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Sample records for clic positron source

  1. The CLIC electron and positron polarized sources

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, Louis; Bulyak, Eugene; Chehab, Robert; Dadoun, Olivier; Gai, Wei; Gladkikh, Peter; Kamitani, Takuya; Kuriki, Masao; Liu, Wanming; Maryuama, Takashi; Omori, Tsunehiko; Poelker, Matt; Sheppard, John; Urakawa, Junji; Variola, Alessandro; Vivoli, Alessandro; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Zhou, Feng; Zimmermann, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC polarized electron source is based on a DC gun where the photocathode is illuminated by a laser beam. Each micro-bunch has a charge of 6x109 e−, a width of 100 ps and a repetition rate of 2 GHz. A peak current of 10 A in the micro-bunch is a challenge for the surface charge limit of the photo-cathode. Two options are feasible to generate the 2 GHz e− bunch train: 100 ps micro-bunches can be extracted from the photo-cathode either by a 2 GHz laser system or by generating a macro-bunch using a ~200 ns laser pulse and a subsequent RF bunching system to produce the appropriate micro-bunch structure. Recent results obtained by SLAC, for the latter case, are presented. The polarized positron source is based on a positron production scheme in which polarized photons are produced by a laser Compton scattering process. The resulting circularly-polarized gamma photons are sent onto a target, producing pairs of longitudinally polarized electrons and positrons. The Compton backscattering process occurs eithe...

  2. Brilliant positron sources for CLIC and other collider projects

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, Louis; Dadoun, Olivier; Kamitani, Takuya; Strakhovenko, Vladimir; Variola, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider), as future linear collider, requires an intense positron source. A brief history is given up to the present baseline configuration which assumes unpolarized beams. A conventional scheme, with a single tungsten target as source of e-e+ pairs, has been studied several years ago. But, in order to reduce the beam energy deposition on the e+ target converter, a double-target system has been studied and proposed as baseline for CLIC. With this ‘‘hybrid target’’, the positron production scheme is based on the channeling process. A 5 GeV electron beam impinges on a thin crystal tungsten target aligned along its axis, enhancing the photon production by channeling radiation. A large number of photons are sent to a thick amorphous tungsten target, generating large number of e-e+ pairs, while the charged particles are bent away, reducing the deposited energy and the PEDD (Peak Energy Deposition Density). The targets parameters are optimized for the positron production. Polarize...

  3. The CLIC positron source based on compton schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, L; Braun, H; Papaphilippou, Y; Schulte, D; Vivoli, A; Zimmermann, F; Dadoun, O; Lepercq, P; Roux, R; Variola, A; Zomer, F; Pogorelski, I; Yakimenko, V; Gai, W; Liu, W; Kamitani, T; Omori, T; Urakawa, J; Kuriki, M; Takahasi, TM; Bulyak, E; Gladkikh, P; Chehab, R; Clarke, J

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC polarized positron source is based on a positron production scheme in which polarized photons are produced by a Compton process. In one option, Compton backscattering takes place in a so-called “Compton ring”, where an electron beam of 1 GeV interacts with circularly-polarized photons in an optical resonator. The resulting circularly-polarized gamma photons are sent on to an amorphous target, producing pairs of longitudinally polarized electrons and positrons. The nominal CLIC bunch population is 4.2x109 particles per bunch at the exit of the Pre-Damping Ring (PDR). Since the photon flux coming out from a "Compton ring" is not sufficient to obtain the requested charge, a stacking process is required in the PDR. Another option is to use a Compton Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) where a quasicontinual stacking in the PDR could be achieved. A third option is to use a "Compton Linac" which would not require stacking. We describe the overall scheme as well as advantages and constraints of the three option...

  4. Beam dynamic simulation and optimization of the CLIC positron source and the capture linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayar, C.; Doebert, S.; Ciftci, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    The CLIC Positron Source is based on the hybrid target composed of a crystal and an amorphous target. Simulations have been performed from the exit of the amorphous target to the end of pre-injector linac which captures and accelerates the positrons to an energy of 200 MeV. Simulations are performed by the particle tracking code PARMELA. The magnetic field of the AMD is represented in PARMELA by simple coils. Two modes are applied in this study. The first one is accelerating mode based on acceleration after the AMD. The second one is decelerating mode based on deceleration in the first accelerating structure. It is shown that the decelerating mode gives a higher yield for the e+ beam in the end of the Pre-Injector Linac.

  5. Positron sources for electron-positron colliders application to the ILC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    The increased demanding qualities for positron sources dedicated to e+e- colliders pushed on investigations oriented on new kinds of e+ sources. The different kinds of positron sources polarized and no polarized are considered. Their main features (intensity, emittance) are described and analysed. Comparison between the different sources is worked out. The characteristics of the positron beam available in the collision point are greatly depending on the capture device and on the positron accelerator. Different kinds of capture systems are considered and their qualities, compared. Intense positron sources which are necessary for the colliders require intense incident beams (electrons or photons). The large number of pairs created in the targets leads to important energy deposition and so, thermal heating, which associated to temperature gradients provoke mechanical stresses often destructive. Moreover, the important Coulomb collisions, can affect the atomic structure in crystal targets and the radiation resist...

  6. Positron source investigation by using CLIC drive beam for Linac-LHC based e+p collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arιkan, Ertan; Aksakal, Hüsnü

    2012-08-01

    Three different methods which are alternately conventional, Compton backscattering and Undulator based methods employed for the production of positrons. The positrons to be used for e+p collisions in a Linac-LHC (Large Hadron Collider) based collider have been studied. The number of produced positrons as a function of drive beam energy and optimum target thickness has been determined. Three different targets have been used as a source investigation which are W75-Ir25, W75-Ta25, and W75-Re25 for three methods. Estimated number of the positrons has been performed with FLUKA simulation code. Then, these produced positrons are used for following Adiabatic matching device (AMD) and capture efficiency is determined. Then e+p collider luminosity corresponding to the methods mentioned above have been calculated by CAIN code.

  7. Positron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tentative survey of positron sources is given. Physical processes on which positron generation is based are indicated and analyzed. Explanation of the general features of electromagnetic interactions and nuclear β+ decay makes it possible to predict the yield and emittance for a given optical matching system between the positron source and the accelerator. Some kinds of matching systems commonly used - mainly working with solenoidal field - are studied and the acceptance volume calculated. Such knowledge is helpful in comparing different matching systems. Since for large machines, a significant distance exists between the positron source and the experimental facility, positron emittance has to be preserved during beam transfer over large distances and methods used for that purpose are indicated. Comparison of existing positron sources leads to extrapolation to sources for future linear colliders. Some new ideas associated with these sources are also presented. (orig.)

  8. Positron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tentative survey of positron sources is given. Physical processes on which positron generation is based are indicated and analyzed. Explanation of the general features of electromagnetic interactions and nuclear β+ decay makes it possible to predict the yield and emittance for a given optical matching system between the positron source and the accelerator. Some kinds of matching systems commonly used - mainly working with solenoidal fields - are studied and the acceptance volume calculated. Such knowledge is helpful in comparing different matching systems. Since for large machines, a significant distance exists between the positron source and the experimental facility, positron emittance has to be preserved during beam transfer over large distances and methods used for that purpose are indicated. Comparison of existing positron sources leads to extrapolation to sources for future linear colliders

  9. Higgs Physics at the CLIC Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Roloff, Philipp Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future $e^+e^-$ collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 TeV, providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper presents the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating in three energy stages, $\\sqrt{s} =$ 350 GeV, 1.4 TeV and 3 TeV. The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung ($e^+e^-\\to ZH$) and $WW$-fusion ($e^+e^-\\to H\

  10. Higgs Physics at the CLIC Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Afanaciev, K; Tehrani, N Alipour; Balázs, C; Benhammou, Y; Benoit, M; Bilki, B; Blaising, J -J; Boland, M J; Boronat, M; Borysov, O; Božović-Jelisavčić, I; Buckland, M; Bugiel, S; Burrows, P N; Charles, T K; Daniluk, W; Dannheim, D; Dasgupta, R; Demarteau, M; Gutierrez, M A Díaz; Eigen, G; Elsener, K; Felzmann, U; Firlej, M; Firu, E; Fiutowski, T; Fuster, J; Gabriel, M; Gaede, F; García, I; Ghenescu, V; Goldstein, J; Green, S; Grefe, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Kačarević, G; Kalinowski, J; Kananov, S; Klempt, W; Kopec, M; Krawczyk, M; Krupa, B; Kucharczyk, M; Kulis, S; Laštovička, T; Lesiak, T; Levy, A; Levy, I; Linssen, L; Lukić, S; Maier, A A; Makarenko, V; Marshall, J S; Mei, K; Milutinović-Dumbelović, G; Moroń, J; Moszczyński, A; Moya, D; Münker, R M; Münnich, A; Neagu, A T; Nikiforou, N; Nikolopoulos, K; Nürnberg, A; Pandurović, M; Pawlik, B; Codina, E Perez; Peric, I; Petric, M; Pitters, F; Poss, S G; Preda, T; Protopopescu, D; Rassool, R; Redford, S; Repond, J; Robson, A; Roloff, P; Ros, E; Rosenblat, O; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Sailer, A; Schlatter, D; Schulte, D; Shumeiko, N; Sicking, E; Simon, F; Simoniello, R; Sopicki, P; Stapnes, S; Ström, R; Strube, J; Świentek, K P; Szalay, M; Tesař, M; Thomson, M A; Trenado, J; Uggerhøj, U I; van der Kolk, N; van der Kraaij, E; Pinto, M Vicente Barreto; Vila, I; Gonzalez, M Vogel; Vos, M; Vossebeld, J; Watson, M; Watson, N; Weber, M A; Weerts, H; Wells, J D; Weuste, L; Winter, A; Wojtoń, T; Xia, L; Xu, B; Żarnecki, A F; Zawiejski, L; Zgura, I -S

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future e+e- collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 TeV, providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper presents the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating in three energy stages, sqrt(s) = 350 GeV, 1.4 TeV and 3 TeV. The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung (e+e- -> ZH) and WW-fusion (e+e- -> Hnunu), resulting in precise measurements of the production cross sections, the Higgs total decay width Gamma_H, and model-independent determinations of the Higgs couplings. Operation at sqrt(s) > 1 TeV provides high-statistics samples of Higgs bosons produced through WW-fusion, enabling tight constraints on the Higgs boson couplings. Studies of the rarer processes e+e- -> ttH and e+e- -> HHnunu would allow measurements of the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs boson self-coupling. This paper presents detailed studies of...

  11. A 12 GHZ RF Power source for the CLIC study

    CERN Document Server

    Peauger, F; Curt, S; Doebert, S; McMonagle, G; Rossat, G; Schirm, KM; Syratchev, I; Timeo, L; Kuzikhov, S; Vikharev, AA; Haase, A; Sprehn, D; Jensen, A; Jongewaard, EN; Nantista, CD; Vlieks, A

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC RF frequency has been changed in 2008 from the initial 30 GHz to the European X-band 11.9942 GHz permitting beam independent power production using klystrons for CLIC accelerating structure testing. A design and fabrication contract for five klystrons at that frequency has been signed by different parties with SLAC. France (IRFU, CEA Saclay) is contributing a solid state modulator purchased in industry and specific 12 GHz RF network components to the CLIC study. RF pulses over 120 MW peak at 230 ns length will be obtained by using a novel SLED-I type pulse compression scheme designed and fabricated by IAP, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. The X-band power test stand is being installed in the CLIC Test Facility CTF3 for independent structure and component testing in a bunker, but allowing, in a later stage, for powering RF components in the CTF3 beam lines. The design of the facility, results from commissioning of the RF power source and the expected performance of the Test Facility are reported.

  12. Polarized positron sources for the future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis introduces the polarized positron source as one of the key element of the future Linear Collider (LC). In this context, the different schemes of the polarized positron source are described highlighting the main issues in this technology. In particular, the main focus is on the Compton based positron source adopted by the CLIC as a preferred option for the future positron source upgrade. In this case, the circularly polarized high energy gamma rays resulting from Compton scattering are directed to a production target where an electromagnetic cascade gives rise to the production of positrons by e+-e- pair conversion. To increase the efficiency of the gamma ray production stage, a multiple collision point line integrated in energy recovery linac is proposed. The simulations of the positron production, capture and primary acceleration allow to estimate the positron production efficiency and provide a simple parametrization of the Compton based polarized positron source in the view of the future LC requirements. The storage ring based Compton source option, so-called Compton ring, is also described. The main constraint of this scheme is given by the beam dynamics resulting in the large energy spread and increased bunch length affecting the gamma ray production rate. An original theoretical contribution is shown to calculate the energy spread induced by Compton scattering. Moreover, an experiment to test the gamma ray production by Compton scattering using a state-of-art laser system developed at LAL has been conducted in the framework of the 'Mighty Laser' project at the ATF, KEK. The experimental layout as well as the main results obtained are discussed in details. The studies carried out in this thesis show that the polarized positron source based on Compton scattering is a promising candidate for the future LC polarized positron source. (author)

  13. CLIC and CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Tecker, F

    2008-01-01

    The CLIC study has been exploring the scheme for an electron-positron Collider (CLIC) with high luminosity (10$^{34}$ - 10$^{35}$ cm2/s) and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV in order to make the multi-TeV range accessible for physics. The CLIC Test Facility CTF3, built at CERN by an international collaboration, aims at demonstrating the feasibility of the CLIC scheme by 2010. CTF3 consists of a 150 MeV electron linac followed by a 42 m long delay loop and an 84 m combiner ring, followed by a two-beam test stand and a test decelerator. The linac and delay loop have been previously commissioned, while the combiner ring has been recently completed. After a presentation of the recent CLIC parameters, the status of the test facility, the experimental results achieved and the future plans will be presented.

  14. CLIC Brochure

    CERN Multimedia

    De Melis, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    After the discovery of the Higgs boson and with upgrades to higher energy and luminosity, the LHC is mapping the route of particle physics into the future. The next step in this journey of discovery could be a linear electron-positron collider, which would complement the LHC and allow high precision measurements of the Higgs boson, the top quark and electroweak processes in addition to possible new physics beyond the Standard Model. The Compact Linear Collider is under development by two worldwide collaborations, pushing the limits of particle acceleration and detection. Technological R&D, physics simulations and engineering studies must all come together to make CLIC a reality.

  15. CLIC brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    The world's biggest and most powerful accelerator, the LHC, is mapping the route of particle physics for the future. The next step, to complement the LHC in exploring this new region, is most likely to be a linear electron-positron collider. The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a novel approach to such a collider. It is currently under development by the CLIC collaboration, which is hosted at CERN.

  16. Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, D.

    2003-03-01

    The Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS) is a state of the art variable energy positron beam under construction at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL). Projected intensities on the order of the order of 10^7 e+/second using ^64Cu as the positron source are expected. Owing to is short half-life (t1/2 12.8 hrs), plans are to produce the ^64Cu isotope on-site using beam port 1 of NETL TRIGA Mark II reactor. Following tungsten moderation, the positrons will be electrostatically focused and accelerated from few 10's of eV up to 30 keV. This intensity and energy range should allow routine performance of several analytical techniques of interest to surface scientists (PALS, PADB and perhaps PAES and LEPD.) The TIPS project is being developed in parallel phases. Phase I of the project entails construction of the vacuum system, source chamber, main beam line, electrostatic/magnetic focusing and transport system as well as moderator design. Initial construction, testing and characterization of moderator and beam transport elements are underway and will use a commercially available 10 mCi ^22Na radioisotope as a source of positrons. Phase II of the project is concerned primarily with the Cu source geometry and thermal properties as well as production and physical handling of the radioisotope. Additional instrument optimizing based upon experience gained during Phase I will be incorporated in the final design. Current progress of both phases will be presented along with motivations and future directions.

  17. Investigations on a hybrid positron source with a granular converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artru, X. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne (France); Chaikovska, I. [Laboratoire de l’Accelerateur Lineaire (LAL), Universite Paris-Sud, Bat. 200, 91898 Orsay (France); Chehab, R., E-mail: chehab@lal.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne (France); Chevallier, M. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne (France); Dadoun, O. [Laboratoire de l’Accelerateur Lineaire (LAL), Universite Paris-Sud, Bat. 200, 91898 Orsay (France); Furukawa, K. [Accelerator Laboratory (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Guler, H. [Laboratoire de l’Accelerateur Lineaire (LAL), Universite Paris-Sud, Bat. 200, 91898 Orsay (France); Kamitani, T.; Miyahara, F.; Satoh, M. [Accelerator Laboratory (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Sievers, P. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Suwada, T.; Umemori, K. [Accelerator Laboratory (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Variola, A. [Laboratoire de l’Accelerateur Lineaire (LAL), Universite Paris-Sud, Bat. 200, 91898 Orsay (France)

    2015-07-15

    Promising results obtained with crystal targets for positron production led to the elaboration of a hybrid source made of an axially oriented tungsten crystal, as a radiator, and an amorphous tungsten converter. If the converter is granular, made of small spheres, the heat dissipation is greatly enhanced and the thermal shocks reduced, allowing the consideration of such device for the future linear colliders. A positron source of this kind is investigated. Previous simulations have shown very promising results for the yield as for the energy deposition and the PEDD (Peak Energy Deposition Density). Here, we present detailed simulations made in this granular converter with emphasis on the energy deposition density, which is a critical parameter as learned from the breakdown of the SLC target. A test on the KEKB linac is foreseen; it will allow a determination of the energy deposited and the PEDD in the converter through temperature measurements. Four granular converters, made of W spheres of mm radius have been built at LAL-Orsay; they will be installed at KEK and compared to compact converters. A description of the experimental layout at KEK is provided. Applications to future linear colliders as CLIC and ILC are considered.

  18. Investigations on a hybrid positron source with a granular converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Promising results obtained with crystal targets for positron production led to the elaboration of a hybrid source made of an axially oriented tungsten crystal, as a radiator, and an amorphous tungsten converter. If the converter is granular, made of small spheres, the heat dissipation is greatly enhanced and the thermal shocks reduced, allowing the consideration of such device for the future linear colliders. A positron source of this kind is investigated. Previous simulations have shown very promising results for the yield as for the energy deposition and the PEDD (Peak Energy Deposition Density). Here, we present detailed simulations made in this granular converter with emphasis on the energy deposition density, which is a critical parameter as learned from the breakdown of the SLC target. A test on the KEKB linac is foreseen; it will allow a determination of the energy deposited and the PEDD in the converter through temperature measurements. Four granular converters, made of W spheres of mm radius have been built at LAL-Orsay; they will be installed at KEK and compared to compact converters. A description of the experimental layout at KEK is provided. Applications to future linear colliders as CLIC and ILC are considered

  19. Preliminary Design of a Bunching System for the CLIC Polarized Electron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Feng

    2009-10-30

    Major parameters of the CLIC and ILC electron sources are given in Table I. It is shown that the CLIC source needs to provide 312 15-ps-long 2-GHz microbunches. There are two approaches to achieve the time structure [2]: one is to develop a 2-GHz optical pulse train, and the other to develop a 156-ns-long CW optical pulse and use an RF bunching system to generate 312 2-GHz microbunches. The former scheme may ease the RF bunching system but still need it to bunch 100-ps of microbunch down to 15-ps level. Otherwise, a huge amount of energy spread is accumulated when the beam is accelerated through downstream 2-GHz accelerator. In addition, in the former scheme, the space charge is high and surface charge is not yet proven in the parameter regime and 2-GHz mode locked laser is challenging. The latter scheme needs a high-efficiency bunching system to generate 312 15-ps microbunches with 2-GHz repetition rate but it has some notable advantages: a 156-ns CW laser technique is matured, and the charge limit behavior in the scheme is better characterized than that in the former case, as listed in the table. This note presents a design and modeling of the bunching system for the latter scheme to convert a 156-ns CW pulse to 312 15-ps long 2-GHz microbunches.

  20. CERN: Making CLIC tick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) scheme for counter-rotating proton beams in a new superconducting ring to be built in CERN's existing 27-kilometre LEP tunnel is being pushed as the Laboratory's main construction project for the 1990s, research and development continues in parallel for an eventual complementary attack on new physics frontiers with CERN's Linear Collider - CLIC - firing TeV electron and positron beams at each other

  1. Hypernovae as possible sources of Galactic positrons

    OpenAIRE

    Schanne, Stephane; Casse, Michel; Cordier, Bertrand; Paul, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    INTEGRAL/SPI has recently observed a strong and extended emission resulting from electron-positron annihilation located in the Galactic center region, consistent with the Galactic bulge geometry, without any counterpart at high gamma-ray energies, nor in the 1809 keV $^{26}$Al decay line. In order to explain the rate of positron injection in the Galactic bulge, estimated to more than 10$^{43}$ s$^{-1}$, the most commonly considered positron injection sources are type Ia supernovae. However, S...

  2. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dannheim, D

    2015-01-01

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a meas- urement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → W b will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit tim- ing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC ver- tex det...

  3. CLIC Muon Sweeper Design

    CERN Document Server

    Aloev, A; Gatignon, L; Modena, M; Pilicer, B; Tapan, I

    2016-01-01

    There are several background sources which may affect the analysis of data and detector performans at the CLIC project. One of the important background source is halo muons, which are generated along the beam delivery system (BDS), for the detector performance. In order to reduce muon background, magnetized muon sweepers have been used as a shielding material that is already described in a previous study for CLIC [1]. The realistic muon sweeper has been designed with OPERA. The design parameters of muon sweeper have also been used to estimate muon background reduction with BDSIM Monte Carlo simulation code [2, 3].

  4. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannheim, D.

    2015-03-01

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a measurement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → Wb will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit timing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC vertex detector. It comprises fast, low-power and small-pitch readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology (CLICpix) coupled to ultra-thin planar or active HV-CMOS sensors via low-mass interconnects. The power dissipation of the readout chips is reduced by means of power pulsing, allowing for a cooling system based on forced gas flow. This contribution reviews the requirements and design optimisation for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R&D achievements in the domains of sensors, readout and detector integration.

  5. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a measurement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → Wb will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit timing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC vertex detector. It comprises fast, low-power and small-pitch readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology (CLICpix) coupled to ultra-thin planar or active HV-CMOS sensors via low-mass interconnects. The power dissipation of the readout chips is reduced by means of power pulsing, allowing for a cooling system based on forced gas flow. This contribution reviews the requirements and design optimisation for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R and D achievements in the domains of sensors, readout and detector integration

  6. Development of Texas intense positron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köymen, A. R.; Ünlü, K.; Jacobsen, F. M.; Göktepeli, S.; Wehring, B. W.

    1999-02-01

    The Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS) is a reactor-based low-energy positron beam facility utilizing some novel techniques in positron beam production. This facility will be located at the University of Texas (UT) at Austin Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) and is being developed by UT Austin and UT Arlington researchers. TIPS will use a large area (total area of 900-1800 cm 2) 64Cu source to supply fast β + particles for subsequent moderation to form an intense monoenergetic positron beam in the energy range of 0-50 keV with an expected intensity of 10 8 e +/s. Natural copper will be neutron activated near the core of the NETL 1 MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor to produce the 64Cu isotope. The activated source will be transported to the moderator/remoderator assembly, outside the biological shield of the reactor. This assembly combines the primary moderation and posterior remoderation of the fast β + particles into one stage using solid Kr to produce a low-energy positron source of a few eV with a diameter of 8 mm. The low-energy positron beam is then extracted by an electrostatic modified SOA gun and after further acceleration to 5 keV, the beam is focused onto the object slit of a 90° bending magnet. After further focusing and another 90° bend, the beam enters the main accelerator/decelerator that transports the beam onto the target for experimentation. The components of TIPS have been manufactured and are currently being optimized. In this communication we present some of the details of the TIPS facility and furthermore briefly discuss its intended applications.

