for patients with cancer, their caregivers, and providers. Prognostic tools have been developed to guide patient-physician communication and decision-making. Given the proliferation of prognostic tools, it is timely to review existing online cancer prognostic tools and discuss implications for their use in clinical settings. Using a systematic approach, we searched the Internet, Medline, and consulted with experts to identify existing online prognostic tools. Each was reviewed for content and format. Twenty-two prognostic tools addressing 89 different cancers were identified. Tools primarily focused on prostate (n = 11), colorectal (n = 10), breast (n = 8), and melanoma (n = 6), although at least one tool was identified for most malignancies. The input variables for the tools included cancer characteristics (n = 22), patient characteristics (n = 18), and comorbidities (n = 9). Effect of therapy on prognosis was included in 15 tools. The most common predicted outcome was cancer-specific survival/mortality (n = 17). Only a few tools (n = 4) suggested patients as potential target users. A comprehensive repository of online prognostic tools was created to understand the state-of-the-art in prognostic tool availability and characteristics. Use of these tools may support communication and understanding about cancer prognosis. Dissemination, testing, refinement of existing, and development of new tools under different conditions are needed.

  2. Expanding acute care nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist education: invasive procedure training and human simulation in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hravnak, Marilyn; Tuite, Patricia; Baldisseri, Marie

    2005-01-01

    Programs educating advanced practice nurses (APNs), including acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) and clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) may struggle with the degree to which technical and cognitive skills necessary and unique to the care of critically ill patients should be incorporated within training programs, and the best ways these skills can be synthesized and retained for clinical practice. This article describes the critical care technical skills training mechanisms and use of a High-Fidelity Human Simulation (HFHS) Laboratory in the ACNP and CNS programs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. The mechanisms for teaching invasive procedures are reviewed including an abbreviated course syllabus and documentation tools. The use of HFHS is discussed as a measure to provide students with technical and cognitive preparation to manage critical incidents. The HFHS Laboratory, scenario development and implementation, and the debriefing process are discussed. Critical care technical skills training and the use of simulation in the curriculum have had a favorable response from students and preceptors at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, and have enhanced faculty's ability to prepare APNs.

  3. Evaluation of a clinical decision support tool for osteoporosis disease management: protocol for an interrupted time series design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Monika; Sawka, Anna; Thorpe, Kevin; Chignel, Mark; Marquez, Christine; Newton, David; Straus, Sharon E

    2011-07-22

    Osteoporosis affects over 200 million people worldwide at a high cost to healthcare systems. Although guidelines on assessing and managing osteoporosis are available, many patients are not receiving appropriate diagnostic testing or treatment. Findings from a systematic review of osteoporosis interventions, a series of mixed-methods studies, and advice from experts in osteoporosis and human-factors engineering were used collectively to develop a multicomponent tool (targeted to family physicians and patients at risk for osteoporosis) that may support clinical decision making in osteoporosis disease management at the point of care. A three-phased approach will be used to evaluate the osteoporosis tool. In phase 1, the tool will be implemented in three family practices. It will involve ensuring optimal functioning of the tool while minimizing disruption to usual practice. In phase 2, the tool will be pilot tested in a quasi-experimental interrupted time series (ITS) design to determine if it can improve osteoporosis disease management at the point of care. Phase 3 will involve conducting a qualitative postintervention follow-up study to better understand participants' experiences and perceived utility of the tool and readiness to adopt the tool at the point of care. The osteoporosis tool has the potential to make several contributions to the development and evaluation of complex, chronic disease interventions, such as the inclusion of an implementation strategy prior to conducting an evaluation study. Anticipated benefits of the tool may be to increase awareness for patients about osteoporosis and its associated risks and provide an opportunity to discuss a management plan with their physician, which may all facilitate patient self-management.

  4. Incorporating ethical principles into clinical research protocols: a tool for protocol writers and ethics committees

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Rebecca H.; Wacholtz, Mary C; Barnes, Mark; Boggs, Liam; Callery-D'Amico, Susan; Davis, Amy; Digilova, Alla; Forster, David; Heffernan, Kate; Luthin, Maeve; Lynch, Holly Fernandez; McNair, Lindsay; Miller, Jennifer E; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Van Campen, Luann

    2016-01-01

    A novel Protocol Ethics Tool Kit (‘Ethics Tool Kit’) has been developed by a multi-stakeholder group of the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard. The purpose of the Ethics Tool Kit is to facilitate effective recognition, consideration and deliberation of critical ethical issues in clinical trial protocols. The Ethics Tool Kit may be used by investigators and sponsors to develop a dedicated Ethics Section within a protocol to improve the consistency...

  5. Usability evaluation of a clinical decision support tool for osteoporosis disease management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton David

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoporosis affects over 200 million people worldwide at a high cost to healthcare systems. Although guidelines are available, patients are not receiving appropriate diagnostic testing or treatment. Findings from a systematic review of osteoporosis interventions and a series of focus groups were used to develop a functional multifaceted tool that can support clinical decision-making in osteoporosis disease management at the point of care. The objective of our study was to assess how well the prototype met functional goals and usability needs. Methods We conducted a usability study for each component of the tool--the Best Practice Recommendation Prompt (BestPROMPT, the Risk Assessment Questionnaire (RAQ, and the Customised Osteoporosis Education (COPE sheet--using the framework described by Kushniruk and Patel. All studies consisted of one-on-one sessions with a moderator using a standardised worksheet. Sessions were audio- and video-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis consisted of a combination of qualitative and quantitative analyses. Results In study 1, physicians liked that the BestPROMPT can provide customised recommendations based on risk factors identified from the RAQ. Barriers included lack of time to use the tool, the need to alter clinic workflow to enable point-of-care use, and that the tool may disrupt the real reason for the visit. In study 2, patients completed the RAQ in a mean of 6 minutes, 35 seconds. Of the 42 critical incidents, 60% were navigational and most occurred when the first nine participants were using the stylus pen; no critical incidents were observed with the last six participants that used the touch screen. Patients thought that the RAQ questions were easy to read and understand, but they found it difficult to initiate the questionnaire. Suggestions for improvement included improving aspects of the interface and navigation. The results of study 3 showed that most patients were able

  6. [Individualised care plan during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call Mañosa, S; Pujol Garcia, A; Chacón Jordan, E; Martí Hereu, L; Pérez Tejero, G; Gómez Simón, V; Estruga Asbert, A; Gallardo Herrera, L; Vaquer Araujo, S; de Haro López, C

    2016-01-01

    An individualised care plan is described for a woman diagnosed with pneumonia, intubated, and on invasive mechanical ventilation, who was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). A nursing care plan was designed based on Marjory Gordon functional patterns. The most important nursing diagnoses were prioritised, using a model of clinical reasoning model (Analysis of the current status) and NANDA taxonomy. A description is presented on, death anxiety, impaired gas exchange, decreased cardiac output, dysfunctional gastrointestinal motility, risk for disuse syndrome, infection risk, and bleeding risk. The principal objectives were: to reduce the fear of the family, achieve optimal respiratory and cardiovascular status, to maintain gastrointestinal function, to avoid immobility complications, and to reduce the risk of infection and bleeding. As regards activities performed: we gave family support; correct management of the mechanical ventilation airway, cardio-respiratory monitoring, skin and nutritional status; control of possible infections and bleeding (management of therapies, care of catheters…). A Likert's scale was used to evaluate the results, accomplishing all key performance indicators which were propose at the beginning. Individualised care plans with NNN taxonomy using the veno-venous ECMO have not been described. Other ECMO care plans have not used the same analysis model. This case can help nurses to take care of patients subjected to veno-venous ECMO treatment, although more cases are needed to standardise nursing care using NANDA taxonomy.

  7. Clinical Implications of Family-Centered Care in Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasy, Kerry Rae; Lutz, Barbara J; Young, Mary Ellen; Stacciarini, Jeanne-Marie R

    2015-01-01

    Most stroke survivors will be cared for at home by family caregivers with limited training. Families actively involved in rehabilitation feel more prepared for the new responsibilities of caring for the stroke survivor. The focus of this article is to highlight the relevant concepts of a family-centered model of care and provide general guidance on how integrating a family-centered mindset may be clinically applicable. Concept Analysis. Synthesis of literature on family-centered care and its application in for rehabilitation nurses. Family-centered care is a model of collaborative healthcare that encourages collaboration and partnership among patients, families, and providers with respect to the planning, delivery, and evaluation of health care. Care provided within such a model can expand providers' knowledge of the impact of illness and any issues that may affect eventual transition back home. Rehabilitation nurses should view stroke patients and family caregivers as a unit. Using family-centered strategies can help nurses provide appropriate, individualized care during rehabilitation. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  8. [Mini clinical evaluation exercise as evaluation tool of communicative and cooperative skills in the outpatient clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Simonsen, Dorit; Bastholt, Lars; Aspegren, Knut; Vinther, Claus; Kruse, Kirsten; Kodal, Troels

    2009-03-16

    In the revised Danish medical specialist training increased focus has been placed on competences which are hard to evaluate such as communication skills. Mini-CEX seems promising as an evaluation tool. Our aim was to test: 1) whether mini-CEX was useable in the evaluation of communicative and cooperative skills and 2) whether mini-CEX would provide reproducible data. Twenty-one residents were evaluated by mini-CEX by trained observers. Seventeen residents had at least two observations within a short period of time and these data were used to estimate the mini-CEX reproducibility. In addition to the residents, the nurses who assisted them in the outpatient clinic answered a questionnaire regarding the mini-CEX satisfaction. Observations had a median duration of 20 minutes (10-60 minutes) and the overall median duration of feedback was 15 minutes (5-60 minutes). Time used for feedback was halved from the first to the following feedback sessions. No significant clinical differences were observed between the scorings performed by the residents themselves and the observers, or the nurses of the outpatient clinic and the observers. In general, the residents were satisfied with the mini-CEX evaluations. The mini-CEX is a promising tool for the evaluation of communicative and cooperative skills.

  9. Care zoning. A pragmatic approach to enhance the understanding of clinical needs as it relates to clinical risks in acute in-patient unit settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kris; Guy, Stuart; Stewart, Linda; Ayling, Mark; Miller, Graham; Anthony, Anne; Bajuk, Anne; Brun, Jo Le; Shearer, Dianne; Gregory, Rebecca; Thomas, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The process of risk assessment which should inform and help identify clinical needs is often seen as a tick box and task-focussed approach. While on the surface this provides a sense of security that forms have been completed, we often fail to communicate in a meaningful manner about the clinical needs identified, which would assist in supporting the care planning delivery processes. A clinical practice improvement (CPI) project implemented a care zoning framework as an evidenced-based process that provides pragmatic support to nurses who are required to continually assess, implement, and evaluate plans to address clinical need across three acute mental health inpatient settings. Risk descriptors informed by the New South Wales (NSW) Mental Health Assessment & Outcome Tools (MHAOT) criteria were developed and described in behavioural contexts in order to improve the project's reliability and translation. A pragmatic traffic light tool was used to share clinical information across three agreed care zones, red (high clinical need), amber (medium clinical need), and green (low clinical need). Additionally nurses were asked to utilise a shift review form in the context of supporting the recording of care zoning and promoting action-orientated note writing. The introduction of care zoning has enthused the nursing teams and the mental health service to adopt care zoning as a supervisory framework that increases their capacity to communicate clinical needs, share information, and gain invaluable support from one another in addressing clinical needs. This includes increased opportunities for staff to feel supported in asking for assistance in understanding and addressing complex clinical presentations.

  10. Cerebellar disorders: clinical/radiologic findings and modern imaging tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Habas, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar disorders, also called cerebellar ataxias, comprise a large group of sporadic and genetic diseases. Their core clinical features include impaired control of coordination and gait, as well as cognitive/behavioral deficits usually not detectable by a standard neurologic examination and therefore often overlooked. Two forms of cognitive/behavioral syndromes are now well identified: (1) the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome, which combines an impairment of executive functions, including planning and working memory, deficits in visuospatial skills, linguistic deficiencies such as agrammatism, and inappropriate behavior; and (2) the posterior fossa syndrome, a very acute form of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome occurring essentially in children. Sporadic ataxias include stroke, toxic causes, immune ataxias, infectious/parainfectious ataxias, traumatic causes, neoplasias and paraneoplastic syndromes, endocrine disorders affecting the cerebellum, and the so-called "degenerative ataxias" (multiple system atrophy, and sporadic adult-onset ataxias). Genetic ataxias include mainly four groups of disorders: autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias, autosomal-dominant ataxias (spinocerebellar ataxias and episodic ataxias), mitochondrial disorders, and X-linked ataxias. In addition to biochemical studies and genetic tests, brain imaging techniques are a cornerstone for the diagnosis, clinicoanatomic correlations, and follow-up of cerebellar ataxias. Modern radiologic tools to assess cerebellar ataxias include: functional imaging studies, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, volumetric studies, and tractography. These complementary methods provide a multimodal appreciation of the whole long-range cerebellar network functioning, and allow the extraction of potential biomarkers for prognosis and rating level of recovery after treatment. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Simulation as an educational tool in acute nursing care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mona

    2016-01-01

    education consists of classroom lessons and clinical instruction, however learning acute nursing skills, use of simulation-based education may improve the students’ fundamental knowledge on acute nursing and increase self-efficacy. Furthermore, the students’ may experience the learning process more......1 Hospital of Southwest Jutland, Finsensgade 35, 6700 Esbjerg, Denmark 2 University College South Denmark, Degnevej 16, 6705 Esbjerg, Denmark 3 Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark /Centre Southwest Jutland, Finsensgade 35, 6700 Esbjerg, Denmark Objective: Nursing...... satisfying. The purpose of the study was to investigate if theory based lessons in combination with simulation-based lectures (FAM Camp) were superior to theory based lessons alone on above mentioned variables. Method: This was a controlled intervention study among nursing students at University College...

  12. Outcomes along the HIV care continuum among undocumented immigrants in clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jonathan; Felsen, Uriel R; Cunningham, Chinazo O; Patel, Viraj V; Hanna, David B

    2017-04-26

    HIV-infected undocumented immigrants face unique barriers to care yet little is known about their clinical outcomes. We performed a retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults in clinical care from 2006-2014 at a large academic medical center in a setting where medical insurance is available to HIV-infected undocumented immigrants. Undocumented status was assessed based on Social Security number and insurance status and verified through medical chart review. Using Poisson regression models, we compared undocumented and documented patients with respect to retention in care (≥ 2 HIV-related lab tests ≥ 90 days apart), antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription (≥ 3 active antiretroviral agents prescribed in a year) and viral suppression (HIV RNA undocumented. For each year of the analysis, higher proportions of undocumented patients were retained in care, prescribed ART and virally suppressed. In adjusted models, undocumented status was associated with increased probability of retention in care (risk ratio [RR] 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.09), ART prescription (RR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.08) and viral suppression (RR 1.13, 95% CI 1.08-1.19) compared to documented status. Undocumented patients achieved clinical outcomes at modestly higher rates than documented patients, despite entering care with more advanced disease. In a setting where insurance is available to undocumented patients, similar outcomes along the HIV care continuum may be achieved regardless of immigration status.

  13. From speckle tracking echocardiography to torsion: research tool today, clinical practice tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Stephen J; Orde, Sam

    2013-06-01

    Speckle tracking is the latest available technology in echocardiography. However, the technology is still mainly used as a research tool. The potential applications of speckle tracking are many, including cardiac synchronization, regional wall motion analysis, and in the areas of cardiac mechanic studies. This review presents the background theory of speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) and how this technology can be extended to velocity vector analysis, strain, and torsion measurements. The interpretations of these measurements are covered. We also present some potential applications in the critical care setting. Speckle tracking is almost always available in high-end ultrasound machines. The technology has been applied to velocity vector analysis, strain and strain rate measurements, and twist and torsion analysis. Torsion analysis and velocity vector analyses are impossible without using speckle tracking. Speckle tracking-derived strain is superior to tissue Doppler strain because it is angle-independent. A number of studies demonstrated that STE is useful in left and right heart assessments and can be used in assessing preload and afterload. Speckle tracking can be used to measure instantaneous myocardial contractility, strain, and left ventricular torsion. It is still a research tool at present, but shows the promise of being a clinical tool in the future.

  14. Computerized clinical documentation system in the pediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Deborah Y

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether a computerized clinical documentation system (CDS: 1 decreased time spent charting and increased time spent in patient care; 2 decreased medication errors; 3 improved clinical decision making; 4 improved quality of documentation; and/or 5 improved shift to shift nursing continuity. Methods Before and after implementation of CDS, a time study involving nursing care, medication delivery, and normalization of serum calcium and potassium values was performed. In addition, an evaluation of completeness of documentation and a clinician survey of shift to shift reporting were also completed. This was a modified one group, pretest-posttest design. Results With the CDS there was: improved legibility and completeness of documentation, data with better accessibility and accuracy, no change in time spent in direct patient care or charting by nursing staff. Incidental observations from the study included improved management functions of our nurse manager; improved JCAHO documentation compliance; timely access to clinical data (labs, vitals, etc; a decrease in time and resource use for audits; improved reimbursement because of the ability to reconstruct lost charts; limited human data entry by automatic data logging; eliminated costs of printing forms. CDS cost was reasonable. Conclusions When compared to a paper chart, the CDS provided a more legible, compete, and accessible patient record without affecting time spent in direct patient care. The availability of the CDS improved shift to shift reporting. Other observations showed that the CDS improved management capabilities; helped physicians deliver care; improved reimbursement; limited data entry errors; and reduced costs.

  15. The work of a clinical psychologist in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M

    1978-11-01

    The data presented suggest that general practitioners would be likely to refer a large number of patients with diverse problems to clinical psychologists working in health centres. Compared with a centrally organized clinical psychology service, the work of the primary care psychologist is likely to offer the following advantages:1. Access to psychological help for patients with a need for such help, but who could not attend a central clinic owing to problems associated with travel, work, physical disability, or even a presenting problem such as agoraphobia.2. Greater continuity of care of patients.3. Increased communication between the psychologist and members of the primary care teams.4. Possibility of the psychologist seeing the patient earlier, before the problems have become entrenched.5. Less need for referral to other agencies.6. Reduced stigma for the patient.7. Development of new therapeutic approaches relevant to problems presenting in primary care.8. More flexible and more relevant therapy due to seeing the patients in their home setting.9. Greater therapeutic involvement of the patient's family.10. Reduced costs and inconvenience for the patient's family.11. Reduced administrative and ambulance service costs.While these points do not overcome the need for a formal evaluation of the work of psychologists in primary care, they do suggest that there are advantages in this type of service over the services which are currently available and that a full evaluation would be worth undertaking.

  16. Perspectives on Clinical Informatics: Integrating Large-Scale Clinical, Genomic, and Health Information for Clinical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Young Choi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs and bioinformatics (BI represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population.

  17. Perspectives on clinical informatics: integrating large-scale clinical, genomic, and health information for clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, In Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myung Shin; Mun, Seong K; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2013-12-01

    The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs) and bioinformatics (BI) represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO) aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population.

  18. Uncertain added value of Global Trigger Tool for monitoring of patient safety in cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipczak, Henriette; Neckelmann, Kirsten; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring patient safety is a challenging task. The lack of a golden standard has contributed to the recommendation and introduction of several methods. In 2000 the Danish Lung Cancer Registry (DLCR) was established to monitor the clinical management of lung cancer. In 2008 the Global Trigger Tool...... (GTT) was recommended in Denmark as a tool for the monitoring of patient safety. Ideally, the recommendation of a new tool should be preceded by a critical assessment of its added value....

  19. Clinician attitudes, skills, motivations and experience following the implementation of clinical decision support tools in a large dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Elizabeth; Wides, Cynthia; White, Joel

    2017-03-01

    This study assesses dental clinicians' pre- and post-implementation attitudes, skills, and experiences with three clinical decision support (CDS) tools built into the electronic health record (EHR) of a multi-specialty group dental practice. Electronic surveys designed to examine factors for acceptance of EHR-based CDS tools including caries management by risk assessment (CAMBRA), periodontal disease management by risk assessment (PEMBRA) and a risk assessment-based Proactive Dental Care Plan (PDCP) were distributed to all Willamette Dental Group employees at 2 time points; 3 months pre-implementation (Fall 2013) and 15 months after implementation (winter 2015). The surveys collected demographics, measures of job experience and satisfaction, and attitudes toward each CDS tool. The baseline survey response rate among clinicians was 83.1% (n = 567) and follow-up survey response rate was 63.2% (n = 508). Among the 344 clinicians who responded to both before and after surveys, 27% were general and specialist dentists, 32% were dental hygienists, and 41% were dental assistants. Adherence to the CDS tools has been sustained at 98%+ since roll-out. Between baseline and follow-up, the change in mean attitude scores regarding CAMBRA reflect statistically significant improvement in formal training, knowing how to use the tools, belief in the science supporting the tools, and the usefulness of the tool to motivate patients. For PEMBRA, statistically significant improvement was found in formal training, knowing how to use the tools, belief in the science supporting the tools, with improvement also found in belief that the format and process worked well. Finally, for the PDCP, significant and positive changes were seen for every attitude and skill item scored. A strong and positive correlation with post-implementation attitudes was found with positive experiences in the work environment, whereas a negative correlation was found with workload and stress. Clinicians highly

  20. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with bette

  1. Doctoral Clinical Geropsychology Training in a Primary Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, Richard A.; Siegel, Lawrence; Hahn, Steven; Kuslansky, Gail; Byrne, Kathy; Fyffe, Denise; Passman, Vicki; Stewart, Douglas; Hinrichsen, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Most older adults diagnosed with a mental disorder receive treatment in primary care settings that lack personnel skilled in geropsychological diagnosis and treatment. The Ferkauf Older Adult Program of Yeshiva University endeavors to bridge this gap by providing training in geriatric psychology, through coursework and diverse clinical practica,…

  2. Doctoral Clinical Geropsychology Training in a Primary Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, Richard A.; Siegel, Lawrence; Hahn, Steven; Kuslansky, Gail; Byrne, Kathy; Fyffe, Denise; Passman, Vicki; Stewart, Douglas; Hinrichsen, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Most older adults diagnosed with a mental disorder receive treatment in primary care settings that lack personnel skilled in geropsychological diagnosis and treatment. The Ferkauf Older Adult Program of Yeshiva University endeavors to bridge this gap by providing training in geriatric psychology, through coursework and diverse clinical practica,…

  3. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with

  4. Development of quality standards in inflammatory bowel disease management and design of an evaluation tool of nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrejón, Antonio; Oltra, Lorena; Hernández-Sampelayo, Paloma; Marín, Laura; García-Sánchez, Valle; Casellas, Francesc; Alfaro, Noelia; Lázaro, Pablo; Vera, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    nursing management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is highly relevant for patient care and outcomes. However, there is evidence of substantial variability in clinical practices. The objectives of this study were to develop standards of healthcare quality for nursing management of IBD and elaborate the evaluation tool "Nursing Care Quality in IBD Assessment" (NCQ-IBD) based on these standards. a 178-item healthcare quality questionnaire was developed based on a systematic review of IBD nursing management literature. The questionnaire was used to perform two 2-round Delphi studies: Delphi A included 27 IBD healthcare professionals and Delphi B involved 12 patients. The NCQ-IBD was developed from the list of items resulting from both Delphi studies combined with the Scientific Committee´s expert opinion. the final NCQ-IBD consists of 90 items, organized in13 sections measuring the following aspects of nursing management of IBD: infrastructure, services, human resources, type of organization, nursing responsibilities, nurse-provided information to the patient, nurses training, annual audits of nursing activities, and nursing research in IBD. Using the NCQ-IBD to evaluate these components allows the rating of healthcare quality for nursing management of IBD into 4 categories: A (highest quality) through D (lowest quality). the use of the NCQ-IBD tool to evaluate nursing management quality of IBD identifies areas in need of improvement and thus contribute to an enhancement of care quality and reduction in clinical practice variations.

  5. Development of quality standards in inflammatory bowel disease management and design of an evaluation tool of nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Torrejón

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: nursing management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is highly relevant for patient care and outcomes. However, there is evidence of substantial variability in clinical practices. The objectives of this study were to develop standards of healthcare quality for nursing management of IBD and elaborate the evaluation tool "Nursing Care Quality in IBD Assessment" (NCQ-IBD based on these standards. Methods: a 178-item healthcare quality questionnaire was developed based on a systematic review of IBD nursing management literature. The questionnaire was used to perform two 2-round Delphi studies: Delphi A included 27 IBD healthcare professionals and Delphi B involved 12 patients. The NCQ-IBD was developed from the list of items resulting from both Delphi studies combined with the Scientific Committee's expert opinion. Results: the final NCQ-IBD consists of 90 items, organized in 13 sections measuring the following aspects of nursing management of IBD: infrastructure, services, human resources, type of organization, nursing responsibilities, nurse-provided information to the patient, nurses training, annual audits of nursing activities, and nursing research in IBD. Using the NCQ-IBD to evaluate these components allows the rating of healthcare quality for nursing management of IBD into 4 categories: A (highest quality through D (lowest quality. Conclusions: the use of the NCQ-IBD tool to evaluate nursing management quality of IBD identifies areas in need of improvement and thus contribute to an enhancement of care quality and reduction in clinical practice variations.

  6. Risk perception and clinical decision making in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Benedicte Marie Lind

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aim to present new knowledge about different perspectives of health care professionals’ risk perceptions and clinical decision making. Furthermore, we intend to discuss differences between professional and personal risk perceptions and the impact on decisions in terms of both short...... and long-term outcomes. Background Insight into healthcare professionals’ perception of risk is a cornerstone for understanding their strategies for practising preventive care. The way people perceive risk can be seen as part of a general personality trait influenced by a mixture of individual...... considerations and the specific context. Most research has been focused on understanding of the concepts of risk. However healthcare professionals’ risk perception and personal attitudes also affect their clinical decision-making and risk communication. The differences between health care professionals’ personal...

  7. Compilation of the neonatal palliative care clinical guideline in neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali; Zoafa, Aniyehsadat; Marofi, Maryam; Badiee, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Clinical guidelines are important instruments for increasing the quality of clinical practice in the treatment team. Compilation of clinical guidelines is important due to special condition of the neonates and the nurses facing critical conditions in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). With 98% of neonatal deaths occurring in NICUs in the hospitals, it is important to pay attention to this issue. This study aimed at compilation of the neonatal palliative care clinical guidelines in NICU. This study was conducted with multistage comparative strategies with localization in Isfahan in 2013. In the first step, the components of the neonatal palliative care clinical guidelines were determined by searching in different databases. In the second stage, the level of expert group's consensus with each component of neonatal palliative care in the nominal group and focus group was investigated, and the clinical guideline was written based on that. In the third stage, the quality and applicability were determined with the positive viewpoints of medical experts, nurses, and members of the science board of five cities in Iran. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics through SPSS. In the first stage, the draft of neonatal palliative care was designed based on neonates', their parents', and the related staff's requirements. In the second stage, its rank and applicability were determined and after analyzing the responses, with agreement of the focus group, the clinical guideline was written. In the third stage, the means of indication scores obtained were 75%, 69%, 72%, 72%, and 68% by Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) instrument. The compilation of the guideline can play an effective role in provision of neonatal care in nursing.

  8. Inflammatory myopathy: diagnosis and clinical course, specific clinical scenarios and new complementary tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva-O'Callaghan, Albert; Trallero-Araguás, Ernesto; Martínez, Maria Angeles; Labrador-Horrillo, Moises; Pinal-Fernández, Iago; Grau-Junyent, Josep Maria; Juárez, Candido

    2015-06-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group of rare autoimmune diseases characterized by symmetric proximal muscle weakness and inflammatory infiltrates on muscle biopsy. A meticulously collected combination of clinical, serological, and pathological data is essential to correctly diagnose and classify myositis patients, often a considerable challenge for clinicians. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the most useful tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with myositis. Capillaroscopy, serological biomarkers (particularly the autoantibody profile) and imaging techniques, such as muscle magnetic resonance and chest ultrasound, are of great aid in diagnosing, classifying and managing these patients. Relevant clinical scenarios, such as interstitial lung disease, associated cancer and pregnancy are also addressed in this review. Myositis registries, identification of new autoantibodies, and genetic studies will enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of these conditions and help to define new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  9. Contribution of a liaison clinical pharmacist to an inpatient palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, C; Glare, P A; Sykes, J V

    1997-05-01

    The impact on patient care of interventions made by a liaison clinical pharmacist visiting a busy inpatient palliative care unit were evaluated using a validated six-point scoring system. Interventions made in 13% of patients could improve patient care, save money or both, but rarely involved the drugs that are commonly used for symptom control in patients with terminal cancer. Advice to rationalize inappropriate drug regimens (53%) was the commonest intervention, followed by warnings about drug interactions (24%) and advice about therapeutic drug monitoring (8%). The interventions were evaluated by the pharmacist, a palliative medicine registrar and two independent doctors, confirming that the pharmacist was valid and accurate in assessing her own work. Although more than 60% of interventions could significantly improve patient care, compliance by medical and nursing staff with advice was only 55%, reflecting possible tensions between palliative and general hospital medicine. This survey emphasizes the role of liaison clinical pharmacists in palliative care, the need for much more critical appraisal of prescribing practices and the utility of ranking pharmacist interventions as a quality assurance and educational tool. In particular, providing palliative care for patients with advanced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is enhanced when a pharmacist with a specialist knowledge of AIDS therapeutics is available.

  10. Health care agreements as a tool for coordinating health and social services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Rudkjøbing

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2007, a substantial reform changed the administrative boundaries of the Danish health care system and introduced health care agreements to be signed between municipal and regional authorities. To assess the health care agreements as a tool for coordinating health and social services, a survey was conducted before (2005–2006 and after the reform (2011.Theory and methods: The study was designed on the basis of a modified version of Alter and Hage's framework for conceptualising coordination. Both surveys addressed all municipal level units (n = 271/98 and a random sample of general practitioners (n = 700/853.Results: The health care agreements were considered more useful for coordinating care than the previous health plans. The power relationship between the regional and municipal authorities in drawing up the agreements was described as more equal. Familiarity with the agreements among general practitioners was higher, as was the perceived influence of the health care agreements on their work.Discussion: Health care agreements with specific content and with regular follow-up and systematic mechanisms for organising feedback between collaborative partners exemplify a useful tool for the coordination of health and social services.Conclusion: There are substantial improvements with the new health agreements in terms of formalising a better coordination of the health care system.

  11. Web-based simulation: a tool for teaching critical care nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Sayonara de Fatima Faria; Marin,Heimar de Fatima

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop, to implement and to evaluate a web-based simulation for critical care nursing, as a tool for teaching nursing students at the undergraduate level. An adapted methodology was used to develop teaching material in a web-based learning environment, consisting of three evaluation phases (ergonomic, pedagogical and usability), carried out by web-designers/programmers, nursing teachers/nurses, and undergraduate nursing students. The research tools used w...

  12. Health economic analyses of domiciliary dental care and care at fixed clinics for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, M; Davidson, T; Ordell, S; Sjöström, O; Zimmerman, M; Sjögren, P

    2015-03-01

    Dental care for elderly nursing home residents is traditionally provided at fixed dental clinics, but domiciliary dental care is an emerging alternative. Longer life expectancy accompanied with increased morbidity, and hospitalisation or dependence on the care of others will contribute to a risk for rapid deterioration of oral health so alternative methods for delivering oral health care to vulnerable individuals for whom access to fixed dental clinics is an obstacle should be considered. The aim was to analyse health economic consequences of domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden, compared to dentistry at a fixed clinic. A review of relevant literature was undertaken complemented by interviews with nursing home staff, officials at county councils, and academic experts in geriatric dentistry. Domiciliary dental care and fixed clinic care were compared in cost analyses and cost-effectiveness analyses. The mean societal cost of domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents was lower than dental care at a fixed clinic, and it was also considered cost-effective. Lower cost of dental care at a fixed dental clinic was only achieved in a scenario where dental care could not be completed in a domiciliary setting. Domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents has a lower societal cost and is cost-effective compared to dental care at fixed clinics. To meet current and predicted need for oral health care in the ageing population alternative methods to deliver dental care should be available.