  7. CLIC CDR - physics and detectors: CLIC conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report forms part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC). The CLIC accelerator complex is described in a separate CDR volume. A third document, to appear later, will assess strategic scenarios for building and operating CLIC in successive center-of-mass energy stages. It is anticipated that CLIC will commence with operation at a few hundred GeV, giving access to precision standard-model physics like Higgs and top-quark physics. Then, depending on the physics landscape, CLIC operation would be staged in a few steps ultimately reaching the maximum 3 TeV center-of-mass energy. Such a scenario would maximize the physics potential of CLIC providing new physics discovery potential over a wide range of energies and the ability to make precision measurements of possible new states previously discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main purpose of this document is to address the physics potential of a future multi-TeV e+e- collider based on CLIC technology and to describe the essential features of a detector that are required to deliver the full physics potential of this machine. The experimental conditions at CLIC are significantly more challenging than those at previous electron-positron colliders due to the much higher levels of beam-induced backgrounds and the 0.5 ns bunch-spacing. Consequently, a large part of this report is devoted to understanding the impact of the machine environment on the detector with the aim of demonstrating, with the example of realistic detector concepts, that high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC. Since the impact of background increases with energy, this document concentrates on the detector requirements and physics measurements at the highest CLIC center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. One essential output of this report is the clear demonstration that a wide range of high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC with detectors which are challenging, but considered

  8. CLIC CDR - physics and detectors: CLIC conceptual design report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, E.; Demarteau, M.; Repond, J.; Xia, L.; Weerts, H. (High Energy Physics); (Many)

    2012-02-10

    This report forms part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC). The CLIC accelerator complex is described in a separate CDR volume. A third document, to appear later, will assess strategic scenarios for building and operating CLIC in successive center-of-mass energy stages. It is anticipated that CLIC will commence with operation at a few hundred GeV, giving access to precision standard-model physics like Higgs and top-quark physics. Then, depending on the physics landscape, CLIC operation would be staged in a few steps ultimately reaching the maximum 3 TeV center-of-mass energy. Such a scenario would maximize the physics potential of CLIC providing new physics discovery potential over a wide range of energies and the ability to make precision measurements of possible new states previously discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main purpose of this document is to address the physics potential of a future multi-TeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider based on CLIC technology and to describe the essential features of a detector that are required to deliver the full physics potential of this machine. The experimental conditions at CLIC are significantly more challenging than those at previous electron-positron colliders due to the much higher levels of beam-induced backgrounds and the 0.5 ns bunch-spacing. Consequently, a large part of this report is devoted to understanding the impact of the machine environment on the detector with the aim of demonstrating, with the example of realistic detector concepts, that high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC. Since the impact of background increases with energy, this document concentrates on the detector requirements and physics measurements at the highest CLIC center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. One essential output of this report is the clear demonstration that a wide range of high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC with detectors which are challenging, but

  9. CLICdp Overview. Overview of physics potential at CLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy Aharon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CLICdp, the CLIC detector and physics study, is an international collaboration presently composed of 23 institutions. The collaboration is addressing detector and physics issues for the future Compact Linear Collider (CLIC, a high-energy electron-positron accelerator which is one of the options for the next collider to be built at CERN. Precision physics under challenging beam and background conditions is the key theme for the CLIC detector studies. This leads to a number of cutting-edge R&D activities within CLICdp. The talk includes a brief introduction to CLIC, accelerator and detectors, hardware R&D as well as physics studies at CLIC.

  10. CLIC CTF3 for open days

    CERN Multimedia

    CLIC

    2013-01-01

    CLIC – the Compact Linear Collider – is a study for a future accelerator that reaches unprecedented energies for electrons and their antimatter twins, positrons. It uses a novel two-beam acceleration scheme in which the electrons and positrons are propelled to high energy by an additional high current electron beam, the so-called Drive Beam. In order to generate this high current Drive Beam, a long train of electron bunches is accelerated, parts of the train delayed in a Delay Loop and Combiner Rings, and interleaved by transversely deflecting radio-frequency cavities. The CLIC Test Facility CTF3, which is shown in the movie, examines the new technologies envisioned by the CLIC design, in particular the Drive Beam generation and the two-beam acceleration. It is a scaled-down version of the CLIC facility, and it has demonstrated the feasibility of the novel scheme.

  11. CLIC CTF3 for open days

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    (subt french) CLIC – the Compact Linear Collider – is a study for a future accelerator that reaches unprecedented energies for electrons and their antimatter twins, positrons. It uses a novel two-beam acceleration scheme in which the electrons and positrons are propelled to high energy by an additional high current electron beam, the so-called Drive Beam. In order to generate this high current Drive Beam, a long train of electron bunches is accelerated, parts of the train delayed in a Delay Loop and Combiner Rings, and interleaved by transversely deflecting radio-frequency cavities. The CLIC Test Facility CTF3, which is shown in the movie, examines the new technologies envisioned by the CLIC design, in particular the Drive Beam generation and the two-beam acceleration. It is a scaled-down version of the CLIC facility, and it has demonstrated the feasibility of the novel scheme.

  12. Detector Optimization of the CLIC Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Saxe, Gandalf

    2015-01-01

    CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) is a proposed high-energy electron-positron collider at CERN [1] that, if approved, will be built at the feet of the Jura Mountains in Switzerland, passing through CERN. As opposed to hadrons, electrons (e-) and positrons (e+) are elementary particles. Therefore, e-e+ collisions give a well defined initial state which allows high precision studies. A circular collider is not a viable option when going to high energies (several TeV) for a e-e+ collider due to synchrotron radiation. Therefore CLIC is designed as a linear collider. CLIC is proposed to be build in three center-of-mass energy stages: 380 GeV, 1.4 TeV and 3.0 TeV. The CLIC physics program includes the high precision measurements of the Higgs and top properties, the observation of rare processes, and the possible discovery of new particles [3].

  13. Precision Higgs boson measurement at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Pandurovic, Mila

    2016-01-01

    The design of the next generation collider in high energy physics will primarily focus on the possibility to achieve high precision of the measurements of interest. The necessary precision limits are set, in the first place, by the measurement of the Higgs boson but also by measurements that are sensitive to signs of New Physics. The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an attractive option for a future multi-TeV linear electron-positron collider, with the potential to cover a rich physics program with high precision. In this lecture the CLIC accelerator, detector and backgrounds will be presented with emphesis on the capabilities of CLIC for precision Higgs physics.

  14. Proceedings of the PF slow-positron source workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop was held on December 21 and 22, 1993, at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK). In the PF of KEK, the construction of the slow positron source by utilizing the 2.5 GeV electron linear accelerator has been advance, and recently, slow positrons have become to be leadable to the laboratory, though at low intensity. At the workshop, lectures were given on synchrotron radiation injector, present state of the PF slow positron source, present state of the slow positron source in ETL, conveyance of slow positron beam, accumulation of positrons, experiment of slow positron utilization, surface electron spectroscopy by slow positrons, surface study using slow positrons, positronium emission from nonmetallic surfaces, formation of positronium beam, expectation to irradiation defect research using slow positrons, application of slow positron beam to SiO2/Si system, application to electron structure research, chemical utilization of positron beam, possibility of X-ray microscope in various energy regions, and application of positron beam to thin films and artificial lattice. (K.I.)

  15. Construction report of the PF slow-positron source. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The slow positron source utilizing the electron beam of the 2.5 GeV electron beam accelerator which is the synchrotron radiation injector is being constructed. The outline of the project and the present state of construction are reported. As of November, 1993, by injecting the electron beam of about 10 W to the targets for producing positrons, the slow positrons of 4 x 104 e+/s has been obtained in the laboratory. Finally, with the electron beam of 30 kW, it is aimed at to obtain the slow positron beam of 2 x 109 e+/s. In the slow positron source, the electron beam from the 2.5 GeV linear accelerator is used as the primary beam. This beam is led to the target with electromagnets. Radiation shields were strengthened, and the electrostatic lens system was attached to efficiently extract and send out slow positrons. The conveying system for slow positrons is explained. Primary electron beam, target and moderator for producing slow positrons, the change to continuous current of pulsed slow positron beam and the heightening of luminance of slow positron beam, and the experiment on the utilization of slow positron beam, and the control system for positron conveyance path are reported. (K.I.)

  16. Polarized positron source with a Compton multiple interaction point line

    CERN Document Server

    Chaikovska, I; Dadoun, O; Lepercq, P; Variola, A

    2014-01-01

    Positron sources are critical components of the future linear collider projects. This is essentially due to the high luminosity required, orders of magnitude higher than existing ones. In addition, polarization of the positron beam rather expands the physics research potential of the machine. In this framework, the Compton sources for polarized positron production are taken into account where the high energy gamma rays are produced by the Compton scattering and subsequently converted into the polarized electron-positron pairs in a target-converter. The Compton multiple Interaction Point (IP) line is proposed as one of the solutions to increase the number of the positrons produced. The gamma ray production with the Compton multiple IP line is simulated and used for polarized positron generation. Later, a capture section based on an adiabatic matching device (AMD) followed by a pre-injector linac is simulated to capture and accelerate the positron beam.

  17. CLIC Status and Outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Stapnes, Stapnes

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider study (CLIC) is in the process of completing a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for a multi-TeV linear electron-positron collider. The CLICconcept is based on high gradient normal-conducting accelerating structures. The RF power for the acceleration of the colliding beams is produced by a novel two beam acceleration scheme, where power is extracted from a high current drive beam that runs parallel with the main linac. In order to establish the feasibility of this concept a number of key issues have been addressed. A short summary of the progress and status of the corresponding studies will be given, as well as an outline of the preparation and work towards an implementation plan by 2016.

  18. Requirements of CLIC Beam Loss Monitoring System

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M; Holzer, EB; Jonker, M; Mallows, S; Otto, T; Welsch, C

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) [1] is a proposed multi-TeV linear electron-positron collider being designed by a world-wide collaboration. It is based on a novel twobeam acceleration scheme in which two beams (drive and main beam) are placed in parallel to each other and energy is transferred from the drive beam to the main one. Beam losses on either of them can have catastrophic consequences for the machine, because of high intensity (drive beam) or high energy and small emittance (main beam). In the framework of machine protection, a Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system has to be put in place. This paper discusses the requirements for the beam loss system in terms of detector sensitivity, resolution, dynamic range and ability to distinguish losses originating from various sources. The two-beam module where the protection from beam losses is particularly challenging and important, is studied.

  19. Experimental Study of a Positron\\\\ Source Using Channeling

    CERN Multimedia

    Gavrykov, V; Kulibaba, V; Baier, V; Beloborodov, K; Bojenok, A; Bukin, A; Burdin, S; Dimova, T; Druzhinin, V; Dubrovin, M; Seredniakov, S; Shary, V; Strakhovenko, V; Keppler, P; Major, J; Bogdanov, A V; Potylitsin, A; Vnoukov, I; Artru, X; Lautesse, P; Poizat, J-C; Remillieux, J

    2002-01-01

    Many simulations have predicted that the yield of positrons, resulting from the interaction of fast electrons in a solid target, increases if the target is a crystal oriented with a major axis parallel to the electron beam. Tests made at Orsay and Tokyo confirmed these expectations. The experiment WA 103 concerns the determination of the main characteristics (emittance, energy spread) of a crystal positron source which could replace advantageously the conventional positron converters foreseen in some linear collider projects. The main element of the set-up is a magnetic spectrometer, using a drift chamber, where the positron trajectories are reconstructed (see Figure 1) A first run has been operated in july 2000 and the first results showed, as expected, a significant enhancement in photon and positron generation along the $$ axis of the tungsten crystal. Indications about a significant increase in the number of soft photons and positrons were also gathered : this point is of importance for the positron colle...

  20. Positron Source Simulations for ILC 1 TeV Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ushakov, Andriy; Riemann, Sabine; Liu, Wanming; Gai, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The generation and capture of polarized positrons at a source with a superconducting helical undulator having 4.3 cm period and 500 GeV electron drive beam have been simulated. The positron polarization has been calculated for the different undulator K values (up to K = 2.5). Without applying a photon collimator, the maximal polarization of positrons is about 25% for 231 meters active magnet length of undulator with K = 0.7. Using an undulator with K = 2.5 and a collimator with an aperture radius of 0.9 mm results in increase of positron polarization to 54%. The energy deposition, temperature rise and stress induced by high intense photon beam in the rotated titanium-alloy target have been estimated. The maximal thermal stress in the target is about 224 MPa for the source with photon collimation to achieve a positron polarization of 54%.

  1. CLIC PHYSICS OVERVIEW

    CERN Document Server

    Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, based on the invited talk at the 17th Lomonosov Conference of Elementary Particle Physics, the physics program at the future Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on the Higgs physics studies. It will be demonstrated, on the basis of detailed physics and detector studies carried out at CLIC, that the CLIC is indeed a precision tool for studies both in the Higgs sector and beyond the Standard Model.

  2. CLIC MDI Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Gatignon, Lau

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to the layout of the CLIC Machine Detector Interface as it has been defined for the CLIC Conceptual Design Report. We concentrate on the specific case of the CLIC_SiD detector, although the push-pull concept for two detectors has been included in the design. Some recent work and developments are described as well. However, for the details we refer to the detailed technical talks at this conference.

  3. Development of high intensity source of thermal positrons APosS (Argonne Positron Source)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an update on the positron-facility development at Argonne National Laboratory. We will discuss advantages of using low-energy electron accelerator, present our latest results on slow positron production simulations, and plans for further development of the facility. We have installed a new converter/moderator assembly that is appropriate for our electron energy that allows increasing the yield about an order of magnitude. We have simulated the relative yields of thermalized positrons as a function of incident positron energy on the moderator. We use these data to calculate positron yields that we compare with our experimental data as well as with available literature data. We will discuss the new design of the next generation positron front end utilization of reflection moderator geometry. We also will discuss planned accelerator upgrades and their impact on APosS.

  4. Preparing for CLIC tests

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The Canon 5 undergoes first brazing for preparation in the CLIC study at the CLIC Test Facility 2 (CTF2). This will test injection for a proposed linear collider that will further explore discoveries made at the LHC. Electric fields in the canon will boost electrons into the acceleration fields of the collider.

  5. CLIC's three-step plan

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    In early October, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) collaboration published its final Conceptual Design Report. Accompanying it was a strategic summary document that describes a whole new approach to the project: developing the linear e+e− collider in three energy stages. Though CLIC’s future still depends on signs from the LHC, its new staged approach to high-energy electron-positron physics for the post-LHC era is nothing short of convincing.   Instead of asking for a 48-kilometre-long commitment right off the bat, the CLIC collaboration is now presenting an accelerator that can be constructed in stages. For example, it could begin as an 11-kilometre 500 GeV accelerator that could later be extended to a 27-kilometre 1.5 TeV machine. Finally, after a decade or so of data taking, it could be taken up to the full 48-kilometre 3 TeV facility (see image 2). “Not only is the approach technically and financially practical, it also offers a very convincing physics prog...

  6. CLIC Drive Beam Phase Stabilisation

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Schulte, Daniel

    The thesis presents phase stability studies for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and focuses in particular on CLIC Drive Beam longitudinal phase stabilisation. This topic constitutes one of the main feasibility challenges for CLIC construction and is an essential component of the current CLIC stabilisation campaign. The studies are divided into two large interrelated sections: the simulation studies for the CLIC Drive Beam stability, and measurements, data analysis and simulations of the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) Drive Beam phase errors. A dedicated software tool has been developed for a step-by-step analysis of the error propagation through the CLIC Drive Beam. It uses realistic RF potential and beam loading amplitude functions for the Drive and Main Beam accelerating structures, complete models of the recombination scheme and compressor chicane as well as of further CLIC Drive Beam modules. The tool has been tested extensively and its functionality has been verified. The phase error propagation at CLIC h...

  7. Performance of particle flow calorimetry at CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particle flow approach to calorimetry can provide unprecedented jet energy resolution at a future high energy collider, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC). However, the use of particle flow calorimetry at the proposed multi-TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) poses a number of significant new challenges. At higher jet energies, detector occupancies increase, and it becomes increasingly difficult to resolve energy deposits from individual particles. The experimental conditions at CLIC are also significantly more challenging than those at previous electron–positron colliders, with increased levels of beam-induced backgrounds combined with a bunch spacing of only 0.5 ns. This paper describes the modifications made to the PandoraPFA particle flow algorithm to improve the jet energy reconstruction for jet energies above 250 GeV. It then introduces a combination of timing and pT cuts that can be applied to reconstructed particles in order to significantly reduce the background. A systematic study is performed to understand the dependence of the jet energy resolution on the jet energy and angle, and the physics performance is assessed via a study of the energy and mass resolution of W and Z particles in the presence of background at CLIC. Finally, the missing transverse momentum resolution is presented, and the fake missing momentum is quantified. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that high granularity particle flow calorimetry leads to a robust and high resolution reconstruction of jet energies and di-jet masses at CLIC.

  8. Conceptual design of a high-intensity positron source for the Advanced Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a planned new basic and applied research facility based on a powerful steady-state research reactor that provides neutrons for measurements and experiments in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The useful neutron flux will be at least five times more than is available in the world's best existing reactor facility. Construction of the ANS provides a unique opportunity to build a positron spectroscopy facility (PSF) with very-high-intensity beams based on the radioactive decay of a positron-generating isotope. The estimated maximum beam current is 1000 to 5000 times higher than that available at the world's best existing positron research facility. Such an improvement in beam capability, coupled with complementary detectors, will reduce experiment durations from months to less than one hour while simultaneously improving output resolution. This facility will remove the existing barriers to the routine use of positron-based analytical techniques and will be a giant step toward realization of the full potential of the application of positron spectroscopy to materials science. The ANS PSF is based on a batch cycle process using 64Cu isotope as the positron emitter and represents the status of the design at the end of last year. Recent work not included in this report, has led to a proposal for placing the laboratory space for the positron experiments outside the ANS containment; however, the design of the positron source is not changed by that relocation. Hydraulic and pneumatic flight tubes transport the source material between the reactor and the positron source where the beam is generated and conditioned. The beam is then transported through a beam pipe to one of several available detectors. The design presented here includes all systems necessary to support the positron source, but the beam pipe and detectors have not been addressed yet

  9. Conceptual design of a high-intensity positron source for the Advanced Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulett, L.D.; Eberle, C.C.

    1994-12-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a planned new basic and applied research facility based on a powerful steady-state research reactor that provides neutrons for measurements and experiments in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The useful neutron flux will be at least five times more than is available in the world`s best existing reactor facility. Construction of the ANS provides a unique opportunity to build a positron spectroscopy facility (PSF) with very-high-intensity beams based on the radioactive decay of a positron-generating isotope. The estimated maximum beam current is 1000 to 5000 times higher than that available at the world`s best existing positron research facility. Such an improvement in beam capability, coupled with complementary detectors, will reduce experiment durations from months to less than one hour while simultaneously improving output resolution. This facility will remove the existing barriers to the routine use of positron-based analytical techniques and will be a giant step toward realization of the full potential of the application of positron spectroscopy to materials science. The ANS PSF is based on a batch cycle process using {sup 64}Cu isotope as the positron emitter and represents the status of the design at the end of last year. Recent work not included in this report, has led to a proposal for placing the laboratory space for the positron experiments outside the ANS containment; however, the design of the positron source is not changed by that relocation. Hydraulic and pneumatic flight tubes transport the source material between the reactor and the positron source where the beam is generated and conditioned. The beam is then transported through a beam pipe to one of several available detectors. The design presented here includes all systems necessary to support the positron source, but the beam pipe and detectors have not been addressed yet.

  10. Development of a transport system for the copper source of the Texas Intense Positron Source facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doron, O.; Biegalski, S. R.; O'Kelly, S.; Hurst, B. J.

    2006-01-01

    The transport system design and construction for The Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS) facility has been completed. This facility is located on beam port 1 of The University of Texas at Austin TRIGA Mark II 1.1 MW research reactor. The TIPS will provide a high intensity, variable energy positron beam for use in material studies. The natural copper source is transported into beam port 1 of the reactor where it is irradiated at close proximity to the reactor core. The transport system is an L-shaped aluminum channel that utilizes pulleys to drive a source cart. The copper source is transported on the cart into and out of the beam port for irradiation. After removal from the beam port, the activated copper positron source will be placed into a vacuum chamber where the positrons are moderated with annealed tungsten foil and electrostatically extracted.

  11. Klystron Modulators for the 3 TeV CLIC Scheme An Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, P

    2001-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) design is based on the Two-Beam technology being developed at CERN. The Drive Beam accelerator will have about 200 multi-beam klystron-modulator (MBK-M) RF power sources for each drive beam linac. These multi-beam klystrons (MBKs) should provide up to 50 MW peak power at 937 MHz, with a 100 ms pulse width and operating at 100 Hz repetition frequency. The CLIC drive beam injector will also use a number of these same MBK-Ms operating at slightly lower power levels. A 0.5 MW peak power, 468 MHz klystron with a bandwidth of around 150 MHz will be required for the sub-harmonic buncher in each drive beam injector chain as well. The Main Beams injector complex is required to deliver e+ and e- beams at 9 GeV via the transfer lines to the CLIC Main Beam accelerator. The present injector complex design uses a series of linacs to accelerate the electron and positron beams coming from RF guns working at 1.5 GHz up to an energy of 1.98 GeV before they are put into damping rings. Each of ...

  12. CLIC Test Facility 3

    CERN Multimedia

    Kossyvakis, I; Faus-golfe, A

    2007-01-01

    The design of CLIC is based on a two-beam scheme, where short pulses of high power 30 GHz RF are extracted from a drive beam running parallel to the main beam. The 3rd generation CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) will demonstrate the generation of the drive beam with the appropriate time structure, the extraction of 30 GHz RF power from this beam, as well as acceleration of a probe beam with 30 GHz RF cavities. The project makes maximum use of existing equipment and infrastructure of the LPI complex, which became available after the closure of LEP.

  13. Automatic sup sup 1 sup sup 8 F positron source supply system for a monoenergetic positron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, F; Itoh, Y; Goto, A; Fujiwara, I; Kurihara, T; Iwata, R; Nagashima, Y; Hyodo, T

    2000-01-01

    A system which supplies an intense sup sup 1 sup sup 8 F (half life 110 min) positron source produced by an AVF cyclotron through sup sup 1 sup sup 8 O(p,n) sup sup 1 sup sup 8 F reaction has been constructed. Produced sup sup 1 sup sup 8 F is transferred to a low background experiment hall through a capillary. It is electro-deposited on a graphite rod and used for a source of a slow positron beam. In the meantime the next batch of target sup sup 1 sup sup 8 O water is loaded and proton irradiation proceeds. This system makes it possible to perform continuous positron beam experiments using the 18 F positron source.

  14. CLIC accelerator modules under construction at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2012-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) study is dedicated to the design of an electron-positron (e- e+) linear accelerator, colliding particle beams at the energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC required luminosity can be reached with powerful particle beams (14 MW each) colliding with extremely small dimensions and high beam stability at the interaction point. The accelerated particle beams must have dimensions of 45 nm in the horizontal plane and 1 nm in the vertical plane. CLIC relies upon a novel two-beam acceleration concept in which the Radio Frequency (RF) power is extracted from a low energy but high-intensity particle beam, called Drive Beam (DB), and transferred to a parallel high energy accelerating particle beam, called Main Beam (MB). The extraction and transfer of the RF power is achieved by the Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS) and the particle beam acceleration is achieved with high precision RF-Accelerating Structures (AS), operating at 11.9942 GHz with an accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m, whi...

  15. Conceptual Design for CLIC Gun Pulser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Tao [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-01-08

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a proposed future electron-positron collider, designed to perform collisions at energies from 0.5 to 5 TeV, with a nominal design optimized for 3 TeV (Dannheim, 2012). The Drive Beam Accelerator consists of a thermionic DC gun, bunching section and an accelerating section. The thermionic gun needs deliver a long (~143us) pulse of current into the buncher. A pulser is needed to drive grid of the gun to generate a stable current output. This report explores the requirements of the gun pulser and potential solutions to regulate grid current.

  16. Performance of Particle Flow Calorimetry at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, J.S.; Thomson, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The experimental conditions at CLIC are also significantly more challenging than those at previous electron-positron colliders, with increased levels of beam-induced backgrounds combined with a bunch spacing of only 0.5 ns. This paper describes the modifications made to the PandoraPFA particle flow algorithm to improve the jet energy reconstruction for jet energies above 250 GeV. It then introduces a combination of timing and pT cuts that can be applied to reconstructed particles in order to significantly reduce the background. A systematic study is...

  17. Technological challenges of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Döbert, Steffen; Arnau-Izquierdo, G; Redaelli, Stefano; Mainaud, Helène; Lefèvre, Thibaut

    2006-01-01

    Future e+e- Linear Colliders offer the potential to explore new physics at the TeV scale and beyond to very high precision. While the International Linear Collider (ILC) scheme of a collider in the 0.5 - 1 TeV range enters the engineering design phase, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study explores the technical feasibility of a collider capable of reaching into the multi-TeV energy domain. Key ingredients of the CLIC scheme are acceleration at high-frequency (30 GHz) and high-gradient (150 MV/m) in normal conducting structures and the use of the so-called Two Beam Acceleration concept, where a high-charge electron beam (drive beam) running parallel to the main beam is decelerated to provide the RF power to accelerate the main beam itself. A vigorous R&D effort is presently developed by the CLIC international collaboration to demonstrate its feasibility by 2010, when the first physics results from LHC should be available to guide the choice of the centre-of-mass energy better suited to explore the futu...

  18. Radiation damage of the ILC positron source target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushakov, A.; Riemann, S.

    2007-11-15

    The radiation damage of the positron source target for the International Linear Collider (ILC) has been studied. The displacement damage in target material due to multi-MeV photons has been calculated by combining FLUKA simulations for secondary particle production, SPECTER data for neutron displacement cross-sections and the Lindhard model for estimations of displacement damage by ions. The radiation damage of a stationary Ti6Al4V target in units of displacements per atom (dpa) has been estimated for photons from an undulator with strength 0.92 and period 1.15 cm. The calculated damage is 7 dpa. Approximately 12.5% of displacement damage result from neutrons. (orig.)

  19. HIGH INTENSITY LOW-ENERGY POSITRON SOURCE AT JEFFERSON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkan Golge, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Branislav Vlahovic

    2012-07-01

    We present a novel concept of a low-energy e{sup +} source with projected intensity on the order of 10{sup 10} slow e{sup +}/s. The key components of this concept are a continuous wave e{sup -} beam, a rotating positron-production target, a synchronized raster/anti-raster, a transport channel, and extraction of e{sup +} into a field-free area through a magnetic plug for moderation in a cryogenic solid. Components were designed in the framework of GEANT4-based (G4beamline) Monte Carlo simulation and TOSCA magnetic field calculation codes. Experimental data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the magnetic plug is presented.

  20. Construction of the spin-polarized slow positron beam with the RI source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajyo, Terunobu; Tashiro, Mutsumi; Kanazawa, Ikuzo [Tokyo Gakugei Univ., Koganei (Japan); Komori, Fumio; Murata, Yoshimasa; Ito, Yasuo

    1997-03-01

    The electrostatic slow-positron beam is constructed by using {sup 22}Na source. We design the electrostatic lens, the system of the detector, and the Wien filter for the experiment`s system of the spin-polarized slow positron beam. The reemitted spin-polarized slow-positron spectroscopy is proposed for studying magnetic thin films and magnetic multilayers. We calculated the depolarized positron fractions in the Fe thin film Fe(10nm)/Cu(substrate) and the multilayers Cu(1nm)/Fe(10nm)/Cu(substrate). (author)

  1. CLIC Pre-damping and Damping Ring Kickers: Initial Ideas to Achieve Stability Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Uythoven, J

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity (1034-1035 cm-2s-1) and a nominal centre-of mass energy of 3 TeV: CLIC would complement LHC physics in the multi-TeV range. The CLIC design relies on the presence of Pre-Damping Rings (PDR) and Damping Rings (DR) to achieve the very low emittance, through synchrotron radiation, needed for the luminosity requirements of CLIC. In order to limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations the combined flat top ripple and droop of the field pulse, for the DR extraction kickers, must be less than 0.02 %. In addition, the allowed beam coupling impedance is also very low: a few Ohms longitudinally and a few MW/m transversally. This paper discusses initial ideas for achieving the demanding requirements for the PDR and DR kickers.

  2. CLIC Physics Overview

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)471575

    2016-01-01

    This paper, based on the invited talk given at the 17th Lomonosov Conference of Elementary Particle Physics, summarizes the physics program at CLIC, with particular emphasis on the Higgs physics studies. The physics reach of CLIC operating in three energy stages, at 350 GeV, 1.4 TeV and 3 TeV center-of-mass energies is reviewed. The energy-staged approach is motivated by the high-precision physics measurements in the Higgs and top sector as well as by direct and indirect searches for beyond the Standard Model physics. The first stage, at or above 350 GeV, gives access to precision Higgs physics through the Higgsstrahlung and WW-fusion production processes, providing absolute values of the Higgs couplings to fermions and bosons. This stage also addresses precision top physics around the top-pair-production threshold. The second stage, at 1.4 TeV, opens the energy frontier, allowing for the discovery of new physics phenomena. This stage also gives access to additional Higgs properties, such as the top-Yukawa co...

  3. Proceedings of the workshop on new kinds of positron sources for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been very clear from the beginning of studies for future linear colliders that the conventional positron source approach, as exemplified by the SLC source, is pushing uncomfortably close to the material limits of the conversion target. Nonetheless, since this type of positron source is better understood and relatively inexpensive to build, it has been incorporated into the initial design studies for the JLC/NLC. New ideas for positron sources for linear colliders have been regularly reported in the literature and at accelerator conferences for at least a decade, and indeed the recirculation scheme associated with the VLEPP design is nearly two decades old. Nearly all the new types of positron sources discussed in this workshop come under the heading of crystals (or channeling), undulators, and Compton. Storage ring and nuclear reactor sources were not discussed. The positron source designs that were discussed have varying degrees of maturity, but except for the case of crystal sources, where proof of principle experiments have been undertaken, experimental results are missing. It is hoped that these presentations, and especially the recommendations of the working groups, will prove useful to the various linear collider groups in deciding if and when new experimental programs for positron sources should be undertaken

  4. Proceedings of the workshop on new kinds of positron sources for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clendenin, J.; Nixon, R. [eds.

    1997-06-01

    It has been very clear from the beginning of studies for future linear colliders that the conventional positron source approach, as exemplified by the SLC source, is pushing uncomfortably close to the material limits of the conversion target. Nonetheless, since this type of positron source is better understood and relatively inexpensive to build, it has been incorporated into the initial design studies for the JLC/NLC. New ideas for positron sources for linear colliders have been regularly reported in the literature and at accelerator conferences for at least a decade, and indeed the recirculation scheme associated with the VLEPP design is nearly two decades old. Nearly all the new types of positron sources discussed in this workshop come under the heading of crystals (or channeling), undulators, and Compton. Storage ring and nuclear reactor sources were not discussed. The positron source designs that were discussed have varying degrees of maturity, but except for the case of crystal sources, where proof of principle experiments have been undertaken, experimental results are missing. It is hoped that these presentations, and especially the recommendations of the working groups, will prove useful to the various linear collider groups in deciding if and when new experimental programs for positron sources should be undertaken.

  5. Positron generation using laser-wakefield electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron generation, using wakefield-accelerated electrons driven into a converter target, was investigated experimentally and through Monte Carlo simulations. Using experimentally measured initial electron distributions from a 60 fs laser system, modeling shows that a collimated wakefield electron beam of moderate energy (50–200 MeV) produces a large number of positrons (∼107), which are emitted from the rear of a mm-scale, high-Z target with divergence angles between 50 and 150 mrad. The large perpendicular momentum of the positrons was found to be dominated by contributions from multiple small angle Coulomb scattering. Positrons were not observed above background noise for a range of targets where simulations indicate a 5–30× increase in the beam charge was necessary to exceed threshold detection. These results provide new understanding to the fundamental limitations of creating narrow-divergence, high-density positron beams from laser-wakefield platforms for use in future laboratory pair plasma experiments

  6. The CLIC Physics Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Robson, Aidan

    2016-01-01

    The physics and detector studies for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) are introduced. A staged programme of $e^{+}e^{−}$ collisions covering $\\sqrt{s}$ = 380 GeV, 1.5 TeV, and 3 TeV would allow precise measurements of Higgs boson couplings, in many cases to the percent level. This corresponds to precision higher than that expected for the high-luminosity Large Hadron Collider. Such precise Higgs coupling measurements would allow sensitivity to a variety of new physics models and the ability to distinguish between them. In addition, new particles directly produced in pairs could be measured with great precision, and measurements in the top-quark sector would provide sensitivity to new physics effects at the scales of tens of TeV.

  7. First phase of CLIC R&D complete

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Let’s turn back the clocks to 2002: the LHC is still under construction, the wrap-up of the LEP physics programme is still in recent memory and the future of electron-positron accelerators at CERN is ambiguous. It was then that CLIC set out to prove the feasibility of their novel accelerator design in the CTF3 test facility. Though once a tall order for the collaboration, the recently released CLIC Conceptual Design Report has proven many of the major design elements… bringing to an end the first phase of CLIC R&D and pointing toward detailed performance optimisation studies in the next phase.   Streak camera images of the final beam, illustrating the combination of beams in the Combiner Ring. Over a decade ago, the CTF3 team set up shop in the vacated LIL injector site, once home to the weathered machine that delivered electrons and positrons to LEP. Rebuilding and upgrading the machine piece by piece, the CTF3 team converted this mA linac into a high-current drive b...

  8. Development of an intense positron source using a crystal-amorphous hybrid target for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesugi, Y., E-mail: uesg@huhep.org [Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Akagi, T. [Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Chehab, R. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne (France); Dadoun, O. [Laboratoire de l’accélérateur linéaire (LAL), Université Paris–Sud 11, Batiment 200, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Furukawa, K.; Kamitani, T. [Accelerator Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kawada, S. [Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Omori, T. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Takahashi, T. [Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Umemori, K.; Urakawa, J.; Satoh, M. [Accelerator Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Strakhovenko, V.; Suwada, T. [Accelerator Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Variola, A. [Laboratoire de l’accélérateur linéaire (LAL), Université Paris–Sud 11, Batiment 200, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2014-01-15

    In a conventional positron source driven by a few GeV electron beam, a high amount of heat is loaded into a positron converter target to generate intense positrons required by linear colliders, and which would eventually damage the converter target. A hybrid target, composed of a single crystal target as a radiator of intense gamma-rays, and an amorphous converter target placed downstream of the crystal, was proposed as a scheme which could overcome the problem. This paper describes the development of an intense positron source with the hybrid target. A series of experiments on positron generation with the hybrid target has been carried out with a 8-GeV electron beam at the KEKB linac. We observed that positron yield from the hybrid target increased when the incident electron beam was aligned to the crystal axis and exceeded the one from the conventional target with the converter target of the same thickness, when its thickness is less than about 2 radiation length. The measurements in the temperature rise of the amorphous converter target was successfully carried out by use of thermocouples. These results lead to establishment to the evaluation of the hybrid target as an intense positron source.

  9. Intra-Beam scattering in the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Vivoli, A

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC 3 TeV nominal design requires very low emittance of the electron and positron beams to be reached in the damping rings. Due to low energy and to relatively high bunch charge and ultra-low emittance, Intra-Beam Scattering (IBS) effect is very strong and an accurate calculation is needed to check if the required emittance is effectively reached. For this reason it is being developed at CERN a new software for IBS and Radiation Effects (SIRE), which simulates the evolution of the beam particle distribution in the damping rings, taking into account radiation damping, IBS and quantum excitation. In this paper we present the results of our simulations performed with SIRE on a lattice of the CLIC damping rings.

  10. Bounds on the electromagnetic dipole moments through the single top production at the CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Koksal, M; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, A

    2016-01-01

    We obtain bounds on the anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments of the $t$-quark from a future high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron collider, such as the CLIC, with unpolarized and polarized electron beams which are a powerful tool to determine new physics. We consider the processes $\\gamma e^- \\to \\bar t b\

  11. Suggested Intense Positron Source based on (micropole) undulator induced pair production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of an Intense Positron Source (IPS) is suggested. The intensity of the produced positrons is to exceed that of any other existing source by orders of magnitude. The instantaneous intensity is to be 103 to 106 times higher yet. Fast positrons are to be produced in pulses of time duration ∼1 ns to 10 ps. Slow positron pulses of order +e-pairs will be produced by the generated gamma rays; 3) moderators to thermalize the produced positrons; and 4) a transport system through which the slow positrons will move. Spinoff benefits provided by the suggested device include the following: The equipment may be used to create (or destroy) nuclear isotopes in a controlled manner (i.e. without producing unwanted species); to produce (or destroy) in a controlled way chemical elements; to produce well collimated intense photon beams in the multi 100 MeV range for nuclear physics research, with intensities many orders of magnitude higher than can be achieved today; to generate intense bursts of neutrons; to supply fast positrons produced at high intensities (1016 to 1017 s-1) and within a small transverse phase space, to future high energy colliders, thereby perhaps even eliminating the need for damping rings. ((orig.))

  12. Tunable Achromats and CLIC Applications

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amico, T E

    2000-01-01

    It is imperative for linear colliders that the bunch length be adjustable. In most cases bunch compression is required, but recently, in the design of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) RF Power Source, it was shown that bunch stretching may also be necessary. In some situations, both modes may be needed, which implies the need for tunable magnetic insertions. This is even more essential in a test facility, to span a wide experimental range. In addition, flexible tuning provides a better control of the stability of an isochronous insertion. To start a numerical search for a tunable insertion from scratch is very uncertain because the related phase space is very uneven. However, a starting point obtained with an analytical approximation is often sufficient to ensure convergence. Another advantage of the analytical treatment described in this paper is that it sheds light on the shape of the entire phase space. To achieve this the isochronous achromat developed previously has been given tuning capabilities by ex...

  13. A CLIC-Prototype Higgs Factory

    OpenAIRE

    Belusevic, Radoje; Higo, Toshiyasu

    2012-01-01

    We propose that a pair of electron linacs with high accelerating gradients and an optical FEL be built at an existing laboratory. The linacs would employ CLIC-type rf cavities and a klystron-based power source; a two-beam scheme could be implemented at a later stage. The proposed facility would serve primarily as an e+e-/gamma-gamma Higgs-boson factory. The rich set of final states in e+e- and gamma-gamma collisions would play an essential role in measuring the mass, spin, parity, two-photon ...

  14. Beam Position Monitoring at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Prochnow, J

    2003-01-01

    At the European Organisation for Nuclear Research CERN in Geneva, Switzerland the design of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) for high energy physics is studied. To achieve the envisaged high luminosity the quadrupole magnets and radio-frequency accelerating structures have to be actively aligned with micron precision and submicron resolution. This will be done using beam-based algorithms which rely on beam position information inside of quadrupoles and accelerating structures. After a general introduction to the CLIC study and the alignment algorithms, the concept of the interaction between beams and radio-frequency structures is given. In the next chapter beam measurements and simulations are described which were done to study the performance of cavity beam position monitors (BPM). A BPM design is presented which is compatible with the multi-bunch operation at CLIC and could be used to align the quadrupoles. The beam position inside the accelerating structures will be measured by using the structures thems...

  15. Study of a positron source generated by photons from ultrarelativistic channeled particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation by channeled electrons in Germanium and Silicon crystals along the axis is studied as a very promising photon source of small angular divergence for positron generation in amorphous targets. Radiation rates for different crystal lengths - from some tenths of mm to 10 mm - and two electron incident energies, 5 and 20 GeV, are considered and a comparison between the two crystals is presented. Thermic behaviour of the crystal under incidence of bunches of 1010 electrons is also examined. The corresponding positron yields for tungsten amorphous converters - of 0.5 and 1 Xo thickness - are calculated considering the case of a Germanium photon generator. Assuming a large acceptance optical matching system as the adiabatic device of the SLC, accepted positrons are evaluated and positron yields larger than 1 e+/e- are obtained

  16. Highlights from CERN: The CLIC Project for a Future e$^{+}$e$^{−}$ Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tecker, Frank

    2007-01-01

    A high luminosity ( 10$^{34}$-10$^{35}$ cm$^{2}$/s) linear electron-positron Collider (CLIC) with a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV is under study in the framework of an international collaboration of laboratories and institutes, with the aim to provide the HEP community with a new facility for the post LHC era. After a brief introduction of the physics motivation, the CLIC scheme to extend Linear Colliders into the Multi-TeV colliding beam energy range will be described. In the following, the main challenges and the very promising achievements already obtained will be presented.

  17. Collective effects and experimental verification of the CLIC drive beam and decelerator

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a potential next-generation particle collider, in which electrons and positrons collide at a center-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. In order to reach a high accelerating gradient and reduce the length of the machine, CLIC uses a novel two-beam scheme. Here, the acceleration energy for the main beam is provided by energy extraction from a secondary electron drive beam, by the use of Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS). This Ph.D. thesis descr...

  18. Sensitivity Analysis for the CLIC Damping Ring Inductive Adder

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings will produce, through synchrotron radiation, ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge, necessary for the luminosity performance of the collider. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse generators for the damping ring kickers must provide extremely flat, high-voltage pulses. The specifications for the extraction kickers of the CLIC damping rings are particularly demanding: the flattop of the output pulse must be 160 ns duration, 12.5 kV and 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 %. An inductive adder allows the use of different modulation techniques and is therefore a very promising approach to meeting the specifications. PSpice has been utilised to carry out a sensitivity analysis of the predicted output pulse to the value of both individual and groups of circuit compon...

  19. Interaction Point Backgrounds from the CLIC Post Collision Line

    OpenAIRE

    Salt, Michael David

    2012-01-01

    The proposed CLIC accelerator is designed to collide electrons and positrons ata centre of mass energy of 3 TeV, and a luminosity of 5.9 x 10^(34) cm^(−2) s^(−1) at the interactionpoint (IP). Being a single-pass machine, luminosity must be maximised byminimising the beam spot size to the order of a few nanometres. The effects of the finalfocussing and the intense beam-beam effects lead to a high production cross sectionof beamstrahlung photons, and highly divergent outgoing beams, both spatia...

  20. Effect of positron source irradiation on positronium annihilation in fine powdered alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. W.; Chen, Z. Q.

    2016-09-01

    Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening of positron annihilation radiation were measured as a function of time to study the irradiation effect by 22Na positron source in fine powdered alumina. The γ-Al2O3 samples were put in a vacuum chamber with a pressure of about 10-6 Torr and were cooled down to 10 K by a closed-cycle helium gas refrigerator. The irradiation of γ-Al2O3 samples by positron source was taken for a duration of about two days immediately after the sample was cooled down. After that, the sample was subjected to a warm up process from 10 K to 300 K with a step of 10 K. Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening spectra were measured simultaneously during these processes. Two long lifetime components corresponding to ortho-positronium annihilation were observed. A significant shortening of these long lifetime components and a large increase in S parameter is observed during irradiation. It is supposed that positron source irradiation creates a large number of paramagnetic centers on the surface of the γ-Al2O3 grains, which induce spin conversion quenching of positronium. The irradiation induced paramagnetic centers are unstable above 70 K and are nearly annealed out when the temperature rises to 190 K. After warming up of the sample to room temperature, the positron lifetime spectrum is identical to that before irradiation. It was also found that after irradiation, a medium long lifetime component of about 5 ns appears, of which the intensity increases with increasing irradiation time. This may be originated from the formation of the surface o-Ps state. This surface o-Ps state is also inhibited at elevated temperatures. Our results indicate that positronium is a very sensitive probe for the surface defects in porous materials.

  1. A positron source using an axially oriented crystal associated to a granular amorphous converter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Cheng-Hai; Robert Chehab; Peter Sievers; Xavier Artru; Michel Chevallier; Olivier Dadoun; PEI Guo-Xi; Vladimir M. Strakhovenko; Alessandro Variola

    2012-01-01

    A non-conventional positron source using the intense γ radiation from an axially oriented monocrystal which materializes into e+e- pairs in a granular amorphous converter is described.The enhancement of photon radiation by multi-GeV electrons crossing a tungsten crystal along its 〈111〉 axis is reported.The resulting enhancement of pair production in an amorphous converter placed 2 meters downstream,is also reported.Sweeping off the charged particles from the crystal by a bending magnet upstream of the converter allows a significant reduction of the deposited energy density.Substituting a granular target made of small spheres for the usual compact one,makes the energy dissipation easier.The deposited energy and corresponding heating are analyzed and solutions for cooling are proposed.The configurations studied here for this kind of positron source allow its consideration for unpolarized positrons for the ILC.

  2. A Versatile Beam Loss Monitoring System for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Kastriotou, Maria; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Holzer, Eva Barbara; Nebot Del Busto, Eduardo; Tecker, Frank; Welsch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The design of a potential CLIC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system presents multiple challenges. To successfully cover the 48 km of beamline, ionisation chambers and optical fibre BLMs are under investigation. The former fulfils all CLIC requirements but would need more than 40000 monitors to protect the whole facility. For the latter, the capability of reconstructing the original loss position with a multi-bunch beam pulse and multiple loss locations still needs to be quantified. Two main sources of background for beam loss measurements are identified for CLIC. The two-beam accelerator scheme introduces so-called crosstalk, i.e. detection of losses originating in one beam line by the monitors protecting the other. Moreover, electrons emitted from the inner surface of RF cavities and boosted by the high RF gradients may produce signals in neighbouring BLMs, limiting their ability to detect real beam losses. This contribution presents the results of dedicated experiments performed in the CLIC Test Facility to qu...

  3. CLIC expands to include the Southern Hemisphere

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    Australia has recently joined the CLIC collaboration: the enlargement will bring new expertise and resources to the project, and is especially welcome in the wake of CERN budget redistributions following the recent adoption of the Medium Term Plan.   The countries involved in CLIC collaboration With the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding on 26 August 2010, the ACAS network (Australian Collaboration for Accelerator Science) became the 40th member of in the multilateral CLIC collaboration making Australia the 22nd country to join the collaboration. “The new MoU was signed by the ACAS network, which includes the Australian Synchrotron and the University of Melbourne”, explains Jean-Pierre Delahaye, CLIC Study Leader. “Thanks to their expertise, the Australian institutes will contribute greatly to the CLIC damping rings and the two-beam test modules." Institutes from any country wishing to join the CLIC collaboration are invited to assume responsibility o...

  4. Internal positron source production with a cyclotron and vacancy study in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasuso, Atsuo; Masuno, Shin-ichi; Okada, Sohei [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Hasegawa, Masayuki; Suezawa, Masashi

    1997-03-01

    In order to detect thermal vacancies in Si, in situ positron annihilation measurement has been performed using an internal source method. An increase (decrease) in S-parameter (W-parameter) was observed above 1200degC. It was explained in terms of the formation of thermal vacancies. (author)

  5. CLIC vertex detector R&D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar

    2016-07-01

    A vertex detector concept is under development for the proposed multi-TeV linear e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). To perform precision physics measurements in a challenging environment, the CLIC vertex detector pushes the technological requirements to the limits. This paper reviews the requirements for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R&D achievements in the domains of sensor, readout, powering and cooling.