  13. Objective Structured Clinical Examination as an Assessment Tool for Clinical Skills in Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saceda-Corralo, D; Fonda-Pascual, P; Moreno-Arrones, Ó M; Alegre-Sánchez, A; Hermosa-Gelbard, Á; Jiménez-Gómez, N; Vañó-Galván, S; Jaén-Olasolo, P

    2017-04-01

    Objective Structured Clinical Evaluation (OSCE) is an excellent method to evaluate student's abilities, but there are no previous reports implementing it in dermatology. To determine the feasibility of implementation of a dermatology OSCE in the medical school. Five stations with standardized patients and image-based assessment were designed. A specific checklist was elaborated in each station with different items which evaluated one competency and were classified into five groups (medical history, physical examination, technical skills, case management and prevention). A total of 28 students were tested. Twenty-five of them (83.3%) passed the exam globally. Concerning each group of items tested: medical interrogation had a mean score of 71.0; physical examination had a mean score of 63.0; management had a mean score of 58.0; and prevention had a mean score of 58.0 points. The highest results were obtained in interpersonal skills items with 91.8 points. Testing a small sample of voluntary students may hinder generalization of our study. OSCE is an useful tool for assessing clinical skills in dermatology and it is possible to carry it out. Our experience enhances that medical school curriculum needs to establish OSCE as an assessment tool in dermatology. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gr

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Jacob HG Grand¹, Sienna Caspar², Stuart WS MacDonald11Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada; 2Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1 Alzheimer’s disease; 2 vascular dementias; 3 frontotemporal dementias; and 4 dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of

  15. [Structured medication management in primary care - a tool to promote medication safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Cornelia; Freund, Tobias; Baldauf, Annika; Jank, Susanne; Ludt, Sabine; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Haefeli, Walter Emil; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic disease usually need to take multiple medications. Drug-related interactions, adverse events, suboptimal adherence, and self-medication are components that can affect medication safety and lead to serious consequences for the patient. At present, regular medication reviews to check what medicines have been prescribed and what medicines are actually taken by the patient or the structured evaluation of drug-related problems rarely take place in Germany. The process of "medication reconciliation" or "medication review" as developed in the USA and the UK aim at increasing medication safety and therefore represent an instrument of quality assurance. Within the HeiCare(®) project a structured medication management was developed for general practice, with medical assistants playing a major role in the implementation of the process. Both the structured medication management and the tools developed for the medication check and medication counselling will be outlined in this article; also, findings on feasibility and acceptance in various projects and experiences from a total of 200 general practices (56 HeiCare(®), 29 HiCMan,115 PraCMan) will be described. The results were obtained from questionnaires and focus group discussions. The implementation of a structured medication management intervention into daily routine was seen as a challenge. Due to the high relevance of medication reconciliation for daily clinical practice, however, the checklists - once implemented successfully - have been applied even after the end of the project. They have led to the regular review and reconciliation of the physicians' documentation of the medicines prescribed (medication chart) with the medicines actually taken by the patient.

  16. Clinical reasoning in nursing: teaching strategies and assessment tools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emília Campos de Carvalho; Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira-Kumakura; Sheila Coelho Ramalho Vasconcelos Morais

    2017-01-01

    Results: Comprehension of the essential concepts of the thought process and its articulation with the different teaching strategies and the assessment tools which has allowed presenting ways to improve...

  17. American Society of Clinical Oncology guidance statement: the cost of cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meropol, Neal J; Schrag, Deborah; Smith, Thomas J; Mulvey, Therese M; Langdon, Robert M; Blum, Diane; Ubel, Peter A; Schnipper, Lowell E

    2009-08-10

    Advances in early detection, prevention, and treatment have resulted in consistently falling cancer death rates in the United States. In parallel with these advances have come significant increases in the cost of cancer care. It is well established that the cost of health care (including cancer care) in the United States is growing more rapidly than the overall economy. In part, this is a result of the prices and rapid uptake of new agents and other technologies, including advances in imaging and therapeutic radiology. Conventional understanding suggests that high prices may reflect the costs and risks associated with the development, production, and marketing of new drugs and technologies, many of which are valued highly by physicians, patients, and payers. The increasing cost of cancer care impacts many stakeholders who play a role in a complex health care system. Our patients are the most vulnerable because they often experience uneven insurance coverage, leading to financial strain or even ruin. Other key groups include pharmaceutical manufacturers that pass along research, development, and marketing costs to the consumer; providers of cancer care who dispense increasingly expensive drugs and technologies; and the insurance industry, which ultimately passes costs to consumers. Increasingly, the economic burden of health care in general, and high-quality cancer care in particular, will be less and less affordable for an increasing number of Americans unless steps are taken to curb current trends. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is committed to improving cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment and eliminating disparities in cancer care through support of evidence-based and cost-effective practices. To address this goal, ASCO established a Cost of Care Task Force, which has developed this Guidance Statement on the Cost of Cancer Care. This Guidance Statement provides a concise overview of the economic issues facing stakeholders in the cancer

  18. Conceptual Tools for Thinking about Interteam Work in Clinical Gerontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, David Patrick; Cott, Cheryl; Robertson, Duncan

    1997-01-01

    Effective interteam work for health care teams must consider the following: each team's distinct model of reality, teams' culture, boundary-crossing functions that link teams with others, systems perspective, and expectations of equitable resource allocation and work burdens. (SK)

  19. The quality of care in an antenatal clinic in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, M I

    1980-02-01

    As part of an operations research project aimed at improving outpatient services in Kenya, the quality of care in Kiambu District Hospital's antenatal clinic was monitored in 1974-76 with particular emphasis on the identification of high risk women. Of the 270 patients studied, 57 (21%) were considered by midwives to be at no risk in terms of their pregnancy and 213 (79%) were considered at risk. 46% of the care observed in this study was considered adequate by the audit method; however, an implicit judgement assessment of the same care rated only 19% as adequate. Since the evaluators were familiar with the working conditions and capabilities of the staff, these low performance statistics suggest that the quality of care being provided in antenatal clinics is a serious problem. Dramatic improvements can be recorded if more attention is given by midwives to obtaining a medical and obstetric history and using an antenatal card. There is a need for clearly defined criteria and instructions for categorizing and managing high and low risk groups of pregnant women. In-service training and clinical meetings are essential to ensure that midwives can interpret abnormal findings and estimate the fundal height of the uterus. Although antenatal cards that guide midwives in the categorization of risk factors are available in Kenya, they are frequently out of stock and replaced with hastily developed, inadequate substitute forms.

  20. External validation of two tools for the clinical diagnosis of acute diverticulitis without imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiewiet, J.J.S.; Andeweg, C.S.; Laurell, H.; Daniels, L.; Laméris, W.; Reitsma, J.B.; Hendriks, J.C.; Bleichrodt, R.; van Goor, H.; Boermeester, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim External validation and comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of two predictive tools, the emergency department triad and the clinical scoring tool in diagnosing acute diverticulitis. Methods Two derivation datasets were used crosswise for external validation. In addition, both tools were valida

  1. Development of a prototype clinical decision support tool for osteoporosis disease management: a qualitative study of focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Monika; Li, Jamy; Lottridge, Danielle; Marquez, Christine; Newton, David; Straus, Sharon E

    2010-07-22

    Osteoporosis affects over 200 million people worldwide, and represents a significant cost burden. Although guidelines are available for best practice in osteoporosis, evidence indicates that patients are not receiving appropriate diagnostic testing or treatment according to guidelines. The use of clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) may be one solution because they can facilitate knowledge translation by providing high-quality evidence at the point of care. Findings from a systematic review of osteoporosis interventions and consultation with clinical and human factors engineering experts were used to develop a conceptual model of an osteoporosis tool. We conducted a qualitative study of focus groups to better understand physicians' perceptions of CDSSs and to transform the conceptual osteoporosis tool into a functional prototype that can support clinical decision making in osteoporosis disease management at the point of care. The conceptual design of the osteoporosis tool was tested in 4 progressive focus groups with family physicians and general internists. An iterative strategy was used to qualitatively explore the experiences of physicians with CDSSs; and to find out what features, functions, and evidence should be included in a working prototype. Focus groups were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide using an iterative process where results of the first focus group informed changes to the questions for subsequent focus groups and to the conceptual tool design. Transcripts were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Of the 3 broad categories of themes that were identified, major barriers related to the accuracy and feasibility of extracting bone mineral density test results and medications from the risk assessment questionnaire; using an electronic input device such as a Tablet PC in the waiting room; and the importance of including well-balanced information in the patient education component of the osteoporosis

  2. Psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Person-Centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT)

    OpenAIRE

    Sjögren, Karin; Lindkvist, Marie; Sandman, Per-Olof; Zingmark, Karin; Edvardsson, David

    2012-01-01

    Background: Person-centered care is a multidimensional concept describing good care, especially within aged care and care for people with dementia. Research studies evaluating person-centered care interventions seldom use direct measurement of levels of person-centeredness. Existing scales that measure person-centeredness need further testing. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Person-Centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT). Methods: A cross-sectional...

  3. [Management of onychocryptosis in primary care: A clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala Aguilar, K; Gutiérrez Pineda, F; Bozalongo de Aragón, E

    2013-09-01

    Onychocryptosis (ingrown toenail) is a condition commonly seen in Primary Care clinics. It is uncomfortable and restrictive for patients and has a high incidence in males between second and third decades of life. It is of unknown origin, with a number of predisposing triggering factors being involved. Treatment depends on the stage of the ingrown nail and the procedures may range from conservative to minor surgery that can be performed by the Primary Care physician in the health centre. We report the case of a 25-year onychocryptosis that did not respond to conservative management, and was extracted with partial matricectomy of the nail.

  4. A framework for a distributed, hybrid, multiple-ontology clinical-guideline library, and automated guideline-support tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, Yuval; Young, Ohad; Shalom, Erez; Galperin, Maya; Mayaffit, Alon; Moskovitch, Robert; Hessing, Alon

    2004-10-01

    Clinical guidelines are a major tool in improving the quality of medical care. However, most guidelines are in free text, not in a formal, executable format, and are not easily accessible to clinicians at the point of care. We introduce a Web-based, modular, distributed architecture, the Digital Electronic Guideline Library (DeGeL), which facilitates gradual conversion of clinical guidelines from text to a formal representation in chosen target guideline ontology. The architecture supports guideline classification, semantic markup, context-sensitive search, browsing, run-time application, and retrospective quality assessment. The DeGeL hybrid meta-ontology includes elements common to all guideline ontologies, such as semantic classification and domain knowledge; it also includes four content-representation formats: free text, semi-structured text, semi-formal representation, and a formal representation. These formats support increasingly sophisticated computational tasks. The DeGeL tools for support of guideline-based care operate, at some level, on all guideline ontologies. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the architecture and the tools for several guideline ontologies, including Asbru and GEM.

  5. Secondary uses of clinical data in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Teasdale

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper, presented as a panel at the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA Fall Symposium 2006, explores a number of secondary uses of primary care clinical data derived from point-of care systems, and the issues arising from those uses. The authors (from the USA and the UK describe, compare and contrast some secondary uses: pay-for-performance, public disclosure, clinical audit, health resource planning, and clinical system usage; in various environments: national health system, network of small family practice offices, and university teaching centres. In the UK, such data are now being used in pay-for-performance for GPs, and approximately 35% of their salary has been put at risk, which has resulted in close scrutiny. In the USA, pay-for-performance is at an earlier stage but is increasingly prevalent and continues to be hotly debated. Some of the issues that arise from these uses of clinical data _data quality including accuracy, comparability, perverse incentives, effect of secondary uses on care provision, and security and confidentiality among others _were discussed. Finally, options and opportunities for improving secondary uses of data in the light of the issues covered earlier were considered.

  6. Keele Aches and Pains Study protocol: validity, acceptability, and feasibility of the Keele STarT MSK tool for subgrouping musculoskeletal patients in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Paul Campbell,1 Jonathan C Hill,1 Joanne Protheroe,1 Ebenezer K Afolabi,1 Martyn Lewis,1 Ruth Beardmore,1 Elaine M Hay,1 Christian D Mallen,1 Bernadette Bartlam,1 Benjamin Saunders,1 Danielle A van der Windt,1 Sue Jowett,2 Nadine E Foster,1 Kate M Dunn1 1Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Research Institute of Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele, 2Health Economics Unit, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK Abstract: Musculoskeletal conditions represent a considerable burden worldwide, and are predominantly managed in primary care. Evidence suggests that many musculoskeletal conditions share similar prognostic factors. Systematically assessing patient’s prognosis and matching treatments based on prognostic subgroups (stratified care has been shown to be both clinically effective and cost-effective. This study (Keele Aches and Pains Study aims to refine and examine the validity of a brief questionnaire (Keele STarT MSK tool designed to enable risk stratification of primary care patients with the five most common musculoskeletal pain presentations. We also describe the subgroups of patients, and explore the acceptability and feasibility of using the tool and how the tool is best implemented in clinical practice. The study design is mixed methods: a prospective, quantitative observational cohort study with a linked qualitative focus group and interview study. Patients who have consulted their GP or health care practitioner about a relevant musculoskeletal condition will be recruited from general practice. Participating patients will complete a baseline questionnaire (shortly after consultation, plus questionnaires 2 and 6 months later. A subsample of patients, along with participating GPs and health care practitioners, will be invited to take part in qualitative focus groups and interviews. The Keele STarT MSK tool will be refined based on face, discriminant, construct, and predictive validity at baseline and 2

  7. Accessibility, usability, and usefulness of a Web-based clinical decision support tool to enhance provider-patient communication around Self-management TO Prevent (STOP) Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jane A; Godwin, Kyler M; Saleem, Jason J; Russell, Scott; Robinson, Joshua J; Kimmel, Barbara

    2014-12-01

    This article reports redesign strategies identified to create a Web-based user-interface for the Self-management TO Prevent (STOP) Stroke Tool. Members of a Stroke Quality Improvement Network (N = 12) viewed a visualization video of a proposed prototype and provided feedback on implementation barriers/facilitators. Stroke-care providers (N = 10) tested the Web-based prototype in think-aloud sessions of simulated clinic visits. Participants' dialogues were coded into themes. Access to comprehensive information and the automated features/systematized processes were the primary accessibility and usability facilitator themes. The need for training, time to complete the tool, and computer-centric care were identified as possible usability barriers. Patient accountability, reminders for best practice, goal-focused care, and communication/counseling themes indicate that the STOP Stroke Tool supports the paradigm of patient-centered care. The STOP Stroke Tool was found to prompt clinicians on secondary stroke-prevention clinical-practice guidelines, facilitate comprehensive documentation of evidence-based care, and support clinicians in providing patient-centered care through the shared decision-making process that occurred while using the action-planning/goal-setting feature of the tool.

  8. Psychometric Properties of an Intimate Partner Violence Tool for Health Care Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Pamela D.; Nouer, Simonne S.; Mackey, See Trail N.; Tipton, Nathan G.; Lloyd, Angela K.

    2011-01-01

    Health care professionals have acknowledged intimate partner violence (IPV) as a highly prevalent public health problem necessitating the creation of standardized education programs, survey tools, and well-defined outcome measures. Testing and evaluation of these measures, however, has been limited to specific populations of health care…

  9. The future of using marketing tools in health care system in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Ya. Ovsyanetska

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This scientific research examines the possibility of using marketing mechanisms in the health care system of Ukraine. Also in this study are analyzed the positive and negative results of marketing tools implementation on the examples from Ukraine and other countries.

  10. Improving the quality of EHR recording in primary care: a data quality feedback tool.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bij, S. van der; Khan, N.; Veen, P. ten; Bakker, D.H. de; Verheij, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electronic health record (EHR) data are used to exchange information among health care providers. For this purpose, the quality of the data is essential. We developed a data quality feedback tool that evaluates differences in EHR data quality among practices and software packages as part o

  11. A Tool for Assessing a Community’s Capacity for Substance Abuse Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerla, Rob; Stroup, Donna F.; Azofeifa, Alejandro; High, Patrick M.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based programs for prevention and intervention in substance abuse are increasing. Community needs assessments and health rankings provide descriptions of local behavioral health needs but do not provide public health practitioners and policy makers with guidelines on the number of programs, health care practitioners, or interventions needed in the local substance abuse care system. This article presents a new framework for measuring and assessing the substance abuse care system in a community. The assessment can inform resource allocation across the continuum of care to more equitably and efficiently distribute interventions and care. We conducted 2 literature reviews and synthesized our findings to create a community assessment methodology and needs calculator, CAST (calculating for an adequate system tool). We reviewed 212 articles to produce an inventory of community and social correlates of behavioral health, components of a substance abuse care system, and numerical values for guidelines for estimating community needs. CAST produces community-specific assessments of the capacity of the components of a community substance abuse care system. CAST generates recommendations by the application of social and community determinants of health as risk coefficients to each estimate of component need. CAST can assist public health practitioners in evaluation and improvement of the capacity of community-based, substance abuse care systems. By using recommendations for component needs across the continuum of care, community leaders can use CAST to prioritize resource allocation more effectively and efficiently. PMID:27657505

  12. Reasons for students’ poor clinical competencies in the Primary Health Care: Clinical nursing, diagnosis treatment and care programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Müller

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available ‘No member of [health] staff should undertake tasks unless they are competent to do so’ is stated in the Comprehensive Primary Health Care Service Package for South Africa (Department of Health 2001document. In South Africa, primary clinical nurses (PCNs, traditionally known as primary health care nurses (PHCNs, function as ‘frontline providers’ of clinical primary health care (PHC services within public PHC facilities, which is their extended role. This extended role of registered nurses(set out in section 38A of the Nursing Act 50 of 1978, as amended demands high clinical competency training by nursing schools and universities.

    The objectives of the study were to explore and describe the perceptions of both clinical instructors and students, in terms of the reasons for poor clinical competencies. Results established that two main challenges contributed to students’ poor clinical competencies: challenges within the PHC clinical field and challenges within the learning programme (University.

    Opsomming

    Die primêre kliniese verpleegkundiges, tradisioneel bekend as primêre gesondheidsorg verpleegkundiges, funksioneer in Suid-Afrika as eerste-linie verskaffers van kliniese primêre gesondheidsorg (PGS dienste binne die publieke PGS fasiliteite. Dit is hulle uitgebreide rol. Hierdie uitgebreide rol van die verpleegkundige (soos deur Wet op Verpleging,No 50 van 1978, artikel 38A voorgeskryf, vereis opleiding in kliniese vaardighede van hoë gehalte deur verpleegskole en universiteite.

    Die doelwitte van die navorsing was om die persepsies van beide kliniese dosente en leerders,met betrekking tot die redes vir swak kliniese vaardighede, repektiewelik te verken en te beskryf.Twee temas is deur die resultate as uitdagings (hoof redes vir die swak vaardighede van leerders aangetoon, naamlik uitdagings in die PGS kliniese praktyk en die uitdagings in die leerprogram (universiteit

  13. Epilepsy and seizure ontology: towards an epilepsy informatics infrastructure for clinical research and patient care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S; Lhatoo, Samden D; Gupta, Deepak K; Cui, Licong; Zhao, Meng; Jayapandian, Catherine; Bozorgi, Alireza; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Objective Epilepsy encompasses an extensive array of clinical and research subdomains, many of which emphasize multi-modal physiological measurements such as electroencephalography and neuroimaging. The integration of structured, unstructured, and signal data into a coherent structure for patient care as well as clinical research requires an effective informatics infrastructure that is underpinned by a formal domain ontology. Methods We have developed an epilepsy and seizure ontology (EpSO) using a four-dimensional epilepsy classification system that integrates the latest International League Against Epilepsy terminology recommendations and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) common data elements. It imports concepts from existing ontologies, including the Neural ElectroMagnetic Ontologies, and uses formal concept analysis to create a taxonomy of epilepsy syndromes based on their seizure semiology and anatomical location. Results EpSO is used in a suite of informatics tools for (a) patient data entry, (b) epilepsy focused clinical free text processing, and (c) patient cohort identification as part of the multi-center NINDS-funded study on sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. EpSO is available for download at http://prism.case.edu/prism/index.php/EpilepsyOntology. Discussion An epilepsy ontology consortium is being created for community-driven extension, review, and adoption of EpSO. We are in the process of submitting EpSO to the BioPortal repository. Conclusions EpSO plays a critical role in informatics tools for epilepsy patient care and multi-center clinical research. PMID:23686934

  14. Improving diabetic foot screening at a primary care clinic: A quality improvement project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michelle L.; Gunst, Colette

    2016-01-01

    Background Foot screening is an important part of diabetic care as it prevents significant morbidity, loss of function and mortality from diabetic foot complications. However, foot screening is often neglected. Aim This project was aimed at educating health care workers (HCWs) in a primary health care clinic to increase diabetic foot screening practices. Setting A primary health care clinic in the Western Cape province of South Africa Methods A quality improvement project was conducted. HCWs’ needs were assessed using a questionnaire. This was followed by focus group discussions with the HCWs, which were recorded, transcribed and assessed using a general inductive approach. An intervention was designed based on common themes. Staff members were trained on foot screening and patient information pamphlets and screening tools were made available to all clinic staff. Thirty-two consecutive diabetic patient folders were audited to compare screening in 2013 with that in 2014 after initiation of the quality improvement cycle. Results HCWs’ confidence in conducting foot screening using the diabetic foot assessment questionnaire improved markedly after training. Diabetic foot screening practices increased from 9% in 2013 to 69% in 2014 after the first quality improvement cycle. A strengths, opportunities, aspirations and results (SOAR) analysis showed promise for continuing quality improvement cycles. Conclusion The findings showed a significant improvement in the number of diabetic patients screened. Using strategic planning with appreciative intent based on SOAR, proved to be motivational and can be used in the planning of the next cycle. PMID:27608673

  15. A model linking clinical workforce skill mix planning to health and health care dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonnell Geoff

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an attempt to devise a simpler computable tool to assist workforce planners in determining what might be an appropriate mix of health service skills, our discussion led us to consider the implications of skill mixing and workforce composition beyond the 'stock and flow' approach of much workforce planning activity. Methods Taking a dynamic systems approach, we were able to address the interactions, delays and feedbacks that influence the balance between the major components of health and health care. Results We linked clinical workforce requirements to clinical workforce workload, taking into account the requisite facilities, technologies, other material resources and their funding to support clinical care microsystems; gave recognition to productivity and quality issues; took cognisance of policies, governance and power concerns in the establishment and operation of the health care system; and, going back to the individual, gave due attention to personal behaviour and biology within the socio-political family environment. Conclusion We have produced the broad endogenous systems model of health and health care which will enable human resource planners to operate within real world variables. We are now considering the development of simple, computable national versions of this model.

  16. Mille general practice governance (MilleGPG): an interactive tool to address an effective quality of care through the Italian general practice network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cricelli, Iacopo; Lapi, Francesco; Montalbano, Carmelo; Medea, Gerardo; Cricelli, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    The General Practitioner (GP) is the "gate-keeper" in patients' treatment and management. Herein, the use of Electronic Medical Records (EMR) could represent an effective support for GPs. Software capable of managing EMRs are available and they can be functional in adopting treatment guidelines by means of computerized prompts and reminders systems. These tools can be also programmed to include clinical algorithms with which to measure the quality of care to make possible the identification of clinical issues, and to take actions for addressing them. Given that similar tools were not available in Italy, we developed MilleGPG, an interactive tool aimed to evaluate, and subsequently improve the quality of care among patients with comorbidities.

  17. A computerized data acquisition system for infusion devices--a clinical support tool, or a risk management tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belal, S Y; Nevill, A J; Jeyaratnam, P

    2001-01-01

    A prototype computerized system for automatic data collection from multi-vendor infusion devices was constructed. The system was specifically designed around the needs of the critical care environment, and a survey of clinical staff was conducted to determine the functional requirements. Hardware, software and system configuration was based on the Medical Information Bus IEEE 1073 standard for medical device data communications. The infusion devices were configured into device communication controllers (DCC), which were polled at 0.25 Hz by a PC configured as a bedside communication controller (BCC). The system stores data samples after intervals of 1 ml of drug delivery and following any changes in the infusion rate. The system demonstrated significant opportunities for supporting clinical care and for the management of health care technology.

  18. Software Tools | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CPTAC program develops new approaches to elucidate aspects of the molecular complexity of cancer made from large-scale proteogenomic datasets, and advance them toward precision medicine.  Part of the CPTAC mission is to make data and tools available and accessible to the greater research community to accelerate the discovery process.

  19. Cost differentials of dental outpatient care across clinical dentistry branches

    OpenAIRE

    Jovana Rančić; Nemanja Rančić; Nemanja Majstorović; Vladimir Biočanin; Marko Milosavljević; Mihajlo Jakovljević

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental care presents affordability issues in Central & Eastern European transitional economies due to lack of insurance coverage in most countries of the region and almost complete out-of-pocket payments by citizens.Objective: Real world estimates on cost differentials across clinical dentistry branches, ICD-10 diagnostic groups and groups of dental services.Methods: Prospective case-series cost analysis was conducted from the patient perspective. A six months time horizon was...

  20. [Satisfaction with primary care nursing: use of measurement tools and explanatory factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, J; Ariza-Cardiel, G; Rodríguez-Martínez, G; Gayo-Milla, M; Martínez-Gil, M; Alzola-Martín, C; Fernández-San Martín, M I

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the psychometric properties of two measurement tools for patient satisfaction with nursing care in Primary Care, the satisfaction level, and the personal and consultation characteristics associated with its variability. Subjects randomly selected in 23 Health Care centres in the Community of Madrid were included. Satisfaction was measured by means of the AMABLE and Baker questionnaires, in which the psychometric properties were evaluated. Sociodemographic characteristics of the consultations, variables related to health status, and other related to the consultation process were collected. An explanatory model using Generalized Estimating Equations was constructed. The 662 subjects expressed a mean satisfaction of 4.95/5 (SD .25) with AMABLE, and 4.83/5 (SD .42) with the Baker questionnaire. AMABLE had a single dimension (Cronbach's alpha .85), and Baker three: professional care (mean 4.76, SD .48 Cronbach's alpha .74), depth of relationship (mean 3.76, SD 1.18, Cronbach's alpha .73), and perceived time (mean 4.42, SD .86, Cronbach's alpha .47). Ageing, a better perception of health status, and appointments arranged by nurses were associated with higher expressed satisfaction. Home care, hospital admissions, delayed consultation, extended family, or high family income were associated with lower satisfaction. Satisfaction with nurse consultations in Primary Care was very high, and varied depending on personal characteristics and on the type of consultation. The assessed tools allowed this outcome to be measured properly. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of the ProPal-COPD tool to identify patients with COPD for proactive palliative care

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    Duenk RG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available RG Duenk,1 C Verhagen,1 EM Bronkhorst,2 RS Djamin,3 GJ Bosman,4 E Lammers,5 PNR Dekhuijzen,6 KCP Vissers,1 Y Engels,1,* Y Heijdra6,* 1Department of Anesthesiology, Pain and Palliative Medicine, 2Department of Health Evidence, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Amphia Hospital, Breda, 4Department of Respiratory Medicine, Slingeland Hospital, Doetinchem, 5Department of Respiratory Medicine, Gelre Hospitals, Zutphen, 6Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Our objective was to develop a tool to identify patients with COPD for proactive palliative care. Since palliative care needs increase during the disease course of COPD, the prediction of mortality within 1 year, measured during hospitalizations for acute exacerbation COPD (AECOPD, was used as a proxy for the need of proactive palliative care.Patients and methods: Patients were recruited from three general hospitals in the Netherlands in 2014. Data of 11 potential predictors, a priori selected based on literature, were collected during hospitalization for AECOPD. After 1 year, the medical files were explored for the date of death. An optimal prediction model was assessed by Lasso logistic regression, with 20-fold cross-validation for optimal shrinkage. Missing data were handled using complete case analysis.Results: Of 174 patients, 155 patients were included; of those 30 (19.4% died within 1 year. The optimal prediction model was internally validated and had good discriminating power (AUC =0.82, 95% CI 0.81–0.82. This model relied on the following seven predictors: the surprise question, Medical Research Council dyspnea questionnaire (MRC dyspnea, Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ, FEV1% of predicted value, body mass index, previous hospitalizations for AECOPD and specific comorbidities. To ensure minimal miss out of patients in need

  2. A Participatory Approach to Develop the Power Mobility Screening Tool and the Power Mobility Clinical Driving Assessment Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepan C. Kamaraj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The electric powered wheelchair (EPW is an indispensable assistive device that increases participation among individuals with disabilities. However, due to lack of standardized assessment tools, developing evidence based training protocols for EPW users to improve driving skills has been a challenge. In this study, we adopt the principles of participatory research and employ qualitative methods to develop the Power Mobility Screening Tool (PMST and Power Mobility Clinical Driving Assessment (PMCDA. Qualitative data from professional experts and expert EPW users who participated in a focus group and a discussion forum were used to establish content validity of the PMCDA and the PMST. These tools collectively could assess a user’s current level of bodily function and their current EPW driving capacity. Further multicenter studies are necessary to evaluate the psychometric properties of these tests and develop EPW driving training protocols based on these assessment tools.

  3. Unanswered clinical questions: a survey of specialists and primary care providers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Bridget; Shenoy, Anant M.; Blanchard, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Objective With the myriad of cases presented to clinicians every day at our integrated academic health system, clinical questions are bound to arise. Clinicians need to recognize these knowledge gaps and act on them. However, for many reasons, clinicians might not seek answers to these questions. Our goal was to investigate the rationale and process behind these unanswered clinical questions. Subsequently, we explored the use of biomedical information resources among specialists and primary care providers and identified ways to promote more informed clinical decision making. Methods We conducted a survey to assess how practitioners identify and respond to information gaps, their background knowledge of search tools and strategies, and their usage of and comfort level with technology. Results Most of the 292 respondents encountered clinical questions at least a few times per week. While the vast majority often or always pursued answers, time was the biggest barrier for not following through on questions. Most respondents did not have any formal training in searching databases, were unaware of many digital resources, and indicated a need for resources and services that could be provided at the point of care. Conclusions While the reasons for unanswered clinical questions varied, thoughtful review of the responses suggested that a combination of educational strategies, embedded librarian services, and technology applications could help providers pursue answers to their clinical questions, enhance patient safety, and contribute to patient-based, self-directed learning. PMID:28096740

  4. A tool for assessing continuity of care across care levels: an extended psychometric validation of the CCAENA questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Beatriz Aller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The CCAENA questionnaire was developed to assess care continuity across levels from the patients’ perspective. The aim is to provide additional evidence on the psychometric properties of the scales of this questionnaire. Methods: Cross-sectional study by means of a survey of a random sample of 1500 patients attended in primary and secondary care in three healthcare areas of the Catalan healthcare system. Data were collected in 2010 using the CCAENA questionnaire. To assess psychometric properties, an exploratory factor analysis was performed (construct validity and the item-rest correlations and Cronbach’s alpha were calculated (internal consistency. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated (multidimensionality and the ability to discriminate between groups was tested. Results: The factor analysis resulted in 21 items grouped into three factors: patient-primary care provider relationship, patient-secondary care provider relationship and continuity across care levels. Cronbach’s alpha indicated good internal consistency (0.97, 0.93, 0.80 and the correlation coefficients indicated that dimensions can be interpreted as separated scales. Scales discriminated patients according to healthcare area, age and educational level. Conclusion: The CCAENA questionnaire has proved to be a valid and reliable tool for measuring patients’ perceptions of continuity. Providers and researchers could apply the questionnaire to identify areas for healthcare improvement.

  5. Spanish validation of the Person-centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Teresa; Suárez-Álvarez, Javier; Yanguas, Javier; Muñiz, José

    2016-01-01

    Person-centered Care (PCC) is an innovative approach which seeks to improve the quality of care services given to the care-dependent elderly. At present there are no Spanish language instruments for the evaluation of PCC delivered by elderly care services. The aim of this work is the adaptation and validation of the Person-centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT) for a Spanish population. The P-CAT was translated and adapted into Spanish, then given to a sample of 1339 front-line care professionals from 56 residential elderly care homes. The reliability and validity of the P-CAT were analyzed, within the frameworks of Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory models. The Spanish P-CAT demonstrated good reliability, with an alpha coefficient of .88 and a test-retest reliability coefficient of .79. The P-CAT information function indicates that the test measures with good precision for the majority of levels of the measured variables (θ values between -2 and +1). The factorial structure of the test is essentially one-dimensional and the item discrimination indices are high, with values between .26 and .61. In terms of predictive validity, the correlations which stand out are between the P-CAT and organizational climate (r = .689), and the burnout factors; personal accomplishment (r = .382), and emotional exhaustion (r = - .510). The Spanish version of the P-CAT demonstrates good psychometric properties for its use in the evaluation of elderly care homes both professionally and in research.