  6. Construction and use of an intense positron source at new linac facilities in Germany. Conceptual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this conceptual report the idea to establish an European positron source for applied research (''EPOS'') based on new LINAC facilities in Germany (ELBE/Rossendorf or TTF-DESY/Hamburg) is considered. The report contains not only the outline of obvious applications in atomic physics, materials science and surface physics, but also several new methodical developments which are only possible with an intense positron beam. This opportunity will also allow the use and further development of imaging techniques being of special interest for industrial applications. (orig.)

  7. Positron Source from Betatron X-rays Emitted in a Plasma Wiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.K.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.H.; Krejcik, P.; O' Connell, C.L.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2006-04-21

    In the E-167 plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), an ultra-short, 28.5 GeV electron beam field ionizes a neutral column of Lithium vapor. In the underdense regime, all plasma electrons are expelled creating an ion column. The beam electrons undergo multiple betatron oscillations leading to a large flux of broadband synchrotron radiation. With a plasma density of 3 x 10{sup 17}cm{sup -3}, the effective focusing gradient is near 9 MT/m with critical photon energies exceeding 50 MeV for on-axis radiation. A positron source is the initial application being explored for these X-rays, as photo-production of positrons eliminates many of the thermal stress and shock wave issues associated with traditional Bremsstrahlung sources. Photo-production of positrons has been well-studied; however, the brightness of plasma X-ray sources provides certain advantages. In this paper, we present results of the simulated radiation spectra for the E-167 experiments, and compute the expected positron yield.

  8. The Intense Slow Positron Source concept: A theoretical perspective on a proposed INEL Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis has been performed of the INEL Intense Slow Positron Source (ISPS) concept. The results of the theoretical study are encouraging. A full-scale device with a monoenergetic 5 KeV positron beam of ≥1012 e+/s on a ≤0.03-cmdiameter target appears feasible and can be obtained within the existing infrastructure of INEL reactor facilities. A 30.0-cm-diameter, large area source dish, moderated at first with thin crystalline W films and later by solid Ne, is proposed as the initial device in order to explore problems with a facility scale system. A demonstration scale beam at ≥1010 slow e+/s is proposed using a 58Co source plated on a 6-cm-diameter source dish insert, placed in a 30- cm adapter

  9. Beam position monitoring at CLIC

    OpenAIRE

    Prochnow, Jan Erik

    2003-01-01

    At the European Organisation for Nuclear Research CERN in Geneva, Switzerland the design of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) for high energy physics is studied. To achieve the envisaged high luminosity the quadrupole magnets and radio-frequency accelerating structures have to be actively aligned with micron precision and submicron resolution. This will be done using beam-based algorithms which rely on beam position information inside of quadrupoles and accelerating structures. After a gener...

  10. CLIC quadrupole stabilization and nano-positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Collette, C; Artoos, K; Fernandez Carmona, P; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, C

    2010-01-01

    In the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) currently under study, electrons and positrons will be accelerated in two linear accelerators to collide at the interaction point with an energy of 0.5- 3 TeV. This machine is constituted of a succession of accelerating structures, used to accelerate the beams of particles, and electromagnets (quadrupoles) used to focus the beams. In order to ensure good performances, the quadrupoles have to be extremely stable. Additionally, they should also have the capability to move by steps of some tens of nanometers every 20 ms with a precision of +/- 1nm. This paper proposes a holistic approach to fulfill alternatively both requirements using the same device. The concept is based on piezoelectric hard mounts to isolate the quadrupoles from the ground vibrations in the sensitive range between 1 and 20 Hz, and to provide nano-positioning capabilities. It is also shown that this strategy ensures robustness to external forces (acoustic noise, water flow for the cooling, air flow for th...

  11. Measurement of the positron polarization at an helical undulator based positron source for the international linear collider ILC. The E-166 experiment at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, Laihem

    2008-06-05

    A helical undulator based polarized positron source is forseen at a future International Linear Collider (ILC). The E-166 experiment has tested this scheme using a one meter long, short-period, pulsed helical undulator installed in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC. A low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam passing through this undulator generated circularly polarized photons with energies up to about 8 MeV. The generated photons of several MeV with circular polarization are then converted in a relatively thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons. Measurements of the positron polarization have been performed at 5 different energies of the positrons. In addition electron polarization has been determined for one energy point. For a comparison of the measured asymmetries with the expectations detailed simulations were necessary. This required upgrading GEANT4 to include the dominant polarization dependent interactions of electrons, positrons and photons in matter. The measured polarization of the positrons agrees with the expectations and is for the energy point with the highest polarization at 6MeV about 80%. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of the positron polarization at an helical undulator based positron source for the international linear collider ILC. The E-166 experiment at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A helical undulator based polarized positron source is forseen at a future International Linear Collider (ILC). The E-166 experiment has tested this scheme using a one meter long, short-period, pulsed helical undulator installed in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC. A low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam passing through this undulator generated circularly polarized photons with energies up to about 8 MeV. The generated photons of several MeV with circular polarization are then converted in a relatively thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons. Measurements of the positron polarization have been performed at 5 different energies of the positrons. In addition electron polarization has been determined for one energy point. For a comparison of the measured asymmetries with the expectations detailed simulations were necessary. This required upgrading GEANT4 to include the dominant polarization dependent interactions of electrons, positrons and photons in matter. The measured polarization of the positrons agrees with the expectations and is for the energy point with the highest polarization at 6MeV about 80%. (orig.)

  13. Source of slow polarized positrons using the brilliant gamma beam at ELI-NP. Converter design and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djourelov, Nikolay; Oprisa, Andreea; Leca, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Simulations of slow positron (es+) source based on interaction of a circularly polarized gamma beam with a W converter were performed. The aim of the study was to propose a converter geometry and to determine the expected slow positron beam intensity and its spot size, and the degree of positron spin polarization, as well. The Monte Carlo simulations by means of GEANT4 were used to estimate the fast positron production and the moderation efficiency of the converter working as a self-moderator, as well. Finite element analysis by means of COMSOL Multiphysics was applied to calculate the fraction of extracted moderated positrons from the converter cells and the quality of the beam formation by focusing. Using the low energy (converter geometry and in case of 100% circular polarization of the gammas the degree of spin polarization of the slow positron beam is expected to be 33%.

  14. Development of mini linac-based positron source and an efficient positronium convertor for positively charged antihydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have installed in Saclay a facility for an intense positron source in November 2008. It is based on a compact 5.5 MeV electron linac connected to a reaction chamber with a tungsten target inside to produce positrons via pair production. The expected production rate for fast positrons is 5·1011 per second. The study of moderation of fast positrons and the construction of a slow positron trap are underway. In parallel, we have investigated an efficient positron-positronium convertor using porous silica materials. These studies are parts of a project to produce positively charged antihydrogen ions aiming to demonstrate the feasibility of a free fall antigravity measurement of neutral antihydrogen.

  15. Development of mini linac-based positron source and an efficient positronium convertor for positively charged antihydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muranaka, T; Debu, P; Dupre, P; Liszkay, L; Mansoulie, B; Perez, P; Rey, J M; Ruiz, N; Sacquin, Y [Irfu, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Crivelli, P; Gendotti, U; Rubbia, A, E-mail: tomoko.muranaka@cea.f [Institut fuer TelichenPhysik, ETHZ, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-04-01

    We have installed in Saclay a facility for an intense positron source in November 2008. It is based on a compact 5.5 MeV electron linac connected to a reaction chamber with a tungsten target inside to produce positrons via pair production. The expected production rate for fast positrons is 5{center_dot}10{sup 11} per second. The study of moderation of fast positrons and the construction of a slow positron trap are underway. In parallel, we have investigated an efficient positron-positronium convertor using porous silica materials. These studies are parts of a project to produce positively charged antihydrogen ions aiming to demonstrate the feasibility of a free fall antigravity measurement of neutral antihydrogen.

  16. Development of mini linac-based positron source and an efficient positronium convertor for positively charged antihydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, T.; Debu, P.; Dupré, P.; Liszkay, L.; Mansoulie, B.; Pérez, P.; Rey, J. M.; Ruiz, N.; Sacquin, Y.; Crivelli, P.; Gendotti, U.; Rubbia, A.

    2010-04-01

    We have installed in Saclay a facility for an intense positron source in November 2008. It is based on a compact 5.5 MeV electron linac connected to a reaction chamber with a tungsten target inside to produce positrons via pair production. The expected production rate for fast positrons is 5·1011 per second. The study of moderation of fast positrons and the construction of a slow positron trap are underway. In parallel, we have investigated an efficient positron-positronium convertor using porous silica materials. These studies are parts of a project to produce positively charged antihydrogen ions aiming to demonstrate the feasibility of a free fall antigravity measurement of neutral antihydrogen.

  17. A CLIC-Prototype Higgs Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Belusevic, Radoje

    2012-01-01

    We propose that a pair of electron linacs with high accelerating gradients and an optical FEL be built at an existing laboratory. The linacs would employ CLIC-type rf cavities and a klystron-based power source; a two-beam scheme could be implemented at a later stage. The proposed facility would serve primarily as an e+e-/gamma-gamma Higgs-boson factory. The rich set of final states in e+e- and gamma-gamma collisions would play an essential role in measuring the mass, spin, parity, two-photon width and trilinear self-coupling of the Higgs-boson, as well as its couplings to fermions and gauge bosons. These quantities are difficult to determine with only one initial state. For some processes within and beyond the Standard Model, the required CM energy is considerably lower at the proposed facility than at an e+e- or proton collider.

  18. Tissue and subcellular distribution of CLIC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards John C

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CLIC1 is a chloride channel whose cellular role remains uncertain. The distribution of CLIC1 in normal tissues is largely unknown and conflicting data have been reported regarding the cellular membrane fraction in which CLIC1 resides. Results New antisera to CLIC1 were generated and were found to be sensitive and specific for detecting this protein. These antisera were used to investigate the distribution of CLIC1 in mouse tissue sections and three cultured cell lines. We find CLIC1 is expressed in the apical domains of several simple columnar epithelia including glandular stomach, small intestine, colon, bile ducts, pancreatic ducts, airway, and the tail of the epididymis, in addition to the previously reported renal proximal tubule. CLIC1 is expressed in a non-polarized distribution in the basal epithelial cell layer of the stratified squamous epithelium of the upper gastrointesitinal tract and the basal cells of the epididymis, and is present diffusely in skeletal muscle. Distribution of CLIC1 was examined in Panc1 cells, a relatively undifferentiated, non-polarized human cell line derived from pancreatic cancer, and T84 cells, a human colon cancer cell line which can form a polarized epithelium that is capable of regulated chloride transport. Digitonin extraction was used to distinguish membrane-inserted CLIC1 from the soluble cytoplasmic form of the protein. We find that digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is primarily present in the plasma membrane of Panc1 cells. In T84 cells, we find digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is present in an intracellular compartment which is concentrated immediately below the apical plasma membrane and the extent of apical polarization is enhanced with forskolin, which activates transepithelial chloride transport and apical membrane traffic in these cells. The sub-apical CLIC1 compartment was further characterized in a well-differentiated mouse renal proximal tubule cell line. The distribution of CLIC1 was

  19. Overview of the CLIC beam instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Lefèvre, T

    2011-01-01

    The performances of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) would rely on extremely tight tolerances on most beam parameters. The requirements for the CLIC beam instrumentation have been reviewed and studied in detail for the whole accelerator complex. In the context of the completion of the CLIC Conceptual Design Report, a first attempt was made to propose a technical solution for every CLIC instruments. Even if these choices were based on most recent technological achievements, whenever possible, alternatives solutions focusing on potential improvements on performance, reliability or cost minimization are proposed and will be studied in the future. This paper presents an overview of the CLIC beam instruments, gives a status of their already achieved performances and presents the future work activities.

  20. Microstructural probing of ferritic/martensitic steels using internal transmutation-based positron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsjak, Vladimir; Dai, Yong

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the use of an internal 44Ti/44Sc radioisotope source for a direct microstructural characterization of ferritic/martensitic (f/m) steels after irradiation in targets of spallation neutron sources. Gamma spectroscopy measurements show a production of ∼1MBq of 44Ti per 1 g of f/m steels irradiated at 1 dpa (displaced per atom) in the mixed proton-neutron spectrum at the Swiss spallation neutron source (SINQ). In the decay chain 44Ti → 44Sc → 44Ca, positrons are produced together with prompt gamma rays which enable the application of different positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) analyses, including lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy. Due to the high production yield, long half-life and relatively high energy of positrons of 44Ti, this methodology opens up new potential for simple, effective and inexpensive characterization of radiation induced defects in f/m steels irradiated in a spallation target.

  1. Summary of experimental studies, at CERN, on a positron source using crystal effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new kind of positron sources for future linear colliders, where the converter is an aligned tungsten crystal, oriented on the -axis, has been studied at CERN in the WA103 experiment with tertiary electron beams from the SPS. In such sources the photons resulting from channeling radiation and coherent bremsstrahlung create the e+e- pairs. Electron beams, of 6 and 10 GeV, were impinging on different kinds of targets: a 4 mm thick crystal, a 8 mm thick crystal and a compound target made of 4 mm crystal followed by 4 mm amorphous disk. An amorphous tungsten target 20 mm thick was also used for the sake of comparison with the 8 mm crystal and to check the ability of the detection system to provide the correct track reconstruction. The charged particles coming out from the target were detected in a drift chamber immersed partially in a magnetic field. The reconstruction of the particle trajectories provided the energy and angular spectrum of the positrons in a rather wide energy range (up to 150 MeV) and angular domain (up to 30o). The experimental approach presented in this article provides a full description of this kind of source. A presentation of the measured positron distribution in momentum space (longitudinal versus transverse) is given to allow an easy determination of the available yield for a given momentum acceptance. Results on photons, measured downstream of the positron detector, are also presented. A significant enhancement of photon and positron production is clearly observed. This enhancement, for a 10 GeV incident beam, is of 4 for the 4 mm thick crystal and larger than 2 for the 8 mm thick crystal. Another important result concerns the validation of the simulations for the crystals, for which a quite good agreement was met between the simulations and the experiment, for positrons as well as for photons. These results are presented after a short presentation of the experimental setup and of the track reconstruction procedure

  2. Mechanical design and development of a high power target system for the SLC Positron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to bring the SLC Positron Source luminosity up to design specifications, the previous (stationary) positron target had to be replaced with a version which could reliably dissipate the higher power levels and cyclic pulsed thermal stresses of the high intensity 33GeV electron beam. In addition to this basic requirement, the new target system had to meet SLAC's specifications for Ultra High Vacuum, be remotely controllable, ''radiation hard,'' and designed in such a way that it could be removed and replaced quickly and easily with minimum personnel exposure to radiation. It was also desirable to integrate the target and collection components into a compact, easily manufacturable, and easily maintainable module. This paper briefly summarize the mechanical design and development of the new modular target system, its associated controls and software, alignment, and the quick removal system. Operational experience gained with the new system over the first running cycle is also summarized

  3. R&D for the Vertexing at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Redford, S

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider is a candidate to be the next high-energy particle physics collider. Using a novel acceleration technique, electrons and positrons would be brought into collision with a centre-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. Despite challenging levels of beam-induced background, this would provide a relatively clean environment in which to perform precision physics measurements. The vertex detector would be crucial in achieving this, and would need to provide accurate particle tracking information to facilitate secondary vertex reconstruction and jet flavour-tagging. With this goal in mind, current technological limits are being stretched to design a low occupancy, low mass and low-power dissipation vertex detector for CLIC. A concept comprising thin hybrid pixel detectors coupled to high- performance readout ASICs, power-pulsing and air-flow cooling is under development. In this paper, the CLIC vertex detector requirements are reviewed and the current status of R&D on sensors, readout, powerin...

  4. Preliminary Design of an Inductive Adder for CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC damping rings will produce ultra-low emittance beam, with high bunch charge, necessary for the luminosity performance of the collider. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse power modulators for the damping rings kickers must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses: specifications call for a 160 ns duration flattop of 12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 %. A solid-state modulator, the inductive adder, is a very promising approach to meeting the demanding specifications; this topology allows the use of both digital and analogue modulation. To effectively use modulation techniques to achieve such low ripple and droop requires an in-depth knowledge of the behaviour of the solid-state switching components and their gate drivers, as well as a good understanding of the overa...

  5. Feasibility study of multipoint based laser alignment system for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, G; Mainaud-Durand, H; Piedigrossi, D; Geiger, A

    2012-01-01

    CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is a study for a future electron-positron collider that would allow physicists to explore a new energy region beyond the capabilities oftoday’s particle accelerators. Alignment is one of the major challenges within the CLIC study in order to achieve the high requirement of a multi-TeV center of mass colliding beam energy range (nominal 3 TeV). To reach this energy in a realistic and cost efficient scenario all accelerator components have to be aligned with an accuracy of 10 μm over a sliding window of 200 m. The demand for a straight line reference is so far based on stretched wires coupled with Wire Positioning Sensors (WPS). These solutions are currently further developed inorder to reduce the drawbacks which are mainly given by their costs and difficult implementation. However, it should be validated through inter-comparison with a solution ideally based on a different physical principle. Therefore, a new metrological approach is proposed using a laser beam as straight lin...

  6. First magnetic test of a superconducting Nb$_{3}$Sn Wiggler magnet for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, D; Fessia, P; Karppinen, M; Mazet, J; Russenschuck, S; Peiffer, P; Grau, A

    2012-01-01

    To achieve high luminosity at the collision point of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) the normalized horizontal and vertical emittances of the electron and positron beams must be reduced to 500 nm and4 nm before the beams enter the 1.5 TeV linear accelerators. An effective way to accomplish ultra-low emittances with only small effects on the electron polarization is using damping rings operating at 2.86GeV equipped with superconducting wiggler magnets. Only superconducting wiggler magnets meet the demanding magnetic specifications of the CLIC damping rings. Although Nb-Ti damping wiggler magnets fulfill the specifications of CLIC, Nb3Sn wiggler magnets would reach higher magnetic fields leading to even better beam properties for CLIC. Moreover, they have at the same time higher thermal and magnetic margins. Therefore, Nb3Sn wiggler magnets are under investigation at CERN despite the challenging manufacturing process. This paper presents first results of Nb3Sn coils and short model tests and outlines the fur...

  7. The 30 GHz transfer structure for the CLIC study

    CERN Document Server

    Carron, G; Thorndahl, L

    1998-01-01

    In the so-called "Two-Beam Acceleration Scheme" the energy of a drive beam is converted to rf power by means of a "Transfer Structure", which plays the role of power source. In the Transfer Structure the bunched drive beam is decelerated by the electromagnetic field which it induces and builds up by the coherent interaction of successive bunches with the chosen longitudinal mode. The CLIC Transfer Structure is original in that it operates at 30 GHz and uses teeth-like corrugations to slow down the hybrid TM mode to make it synchronous with the drive beam. The beam energy is transformed into rf power, which travels along the structure and is collected by the output couplers. The 30 GHz rf power is then transported by means of two waveguides to two main linac disk-loaded accelerating structures. This report describes the CLIC Transfer Structure design, 3-D computer simulations, model construction and measure-ments as well as the prototype construction and testing with the low energy beam in the CLIC Test Facili...

  8. LHC and CLIC LLRF final reports

    CERN Document Server

    Dexter, A; Woolley, B; Ambattu, P; Tahir, I; Syratchev, Igor; Wuensch, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Crab cavities rotate bunches from opposing beams to achieve effective head-on collision in CLIC or collisions at an adjustable angle in LHC. Without crab cavities 90% of achievable luminosity at CLIC would be lost. In the LHC, the crab cavities allow the same or larger integrated luminosity while reducing significantly the requested dynamic range of physics detectors. The focus for CLIC is accurate phase synchronisation of the cavities, adequate damping of wakefields and modest amplitude stability. For the LHC, the main LLRF issues are related to imperfections: beam offsets in cavities, RF noise, measurement noise in feedback loops, failure modes and mitigations. This report develops issues associated with synchronising the CLIC cavities. It defines an RF system and experiments to validate the approach. It reports on the development of hardware for measuring the phase performance of the RF distributions system and cavities. For the LHC, the hardware being very close to the existing LLRF, the report focuses on...

  9. Acquisition system for the CLIC Module

    CERN Document Server

    Vilalte, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    The status of R&D activities for CLIC module acquisition are discussed [1]. LAPP is involved in the design of the local CLIC module acquisition crate, described in the document Study of the CLIC Module Front-End Acquisition and Evaluation Electronics [2]. This acquisition system is a project based on a local crate, assigned to the CLIC module, including several mother boards. These motherboards are foreseen to hold mezzanines dedicated to the different subsystems. This system has to work in radiation environment. LAPP is involved in the development of Drive Beam stripline position monitors read-out, described in the document Drive Beam Stripline BPM Electronics and Acquisition [3]. LAPP also develops a generic acquisition mezzanine that allows to perform all-around acquisition and components tests for drive beam stripline BPM read-out.

  10. Successful start for new CLIC test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    A new test facility is being built to study key feasibility issues for a possible future linear collider called CLIC. Commissioning of the first part of the facility began in June 2003 and nominal beam parameters have been achieved already.

  11. Application of the 4 pigammaMethod to the Absolute Standardization of Radioactive Sources of Positron Emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the application of the method known as 4 pigammacountingto the standardization of positron emitters. Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the detection efficiency of positrons emitted by the nuclides 22Na and 18F. Two experimental setups are used, both based on a NaI(Tl) well detector. The results of the standardizations are in good agreement with those obtained by other methods. It is shown that the 4 pigammamethod can be successfully used for the absolute standardization of sources of positron emitters. (Author) 23 refs

  12. Feasibility and conceptual design of a C.W. positron source at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golge, Serkan [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2010-08-01

    A feasibility study of a CW positron source for the 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) is provided. The proposed ≥ 100 nA Continuous Wave (CW) positron source at JLAB has several unique and challenging characteristics: high current incident electron beam at 126 MeV with a high beam power (up to a MW); CW e- beam and CW e+ production. The multiple scattering is a dominant process when creating e+ in a target, which results a large phase space area of the emitted positrons. An admittance study was done at CEBAF to find the maximum phase space area, which is tolerated in the machine. The measured geometrical transverse admittance (A) were Ax =10 and Ay = 5 mm∙mrad at the injector. Energy spread measurement was also done at the ARC1. The fractional spread limit in the ARC1 was measured as δ = 3×10-3 at 653 MeV. By using the optimized results and the CEBAF parameters, three positron injector configurations are proposed; Combined Function Magnet, Two-Dipole and Microtron Dipole configurations. With the assumptions made, by using 126 MeV Ⓧ10 mA e- beam impinging on a 2 mm W target with a 100 μm spot size, we can get up to 3 μA useful e+ current at the North Linac connection. One of the biggest challenges is the target design, which the deposited power is about 60 kW. ILC designs project power deposition up to 13 kW, which would allow the creation of a e+ beam of up to 650 nA otherwise. The results of analytic and monte carlo simulations of the positron production, capture and acceleration are presented. For the target design, a review is presented of solutions for the high power production target. Portions of this dissertation work have been published in two conference proceedings.

  13. A tunable gamma-ray source based on the single-quantum annihilation of positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the single-quantum annihilation (SQA) of positrons has shown that a tunable gamma-ray source (TGRS) could be built based on the phenomenon, that could provide a photon beam of energy variable from 1 MeV upwards. The photon beam could have an excellent bandwidth, of around 1 keV, and a low background level for beam energies up to several MeV, and could be made polarized. The beam is highly self-collimated. The photon yield is much larger than the tunable gamma-ray sources envisaged by other means, which also employ particle beams. In simplicity as well as features, the SQA-based tunable gamma-ray source is potentially superior to other proposed sources

  14. A feasibility study of high intensity positron sources for the S-band and TESLA linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glantz, R.