  6. Physicians’ experience adopting the electronic transfer of care communication tool: barriers and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Grood C

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloe de Grood, Katherine Eso, Maria Jose Santana Department of Community Health Sciences, W21C Research and Innovation Centre, Institute of Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess physicians' perceptions on a newly developed electronic transfer of care (e-TOC communication tool and identify barriers and opportunities toward its adoption. Participants and methods: The study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching center as part of a randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of an e-TOC communication tool. The e-TOC technology was developed through iterative consultation with stakeholders. This e-TOC summary was populated by acute care physicians (AcPs and communicated electronically to community care physicians (CcPs. The AcPs consisted of attending physicians, resident trainees, and medical students rotating through the Medical Teaching Unit. The CcPs were health care providers caring for patients discharged from hospital to the community. AcPs and CcPs completed validated surveys assessing their experience with the newly developed e-TOC tool. Free text questions were added to gather general comments from both groups of physicians. Units of analysis were individual physicians. Data from the surveys were analyzed using mixed methods. Results: AcPs completed 138 linked pre- and post-rotation surveys. At post-rotation, each AcP completed an average of six e-TOC summaries, taking an average of 37 minutes per e-TOC summary. Over 100 CcPs assessed the quality of the TOC summaries, with an overall rating of 8.3 (standard deviation: 1.48; on a scale of 1–10. Thematic analyses revealed barriers and opportunities encountered by physicians toward the adoption of the e-TOC tool. While the AcPs highlighted issues with timeliness, usability, and presentation, the CcPs identified barriers accessing the web-based TOC summaries, emphasizing that the summaries were timely and the

  7. O uso da sorologia como ferramenta adicional no apoio ao diagnóstico de casos difíceis de hanseníase multibacilar: lições de uma unidade de referência The use of serology as an additional tool to support diagnosis of difficult multibacillary leprosy cases: lessons from clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leide W. Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sete casos de hanseníase multibacilar (MB e dois casos com suspeição de hanseníase atendidos em situações distintas do atendimento clínico-dermatológico na Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro são descritos. Todos apresentaram dificuldades no diagnóstico visto que não tinham sinais e sintomas cardinais da hanseníase. Um teste sorológico utilizado como ferramenta auxiliar foi útil no processo de diagnóstico ou exclusão de cada caso e facilitou as discussões acadêmicas na hora do exame clínico. A sorologia e baciloscopia de linfa são consideradas como os únicos instrumentos rápidos e de baixo custo para a confirmação de casos MB atípicos, e as vantagens e desvantagens de cada exame são discutidas. Ambos os testes complementam o processo diagnóstico e classificação dos casos para fins terapêuticos. A vantagem da baciloscopia está na sua capacidade de confirmação do diagnóstico. As vantagens da sorologia são: (a sua aplicabilidade para uso direto por profissionais de saúde no momento da consulta, visto que os resultados são imediatos, (b a possibilidade da participação dos pacientes no processo, e (c oferece uma oportunidade para melhor ensino da patogênese da hanseníase.Seven multibacillary leprosy and two suspected cases assisted in different situations during clinical care activities at the university in Rio de Janeiro city are described. All cases presented some difficulties for diagnosis, since they evolved with few or no cardinal signs or symptoms of leprosy. A serological test used as an auxiliary tool was helpful in the diagnosis or exclusion procedure of each case, facilitating academic discussions at the time of case examination. Considering serology and bacilloscopy (skin smear as the only rapid and relatively cheap available tests for confirmation of atypical MB leprosy, the advantages and disadvantages of their use were discussed. Both tests support the diagnostic procedure and the

  8. Chronic patient care at North West Province clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire van Deventer

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic illnesses are a significant burden to the health services in South Africa. There is a specific national health plan whereby chronically ill patients who are acceptably controlled should be managed at clinic level. The perception has emerged that the management of primary care has not been optimal in the Southern District of the North West Province. This provided the motivation to initiate this research, namely consideration of chronic patient care at clinics in the North West Province of South Africa.Method: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out at four randomly selected clinics covering four sub-districts in the Southern District (North West Province. This was done using charts and registers at the clinics. Inclusion criteria were patients older than 18, and presenting with the following chronic illnesses: asthma/chronic obstructive airways disease (COAD, hypertension, diabetes and epilepsy. The major focus areas were the regular assessment of the patients, the level of control of the illness and the use of the Essential Drugs List and Standard Treatment Guidelines (EDL/STG.Results: In the cases of all the chronic illnesses it was found that regular assessments were poorly done, with asthma (peak flow measurements being the most poorly done. Control was generally less than 50% for all the illnesses, although the EDL was followed fairly well by the personnel at the clinics.Conclusion: In the light of the burden of chronic illness the results give cause for great concern about the quality of care for chronically ill patients, and reasons were sought for some of the poor results. A subsequent decision was taken to carry out comprehensive quality improvement projects on each of the illnesses over the following five years.

  9. Validation of the tool assessment of clinical education (AssCE): A study using Delphi method and clinical experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfmark, Anna; Mårtensson, Gunilla

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish the validity of the tool Assessment of Clinical Education (AssCE). The tool is widely used in Sweden and some Nordic countries for assessing nursing students' performance in clinical education. It is important that the tools in use be subjected to regular audit and critical reviews. The validation process, performed in two stages, was concluded with a high level of congruence. In the first stage, Delphi technique was used to elaborate the AssCE tool using a group of 35 clinical nurse lecturers. After three rounds, we reached consensus. In the second stage, a group of 46 clinical nurse lecturers representing 12 universities in Sweden and Norway audited the revised version of the AssCE in relation to learning outcomes from the last clinical course at their respective institutions. Validation of the revised AssCE was established with high congruence between the factors in the AssCE and examined learning outcomes. The revised AssCE tool seems to meet its objective to be a validated assessment tool for use in clinical nursing education.

  10. Gold Nanotheranostics: Proof-of-Concept or Clinical Tool?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pedrosa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have been making their way in biomedical applications and personalized medicine, allowing for the coupling of diagnostics and therapeutics into a single nanomaterial—nanotheranostics. Gold nanoparticles, in particular, have unique features that make them excellent nanomaterials for theranostics, enabling the integration of targeting, imaging and therapeutics in a single platform, with proven applicability in the management of heterogeneous diseases, such as cancer. In this review, we focus on gold nanoparticle-based theranostics at the lab bench, through pre-clinical and clinical stages. With few products facing clinical trials, much remains to be done to effectively assess the real benefits of nanotheranostics at the clinical level. Hence, we also discuss the efforts currently being made to translate nanotheranostics into the market, as well as their commercial impact.

  11. Clinical algorithms as a tool for psychotherapy with Latino clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoleas, Peter; Garcia, Betty

    2003-04-01

    Clinical algorithms have the advantage of being able to integrate clinical, cultural, and environmental factors into a unified method of planning and implementing treatment. A model for practice is proposed that uses 3 algorithms as guides for conducting psychotherapy with Latino clients, the uses of which are illustrated in a single, ongoing case vignette. The algorithm format has the additional advantage of easily adapting itself for data gathering for research purposes.

  12. Discovering the dementia evidence base: Tools to support knowledge to action in dementia care (innovative practice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Sarah L; Tieman, Jennifer J

    2016-09-01

    Dementia requires expert care and decision making, based on sound evidence. Reliable evidence is difficult for busy dementia care professionals to find quickly. This study developed an experimentally tested search filter as an innovative tool to retrieve literature on dementia. It has a known retrieval performance and can be provided as an open access web link directly to current literature. The Dementia Search Filter was developed using validated methodology. An Expert Advisory Group of dementia care practitioners and researchers ratified a representative set of relevant studies and undertook post hoc relevance assessment, to ensure the usefulness of the search filter. The Dementia Search Filter is published on two websites and combined with expert searches to link to evidence on dementia, at end of life in aged care settings and more generally. Evidence accessed by the Dementia Search Filter will help overcome barriers to finding current relevant research in the field, for practitioners, researchers and decision makers.

  13. A clinical tool to predict failed response to therapy in children with severe pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamtani, Manju; Patel, Archana; Hibberd, Patricia L; Tuan, Tran Anh; Jeena, Prakash; Chisaka, Noel; Hassan, Mumtaz; Radovan, Irene Maulen; Thea, Donald M; Qazi, Shamim; Kulkarni, Hemant

    2009-04-01

    Severe pneumonia in children under 5 years of age continues to be an important clinical entity with treatment failure rates as high as 20%. Where severe pneumonias are common, predictive tools for treatment failure like chest radiography and pulse oximetry are not available or affordable. Thus, there is a need for development of simple, accurate and inexpensive clinical tools for prediction of treatment failure. Using clinical, chest radiographic and pulse oximetry data from 1702 children recruited in the Amoxicillin Penicillin Pneumonia International Study (APPIS) trial we developed and validated a simple clinical tool. For development, a randomly derived development sample (n = 889) was used. The tool which was based on the results of multivariate logistic regression models was validated on a separate sample of 813 children. The derived clinical tool in its final form contained three clinical predictors: age of child, excess age-specific respiratory rate at baseline and at 24 hr of hospitalization. This tool had a 70% and 66% predictive accuracy in the development and validation samples, respectively. The tool is presented as an easy-to-use nomogram. It is possible to predict the likelihood of treatment failure in children with severe pneumonia based on clinical features that are simple and inexpensive to measure.

  14. Clinical Predictors of Intensive Care Unit Admission for Asthmatic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Kargar Maher

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionChildren with severe asthma attack are a challenging group of patients who could be difficult to treat and leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Asthma attack severity is qualitatively estimated as mild, moderate and severe attacks and respiratory failure based on conditions such as respiration status, feeling of dyspnea, and the degree of unconsciousness. part of which are subjective rather than objective. We investigated clinical findings as predictors of severe attack and probable requirement for Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU admission.Materials and MethodsIn a cross sectional and analytical study 120 patients with asthma attack were enrolled from April 2010 to April 2014 (80 admitted in the ward and 40 in pediatric intensive care unit. Predictors of PICU admission were investigated regarding to initial heart rate(HR, respiratory rate (RR, Arterial Oxygen Saturation(SaO2 and PaCo2 and clinically evident cyanosis.ResultsInitial heart rate(p-value=0.02, respiratory rate (p-value=0.03, Arterial Oxygen Saturation(p-value=0.02 and PaCo2(p-value=0.03 and clinically evident cyanosis were significantly different in two groups(Ward admitted and PICU admittedConclusion There was a significant correlation between initial vital sign and blood gas analysis suggesting usefulness of these factors as predictors of severe asthma attack and subsequent clinical course.

  15. [Systematic revue of the tools for multiprofessional primary care teams assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, P; Cardaci, C; Lopez-Ruiz, C; Boussat, B; Marchand, O

    2017-02-01

    Multiprofessionnal teams in primary care are developing in many countries including France. These groups appear very heterogeneous regarding the level of integration and interprofessional cooperation. A systematic review of the literature was performed to screen the instruments which assess the organizational development of primary care groups. Scientific literature was searched in the Pubmed database, gray literature was searched for on the Internet. The documents were selected by two independent investigators. The collected data included information on assessment instruments: origin, content, method of use, and validation process. Sixty-five documents involving 16 assessment instruments were selected for the study. Twelve instruments have been developed in North America and 4 in Europe. Four instruments were evaluation questionnaires, 4 accreditation tools and 8 were maturity matrices. The maturity matrices were structured by levels of organizational development. Their use were effected by an individual self-assessment of each professional and then by consensus of the group in the presence of an external facilitator. The questionnaire and accreditation tools have organizations and use patterns variable. The number of questions ranged from 25 to 200 with a median of 80. The instruments were organized into 4 to 16 dimensions with a median of 7. Six common themes were identified: practice and staff management, quality development, data patient management, interprofessional cooperation, accessibility and continuity of care, and formation. The validation process of tools were variable and often incomplete. The set of assessment tools for primary care group is heterogeneous in purpose, content and mode of use. However, common themes were found for all tools. An evaluation questionnaire, in French, would be useful to monitor over time and evaluate the organizational development of centers and health houses in France. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights

  16. [Clinical safety audits for primary care centers. A pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Sánchez, Míriam; Borrell-Carrió, Francisco; Ortodó Parra, Cristina; Fernàndez I Danés, Neus; Fité Gallego, Anna

    2013-01-01

    To identify organizational processes, violations of rules, or professional performances that pose clinical levels of insecurity. Descriptive cross-sectional survey with customized externally-behavioral verification and comparison of sources, conducted from June 2008 to February 2010. Thirteen of the 53 primary care teams (PCT) of the Catalonian Health Institute (ICS Costa de Ponent, Barcelona). Employees of 13 PCT classified into: director, nurse director, customer care administrators, and general practitioners. Non-random selection, teaching (TC)/non-teaching, urban (UC)/rural and small/large (LC) health care centers (HCC). A total of 33 indicators were evaluated; 15 of procedures, 9 of attitude, 3 of training, and 6 of communication. Level of uncertainty: <50% positive answers for each indicator. no collaboration. A total of 55 professionals participated (84.6% UC, 46.2% LC and 76.9% TC). Rank distribution: 13 customer care administrators, 13 nurse directors, 13 HCC directors, and 16 general practitioners. Levels of insecurity emerged from the following areas: reception of new medical professionals, injections administration, nursing weekend home calls, urgent consultations to specialists, aggressive patients, critical incidents over the agenda of the doctors, communication barriers with patients about treatment plans, and with immigrants. Clinical safety is on the agenda of the health centers. Identified areas of uncertainty are easily approachable, and are considered in the future system of accreditation of the Catalonian Government. General practitioners are more critical than directors, and teaching health care centers, rural and small HCC had a better sense of security. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Sleep Tracking, Wearable Technology, and Opportunities for Research and Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelgikar, Anita Valanju; Anderson, Patricia F; Stephens, Marc R

    2016-09-01

    Consumer-driven sleep-tracking technologies are becoming increasingly popular with patients with sleep disorders and the general population. As the list of sleep-tracking technologies continues to grow, clinicians and researchers are faced with new challenges and opportunities to incorporate these technologies into current practice. We review diagnostic tools used in sleep medicine clinical practice, discuss categories of consumer sleep-tracking technologies currently available, and explore the advantages and disadvantages of each. Potential uses of consumer sleep-tracking technologies to enhance sleep medicine patient care and research are also discussed.

  18. Job analysis and student assessment tool: perfusion education clinical preceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jeffrey B

    2007-09-01

    The perfusion education system centers on the cardiac surgery operating room and the perfusionist teacher who serves as a preceptor for the perfusion student. One method to improve the quality of perfusion education is to create a valid method for perfusion students to give feedback to clinical teachers. The preceptor job analysis consisted of a literature review and interviews with preceptors to list their critical tasks, critical incidents, and cognitive and behavioral competencies. Behaviorally anchored rating traits associated with the preceptors' tasks were identified. Students voted to validate the instrument items. The perfusion instructor rating instrument with a 0-4, "very weak" to "very strong" Likert rating scale was used. The five preceptor traits for student evaluation of clinical instruction (SECI) are as follows: The clinical instructor (1) encourages self-learning, (2) encourages clinical reasoning, (3) meets student's learning needs, (4) gives continuous feedback, and (5) represents a good role model. Scores from 430 student-preceptor relationships for 28 students rotating at 24 affiliate institutions with 134 clinical instructors were evaluated. The mean overall good preceptor average (GPA) was 3.45 +/- 0.76 and was skewed to the left, ranging from 0.0 to 4.0 (median = 3.8). Only 21 of the SECI relationships earned a GPA education program.

  19. Shared care and implementation of a pediatric clinical pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langfrits, Mette Sørensen; Thomsen, RW; Rubak, Jens Mørck

    with uncontrolled asthma should be followed at the pediatrics department. Study 2) An increased overall proportion of children with well-controlled asthma. Study 3) Favorable changes in the use of asthma medication. Study 4) Self-reported higher quality of life among children with asthma Material and methods...... specialist out-patient clinic at the pediatrics department at Viborg hospital or at one of 100 GPs in the Viborg area. At baseline the involved health care professionals participated in an introduction to the clinical pathway and treatment guide. Furthermore the clinical pathway and treatment guide...... Midten. We sincerely thank Lars G. Hansen (Head of Department of Pediatrics, Viborg Hospital) for his help and participation....

  20. Nurses Use of Critical Care Pain Observational Tool in Patients with Low Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad-Ali Asadi-Noghabi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The diagnosis of pain in patients with low consciousness is a major challenge in the intensive care unit (ICU. Therefore, the use of behavioral tools for pain assessment could be an effective tool to manage pain in this group of patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects on pain management by nurses using a critical care pain observational tool in patients with a decreased level of consciousness. Methods: Our research used a before and after design to evaluate the ability of nurses to manage pain in patients with low consciousness. A total of 106 ICU nurses were included in the study. The study was divided into three phases: pre-implementation, implementation, and post-implementation. The researchers first observed the nurses management of pain in their patients; this was done three times using a checklist following tracheal suctioning and position change procedures. The nurses were then taught how to apply the critical-care pain observational tool (CPOT. Post-implementation of the tool, the researchers re-evaluated trained the nurses’ pain management. Results: Performance scores after training improved with relation to the nurses diagnosis of pain, pharmacological and nonpharmacological actions, reassessment of pain, and re-relieving of any pain. However, use of the tool did not improve the recording of the patient’s pain and the relief measures used. Conclusion: Use of the CPOT can increase nurse’s sensitivity to pain in non-conscious patients and drive them to track and perform pain management.

  1. Development and Validation of an Assessment Tool for Competency in Critical Care Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrawalla, Paru; Eisen, Lewis Ari; Shiloh, Ariel; Shah, Brijen J.; Savenkov, Oleksandr; Wise, Wendy; Evans, Laura; Mayo, Paul; Szyld, Demian

    2015-01-01

    Background Point-of-care ultrasound is an emerging technology in critical care medicine. Despite requirements for critical care medicine fellowship programs to demonstrate knowledge and competency in point-of-care ultrasound, tools to guide competency-based training are lacking. Objective We describe the development and validity arguments of a competency assessment tool for critical care ultrasound. Methods A modified Delphi method was used to develop behaviorally anchored checklists for 2 ultrasound applications: “Perform deep venous thrombosis study (DVT)” and “Qualify left ventricular function using parasternal long axis and parasternal short axis views (Echo).” One live rater and 1 video rater evaluated performance of 28 fellows. A second video rater evaluated a subset of 10 fellows. Validity evidence for content, response process, and internal consistency was assessed. Results An expert panel finalized checklists after 2 rounds of a modified Delphi method. The DVT checklist consisted of 13 items, including 1.00 global rating step (GRS). The Echo checklist consisted of 14 items, and included 1.00 GRS for each of 2 views. Interrater reliability evaluated with a Cohen kappa between the live and video rater was 1.00 for the DVT GRS, 0.44 for the PSLA GRS, and 0.58 for the PSSA GRS. Cronbach α was 0.85 for DVT and 0.92 for Echo. Conclusions The findings offer preliminary evidence for the validity of competency assessment tools for 2 applications of critical care ultrasound and data on live versus video raters. PMID:26692968

  2. Validation of a measurement tool for self-assessment of teamwork in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, J; Shulruf, B; Torrie, J; Frengley, R; Boyd, M; Paul, A; Yee, B; Dzendrowskyj, P

    2013-09-01

    Teamwork is an important contributor to patient safety and a validated teamwork measurement tool could help healthcare teams identify areas for improvement and measure progress. We explored the psychometric properties of a teamwork measurement tool when used for self-assessment. We hypothesized that the tool had a valid factor structure and that scores from participants and external assessors would correlate. Forty intensive care teams (one doctor, three nurses) participated in four simulated emergencies, and each independently rated their team's performance at the end of each case using the teamwork measurement tool, without prior training in the use of the tool. We used exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and compared factor structure between participants and external assessors (using previously reported data). Scores from participants and external assessors were compared using Pearson's correlation coefficient. EFA demonstrated items loaded onto three distinct factors which were supported by the CFA. We found significant correlations between external and participant scores for overall teamwork scores and the three factors. Participants agreed with external assessors on the ranking of overall team performance but scored themselves significantly higher than external assessors. The teamwork measurement tool has a valid structure when used for self-assessment. Participant and external assessor scores correlated significantly, suggesting that participants could discriminate between different levels of performance, although leniency in self-assessed scores indicated the need for calibration. This tool could help structure reflection on teamwork and potentially facilitate self-directed, workplace-based improvement in teamwork.

  3. Electronic health records: essential tools in integrating substance abuse treatment with primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark HW

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Betty Tai1, Li-Tzy Wu2, H Westley Clark31Center for Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, MD, 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 3Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Rockville, MD, USAAbstract: While substance use problems are considered to be common in medical settings, they are not systematically assessed and diagnosed for treatment management. Research data suggest that the majority of individuals with a substance use disorder either do not use treatment or delay treatment-seeking for over a decade. The separation of substance abuse services from mainstream medical care and a lack of preventive services for substance abuse in primary care can contribute to under-detection of substance use problems. When fully enacted in 2014, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act 2010 will address these barriers by supporting preventive services for substance abuse (screening, counseling and integration of substance abuse care with primary care. One key factor that can help to achieve this goal is to incorporate the standardized screeners or common data elements for substance use and related disorders into the electronic health records (EHR system in the health care setting. Incentives for care providers to adopt an EHR system for meaningful use are part of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act 2009. This commentary focuses on recent evidence about routine screening and intervention for alcohol/drug use and related disorders in primary care. Federal efforts in developing common data elements for use as screeners for substance use and related disorders are described. A pressing need for empirical data on screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT for drug-related disorders to inform SBIRT and related EHR efforts is highlighted

  4. A randomized clinical trial in preterm infants on the effects of a home-based early intervention with the 'CareToy System'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sgandurra, Giuseppina; Lorentzen, Jakob; Inguaggiato, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    CareToy system is an innovative tele-rehabilitative tool, useful in providing intensive, individualized, home-based, family-centred Early Intervention (EI) in infants. Our aim was to evaluate, through a Randomized Clinical Trial (RCT) study, the effects of CareToy intervention on early motor...

  5. Deep sequencing: becoming a critical tool in clinical virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E; Avila, Santiago; Reyes-Teran, Gustavo; Martinez, Miguel A

    2014-09-01

    Population (Sanger) sequencing has been the standard method in basic and clinical DNA sequencing for almost 40 years; however, next-generation (deep) sequencing methodologies are now revolutionizing the field of genomics, and clinical virology is no exception. Deep sequencing is highly efficient, producing an enormous amount of information at low cost in a relatively short period of time. High-throughput sequencing techniques have enabled significant contributions to multiples areas in virology, including virus discovery and metagenomics (viromes), molecular epidemiology, pathogenesis, and studies of how viruses to escape the host immune system and antiviral pressures. In addition, new and more affordable deep sequencing-based assays are now being implemented in clinical laboratories. Here, we review the use of the current deep sequencing platforms in virology, focusing on three of the most studied viruses: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and influenza virus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A new tool to give hospitalists feedback to improve interprofessional teamwork and advance patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesluk, Benjamin J; Bernabeo, Elizabeth; Hess, Brian; Lynn, Lorna A; Reddy, Siddharta; Holmboe, Eric S

    2012-11-01

    Teamwork is a vital skill for health care professionals, but the fragmented systems within which they work frequently do not recognize or support good teamwork. The American Board of Internal Medicine has developed and is testing the Teamwork Effectiveness Assessment Module (TEAM), a tool for physicians to evaluate how they perform as part of an interprofessional patient care team. The assessment provides hospitalist physicians with feedback data drawn from their own work of caring for patients, in a way that is intended to support immediate, concrete change efforts to improve the quality of patient care. Our approach demonstrates the value of looking at teamwork in the real world of health care-that is, as it occurs in the actual contexts in which providers work together to care for patients. The assessment of individual physicians' teamwork competencies may play a role in the larger effort to bring disparate health professions together in a system that supports and rewards a team approach in hope of improving patient care.

  7. Improving COPD Care in a Medically Underserved Primary Care Clinic: A Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Irene; Wang, Fei; Reardon, Jane; Vergara, Cunegundo D; Salvietti, Ralph; Acevedo, Myrtha; Santana, Blanca; Fortunato, Gil

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a focus group study in an urban hospital-based primary care teaching clinic serving an indigent and Hispanic (predominantly Puerto Rican) population in New England in order to learn how patients with Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD) perceive their disease, how they experience their medical care, and the barriers they face managing their disease and following medical recommendations. The research team included medical doctors, nurses, a medical anthropologist, a clinical pharmacist, a hospital interpreter, and a systems analyst. Four focus groups were conducted in Spanish and English in April and May 2014. The demographic characteristics of the 25 focus group participants closely reflected the demographics of the total COPD clinic patients. The participants were predominantly female (72%) and Hispanic (72%) and had a median age of 63. The major themes expressed in the focus groups included: problems living with COPD; coping with complexities of comorbid illnesses; challenges of quitting smoking and maintaining cessation; dealing with second-hand smoke; beliefs and myths about quitting smoking; difficulty paying for and obtaining medications; positive experiences obtaining and managing medications; difficulties in using sleep machines at home; expressions of disappointment with the departure of their doctors; and overall satisfaction with the clinic health care providers. The study led to the creation of an action plan that addresses the concerns expressed by the focus study participants. The action plan is spearheaded by a designated bilingual and bicultural nurse and is now in operation.

  8. Primary hyperparathyroidism: epidemiology, clinical features, diagnostic tools and current management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Percivale

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT is a clinical condition characterized by overactive parathyroid gland secretion of parathyroid hormone with concurrent alteration of the phosphocalcemic metabolism. We present a literature review on primary hyperparathyroidism addressing key on clinical presentation, causes, medical and surgical treatment at the best of our knowledge. Based on this review we confirm the role of serum calcium and serum level examination, as well as we define the definitive treatment for PHPT being parathyroidectomy. In case of contraindication for surgery, medical treatment can play a relevant role.

  9. The internet as a tool in clinical pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, Josep-Maria; Figueras, Albert; Vigo, Joan-Miquel

    2006-01-01

    The invention of the internet and the world-wide web was a landmark that has affected many aspects of everyday life, but is so recent and dynamic that many of its potential uses are still being explored. Aside from its purely commercial use as a virtual pharmacy (e-commerce), the internet is useful in at least three aspects related to clinical pharmacology: communication, training and research. In this paper we briefly review several internet applications related to clinical pharmacology and describe, as an example, the logistics of a multicentre research collaboration related to the promotion of rational drug use in the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage. PMID:16722847

  10. Saliva-based biosensors: noninvasive monitoring tool for clinical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malon, Radha S P; Sadir, Sahba; Balakrishnan, Malarvili; Córcoles, Emma P

    2014-01-01

    Saliva is increasingly recognised as an attractive diagnostic fluid. The presence of various disease signalling salivary biomarkers that accurately reflect normal and disease states in humans and the sampling benefits compared to blood sampling are some of the reasons for this recognition. This explains the burgeoning research field in assay developments and technological advancements for the detection of various salivary biomarkers to improve clinical diagnosis, management, and treatment. This paper reviews the significance of salivary biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and therapeutic applications, with focus on the technologies and biosensing platforms that have been reported for screening these biomarkers.

  11. Saliva-Based Biosensors: Noninvasive Monitoring Tool for Clinical Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha S. P. Malon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Saliva is increasingly recognised as an attractive diagnostic fluid. The presence of various disease signalling salivary biomarkers that accurately reflect normal and disease states in humans and the sampling benefits compared to blood sampling are some of the reasons for this recognition. This explains the burgeoning research field in assay developments and technological advancements for the detection of various salivary biomarkers to improve clinical diagnosis, management, and treatment. This paper reviews the significance of salivary biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and therapeutic applications, with focus on the technologies and biosensing platforms that have been reported for screening these biomarkers.

  12. Impact of a critical care clinical information system on interruption rates during intensive care nurse and physician documentation tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballermann, Mark A; Shaw, Nicola T; Arbeau, Kelly J; Mayes, Damon C; Noel Gibney, R T

    2010-01-01

    Computerized documentation methods in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) may assist Health Care Providers (HCP) with their documentation workload, but evaluating impacts remains problematic. A Critical Care clinical Information System (CCIS) is an electronic charting tool designed for ICUs that may fit seamlessly into HCP work. Observers followed ICU nurses and physicians in two ICUs in Edmonton, Canada, in which a CCIS had recently been introduced. Observers recorded amounts of time HCPs spent on documentation related tasks, interruptions encountered by HCPs, and contextual information in field notes. Interruption rates varied depending on the charting medium used, with physicians being interrupted less frequently when performing documentation tasks using the CCIS, than when performing documentation tasks using other methods. In contrast, nurses were interrupted more frequently when charting using the CCIS than when using other methods. Interruption rates coupled with qualitative observations suggest that physicians utilize strategies to avoid interruptions if interfaces for entering textual notes are not well adapted to interruption-rich environments such as ICUs. Potential improvements are discussed such that systems like the CCIS may better integrate into ICU work.

  13. [Standardised pain assessment in cognitively impaired nursing home residents: Comparing the use of assessment tools in dementia care units and in integrated care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Rebecca; Sirsch, Erika; Holle, Bernhard; Bartholomeyczik, Sabine

    2017-05-01

    median percentage of residents with severe cognitive impairments who were assessed with a self-rating instrument was below 10 %; in integrated care units it was 51 %. The differences were statistically significant. A mixed regression model confirmed the results. In the majority of dementia care units a single pain assessment tool was used for all residents; in 18 of 30 dementia care units this was a proxy-rated observational instrument. The results indicate that pain assessment in cognitively impaired patients is suboptimal in many integrated care units because the nurses use inappropriate instruments. Also, they confirm the results of previous studies by demonstrating that instruments are used in clinical practice that are not recommended because their German-language versions are not validated. Since valid pain assessment is a prerequisite to appropriate pain treatment, we may assume that in many residents this is also not carried out as recommended. Especially in integrated units, a defined and consented method of pain assessment is important because of the differences in their residents' cognitive and verbal abilities. Appropriate education may help to improve this process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  14. Clinical Holistic Health: Advanced Tools for Holistic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available According to holistic medical theory, the patient will heal when old painful moments, the traumatic events of life that are often called “gestalts”, are integrated in the present “now”. The advanced holistic physician’s expanded toolbox has many different tools to induce this healing, some that are more dangerous and potentially traumatic than others. The more intense the therapeutic technique, the more emotional energy will be released and contained in the session, but the higher also is the risk for the therapist to lose control of the session and lose the patient to his or her own dark side. To avoid harming the patient must be the highest priority in holistic existential therapy, making sufficient education and training an issue of highest importance. The concept of “stepping up” the therapy by using more and more “dramatic” methods to get access to repressed emotions and events has led us to a “therapeutic staircase” with ten steps: (1 establishing the relationship; (2 establishing intimacy, trust, and confidentiality; (3 giving support and holding; (4 taking the patient into the process of physical, emotional, and mental healing; (5 social healing of being in the family; (6 spiritual healing — returning to the abstract wholeness of the soul; (7 healing the informational layer of the body; (8 healing the three fundamental dimensions of existence: love, power, and sexuality in a direct way using, among other techniques, “controlled violence” and “acupressure through the vagina”; (9 mind-expanding and consciousness-transformative techniques like psychotropic drugs; and (10 techniques transgressing the patient's borders and, therefore, often traumatizing (for instance, the use of force against the will of the patient.We believe that the systematic use of the staircase will greatly improve the power and efficiency of holistic medicine for the patient and we invite a broad cooperation in scientifically testing the

  15. Impact of patient satisfaction ratings on physicians and clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zgierska A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aleksandra Zgierska,1 David Rabago,1 Michael M Miller2–4 1Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, 2American Society of Addiction Medicine, Chevy Chase, MD, 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health, 4Herrington Recovery Center, Rogers Memorial Hospital, Oconomowoc, WI, USA Background: Although patient satisfaction ratings often drive positive changes, they may have unintended consequences. Objective: The study reported here aimed to evaluate the clinician-perceived effects of patient satisfaction ratings on job satisfaction and clinical care. Methods: A 26-item survey, developed by a state medical society in 2012 to assess the effects of patient satisfaction surveys, was administered online to physician members of a state-level medical society. Respondents remained anonymous. Results: One hundred fifty five physicians provided responses (3.9% of the estimated 4,000 physician members of the state-level medical society, or approximately 16% of the state's emergency department [ED] physicians. The respondents were predominantly male (85% and practicing in solo or private practice (45%, hospital (43%, or academia (15%. The majority were ED (57%, followed by primary care (16% physicians. Fifty-nine percent reported that their compensation was linked to patient satisfaction ratings. Seventy-eight percent reported that patient satisfaction surveys moderately or severely affected their job satisfaction; 28% had considered quitting their job or leaving the medical profession. Twenty percent reported their employment being threatened because of patient satisfaction data. Almost half believed that pressure to obtain better scores promoted inappropriate care, including unnecessary antibiotic and opioid prescriptions, tests, procedures, and hospital admissions. Among 52 qualitative responses, only three were positive. Conclusion

  16. [BALANCED SCORECARD AS A MANAGEMENT TOOL IN CLINICAL NUTRITION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez López, Cristina; Mauriz, Jose L; Culebras, Jesús M

    2015-07-01

    Nowadays, balanced scorecards have updated traditional management systems in the business sector. In this way, Kaplan and Norton propose performance measurement through several perspectives with a logical sequence: internal processes and learning impact client services, so that financial performance is affected. The aim of the present paper is to analyze the main characteristics of balanced scorecard when it is applied to non-for-profit companies and, specifically to the health sector in the clinical nutrition field. This model improves the economic vision of management with clinical indicators that represent healthcare professional's perspective. The balanced scorecard would allow a proper monitoring and tracking system for the main healthcare indicators. This contributes to a better control in comparison with standards that are associated with adequate quality assistance. Owing to the role of management accounting and cost calculations, the definition of healthcare professionals as clients or users, and clinical results relevance, it is necessary to adapt the balanced scorecard to the specific characteristics of the clinical field, redefining both perspectives and indicators.

  17. Close range photogrammetry--a clinical dental research tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, R G

    1992-08-01

    Photogrammetry is the art, science and technology of obtaining reliable information about physical objects through processes of recording and interpreting photographic images. This review outlines the principles of the technique and summarizes the various methodologies and applications in clinical dental research.

  18. Child Language Data Exchange System Tools for Clinical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacWhinney, Brian; Fromm, Davida

    2016-05-01

    The Child Language Data Exchange System Project has developed methods for analyzing many aspects of child language development, including grammar, lexicon, discourse, gesture, phonology, and fluency. This article will describe the methods available for each of these six fields, and how they can be used for assessment in the clinical setting.

  19. Perceptions of clinical utility of an Augmented Reality musical software among health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Ana Grasielle Dionísio; de Assis, Gilda Aparecida; do Nascimento, Marilena; de Deus Lopes, Roseli

    2017-04-01

    Augmented Reality musical software (GenVirtual) is a technology, which primarily allows users to develop music activities for rehabilitation. This study aimed to analyse the perceptions of health care professionals regarding the clinical utility of GenVirtual. A second objective was to identify improvements to GenVirtual software and similar technologies. Music therapists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and speech and language therapist who assist people with physical and cognitive disabilities were enrolled in three focus groups. The quantitative and qualitative data were collected through inductive thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified: the use of GenVirtual in health care areas; opportunities for realistic application of GenVirtual; and limitations in the use of GenVirtual. The registration units identified were: motor stimulation, cognitive stimulation, verbal learning, recreation activity, musicality, accessibility, motivation, sonic accuracy, interference of lighting, poor sound, children and adults. This research suggested that the GenVirtual is a complementary tool to conventional clinical practice and has great potential to motor and cognitive rehabilitation of children and adults. Implications for Rehabilitation Gaining health professional' perceptions of the Augmented Reality musical game (GenVirtual) give valuable information as to the clinical utility of the software. GenVirtual was perceived as a tool that could be used as enhancing the motor and cognitive rehabilitation process. GenVirtual was viewed as a tool that could enhance clinical practice and communication among various agencies, but it was suggested that it should be used with caution to avoid confusion and replacement of important services.

  20. Leveraging effective clinical registries to advance medical care quality and transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaiman, Tamar; Pracilio, Valerie; Kimberly, Laura; Cecil, Kate; Legnini, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Policy makers, payers, and the general public are increasingly focused on health care quality improvement. Measuring quality requires robust data systems that collect data over time, can be integrated with other systems, and can be analyzed easily for trends. The goal of this project was to study effective tools and strategies in the design and use of clinical registries with the potential to facilitate quality improvement, value-based purchasing, and public reporting on the quality of care. The research team worked with an expert panel to define characteristics of effectiveness, and studied examples of effective registries in cancer, cardiovascular care, maternity, and joint replacement. The research team found that effective registries were successful in 1 or more of 6 key areas: data standardization, transparency, accuracy/completeness of data, participation by providers, financial sustainability, and/or providing feedback to providers. The findings from this work can assist registry designers, sponsors, and researchers in implementing strategies to increase the use of clinical registries to improve patient care and outcomes.

  1. A knowledge translation tool improved osteoporosis disease management in primary care: an interrupted time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Monika; Sawka, Anna M; Hamid, Jemila; Chen, Maggie; Thorpe, Kevin; Chignell, Mark; Ewusie, Joycelyne; Marquez, Christine; Newton, David; Straus, Sharon E

    2014-09-25

    Osteoporosis affects over 200 million people worldwide at a high cost to healthcare systems, yet gaps in management still exist. In response, we developed a multi-component osteoporosis knowledge translation (Op-KT) tool involving a patient-initiated risk assessment questionnaire (RAQ), which generates individualized best practice recommendations for physicians and customized education for patients at the point of care. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Op-KT tool for appropriate disease management by physicians. The Op-KT tool was evaluated using an interrupted time series design. This involved multiple assessments of the outcomes 12 months before (baseline) and 12 months after tool implementation (52 data points in total). Inclusion criteria were family physicians and their patients at risk for osteoporosis (women aged ≥ 50 years, men aged ≥ 65 years). Primary outcomes were the initiation of appropriate osteoporosis screening and treatment. Analyses included segmented linear regression modeling and analysis of variance. The Op-KT tool was implemented in three family practices in Ontario, Canada representing 5 family physicians with 2840 age eligible patients (mean age 67 years; 76% women). Time series regression models showed an overall increase from baseline in the initiation of screening (3.4%; P time for completing the RAQ was 3.43 minutes, and 56% had any disease management addressed by their physician. Study limitations included the inherent susceptibility of our design compared with a randomized trial. The multicomponent Op-KT tool significantly increased osteoporosis investigations in three family practices, and highlights its potential to facilitate patient self-management. Next steps include wider implementation and evaluation of the tool in primary care.

  2. A knowledge based search tool for performance measures in health care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyan, Oya D; Baykal, Nazife

    2012-02-01

    Performance measurement is vital for improving the health care systems. However, we are still far from having accepted performance measurement models. Researchers and developers are seeking comparable performance indicators. We developed an intelligent search tool to identify appropriate measures for specific requirements by matching diverse care settings. We reviewed the literature and analyzed 229 performance measurement studies published after 2000. These studies are evaluated with an original theoretical framework and stored in the database. A semantic network is designed for representing domain knowledge and supporting reasoning. We have applied knowledge based decision support techniques to cope with uncertainty problems. As a result we designed a tool which simplifies the performance indicator search process and provides most relevant indicators by employing knowledge based systems.

  3. Incorporating ethical principles into clinical research protocols: a tool for protocol writers and ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rebecca H; Wacholtz, Mary C; Barnes, Mark; Boggs, Liam; Callery-D'Amico, Susan; Davis, Amy; Digilova, Alla; Forster, David; Heffernan, Kate; Luthin, Maeve; Lynch, Holly Fernandez; McNair, Lindsay; Miller, Jennifer E; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Van Campen, Luann; Wilenzick, Mark; Wolf, Delia; Woolston, Cris; Aldinger, Carmen; Bierer, Barbara E

    2016-04-01

    A novel Protocol Ethics Tool Kit ('Ethics Tool Kit') has been developed by a multi-stakeholder group of the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard. The purpose of the Ethics Tool Kit is to facilitate effective recognition, consideration and deliberation of critical ethical issues in clinical trial protocols. The Ethics Tool Kit may be used by investigators and sponsors to develop a dedicated Ethics Section within a protocol to improve the consistency and transparency between clinical trial protocols and research ethics committee reviews. It may also streamline ethics review and may facilitate and expedite the review process by anticipating the concerns of ethics committee reviewers. Specific attention was given to issues arising in multinational settings. With the use of this Tool Kit, researchers have the opportunity to address critical research ethics issues proactively, potentially speeding the time and easing the process to final protocol approval.

  4. Sociodemographic and Clinical Characteristics of Patients attending Psychotherapy in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zena Al-Sharbati

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There is significant evidence that psychotherapy is a pivotal treatment for persons diagnosed with Axis I clinical psychiatric conditions; however, a psychotherapy service has only recently been established in the Omani health care system. This study aimed to investigate the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of attendees at a psychotherapy clinic at a tertiary care hospital. Methods: An analysis was carried out of 133 new referrals to the Psychotherapy Service at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, a tertiary care hospital. Results: The majority of referrals were females (59%, aged 18–34 years, employed (38%, had ≤12 years of formal education (51%, and were single (54%. A total of 43% were treated for anxiety disorders (including obsessive compulsive disorder, while 22% were treated for depression. A total of 65% were prescribed psychotropic medications. The utilisation of the Psychotherapy Service and its user characteristics are discussed within the context of a culturally diverse Omani community which has unique personal belief systems such as in supernatural powers (Jinn, contemptuous envy (Hassad, evil eye (Ain and sorcery (Sihr which are often used to explain the aetiology of mental illness and influence personal decisions on utilising medical and psychological treatments. Conclusion: Despite the low number of referrals to the Psychotherapy Service, there is reason to believe that psychotherapy would be an essential tool to come to grips with the increasing number of mental disorders in Oman.

  5. Sociodemographic and Clinical Characteristics of Patients attending Psychotherapy in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sharbati, Zena; Hallas, Claire; Al-Zadjali, Hazar; Al-Sharbati, Marwan

    2012-02-01

    There is significant evidence that psychotherapy is a pivotal treatment for persons diagnosed with Axis I clinical psychiatric conditions; however, a psychotherapy service has only recently been established in the Omani health care system. This study aimed to investigate the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of attendees at a psychotherapy clinic at a tertiary care hospital. An analysis was carried out of 133 new referrals to the Psychotherapy Service at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, a tertiary care hospital. The majority of referrals were females (59%), aged 18-34 years, employed (38%), had ≤12 years of formal education (51%), and were single (54%). A total of 43% were treated for anxiety disorders (including obsessive compulsive disorder), while 22% were treated for depression. A total of 65% were prescribed psychotropic medications. The utilisation of the Psychotherapy Service and its user characteristics are discussed within the context of a culturally diverse Omani community which has unique personal belief systems such as in supernatural powers (Jinn), contemptuous envy (Hassad), evil eye (Ain) and sorcery (Sihr) which are often used to explain the aetiology of mental illness and influence personal decisions on utilising medical and psychological treatments. Despite the low number of referrals to the Psychotherapy Service, there is reason to believe that psychotherapy would be an essential tool to come to grips with the increasing number of mental disorders in Oman.

  6. Physician clinical information technology and health care disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcham, Jonathan D; Lutfey, Karen E; Gerstenberger, Eric; Link, Carol L; McKinlay, John B

    2009-12-01

    The authors develop a conceptual framework regarding how information technology (IT) can alter within-physician disparities, and they empirically test some of its implications in the context of coronary heart disease. Using a random experiment on 256 primary care physicians, the authors analyze the relationships between three IT functions (feedback and two types of clinical decision support) and five process-of-care measures. Endogeneity is addressed by eliminating unobserved patient characteristics with vignettes and by proxying for omitted physician characteristics. The results indicate that IT has no effects on physicians' diagnostic certainty and treatment of vignette patients overall. The authors find that treatment and certainty differ by patient age, gender, and race. Consistent with the framework, IT's effects on these disparities are complex. Feedback eliminated the gender disparities, but the relationships differed for other IT functions and process measures. Current policies to reduce disparities and increase IT adoption may be in discord.

  7. Functional profile of swallowing in clinical intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rodrigues Padovani

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the functional profile of swallowing and feedingin patients admitted to a clinical intensive care unit. Methods: Asurvey on the speech therapy care provided at clinical intensive careunit, from May to August 2006, to establish indicators to describeswallowing functional profile. In this study we included patients referredfor suspected dysphagia after undergoing long periods of mechanicalventilation and/or tracheostomy, and we excluded those suspectedof neurogenic dysphagia. Results: We observed a 65% prevalence oforopharyngeal dysphagia in four months of speech therapy. Amongthe patients who were previously submitted to orotracheal intubation,we observed oropharyngeal dysphagia in 64% of assessments, and wenoticed a reduction in dysphagia severity after speech therapy. Thirtyninepercent of cases required further speech therapy. Conclusion:Speech therapy in non-neurogenic dysphagia in clinical intensive careunit focuses mainly on patients who were intubated for more than 48hours. These patients benefited from the intervention through the useof therapeutic techniques based on the necessary criteria for safefeeding habits.

  8. Impact of clinical pharmacist in an Indian Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisham, Mohamed; Sivakumar, Mudalipalayam N; Veerasekar, Ganesh

    2016-02-01

    A critically ill patient is treated and reviewed by physicians from different specialties; hence, polypharmacy is a very common. This study was conducted to assess the impact and effectiveness of having a clinical pharmacist in an Indian Intensive Care Unit (ICU). It also evaluates the clinical pharmacist interventions with a focus on optimizing the quality of pharmacotherapy and patient safety. The prospective, observational study was carried out in medical and surgical/trauma ICU over a period of 1 year. All detected drug-related problems and interventions were categorized based on the Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe system. During the study period, average monthly census of 1032 patients got treated in the ICUs. A total of 986 pharmaceutical interventions due to drug-related problems were documented, whereof medication errors accounted for 42.6% (n = 420), drug of choice problem 15.4% (n = 152), drug-drug interactions were 15.1% (n = 149), Y-site drug incompatibility was 13.7% (n = 135), drug dosing problems were 4.8% (n = 47), drug duplications reported were 4.6% (n = 45), and adverse drug reactions documented were 3.8% (n = 38). Drug dosing adjustment done by the clinical pharmacist included 140 (11.9%) renal dose, 62 (5.2%) hepatic dose, 17 (1.4%) pediatric dose, and 104 (8.8%) insulin dosing modifications. A total of 577 drug and poison information queries were answered by the clinical pharmacist. Clinical pharmacist as a part of multidisciplinary team in our study was associated with a substantially lower rate of adverse drug event caused by medication errors, drug interactions, and drug incompatibilities.

  9. Bacteriophages in clinical samples can interfere with microbiological diagnostic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Muniesa, Maite; Navarro, Ferran

    2016-09-09

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and they are found everywhere their bacterial hosts are present, including the human body. To explore the presence of phages in clinical samples, we assessed 65 clinical samples (blood, ascitic fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and serum). Infectious tailed phages were detected in >45% of ascitic fluid and urine samples. Three examples of phage interference with bacterial isolation were observed. Phages prevented the confluent bacterial growth required for an antibiogram assay when the inoculum was taken from an agar plate containing lysis plaques, but not when taken from a single colony in a phage-free area. In addition, bacteria were isolated directly from ascitic fluid, but not after liquid enrichment culture of the same samples, since phage propagation lysed the bacteria. Lastly, Gram-negative bacilli observed in a urine sample did not grow on agar plates due to the high densities of infectious phages in the sample.

  10. Bacteriophages in clinical samples can interfere with microbiological diagnostic tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Muniesa, Maite; Navarro, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and they are found everywhere their bacterial hosts are present, including the human body. To explore the presence of phages in clinical samples, we assessed 65 clinical samples (blood, ascitic fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and serum). Infectious tailed phages were detected in >45% of ascitic fluid and urine samples. Three examples of phage interference with bacterial isolation were observed. Phages prevented the confluent bacterial growth required for an antibiogram assay when the inoculum was taken from an agar plate containing lysis plaques, but not when taken from a single colony in a phage-free area. In addition, bacteria were isolated directly from ascitic fluid, but not after liquid enrichment culture of the same samples, since phage propagation lysed the bacteria. Lastly, Gram-negative bacilli observed in a urine sample did not grow on agar plates due to the high densities of infectious phages in the sample. PMID:27609086

  11. Clinical aspects of MR colonography as a diagnostic tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Since first described in 1997, MR colonography (MRC) has since been labelled as a promising new, non-invasive technique for examining the colon. At present time, the examination is ready to be implemented as a supplement to incomplete colonoscopy or preoperative colonic evaluation. Furthermore, MRC...... and that polypectomy might be curative. Colonoscopy remains the gold standard for full colon evaluation. However, the result of our studies can justify clinical use of MRC on selected indications, e.g. in the cases where colonoscopy is incomplete or technically difficult. Since up to 54% of all preoperative colon...... evaluations in patients with colorectal cancer and up to 17-23% of regular colonoscopies are incomplete, the clinical potential of MRC is evident. Furthermore, in our studies we have shown the insufficiency of preoperative colonic evaluation by CC. In addition, considering the invasiveness, the serious...

  12. Development of a Self-Assessment Tool to Facilitate Decision-Making in Choosing a Long Term Care Administration Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johs-Artisensi, Jennifer L.; Olson, Douglas M.; Nahm, Abraham Y.

    2016-01-01

    Long term care administrators need a broad base of knowledge, skills, and interests to provide leadership and be successful in managing a fiscally responsible, quality long term care organization. Researchers developed a tool to help students assess whether a long term care administration major is a compatible fit. With input from professionals in…

  13. CLINICAL AUDIT AND RECORD KEEPING GUIDE FOR IMPROVING PATIENT CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Motimath

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Maintaining records and documentation of all aspects of patient’s dental care is considered as the legal responsibility and professional duty of the dental surgeon. Complete dental records consist of documents pertaining to history of present illness, clinical examination, diagnosis, treatment plan, treatment provided and prognosis. Record maintenance helps in all the aspects of practice whether providing appropriate treatment or medicolegal defence. MATERIALS AND METHODS We conducted thorough research of documents pertaining to patients who reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, KLES V.K. Institute of Dental Sciences, Karnataka, India, between 2015-2016.Their records were maintained in the prescribed format followed by entry in a register about the records, diagnosis, treatment which was crosschecked by a consultant daily.The record consist of several different elements, which include written notes, radiographs, study models, referral letters, consultants reports, clinical photographs, results of special investigations, drug prescriptions, laboratory prescriptions, patient identification information and a comprehensive medical history. Timely auditing was done to evaluate the quality of care provided with constant refinement of the protocols RESULTS The audit of the records done in our department showed the common mistakes in recording history by the trainees. We recorded common postoperative complications seen with different procedures and treatment protocols.Wherever required protocols and follow ups were changed to minimise them. With the help of this audit, we were able to compare new treatment modalities and were able to provide best possible care which was also cost effective. CONCLUSION This article highlights the importance of dental records and how it helps in improving patient care, especially in developing countries where this habit is to be inculcated from roots now. It gives an insight into the

  14. Use of Electronic Data and Existing Screening Tools to Identify Clinically Significant Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl A Severson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the ability of electronic health data and existing screening tools to identify clinically significant obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, as defined by symptomatic or severe OSA.

  15. NIKE: a new clinical tool for establishing levels of indications for cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundström, Mats; Albrecht, Susanne; Håkansson, Ingemar; Lorefors, Ragnhild; Ohlsson, Sven; Polland, Werner; Schmid, Andrea; Svensson, Göran; Wendel, Eva

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct a new clinical tool for establishing levels of indications for cataract surgery, and to validate this tool. Teams from nine eye clinics reached an agreement about the need to develop a clinical tool for setting levels of indications for cataract surgery and about the items that should be included in the tool. The tool was to be called 'NIKE' (Nationell Indikationsmodell för Kataraktextraktion). The Canadian Cataract Priority Criteria Tool served as a model for the NIKE tool, which was modified for Swedish conditions. Items included in the tool were visual acuity of both eyes, patients' perceived difficulties in day-to-day life, cataract symptoms, the ability to live independently, and medical/ophthalmic reasons for surgery. The tool was validated and tested in 343 cataract surgery patients. Validity, stability and reliability were tested and the outcome of surgery was studied in relation to the indication setting. Four indication groups (IGs) were suggested. The group with the greatest indications for surgery was named group 1 and that with the lowest, group 4. Validity was proved to be good. Surgery had the greatest impact on the group with the highest indications for surgery. Test-retest reliability test and interexaminer tests of indication settings showed statistically significant intraclass correlations (intraclass correlation coefficients [ICCs] 0.526 and 0.923, respectively). A new clinical tool for indication setting in cataract surgery is presented. This tool, the NIKE, takes into account both visual acuity and the patient's perceived problems in day-to-day life because of cataract. The tool seems to be stable and reliable and neutral towards different examiners.

  16. Evaluation of the Cochrane tool for assessing risk of bias in randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars; Paludan-Müller, Asger Sand; Laursen, David R. T.;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized clinical trials was introduced in 2008 and has frequently been commented on and used in systematic reviews. We wanted to evaluate the tool by reviewing published comments on its strengths and challenges and by describing and analysing how ...

  17. Evaluation of the Cochrane tool for assessing risk of bias in randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L; Paludan-Müller, A. S.; Laursen, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized clinical trials was introduced in 2008 and has frequently been commented on and used in systematic reviews. We wanted to evaluate the tool by reviewing published comments on its strengths and challenges and by describing and analysing how ...

  18. The Development and Testing of a Community Health Nursing Clinical Evaluation Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawranik, Pamela

    2000-01-01

    Describes the development and testing of a clinical evaluation tool for a community health nursing course for registered nurses through review of the literature and focus groups with community health nurses and faculty. The article contains 22 references and an abbreviated form of the evaluation tool. (Author/JOW)

  19. Progressing the utilisation of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics into clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Ronald J; Cheong, Pak Leng; Chua, Eng Wee; Kennedy, Martin A

    2013-06-01

    Understanding human genetic variation and how it impacts on gene function is a major focus in genomic-based research. Translation of this knowledge into clinical care is exemplified by pharmacogenetics/pharmacogenomics. The identification of particular gene variants that might influence drug uptake, metabolism, distribution or excretion promises a more effective personalised medicine approach in choosing the right drug or its dose for any particular individual. Adverse drug responses can then be avoided or mitigated. An understanding of germline or acquired (somatic) DNA mutations can also be used to identify drugs that are more likely to be therapeutically beneficial. This represents an area of growing interest in the treatment of cancer.

  20. Evaluation of a multimodal, distance learning HIV management course for clinical care providers in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Larry William; Kadam, Dileep B; Sangle, Shashi; Narayanan, Shivakumar; Borse, Rohidas T; McKenzie-White, Jane; Bowen, Craig W; Sisson, Stephen D; Bollinger, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    Distance learning is an important tool for training HIV health workers. However, there is limited evidence on design and evaluation of distance learning HIV curricula and tools. We therefore designed, implemented, and evaluated a distance learning course on HIV management for clinical care providers in India. After course completion, participant scores rose significantly from a pretest (78.4% mean correct) compared with the posttest (87.5%, P < .001). After course completion, participants were more likely to be confident in starting an initial antiretroviral (ARV) regimen, understanding ARV toxicities, encouraging patient adherence, diagnosing immune reconstitution syndrome, and monitoring patients on ARV medications (P ≤ .05). All participants (100%) strongly agreed/agreed that they would recommend this course to others, and most of them (96%) strongly agreed/agreed that they would take a course in this format again. A pragmatic approach to HIV curriculum development and evaluation resulted in reliable learning outcomes, as well as learner satisfaction and improvement in knowledge.

  1. A Clinically Useful Tool to Determine an Effective Snellen Fraction: Details

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    A Clinically Useful Tool to Determine an Effective Snellen Fraction: Details by William A. Monaco, Joseph M. Heimerl, and Joel T. Kalb...ARL-TR-4756 March 2009 A Clinically Useful Tool to Determine an Effective Snellen Fraction: Details William A. Monaco, Joseph M...Effective Snellen Fraction: Details 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) William A. Monaco, Joseph M

  2. Micro HTA as a tool for clinical governance: the experience of the Breast Unit in "Santa Maria" Terni Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguinetti, A; Lucchini, R; Triola, R; Avenia, S; Bistoni, G; Conti, C; Santoprete, S; Avenia, N

    2013-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the affirmation of the paradigm Health Technology Assessment (HTA) as a tool for government innovation technology in health care. As is known, this is an approach of evaluation oriented policy making that, in addition to provide for the disclosure of its results, it is proposed to consider simultaneously the clinical, economic, organizational, ethical and social issues arising from the introduction or disposal of a health technology, understood in the broadest sense of the term. In order to reconstruct a realistic picture of its level of implementation we have reproduced a micro HTA which served to assess the Harmonic Focus® device usefulness in breast surgery.

  3. "Collaboration technology": a case study of innovation in order set and clinical care standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yount, Brian; McNamara, Timothy

    2008-11-06

    Effective standardization of clinical processes, which is a growing priority for healthcare provider organizations and networks, requires effective teamwork among clinicians and staff from multidisciplinary backgrounds--often from geographically dispersed facilities--to reach consensus on care practices. Yet, most healthcare provider organizations have no precedence or tools for managing large-scale, sustained, collaborative activities. This presentation explores the human and social implications of technology. It specifically addresses healthcare collaboration and describes how innovative collaboration management technologies can be used in the healthcare industry to accelerate care standardization, order set standardization and other initiatives necessary for successful computerized provider order entry and electronic health record deployments. These topics are explored through presentation of a survey of healthcare executives and a case study of an advanced collaboration application that was adapted and deployed in a partnership between a large healthcare provider organization and a commercial developer of document management and collaboration management technologies.

  4. Body painting as a tool in clinical anatomy teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMenamin, Paul G

    2008-01-01

    The teaching of human anatomy has had to respond to significant changes in medical curricula, and it behooves anatomists to devise alternative strategies to effectively facilitate learning of the discipline by medical students in an integrated, applied, relevant, and contextual framework. In many medical schools, the lack of cadaver dissection as the primary method of learning is driving changes to more varied and novel learning and teaching methodologies. The present article describes the introduction and evaluation of a range of body painting exercises in a medical curriculum. Body painting was introduced into integrated clinical skills teaching sessions which included clinically important aspects of respiratory system, musculoskeletal system, and topics in regional anatomy including head and neck. Nontoxic body paints, easels, a mixture of brush sizes, and anatomical images were supplied. Students were allowed between 20 and 40 min to complete body painting tasks, in which they were encouraged to alternate between painting and acting as a model. Students were encouraged to use life-like rendering and coloration where appropriate. Evaluation of these sessions was performed at the end of the semester as part of a larger evaluation process. The kinesthetic nature and active participation together with the powerful visual images of underlying anatomy appear to contribute to the value of body painting as a teaching exercise. In addition, it may have the added bonus of helping break down apprehension regarding peer-peer examination. Some practical advice on introducing this method of teaching in medical curricula based on the outcomes of the evaluation is given. On the basis of our experience and student feedback, we strongly advocate the use of body painting as an adjunct to surface anatomy and clinical skills teaching classes.

  5. The community need index. A new tool pinpoints health care disparities in communities throughout the nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Richard; Barsi, Eileen

    2005-01-01

    Catholic Healthcare West, San Francisco (CHW), has developed a national Community Need Index (CNI) in partnership with Solucient, an information products company, to help health care organizations, not-for-profits, and policymakers identify and address barriers to health care access in their communities. The CNI aggregates five socioeconomic indicators long known to contribute to health disparity--income, culture/language, education, housing status, and insurance coverage--and applies them to every zip code in the United States. Each zip code is then given a score ranging from 1.0 (low need) to 5.0 (high need). Residents of communities with the highest CNI scores were shown to be twice as likely to experience preventable hospitalization for manageable conditions--such as ear infections, pneumonia or congestive heart failure--as communities with the lowest CNI scores. The CNI provides compelling evidence for addressing socioeconomic barriers when considering health policy and local health planning. The tool highlights health care disparities between geographic regions and illustrates the acute needs of several notable geographies, including inner city and rural areas.Further, it should enable health care providers, policymakers, and others to allocate resources where they are most needed, using a standardized, quantitative tool. The CNI provides CHW with an important means to strategically allocate resources where it will be most effective in maintaining a healthy community.

  6. [Initiation into nursing care research, a tool for measuring the construction of nursing professional identity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietrich, Laurence; Regnier, Jean-Claude

    2005-03-01

    This article presents some results stemming from university research work, in relation with nursing training and the construction of student nurses' professional identity. As a tool contributing in the process of this construction, Research in Nursing Care (RNS), the main subject of our research, is an element of the training program in nursing care. In a context of development of the profession, we tried to clarify the meaning of RNC as part of training but also in the fields where care is lavished as this is a work/study education program. The RNC object was discussed in historical, regulatory, and scientific contexts. Three hypotheses were raised and put to the test; the followed methodology was clarified some proposals followed the analysis of the various data corpus obtained and some reflection tracks were initiated for the trainers and assistants.

  7. Implementing the Mother-Baby Model of Nursing Care Using Models and Quality Improvement Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockman, Vicki

    As family-centered care has become the expected standard, many facilities follow the mother-baby model, in which care is provided to both a woman and her newborn in the same room by the same nurse. My facility employed a traditional model of nursing care, which was not evidence-based or financially sustainable. After implementing the mother-baby model, we experienced an increase in exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge, increased patient satisfaction, improved staff productivity and decreased salary costs, all while the number of births increased. Our change was successful because it was guided by the use of quality improvement tools, change theory and evidence-based practice models. © 2015 AWHONN.

  8. Managing clinical research data: software tools for hypothesis exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starmer, C F; Dietz, M A

    1990-07-01

    Data representation, data file specification, and the communication of data between software systems are playing increasingly important roles in clinical data management. This paper describes the concept of a self-documenting file that contains annotations or comments that aid visual inspection of the data file. We describe access of data from annotated files and illustrate data analysis with a few examples derived from the UNIX operating environment. Use of annotated files provides the investigator with both a useful representation of the primary data and a repository of comments that describe some of the context surrounding data capture.

  9. "In the beginning...": tools for talking about resuscitation and goals of care early in the admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jocelyn; Fromme, Erik K

    2013-11-01

    Quality standards no longer allow physicians to delay discussing goals of care and resuscitation. We propose 2 novel strategies for discussing goals and resuscitation on admission. The first, SPAM (determine Surrogate decision maker, determine resuscitation Preferences, Assume full care, and advise them to expect More discussion especially with clinical changes), helps clinicians discover patient preferences and decision maker during routine admissions. The second, UFO-UFO (Understand what they know, Fill in knowledge gaps, ask about desired Outcomes, Understand their reasoning, discuss the spectrum Feasible Outcomes), helps patients with poor or uncertain prognosis or family-team conflict. Using a challenging case example, this article illustrates how SPAM and UFO-UFO can help clinicians have patient-centered resuscitation and goals of care discussions at the beginning of care.