    1997-10-01

    Future high energy linear colliders require luminosities above 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Therefore beam intensities have to be provided up to two orders of magnitude higher than achieved at present. It is comparably simple to reach high electron intensities. Positron intensities in this range, however, are difficult to realize with conventional positron sources. A new method of positron production was proposed in 1979 by V.E. Balakin and A.A. Mikhailichenko. The photons, necessary for pair production, are not generated by bremsstrahlung but by high energy electrons passing through an undulator. Based on this principle, a high intensity, unpolarized and polarized positron source for linear colliders was developed by K.Floettmann. In the present work, the requirements derived by K.Floettmann are used to study the feasibility of both the polarized and the unpolarized positron source. For economical reasons it is advantageous to use the beam after the interaction for positron production. In the main part of the present work a beam line is developed which guarantees a stable operation of the unpolarized wiggler-based positron source for the S-Band and TESLA linear collider. The requirements on the electron beam emittances are much higher for the polarized undulator-based source. For TESLA it is shown, that an operation of the polarized source is possible for design interactions. For a stable operation, taking into account perturbations at the interaction point, further investigations are necessary. For the SBLC, an operation of the polarized source is not possible with the present design.

  15. $2\\times250$ GeV CLIC $\\gamma\\gamma$ Collider Based on its Drive Beam FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Aksakal, Husnu

    2007-01-01

    CLIC is a linear $e^+e^-$ ($\\gamma\\gamma$) collider project which uses a drive beam to accelerate the main beam. The drive beam provides RF power for each corresponding unit of the main linac through energy extracting RF structures. CLIC has a wide range of center-of-mass energy options from 150 GeV to 3 TeV. The present paper contains optimization of Free Electron Laser (FEL) using one bunch of CLIC drive beam in order to provide polarized light amplification using appropriate wiggler and luminosity spectrum of $\\gamma\\gamma$ collider for $E_{cm}$=0.5 TeV. Then amplified laser can be converted to a polarized high-energy $\\gamma$ beam at the Conversion point (CP-prior to electron positron interaction point) in the process of Compton backscattering. At the CP a powerful laser pulse (FEL) focused to main linac electrons (positrons). Here this scheme described and it is show that CLIC drive beam parameters satisfy the requirement of FEL additionally essential undulator parameters has been defined. Achievable $\\g...

  16. Optimal Power System and Grid Interface Design Considerations for the CLICs Klystron Modulators

    CERN Document Server

    Marija, Jankovic; Jon, Clare; Pat, Wheeler; Davide, Aguglia

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an electron-positron collider under study at CERN with the aim to explore the next generation of high precision/high energy particles physics. The CLIC’s drive beams will be accelerated by approximately 1300 klystrons, requiring highly efficient and controllable solid state capacitor discharge modulators. Capacitor charger specifications include the requirement to mask the pulsed effect of the load from the utility grid, ensure maximum power quality, control the derived DC voltage precisely (to maximize accuracy for the modulators being implemented), and achieve high efficiency and operability of the overall power system. This paper presents the work carried out on the power system interface for the CLIC facility. In particular it discusses the challenges on the utility interface and analysis of the grid interface converters with regards to required functionality, efficiency, and control methodologies.

  17. Calibration of an Advanced Photon Source linac beam position monitor used for positron position measurement of a beam containing both positrons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac beam position monitors can be used to monitor the position of a positron beam also containing electrons. To accomplish this task, both the signal at the bunching frequency of 2856 MHz and the signal at 2 x 2856 MHz are acquired and processed for each stripline. The positron beam position is obtained by forming a linear combination of both 2856- and 5712-MHz signals for each stripline and then performing the standard difference over sum computation. The required linear combination of the 2856- and 5712-MHz signals depends on the electrical calibration of each stripline/cable combination. In this paper, the calibration constants for both 2856-MHz and 5712-MHz signals for each stripline are determined using a pure beam of electrons. The calibration constants are obtained by measuring the 2856- and 5712-MHz stripline signals at various electron beam currents and positions. Finally, the calibration constants measured using electrons are used to determine positron beam position for the mixed beam case

  18. DC Breakdown experiments for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Descoeudres, A; Taborelli, M

    2008-01-01

    For the production of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) RF accelerating structures, a material capable of sustaining high electric field, with a low breakdown rate and showing low damages after breakdowns is needed. A DC breakdown study is underway at CERN in order to test candidate materials and surface preparations. The saturated breakdown fields of several metals and alloys have been measured, ranging from 100 MV/m for Al to 850 MV/m for stainless steel, being around 170 MV/m for Cu and 430 MV/m for Mo for example. The conditioning speed of Mo can be significantly improved by removing oxides at the surface with a vacuum heat treatment, typically at 875±C for 2 hours. DC breakdown rate measurements have been done with Cu and Mo electrodes, showing similar results as in RF experiments: the breakdown probability seems to exponentially increase with the applied field. Measurements of time delays before breakdown show two different populations of breakdowns, immediate and delayed breakdowns, indicating that t...

  19. Wakefield Damping for the CLIC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambattu, P.K.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Carter, R.G.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Khan, V.; Jones, R.M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  20. Wakefield damping for the CLIC crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P K; Dexter, A C; Carter, R G; Khan, V; Jones, R M; Dolgashev, V

    2009-01-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  1. WAKEFIELD DAMPING FOR THE CLIC CRAB CAVITY

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Dexter, A; Carter, R; Khan, V; Jones, R; Dolgashev, V

    2009-01-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  2. Light-flavor squark reconstruction at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)548062; Weuste, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a simulation study of the prospects for the mass measurement of TeV-scale light- flavored right-handed squark at a 3 TeV e+e collider based on CLIC technology. The analysis is based on full GEANT4 simulations of the CLIC_ILD detector concept, including Standard Model physics backgrounds and beam-induced hadronic backgrounds from two- photon processes. The analysis serves as a generic benchmark for the reconstruction of highly energetic jets in events with substantial missing energy. Several jet finding algorithms were evaluated, with the longitudinally invariant kt algorithm showing a high degree of robustness towards beam-induced background while preserving the features typically found in algorithms developed for e+e- collisions. The presented study of the reconstruction of light-flavored squarks shows that for TeV-scale squark masses, sub-percent accuracy on the mass measurement can be achieved at CLIC.

  3. Physics highlights at ILC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukić, Strahinja

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture, the physics potential for the e+e- linear collider experiments ILC and CLIC is reviewed. The experimental conditions are compared to those at hadron colliders and their intrinsic value for precision experiments, complementary to the hadron colliders, is discussed. The detector concepts for ILC and CLIC are outlined in their most important aspects related to the precision physics. Highlights from the physics program and from the benchmark studies are given. It is shown that linear colliders are a promising tool, complementing the LHC in essential ways to test the Standard Model and to search for new physics.

  4. New clic-g structure design

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082335

    2016-01-01

    The baseline design of the Compact Linear Collider main linac accelerating structure is called ‘CLIC-G’. It is described in the CLIC Conceptual Design Report (CDR) [1]. As shown in Fig. 1, a regular cell of the structure has four waveguides to damp unwanted high-order-modes (HOMs). These waveguides are dimensioned to cut off the fundamental working frequency in order to prevent the degradation of the fundamental mode Q-factor. The cell geometry and HOM damping loads had been extensively optimized in order to maximize the RF-to-beam efficiency, to minimize the cost, and to meet the beam dynamics and the high gradient RF constraints [2

  5. High performance electronics for alignment regulation on the CLIC 30GHz modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CERN is studying a linear collider (CLIC) to obtain electron-positron collisions with centre-of-mass energies in the TeV range. To demonstrate the feasibility of CLIC, a test facility (CTF2) is being constructed. CTF2 consists of 4 identical modules, each 1.4 m long module consists of 2 linac with a girder and a doublet or a triplet quadrupole. Girders are elements that support mechanically the cavities of the accelerator while the main objective of the quadrupole is to focus particle beams. The alignment system has 2 principal utilities. The first is to pre-align the elements to make the beam pass through the aperture and produce signals in beam position monitors. In respect to these signals the girders and the quadrupoles are moved for making the definitive alignment. The second utility is to maintain the elements in this position. The alignment control system of CTF2 must regulate the position of the girders and quadrupoles with a precision < 10 μm. In fact an accuracy of 1 μ has been obtained on CTF2. Thanks to its flexibility and its simplicity, the system is expected to adapt easily to CLIC even if it means to control modules that involve up to a maximum of 384 motors and 896 sensors

  6. Evaluation of Components for the High Precision Inductive Adder for the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC damping rings will produce, through synchrotron radiation, ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge, necessary for the luminosity performance of the collider. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse generators for the damping ring kickers must provide extremely flat high-voltage pulses. The specifications for the extraction kickers of the CLIC damping rings are particularly demanding: the flattop of the output pulse must be 160 ns duration, 12.5 kV and 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 %. An inductive adder allows the use of different modulation techniques and is therefore a very promising approach to meeting the specifications. In addition to semiconductors working in their saturated region, semiconductors working in their linear region are needed for applying analogue modulation techniques. Simulat...

  7. Z′ Resonance and Associated Zh Production at Future Higgs Boson Factory: ILC and CLIC

    OpenAIRE

    A. Gutiérrez-Rodríguez; Hernández-Ruíz, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the prospects of the B-L model with an additional $Z'$ boson to be a Higgs boson factory at high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron colliders, such as the ILC and CLIC, through the Higgs-strahlung process $e^{+}e^{-}\\rightarrow (Z, Z') \\to Zh$, including both the resonant and non-resonant effects. We evaluate the total cross section of $Zh$ and we calculate the total number of events for integrated luminosities of 500-2000\\hspace{0.8mm}$fb^{-1}$ and center of mass en...

  8. CLIC preparations go up a notch

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider gears up for post-LHC physics with an international workshop. A schematic diagram of CLIC.In June CERN gained a new building: number 2010. And as chance would have it, this is more than just a number to its new residents. By the year 2010, teams working at the new CLIC Experimental Area, along with the already established CLIC Test Facility Three (CTF3), hope to have demonstrated the feasibility of the Compact Linear Collider and, depending on results from the LHC, embark on its final design and proposal. A workshop on 16t-18 October brought people from all around the world to CERN to exchange ideas and hear how the ambitious project is progressing. CLIC is a project that aims to extend lepton collider technology to multi-TeV energy physics, colliding leptons with a centre-of-mass-energy up to 3TeV, more than ten times the energy of the LEP. This is only possible in a linear collider, where no energy is lo...

  9. Cherenkov Fibers for Beam Loss Monitoring at the CLIC Two Beam Module

    CERN Document Server

    van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Holzer, E B

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is a feasibility study aiming at a nominal center of mass energy of 3TeV and is based on normal conducting travelling-wave accelerating structures, operating at very high field gradients of 100 MV/m. Such high fields require high peak power and hence a novel power source, the CLIC two beam system, has been developed, in which a high intensity, low energy drive beam (DB) supplies energy to a high energy, low intensity main beam (MB). At the Two Beam Modules (TBM), which compose the 2x21km long CLIC main linac, a protection against beam losses resulting from badly controlled beams is necessary and particularly challenging, since the beam power of both main beam (14 MW) and drive beam (70 MW) is impressive. To avoid operational downtimes and severe damages to machine components, a general Machine Protection System (MPS) scheme has been developed. The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is a key element of the CLIC machine protection system. Its main role will be to detect p...

  10. Extended MSSM Neutralinos as the Source of the PAMELA Positron Excess

    OpenAIRE

    Hooper, Dan; Tait, Tim M. P.

    2009-01-01

    We consider a scenario within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model extended by a singlet chiral superfield, in which neutralino dark matter annihilates to light singlet-like Higgs bosons, which proceed to decay to either electron-positron or muon-antimuon pairs. Unlike neutralino annihilations in the MSSM, this model can provide a good fit to the PAMELA cosmic ray positron fraction excess. Furthermore, the singlet-like scalar Higgs can induce a large Sommerfeld enhancement and provide an...

  11. CLIC Post-Collision Line Luminosity Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, R B; Deacon, L; Geschwendtner, E

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC post collision line is designed to transport the un-collided beams and the products of the collided beams with a total power of 14MW to the main beam dump. Full Monte Carlo simulation has been done for the description of the CLIC luminosity monitoring in the post collision line. One method of the luminosity diagnostic is based on the detection of high energy muons produced by beamstrahlung photons in the main beam dump. The disrupted beam and the beamstrahlung photons produce at the order of 106 muons per bunch crossing per cm2, with energies higher than 10 GeV. Threshold Cherenkov counters are considered after the beam dump for the detection of these high energy muons. Another method for luminosity monitoring is presented using the direct detection of the beamstrahlung photons.

  12. Light-flavor squark reconstruction at CLIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Frank; Weuste, Lars

    2015-08-01

    We present a simulation study of the prospects for the mass measurement of TeV-scale light-flavored right-handed squarks at a 3 TeV collider based on CLIC technology. In the considered model, these particles decay into their standard-model counterparts and the lightest neutralino, resulting in a signature of two jets plus missing energy. The analysis is based on full GEANT4 simulations of the CLIC_ILD detector concept, including Standard Model physics backgrounds and beam-induced hadronic backgrounds from two-photon processes. The analysis serves as a generic benchmark for the reconstruction of highly energetic jets in events with substantial missing energy. Several jet finding algorithms were evaluated, with the longitudinally invariant algorithm showing a high degree of robustness towards beam-induced background while preserving the features typically found in algorithms developed for collisions. The presented study of the reconstruction of light-flavored squarks shows that for TeV-scale squark masses, sub-percent accuracy on the mass measurement can be achieved at CLIC.

  13. Academic Training - Technological challenges of CLIC

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Technological challenges of CLIC R. Corsini, S. Doebert, S. Redaelli, T.Lefevre, CERN-AB and G. Arnau Izquierdo, H. Mainaud, CERN-TS Future e+e- Linear Colliders offer the potential to explore new physics at the TeV scale and beyond to very high precision. While the International Linear Collider (ILC) scheme of a collider in the 0.5 - 1 TeV range enters the engineering design phase, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study explores the technical feasibility of a collider capable of reaching into the multi-TeV energy domain. Key ingredients of the CLIC scheme are acceleration at high-frequency (30 GHz) and high-gradient (150 MV/m) in normal conducting structures and the use of the so-called Two Beam Acceleration concept, where a high-charge electron beam (drive beam) running parallel to the main beam is decelerated to provide the RF power to accelerate the main beam itself. A vigorous R&...

  14. Submicron multi-bunch BPM for CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmickler, H.; Soby, L.; /CERN; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Wendt, M.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    A common-mode free cavity BPM is currently under development at Fermilab within the ILC-CLIC collaboration. This monitor will be operated in a CLIC Main Linac multi-bunch regime, and needs to provide both, high spatial and time resolution. We present the design concept, numerical analysis, investigation on tolerances and error effects, as well as simulations on the signal response applying a multi-bunch stimulus. The proposed CERN linear collider (CLIC) requires a very precise measurement of beam trajectory to preserve the low emittance when transporting the beam through the Main Linac. An energy chirp within the bunch train will be applied to measure and minimize the dispersion effects, which require high resolution (in both, time and space) beam position monitors (BPM) along the beam-line. We propose a low-Q waveguide loaded TM{sub 110} dipole mode cavity as BPM, which is complemented by a TM{sub 010} monopole mode resonator of same resonant frequency for reference signal purposes. The design is based on a well known TM{sub 110} selective mode coupling idea.

  15. A novel source of MeV positron bunches driven by energetic protons for PAS application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zongquan; Xu, Wenzhen; Liu, Yanfen; Xiao, Ran; Kong, Wei; Ye, Bangjiao

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel methodology of MeV positrons generation for PAS application. Feasibility of this proposal analyzed by G4Beamline and Transport have shown reasonable success. Using 2 Hz, 1.6 GeV, 100 ns and 1.5 μC/bunch proton bunches for bombarding a graphite target, about 100 ns e+ bunches are generated. Quasi-monochromatic positrons in the range of 1-10 MeV included in these bunches have a flux of >107/s, peak brightness of 1014/s. A magnetic-confinement beamline is utilized to transport the positrons and a "Fast Beam Chopper" is unprecedentedly extended to chop those relativistic bunches. The positron beam can be finally characterized by the energy range of 1-10 MeV and bunch width from one hundred ps up to 1 ns. Such ultrashort bunches can be useful in tomography-type positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) as well as other applications.

  16. Laser-driven γ-ray, positron, and neutron source from ultra-intense laser-matter interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In ultra-intense laser-matter interactions, γ-rays are effectively generated via the radiation reaction effect. Since a significant fraction of the laser energy is converted into γ-rays, understanding of the energy transport inside of the target is important. We have developed a Particle-in-Cell code which includes generation of the γ-rays, their energy transport, and photo-nuclear reactions. Using the code, we have investigated the characteristics of the quantum beams generated by the transport of the laser-driven γ-rays. It is shown that collimated, mono-energetic positron beams with hundreds of MeV are generated by using thick targets. Neutron beams are also effectively generated by using beryllium targets via photo-nuclear reactions. These lead to the proposal of quantum beam sources of γ-rays, positrons, and neutrons with distinctive characters, which are selectively generated by choosing target conditions

  17. The Event Display for CLIC: DD4hep Compatibility and Improvements

    CERN Document Server

    Quast, Thorben

    2015-01-01

    This document is a short summary of my contributions to the Event Display for the CLICdp Software group in the context of CERN’s Summer Student Programme 2015. After a brief outline of CLIC and the relevant software package, the project is motivated. The individual achievements and their technical realizations are explained rather qualitatively, as details are well documented directly in the source code.

  18. From glutathione transferase to pore in a CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Cromer, B A; Morton, C J; Parker, M W; 10.1007/s00249-002-0219-1

    2002-01-01

    Many plasma membrane chloride channels have been cloned and characterized in great detail. In contrast, very little is known about intracellular chloride channels. Members of a novel class of such channels, called the CLICs (chloride intracellular channels), have been identified over the last few years. A striking feature of the CLIC family of ion channels is that they can exist in a water- soluble state as well as a membrane-bound state. A major step forward in understanding the functioning of these channels has been the recent crystal structure determination of one family member, CLIC1. The structure confirms that CLICs are members of the glutathione S- transferase superfamily and provides clues as to how CLICs can insert into membranes to form chloride channels. (69 refs).

  19. A Multi-TeV Linear Collider Based on CLIC Technology CLIC Conceptual Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, P; Draper, M; Garvey, T; Lebrun, P; Peach, K; Phinney, N; Schmickler, H; Schulte, D; Toge, N

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the accelerator studies for a future multi-TeV e+e- collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) technology. The CLIC concept as described in the report is based on high gradient normal-conducting accelerating structures where the RF power for the acceleration of the colliding beams is extracted from a high-current Drive Beam that runs parallel with the main linac. The focus of CLIC R&D over the last years has been on addressing a set of key feasibility issues that are essential for proving the fundamental validity of the CLIC concept. The status of these feasibility studies are described and summarized. The report also includes a technical description of the accelerator components and R&D to develop the most important parts and methods, as well as a description of the civil engineering and technical services associated with the installation. Several larger system tests have been performed to validate the two-beam scheme, and of particular importance are the results from ...

  20. The physics benchmark processes for the detector performance studies used in CLIC CDR Volume 3

    CERN Document Server

    Allanach, B.J.; Desch, K.; Ellis, J.; Giudice, G.; Grefe, C.; Kraml, S.; Lastovicka, T.; Linssen, L.; Marschall, J.; Martin, S.P.; Muennich, A.; Poss, S.; Roloff, P.; Simon, F.; Strube, J.; Thomson, M.; Wells, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    This note describes the detector benchmark processes used in volume 3 of the CLIC conceptual design report (CDR), which explores a staged construction and operation of the CLIC accelerator. The goal of the detector benchmark studies is to assess the performance of the CLIC ILD and CLIC SiD detector concepts for different physics processes and at a few CLIC centre-of-mass energies.

  1. Tungsten moderator of Venetian blinds- and honeycomb-type for the slow positron source on hard synchrotron radiation of SPring-8 storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plokhoi, V. V.; Kandiev, Ya. Z.; Samarin, S. I.; Malyshkin, G. N.; Baidin, G. V.; Litvinenko, I. A.; Nikitin, V. P.

    2001-09-01

    The paper considers designs of moderators where fast positron stopping medium consists of very fine tungsten strips separated by vacuum gaps and the strips are arranged into Venetian blinds- or honeycomb-type structures. Moderator efficiency is evaluated through Monte-Carlo simulations. According to the maximal estimate, the efficiency of conversion of fast positrons into slow ones in the Venetian blinds and honeycomb-type moderators is ˜5×10 -3 for the reasonable thickness of the tungsten foil. If such moderator is used, the intensity of slow positron source on the hard synchrotron of SPring-8 storage ring can reach the level of ˜5×10 10 e +/s.

  2. On-Line Dispersion Free Steering for the Main Linac of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Pfingstner, J

    2013-01-01

    For future linear colliders as well as for light sources, ground motion effects are a severe problem for the accelerator performance. After a few minutes, orbit feedback systems are not sufficient to mitigate all ground motion effects and additional long term methods will have to be deployed. In this paper, the long term ground motion effects in the main linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) are analysed via simulation studies. The primary growth of the projected emittance is identified to originate from chromatic dilutions due to dispersive beam orbits. To counter this effect, an on-line identification algorithm is applied to measure the dispersion parasitically. This dispersion estimate is used to correct the beam orbit with an iterative dispersion free steering algorithm. The presented results are not only of interest for the CLIC project, but for all linacs in which the dispersive orbit has to be corrected over time.

  3. Spectrometers for RF breakdown studies for CLIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacewicz, M.; Ziemann, V.; Ekelöf, T.; Dubrovskiy, A.; Ruber, R.

    2016-08-01

    An e+e- collider of several TeV energy will be needed for the precision studies of any new physics discovered at the LHC collider at CERN. One promising candidate is CLIC, a linear collider which is based on a two-beam acceleration scheme that efficiently solves the problem of power distribution to the acceleration structures. The phenomenon that currently prevents achieving high accelerating gradients in high energy accelerators such as the CLIC is the electrical breakdown at very high electrical field. The ongoing experimental work within the CLIC collaboration is trying to benchmark the theoretical models focusing on the physics of vacuum breakdown which is responsible for the discharges. In order to validate the feasibility of accelerating structures and observe the characteristics of the vacuum discharges and their eroding effects on the structure two dedicated spectrometers are now commissioned at the high-power test-stands at CERN. First, the so called Flashbox has opened up a possibility for non-invasive studies of the emitted breakdown currents during two-beam acceleration experiments. It gives a unique possibility to measure the energy of electrons and ions in combination with the arrival time spectra and to put that in context with accelerated beam, which is not possible at any of the other existing test-stands. The second instrument, a spectrometer for detection of the dark and breakdown currents, is operated at one of the 12 GHz stand-alone test-stands at CERN. Built for high repetition rate operation it can measure the spatial and energy distributions of the electrons emitted from the acceleration structure during a single RF pulse. Two new analysis tools: discharge impedance tracking and tomographic image reconstruction, applied to the data from the spectrometer make possible for the first time to obtain the location of the breakdown inside the structure both in the transversal and longitudinal direction thus giving a more complete picture of the

  4. Electro-Weak Fits at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    De Curtis, S

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the future linear colliders is to extend the sensitivity to new physics beyond the reach of the LHC. Several models predict the existence of new vector resonances in the multi-TeV region. We review the existing limits on the masses of these new resonances from LEP/SLC and TEVATRON data and from the atomic parity violation measurements, in some specific models. We study the potential of a multi-TeV e+e- collider, such as CLIC, for the determination of their properties and nature.