  10. Final-Year Students' and Clinical instructors' Experience of Workplace-Based Assessments Used in a Small-Animal Primary-Veterinary-Care Clinical Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, Cynthia A; Coe, Jason B; Hecker, Kent G

    2015-01-01

    Final-year veterinary students must meet baseline clinical competency upon completion of their training for entry to practice. Workplace-based assessments (WBAs), widely used in human medical training to assess post-graduate students' professionalism and clinical performance, have recently been adopted in undergraduate veterinary clinical teaching environments. WBAs should support veterinary trainees' learning in a clinical teaching environment, though utility of WBAs within veterinary education may differ from that in medical training due to differences in context and in learners' stage of clinical development. We conducted focus groups with final-year veterinary students and clinical instructors following the implementation of three WBAs (Direct Observation of Procedural Skills [DOPS], the Mini-Clinical evaluation exercise [Mini-CEX], and the In-Training Evaluation Report [ITER]) during a small-animal primary-veterinary-care rotation. Students and clinical instructors viewed the DOPS and Mini-CEX as feasible and valuable learning and assessment tools that offered an overall opportunity for timely in-the-moment feedback. Instructors viewed the ITER as less feasible in the context of a service-oriented veterinary clinical teaching environment. Students believed the ITER had potential to be informative, although in its existing application the ITER had limited utility due to time constraints on instructors that prevented them from providing students with individualized and specific feedback. In service-oriented veterinary clinical teaching environments, successful implementation of WBAs requires balancing provision of feedback to students, time demands on clinical instructors, and flexibility of assessment tools.

  11. Missing Clinical Information in NHS hospital outpatient clinics: prevalence, causes and effects on patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorthy Krishna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Britain over 39,000 reports were received by the National Patient Safety Agency relating to failures in documentation in 2007 and the UK Health Services Journal estimated in 2008 that over a million hospital outpatient visits each year might take place without the full record available. Despite these high numbers, the impact of missing clinical information has not been investigated for hospital outpatients in the UK. Studies in primary care in the USA have found 13.6% of patient consultations have missing clinical information, with this adversely affecting care in about half of cases, and in Australia 1.8% of medical errors were found to be due to the unavailability of clinical information. Our objectives were to assess the frequency, nature and potential impact on patient care of missing clinical information in NHS hospital outpatients and to assess the principal causes. This is the first study to present such figures for the UK and the first to look at how clinicians respond, including the associated impact on patient care. Methods Prospective descriptive study of missing information reported by surgeons, supplemented by interviews on the causes. Data were collected by surgeons in general, gastrointestinal, colorectal and vascular surgical clinics in three teaching hospitals across the UK for over a thousand outpatient appointments. Fifteen interviews were conducted with those involved in collating clinical information for these clinics. The study had ethics approval (Hammersmith and Queen Charlotte's & Chelsea Research Ethics Committee, reference number (09/H0707/27. Participants involved in the interviews signed a consent form and were offered the opportunity to review and agree the transcript of their interview before analysis. No patients were involved in this research. Results In 15% of outpatient consultations key items of clinical information were missing. Of these patients, 32% experienced a delay or disruption

  12. Successfully integrating aged care services: A review of the evidence and tools emerging from a long-term care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Stewart

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Providing efficient and effective aged care services is one of the greatest public policy concerns currently facing governments. Increasing the integration of care services has the potential to provide many benefits including increased access, promoting greater efficiency, and improving care outcomes. There is little research, however, investigating how integrated aged care can be successfully achieved. The PRISMA (Program of Research to Integrate Services for the Maintenance of Autonomy project, from Quebec, Canada, is one of the most systematic and sustained bodies of research investigating the translation and outcomes of an integrated care policy into practice.  The PRISMA research program has run since 1988, yet there has been no independent systematic review of this work to draw out the lessons learnt. Methods: Narrative review of all literature emanating from the PRISMA project between 1988 and 2012. Researchers accessed an online list of all published papers from the program website. The reference lists of papers were hand searched to identify additional literature. Finally, Medline, Pubmed, EMBASE and Google Scholar indexing databases were searched using key terms and author names. Results were extracted into specially designed spread sheets for analysis. Results: 45 journal articles and two books authored or co-authored by the PRISMA team were identified. Research was primarily concerned with: the design, development and validation of screening and assessment tools; and results generated from their application. Both quasi-experimental and cross sectional analytic designs were used extensively. Contextually appropriate expert opinion was obtained using variations on the Delphi Method. Literature analysis revealed the structures, processes and outcomes which underpinned the implementation. PRISMA provides evidence that integrating care for older persons is beneficial to individuals through reducing incidence of functional

  13. Successfully integrating aged care services: A review of the evidence and tools emerging from a long-term care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Stewart

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Providing efficient and effective aged care services is one of the greatest public policy concerns currently facing governments. Increasing the integration of care services has the potential to provide many benefits including increased access, promoting greater efficiency, and improving care outcomes. There is little research, however, investigating how integrated aged care can be successfully achieved. The PRISMA (Program of Research to Integrate Services for the Maintenance of Autonomy project, from Quebec, Canada, is one of the most systematic and sustained bodies of research investigating the translation and outcomes of an integrated care policy into practice.  The PRISMA research program has run since 1988, yet there has been no independent systematic review of this work to draw out the lessons learnt.Methods: Narrative review of all literature emanating from the PRISMA project between 1988 and 2012. Researchers accessed an online list of all published papers from the program website. The reference lists of papers were hand searched to identify additional literature. Finally, Medline, Pubmed, EMBASE and Google Scholar indexing databases were searched using key terms and author names. Results were extracted into specially designed spread sheets for analysis.Results: 45 journal articles and two books authored or co-authored by the PRISMA team were identified. Research was primarily concerned with: the design, development and validation of screening and assessment tools; and results generated from their application. Both quasi-experimental and cross sectional analytic designs were used extensively. Contextually appropriate expert opinion was obtained using variations on the Delphi Method. Literature analysis revealed the structures, processes and outcomes which underpinned the implementation. PRISMA provides evidence that integrating care for older persons is beneficial to individuals through reducing incidence of functional

  14. Exploring the leadership role of the clinical nurse specialist on an inpatient palliative care consulting team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilos, Kalli; Daines, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Demand for palliative care services in Canada will increase owing to an aging population and the evolving role of palliative care in non-malignant illness. Increasing healthcare demands continue to shape the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role, especially in the area of palliative care. Clinical nurse specialists bring specialized knowledge, skills and leadership to the clinical setting to enhance patient and family care. This paper highlights the clinical leadership role of the CNS as triage leader for a hospital-based palliative care consulting team. Changes to the team's referral and triage processes are emphasized as key improvements to team efficiency and timely access to care for patients and families.

  15. A new online software tool for pressure ulcer monitoring as an educational instrument for unified nursing assessment in clinical settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pokorná

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Data collection and evaluation of that data is crucial for effective quality management and naturally also for prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Data collected in a uniform manner by nurses in clinical practice could be used for further analyses. Data about pressure ulcers are collected to differing degrees of quality based on the local policy of the given health care facility and in relation to the nurse’s actual level of knowledge concerning pressure ulcer identification and use of objective scales (i.e. categorization of pressure ulcers. Therefore, we have developed software suitable for data collection which includes some educational tools to promote unified reporting of data by nurses. A description of this software and some educational and learning components of the tool is presented herein. The planned process of clinical application of the newly developed software is also briefly mentioned. The discussion is focused on the usability of the online reporting tool and possible further development of the tool.

  16. Assessing barriers to adherence in routine clinical care for pediatric kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnell, Charles D; Rich, Kristin L; Nichols, Melissa; Dahale, Devesh; Goebel, Jens W; Pai, Ahna L H; Hooper, David K; Modi, Avani C

    2017-08-01

    Patient-identified barriers to immunosuppressive medications are associated with poor adherence and negative clinical outcomes in transplant patients. Assessment of adherence barriers is not part of routine post-transplant care, and studies regarding implementing such a process in a reliable way are lacking. Using the Model for Improvement and PDSA cycles, we implemented a system to identify adherence barriers, including patient-centered design of a barriers assessment tool, identification of eligible patients, clear roles for clinic staff, and creating a culture of non-judgmental discussion around adherence. We performed time-series analysis of our process measure. Secondary analyses examined the endorsement and concordance of adherence barriers between patient-caregiver dyads. After three methods of testing, the most reliable delivery system was an EHR-integrated tablet that alerted staff of patient eligibility for assessment. Barriers were endorsed by 35% of caregivers (n=85) and 43% of patients (n=60). The most frequently patient-endorsed barriers were forgetting, poor taste, and side effects. Caregivers endorsed forgetting and side effects. Concordance between patient-caregiver dyads was fair (k=0.299). Standardized adherence barriers assessment is feasible in the clinical care of pediatric kidney transplant patients. Features necessary for success included automation, redundant systems with designated staff to identify and mitigate failures, aligned reporting structures, and reliable measurement approaches. Future studies will examine whether barriers predict clinical outcomes (eg, organ rejection, graft loss). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Application of the Smoking Scale for Primary Care (ETAP) in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Romero, M P; Cuevas-Fernández, F J; Marcelino-Rodríguez, I; Covas, V J; Rodríguez Pérez, M C; Cabrera de León, A; Aguirre-Jaime, A

    2017-08-23

    To determine if the ETAP smoking scale, which measures accumulated exposure to tobacco, both actively and passively, is applicable and effective in the clinical practice of Primary Care for the prevention of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Location Barranco Grande Health Centre in Tenerife, Spain. A study of 61 cases (AMI) and 144 controls. Sampling with random start, without matching. COR-II curves were analysed, and effectiveness was estimated using sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV). A questionnaire was provided to participating family physicians on the applicability of ETAP in the clinic. The opinion of the participating physicians was unanimously favourable. ETAP was easy to use in the clinic, required less than 3min per patient, and was useful to reinforce the preventive intervention. The ETAP COR-II curve showed that 20years of exposure was the best cut-off point, with an area under the curve of 0.70 (95%CI: 0.62-0.78), and a combination of sensitivity (98%) and NPV (96%) for AMI. When stratifying age and gender, all groups achieved sensitivities and NPVs close to 100%, except for men aged ≥55years, in whom the NPV fell to 75%. The results indicate that ETAP is a valid tool that can be applied and be effective in the clinical practice of Primary Care for the prevention of AMI related to smoking exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Checking the Quality of Clinical Guidelines using Automated Reasoning Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Hommersom, Arjen; van Bommel, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Requirements about the quality of clinical guidelines can be represented by schemata borrowed from the theory of abductive diagnosis, using temporal logic to model the time-oriented aspects expressed in a guideline. Previously, we have shown that these requirements can be verified using interactive theorem proving techniques. In this paper, we investigate how this approach can be mapped to the facilities of a resolution-based theorem prover, Otter, and a complementary program that searches for finite models of first-order statements, Mace. It is shown that the reasoning required for checking the quality of a guideline can be mapped to such fully automated theorem-proving facilities. The medical quality of an actual guideline concerning diabetes mellitus 2 is investigated in this way.

  19. Newer endovascular tools: a review of experimental and clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Thomas; Brinjikji, Waleed; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    The history of treatment of intracranial aneurysms dates back to the late 18th century. These early physicians largely based their crude techniques around "wire insertion alone, galvanopuncture (electrothrombosis), and fili-galvanopuncture (wire insertion together with electrothrombosis)," albeit with overwhelmingly unfavorable outcomes. By the end of the 20th century, treatment options progressed to include two highly effective, and safe, procedures: surgical clipping and endovascular coiling. These methods have been found to be effective treatments for a large portion of aneurysms, but there still exists a subset of patients that do not respond well to these therapies. While much progress has been made in stent-assisted coiling including the development of newer stents aimed at keep the coil ball from protruding into the parent vessel, the introduction of flow diverters has characterized a new phase in the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms. This treatment paradigm is rapidly becoming the treatment of choice for large and complex aneurysms internal carotid artery. Intrasaccular flow diverters such as the Woven EndoBridge device (WEB) and Luna device are showing promise in the treatment of wide neck bifurcation aneurysms. Other newer devices including the pCONus Bifurcating Aneurysm Implant and Endovascular Clip Systems (eCLIPs) are showing promise in small clinical and preclinical studies. As technology improves, newer devices with ingenious designs are constantly being introduced into the clinical arena. Most of these devices try to address the limitations of traditional endovascular methods in regard to providing a safe and effective treatment of wide-necked bifurcation aneurysms. Several large prospective studies are underway and once completed, the role of these newer devices will be better defined. It is easy to anticipate that with advances in 3D techniques and printing, a future in which customized devices are designed based on the individual

  20. [Ethics in clinical practice and in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintor, S; Mennuni, G; Fontana, M; Nocchi, S; Giarrusso, P; Serio, A; Fraioli, A

    2015-01-01

    The clinical ethics is the identification, analysis and solution of moral problems that can arise during the care of a patient. Given that when dealing with ethical issues in health care some risks will be encountered (talking about ethics in general, or as a problem overlapped with others in this area, or by delegation to legislative determinations) in the text certain important aspects of the topic are examined. First of all ethics as human quality of the relationship between people for the common good, especially in health services where there are serious problems like the life and the health. It is also necessary a "humanizing relationship" between those who work in these services in order to achieve quality and efficiency in this business. It is important a proper training of health professionals, especially doctors, so that they can identify the real needs and means of intervention. It is also important that scientific research must respect fundamental ethical assumptions. In conclusion, ethics in health care is not a simple matter of "cookbook" rules, but involves the responsibility and consciousness of individual operators.

  1. Quality-of-care standards for early arthritis clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivorra, José Andrés Román; Martínez, Juan Antonio; Lázaro, Pablo; Navarro, Federico; Fernandez-Nebro, Antonio; de Miguel, Eugenio; Loza, Estibaliz; Carmona, Loreto

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of early arthritis is associated with improved patient outcomes. One way to achieve this is by organising early arthritis clinics (EACs). The objective of this project was to develop standards of quality for EACs. The standards were developed using the two-round Delphi method. The questionnaire, developed using the best-available scientific evidence, includes potentially relevant items describing the dimensions of quality of care in the EAC. The questionnaire was completed by 26 experts (physicians responsible for the EACs in Spain and chiefs of the rheumatology service in Spanish hospitals). Two hundred and forty-four items (standards) describing the quality of the EAC were developed, grouped by the following dimensions: (1) patient referral to the EAC; (2) standards of structure for an EAC; (3) standards of process; (4) relation between primary care physicians and the EAC; (5) diagnosis and assessment of early arthritis; (6) patient treatment and follow-up in the EAC; (7) research and training in an EAC; and (8) quality of care perceived by the patient. An operational definition of early arthritis was also developed based on eight criteria. The standards developed can be used to measure/establish the requirements, resources, and processes that EACs have or should have to carry out their treatment, research, and educational activities. These standards may be useful to health professionals, patient associations, and health authorities.

  2. Successfully integrating aged care services: a review of the evidence and tools emerging from a long-term care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Michael J; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2013-01-01

    Providing efficient and effective aged care services is one of the greatest public policy concerns currently facing governments. Increasing the integration of care services has the potential to provide many benefits including increased access, promoting greater efficiency, and improving care outcomes. There is little research, however, investigating how integrated aged care can be successfully achieved. The PRISMA (Program of Research to Integrate Services for the Maintenance of Autonomy) project, from Quebec, Canada, is one of the most systematic and sustained bodies of research investigating the translation and outcomes of an integrated care policy into practice. The PRISMA research program has run since 1988, yet there has been no independent systematic review of this work to draw out the lessons learnt. Narrative review of all literature emanating from the PRISMA project between 1988 and 2012. Researchers accessed an online list of all published papers from the program website. The reference lists of papers were hand searched to identify additional literature. Finally, Medline, Pubmed, EMBASE and Google Scholar indexing databases were searched using key terms and author names. Results were extracted into specially designed spread sheets for analysis. Forty-five journal articles and two books authored or co-authored by the PRISMA team were identified. Research was primarily concerned with: the design, development and validation of screening and assessment tools; and results generated from their application. Both quasi-experimental and cross sectional analytic designs were used extensively. Contextually appropriate expert opinion was obtained using variations on the Delphi Method. Literature analysis revealed the structures, processes and outcomes which underpinned the implementation. PRISMA provides evidence that integrating care for older persons is beneficial to individuals through reducing incidence of functional decline and handicap levels, and improving

  3. Introduction to the special issue on advances in clinical and health-care knowledge management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Rajeev K; Feng, David Dagan; Burstein, Frada; Dwivedi, Ashish N

    2005-06-01

    Clinical and health-care knowledge management (KM) as a discipline has attracted increasing worldwide attention in recent years. The approach encompasses a plethora of interrelated themes including aspects of clinical informatics, clinical governance, artificial intelligence, privacy and security, data mining, genomic mining, information management, and organizational behavior. This paper introduces key manuscripts which detail health-care and clinical KM cases and applications.

  4. Utility of pharmacists on clinical outcomes of patients in palliative care: A short review

    OpenAIRE

    Brkić, Jovana; Tasić, Ljiljana; id_orcid 0000-0001-9584-0341; Krajnović, Dušanka

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacists as the most accessible health care professionals in outpatient settings can improve palliative patient care. The aim of this review was to assess utility of pharmacists (the effectiveness of pharmacists' interventions) on clinical outcomes of patients in palliative care at all levels of health care and in home care. Two electronic databases were searched: PubMed and SCOPUS (last searched August 2014). Primary studies, of any type of research design, in English, related to clinical...

  5. The utility of clinical decision tools for diagnosing osteoporosis in postmenopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Caroline; Lowe, Adrian; Hall, Stephen

    2008-01-29

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have a higher risk of low bone mineral density than normal age matched populations. There is limited evidence to support cost effectiveness of population screening in rheumatoid arthritis and case finding strategies have been proposed as a means to increase cost effectiveness of diagnostic screening for osteoporosis. This study aimed to assess the performance attributes of generic and rheumatoid arthritis specific clinical decision tools for diagnosing osteoporosis in a postmenopausal population with rheumatoid arthritis who attend ambulatory specialist rheumatology clinics. A cross-sectional study of 127 ambulatory post-menopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis was performed. Patients currently receiving or who had previously received bone active therapy were excluded. Eligible women underwent clinical assessment and dual-energy-xray absorptiometry (DXA) bone mineral density assessment. Clinical decision tools, including those specific for rheumatoid arthritis, were compared to seven generic post-menopausal tools to predict osteoporosis (defined as T score perform better than generic tools, however, the National Osteoporosis Foundation score could potentially reduce the number of unnecessary DXA tests by approximately 45% in this population. There was limited utility of clinical decision tools for predicting osteoporosis in this patient population. Fracture prediction tools that include risk factors independent of BMD are needed.

  6. Patient engagement: an investigation at a primary care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Preetinder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Engaged employees are an asset to any organization. They are instrumental in ensuring good commercial outcomes through continuous innovation and incremental improvement. A health care facility is similar to a regular work setting in many ways. A health care provider and a patient have roles akin to a team leader and a team member/stakeholder, respectively. Hence it can be argued that the concept of employee engagement can be applied to patients in health care settings in order to improve health outcomes. Patient engagement data were collected using a survey instrument from a primary care clinic in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Canonical correlation equations were formulated to identify combinations which were strongly related to each other. In addition, the cause-effect relationship between patient engagement and patient-perceived health outcomes was described using structural equation modeling. Canonical correlation analysis showed that the first set of canonical variables had a fairly strong relationship, ie, a magnitude > 0.80 at the 95% confidence interval, for five dimensions of patient engagement. Structural equation modeling analysis yielded a β ≥ 0.10 and a Student's t statistic ≥ 2.96 for these five dimensions. The threshold Student's t statistic was 1.99. Hence it was found the β values were significant at the 95% confidence interval for all census regions. A scaled reliable survey instrument was developed to measured patient engagement. Better patient engagement is associated with better patient-perceived health outcomes. This study provides preliminary evidence that patient engagement has a causal relationship with patient-perceived health outcomes.

  7. Patient engagement: an investigation at a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill PS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Preetinder Singh Gill College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USA Background: Engaged employees are an asset to any organization. They are instrumental in ensuring good commercial outcomes through continuous innovation and incremental improvement. A health care facility is similar to a regular work setting in many ways. A health care provider and a patient have roles akin to a team leader and a team member/stakeholder, respectively. Hence it can be argued that the concept of employee engagement can be applied to patients in health care settings in order to improve health outcomes. Methods: Patient engagement data were collected using a survey instrument from a primary care clinic in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Canonical correlation equations were formulated to identify combinations which were strongly related to each other. In addition, the cause-effect relationship between patient engagement and patient-perceived health outcomes was described using structural equation modeling. Results: Canonical correlation analysis showed that the first set of canonical variables had a fairly strong relationship, ie, a magnitude > 0.80 at the 95% confidence interval, for five dimensions of patient engagement. Structural equation modeling analysis yielded a β ≥ 0.10 and a Student's t statistic ≥ 2.96 for these five dimensions. The threshold Student's t statistic was 1.99. Hence it was found the β values were significant at the 95% confidence interval for all census regions. Conclusion: A scaled reliable survey instrument was developed to measured patient engagement. Better patient engagement is associated with better patient-perceived health outcomes. This study provides preliminary evidence that patient engagement has a causal relationship with patient-perceived health outcomes. Keywords: patient engagement, health outcomes, communication, provider effectiveness, patient incentive

  8. The clinical case report: a tool for hypothesis generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniderman, A D

    1996-10-01

    The clinical case report is generally limited to a description of unusual examples of the complications of disease or responses to therapy. However, it can also be used to present novel hypotheses which have been derived from individual cases. Two examples of this latter genre are presented and updated. These are Syndrome X and the stiff left atrial syndrome. In both instances, general and novel formulations were derived from single cases. With respect to Syndrome X, a hypothesis was generated that the chest pain and ST abnormalities in these patients represent excess activation of adenosine A1 receptors in the absence of myocardial ischemia. With respect to the stiff left atrial syndrome, recognition of the first case led to the recognition of the problem in many others. Now, a variant of the syndrome has been recognized in which mitral regurgitation is also present. In addition, the possibility that tricuspid annuloplasty may rescue patients dying of cardiac cachexia due to right heart failure caused by combined pressure and volume overload of the right ventricle is outlined.

  9. A clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, S F

    2012-05-01

    Competency in anesthesia traditionally has been determined subjectively in practice. Optimal training in procedural skills requires valid and reliable forms of assessment. The objective was to examine a procedure-specific clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block for inter-rater reliability and construct validity in a clinical setting.

  10. Systematic review of clinical prediction tools and prognostic factors in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin W. Y. Lo

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Systematic reviews for clinical prognostic factors and clinical prediction tools in aneurysmal SAH face a number of methodological challenges. These include within and between study patient heterogeneity, regional variations in treatment protocols, patient referral biases, and differences in treatment, and prognosis viewpoints across different cultures.

  11. Sustainability of the integrated chronic disease management model at primary care clinics in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozayr H. Mahomed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: An integrated chronic disease management (ICDM model consisting of four components (facility reorganisation, clinical supportive management, assisted self-supportive management and strengthening of support systems and structures outside the facility has been implemented across 42 primary health care clinics in South Africa with a view to improve the operational efficiency and patient clinical outcomes.Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the sustainability of the facility reorganisation and clinical support components 18 months after the initiation.Setting: The study was conducted at 37 of the initiating clinics across three districts in three provinces of South Africa.Methods: The National Health Service (NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement Sustainability Model (SM self-assessment tool was used to assess sustainability.Results: Bushbuckridge had the highest mean sustainability score of 71.79 (95% CI: 63.70–79.89 followed by West Rand Health District (70.25 (95% CI: 63.96–76.53 and Dr Kenneth Kaunda District (66.50 (95% CI: 55.17–77.83. Four facilities (11% had an overall sustainability score of less than 55.Conclusion: The less than optimal involvement of clinical leadership (doctors, negative staff behaviour towards the ICDM, adaptability or flexibility of the model to adapt to external factors and infrastructure limitation have the potential to negatively affect the sustainability and scale-up of the model.

  12. Sustainability of the integrated chronic disease management model at primary care clinics in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Ozayr H; Asmall, Shaidah; Voce, Anna

    2016-11-17

    An integrated chronic disease management (ICDM) model consisting of four components (facility reorganisation, clinical supportive management, assisted self-supportive management and strengthening of support systems and structures outside the facility) has been implemented across 42 primary health care clinics in South Africa with a view to improve the operational efficiency and patient clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess the sustainability of the facility reorganisation and clinical support components 18 months after the initiation. The study was conducted at 37 of the initiating clinics across three districts in three provinces of South Africa. The National Health Service (NHS) Institute for Innovation and Improvement Sustainability Model (SM) self-assessment tool was used to assess sustainability. Bushbuckridge had the highest mean sustainability score of 71.79 (95% CI: 63.70-79.89) followed by West Rand Health District (70.25 (95% CI: 63.96-76.53)) and Dr Kenneth Kaunda District (66.50 (95% CI: 55.17-77.83)). Four facilities (11%) had an overall sustainability score of less than 55. The less than optimal involvement of clinical leadership (doctors), negative staff behaviour towards the ICDM, adaptability or flexibility of the model to adapt to external factors and infrastructure limitation have the potential to negatively affect the sustainability and scale-up of the model.

  13. Does Radar Technology Support the Diagnosis of Pneumothorax? PneumoScan—A Diagnostic Point-of-Care Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lindner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A nonrecognized pneumothorax (PTX may become a life-threatening tension PTX. A reliable point-of-care diagnostic tool could help in reduce this risk. For this purpose, we investigated the feasibility of the use of the PneumoScan, an innovative device based on micropower impulse radar (MIR. Patients and Methods. addition to a standard diagnostic protocol including clinical examination, chest X-ray (CXR, and computed tomography (CT, 24 consecutive patients with chest trauma underwent PneumoScan testing in the shock trauma room to exclude a PTX. Results. The application of the PneumoScan was simple, quick, and reliable without functional disorder. Clinical examination and CXR each revealed one and PneumoScan three out of altogether four PTXs (sensitivity 75%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 95%. The undetected PTX did not require intervention. Conclusion. The PneumoScan as a point-of-care device offers additional diagnostic value in patient management following chest trauma. Further studies with more patients have to be performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the device.

  14. Management tools and organization as key factors towards quality care: reflections from experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonneau, D

    1997-06-01

    Health care organization in French hospitals has become an increasingly important issue, as efforts to ensure better cost control have increased financial constraints, as patients have demanded ever better results and quality, and as nurses' expectations for better working conditions have grown. Organizing a health care unit requires an articulation between individual efforts--necessary both for gathering accurate information on each patient and for providing patients with personalized care--as well as an integrated system of various logistics, specialized services such as nursing care, custodial care, technical examinations, and administrative procedures. Coordination between these different components continues to be a significant challenge to hospitals, as each category has developed independently its own specialty and sense of autonomy, resulting in different professional rationalities, cultures, approaches, and sometimes conflicting behaviour. Pointing out these difficulties is not sufficient to solve the problem, however, and since the management tools currently in use (activity measurements, procedures used to develop choices and judgements) are often kept in place for external reasons, they may actually perpetuate these behaviours. This paper is a set of reflections derived from a long period of experience and research in the management of French hospitals and health management institutions. It reports that the financial reforms implemented in budgeting procedures for French hospitals, and the efforts to control costs better in the national health insurance system, have resulted in new types of behaviour in physicians, nurses and health care managers, as well as the need for information that deals not only with health care activities but also with quality.

  15. Volunteering for Clinical Trials Can Help Improve Health Care for Everyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Volunteering for Clinical Trials Can Help Improve Health Care for Everyone Past ... healthy people to help," says Melanie Modlin about clinical trials. "We have a role to play in helping ...

  16. Comparison of 5 health care professionals’ratings of the clinical significance of drug related problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villesen, Christine; Hojsted, Jette; Kjeldsen, Lene Juel

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients have medicines reviews conducted by different health care professionals in different settings. Introducing a clinical panel to drug related problems (DRPs) to evaluate their clinical significance is common practice. The clinical panel discuss the potential consequences and com...

  17. Feasibility and acceptability of TRANSFoRm to improve clinical trial recruitment in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellos, Nikolaos; Bliźniuk, Grzegorz; Czopnik, Dorota; McGilchrist, Mark; Misiaszek, Andrzej; Bródka, Piotr; Curcin, Vasa; Car, Josip; Delaney, Brendan C; Andreasson, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Recruitment of study participants is a challenging process for health professionals and patients. The Translational Medicine and Patient Safety in Europe (TRANSFoRm) clinical trial tools enable automated identification, recruitment and follow-up in clinical trials, potentially saving time, effort and costs for all parties involved. This study evaluates the acceptability and feasibility of TRANSFoRm to improve clinical trial recruitment in primary care. A feasibility study was conducted in three general practices in Poland. Participants were physicians and patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Semi-structured interviews were held to obtain feedback about the usefulness, ease of use and overall experience with the TRANSFoRm tools and to identify potential usability issues. Data were analysed thematically. A total of 5 physicians and 10 patients participated in the study. Physicians were satisfied with the usefulness of the system, as it enabled easier and faster identification, recruitment and follow-up of patients compared with existing methods. Patients found the TRANSFoRm apps easy to use to report patient outcomes. However, they also felt that the apps may not be useful for patients with limited exposure to smartphone and web technologies. Two main usability issues were identified: physicians could not access the result of the randomization at the end of each visit, and participants could not locate the follow-up reminder email. This study provides new evidence on the acceptability and feasibility of TRANSFoRm to enable automated identification, recruitment and follow-up of study participants in primary care trials. It also helps to better understand and address users' requirements in eHealth-supported clinical research. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Robotic Seals as Therapeutic Tools in an Aged Care Facility: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Birks

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Robots, including robotic seals, have been used as an alternative to therapies such as animal assisted therapy in the promotion of health and social wellbeing of older people in aged care facilities. There is limited research available that evaluates the effectiveness of robot therapies in these settings. The aim of this study was to identify, explore, and describe the impact of the use of Paro robotic seals in an aged care facility in a regional Australian city. A qualitative, descriptive, exploratory design was employed. Data were gathered through interviews with the three recreational therapists employed at the facility who were also asked to maintain logs of their interactions with the Paro and residents. Data were transcribed and thematically analysed. Three major themes were identified from the analyses of these data: “a therapeutic tool that’s not for everybody,” “every interaction is powerful,” and “keeping the momentum.” Findings support the use of Paro as a therapeutic tool, revealing improvement in emotional state, reduction of challenging behaviours, and improvement in social interactions of residents. The potential benefits justify the investment in Paro, with clear evidence that these tools can have a positive impact that warrants further exploration.

  19. CLINICAL FEATURES OF ACUTE FEBRILE THROMBOCYTOPAENIA AMONG PATIENTS ATTENDING PRIMARY CARE CLINICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairani Omar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Identifying clinical features that differentiate acute febrile thrombocytopaenia from acute febrile illness without thrombocytopaenia can help primary care physician to decide whether to order a full blood count (FBC. This is important because thrombocytopaenia in viral fever may signify more serious underlying aetiology like dengue infection.Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the clinical features of acute febrile patients with thrombocytopaenia and acute febrile patients without thrombocytopaenia.Methodology: This was a clinic-based cross-sectional study from May to November 2003. Consecutive patients presenting with undifferentiated fever of less than two weeks were selected from the Primary Care Centre of Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia and Batu 9 Cheras Health Clinic. Clinical features of these patients were recorded and FBC examination was done for all patients. Thrombocytopaenia was defined as platelet count <150X109/L. The odds ratio of thrombocytopaenia for each presenting symptoms was calculated.Result: Seventy-three patients participated in this study. Among them, 45.2% had thrombocytopaenia. Myalgia and headache were common among all patients. However, nausea and vomiting occurred significantly more often among patients with thrombocytopaenia than in patients with normal platelet count (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.5.Conclusion: Acute non-specific febrile patients presenting with symptoms of nausea and vomiting may have higher risk of thrombocytopaenia and should be seriously considered for FBC.

  20. The clinical content of preconception care: infectious diseases in preconception care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coonrod, Dean V; Jack, Brian W; Stubblefield, Phillip G; Hollier, Lisa M; Boggess, Kim A; Cefalo, Robert; Cox, Shanna N; Dunlop, Anne L; Hunter, Kam D; Prasad, Mona R; Lu, Michael C; Conry, Jeanne A; Gibbs, Ronald S; Hogan, Vijaya K

    2008-12-01

    A number of infectious diseases should be considered for inclusion as part of clinical preconception care. Those infections strongly recommended for health promotion messages and risk assessment or for the initiation of interventions include Chlamydia infection, syphilis, and HIV. For selected populations, the inclusion of interventions for tuberculosis, gonorrheal infection, and herpes simplex virus are recommended. No clear evidence exists for the specific inclusion in preconception care of hepatitis C, toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, listeriosis, malaria, periodontal disease, and bacterial vaginosis (in those with a previous preterm birth). Some infections that have important consequences during pregnancy, such as bacterial vaginosis (in those with no history of preterm birth), asymptomatic bacteriuria, parvovirus, and group B streptococcus infection, most likely would not be improved through intervention in the preconception time frame.