  5. Intense positron beams: linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beams of monoenergetic positrons with energies of a few eV to many keV have been used in experiments in atomic physics, solid-state physics and materials science. The production of positron beams from a new source, an electron linac, is described. Intense, pulsed beams of low-energy positrons were produced by a high-energy beam from an electron linac. The production efficiency, moderator geometry, beam spot size and other positron beam parameters were determined for electrons with energies from 60 to 120 MeV. Low-energy positron beams produced with a high-energy electron linac can be of much higher intensity than those beams currently derived from radioactive sources. These higher intensity beams will make possible positron experiments previously infeasible. 10 references, 1 figure

  6. M10.3.4: CLIC crab cavity specifications completed

    CERN Document Server

    Dexter, A; Ambattu, P; Shinton, I; Jones, R

    2010-01-01

    The starting point of Sub-task 2 is to document the currently anticipated requirements for the CLIC crab cavity system. This milestone concerns completion of the basic specifications for the CLIC crab cavity system. This comprises kick, power requirement, phase and amplitude stability, technology choice, and RF layout. The wakefield calculations of a baseline CLIC cavity will be used to estimate the required damping of the higher order modes as well as other special modes in crab cavities (the lower and same order modes).

  7. CLIC CRAB CAVITY SPECIFICATIONS MILESTONE: M10.3.4

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Dexter, A; Jones, R; McIntosh, P; Shinton, I

    2010-01-01

    The starting point of Sub-task 2 is to document the currently anticipated requirements for the CLIC crab cavity system. This milestone concerns completion of the basic specifications for the CLIC crab cavity system. This comprises kick, power requirement, phase and amplitude stability, technology choice, and RF layout. The wakefield calculations of a baseline CLIC cavity will be used to estimate the required damping of the higher order modes as well as other special modes in crab cavities (the lower and same order modes).

  8. Initial measurements on a prototype inductive adder for the CLIC kicker systems

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings will produce, through synchrotron radiation, ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the damping ring kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the extraction kickers of the DRs are particularly demanding: the flattops of the pulses must be ±12.5 kV with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 % (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications. To achieve ultra-flat pulses with a fast rise time the output impedance of the inductive adder needs to be well matched to the system impedance. The parasitic circuit elements of the inductive adder have a significant effect upon the output impedance and these values are very difficult to calculate accurately analytically. To predict these paramet...

  9. Modelling of Parasitic Inductances of a High Precision Inductive Adder for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J; Ovaska, S J

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings will produce, through synchrotron radiation, ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the damping ring kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the extraction kickers of the DRs are particularly demanding: the flat-top of the pulses must be ±12.5 kV with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 % (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications. However, the output impedance of the inductive adder needs to be well matched to the system impedance. The primary leakage inductance, which cannot be computed accurately analytically, has a significant effect upon the output impedance of the inductive adder. This paper presents predictions, obtained by modelling the 3D geometry of the adder struc...

  10. Measurements on Prototype Inductive Adders with Ultra-Flat-Top Output Pulses for CLIC DR Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J; Belver-Aguilar, C

    2014-01-01

    The CLIC study is investigating the technical feasibility of an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings (DRs) will produce ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the DR kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the DR extraction kickers call for a 160 ns duration flat-top pulses of ±12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 % (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications because this topology allows the use of both passive and analogue modulation methods to adjust the output waveform. Recently, two five-layer, 3.5 kV, prototype inductive adders have been built at CERN. The first of these has been used to test the passive and active analogue modulation methods to compensate voltage droop and ripple of the output pulses. Pulse waveforms have been reco...

  11. Effective source size, radial, angular and energy spread of therapeutic 11C positron emitter beams produced by 12C fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of positron emitter light ion beams in combination with PET (Positron Emission Tomography) and PET–CT (Computed Tomography) imaging could significantly improve treatment verification and dose delivery imaging during radiation therapy. The present study is dedicated to the analysis of the beam quality in terms of the effective source size, as well as radial, angular and energy spread of the 11C ion beam produced by projectile fragmentation of a primary point monodirectional and monoenergetic 12C ion beam in a dedicated range shifter of different materials. This study was performed combining analytical methods describing the transport of particles in matter and the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT+. A high brilliance and production yield of 11C fragments with a small effective source size and emittance is best achieved with a decelerator made of two media: a first liquid hydrogen section of about 20 cm followed by a hydrogen rich section of variable length. The calculated intensity of the produced 11C ion beam ranges from about 5% to 8% of the primary 12C beam intensity depending on the exit energy and the acceptance of the beam transport system. The angular spread is lower than 1 degree for all the materials studied, but the brilliance of the beam is the highest with the proposed mixed decelerator

  12. Summary of the BDS and MDI CLIC08 Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; Ahmed, I; Ambatu, PK; Angal-Kalinin, D; Barlow, R; Baud, J P; Bolzon, B; Braun, H; Burkhardt, H; Burt, GC; Corsini, R; Dalena, B; Dexter, AC; Dolgashev, V; Elsener, K; Fernandez Hernando, JL; Gaillard, G; Geffroy, N; Jackson, F; Jeremie, A; Jones, RM; McIntosh, P; Moffeit, K; Peltier, F; Resta-López, J; Rumolo, G; Schulte, D; Seryi, A; Toader, A; Zimmermann, F

    2008-01-01

    This note summarizes the presentations held within the Beam Delivery System and Machine Detector Interface working group of the CLIC08 workshop. The written contributions have been provided by the presenters on a voluntary basis.

  13. Z′ Resonance and Associated Zh Production at Future Higgs Boson Factory: ILC and CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the prospects of the B-L model with an additional Z′ boson to be a Higgs boson factory at high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron colliders, such as the ILC and CLIC, through the Higgs-strahlung process e+e-→(Z,Z′)→Zh, including both the resonant and the nonresonant effects. We evaluate the total cross section of Zh and we calculate the total number of events for integrated luminosities of 500–2000 fb−1 and center of mass energies between 500 and 3000 GeV. We find that the total number of expected Zh events can reach 106, which is a very optimistic scenario and it would be possible to perform precision measurements for both Z′ and Higgs boson in future high-energy e+e- colliders experiments

  14. Z′ Resonance and Associated Zh Production at Future Higgs Boson Factory: ILC and CLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gutiérrez-Rodríguez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the prospects of the B-L model with an additional Z′ boson to be a Higgs boson factory at high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron colliders, such as the ILC and CLIC, through the Higgs-strahlung process e+e-→(Z,Z′→Zh, including both the resonant and the nonresonant effects. We evaluate the total cross section of Zh and we calculate the total number of events for integrated luminosities of 500–2000 fb−1 and center of mass energies between 500 and 3000 GeV. We find that the total number of expected Zh events can reach 106, which is a very optimistic scenario and it would be possible to perform precision measurements for both Z′ and Higgs boson in future high-energy e+e- colliders experiments.

  15. Luminosity Upgrade of CLIC LHC ep/gp Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Aksakal, H; Nergiz, Z; Schulte, D; Zimmermann, F

    2007-01-01

    An energy frontier or QCD Explorer ep and collider can be realized by colliding high-energy photons generated by Compton backscattered off a CLIC electron beam, at either 75 GeV or 1.5 TeV, with protons or ions stored in the LHC. In this study we discuss a performance optimization of this type of collider by tailoring the parameters of both CLIC and LHC. An estimate of the ultimately achievable luminosity is given.

  16. The CLIC project and the design for an e+- collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-beam scheme of the CERN Linear Collider (CLIC) project is discussed. The problems in achieving the needed luminosity, caused by disruption and beam radiation are outlined. The main CLIC paramaters are presented. The supply of the RF power and problems of RF focusing caused by wakefield effects are discussed. The transfer and main LINAC structures, and the design of damping rings and the final focus are outlined. (H.W.). 25 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  17. A high resolution cavity BPM for the CLIC Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chritin, N.; Schmickler, H.; Soby, L.; /CERN; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Wendt, M.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In frame of the development of a high resolution BPM system for the CLIC Main Linac we present the design of a cavity BPM prototype. It consists of a waveguide loaded dipole mode resonator and a monopole mode reference cavity, both operating at 15 GHz, to be compatible with the bunch frequencies at the CLIC Test Facility. Requirements, design concept, numerical analysis, and practical considerations are discussed.

  18. CLIC1 regulates dendritic cell antigen processing and presentation by modulating phagosome acidification and proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salao, Kanin; Jiang, Lele; Li, Hui; Tsai, Vicky W.-W.; Husaini, Yasmin; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Brown, Louise J.; Brown, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular chloride channel protein 1 (CLIC1) participates in inflammatory processes by regulating macrophage phagosomal functions such as pH and proteolysis. Here, we sought to determine if CLIC1 can regulate adaptive immunity by actions on dendritic cells (DCs), the key professional antigen presenting cells. To do this, we first generated bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from germline CLIC1 gene-deleted (CLIC1−/−) and wild-type (CLIC1+/+) mice, then studied them in vitro and in vivo. We found phagocytosis triggered cytoplasmic CLIC1 translocation to the phagosomal membrane where it regulated phagosomal pH and proteolysis. Phagosomes from CLIC1−/− BMDCs displayed impaired acidification and proteolysis, which could be reproduced if CLIC1+/+, but not CLIC1−/− cells, were treated with IAA94, a CLIC family ion channel blocker. CLIC1−/− BMDC displayed reduced in vitro antigen processing and presentation of full-length myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and reduced MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data suggest that CLIC1 regulates DC phagosomal pH to ensure optimal processing of antigen for presentation to antigen-specific T-cells. Further, they indicate that CLIC1 is a novel therapeutic target to help reduce the adaptive immune response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:27113959

  19. Wakefield monitor development for CLIC accelerating structure

    CERN Document Server

    Peauger, F; Girardot, P; Andersson, A; Riddone, G; Samoshkin, A; Solodko, A; Zennaro, R; Ruber, R

    2010-01-01

    Abstract To achieve high luminosity in CLIC, the accelerating structures must be aligned to an accuracy of 5 μm with respect to the beam trajectory. Position detectors called Wakefield Monitors (WFM) are integrated to the structure for a beam based alignment. This paper describes the requirements of such monitors. Detailed RF design and electromagnetic simulations of the WFM itself are presented. In particular, time domain computations are performed and an evaluation of the resolution is done for two higher order modes at 18 and 24 GHz. The mechanical design of a prototype accelerating structure with WFM is also presented as well as the fabrication status of three complete structures. The objective is to implement two of them in CTF3 at CERN for a feasibility demonstration with beam and high power rf.

  20. Conceptual Design of the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Papaphilippou, Y; Barnes, M; Calatroni, S; Chiggiato, P; Corsini, R; Grudiev, A; Koukovini, E; Lefevre, T; Martini, M; Modena, M; Mounet, N; Perin, A; Renier, Y; Russenschuck, S; Rumolo, G; Schoerling, D; Schulte, D; Schmickler, H; Taborelli, M; Vandoni, G; Zimmermann, F; Zisopoulos, P; Boland, M; Palmer, M; Bragin, A; Levichev, E; Syniatkin, S; Zolotarev, K; Vobly, P; Korostelev, M; Vivoli, A; Belver-Aguilar, C; Faus-Golfe, A; Rinolfi, L; Bernhard, A; Pivi, M; Smith, S; Rassool, R; Wootton, K

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC Damping rings are designed to produce unprecedentedly low-emittances of 500 nm and 5 nm normalized at 2.86 GeV, with high bunch charge, necessary for the performance of the collider. The large beam brightness triggers a number of beam dynamics and technical challenges. Ring parameters such as energy, circumference, lattice, momentum compaction, bending and superconducting wiggler fields are carefully chosen in order to provide the target emittances under the influence of intrabeam scattering but also reduce the impact of collective effects such as space-charge and coherent synchrotron radiation. Mitigation techniques for two stream instabilities have been identified and tested. The low vertical emittance is achieved by modern orbit and coupling correction techniques. Design considerations and plans for technical systems, such as wigglers, transfer systems, vacuum, RF cavities, instrumentation and feedback are finally reviewed.

  1. Impedance effects in the CLIC damping rings

    CERN Document Server

    Koukovini-Platia, E; Mounet, N; Rumolo, G; Salvant, B

    2011-01-01

    Due to the unprecedented brilliance of the beams, the performance of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) damping rings (DR) is affected by collective effects. Single bunch instability thresholds based on a broad-band resonator model and the associated coherent tune shifts have been evaluated with the HEADTAIL code. Simulations performed for positive and negative values of chromaticity showed that higher order bunch modes can be potentially dangerous for the beam stability. This study also includes the effects of high frequency resistive wall impedance due to different coatings applied on the chambers of the wigglers for e-cloud mitigation and/or ultra-low vacuum pressure. The impact of the resistive wall wake fields on the transverse impedance budget is finally discussed.

  2. Simulations for CLIC Drive Beam Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Aksoy, Avni

    2012-01-01

    The Drive Beam Linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) has to accelerate an electron beam with 4.2 A up to 2.4 GeV in almost fully-loaded structures. The pulse contains about 70000 bunches, one in every second rf bucket, and has a length of 140 $\\mu$s. The beam stability along the beamline is of concern for such a high current and pulse length. We present different options for the lattice of the linac based on FODO, triplet and doublet cells and compare the transverse instability for each lattice including the effects of beam jitter, alignment and beam-based correction. Additionally longitudinal stability is discussed for different bunch compressors using FODO type of lattice.

  3. Future laser-accelerated proton beams at ELI-Beamlines as potential source of positron emitters for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of novel, fast and efficient, radiopharmaceutical methods of labeling. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility where a PW, 30 fs, 10 Hz laser system will be available. The production yields of several positron emitters were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account three possible scenarios of broad proton spectra expected, with maximum energies ranging from about 8 MeV to 100 MeV. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of radiopharmaceuticals exploiting modern fast and efficient labeling systems

  4. Future laser-accelerated proton beams at ELI-Beamlines as potential source of positron emitters for PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, E.; Italiano, A.; Margarone, D.; Pagano, B.; Baldari, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-04-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of novel, fast and efficient, radiopharmaceutical methods of labeling. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility where a PW, 30 fs, 10 Hz laser system will be available. The production yields of several positron emitters were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account three possible scenarios of broad proton spectra expected, with maximum energies ranging from about 8 MeV to 100 MeV. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of radiopharmaceuticals exploiting modern fast and efficient labeling systems.

  5. Positron spectroscopy and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positrons are the antiparticles of electrons, and their mass is m (the stationary mass of an electron) and their charge is e (the charge of an electron is -e). Accordingly, in principle only by reversing the polarity of measuring systems, the positron version of the analysis methods utilizing electrons becomes feasible, such as low energy positron diffraction (LEPD), reflection high energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) and transmission positron microscope (TPM), and except the problem of beam intensity, there are much merits than electrons. Positrons are the stable particles that do not have peculiar life similarly to electrons, but since matters are composed of electrons and atomic nuclei in this world, the pair annihilation with electrons occurs. At the time of pair annihilation, gamma-ray is emitted, and this gamma-ray transmits the information on the life of positrons. The individual character and possibility of positrons as a physical property probe, the interaction of positrons with matters, the sources of positrons, the analysis method utilizing positrons, the concrete examples of utilizing positron beam and the future perspective of positron utilization as probes are reported. (K.I.) 83 refs

  6. Tungsten moderator of Venetian blinds- and honeycomb-type for the slow positron source on hard synchrotron radiation of SPring-8 storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Plokhoi, V V; Samarin, S I; Malyshkin, G N; Baidin, G V; Litvinenko, I A; Nikitin, V P

    2001-01-01

    The paper considers designs of moderators where fast positron stopping medium consists of very fine tungsten strips separated by vacuum gaps and the strips are arranged into Venetian blinds- or honeycomb-type structures. Moderator efficiency is evaluated through Monte-Carlo simulations. According to the maximal estimate, the efficiency of conversion of fast positrons into slow ones in the Venetian blinds and honeycomb-type moderators is approx 5x10 sup - sup 3 for the reasonable thickness of the tungsten foil. If such moderator is used, the intensity of slow positron source on the hard synchrotron of SPring-8 storage ring can reach the level of approx 5x10 sup 1 sup 0 e sup + /s.

  7. CLIC-ACM: Acquisition and Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Bielawski, B; Magnoni, S

    2014-01-01

    CLIC [1] (Compact Linear Collider) is a world-wide collaboration to study the next terascale lepton collider, relying upon a very innovative concept of two-beamacceleration. In this scheme, the power is transported to the main accelerating structures by a primary electron beam. The Two Beam Module (TBM) is a compact integration with a high filling factor of all components: RF, Magnets, Instrumentation, Vacuum, Alignment and Stabilization. This paper describes the very challenging aspects of designing the compact system to serve as a dedicated Acquisition & Control Module (ACM) for all signals of the TBM. Very delicate conditions must be considered, in particular radiation doses that could reach several kGy in the tunnel. In such severe conditions shielding and hardened electronics will have to be taken into consideration. In addition, with more than 300 ADC&DAC channels per ACM and about 21000 ACMs in total, it appears clearly that power consumption will be an important issue. It is also obvious that...

  8. Minimizing Emittance for the CLIC Damping Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, H; Levitchev, E; Piminov, P; Schulte, Daniel; Siniatkin, S; Vobly, P P; Zimmermann, Frank; Zolotarev, Konstantin V; CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    The CLIC damping rings aim at unprecedented small normalized equilibrium emittances of 3.3 nm vertical and 550 nm horizontal, for a bunch charge of 2.6·109 particles and an energy of 2.4 GeV. In this parameter regime the dominant emittance growth mechanism is intra-beam scattering. Intense synchrotron radiation damping from wigglers is required to counteract its effect. Here the overall optimization of the wiggler parameters is described, taking into account state-of-the-art wiggler technologies, wiggler effects on dynamic aperture, and problems of wiggler radiation absorption. Two technical solutions, one based on superconducting magnet technology the other on permanent magnets are presented. Although dynamic aperture and tolerances of this ring design remain challenging, benefits are obtained from the strong damping. For optimized wigglers, only bunches for a single machine pulse may need to be stored, making injection/extraction particularly simple and limiting the synchrotron-radiation power. With a 36...

  9. CLIC/ILC Researchers Explore New Avenues for Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Researchers from CLIC and ILC met for their first common International Workshop on Linear Colliders, which was held in Geneva from 18 to 22 October. Although the talks were mostly scientific and technical, the political message behind them was a breakthrough, as the workshop showed the progress made in unifying the two communities.   The International Workshop on Linear Colliders (IWLC), which was organised by the European Committee for Future Accelerators, hosted by CERN, and held at CERN and the International Conference Centre in Geneva, attracted a large audience of about 500 experts. Although there have been other joint conferences between the CLIC and ILC communities before, they have all been focused on specific technical and/or managerial issues. The IWLC was part of an ongoing effort by CLIC and ILC to provide an environment in which researchers can exchange ideas, inform their peers about their most recent achievements and work together on common issues. Given the possible technical ov...

  10. Status of Wakefield Monitor Experiments at the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, Reidar; Aftab, Namra; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Grudiev, Alexej; Javeed, Sumera; Pfingstner, Juergen; Wuensch, Walter

    2016-01-01

    For the very low emittance beams in CLIC, it is vital to mitigate emittance growth which leads to reduced luminosity in the detectors. One factor that leads to emittance growth is transverse wakefields in the accelerating structures. In order to combat this the structures must be aligned with a precision of a few um. For achieving this tolerance, accelerating structures are equipped with wakefield monitors that measure higher-order dipole modes excited by the beam when offset from the structure axis. We report on such measurements, performed using prototype CLIC accelerating structures which are part of the module installed in the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. Measurements with and without the drive beam that feeds rf power to the structures are compared. Improvements to the experimental setup are discussed, and finally remaining measurements that should be performed before the completion of the program are summarized.

  11. The E166 experiment: Development of an undulator-based polarized positron source for the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Kovermann; A Stahl; A A Mikhailichenko; D Scott; G A Moortgat-Pick; V Gharibyan; P Pahl; R Pöschl; K P Schüler; K Laihem; S Riemann; A Schälicke; R Dollan; H Kolanoski; T Lohse; T Schweizer; K T McDonald; Y Batygin; V Bharadwaj; G Bower; F-J Decker; C Hast; R Iverson; J C Sheppard; Z Szalata; D Walz; A Weidemann; G Alexander; E Reinherz-Aronis; S Berridge; W Bugg; Y Efrimenko

    2007-12-01

    A longitudinal polarized positron beam is foreseen for the international linear collider (ILC). A proof-of-principle experiment has been performed in the final focus test beam at SLAC to demonstrate the production of polarized positrons for implementation at the ILC. The E166 experiment uses a 1 m long helical undulator in a 46.6 GeV electron beam to produce a few MeV photons with a high degree of circular polarization. These photons are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized + and -. The positron polarization is measured using a Compton transmission polarimeter. The data analysis has shown asymmetries in the expected vicinity of 3.4% and ∼ 1% for photons and positrons respectively and the expected positron longitudinal polarization is covering a range from 50% to 90%.

  12. Pulsar Wind Nebulae as a source of the observed electron and positron excess at high energy: The case of Vela-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Torre, S.; Gervasi, M.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rozza, D.; Treves, A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate, in terms of production from pulsars and their nebulae, the cosmic ray positron and electron fluxes above ∼10 GeV, observed by the AMS-02 experiment up to 1 TeV. We concentrate on the Vela-X case. Starting from the gamma-ray photon spectrum of the source, generated via synchrotron and inverse Compton processes, we estimated the electron and positron injection spectra. Several features are fixed from observations of Vela-X and unknown parameters are borrowed from the Crab nebula. The particle spectra produced in the pulsar wind nebula are then propagated up to the Solar System, using a diffusion model. Differently from previous works, the omnidirectional intensity excess for electrons and positrons is obtained as a difference between the AMS-02 data and the corresponding local interstellar spectrum. An equal amount of electron and positron excess is observed and we interpreted this excess (above ∼100 GeV in the AMS-02 data) as a supply coming from Vela-X. The particle contribution is consistent with models predicting the gamma-ray emission at the source. The input of a few more young pulsars is also allowed, while below ∼100 GeV more aged pulsars could be the main contributors.

  13. Vertex-Detector R&D for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Dannheim, D

    2014-01-01

    A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC vertex detector. It comprises fast, low-power and small-pitch readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology (CLICpix) coupled to ultra-thin sensors (planar or active HV-CMOS) via low-mass interconnects. The power dissipation of the readout chips is reduced by means of power pulsing, allowing for a cooling system based on forced air flow. In this contribution the CLIC vertex-detector requirements are reviewed and the current status of R&D on readout and sensors is presented.

  14. Single Z' production at CLIC based on e^- gamma collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Soa, D. V.; H.N. Long(Institute of Physics, VAST, 10 Dao Tan, Ba Dinh, Hanoi, Vietnam); Binh, D. T.; Khoi, D. P.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the potential of CLIC based on e- gamma collisions to search for new $Z'$ gauge boson. Single Z' production at e-gamma colliders in two SU(3)_C X SU(3)_L X U(1)_N models: the minimal model and the model with right-handed (RH) neutrinos is studied in detail. Results show that new Z' gauge bosons can be observed at the CLIC, and the cross sections in the model with RH neutrinos are bigger than those in the minimal one.

  15. Beam Loading Compensation in the Main Linac of CLIC

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, D.; Syratchev, I.

    2000-01-01

    Compensation of multi-bunch beam loading is of great importance in the main linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The bunch-to-bunch energy variation has to stay below 1 part in 1000. In CLIC, the RF power is obtained by decelerating a drive beam which is formed by merging a number of short bunch trains. A promising scheme for tackling beam loading in the main linac is based on varying the lengths of the bunch trains in the drive beam. The scheme and its expected performance are presen...