  1. Validation of Clinical Tools for Vaginal and Vulvar Symptom Assessment in Cancer Patients and Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Anne A; Baser, Raymond E; Seidel, Barbara; Stabile, Cara; Canty, Jocelyn P; Goldfrank, Deborah J; Carter, Jeanne

    2017-01-01

    Health care professionals can play a pivotal role in promoting vulvovaginal health through assessment and appropriate intervention. To develop and validate brief clinical measurements to facilitate the identification of vulvovaginal symptoms in patients with and survivors of cancer. One hundred seventy-five women survivors of cancer attending a Female Sexual Medicine and Women's Health Program from September 26, 2012 through October 31, 2014 completed the Vaginal Assessment Scale (VAS) and the Vulvar Assessment Scale (VuAS)-a modified version of the VAS that targets vulvar symptoms. Pelvic examination results were recorded using a clinical examination checklist. Internal consistency of the two scales was assessed using Cronbach α, and the correlation between scales and other outcomes was reported. The internal consistency measurements of the VAS and VuAS at the first visit were 0.70 and 0.68, which decreased to 0.53 and 0.66 at the last visit. The VAS composite and VuAS composite scores were moderately correlated with each other (0.42 and 0.45 at first and last visits, respectively). A strong correlation was observed between VAS pain with intercourse and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) pain with intercourse (-0.63 and -0.71 at the first and last visits, respectively). Worse pain with examination, worse functioning on the FSFI pain, lubrication, and total scores, and worse vulvar irritation were correlated with more severe symptoms on the VAS and VuAS. The VAS and VuAS are simple tools that can be used by clinicians to assess health concerns in women diagnosed with and treated for cancer. Validation is needed across diverse settings and groups of women. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cost differentials of dental outpatient care across clinical dentistry branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Rančić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental care presents affordability issues in Central & Eastern European transitional economies due to lack of insurance coverage in most countries of the region and almost complete out-of-pocket payments by citizens.Objective: Real world estimates on cost differentials across clinical dentistry branches, ICD-10 diagnostic groups and groups of dental services.Methods: Prospective case-series cost analysis was conducted from the patient perspective. A six months time horizon was adopted. Sample size was 752 complete episodes of treatment in 250 patients, selected in 2012/2013 throughout several specialist state- and private-owned dental clinics in Serbia. All direct costs of dental care were taken into account and expressed in Euros (€.Results: Mean total costs of dental care were € 46 ± 156 per single dentist visit while total costs incurred by this population sample were € 34,424. Highest unit utilization of services belongs to conservative dentistry (31.9%, oral surgery (19.5% and radiology (17.4%, while the resource with the highest monetary value belongs to implantology € 828 ± 392, orthodontics € 706 ± 667 and prosthetics € 555 ± 244. The most frequently treated diagnosis was tooth decay (33.8% unit services provided, pulpitis (11.2% and impacted teeth (8.5%, while most expensive to treat were anomalies of tooth position (€ 648 ± 667, abnormalities of size and form of teeth (€ 508 ± 705 and loss of teeth due to accident, extraction or local periodontal disease (€ 336 ± 339.Conclusion: Although the range of dental costs currently falls behind EU average, Serbia’s emerging economy is likely to expand in the long run while market demand for dental services will grow. Due to threatened financial sustainability of current health insurance patterns in Western Balkans, getting acquainted with true size and structure of dental care costs could essentially support informed decision making in future

  3. Ethical considerations in clinical training, care and research in psychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strous, Rael D

    2011-04-01

    Psychopharmacology is a powerful tool in psychiatry; however, it is one that demands responsibility in order to deal with the ethical complexities that accompany advances in the field. It is important that questions are asked and that ethical mindfulness and sensitivity are developed along with clinical skills. In order to cultivate and deepen ethical awareness and subsequently solve issues in optimal fashion, investment should be made in the development of an ethical decision-making process as well as in education in the ethics of psychopharmacology to trainees in the field at all stages of their educational development. A clear approach to identifying ethical problems, engaging various ethical concepts in considering solutions and then applying these principles in problem resolution is demanded. An openness in identifying and exploring issues has become crucial to the future development and maturation of psychopharmacologists, both research and clinical. Consideration must be given to the social implications of psychopharmacological practice, with the best interests of patients always paramount. From both a research and clinical perspective, psychopharmacology has to be practised with fairness, sensitivity and ethical relevance to all. While ethical issues related to psychopharmacological practice are varied and plentiful, this review focuses on advances in technology and biological sciences, personal integrity, special populations, and education and training.

  4. Measurement tools and process indicators of patient safety culture in primary care. A mixed methods study by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parker, D.; Wensing, M.; Esmail, A.; Valderas, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little guidance available to healthcare practitioners about what tools they might use to assess the patient safety culture. OBJECTIVE: To identify useful tools for assessing patient safety culture in primary care organizations in Europe; to identify those aspects of performance

  5. A Methodology for Implementing Clinical Algorithms Using Expert-System and Database Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Rucker, Donald W.; Shortliffe, Edward H.

    1989-01-01

    The HyperLipid Advisory System is a combination of an expert system and a database that uses an augmented transition network methodology for implementing clinical algorithms. These algorithms exist as tables from which the separate expert-system rule base sequentially extracts the steps in the algorithm. The rule base assumes that the algorithm has a binary branching structure and models episodes of clinical care, but otherwise makes no assumption regarding the specific clinical domain. Hyper...

  6. Pediatric Oncology Clinic Care Model: Achieving Better Continuity of Care for Patients in a Medium-sized Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Donna L; Halton, Jacqueline; Bassal, Mylène; Klaassen, Robert J; Mandel, Karen; Ramphal, Raveena; Simpson, Ewurabena; Peckan, Li

    2016-10-25

    Providing the best care in both the inpatient and outpatient settings to pediatric oncology patients is all programs goal. Using continuous improvement methodologies, we changed from a solely team-based physician care model to a hybrid model. All patients were assigned a dedicated oncologist. There would then be 2 types of weeks of outpatient clinical service. A "Doc of the Day" week where each oncologist would have a specific day in clinic when their assigned patients would be scheduled, and then a "Doc of the Week" week where one physician would cover clinic for the week. Patient satisfaction surveys done before and 14 months after changing the model of care showed that patients were very satisfied with the care they received in both models. A questionnaire to staff 14 months after changing showed that the biggest effect was increased continuity of care, followed by more efficient clinic workflow and increased consistency of care. Staff felt it provided better planning and delivery of care. A hybrid model of care with a primary physician for each patient and assigned clinic days, alternating with weeks of single physician coverage is a feasible model of care for a medium-sized pediatric oncology program.

  7. THE ROLE OF AUTOPSY IN MEDICAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT: COMPARISON OF CLINICAL AND POSTMORTEM DIAGNOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Tukaram

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Autopsy is an essential auditing tool in clinical practice. The autopsy teaches us not only what is killing people right now, but points to what will kill us in the near future. This is the first autopsy study in Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU in India as per our knowledge. METHODS Retro-prospective study of total of 141 medical autopsies of MICU deaths performed in the Department of Pathology during a period of three years. A meticulous study was performed to compare ante-mortem clinical diagnosis and post-mortem final cause of death. Cases showing a discrepancy between the clinical diagnosis and post-mortem final cause of death were categorized into IV classes according to Goldman classification. RESULTS Maximum autopsies were performed in 21-40 years (58.15%. Female preponderance noted. Non-infectious aetiology was most common cause of death (50%, of which lesions of respiratory system were the most common (33.8%. Amongst the infections, pneumonia was the most common cause of death (29.23%. Discrepancies between ante-mortem and post-mortem were noted in 63 cases (44.68%. Class I and class II discrepancies were 49.21% and 44.45%, respectively. CONCLUSION Our study stresses that routine autopsy is still very useful in MICU and emphasis must be placed on autopsy evaluation for the improvement of quality of patient care.

  8. The treatable intellectual disability APP www.treatable-id.org: A digital tool to enhance diagnosis & care for rare diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Karnebeek Clara D M

    2012-07-01

    . This innovative digital tool is designed to motivate health care providers to search actively for treatable causes of ID, and support an evidence-based approach to rare metabolic diseases. In our current –omics world with continuous information flow, the effective synthesis of data into accessible, clinical knowledge has become ever more essential to bridge the gap between research and care.

  9. [HOLDING OBJECTIVE STRUCTURED CLINICAL EXAMINATIONS FOR ANESTHESIOLOGY AND INTENSIVE CARE CLINICAL RESIDENCY IN STATE GRADUATES CERTIFICATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schegolev, A V; Andreenko, A A; Ershov, E N; Lahin, R E; Makarenko, E P

    2016-01-01

    The modern system of medical education requires objective methods to assess clinical competence of medical specialists. Application of objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) during the final certification of graduates of clinical residency allows to evaluate the theoretical knowledge, manual skills. Enabling simulation scenarios in the program makes it possible to objectively evaluate the important non-technical skills of anesthesiologists, identify gaps in the system of training and modify it. The experience of the objective structured clinical examination as part of the state certification of graduates of clinical residency of the Department ofAnesthesiology and Intensive Care, Military MedicalAcademy after C M Kirov allows us to consider this technique in an objective way a comprehensive assessment of the competence of health professionals. Students confirmed its highly realistic, they have revealed the presence of emotional stress during the simulation sessions, the majority agreed that the simulation session increased the level of their readiness to address these situations in clinical practice. Staff of the department is planning to testing and introduction rating scales into a system of assessment, to improved exam program, increasing the number of clinical scenarios for simulation sessions.

  10. Web-based simulation: a tool for teaching critical care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Sayonara de Fatima Faria; Marin, Heimar de Fatima

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop, to implement and to evaluate a web-based simulation for critical care nursing, as a tool for teaching nursing students at the undergraduate level. An adapted methodology was used to develop teaching material in a web-based learning environment, consisting of three evaluation phases (ergonomic, pedagogical and usability), carried out by web-designers/programmers, nursing teachers/nurses, and undergraduate nursing students. The research tools used were three different evaluation forms, based on a five-point Likert scale, which were applied after using the simulation. The results garnered from the forms show positive analyses in every evaluation, with special emphasis on the encouragement of learning in the pedagogical evaluation period. In the usability evaluation, the highlight was on the students' satisfaction in using the environment and how easy it was to navigate. This shows the feasibility of using this simulation to improve the learning process.

  11. Transforming health care the financial impact of technology, electronic tools and data mining

    CERN Document Server

    Fasano, Phil

    2013-01-01

    The future of healthcare technologies, and what they mean for investors and entrepreneurs The healthcare technology revolution is just around the corner. And when it arrives, it will change and enrich our lives in ways we can only begin to imagine. Doctors will perform blood pressure readings via video chat and nutritionists will analyze diet based on photos taken with cellphone cameras. Transforming Health Care combines healthcare, technology, and finance in an innovative new way that explains the future of healthcare and its effects on patient care, exploring the emergence of electronic tools that will transform the medical industry. Explaining how technology, not politics, will lead the future of the healthcare revolution, author and healthcare technology expert Phil Fasano presents real-life examples that show how the next generation of medical breakthroughs will come from the instant exchange of information across the world Explores how new technologies will radically change the future of healthcare by m...

  12. Validation of the Danish version of the Critical Care Pain Observation Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, J B; Poulsen, Kristian S.O.; Laerkner, E;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessing pain in critically ill patients is a challenge even in an intensive care unit (ICU) with a no sedation protocol. The aim of this study was to validate the Danish version of the pain assessment method; Critical Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) in an ICU with a no sedation...... in the data collection and CPOT scores were blinded to each other. Calculations of interrater reliability, criterion validity and discriminant validity were performed to validate the Danish version of CPOT. RESULTS: The results indicated a good correlation between the two raters (all scores > 0.9 and P ....05). About 48 (68.6%) of the included patients were able to self-report pain. We found a significantly higher mean CPOT score at the nociceptive procedure than at rest or the non-nociceptive procedure (P

  13. Implementing a balanced scorecard as a strategic management tool in a long-term care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalm, Corinne

    2008-01-01

    The Capital Care Group, the largest public sector continuing care organization in Canada, had no ready access to information on its own performance and therefore was limited in its pursuit of evidence-informed decision-making. To remedy this, it was decided to introduce a balanced scorecard. A literature review was conducted together with interviews with 10 other health care organizations which had implemented balanced scorecards. With this information, a workshop was held that resulted in a framework and about 120 potential indicators. Subsequently the number of indicators was reduced to 29, using pre-determined criteria. Development of a corporate balanced scorecard facilitated executive strategic thinking and clarified the organization's strategic direction. In parallel, scorecards were developed at the level of care centres. These had a common core of indicators, plus some site-specific ones. Development of the corporate scorecard took three years and an additional six months for the care centre scorecards. A formal implementation plan has been accepted by the executive team. Key to this is communicating to staff the role of scorecards for strategic management and not just performance measurement. Traditional thinking needs to change from a short-term operational focus to long-term strategy. In addition, champions need to be identified in each care centre and they need to be networked together. Finally, the scorecard is being integrated into existing operational management as a routine component together with resources to support its use. The balanced scorecard has focused on its role as a strategic management tool. The indicators and dimensions need to be customized to the organization. Senior management must be seen to be driving its introduction. It is worth spending sufficient time developing and implementing a scorecard rather than trying to rush its introduction. The scorecard needs to be integrated with existing management processes and sufficient

  14. The interprofessional socialization and valuing scale: a tool for evaluating the shift toward collaborative care approaches in health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gillian; Shaw, Lynn; Orchard, Carole A; Miller, Stacy

    2010-01-01

    There is a need for tools by which to evaluate the beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes that underlie interprofessional socialization and collaborative practice in health care settings. This paper introduces the Interprofessional Socialization and Valuing Scale (ISVS), a 24-item self-report measure based on concepts in the interprofessional literature concerning shifts in beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes that underlie interprofessional socialization. The ISVS was designed to measure the degree to which transformative learning takes place, as evidenced by changed assumptions and worldviews, enhanced knowledge and skills concerning interprofessional collaborative teamwork, and shifts in values and identities. The scales of the ISVS were determined using principal components analysis. The principal components analysis revealed three scales accounting for approximately 49% of the variance in responses: (a) Self-Perceived Ability to Work with Others, (b) Value in Working with Others, and (c) Comfort in Working with Others. These empirically derived scales showed good fit with the conceptual basis of the measure. The ISVS provides insight into the abilities, values, and beliefs underlying socio-cultural aspects of collaborative and authentic interprofessional care in the workplace, and can be used to evaluate the impact of interprofessional education efforts, in house team training, and workshops.

  15. Clinically important drug-drug interactions in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabali, A A H; Awang, R; Zyoud, S H

    2012-08-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) cause considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide and may lead to hospital admission. Sophisticated computerized drug information and monitoring systems, more recently established in many of the emerging economies, including Malaysia, are capturing useful information on prescribing. Our aim is to report on an investigation of potentially serious DDIs, using a university primary care-based system capturing prescription records from its primary care services. We retrospectively collected data from two academic years over 20 months from computerized databases at the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) from users of the USM primary care services. Three hundred and eighty-six DDI events were observed in a cohort of 208 exposed patients from a total of 23,733 patients, representing a 2-year period prevalence of 876·4 per 100,000 patients. Of the 208 exposed patients, 138 (66·3%) were exposed to one DDI event, 29 (13·9%) to two DDI events, 15 (7·2%) to three DDI events, 6 (2·9%) to four DDI events and 20 (9·6%) to more than five DDI events. Overall, an increasing mean number of episodes of DDIs was noted among exposed patients within the age category ≥70 years (P=0·01), an increasing trend in the number of medications prescribed (P<0·001) and an increasing trend in the number of long-term therapeutic groups (P<0·001). We describe the prevalence of clinically important DDIs in an emerging economy setting and identify the more common potentially serious DDIs. In line with the observations in developed economies, a higher number of episodes of DDIs were seen in patients aged ≥70 years and with more medications prescribed. The easiest method to reduce the frequency of DDIs is to reduce the number of medications prescribed. Therapeutic alternatives should be selected cautiously. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Methodology for matrix support: interfaces between Occupational Therapy and the health care organizing tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone de Pádua Ayresb

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses matrix support as a tool for transforming the ways of organizing health care,particularly concerning primary care. To this end, it conceptualizes the subject and reflects on the growing roleof the Occupational Therapist in matrix teams since the creation of the Centers of Support for Family HealthCare (NASF by the Brazilian Health Agency. Moreover, it discusses the issues raised during the workshopon “Teamwork and matrix support in Primary Health Care” held in October 2011, at the Primary Health CareSymposium of the XII Brazilian Congress and IX Latin American Congress of Occupational Therapy. It introducesreflections on the challenges encountered in the practice of matrix support in the everyday work in the NASFs.It was possible to observe that the obstacles found have been impairing workers’ activities; nevertheless, what isvalued in this article is the importance of the identification of these obstacles as the first step to overcome them,as well as the occupational therapist’s role as one of the actors of the transformations needed.

  17. Situational Analysis of Essential Surgical Care Management in Iran Using the WHO Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhor, Rohollah; Keshavarz Mohamadi, Nastaran; Khalesi, Nader; Jafari, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    Surgery is an essential component of health care, yet it has usually been overlooked in public health across the world. This study aimed to perform a situational analysis of essential surgical care management at district hospitals in Iran. This research was a descriptive and cross-sectional study performed at 42 first-referral district hospitals of Iran in 2013. The World Health Organization (WHO) Tool for the situational analysis of emergency and essential care was used for data collection in four domains of facilities and equipment, human resources, surgical interventions, and infrastructure. Data analysis was conducted using simple descriptive statistical methods. In this study, 100% of the studied hospitals had oxygen cylinders, running water, electricity, anesthesia machines, emergency departments, archives of medical records, and X-ray machines. In 100% of the surveyed hospitals, specialists in surgery, anesthesia, and obstetrics and gynecology were available as full-time staff. Life-saving procedures were performed in the majority of the hospitals. Among urgent procedures, neonatal surgeries were conducted in 14.3% of the hospitals. Regarding non-urgent procedures, acute burn management was conducted in 38.1% of the hospitals. Also, a few other procedures such as cricothyrotomy and foreign body removal were performed in 85.7% of the hospitals. The results indicated that suitable facilities and equipment, human resources, and infrastructure were available in the district hospitals in Iran. These findings showed that there is potential for the district hospitals to provide care in a wider spectrum.

  18. Wearable technology as a booster of clinical care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Stephan; Hannig, Andreas; Spreckelsen, Cord; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2014-03-01

    Wearable technology defines a new class of smart devices that are accessories or clothing equipped with computational power and sensors, like Google Glass. In this work, we propose a novel concept for supporting everyday clinical pathways with wearable technology. In contrast to most prior work, we are not focusing on the omnipresent screen to display patient information or images, but are trying to maintain existing workflows. To achieve this, our system supports clinical staff as a documenting observer, only intervening adequately if problems are detected. Using the example of medication preparation and administration, a task known to be prone to errors, we demonstrate the full potential of the new devices. Patient and medication identifier are captured with the built-in camera, and the information is send to a transaction server. The server communicates with the hospital information system to obtain patient records and medication information. The system then analyses the new medication for possible side-effects and interactions with already administered drugs. The result is sent to the device while encapsulating all sensitive information respecting data security and privacy. The user only sees a traffic light style encoded feedback to avoid distraction. The server can reduce documentation efforts and reports in real-time on possible problems during medication preparation or administration. In conclusion, we designed a secure system around three basic principles with many applications in everyday clinical work: (i) interaction and distraction is kept as low as possible; (ii) no patient data is displayed; and (iii) device is pure observer, not part of the workflow. By reducing errors and documentation burden, our approach has the capability to boost clinical care.

  19. Team dynamics, clinical work satisfaction, and patient care coordination between primary care providers: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hummy; Ryan, Molly; Tendulkar, Shalini; Fisher, Josephine; Martin, Julia; Peters, Antoinette S; Frolkis, Joseph P; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Chien, Alyna T; Singer, Sara J

    Team-based care is essential for delivering high-quality, comprehensive, and coordinated care. Despite considerable research about the effects of team-based care on patient outcomes, few studies have examined how team dynamics relate to provider outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine relationships among team dynamics, primary care provider (PCP) clinical work satisfaction, and patient care coordination between PCPs in 18 Harvard-affiliated primary care practices participating in Harvard's Academic Innovations Collaborative. First, we administered a cross-sectional survey to all 548 PCPs (267 attending clinicians, 281 resident physicians) working at participating practices; 65% responded. We assessed the relationship of team dynamics with PCPs' clinical work satisfaction and perception of patient care coordination between PCPs, respectively, and the potential mediating effect of patient care coordination on the relationship between team dynamics and work satisfaction. In addition, we embedded a qualitative evaluation within the quantitative evaluation to achieve a convergent mixed methods design to help us better understand our findings and illuminate relationships among key variables. Better team dynamics were positively associated with clinical work satisfaction and quality of patient care coordination between PCPs. Coordination partially mediated the relationship between team dynamics and satisfaction for attending clinicians, suggesting that higher satisfaction depends, in part, on better teamwork, yielding more coordinated patient care. We found no mediating effects for resident physicians. Qualitative results suggest that sources of satisfaction from positive team dynamics for PCPs may be most relevant to attending clinicians. Improving primary care team dynamics could improve clinical work satisfaction among PCPs and patient care coordination between PCPs. In addition to improving outcomes that directly concern health care providers, efforts to

  20. Assessing the Proximity Relationship of Walk-in Clinics and Primary Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alissa; Revere, Lee; Ramphul, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    This article evaluates the spatial relationship between primary care provider clinics and walk-in clinics. Using ZIP code level data from Harris County, Texas, the results suggest that primary care physicians and walk-in clinics are similarly located at lower rates in geographic areas with populations of lower socioeconomic status. Although current clinic location choices effectively broaden the gap in primary care access for the lower income population, the growing number of newly insured individuals may make it increasingly attractive for walk-in clinics to locate in geographic areas with populations of lower socioeconomic status and less competition from primary care physicians.

  1. Nurse Practitioner Perceptions of a Diabetes Risk Assessment Tool in the Retail Clinic Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjama, Kristen L; Oliver, JoAnn S; Hayes, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    IN BRIEF This article describes a study to gain insight into the utility and perceived feasibility of the American Diabetes Association's Diabetes Risk Test (DRT) implemented by nurse practitioners (NPs) in the retail clinic setting. The DRT is intended for those without a known risk for diabetes. Researchers invited 1,097 NPs working in the retail clinics of a nationwide company to participate voluntarily in an online questionnaire. Of the 248 NPs who sent in complete responses, 114 (46%) indicated that they used the DRT in the clinic. Overall mean responses from these NPs indicated that they perceive the DRT as a feasible tool in the retail clinic setting. Use of the DRT or similar risk assessment tools in the retail clinic setting can aid in the identification of people at risk for type 2 diabetes.

  2. Assessing the need for an online decision-support tool to promote evidence-based practices of psychosocial counseling in HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukafka, Rita; Millery, Mari; Chan, Connie; LaRock, William; Bakken, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Psychosocial counselors have a vital and challenging role in supporting persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH/A) to better manage their disease. However, gaps in training, education, and skills limit the effectiveness of counselors' efforts. We propose that the use of a decision-support tool for counselors at the point of care can support them in their work as well as help alleviate many training and practice gaps. Decision-support tools aimed at reducing knowledge and practice gaps are used extensively to assist clinical providers at the point of care; however, there is a need for decision-support tools designed specifically for HIV/AIDS counselors. To identify requirements for such a tool, we conducted a needs assessment through interviews of 19 HIV/AIDS clinic counselors who provide 20 or more hours per week of psychosocial support to PLWH/A. The assessment explored their education and training backgrounds, the extent to which evidence-based practices are implemented, and how a decision-support tool can support counselor work practices. Qualitative analysis was organized around seven main categories: counselor characteristics, patient characteristics, barriers, definitions of key concepts, use of guidelines, client assessments, and resources. The resulting coding schemes revealed knowledge and practice gaps among the interviewees, as well as barriers and challenges of counseling. Education and training background of the counseling staff varied widely. When asked to define five key concepts related to HIV counseling, 26-47% of respondents were unable to articulate an adequate definition. Less than half of the interviewees recalled sources of guidelines used in their work and specific models of care introduced during trainings. Interviews identified environmental barriers, language and literacy, patient education, and patient communication as the most prominent challenges to counseling work. The results from this study inform the need for and development of a

  3. Developing a tool for mapping adult mental health care provision in Europe: the REMAST research protocol and its contribution to better integrated care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Salvador-Carulla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mental health care is a critical area to better understand integrated care and to pilot the different components of the integrated care model. However, there is an urgent need for better tools to compare and understand the context of integrated mental health care in Europe.Method: The REMAST tool (REFINEMENT MApping Services Tool combines a series of standardised health service research instruments and geographical information systems (GIS to develop local atlases of mental health care from the perspective of horizontal and vertical integrated care. It contains five main sections: (a Population Data; (b the Verona Socio-economic Status (SES Index; (c the Mental Health System Checklist; (d the Mental Health Services Inventory using the DESDE-LTC instrument; and (e Geographical Data.Expected results: The REMAST tool facilitates context analysis in mental health by providing the comparative rates of mental health service provision according to the availability of main types of care; care placement capacity; workforce capacity; and geographical accessibility to services in the local areas in eight study areas in Austria, England, Finland, France, Italy, Norway, Romania and Spain.Discussion: The outcomes of this project will facilitate cooperative work and knowledge transfer on mental health care to the different agencies involved in mental health planning and provision. This project would improve the information to users and society on the available resources for mental health care and system thinking at the local level by the different stakeholders. The techniques used in this project and the knowledge generated could eventually be transferred to the mapping of other fields of integrated care.

  4. Use of a validated screening tool for psoriatic arthritis in dermatology clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Ganatra, Bella; Manoharan, Dishan; Akhras, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Dermatology clinics represent a key opportunity to screen patients with psoriasis for psoriatic arthritis (PA) which often remains unrecognised. A significant proportion of adults with psoriasis develop arthropathy [5] with around two-thirds having progressive arthritis.[6] NICE has recognised this by the annual use of a validated screening tool such as psoriasis epidemiological screening tool (PEST) on all psoriasis patients without PA. We introduced the PEST into our dermatology department ...

  5. Outcome tools used for ambulatory children with cerebral palsy: responsiveness and minimum clinically important differences

    OpenAIRE

    Oeffinger, D; Bagley, A; Rogers, S.; Gorton, G; Kryscio, R; Abel, M.; Damiano, D; Barnes, D.; Tylkowski, C

    2008-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal multicenter study of ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP) examined changes in outcome tool score over time, tool responsiveness, and used a systematic method for defining minimum clinically important differences (MCIDs). Three hundred and eighty-one participants with CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS] Levels I–III; age range 4–18y, mean age 11y [SD 4y 4mo]; 265 diplegia, 116 hemiplegia; 230 males, 151 females). At baseline and follow-u...

  6. Integrating substance abuse care with community diabetes care: implications for research and clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghitza UE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Udi E Ghitza,1 Li-Tzy Wu,2 Betty Tai11Center for the Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD, 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Cigarette smoking and alcohol use are prevalent among individuals with diabetes in the US, but little is known about screening and treatment for substance use disorders in the diabetic population. This commentary discusses the scope and clinical implications of the public health problem of coexisting substance use and diabetes, including suggestions for future research. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the US, and is associated with many severe health complications like cardiovascular disease, stroke, kidney damage, and limb amputations. There are an estimated 24 million adults in the US with type 2 diabetes. Approximately 20% of adults aged 18 years or older with diabetes report current cigarette smoking. The prevalence of current alcohol use in the diabetic population is estimated to be around 50%–60% in epidemiological surveys and treatment-seeking populations. Cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in a dose-dependent manner and is an independent modifiable risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes. Diabetic patients with an alcohol or other drug use disorder show a higher rate of adverse health outcomes. For example, these patients experience more frequent and severe health complications as well as an increased risk of hospitalization, and require longer hospital stays. They are also less likely to seek routine care for diabetes or adhere to diabetes treatment than those without an alcohol or other drug use disorder. The Affordable Care Act of 2010 and the Mental Health Parity Act and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 provide opportunities for facilitating integration of

  7. Conformity of pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics to the patient-centered medical home care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehia, Baligh R; Agwu, Allison L; Schranz, Asher; Korthuis, P Todd; Gaur, Aditya H; Rutstein, Richard; Sharp, Victoria; Spector, Stephen A; Berry, Stephen A; Gebo, Kelly A

    2013-05-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has been introduced as a model for providing high-quality, comprehensive, patient-centered care that is both accessible and coordinated, and may provide a framework for optimizing the care of youth living with HIV (YLH). We surveyed six pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics caring for 578 patients (median age 19 years, 51% male, and 82% black) in July 2011 to assess conformity to the PCMH. Clinics completed a 50-item survey covering the six domains of the PCMH: (1) comprehensive care, (2) patient-centered care, (3) coordinated care, (4) accessible services, (5) quality and safety, and (6) health information technology. To determine conformity to the PCMH, a novel point-based scoring system was devised. Points were tabulated across clinics by domain to obtain an aggregate assessment of PCMH conformity. All six clinics responded. Overall, clinics attained a mean 75.8% [95% CI, 63.3-88.3%] on PCMH measures-scoring highest on patient-centered care (94.7%), coordinated care (83.3%), and quality and safety measures (76.7%), and lowest on health information technology (70.0%), accessible services (69.1%), and comprehensive care (61.1%). Clinics moderately conformed to the PCMH model. Areas for improvement include access to care, comprehensive care, and health information technology. Future studies are warranted to determine whether greater clinic PCMH conformity improves clinical outcomes and cost savings for YLH.

  8. How do interprofessional student teams interact in a primary care clinic? A qualitative analysis using activity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Fiona; Francis-Cracknell, Alison; McDonald, Rachael; Newton, Jennifer M; Keating, Jennifer L; Dodic, Miodrag

    2016-10-01

    Practice based interprofessional education opportunities are proposed as a mechanism for health professionals to learn teamwork skills and gain an understanding of the roles of others. Primary care is an area of practice that offers a promising option for interprofessional student learning. In this study, we investigated what and how students from differing professions learn together. Our findings inform the design of future interprofessional education initiatives. Using activity theory, we conducted an ethnographic investigation of interprofessional education in primary care. During a 5 months period, we observed 14 clinic sessions involving mixed discipline student teams who interviewed people with chronic disease. Teams were comprised of senior medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy and physiotherapy entry level students. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted with seven clinical educators. Data were analysed to ascertain the objectives, tools, rules and division of labour. Two integrated activity systems were identified: (1) student teams gathering information to determine patients' health care needs and (2) patients either as health consumers or student educators. Unwritten rules regarding 'shared contribution', 'patient as key information source' and 'time constraints' were identified. Both the significance of software literacy on team leadership, and a pre-determined structure of enquiry, highlighted the importance of careful consideration of the tools used in interprofessional education, and the way they can influence practice. The systems of practice identified provide evidence of differing priorities and values, and multiple perspectives of how to manage health. The work reinforced the value of the patients' voice in clinical and education processes.

  9. Asthma control limitations in selected primary health care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan J. Gerber

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary health care services worldwide are currently experiencing many quality-related problems. Efforts to improve these services appear to be sporadic and unsatisfactory. Investigations have revealed (Sharma & Sharma 2007 that one of the main causes for this state of affairs can be identif ed as neglected or inadequate documentation of patient/case history. The health care provider (HCP should be equipped to improve the quality of health care and to take the lead in assuaging the predicament.

    The present study was undertaken to assess the correlation between asthma control and patient-related case history notes as recorded via the HCP. The data were obtained retrospectively from the patient notes of all asthmatic patients (including children and pregnant women who attended six selected clinics in the North West Province of South Africa (Dr Kenneth Kaunda Municipal District.

    The analysis of the data collected from the patient clinic books confirmed the suspicion of poor quality of documentation, although the documentation in certain categories rendered some positive results. When compared to the GINA® guidelines, none of the patients had been controlled properly and only a small number (18.4% had been controlled partly (GINA 2008. Asthma control may be enhanced when a standard template is developed for completion by the HCP. It is envisaged that this will ensure that vital information regarding asthma control is documented in order to contribute to satisfactory chronic disease control.

    Opsomming

    Primêre gesondheidsorgdienste wêreldwyd ondervind tans menige gehaltediens-verwante probleme, terwyl pogings om dit te verbeter sporadies en onbevredigend voorkom. Navorsing toon (Sharma & Sharma, 2007 dat een van die hoofoorsake hiervan die onvoldoende dokumentasie van die pasiënt of die geval se geskiedenis of nalating om te dokumenteer, is. Die gesondheidsorgverskaffer (GSV moet toegerus word om die gehalte

  10. Principles supporting dynamic clinical care teams: an American College of Physicians position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Robert B; Crowley, Ryan A

    2013-11-05

    The U.S. health care system is undergoing a shift from individual clinical practice toward team-based care. This move toward team-based care requires fresh thinking about clinical leadership and responsibilities to ensure that the unique skills of each clinician are used to provide the best care for the patient as the patient's needs dictate, while the team as a whole must work together to ensure that all aspects of a patient's care are coordinated for the benefit of the patient. In this position paper, the American College of Physicians offers principles, definitions, and examples to dissolve barriers that prevent movement toward dynamic clinical care teams. These principles offer a framework for an evolving, updated approach to health care delivery, providing policy guidance that can be useful to clinical teams in organizing the care processes and clinician responsibilities consistent with professionalism.

  11. Clinically assisted hydration and the Liverpool Care Pathway: Catholic ethics and clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowarska, Anna

    2015-08-01

    The Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient (LCP), a framework introduced for providing comfortable care at the last stage of life, has recently become highly contentious. Among the most serious allegations levelled against it, has been that the LCP may be used as a covert form of euthanasia by withdrawal of clinically assisted hydration (CAH). This concern has been raised, in particular by a number of Catholic medical professionals, who have asserted that the LCP is incompatible with Catholic ethics. This paper examines the key Catholic ethical principles relevant to treatment and care towards the end of life (the sanctity/inviolability of life principle, the distinction between ordinary and extraordinary means). Relevant current clinical evidence regarding CAH in relation to terminal thirst, dehydration, prolongation of life and possible negative impacts on the dying is also scrutinised. It is argued that for some patients at the very end of life it may be permissible and even desirable to withhold or withdraw it. Thus, as administration of CAH may become extraordinary, forgoing it in some situations is fully compatible with Catholic ethics. The article therefore concludes that the stance of the LCP in respect of provision of CAH is fully in alignment with Catholic teaching.

  12. The utility of clinical decision tools for diagnosing osteoporosis in postmenopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brand Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have a higher risk of low bone mineral density than normal age matched populations. There is limited evidence to support cost effectiveness of population screening in rheumatoid arthritis and case finding strategies have been proposed as a means to increase cost effectiveness of diagnostic screening for osteoporosis. This study aimed to assess the performance attributes of generic and rheumatoid arthritis specific clinical decision tools for diagnosing osteoporosis in a postmenopausal population with rheumatoid arthritis who attend ambulatory specialist rheumatology clinics. Methods A cross-sectional study of 127 ambulatory post-menopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis was performed. Patients currently receiving or who had previously received bone active therapy were excluded. Eligible women underwent clinical assessment and dual-energy-xray absorptiometry (DXA bone mineral density assessment. Clinical decision tools, including those specific for rheumatoid arthritis, were compared to seven generic post-menopausal tools to predict osteoporosis (defined as T score Results One hundred and twenty seven women participated. The median age was 62 (IQR 56–71 years. Median disease duration was 108 (60–168 months. Seventy two (57% women had no record of a previous DXA examination. Eighty (63% women had T scores at femoral neck or lumbar spine less than -1. The area under the ROC curve for clinical decision tool prediction of T score Conclusion There was limited utility of clinical decision tools for predicting osteoporosis in this patient population. Fracture prediction tools that include risk factors independent of BMD are needed.

  13. Development of a Physical Environmental Observational Tool for Dining Environments in Long-Term Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Habib; Keller, Heather; Pfisterer, Kaylen; Hung, Lillian

    2017-02-20

    This paper presents the first standardized physical environmental assessment tool titled Dining Environment Audit Protocol (DEAP) specifically designed for dining spaces in care homes and reports the results of its psychometric properties. Items rated include: adequacy of lighting, glare, personal control, clutter, staff supervision support, restraint use, and seating arrangement option for social interaction. Two scales summarize the prior items and rate the overall homelikeness and functionality of the space. Ten dining rooms in three long-term care homes were selected for assessment. Data were collected over 11 days across 5 weeks. Two trained assessors completed DEAP independently on the same day. Interrater-reliability was completed for lighting, glare, space, homelike aspects, seating arrangements and the two summary scales, homelikeness and functionality of the space. For categorical measures, measure responses were dichotomized at logical points and Cohen's Kappa and concordance on ratings were determined. The two overall rating scales on homelikeness and functionality of space were found to be reliable intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (~0.7). The mean rating for homelikeness for Assessor 1 was 3.5 (SD 1.35) and for functionality of the room was 5.3. (SD 0.82; median 5.5). The findings indicate that the tool's interrater-reliability scores are promising. The high concordance on the overall scores for homelikeness and functionality is indicative of the strength of the individual items in generating a reliable global assessment score on these two important aspects of the dining space.

  14. Pathology is a necessary and informative tool in oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagtegaal, Iris D; West, Nicholas P; van Krieken, J Han J M; Quirke, Phil

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are essential for the improvement of cancer care. The complexity of modern cancer care and research require careful design, for which input from all disciplines is necessary. Pathologists should play a key role in the design and execution of modern cancer trials, with special attention to the eligibility, stratification and evaluation of response to therapy. In the current review all these aspects are discussed, with examples from colorectal cancer trials. We describe critical issues in biomarker evaluation and development and emphasize the importance of the role of the pathologist in quality control of cancer treatment.

  15. A feasibility study of a combined nurse/pharmacist-led chronic pain clinic in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Michelle; Closs, S José; Marczewski, Kath; Barratt, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pain is common and management hampered by lack of resources in primary and secondary care. Nurse- or pharmacist-led clinics have been shown to lead to improvements in care for patients with chronic pain. This study showed that a combined nurse/pharmacist-led clinic for managing chronic pain in primary care can lead to improvements in management of pain, reduction in use of secondary care resources and high rates of satisfaction.

  16. Computational challenges and human factors influencing the design and use of clinical research participant eligibility pre-screening tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pressler Taylor R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trials are the primary mechanism for advancing clinical care and evidenced-based practice, yet challenges with the recruitment of participants for such trials are widely recognized as a major barrier to these types of studies. Data warehouses (DW store large amounts of heterogenous clinical data that can be used to enhance recruitment practices, but multiple challenges exist when using a data warehouse for such activities, due to the manner of collection, management, integration, analysis, and dissemination of the data. A critical step in leveraging the DW for recruitment purposes is being able to match trial eligibility criteria to discrete and semi-structured data types in the data warehouse, though trial eligibility criteria tend to be written without concern for their computability. We present the multi-modal evaluation of a web-based tool that can be used for pre-screening patients for clinical trial eligibility and assess the ability of this tool to be practically used for clinical research pre-screening and recruitment. Methods The study used a validation study, usability testing, and a heuristic evaluation to evaluate and characterize the operational characteristics of the software as well as human factors affecting its use. Results Clinical trials from the Division of Cardiology and the Department of Family Medicine were used for this multi-modal evaluation, which included a validation study, usability study, and a heuristic evaluation. From the results of the validation study, the software demonstrated a positive predictive value (PPV of 54.12% and 0.7%, respectively, and a negative predictive value (NPV of 73.3% and 87.5%, respectively, for two types of clinical trials. Heuristic principles concerning error prevention and documentation were characterized as the major usability issues during the heuristic evaluation. Conclusions This software is intended to provide an initial list of eligible patients to a

  17. Are Women of East Kazakhstan Satisfied with the Quality of Ma¬ternity Care? Implementing the WHO Tool to Assess the Quality of Hospital Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzhan DAULETYAROVA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the satisfaction of mothers with the quality of care provided by maternity institutions in East Kazakhstan on the basis of the “Quality of hospital Care for mothers and newborn babies, assessment tool” (WHO, 2009.Methods: This cross-sectional study took place in 2013 and covered five maternity hospitals in East Kazakhstan (one referral, two urban and two rural. To obtain information, interviews with 872 patients were conducted. The standard tool covered 12 areas ranging from pregnancy to childcare. A score was assigned to each area of care (from 0 to 3. The assessment provided the semi-quantitative data on the quality of hospital care for women and newborns from the perception of mothers.Results: The average satisfaction score was 2.48 with a range from 2.2 to 2.7. The mean age of women was 27.4 yr. Forty-two percent were primiparas. Mean birth weight was 3455.4 g. All infants had ‘skin to skin’ contact with their mothers immediately after birth. Mean number of antenatal visits to family clinics was 8.6. Only 42.1% of the respondents used contraceptives while the rest were not aware of contraception, never applied it and could not distinguish between different methods and devices.Conclusions: The quality of care was substandard in all institutions. To improve the quality of care, WHO technologies in perinatal care could be applied. Keywords: Maternal health care, Quality of care, WHO assessment tool, Kazakhstan

  18. Feedback and clinical practice improvement: A tool to assist workplace supervisors and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja, P; Harvey, T; Fox, A; Carmichael, M

    2016-03-01

    In work integrated learning, students may report difficulties applying theory learned at university to clinical practice. One contributing factor may be students' inability to engage in meaningful reflection and self-correcting behaviours. This paper reports the evaluation of a tool, process and resources developed to assist students to reflect on feedback and engage in self-assessment. Students were assisted to develop self-assessment skills by reflecting on, and engaging with feedback from previous workplace experiences to develop goals, learning outcomes and strategies to improve performance with mostly positive results. A secondary aim was to identify common learning strategies or barriers that impacted on student outcomes. Four themes emerged from the qualitative data: 1) preparing for clinical learning, 2) relationships and engagement levels, 3) shared awareness and, 4) developing clinical practice. Overall students felt the tool assisted them to narrow their attention on what needed to be improved. While supervisors believed the tool helped them to focus on specific needs of each student. Common barriers to clinical practice improvement related to a lack of opportunity in some settings, and lack of staff willingness to support students to achieve identified goals. Students and supervisors found the use of the tools beneficial and assisted students to demonstrate a greater understanding of how to apply feedback received to support their learning in the clinical environment.

  19. Developing and testing a tool to measure nurse/physician communication in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojlovich, Milisa; Saint, Sanjay; Forman, Jane; Fletcher, Carol E; Keith, Rosalind; Krein, Sarah

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study, conducted in 3 intensive care units (ICUs) at 1 Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, was to develop tools and procedures to measure nurse/physician communication in future studies. We used mixed methods in a multistaged approach. Qualitative data came from 4 observations of patient care rounds and 8 interviews with nurses and physicians. Quantitative data came from anonymous surveys distributed to nurses in all 3 ICUs (n = 66). We administered the Safety Organizing Scale to measure nurses' self-reported behaviors that enable a safety culture. Analysis of variance was the main statistical test. Qualitative data were used to create an observation data collection tool and a working protocol, to measure nurse/physician communication in a future study. Analysis of variance revealed significant differences between the 3 units (f = 4.57, P = 0.02). There also were significant differences on 4 of 9 items of the Safety Organizing Scale. Using mixed methods, we gained multiple perspectives that helped us to clarify and validate the context and content of communication. Quantitative analysis showed significant differences between the 3 ICUs in nurses' perceptions of a safety culture. According to qualitative analyses, nurses from the unit which reported the weakest safety culture also were the least satisfied in their communication with physicians. Qualitative analyses corroborated quantitative findings and demonstrated the importance of contextual influences on nurse/physician communication. Through the tools and protocol we created, more realistic strategies to promote effective communication between nurses and physicians may be developed and tested in future studies.

  20. Design Thinking as a Tool for Interdisciplinary Education in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Grift, Tim C; Kroeze, Renske

    2016-09-01

    Grappling with complex structural health care issues requires medical professionals to have training in skills and knowledge that go beyond the basic and clinical sciences. It is also crucial for health care professionals to be able to work collaboratively. However, medical education has only limitedly institutionalized the teaching of these skills. In fall 2014, a one-semester crossover course called Hacking Healthcare was developed by the University of Amsterdam in cooperation with the Gerrit Rietveld Academie of Fine Arts and six health care institutions in the greater Amsterdam area. The course comprised one or two weekly three-hour evening sessions consisting of a lecture, workshop, and group work. It was structured using the three stages of the design thinking process-inspiration, ideation, and implementation. Twenty-seven medicine, psychology, other science disciplines, and art students participated, working in interdisciplinary groups on an assigned case study. The course yielded both unconventional and holistic key insights and a wide range of tangible outcomes, which were also considered to be relevant by the patient. Among university (i.e., nonart) students (n = 14), the average overall score of the course was 8.5 out of 10, with 10 being the highest rating. Aspects of the course that were mentioned as positive points were the activating teaching environment, academic development, and development of collaboration skills and creative capabilities. This approach could be applied in other fields, such as medical education on a larger scale, clinical practice, and the design of scientific research.

  1. [Incidence of adverse medical events in the neonatal intensive care unit with the help of a global trigger tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Фастовец, Марина Н; Белорус, Андрей И; Лысак, Виктор П; Зюзина, Лариса С; Ковалева, Елена М

    Identification and monitoring of the frequency of adverse medical events are important in the organization of the patient's safety system in the intensive care units (ICU). The consistent and accurate identification of adverse events remains a problem for most medical institutions, even in developed countries of the world. To determine the frequency of adverse medical events in the NICU by using Global and Pediatric Trigger Instruments. To achieve the goal, the cross-sectional study was conducted in which in retrospect analyzed 160 newborn development records which were treated in the ICU of the newborn in the perinatal center of the M.V. Sklifosovsky Poltava Regional Clinical Hospital in 2016 to identify in them certain neonatal triggers. In 21.3% of newborns, after detecting the triggers of the "Care" module, the hospital infection was confirmed, which we regarded as medical adverse event. The trigger "Infiltration / extravasation" of the same module was detected in 1.9% medical records. Triggers "Glucose less than 3.0 mmol / L after 48 hours from birth", "Increase in creatinine" and trigger "deviation of electrolytes" of the module "Laboratory" were accordingly found in 21.9%, 6.3% and 11.3% medical records of newborns. Trigger tool is an effective way to identify adverse events that cause to patient harm. Our results can form the basis for the development of a national neonatal trigger instrument that will effectively monitor the frequency of such events in the ICU of newborn.

  2. Pharmacist's management of drug-related problems: a tool for teaching and providing pharmaceutical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslade, N E; Bajcar, J M; Bombassaro, A M; Caravaggio, C D; Strong, D K; Yamashita, S K

    1997-01-01

    During the development of education and practice models based on the philosophy of pharmaceutical care (PC), six pharmacists worked with the University of Toronto Faculty of Pharmacy to implement the PC model in their practice sites. These pharmacists found it necessary to modify existing tools to create one that explicitly guided them through the PC process, including the phase of monitoring patients for desired outcomes. This resulted in the development of the Pharmacist's Management of Drug Related Problems. This tool requires pharmacists to collect patient drug and medical data and write responses to specific questions about the data to interpret their significance. As proficiency in providing PC is attained, the questions and space for written responses can be eliminated, leaving a comprehensive documentation system of patient outcomes and the data collected, recommendations made, and monitoring completed by the pharmacist. This tool has been adopted by the University of Toronto Faculty of Pharmacy and is being used in various continuing education programs and by practicing pharmacists across Canada.

  3. Prediction of falls using a risk assessment tool in the acute care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferko Nicole

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The British STRATIFY tool was previously developed to predict falls in hospital. Although the tool has several strengths, certain limitations exist which may not allow generalizability to a Canadian setting. Thus, we tested the STRATIFY tool with some modification and re-weighting of items in Canadian hospitals. Methods This was a prospective validation cohort study in four acute care medical units of two teaching hospitals in Hamilton, Ontario. In total, 620 patients over the age of 65 years admitted during a 6-month period. Five patient characteristics found to be risk factors for falls in the British STRATIFY study were tested for predictive validity. The characteristics included history of falls, mental impairment, visual impairment, toileting, and dependency in transfers and mobility. Multivariate logistic regression was used to obtain optimal weights for the construction of a risk score. A receiver-operating characteristic curve was generated to show sensitivities and specificities for predicting falls based on different threshold scores for considering patients at high risk. Results Inter-rater reliability for the weighted risk score indicated very good agreement (inter-class correlation coefficient = 0.78. History of falls, mental impairment, toileting difficulties, and dependency in transfer / mobility significantly predicted fallers. In the multivariate model, mental status was a significant predictor (P Conclusion Good predictive validity for identifying fallers was achieved in a Canadian setting using a simple-to-obtain risk score that can easily be incorporated into practice.

  4. VCT clinic HIV burden and its link with HIV care clinic at the University of Gondar hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemie Getahun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT is an important component of any HIV/AIDS control and prevention activities. VCT makes people aware of their HIV serostatus and enables early identification of those who need care. It is an important link to HIV care and support. The main aim of this study is to describe the HIV burden at VCT and define the relationship between the VCT Center and the HIV Chronic Care Clinic of the University of Gondar (UoG Hospital. Methods It is a record based descriptive study undertaken by using data collected by health professionals at the VCT center and the HIV chronic care clinic of the UoG Hospital. Patient data collected from 2005/06 to 2008/09 was investigated. Analysis was carried out using the SPSS version 16.0. Results A total of 19,168 people were tested for HIV and a prevalence of 25.4% was obtained. 4298 HIV positive people were referred to the HIV chronic care clinic but only 27% actually registered at the clinic. Chi-square analyses showed residence, age and time of VCT visit showed significant relations with hospital care attendance. Conclusion The overall HIV prevalence is high. The data obtained at the HIV care clinic regarding patients’ clinical conditions at acceptance were incomplete. Improvements are required on the link between VCT and HIV care and documentation of data.

  5. Perceptions of Cancer Care and Clinical Trials in the Black Community: Implications for Care Coordination Between Oncology and Primary Care Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague Martinez, Linda; Freeman, Elmer R; Winkfield, Karen M

    2017-07-13

    Despite efforts to ameliorate disparities in cancer care and clinical trials, barriers persist. As part of a multiphase community-engaged assessment, an exploratory community-engaged research partnership, forged between an academic hospital and a community-based organization, set out to explore perceptions of cancer care and cancer clinical trials by black Bostonians. Key informant interviews with health care providers and patient advocates in community health centers (CHCs), organizers from grassroots coalitions focused on cancer, informed the development of a focus group protocol. Six focus groups were conducted with black residents in Boston, including groups of cancer survivors and family members. Transcripts were coded thematically and a code-based report was generated and analyzed by community and academic stakeholders. While some participants identified clinical trials as beneficial, overall perceptions conjured feelings of fear and exploitation. Participants describe barriers to clinical trial participation in the context of cancer care experiences, which included negative interactions with providers and mistrust. Primary care physicians (PCPs) reported being levied as a trusted resource for patients undergoing care, but lamented the absence of a mechanism by which to gain information about cancer care and clinical trials. Confusion about cancer care and clinical trials persists, even among individuals who have undergone treatment for cancer. Greater coordination between PCPs and CHC care teams and oncology care teams may improve patient experiences with cancer care, while also serving as a mechanism to disseminate information about treatment options and clinical trials. Inequities in cancer care and clinical trial participation persist. Our findings indicate that greater coordination with primary care physicians (PCPs) and community health center (CHC) providers may be an important step for both improving the quality of cancer care in communities and

  6. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  7. Customer Satisfaction Survey With Clinical Laboratory and Phlebotomy Services at a Tertiary Care Unit Level

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-01-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate...

  8. Crime Scene Investigation: Clinical Application of Chemical Shift Imaging as a Problem Solving Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-26

    MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approva l 26 FEB 2016 1. Your paper, entitled Crime Scene Investigation: Clinical Aoolication of...or technical information as a publication/presentation, a new 59 MDW Form 3039 must be submitted for review and approval.] Crime Scene Investiga...tion: Clinical Application of Chemical Shift Imaging as a Problem Solving Tool 1. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED Crime Scene

  9. The power of data--from data mining to consumer pricing and quality-of-care tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malof, Leah C

    2013-01-01

    Transparency tools, whether offered by carriers or third-party administrators, rely on adequate experience, by market and by service, to provide information to consumers about health care costs and quality of care. The opportunities for savings to individual consumers and to employer-sponsored health plans are clearly significant and possible if people will use the tools and act. This article reviews two studies showing a shift in consumer claims experience to less costly services afte the implementation of a transparency tool and when combined with a consumer-driven health plan. It also outlines best practices employers can implement to carefully craft interventions to engage and create value in the minds of health care consumers.

  10. Health care professionals' attitudes and compliance to clinical practice guidelines to prevent falls and fall injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Marie; Wann-Hansson, Christine

    2011-06-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) aimed at preventing falls and fall injuries have been shown to be effective in acute care hospitals. However, although CPGs are systematically developed and evidence-based tools, there has been a problem with their implementation in clinical practice. To describe influences on health care professionals' attitudes to CPGs for preventing falls and fall injuries. A qualitative approach was chosen and five focus group discussions were conducted, which included physicians, nurses, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists. The transcribed texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis. Two main categories emerged: experiencing a course of events and influence of social factors. Experiencing a course of event included incidence of falls and fall injuries followed by negative consequences, which revealed benefits of using a CPG. Influence of social factors for implementation and compliance with the CPG was described as community obligations and organizational and individual resources. The findings confirm the complex process of implementation and compliance of CPGs for fall prevention. A relation between experiences of high incidence of falls with negative consequences and a positive attitude and compliance to CPGs appeared. To assure compliance and a positive attitude requires an obvious benefit of the CPG in reducing falls. Factors to overcome barriers to implementation and compliance seem to be a supportive leadership, systematic evaluations of the CPG outcome, and the facilitator role. Copyright ©2010 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  11. Assessment of a pharmacist-driven point-of-care spirometry clinic within a primary care physicians office

    OpenAIRE

    Cawley MJ; Pacitti R; Warning W

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess value-added service of a pharmacist-driven point-of-care spirometry clinic to quantify respiratory disease abnormalities within a primary care physicians officeMethods: This retrospective, cohort study was an analysis of physician referred patients who attended our spirometry clinic during 2008-2010 due to pulmonary symptoms or disease. After spirometry testing, data was collected retrospectively to include patient demographics, spirometry results, and pulmonary pharmaceu...

  12. Evolution, current structure, and role of a primary care clinical pharmacy service in an integrated managed care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Rachel M F; Campbell, Stephanie M; Kroner, Beverly A; Proksel, Jenel R; Billups, Sarah J; Witt, Daniel M; Helling, Dennis K

    2013-01-01

    The impact of the declining number of primary care physicians is exacerbated by a growing elderly population in need of chronic disease management. Primary care clinical pharmacy specialists, with their unique knowledge and skill set, are well suited to address this gap. At Kaiser Permanente of Colorado (KPCO), primary care clinical pharmacy specialists have a long history of integration with medical practices and are located in close proximity to physicians, nurses, and other members of the health care team. Since 1992, Primary Care Clinical Pharmacy Services (PCCPS) has expanded from 4 to 30 full-time equivalents (FTEs) to provide services in all KPCO medical office buildings. With this growth in size, PCCPS has evolved to play a vital role in working with primary care medical teams to ensure that drug therapy is effective, safe, and affordable. In addition, PCCPS specialists provide ambulatory teaching sites for pharmacy students and pharmacy residents. There is approximately 1 specialist FTE for every 13,000 adult KPCO members and every 9 clinical FTEs of internal medicine and family medicine physicians. All clinical pharmacy specialists in the pharmacy department are required to have a PharmD degree, to complete postgraduate year 2 residencies, and, as a condition of employment, to become board certified in an applicable specialty. The evolution, current structure, and role of PCCPS at KPCO, including factors facilitating successful integration within the medical team, are highlighted. Patient and nonpatient care responsibilities are described.

  13. Palliative care in advanced kidney disease: a nurse-led joint renal and specialist palliative care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Kerry; Watson, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The National Service Framework for Renal Services Part 2 identifies quality requirements for end-of-life care for individuals with kidney failure, recognizing the potential to forge closer relationships between renal and specialist palliative care providers. This article describes a pilot project set up by two Clinical Nurse Specialists, one working in hospice specialist palliative care and the other in renal palliative care within an acute trust. The purpose of the pilot was to work in collaboration to run a streamlined nurse-led clinic that would meet the palliative care needs of chronic kidney disease (CKD) Stage 5 patients and their carers. To achieve this the clinic would have to provide optimal symptom management, empower patients to make their own choices, and support them with advance care planning underpinned by the End of Life Care Strategy. The partnership also aimed to promote service improvement and practice development using transference of knowledge, skills, and expertise. Initial informal feedback, including a very small patient survey, suggests that the clinic was well received by patients, carers, and other health professionals. The clinic is ongoing and deserves more formal evaluation to encourage future service development.

  14. Describing clinical faculty experiences with patient safety and quality care in acute care settings: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roney, Linda; Sumpio, Catherine; Beauvais, Audrey M; O'Shea, Eileen R

    2017-02-01

    A major safety initiative in acute care settings across the United States has been to transform hospitals into High Reliability Organizations. The initiative requires developing cognitive awareness, best practices, and infrastructure so that all healthcare providers including clinical faculty are accountable to deliver quality and safe care. To describe the experience of baccalaureate clinical nursing faculty concerning safety and near miss events, in acute care hospital settings. A mixed method approach was used to conduct the pilot study. Nurse faculty (n=18) completed study surveys from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to track patient safety concerns: Incidents; Near misses; or Unsafe conditions, during one academic semester, within 9 different acute care hospitals. Additionally, seven nurse faculty participated in end of the semester focus groups to discuss the semester long experience. Clinical faculty identified a total of 24 patient occurrences: 15 Incidents, 1 Near miss event, and 8 Unsafe conditions. Focus group participants (n=7) described benefits and challenges experienced by nursing clinical faculty and students in relation to the culture of safety in acute care hospital settings. Six themes resulted from the content analysis. Utilizing nursing clinical faculty and students may add significant value to promoting patient safety and the delivery of quality care, within acute care hospital settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A discrete event simulation tool to support and predict hospital and clinic staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRienzo, Christopher M; Shaw, Ryan J; Meanor, Phillip; Lada, Emily; Ferranti, Jeffrey; Tanaka, David

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate how to develop a simulation tool to help healthcare managers and administrators predict and plan for staffing needs in a hospital neonatal intensive care unit using administrative data. We developed a discrete event simulation model of nursing staff needed in a neonatal intensive care unit and then validated the model against historical data. The process flow was translated into a discrete event simulation model. Results demonstrated that the model can be used to give a respectable estimate of annual admissions, transfers, and deaths based upon two different staffing levels. The discrete event simulation tool model can provide healthcare managers and administrators with (1) a valid method of modeling patient mix, patient acuity, staffing needs, and costs in the present state and (2) a forecast of how changes in a unit's staffing, referral patterns, or patient mix would affect a unit in a future state.

  16. How doctors make use of online, point-of-care clinical decision support systems: a case study of UpToDate©.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, John; Whitcombe, Jo; William Glover, Steven

    2013-03-01

    Online point-of-care evidence-based information tools are becoming increasingly popular. To discover how doctors actually use one such tool - UpToDate - in clinical practice. An online survey was distributed to doctors at healthcare organisations in the north-west of England which subscribed to UpToDate. Some survey questions asked for quantifiable data (e.g. demographic details), whilst other questions were open-ended and sought examples of clinical scenarios and actual point-of-care use of UpToDate. Open-ended responses were then analysed into emerging themes. The open-ended responses include evidence illustrating a large variety of clinical scenarios in which the use of UpToDate influenced clinical practice. These results show how just one point-of-care tool is used in a variety of ways that benefit the patient, the doctor and the healthcare organisation. Direct quotations reported will provide compelling evidence for librarians to present to senior managers who may be unsure of the value of point-of-care tools in clinical practice. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group.

  17. Information and research needs of acute-care clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spath, M; Buttlar, L

    1996-01-01

    The majority of nurses surveyed used the library on a regular but limited basis to obtain information needed in caring for or making decisions about their patients. A minority indicated that the libraries in their own institutions totally met their information needs. In fact, only 4% depended on the library to stay abreast of new information and developments in the field. Many of the nurses had their own journal subscriptions, which could account in part for the limited use of libraries and the popularity of the professional journal as the key information source. This finding correlates with the research of Binger and Huntsman, who found that 95% of staff development educators relied on professional journal literature to keep up with current information in the field, and only 45% regularly monitored indexing-and-abstracting services. The present study also revealed that nurses seek information from colleagues more than from any other source, supporting the findings of Corcoran-Perry and Graves. Further research is necessary to clarify why nurses use libraries on a limited basis. It appears, as Bunyan and Lutz contend, that a more aggressive approach to marketing the library to nurses is needed. Further research should include an assessment of how the library can meet the information needs of nurses for both research and patient care. Options to be considered include offering library orientation sessions for new staff nurses, providing current-awareness services by circulating photocopied table-of-contents pages, sending out reviews of new monographs, inviting nurses to submit search requests on a topic, scheduling seminars and workshops that teach CD-ROM and online search strategies, and providing information about electronic databases covering topics related to nursing. Information on databases may be particularly important in light of the present study's finding that databases available in CD-ROM format are consulted very little. Nursing education programs should

  18. Implementation of an electronic genomic and family health history tool in primary prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Emily A; Lin, Bruce K; Doksum, Teresa; Drohan, Brian; Edelson, Vaughn; Dolan, Siobhan M; Hughes, Kevin S; O'Leary, James; Galvin, Shelley L; Degroat, Nicole; Pardanani, Setul; Feero, W Gregory; Adams, Claire; Jones, Renee; Scott, Joan

    2014-03-01

    "The Pregnancy and Health Profile," (PHP) is a free genetic risk assessment software tool for primary prenatal providers that collects patient-entered family (FHH), personal, and obstetrical health history, performs risk assessment, and presents the provider with clinical decision support during the prenatal encounter. The tool is freely available for download at www.hughesriskapps.net. We evaluated the implementation of PHP in four geographically diverse clinical sites. Retrospective chart reviews were conducted for patients seen prior to the study period and for patients who used the PHP to collect data on documentation of FHH, discussion of cystic fibrosis (CF) and hemoglobinopathy (HB) carrier screening, and CF and HB interventions (tests, referrals). Five hundred pre-implementation phase and 618 implementation phase charts were reviewed. Documentation of a 3-generation FHH or pedigree improved at three sites; patient race/ethnicity at three sites, father of the baby (FOB) race/ethnicity at all sites, and ancestry for the patient and FOB at three sites (P < 0.001-0001). CF counseling improved for implementation phase patients at one site (8% vs. 48%, P < 0.0001) and CF screening/referrals at two (2% vs. 14%, P < 0.0001; 6% vs. 14%; P = 0.05). Counseling and intervention rates did not increase for HB. This preliminary study suggests that the PHP can improve documentation of FHH, race, and ancestry, as well as the compliance with current CF counseling and intervention guidelines in some prenatal clinics. Future evaluation of the PHP should include testing in a larger number of clinical environments, assessment of additional performance measures, and evaluation of the system's overall clinical utility.

  19. Open source clinical portals: a model for healthcare information systems to support care processes and feed clinical research. An Italian case of design, development, reuse, and exploitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Paolo; Baj, Emanuele; Restifo, Nicola; Origgi, Gianni; Bragagia, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Open source is a still unexploited chance for healthcare organizations and technology providers to answer to a growing demand for innovation and to join economical benefits with a new way of managing hospital information systems. This chapter will present the case of the web enterprise clinical portal developed in Italy by Niguarda Hospital in Milan with the support of Fondazione Politecnico di Milano, to enable a paperless environment for clinical and administrative activities in the ward. This represents also one rare case of open source technology and reuse in the healthcare sector, as the system's porting is now taking place at Besta Neurological Institute in Milan. This institute is customizing the portal to feed researchers with structured clinical data collected in its portal's patient records, so that they can be analyzed, e.g., through business intelligence tools. Both organizational and clinical advantages are investigated, from process monitoring, to semantic data structuring, to recognition of common patterns in care processes.