  16. Accelerator and Technical Sector Seminar: Mechanical stabilization and positioning of CLIC quadrupoles with sub-nanometre resolution

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Thursday 24 November 2010 Accelerator and Technical Sector Seminar at 14:15  -  BE Auditorium, bldg. 6 (Meyrin) – please note unusual place Mechanical stabilization and positioning of CLIC quadrupoles with sub-nanometre resolution Stef Janssens /EN-MME Abstract: To reach the required luminosity at the CLIC interaction point, about 4000 quadrupoles are needed to obtain a vertical beam size of 1 nm at the interaction point. The mechanical jitter of the quadrupole magnets will result in an emittance growth. An active vibration isolation system is required to reduce vibrations from the ground and from external forces to about 1.5 nm integrated root mean square (r.m.s.) vertical displacement at 1 Hz. A short overview of vibration damping and isolation strategies will be presented as well as a comparison of existing systems. The unprecedented resolution requirements and the instruments enabling these measurements will be discussed. The vibration sources from which the magnets need to...

  17. Pulsar Wind Nebulae as a source of the observed electron and positron excess at high energy: the case of Vela-X

    CERN Document Server

    Della Torre, S; Rancoita, P G; Rozza, D; Treves, A

    2015-01-01

    We investigate, in terms of production from pulsars and their nebulae, the cosmic ray positron and electron fluxes above $\\sim10$ GeV, observed by the AMS-02 experiment up to 1 TeV. We concentrate on the Vela-X case. Starting from the gamma-ray photon spectrum of the source, generated via synchrotron and inverse Compton processes, we estimated the electron and positron injection spectra. Several features are fixed from observations of Vela-X and unknown parameters are borrowed from the Crab nebula. The particle spectra produced in the pulsar wind nebula are then propagated up to the Solar System, using a diffusion model. Differently from previous works, the omnidirectional intensity excess for electrons and positrons is obtained as a difference between the AMS-02 data and the corresponding local interstellar spectrum. An equal amount of electron and positron excess is observed and we interpreted this excess (above $\\sim$100 GeV in the AMS-02 data) as a supply coming from Vela-X. The particle contribution is c...

  18. Iterative image reconstruction for positron emission tomography based on a detector response function estimated from point source measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohme, Michel S; Qi Jinyi [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)], E-mail: qi@ucdavis.edu

    2009-06-21

    The accuracy of the system model in an iterative reconstruction algorithm greatly affects the quality of reconstructed positron emission tomography (PET) images. For efficient computation in reconstruction, the system model in PET can be factored into a product of a geometric projection matrix and sinogram blurring matrix, where the former is often computed based on analytical calculation, and the latter is estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Direct measurement of a sinogram blurring matrix is difficult in practice because of the requirement of a collimated source. In this work, we propose a method to estimate the 2D blurring kernels from uncollimated point source measurements. Since the resulting sinogram blurring matrix stems from actual measurements, it can take into account the physical effects in the photon detection process that are difficult or impossible to model in a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and hence provide a more accurate system model. Another advantage of the proposed method over MC simulation is that it can easily be applied to data that have undergone a transformation to reduce the data size (e.g., Fourier rebinning). Point source measurements were acquired with high count statistics in a relatively fine grid inside the microPET II scanner using a high-precision 2D motion stage. A monotonically convergent iterative algorithm has been derived to estimate the detector blurring matrix from the point source measurements. The algorithm takes advantage of the rotational symmetry of the PET scanner and explicitly models the detector block structure. The resulting sinogram blurring matrix is incorporated into a maximum a posteriori (MAP) image reconstruction algorithm. The proposed method has been validated using a 3 x 3 line phantom, an ultra-micro resolution phantom and a {sup 22}Na point source superimposed on a warm background. The results of the proposed method show improvements in both resolution and contrast ratio when compared with the MAP

  19. Iterative Image Reconstruction for Positron Emission Tomography Based on Detector Response Function Estimated from Point Source Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Michel S.; Qi, Jinyi

    2009-01-01

    The accuracy of the system model in an iterative reconstruction algorithm greatly affects the quality of reconstructed positron emission tomography (PET) images. For efficient computation in reconstruction, the system model in PET can be factored into a product of a geometric projection matrix and sinogram blurring matrix, where the former is often computed based on analytical calculation, and the latter is estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Direct measurement of sinogram blurring matrix is difficult in practice because of the requirement of a collimated source. In this work, we propose a method to estimate the 2D blurring kernels from uncollimated point source measurements. Since the resulting sinogram blurring matrix stems from actual measurements, it can take into account the physical effects in the photon detection process that are difficult or impossible to model in a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and hence provide a more accurate system model. Another advantage of the proposed method over MC simulation is that it can be easily applied to data that have undergone a transformation to reduce the data size (e.g., Fourier rebinning). Point source measurements were acquired with high count statistics in a relatively fine grid inside the microPET II scanner using a high-precision 2-D motion stage. A monotonically convergent iterative algorithm has been derived to estimate the detector blurring matrix from the point source measurements. The algorithm takes advantage of the rotational symmetry of the PET scanner and explicitly models the detector block structure. The resulting sinogram blurring matrix is incorporated into a maximum a posteriori (MAP) image reconstruction algorithm. The proposed method has been validated using a 3-by-3 line phantom, an ultra-micro resolution phantom, and a 22Na point source superimposed on a warm background. The results of the proposed method show improvements in both resolution and contrast ratio when compared with the MAP

  20. Iterative image reconstruction for positron emission tomography based on a detector response function estimated from point source measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Michel S.; Qi, Jinyi

    2009-06-01

    The accuracy of the system model in an iterative reconstruction algorithm greatly affects the quality of reconstructed positron emission tomography (PET) images. For efficient computation in reconstruction, the system model in PET can be factored into a product of a geometric projection matrix and sinogram blurring matrix, where the former is often computed based on analytical calculation, and the latter is estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Direct measurement of a sinogram blurring matrix is difficult in practice because of the requirement of a collimated source. In this work, we propose a method to estimate the 2D blurring kernels from uncollimated point source measurements. Since the resulting sinogram blurring matrix stems from actual measurements, it can take into account the physical effects in the photon detection process that are difficult or impossible to model in a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and hence provide a more accurate system model. Another advantage of the proposed method over MC simulation is that it can easily be applied to data that have undergone a transformation to reduce the data size (e.g., Fourier rebinning). Point source measurements were acquired with high count statistics in a relatively fine grid inside the microPET II scanner using a high-precision 2D motion stage. A monotonically convergent iterative algorithm has been derived to estimate the detector blurring matrix from the point source measurements. The algorithm takes advantage of the rotational symmetry of the PET scanner and explicitly models the detector block structure. The resulting sinogram blurring matrix is incorporated into a maximum a posteriori (MAP) image reconstruction algorithm. The proposed method has been validated using a 3 × 3 line phantom, an ultra-micro resolution phantom and a 22Na point source superimposed on a warm background. The results of the proposed method show improvements in both resolution and contrast ratio when compared with the MAP

  1. Photon-Nucleon Collider based on LHC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Aksakal, Husnu; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    We describe the scheme of a photon-nucleon collider where high energy photons generated by Compton backscattering off a CLIC electron beam, at either 75 GeV or 1.5 TeV are collided with protons or ions stored in LHC. Different design constraints for such a collider are discussed and achievable luminosity performance is estimated.

  2. Grid Interface Design for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Jankovic, Maria; Clare, Jon; Wheeler, Pat; Aguglia, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the grid interface challenges for CERN’s proposed Compact Linear Colliders’ (CLIC) klystron modulators, including a 280 MW power system optimisation. The modular multilevel converter is evaluated as a candidate topology for a Medium Voltage grid interface along with a control method for reducing the impact of klystron modulators on the electrical network.

  3. Development of Stripline Kickers for Low Emittance Rings: Application to the Beam Extraction Kicker for CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)728476; Toral Fernandez, Fernando

    In the framework of the design study of Future Linear Colliders, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) aims for electron-positron collisions with high luminosity at a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. To achieve the luminosity requirements, Pre-Damping Rings (PDRs) and Damping Rings (DRs) are required: they reduce the beam emittance before the beam is accelerated in the main linac. Several injection and extraction systems are needed to inject and extract the beam from the PDRs and DRs. The work of this Thesis consists of the design, fabrication and laboratory tests of the first stripline kicker prototype for beam extraction from the CLIC DRs, although the methodology proposed can be extended to stripline kickers for any low emittance ring. The excellent field homogeneity required, as well as a good transmission of the high voltage pulse through the electrodes, has been achieved by choosing a novel electrode shape. With this new geometry, it has been possible to benefit from all the advantages that the most...

  4. Assembly Test of Elastic Averaging Technique to Improve Mechanical Alignment for Accelerating Structure Assemblies in CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Huopana, J

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is being studied at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e- collider [1]. The manufacturing and assembly tolerances for the required RF-components are important for the final efficiency and for the operation of CLIC. The proper function of an accelerating structure is very sensitive to errors in shape and location of the accelerating cavity. This causes considerable issues in the field of mechanical design and manufacturing. Currently the design of the accelerating structures is a disk design. Alternatively it is possible to create the accelerating assembly from quadrants, which favour the mass manufacturing. The functional shape inside of the accelerating structure remains the same and a single assembly uses less parts. The alignment of these quadrants has been previously made kinematic by using steel pins or spheres to align the pieces together. This method proved to be a quite tedious and time consuming method of assembly. To limit the number of different error sources, a meth...

  5. A CLIC Damping Wiggler Prototype at ANKA: Commissioning and Preparations for a Beam Dynamics Experimental Program

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhard, Axel; Casalbuoni, Sara; Ferracin, Paolo; Garcia Fajardo, Laura; Gerstl, Stefan; Gethmann, Julian; Grau, Andreas; Huttel, Erhard; Khrushchev, Sergey; Mezentsev, Nikolai; Müller, Anke-Susanne; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Saez de Jauregui, David; Schmickler, Hermann; Schoerling, Daniel; Shkaruba, Vitaliy; Smale, Nigel; Tsukanov, Valery; Zisopoulos, Panagiotis; Zolotarev, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    In a collaboration between CERN, BINP and KIT a prototype of a superconducting damping wiggler for the CLIC damping rings has been installed at the ANKA synchrotron light source. On the one hand, the foreseen experimental program aims at validating the technical design of the wiggler, particularly the conduction cooling concept applied in its cryostat design, in a long-term study. On the other hand, the wiggler's influence on the beam dynamics particularly in the presence of collective effects is planned to be investigated. ANKA's low-alpha short-bunch operation mode will serve as a model system for these studies on collective effects. To simulate these effects and to make verifiable predictions an accurate model of the ANKA storage ring in low-alpha mode, including the insertion devices is under parallel development. This contribution reports on the first operational experience with the CLIC damping wiggler prototype in the ANKA storage ring and steps towards the planned advanced experimental program with th...

  6. Interaction of the chloride intracellular ion channel protein CLIC1 with different sterols in model membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Aims: Sterols have been reported to modulate conformation and hence the function of several membrane proteins. One such group is the Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel (CLIC) family of proteins. The CLIC protein family consists of six evolutionarily conserved protein members in vertebrates. These proteins are unusual, existing as both monomeric soluble proteins and as membrane bound proteins. We now for the first time demonstrate that the spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 is dependent on the presence of cholesterol in membranes. Our novel findings also extend to the identification of a cholesterol-binding domain within CLIC1 that facilitates the spontaneous membrane insertion of the protein into membranes containing cholesterol. Methods: CLIC1 wild type (WT) and mutant proteins were purified by Ni-NTA followed by size‐exclusion chromatography. Langmuir monolayer film balance experiments were carried out using 1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) alone, or in a 5:1 mole ratio combination with either one of the following sterols: Cholesterol (CHOL), β-Sitosterol (SITO), Ergosterol (ERG), Hydroxyecdysone (HYD) or Cholestane (CHOS). WT CLIC1 or mutant versions of CLIC1 were then injected into the aqueous subphase under the lipid film. Results: In lipid monolayers lacking sterols, CLIC1 did not insert. However significant membrane insertion occurred when CLIC1 was added to membranes containing cholesterol. Substitution of membrane cholesterol with either HYD, SITO or ERG, not only increased CLIC1’s membrane interaction but also increased its rate of insertion. Conversely, CLIC1 showed no insertion into monolayers containing CHOS, which lacked the intact sterol 3β-OH group. CLIC1 mutants G18A and G22A, did not insert in POPC:CHOL monolayers whereas the C24A mutant showed membrane insertion equivalent to WT CLIC1. X-ray and Neutron reflectivity, along with Small Angle X-ray Scattering techniques were subsequently used to probe

  7. Interaction of Human Chloride Intracellular Channel Protein 1 (CLIC1) with Lipid Bilayers: A Fluorescence Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Joanna E; Goodchild, Sophia C; Breit, Samuel N; Curmi, Paul M G; Brown, Louise J

    2016-07-12

    Chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1) is very unusual as it adopts a soluble glutathione S-transferase-like canonical fold but can also autoinsert into lipid bilayers to form an ion channel. The conversion between these forms involves a large, but reversible, structural rearrangement of the CLIC1 module. The only identified environmental triggers controlling the metamorphic transition of CLIC1 are pH and oxidation. Until now, there have been no high-resolution structural data available for the CLIC1 integral membrane state, and consequently, a limited understanding of how CLIC1 unfolds and refolds across the bilayer to form a membrane protein with ion channel activity exists. Here we show that fluorescence spectroscopy can be used to establish the interaction and position of CLIC1 in a lipid bilayer. Our method employs a fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) approach between CLIC1 and a dansyl-labeled lipid analogue to probe the CLIC1-lipid interface. Under oxidizing conditions, a strong FRET signal between the single tryptophan residue of CLIC1 (Trp35) and the dansyl-lipid analogue was detected. When considering the proportion of CLIC1 interacting with the lipid bilayer, as estimated by fluorescence quenching experiments, the FRET distance between Trp35 and the dansyl moiety on the membrane surface was determined to be ∼15 Å. This FRET-detected interaction provides direct structural evidence that CLIC1 associates with membranes. The results presented support the current model of an oxidation-driven interaction of CLIC1 with lipid bilayers and also propose a membrane anchoring role for Trp35. PMID:27299171

  8. Application of the 4 {sup {pi}{sup {gamma}}} Method to the Absolute Standardization of Radioactive Sources of Positron Emitters; Aplicacion del Metodo 4 {sup {pi}{sup {gamma}}} a la Medida Absoluta de la Actividad de Fuentes Radiactivas Emisoras de Positrones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyres Medina, V.; Garcia-Torano Martinez, E.; Roteta Ibarra, M.

    2006-07-01

    We discuss the application of the method known as 4 {sup {pi}{sup {gamma}}} counting to the standardization of positron emitters. Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the detection efficiency of positrons emitted by the nuclides 22Na and 18F. Two experimental setups are used, both based on a NaI(Tl) well detector. The results of the standardizations are in good agreement with those obtained by other methods. It is shown that the 4 {sup {pi}{sup {gamma}}} method can be successfully used for the absolute standardization of sources of positron emitters. (Author) 23 refs.

  9. Common ground in ILC and CLIC detector concepts

    CERN Multimedia

    Daisy Yuhas

    2013-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider will accelerate particles and create collisions in different ways. Nonetheless, the detector concepts under development share many commonalities.   Timepix chips under scrutiny in the DESY test beam with the help of the beam telescope. CERN physicist Dominik Dannheim explains that the CLIC detector plans are adaptations of the ILC detector designs with a few select modifications. “When we started several years ago, we did not want to reinvent the wheel,” says Dannheim. “The approved ILC detector concepts served as an excellent starting point for our designs.” Essential differences Both CLIC and ILC scientists foresee general-purpose detectors that make measurements with exquisite precision. These colliders, however, have very different operating parameters, which will have important consequences for the various detector components. The ILC’s collision energy is set at 500 GeV ...

  10. Golden Jubilee Photos: A CLIC for the future

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ Prototype copper accelerating structures for CLIC. New accelerator projects take many years to make and mature. When the LHC project was still only a twinkle in CERN's eye, research was already starting on a new machine. A small team at CERN was setting about the task of studying a high-energy, compact, lepton linear collider, known as CLIC. This is possibly set to become the collider of the future. A machine of this kind has all the advantages of a collider (the total collision energy is equal to the sum of the energies of the two colliding beams) without the drawback of synchrotron radiation, which is produced when particles are accelerated around a ring and thus puts a limit on the energy of such colliders. But in a project as technically challenging as CLIC, considerable technological hurdles must be overcome. To limit the linear collider's length to some tens of kilometres, the beams must acquire a considerable quantity of energy per metre travelled. The collision rate (lumi...

  11. Study on low-energy positron polarimetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Schälicke; G Alexander; R Dollan; K Laihem; T Lohse; S Riemann; P Starovoitov; A Ushakov

    2007-12-01

    A polarised positron source has been proposed for the design of the international linear collider (ILC). In order to optimise the positron beam, a measurement of its degree of polarisation close to the positron creation point is desired. In this contribution, methods for determining the positron polarisation at low energies are reviewed. A newly developed polarisation extension to GEANT4 will provide the basis for further polarimeter investigations.

  12. Experimental results and first 22Na source image reconstruction by two prototype modules in coincidence of a liquid xenon positron emission tomograph for small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detector with a very specific design using liquid Xenon (LXe) in the scintillation mode is studied for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of small animals. Two prototype modules equipped with Position Sensitive Photo Multiplier Tubes (PSPMTs) operating in the VUV range (178 nm) and at 165 K were built and studied in coincidence. This paper reports on energy, time and spatial resolution capabilities of this experimental test bench. Furthermore, these experimental results were used to perform the first image reconstruction of a 22Na source placed in the experimental setup.

  13. Initial study on the shape optimisation of the CLIC crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P K; Carter, R G; Dexter, A C; Jones, R M; McIntosh, P

    2008-01-01

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) requires a crab cavity to align bunches prior to collision. The bunch structure demands tight amplitude and phase tolerances of the RF fields inside the cavity, for the minimal luminosity loss. Beam loading effects require special attention as it is one potential sources of field errors in the cavity. In order to assist the amplitude and phase control, we propose a travelling wave (TW) structure with a high group velocity allowing rapid propagation of errors out of the system. Such a design makes the cavity structure significantly different from previous ones. This paper will look at the implications of this on other cavity parameters and the optimisation of the cavity geometry.

  14. Scalar leptoquark production at TESLA and CLIC based eγ colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study scalar leptoquark production at TESLA and CLIC based eγ colliders. Both direct and resolved contributions to the cross section are examined. We find that the masses of scalar leptoquarks can be probed up to about 0.9 TeV at TESLA and 2.6 TeV at CLIC. (orig.)

  15. Scalar leptoquark production at TESLA and CLIC based e-gamma colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Cakir, O.; Ateser, E.; Koru, H.

    2002-01-01

    We study scalar leptoquark production at TESLA and CLIC based e-gamma colliders. Both direct and resolved contributions to the cross section are examined. We find that the masses of scalar leptoquarks can be probed up to about 0.9 TeV at TESLA and 2.6 TeV at CLIC.

  16. 169Lu positron decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of the investigation is the positron decay spectrum of 169Lu. The isotope under study was obtained by irradiating a tantalum target with 660 MeV protons. The spectra of positrons and conversion electrons were investigated by means of an air-core toroidal β spectrometer. When processing the spectra coefficients were introduced, which took into account the efficiency of β particle detection, backscattering of β particles in a source substrate, and the shape of spectrometer lines. The Fermi-Curie plot obtained as a result of processing the experimental spectrum of 169Lu is presented. The ratio of the intensities of positron components to that of the K conversion line of the 199 keV transition is determined. The relative intensity of the 169Lu positron decay is Isub(β)sup(+)=0.56+-0.07% of the total number of decays. The mass difference 169Lu-169Yt is equal to 2293+-3 keV. The 169Lu positron spectrum served to determine the matrix element for the β transition (log ft=8.0+-0.1) and the intensity of electron capture into the ground state of 169Yb (11.4+-1.6%)

  17. PEPPo: Using a Polarized Electron Beam to Produce Polarized Positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeyemi, Adeleke H. [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); et al.

    2015-09-01

    Polarized positron beams have been identified as either an essential or a significant ingredient for the experimental program of both the present and next generation of lepton accelerators (JLab, Super KEK B, ILC, CLIC). An experiment demonstrating a new method for producing polarized positrons has been performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Lab. The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) concept relies on the production of polarized e⁻/e⁺ pairs from the bremsstrahlung radiation of a longitudinally polarized electron beam interacting within a high-Z conversion target. PEPPo demonstrated the effective transfer of spin-polarization of an 8.2 MeV/c polarized (P~85%) electron beam to positrons produced in varying thickness tungsten production targets, and collected and measured in the range of 3.1 to 6.2 MeV/c. In comparison to other methods this technique reveals a new pathway for producing either high-energy or thermal polarized positron beams using a relatively low polarized electron beam energy (~10MeV) .This presentation will describe the PEPPo concept, the motivations of the experiment and high positron polarization achieved.

  18. Thermal joining studies of CLIC accelerating structures and Establishment of a test bench and studies of thermomechanical behaviour of a CLIC two beam module

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    The assembly procedure of the CLIC accelerating structures is constituted of several steps, involving ultra-precision machining, heating cycles at very high temperatures and many quality controls necessary to fulfil the very tight technical requirements. Diverse issues are related to the diffusion bonding process of CLIC accelerating structures; due to diffusion creep mechanisms occurring at high temperature and low stress, residual deformations might be present at the end of the joining process. A theoretical and experimental approach is presented here in order to understand this issue further and feedback on the design process. As a second issue tackled here, the final alignment of CLIC is also affected by the power dissipation occurring in the module during the normal operation modes and resulting in time-varying non-uniform thermal fields. The thermo-mechanical models of CLIC two-beam modules developed in the past are then useful to predict the structural deformations affecting the final alignment of the ...

  19. Online Resources for High School Teachers--A CLIC Away

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    2000-04-01

    "I'm a high school teacher. I don't have time to sift through all of JCE to find what I need. I don't have enough time as it is!" If you need to find things in a hurry, go to JCE HS CLIC, the JCE High School Chemed Learning Information Center, http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/HS/. You will find good solid, reliable information, and you will find it fast. CLIC is open 24 hours every day, all over the world. What You Will Find at JCE CLIC We know teachers are pressed for time. During the few minutes between classes or at the end of the day, information needs to be found very quickly. Perhaps you are looking for a demo that illustrates electrochemistry using Cu, Mg, orange juice, and a clock; or a student activity on chromatography that is ready to copy and hand out; or a video to illustrate the action of aqua regia on gold, because you can't use aqua regia and can't afford gold. You can find each of these quickly at CLIC. The Journal has always provided lots of articles designed with high school teachers in mind. What the new JCE HS CLIC does is collect the recent materials at one address on JCE Online, making it quicker and easier for you to find them. Information has been gathered from both print and online versions of the Journal, from JCE Software, and from JCE Internet. It is organized as shown at the bottom of the page. Getting Access to Information You have located something that interests you, perhaps a list of tested demonstrations that pertain to consumer chemistry. Now it is time to get it. JCE subscribers (individuals and libraries) can read, download, and print the full versions of the articles as well as all supplemental materials, including student handouts and instructor's notes. You will need the username and password that are on the mailing label that comes with your Journaleach month. JCE HS CLIC home page: http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/HS/ Your Suggestions, Please Our plans for JCE HS CLIC do not end with what you find now. Other resources and features

  20. High intensity laser generation of proton beams for the production of β+ sources used in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protons of energies up to 37 MeV have been generated using ultra-intense laser-solid interactions. These protons can be used to induce nuclear reactions in materials to produce β+ emitting nuclei of relevance to the nuclear medicine community for Positron Emission Tomography, namely 11C and 13N via (p,n) and (p,α) reactions. Activities of the order of 100 kBq have been measured from a single laser pulse. The possibility of using ultraintense lasers as a substitute to cyclotrons for isotope production is discussed

  1. Generation and application of slow positrons based on a electron LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    History of slow positron in Institute of Materials Structure Science High Energy Accelerator Research Organization is explained. The principle of generation and application of intense positron beam is mentioned. Two sources of intense positron are radioactive decay of radioactive isotopes emitting positron and electron-positron pair creation. The radioactive decay method uses 58Co, 64Cu, 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F. The electron-positron pair creation method uses nuclear reactor or electron linear accelerator (LINAC). The positron experimental facility in this organization consists of electron LINAC, slow positron beam source, positron transport and experimental station. The outline of this facility is started. The intense slow positron beam is applied to research positronium work function, electron structure of surface. New method such as combination of positron lifetime measurement and slow positron beam or Auger electron spectroscopy by positron annihilation excitation and positron reemission microscope are developed. (S.Y.)