  20. The Watched Structure Clinical Examination (WASCE) as a tool of assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnasir, Faisal A

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of medical students' clinical competencies is still evolving. The aim of this study was to find out the effectiveness of a new tool of assessment to assess medical students at the end of clinical rotations. A new tool has been developed in the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Bahrain, called the Watched Structure Clinical Examination (WASCE). It was used at the end of the Family Medicine clinical rotation during the academic year 2000-2001 involving 62 final year students. The study found a significant statistical correlation between the students' results in the WASCE and their results in Doctor of Medicine final examination, which included the written examination, the patient encountered clinical examination and the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Watched Structured Clinical Examination can be a useful method of assessment for examining certain clinical skills, with an advantage over the OSCE in that it is less time consuming, more cost effective, requires less supervising staff to conduct the examination and, more importantly, it is less stressful to the students.

  1. Are Women of East Kazakhstan Satisfied with the Quality of Maternity Care? Implementing the WHO Tool to Assess the Quality of Hospital Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    DAULETYAROVA, Marzhan; SEMENOVA, Yuliya; KAYLUBAEVA, Galiya; MANABAEVA, Gulshat; KHISMETOVA, Zayituna; AKILZHANOVA, Zhansulu; TUSSUPKALIEV, Akylbek; ORAZGALIYEVA, Zhazira

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the satisfaction of mothers with the quality of care provided by maternity institutions in East Kazakhstan on the basis of the “Quality of hospital Care for mothers and newborn babies, assessment tool” (WHO, 2009). Methods: This cross-sectional study took place in 2013 and covered five maternity hospitals in East Kazakhstan (one referral, two urban and two rural). To obtain information, interviews with 872 patients were conducted. The standard tool covered 12 areas ranging from pregnancy to childcare. A score was assigned to each area of care (from 0 to 3). The assessment provided the semi-quantitative data on the quality of hospital care for women and newborns from the perception of mothers. Results: The average satisfaction score was 2.48 with a range from 2.2 to 2.7. The mean age of women was 27.4 yr. Forty-two percent were primiparas. Mean birth weight was 3455.4 g. All infants had ‘skin to skin’ contact with their mothers immediately after birth. Mean number of antenatal visits to family clinics was 8.6. Only 42.1% of the respondents used contraceptives while the rest were not aware of contraception, never applied it and could not distinguish between different methods and devices. Conclusion: The quality of care was substandard in all institutions. To improve the quality of care, WHO technologies in perinatal care could be applied. PMID:27648415

  2. Collaborating and delivering literature search results to clinical teams using web 2.0 tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damani, Shamsha; Fulton, Stephanie

    2010-07-01

    This article describes the experiences of librarians at the Research Medical Library embedded within clinical teams at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and their efforts to enhance communication within their teams using Web 2.0 tools. Pros and cons of EndNote Web, Delicious, Connotea, PBWorks, and SharePoint are discussed.

  3. [A clinical monitoring tool for diabetic patients for the benefit of freelance nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhuillier, Odile; Adain, Emmanuiel

    2012-04-01

    The major role in prevention and therapeutic education played by freelance nurses is essential in the face of the prevalence of diabetes in Reunion.This role can only be developed using multi-disciplinary and shared clinical monitoring tools. A growing number of freelance nurses are using a newly created traceability sheet,specifically designed to reflect those requirements.

  4. The Use of Personal Digital Assistants as Tools for Work-Based Learning in Clinical Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerman, Sanne; Filius, Renee

    2011-01-01

    Though mobile technologies have been studied, their specific value in supporting work-based learning has not yet been investigated. This paper describes a small exploratory study in health care education in which medical students work in clinical practice. The study investigates both the perceived potential as well as the actual role of PDAs in…

  5. Evolving Systems of Care with Total Clinical Outcomes Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, John S.; Epstein, Richard A.; Jordan, Neil

    2010-01-01

    The current article proposes that further specification of the system of care concept is required. Based on the assertions that the system of care concept (a) refers to an ideal as opposed to an observable phenomenon, and (b) is engaged in offering transformational experiences, the authors propose that the system of care definition must be…

  6. Clinical Outcomes of Colonic Stent in a Tertiary Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Gajendran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Colonic obstruction is one of the manifestations of colon cancer for which self-expanding metal stents (SEMS have been effectively used, to restore the luminal patency either for palliative care or as a bridge to resective surgery. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of large diameter SEMS in patients with malignant colorectal obstruction. Methods and Results. A four-year retrospective review of the Medical Archival System was performed and identified 16 patients. The average age was 70.8 years, of which 56% were females. The most common cause of obstruction was colon cancer (9/16, 56%. Rectosigmoid was the main site of obstruction (9/16 and complete obstruction occurred in 31% of cases. The overall technical and clinical success rates were 100% and 87%, respectively. There were no immediate complications (<24 hours, but stent stenosis due to kinking occurred within one week of stent placement in 2 patients. Stent migration occurred in 2 patients at 34 and 91 days, respectively. There were no perforations or bleeding complications. Conclusion. Large diameter SEMS provide a safe method for palliation or as a bridge to therapy in patients with malignant colonic obstruction with high technical success and very low complication rates.

  7. Analyzing the "CareGap": assessing gaps in adherence to clinical guidelines in adult soft tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, Zeev; Goldbraich, Esther; Farkash, Ariel; Torresani, Michele; Bertulli, Rossella; Restifo, Nicola; Locatelli, Paolo; Casali, Paolo; Carmeli, Boaz

    2013-01-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) are gaining popularity as tools that assist physicians in optimizing medical care. These systems typically comply with evidence-based medicine and are designed with input from domain experts. Nonetheless, deviations from CDSS recommendations are abundant across a broad spectrum of disorders, raising the question as to why this phenomenon exists. Here, we analyze this gap in adherence to a clinical guidelines-based CDSS by examining the physician treatment decisions for 1329 adult soft tissue sarcoma patients in northern Italy using patient-specific parameters. Dubbing this analysis "CareGap", we find that deviations correlate strongly with certain disease features such as local versus metastatic clinical presentation. We also notice that deviations from the guideline-based CDSS suggestions occur more frequently for patients with shorter survival time. Such observations can direct physicians' attention to distinct patient cohorts that are prone to higher deviation levels from clinical practice guidelines. This illustrates the value of CareGap analysis in assessing quality of care for subsets of patients within a larger pathology.

  8. Identifying Sources of Clinical Conflict: A Tool for Practice and Training in Bioethics Mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Bioethics mediators manage a wide range of clinical conflict emanating from diverse sources. Parties to clinical conflict are often not fully aware of, nor willing to express, the true nature and scope of their conflict. As such, a significant task of the bioethics mediator is to help define that conflict. The ability to assess and apply the tools necessary for an effective mediation process can be facilitated by each mediator's creation of a personal compendium of sources that generate clinical conflict, to provide an orientation for the successful management of complex dilemmatic cases.

  9. Association of medical home team-based care functions and perceived improvements in patient-centered care at VHA primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Christian D; Dolan, Emily D; Fihn, Stephan D; Rodriguez, Hector P; Meredith, Lisa S; Rosland, Ann-Marie; Lempa, Michele; Wakefield, Bonnie J; Joos, Sandra; Lawler, Lauren H; Harvey, Henry B; Stark, Richard; Schectman, Gordon; Nelson, Karin M

    2014-12-01

    Team-based care is central to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), but most PCMH evaluations measure team structure exclusively. We assessed team-based care in terms of team structure, process and effectiveness, and the association with improvements in teams׳ abilities to deliver patient-centered care. We fielded a cross-sectional survey among 913 VA primary care clinics implementing a PCMH model in 2012. The dependent variable was clinic-level respondent-reported improvements in delivery of patient-centered care. Independent variables included three sets of measures: (1) team structure, (2) team process, and (3) team effectiveness. We adjusted for clinic workload and patient comorbidity. 4819 surveys were returned (25% estimated response rate). The highest ratings were for team structure (median of 89% of respondents being assigned to a teamlet, i.e., a PCP working with the same clinical associate, nurse care manager and clerk) and lowest for team process (median of 10% of respondents reporting the lowest level of stress/chaos). In multivariable regression, perceived improvements in patient-centered care were most strongly associated with participatory decision making (β=32, Peffectiveness measures, often omitted from PCMH evaluations, had stronger associations with perceived improvements in patient-centered care than team structure measures. Team process and effectiveness measures may facilitate synthesis of evaluation findings and help identify positive outlier clinics. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Appropriateness of admission and stay in obstetrics wards: a new tool assessing unnecessary days of hospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Poppa

    2009-12-01

    the presence of anamnesis, objective exams, discharge letters, clinical diary entries and the signature of the responsible healthcare professional. Objective examination was often incomplete or partially complete or absent.

    Conclusions: The proposed Obstetric AEP was demonstrated to be useful for the evaluation of the appropriateness of obstetric admissions and hospital stays, as well as the determinants for when these were inappropriate. This specific tool, in the future, could be used to monitor hospital usage and the allocation of resources related to this health care area.

  11. Attacks against health care in Syria, 2015-16: results from a real-time reporting tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamein, Mohamed; Bower, Hilary; Valderrama, Camilo; Zedan, Daher; Rihawi, Hazem; Almilaji, Khaled; Abdelhafeez, Mohammed; Tabbal, Nabil; Almhawish, Naser; Maes, Sophie; AbouZeid, Alaa

    2017-06-07

    directly harmed in 402 incidents of violence against health care: 677 (72%) were wounded and 261 (28%) were killed. Most of the dead were adult males (68%), but the highest case fatality (39%) was seen in children aged younger than 5 years. 24% of attack victims were health workers. Around 44% of hospitals and 5% of all primary care clinics in mainly areas with a substantial presence of armed opposition groups experienced attacks. Aerial bombardment was the main form of attack. A third of health-care services were hit more than once. Services providing trauma care were attacked more than other services. The data system used in this study addressed double-counting, reduced the effect of potentially biased self-reports, and produced credible data from anonymous information. The MVH tool could be feasibly deployed in many conflict areas. Reliable data are essential to show how far warring parties have strayed from international law protecting health care in conflict and to effectively harness legal mechanisms to discourage future perpetrators. None. Copyright © 2017 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd/Inc/BV. All rights reserved. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Initial impact of the acute otitis externa clinical practice guideline on clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Neil; Kepnes, Lynn J

    2011-09-01

    Objectives. Determine the influence of the acute otitis externa clinical practice guideline on clinical care. Study Design. Cross-sectional study with historical controls. Setting. Outpatient departments in the United States. Methods. Cases of acute otitis externa occurring in 2004-2005 (before guideline publication) and 2007-2008 (after guideline publication) were extracted from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Care Survey. Prescribing rates for ototopical medications, analgesic recommendations, and oral antibiotics were determined and compared before and after guideline publication and relative to guideline recommendations. Results. An estimated 5.50 (standard error of the estimated mean, 0.38) million visits (mean age, 27.7 [1.7] years; 49.8% male) with a primary and singular coded diagnosis of acute otitis externa were studied (2.64 [0.26] million visits for 2004-2005 and 2.86 [0.28] million visits for 2007-2008). Prescribing rates for ototopical preparations were 67.2% (5.3%) and 67.6% (5.0%) before and after guideline publication, respectively (P = .955). Recommendation rates for analgesics were 14.2% (3.3%) and 20.6% (3.9%), respectively (P = .248). Prescription rates for oral antibiotics were 21.7% (4.8%) and 30.5% (3.6%), before and after, respectively (P = .166). Conclusion. Clinician behavior in the medical treatment of acute otitis externa has not significantly changed after guideline publication, despite clear, evidence-based guideline recommendations. These data have important implications for performance measures based on the guideline. Further efforts toward guideline dissemination are likely needed.

  13. Evaluation of clinical skills for first-year surgical residents using orientation programme and objective structured clinical evaluation as a tool of assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandya J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postgraduate specialities require a combination of knowledge and clinical skills. The internship year is less structured. Clinical and practical skills that are picked up during training are not well regulated and the impact is not assessed. In this study, we assessed knowledge and skills using objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. Aim: To evaluate the clinical skills of new first-year surgical residents using orientation programme and OSCE as a tool for assessment. Settings and Design: Observational study. Materials and Methods: Twenty new first-year surgical residents (10 each in 2008 and 2009 participated in a detailed structured orientation programme conducted over a period of 7 days. Clinically important topics and skills expected at this level (e.g., suturing, wound care etc. were covered. The programme was preceded by an OSCE to test pre-programme knowledge (the "pre-test". The questions were validated by senior department staff. A post-programme OSCE (the "post-test" helped to evaluate the change in clinical skill level brought about by the orientation programme. Statistical Analysis: Wilcoxson matched-pairs signed-ranks test. Results: Passing performance was achieved by all participants in both pre- and post-tests. Following the orientation programme, significant improvement was seen in tasks testing the psychomotor and cognitive domains. (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.0401, respectively. Overall reliability of the OSCE was found to be 0.7026 (Cronbach′s coefficient alpha. Conclusions: This study highlighted the lacunae in current internship training, especially for skill-based tasks. There is a need for universal inclusion of structured orientation programmes in the training of first-year residents. OSCE is a reliable, valid and effective method for the assessment of clinical skills.

  14. Instinctive Clinical Teaching: Erasing the Mental Boundary Between Clinical Education and Patient Care to Promote Natural Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yih-Ming; Kim, Christopher H; Briones, Michael A; Hilinski, Joseph A; Greenwald, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Effective clinical teaching is essential in physician education, yet faculty members rarely receive formal training in clinical teaching. Formal models for training clinical educators are often tedious and require significant time and effort. Instinctive clinical teaching allows clinicians to seamlessly integrate and promote effective teaching into their clinical practice. The approach is guided by similarities between the components of Kolb's experiential learning cycle-concrete experience, reflective observation, abstract conceptualization, and active experimentation-and the elements of the patient care process-history and physical, initial assessment, differential, hypothesis, final diagnosis, management, and follow-up. Externalization of these clinical thought processes allows for inclusion of learners and promotes effective clinical teaching.

  15. Providing Nutritional Care in the Office Practice: Teams, Tools, and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Robert F

    2016-11-01

    Provision of dietary counseling in the office setting is enhanced by using team-based care and electronic tools. Effective provider-patient communication is essential for fostering behavior change: the key component of lifestyle medicine. The principles of communication and behavior change are skill-based and grounded in scientific theories and models. Motivational interviewing and shared decision making, a collaboration process between patients and their providers to reach agreement about a health decision, is an important process in counseling. The stages of change, self-determination, health belief model, social cognitive model, theory of planned behavior, and cognitive behavioral therapy are used in the counseling process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Introducing pharmacogenetic testing with clinical decision support into primary care: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Martin; Aloise, Martin N; Ang, J Sidney; Cullis, Pieter; Dawes, Diana; Fraser, Robert; Liknaitzky, Gideon; Paterson, Andrea; Stanley, Paul; Suarez-Gonzalez, Adriana; Katzov-Eckert, Hagit

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate prescribing increases patient illness and death owing to adverse drug events. The inclusion of genetic information into primary care medication practices is one solution. Our aim was to assess the ability to obtain and genotype saliva samples and to determine the levels of use of a decision support tool that creates medication options adjusted for patient characteristics, drug-drug interactions and pharmacogenetics. We conducted a cohort study in 6 primary care settings (5 family practices and 1 pharmacy), enrolling 191 adults with at least 1 of 10 common diseases. Saliva samples were obtained in the physician's office or pharmacy and sent to our laboratory, where DNA was extracted and genotyped and reports were generated. The reports were sent directly to the family physician/pharmacist and linked to an evidence-based prescribing decision support system. The primary outcome was ability to obtain and genotype samples. The secondary outcomes were yield and purity of DNA samples, ability to link results to decision support software and use of the decision support software. Genotyping resulted in linking of 189 patients (99%) with pharmacogenetic reports to the decision support program. A total of 96.8% of samples had at least 1 actionable genotype for medications included in the decision support system. The medication support system was used by the physicians and pharmacists 236 times over 3 months. Physicians and pharmacists can collect saliva samples of sufficient quantity and quality for DNA extraction, purification and genotyping. A clinical decision support system with integrated data from pharmacogenetic tests may enable personalized prescribing within primary care. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02383290.

  17. Diagnosing malignant melanoma in ambulatory care: a systematic review of clinical prediction rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Emma; Clyne, Barbara; Wesseling, Nieneke; Sandhu, Harkiran; Armstrong, Laura; Bennett, Holly; Fahey, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Malignant melanoma has high morbidity and mortality rates. Early diagnosis improves prognosis. Clinical prediction rules (CPRs) can be used to stratify patients with symptoms of suspected malignant melanoma to improve early diagnosis. We conducted a systematic review of CPRs for melanoma diagnosis in ambulatory care. Design Systematic review. Data sources A comprehensive search of PubMed, EMBASE, PROSPERO, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and SCOPUS was conducted in May 2015, using combinations of keywords and medical subject headings (MeSH) terms. Study selection and data extraction Studies deriving and validating, validating or assessing the impact of a CPR for predicting melanoma diagnosis in ambulatory care were included. Data extraction and methodological quality assessment were guided by the CHARMS checklist. Results From 16 334 studies reviewed, 51 were included, validating the performance of 24 unique CPRs. Three impact analysis studies were identified. Five studies were set in primary care. The most commonly evaluated CPRs were the ABCD, more than one or uneven distribution of Colour, or a large (greater than 6 mm) Diameter (ABCD) dermoscopy rule (at a cut-point of >4.75; 8 studies; pooled sensitivity 0.85, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.93, specificity 0.72, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.78) and the 7-point dermoscopy checklist (at a cut-point of ≥1 recommending ruling in melanoma; 11 studies; pooled sensitivity 0.77, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.88, specificity 0.80, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.92). The methodological quality of studies varied. Conclusions At their recommended cut-points, the ABCD dermoscopy rule is more useful for ruling out melanoma than the 7-point dermoscopy checklist. A focus on impact analysis will help translate melanoma risk prediction rules into useful tools for clinical practice. PMID:28264830

  18. The prevalence of neuropathic pain: clinical evaluation compared with screening tools in a community population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Wollan, Peter C; Weingarten, Toby N; Watson, James C; Hooten, W Michael; Melton, L Joseph

    2009-04-01

    Neuropathic pain is reported to be common based on studies from specialty centers and survey studies. However, few prevalence estimates have been completed in a community population using clinical evaluation. To develop an estimate of the prevalence of neuropathic pain in community-dwelling adults. Data from a mailed survey (N = 3,575 community respondents), telephone interview (N = 907), and a clinical examination (N = 205) were linked to estimate the population prevalence of neuropathic pain. Using the clinical examination as the "gold" standard, estimates from several screening tools were developed and adjusted to the Olmsted County, MN adult population. The estimated community prevalence of neuropathic pain from the clinical examination (gold standard) was 9.8%. Most other estimates were lower, including a 3.0% population prevalence using the Berger criteria and 8.8% using the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs. Only the prevalence rate based on self-report of nerve pain was higher (12.4%). Overlap among the groups each tool identified as having "neuropathic predominant pain" was only modest and the groups had significantly different rates of depressive symptoms, anxiety, limited functional ability, and use of complementary and alternative medicine. The estimated rates and personal characteristics of community residents with "neuropathic pain" vary widely depending on the tools used to identify neuropathic pain. None of the screening tools compared well with clinical evaluation. The differences in the groups identified by alternative screening methods become of major importance when reporting neuropathic pain epidemiology, studying therapies for neuropathic pain, or attempting to translate neuropathic pain research into clinical practice.

  19. Meeting standards of high-quality intensive care unit palliative care: clinical performance and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penrod, Joan D; Pronovost, Peter J; Livote, Elayne E; Puntillo, Kathleen A; Walker, Amy S; Wallenstein, Sylvan; Mercado, Alice F; Swoboda, Sandra M; Ilaoa, Debra; Thompson, David A; Nelson, Judith E

    2012-04-01

    High-quality care for intensive care unit patients and families includes palliative care. To promote performance improvement, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's National Quality Measures Clearinghouse identified nine evidence-based processes of intensive care unit palliative care (Care and Communication Bundle) that are measured through review of medical record documentation. We conducted this study to examine how frequently the Care and Communication Bundle processes were performed in diverse intensive care units and to understand patient factors that are associated with such performance. Prospective, multisite, observational study of performance of key intensive care unit palliative care processes. A surgical intensive care unit and a medical intensive care unit in two different large academic health centers and a medical-surgical intensive care unit in a medium-sized community hospital. Consecutive adult patients with length of intensive care unit stay ≥5 days. None. Between November 2007 and December 2009, we measured performance by specified day after intensive care unit admission on nine care process measures: Identify medical decision-maker, advance directive and resuscitation preference, distribute family information leaflet, assess and manage pain, offer social work and spiritual support, and conduct interdisciplinary family meeting. Multivariable regression analysis was used to determine predictors of performance of five care processes. We enrolled 518 (94.9%) patients and 336 (83.6%) family members. Performances on pain assessment and management measures were high. In contrast, interdisciplinary family meetings were documented for <20% of patients by intensive care unit day 5. Performance on other measures ranged from 8% to 43%, with substantial variation across and within sites. Chronic comorbidity burden and site were the most consistent predictors of care process performance. Across three intensive care units in this study, performance

  20. A clinical clerkship collaborative program in Taiwan: Acquiring core clinical competencies through patient care responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong A; Chen, Cheng-Feng; Chen, Chen-Huan; Wang, Ging-Long; Huang, Andrew T

    2016-06-01

    Traditionally, clinical clerkship training in Taiwan does not provide medical students with sufficient patient care responsibilities and often results in inadequate clinical skills. We implemented a pilot clerkship program at a comprehensive cancer center that emphasizes core clinical competency through direct patient care and dedicated faculty and mentors. Students were an integral part of the patient care team held accountable for providing coordinated and holistic care. Students' self-assessment of clinical competencies, faculty evaluation, and objective structured clinical examination were compared against their peers trained by traditional clerkship at a main teaching hospital. Fifty medical students completed the clerkship program in the first 3 years. At the end of the clerkship, participants rated themselves significantly higher than their peers in almost all patient care and clinical skill domains. The most significant areas included physical examination, clinical reasoning, developing management plan, holistic approach, handling ethical issues, and time management skills. The students rated their clerkship teachers significantly higher in time spent with students, skills and enthusiasm in teaching, as well as giving students appropriate patient care responsibilities. There was no significant difference in the end-of-clerkship objective structured clinical examination performance, but participants of the program achieved better grades in their subsequent internship. This pilot collaborative program presented a successful model for clinical education in the teaching of core clinical competencies through direct patient care responsibilities at the clerkship stage. It is hoped that the project will become a catalyst for medical education reform in Taiwan and regions with similar traditions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Depression Care for Low-Income, Minority, Safety Net Clinic Populations with Comorbid Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ell, Kathleen; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Xie, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Increasingly, mental health care is provided within the general health care sector. Accompanying this significant change is the demand for evidence-based as well as cost-effective or cost-neutral care models. Method: The authors present a pooled analysis of three large randomized clinical trials in which social workers provide…

  2. Developing a nurse led hospice outpatient clinic to improve palliative care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Catherine

    A team of palliative care clinical nurse specialists at the Phyllis Tuckwell Hospice in Farnham, Surrey, set up a hospice based outpatient clinic to improve services for patients with cancer. This article examines how the team used clinical audit, a staff questionnaire and patient feedback to evaluate the service and make recommendations for the future development of the clinic.

  3. [Nutrition and malnutrition in the intensive coronary care unit. Fundamentals for the clinical cardiologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogi, Daria; Espinosa, Emma; Lilli, Alessio; Bovenzi, Francesco Maria; Battino, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Patients admitted to coronary care units (CCU) have largely changed in the last decades. As observed in national and international registries, they are older, with different degrees of disability and several comorbidities. Moreover, they often undergo complex procedures. In this scenario, the cardiologist of the CCU has to deal with multidisciplinarity that should involve physiology and pathophysiology of nutrition. Despite the lack of specific data about our CCUs, hospital malnutrition is indeed a common entity that can reach a prevalence of 50% in elderly patients aged more than 75 years old. Malnutrition has several consequences in CCU patients since it involves respiratory drive, immune system and, clinically, patients have longer CCU stay and more complications. Briefly, malnutrition has a significant impact on their final outcome. In the clinical arena, the main issues for CCU physicians are the nutritional screening tools to promote an early recognition of patients with malnutrition, the pathophysiological knowledge of nutrition for a correct interaction with nutritionists, and the way of administration with its major complications. The changes in the population within CCUs are relatively recent and, although specific data in the cardiology setting are still scarce, nutrition science has reached a high level of knowledge to understand and plan tailored nutritional schemes based on the clinical and demographic features of our sick patients.

  4. Measures of user experience in a streptococcal pharyngitis and pneumonia clinical decision support tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, D; Knaus, M; McCullagh, L; Sofianou, A; Rosen, L; McGinn, T; Kannry, J

    2014-01-01

    To understand clinician adoption of CDS tools as this may provide important insights for the implementation and dissemination of future CDS tools. Clinicians (n=168) at a large academic center were randomized into intervention and control arms to assess the impact of strep and pneumonia CDS tools. Intervention arm data were analyzed to examine provider adoption and clinical workflow. Electronic health record data were collected on trigger location, the use of each component and whether an antibiotic, other medication or test was ordered. Frequencies were tabulated and regression analyses were used to determine the association of tool component use and physician orders. The CDS tool was triggered 586 times over the study period. Diagnosis was the most frequent workflow trigger of the CDS tool (57%) as compared to chief complaint (30%) and diagnosis/antibiotic combinations (13%). Conversely, chief complaint was associated with the highest rate (83%) of triggers leading to an initiation of the CDS tool (opening the risk prediction calculator). Similar patterns were noted for initiation of the CDS bundled ordered set and completion of the entire CDS tool pathway. Completion of risk prediction and bundled order set components were associated with lower rates of antibiotic prescribing (OR 0.5; CI 0.2-1.2 and OR 0.5; CI 0.3-0.9, respectively). Different CDS trigger points in the clinician user workflow lead to substantial variation in downstream use of the CDS tool components. These variations were important as they were associated with significant differences in antibiotic ordering. These results highlight the importance of workflow integration and flexibility for CDS success.

  5. How can we improve outcomes for patients and families under palliative care? implementing clinical audit for quality improvement in resource limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Selman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative care in India has made enormous advances in providing better care for patients and families living with progressive disease, and many clinical services are well placed to begin quality improvement initiatives, including clinical audit. Clinical audit is recognized globally to be essential in all healthcare, as a way of monitoring and improving quality of care. However, it is not common in developing country settings, including India. Clinical audit is a cyclical activity involving: identification of areas of care in need of improvement, through data collection and analysis utilizing an appropriate questionnaire; setting measurable quality of care targets in specific areas; designing and implementing service improvement strategies; and then re-evaluating quality of care to assess progress towards meeting the targets. Outcome measurement is an important component of clinical audit that has additional advantages; for example, establishing an evidence base for the effectiveness of services. In resource limited contexts, outcome measurement in clinical audit is particularly important as it enables service development to be evidence-based and ensures resources are allocated effectively. Key success factors in conducting clinical audit are identified (shared ownership, training, managerial support, inclusion of all members of staff and a positive approach. The choice of outcome measurement tool is discussed, including the need for a culturally appropriate and validated measure which is brief and simple enough to incorporate into clinical practice and reflects the holistic nature of palliative care. Support for clinical audit is needed at a national level, and development and validation of an outcome measurement tool in the Indian context is a crucial next step.

  6. The need for hospital care of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by noncurative intent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Friis, S; Juel, K;

    2000-01-01

    We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy.......We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy....

  7. Frontline health care can be improved by bringing research into the clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinhausen, Kirsten; Berghmans, Stephane; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2011-01-01

    Progress in clinical research has played a huge role in the great improvements in frontline health care achieved over the last 50 years, both in general practice and in hospitals.......Progress in clinical research has played a huge role in the great improvements in frontline health care achieved over the last 50 years, both in general practice and in hospitals....

  8. Profit centers in clinical care departments: an idea whose time has gone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, David W

    2008-03-01

    If a hospital is to use profit centers successfully, it should resolve several philosophical, organizational, and accounting matters, including: How much decisionmaking latitude clinical care chiefs should have. Whether to take a cross-subsidization approach. What role clinical care departments should take in a service line strategy.

  9. A tool to measure whether business management capacity in general practice impacts on the quality of chronic illness care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Christine H; Proudfoot, Judith G; Jayasinghe, Upali W; Grimm, Jane; Bubner, Tanya K; Winstanley, Julie; Harris, Mark F; Beilby, Justin J

    2010-11-01

    Our aim was to develop a tool to identify specific features of the business and financial management of practices that facilitate better quality care for chronic illness in primary care. Domains of management were identified, resulting in the development of a structured interview tool that was administered in 97 primary care practices in Australia. Interview items were screened and subjected to factor analysis, subscales identified and the overall model fit determined. The instrument's validity was assessed against another measure of quality of care. Analysis provided a four-factor solution containing 21 items, which explained 42.5% of the variance in the total scores. The factors related to administrative processes, human resources, marketing analysis and business development. All scores increased significantly with practice size. The business development subscale and total score were higher for rural practices. There was a significant correlation between the business development subscale and quality of care. The indicators of business and financial management in the final tool appear to be useful predictors of the quality of care. The instrument may help inform policy regarding the structure of general practice and implementation of a systems approach to chronic illness care. It can provide information to practices about areas for further development.

  10. A tool to assess knowledge, attitude and behavior of Indonesian health care workers regarding infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerink, D O; Hadi, U; Lestari, E S; Roeshadi, Djoko; Wahyono, Hendro; Nagelkerke, N J D; Van der Meulen, R G; Van den Broek, P J

    2013-07-01

    to investigate knowledge, attitude and behaviour toward infection control in two teaching hospitals on the island of Java by means of a questionnaire and to evaluate the use of the questionnaire as a tool. we investigated knowledge, attitude and behaviour toward infection control in two teaching hospitals on the island of Java by means of a questionnaire to identify problem areas, barriers and facilitators. The target was to include at least 50% of all health care workers (physicians, nurses, assistant nurses and infection control nurses) in each hospital, department and profession. Differences between demographic variables and scores for individual questions and groups of questions were compared using the chi-square statistic and analysis of variance and Spearman's rho was used to test for correlations between knowledge, attitude, self-reported behaviour and perceived obstacles. more than half of the health care workers of the participating departments completed the questionnaire. Of the 1036 respondents (44% nurses, 37% physicians and 19% assistant nurses), 34% were vaccinated against hepatitis B, 77% had experienced needle stick accidents and 93% had been instructed about infection control. The mean of the correct answers to the knowledge questions was 44%; of the answers to the attitude questions 67% were in agreement with the correct attitude; obstacles to compliance with infection control guidelines were perceived in 30% of the questions and the mean self-reported compliance was 63%. Safe handling of sharps, hand hygiene and the use of personal protective equipment were identified as the most important aspects for interventions. Significant positive correlations were found between knowledge, attitude, self-reported behaviour and perceived obstacles. the questionnaire in conjunction with site visits and interviews was a valuable strategy to identify trouble spots in the hospitals and to determine barriers to facilitators of change that should be taken into

  11. THE ORGANIZATION WORKS TO IMPROVE THE CLINICAL AND ECONOMIC OUTCOMES OF CARE FOR PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Apolikhin

    2015-01-01

    Programme on the territory of theVoronezh region they deployed 7 Interdistrict (ITC and 1 regional centre. The most difficult clinical cases were sent to the Federal urology center - research Institute of urology. They humiliated 140 experts from the region, with 80 of them they studied using remote sensing technology. For the realisation of the Program it was established an Advisory portal NetHealth.ru, which considered 498 clinical cases of prostate cancer, with 28 of specialists in various stages of the region took an active part in distance counseling.      From 2009 to 2013 an improvement of a number of indicators was marked: increase in the absolute number of patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer from 451 to 603 cases, a localized increase in the share stages with 60.3% to 71.2 %, a decrease of deaths within one year from the date of diagnosis for prostate cancer from 14.6% to 6.5% and deaths among all registered patients with prost