  2. CLIC5A, a component of the ezrin-podocalyxin complex in glomeruli, is a determinant of podocyte integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Binytha; Al-Momany, Abass; Kulak, Stephen C; Kozlowski, Kathy; Obeidat, Marya; Jahroudi, Nadia; Paes, John; Berryman, Mark; Ballermann, Barbara J

    2010-06-01

    The chloride intracellular channel 5A (CLIC5A) protein, one of two isoforms produced by the CLIC5 gene, was isolated originally as part of a cytoskeletal protein complex containing ezrin from placental microvilli. Whether CLIC5A functions as a bona fide ion channel is controversial. We reported previously that a CLIC5 transcript is enriched approximately 800-fold in human renal glomeruli relative to most other tissues. Therefore, this study sought to explore CLIC5 expression and function in glomeruli. RT-PCR and Western blots show that CLIC5A is the predominant CLIC5 isoform expressed in glomeruli. Confocal immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy reveal high levels of CLIC5A protein in glomerular endothelial cells and podocytes. In podocytes, CLIC5A localizes to the apical plasma membrane of foot processes, similar to the known distribution of podocalyxin and ezrin. Ezrin and podocalyxin colocalize with CLIC5A in glomeruli, and podocalyxin coimmunoprecipitates with CLIC5A from glomerular lysates. In glomeruli of jitterbug (jbg/jbg) mice, which lack the CLIC5A protein, ezrin and phospho-ERM levels in podocytes are markedly lower than in wild-type mice. Transmission electron microscopy reveals patchy broadening and effacement of podocyte foot processes as well as vacuolization of glomerular endothelial cells. These ultrastructural changes are associated with microalbuminuria at baseline and increased susceptibility to adriamycin-induced glomerular injury compared with wild-type mice. Together, the data suggest that CLIC5A is required for the development and/or maintenance of the proper glomerular endothelial cell and podocyte architecture. We postulate that the interaction between podocalyxin and subjacent filamentous actin, which requires ezrin, is compromised in podocytes of CLIC5A-deficient mice, leading to dysfunction under unfavorable genetic or environmental conditions. PMID:20335315

  3. A prototype hybrid pixel detector ASIC for the CLIC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Valerio, P; Arfaoui, S; Ballabriga, R; Benoit, M; Bonacini, S; Campbell, M; Dannheim, D; De Gaspari, M; Felici, D; Kulis, S; Llopart, X; Nascetti, A; Poikela, T; Wong, W S

    2014-01-01

    A prototype hybrid pixel detector ASIC specifically designed to the requirements of the vertex detector for CLIC is described and first electrical measurements are presented. The chip has been designed using a commercial 65 nm CMOS technology and comprises a matrix of 64x64 square pixels with 25 μm pitch. The main features include simultaneous 4-bit measure- ment of Time-over-Threshold (ToT) and Time-of-Arrival (ToA) with 10 ns accuracy, on-chip data compression and power pulsing capability.

  4. Status of the Fatigue Studies on the CLIC Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, S; Neupert, H; Wuensch, Walter; CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    The need for high accelerating gradients for the future multi-TeV e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) imposes considerable constraints on the materials of the accelerating structures. The surfaces exposed to high pulsed RF (Radio Frequency) currents are subject to cyclic thermal stresses which are expected to induce surface break up by fatigue. Since no fatigue data exists in the literature up to very large numbers of cycles and for the particular stress pattern present in RF cavities, a comprehensive study of copper alloys in this parameter range has been initiated. Fatigue data for selected copper alloys in different states are presented

  5. On structure design for the CLIC Booster Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Darvish, Esmat

    2015-01-01

    Using the SUPERFISH code we present a design for a traveling wave (TW) structure of the Booster Linac for CLIC. The structure, consisting of thirty asymmetric cells attached to the beam pipes at two ends, works in 2π/3 operating mode at working frequency 2 GHz. For the corresponding operating mode and frequency, the RF field configuration transmitted through the cavity is obtained. The results are prepared in an RF field data file to be used in the PARMELA code for further beam dynamic study.

  6. An Asset Test of the CLIC Accelerating Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transverse wakefield suppression in the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) multibunch accelerating structure, called the TDS (Tapered Damped Structure), is achieved primarily through heavy damping. In order to verify the performance of the TDS design and the validity of the theoretical tools used to model it, a 15 GHz version of the TDS has been constructed and tested in the ASSET facility at SLAC. The test has directly demonstrated transverse wakefield suppression of over a factor 100, with an excellent agreement between the measured and the calculated wakefield

  7. Use of superconducting linacs for positron generation: the EPOS system at the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intense positron sources require the pair production process for the positron generation. In case a pulsed positron source shall be constructed, a superconducting LINAC-based accelerator allows generating the required final time structure for the electron beam. This simplifies the positron beam construction. The first such setup, the EPOS system (ELBE Positron Source) at the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD), is described.

  8. Positron-acoustic shock waves associated with cold viscous positron fluid in superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M. J., E-mail: josim.phys2007@gmail.com; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2015-06-15

    A theoretical investigation is made on the positron-acoustic (PA) shock waves (SHWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma containing immobile positive ions, cold mobile positrons, and hot positrons and electrons following the kappa (κ) distribution. The cold positron kinematic viscosity is taken into account, and the reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Burgers equation. It is found that the viscous force acting on cold mobile positron fluid is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the PA SHWs. It is also observed that the fundamental properties of the PA SHWs are significantly modified by the effects of different parameters associated with superthermal (κ distributed) hot positrons and electrons.

  9. A positron accumulator for antihydrogen synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Jørgensen, L V; Fine, K S; Watson, T L; Van der Werf, D P; Charlton, M

    2001-01-01

    A positron accumulator based on the modified Penning-Malmberg design of Surko and co-workers at UCSD has been constructed and undergone testing in preparation for the ATHENA experiment now under way at CERN. This experiment aims to produce and characterize atomic anti- hydrogen. The positron accumulator utilises nitrogen buffer gas to cool and trap a continuous beam of positrons emanating from a /sup 22 /Na radioactive source. A solid neon moderator slows the positrons from the source down to epithermal energies of a few eV before being injected into the trap. It is estimated that around 10/sup 7/ positrons can be trapped and cooled to ambient temperature within a couple of minutes in this scheme using a 6 mCi source. Preliminary tests have so far demonstrated trapping of approximately 3*10/sup 6/ positrons and an efficiency of the Ne moderator of nearly 1%. (8 refs).

  10. Positron clouds within thunderstorms

    CERN Document Server

    Dwyer, Joseph R; Hazelton, Bryna J; Grefenstette, Brian W; Kelley, Nicole A; Lowell, Alexander W; Schaal, Meagan M; Rassoul, Hamid K

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation of two isolated clouds of positrons inside an active thunderstorm. These observations were made by the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE), an array of six gamma-ray detectors, which flew on a Gulfstream V jet aircraft through the top of an active thunderstorm in August 2009. ADELE recorded two 511 keV gamma-ray count rate enhancements, 35 seconds apart, each lasting approximately 0.2 seconds. The enhancements, which were about a factor of 12 above background, were both accompanied by electrical activity as measured by a flat-plate antenna on the underside of the aircraft. The energy spectra were consistent with a source mostly composed of positron annihilation gamma rays, with a prominent 511 keV line clearly visible in the data. Model fits to the data suggest that the aircraft was briefly immersed in clouds of positrons, more than a kilometer across. It is not clear how the positron clouds were created within the thunderstorm, but it is possible they were ca...

  11. 151Tb positron decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The positron and (K251-β+)-coincidence spectra produced in the 151Tb are studied decay. The positron spectrum was detected by means of toroidal beta-spectrometers. The content of the 152Tb isotope impurity in 151Tb monoisotope sources was not more than 0.3 per cent. The β+-spectrum components and the Fermi-Curie diagram are shown. The ratio of positron intensity of that of K-conversion electrons of the 287.2 keV transition has been found Isub(β+)/Isub(K287.2)=0.36+-0.02. The 151Tb positron decay intensity has been determined: Isub(β+)=0.92+-0.12%. A fragment of the 1+H51Cd excited state scheme is shown. The experimental lg ft values for β-transitions in the 151Tb decay into excited states of 151Cd with the energies of 838.3 2 and 395.2 keV, equal to 6.46+-0.10 and 7.9+-0.1, are consistent with the ground state spin of 1/2 found for 151Tb by other authors

  12. The CERN study of a 2 TeV e+e- collider CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress with the CERN study of a 2 TeV e+e- linear collider (CLIC) is reported. The CLIC Test Facility for drive beam generation is giving first results. Results are also reported from development work on 30 GHz prototype accelerating structures (including RF quadrupole configurations) from a 30 GHz transfer structure for RF power generation in the CLIC two-beam scheme, from a prototype system for submicron automatic alignment and from theoretical work on wake-field stabilization, alignment tolerances, compensation of the beams energy spread and the final focus system

  13. Achievements and Future Plans of CLIC Test Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Hans Heinrich

    2001-01-01

    CTF2 was originally designed to demonstrate the feasibility of two-beam acceleration with high current drive beams and a string of 30 GHz CLIC accelerating structure prototypes (CAS). This goal was achieved in 1999 and the facility has since been modified to focus on high gradient testing of CAS's and 30 GHz single cell cavities (SCC). With these modifications, it is now possible to provide 30 GHz RF pulses of more than 150 MW and an adjustable pulselength from 3 to 15 ns. While the SCC results are promising, the testing of CAS's revealed problems of RF breakdown and related surface damage. As a consequence, a new R&D program has been launched to advance the understanding of RF breakdown processes, to improve surface properties, investigate new materials and to optimise the structure geometries of the CAS's. In parallel the construction of a new facility named CTF3 has started. CTF3 will mainly serve two purposes. The first is the demonstration of the CLIC drive beam generation scheme. CTF3 will acceler-a...

  14. Positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main work in the annihilation of positrons at Harwell (UK) has been the application of the technique of technological problems to do with the effects of radiation damage and mechanical phenomena, such as fatigue and creep, on the properties of materials. Three experimental techniques for studying positron annihilation in solids are documented in this article. Nuclear pulse counting methods are being used, also angular correlation and the Doppler method. The irradiation of metals and alloys with fast neutrons at high temperatures in a reactor can cause voids to develop in the material. Defects are also produced by the plastic deformation of metals and alloys. It opens up the possibility of using positron annihilation as a practical non-destructive tool to assess mechanical damage in materials. Harwell has also been able to make measurements on the inside surface of a hole in a metal sample and on variously-shaped notched and cracked test pieces, which means that it is possible to apply the technique to engineering components

  15. Ground Motion Mitigation in the Main Linac of CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The future linear collider CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) is CERN's propose for a successor of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The design of CLIC requires ultralow particle beam emittances, which makes the accelerator very sensitive to ground motion. Without countermeasure, the beam quality would be already unacceptable after a few seconds. In our work we present a feedback algorithm, which mitigates the parasitic effects of ground motion in the main linac of CLIC efficiently. We use an adaptive controller, which is composed of two parts: a system identification unit and a SVD control algorithm. The system identification unit calculates on-line estimates of the time changing accelerator behaviour. This precise model, which can adapt to system changes, is used by the control algorithm. If the system identification unit would not be used, drifting accelerator parameter would cause a mismatch between the real accelerator behaviour and the model used by the controller, which would result in a poor controller performance. Standard system identification algorithms cannot be used in an accelerator environment. The indispensable system excitation cause a not tolerable emittance growth, if it is applied thoughtless. Instead a special excitation scheme consisting of interleaved beam bumps was implemented, which keeps the emittance growth at an acceptable level. However, this special excitation has the disadvantage that not the complete system can be identified anymore. To still get an all over model of the system, we use the identification data and interpolate them with the help of a beam oscillation amplitude model, derived for the main linac of CLIC. The control algorithm uses the identified system data, which are the orbit response matrix R. With the help of the SVD decomposition of R, a very efficient filter can be created. This filter reconstructs the ground motion components, which are causing the majority of the emittance growth. At the same time the

  16. Calibration and operational data for a compact photodiode detector useful for monitoring the location of moving sources of positron emitting radioisotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsland, M. G.; Dehnel, M. P.; Johansson, S.; Rajander, J.; Solin, O.; Theroux, J.; Stewart, T. M.; Christensen, T.; Hollinger, C.

    2013-04-01

    D-Pace has developed a compact cost-effective gamma detector system based on technology licensed from TRIUMF [1]. These photodiode detectors are convenient for detecting the presence of positron emitting radioisotopes, particularly for the case of transport of radioisotopes from a PET cyclotron to hotlab, or from one location to another in an automated radiochemistry processing unit. This paper describes recent calibration experiments undertaken at the Turku PET Centre for stationary and moving sources of F18 and C11 in standard setups. The practical diagnostic utility of using several of these devices to track the transport of radioisotopes from the cyclotron to hotlab is illustrated. For example, such a detector system provides: a semi-quantitative indication of total activity, speed of transport, location of any activity lost en route and effectiveness of follow-up system flushes, a means of identifying bolus break-up, feedback useful for deciding when to change out tubing.

  17. Gamma-rays generation experiment with the optical resonant cavity for ILC polarized positron source at the KEK-ATF 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed a gamma-rays generation experiment by laser-Compton scattering at the KEK-ATF, aiming to develop a Compton based polarized positron source for linear colliders. In the experiment, laser pulses with a 357 MHz repetition rate were accumulated and their power was enhanced by up to 250 times in the Fabry-Perot optical resonant cavity. The control system for the laser pulse accumulation was improved because it had not been possible to accumulate in the optical resonant cavity until last summer. As a result, we succeeded in synchronizing the laser pulses and colliding them with the 1.3 GeV electron beam in the ATF ring while maintaining the laser pulse accumulation in the optical resonant cavity. (author)

  18. Studies on the thermo-mechanical behavior of the CLIC two-beam module

    CERN Document Server

    Nousiainen, R; Österberg, K

    2010-01-01

    To fulfil the mechanical requirements set by the luminosity goals of the CLIC collider, currently under study, the 2-m two-beam modules, the shortest repetitive elements in the main linac, have to be controlled at micrometer level. At the same time these modules are exposed to variable high power dissipation while the accelerator is ramped up to nominal power as well as when the mode of CLIC operation is varied. This will result into inevitable temperature excursions driving mechanical distortions in and between different module components. A FEM model is essential to estimate and simulate the fundamental thermo-mechanical behaviour of the CLIC two-beam module to facilitate its design and development. In this paper, the fundamental thermal environments for the RF-components of the module are described. Also the thermal and structural results for the studied module configuration are presented showing the fundamental thermo-mechanical behaviour under the main CLIC collider operation conditions.

  19. Experimental Program for the CLIC test facility 3 test beam line

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Dobert, S; Olvegaard, M; Schulte, D; Syratchev, I; Lillestol, Reidar

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility 3 Test Beam Line is the first prototype for the CLIC drive beam decelerator. Stable transport of the drive beam under deceleration is a mandatory component in the CLIC two-beam scheme. In the Test Beam Line more than 50% of the total energy will be extracted from a 150 MeV, 28 A electron drive beam, by the use of 16 power extraction and transfer structures. A number of experiments are foreseen to investigate the drive beam characteristics under deceleration in the Test Beam Line, including beam stability, beam blow up and the efficiency of the power extraction. General benchmarking of decelerator simulation and theory studies will also be performed. Specially designed instrumentation including precision BPMs, loss monitors and a time-resolved spectrometer dump will be used for the experiments. This paper describes the experimental program foreseen for the Test Beam Line, including the relevance of the results for the CLIC decelerator studies.

  20. Intense positron beams: linacs - preworkshop copy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beams of monoenergetic positrons with energies of a few eV to many keV have been used in experiments in atomic physics, solid-state physics and materials science. The production of positron beams from a new source, an electron linac, is described. Intense, pulsed beams of low-energy positrons have been produced by a high-energy beam from an electron linac. The production efficiency, moderator geometry, beam spot size and other positron beam parameters have been determined for electrons with energies from 60 to 120 MeV. Low-energy positron beams produced with a high-energy electron linac can be of much higher intensity than those beams currently derived from radioactive sources. These higher-intensity beams will make possible positron experiments previously infeasible

  1. Intense positron beams: linacs. Preworkshop copy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beams of monoenergetic positrons with energies of a few eV to many keV have been used in experiments in atomic physics, solid state physics and materials science. The production of positron beams from a new source, an electron linac, is described. Intense, pulsed beams of low-energy positrons have been produced by a high-energy beam from an electron linac. The production efficiency, moderator geometry, beam spot size and other positron beam parameters have been determined for electrons with energies from 60 to 120 MeV. Low-energy positron beams produced with a high-energy electron linac can be of much higher intensity than those beams currently derived from radioactive sources. These higher intensity beams will make possible positron experiments previously infeasible

  2. Choke-Mode Damped Structure Design for the CLIC Main Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Zha, Hao; Tang, Chuanxiang; Huang, Wenhui; Shi, Jiaru; Grudiev, Alexej; Wuensch, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Choke-mode damped structures are being studied as an alternative design for the accelerating structures of main linacs of the compact linear collider (CLIC). Choke-mode structures have the potential for much lower pulsed temperature rise, and lower cost of manufacture and fabrication. A new kind of choke-mode structure was proposed and simulated by Gdfidl. This structures has comparable wakefield damping effect as the baseline design of CLIC main linacs.

  3. PACMAN – an Innovative Doctoral Programme for CLIC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    The final network project funded under the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7), Marie Curie Actions, held its kick-off meeting at CERN on 20 November 2013.   PACMAN – a study on Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometre scale – is in the final stage of recruiting 10 PhD students to do research on beam instrumentation, metrology, micrometric alignment, magnetic measurements, nano-positioning and high-precision engineering. The students will acquire multi-disciplinary expertise in advanced engineering combined with a broad span of transferable skills. “PACMAN gives us the opportunity to attract students to CERN at a key moment in the CLIC study,” said Frédérick Bordry, Head of CERN’s Technology Department. “This is also an ideal opportunity to further develop CERN’s networks with industry and universities.” “The project is...

  4. Capacitively coupled hybrid pixel assemblies for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar; Benoit, Mathieu; Dannheim, Dominik; Dette, Karola; Hynds, Daniel; Kulis, Szymon; Peric, Ivan; Petric, Marko; Redford, Sophie; Sicking, Eva; Valerio, Pierpaolo

    2015-01-01

    The vertex detector at the proposed CLIC multi-TeV linear e+e- collider must have minimal material content and high spatial resolution, combined with accurate time-stamping to cope with the expected high rate of beam-induced backgrounds. One of the options being considered is the use of active sensors implemented in a commercial high-voltage CMOS process, capacitively coupled to hybrid pixel ASICs. A prototype of such an assembly, using two custom designed chips (CCPDv3 as active sensor glued to a CLICpix readout chip), has been characterised both in the lab and in beam tests at the CERN SPS using 120 GeV/c positively charged hadrons. Results of these characterisation studies are presented both for single and dual amplification stages in the active sensor. Pixel cross-coupling results are also presented, showing the sensitivity to placement precision and planarity of the glue layer.

  5. CLIC crab cavity design optimisation for maximum luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  6. CLIC Crab Cavity Design Optimisation for Maximum Luminosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, A.C.; /Lancaster U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Burt, G.; /Lancaster U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Ambattu, P.K.; /Lancaster U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC; Jones, R.; /Manchester U.

    2012-04-25

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  7. CLIC crab cavity design optimisation for maximum luminosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, A.C., E-mail: a.dexter@lancaster.ac.uk [Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K. [Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Dolgashev, V. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Jones, R. [University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-21

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  8. Vacuum arc localization in CLIC prototype radio frequency accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091976; Koivunen, Visa

    2016-04-04

    A future linear collider capable of reaching TeV collision energies should support accelerating gradients beyond 100 MV/m. At such high fields, the occurrence of vacuum arcs have to be mitigated through conditioning, during which an accelerating structure’s resilience against breakdowns is slowly increased through repeated radio frequency pulsing. Conditioning is very time and resource consuming, which is why developing more efficient procedures is desirable. At CERN, conditioning related research is conducted at the CLIC high-power X-band test stands. Breakdown localization is an important diagnostic tool of accelerating structure tests. Abnormal position distributions highlight issues in structure design, manufacturing or operation and may consequently help improve these processes. Additionally, positioning can provide insight into the physics of vacuum arcs. In this work, two established positioning methods based on the time-difference-ofarrival of radio frequency waves are extended. The first method i...

  9. Cholesterol Promotes Interaction of the Protein CLIC1 with Phospholipid Monolayers at the Air–Water Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khondker R. Hossain

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CLIC1 is a Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel protein that exists either in a soluble state in the cytoplasm or as a membrane bound protein. Members of the CLIC family are largely soluble proteins that possess the intriguing property of spontaneous insertion into phospholipid bilayers to form integral membrane ion channels. The regulatory role of cholesterol in the ion-channel activity of CLIC1 in tethered lipid bilayers was previously assessed using impedance spectroscopy. Here we extend this investigation by evaluating the influence of cholesterol on the spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 into Langmuir film monolayers prepared using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine alone or in combination with cholesterol. The spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 was shown to be dependent on the presence of cholesterol in the membrane. Furthermore, pre-incubation of CLIC1 with cholesterol prior to its addition to the Langmuir film, showed no membrane insertion even in monolayers containing cholesterol, suggesting the formation of a CLIC1-cholesterol pre-complex. Our results therefore suggest that CLIC1 membrane interaction involves CLIC1 binding to cholesterol located in the membrane for its initial docking followed by insertion. Subsequent structural rearrangements of the protein would likely also be required along with oligomerisation to form functional ion channels.

  10. Cholesterol Promotes Interaction of the Protein CLIC1 with Phospholipid Monolayers at the Air–Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Khondker R.; Al Khamici, Heba; Holt, Stephen A.; Valenzuela, Stella M.

    2016-01-01

    CLIC1 is a Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel protein that exists either in a soluble state in the cytoplasm or as a membrane bound protein. Members of the CLIC family are largely soluble proteins that possess the intriguing property of spontaneous insertion into phospholipid bilayers to form integral membrane ion channels. The regulatory role of cholesterol in the ion-channel activity of CLIC1 in tethered lipid bilayers was previously assessed using impedance spectroscopy. Here we extend this investigation by evaluating the influence of cholesterol on the spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 into Langmuir film monolayers prepared using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine alone or in combination with cholesterol. The spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 was shown to be dependent on the presence of cholesterol in the membrane. Furthermore, pre-incubation of CLIC1 with cholesterol prior to its addition to the Langmuir film, showed no membrane insertion even in monolayers containing cholesterol, suggesting the formation of a CLIC1-cholesterol pre-complex. Our results therefore suggest that CLIC1 membrane interaction involves CLIC1 binding to cholesterol located in the membrane for its initial docking followed by insertion. Subsequent structural rearrangements of the protein would likely also be required along with oligomerisation to form functional ion channels. PMID:26875987

  11. 171Lu positron decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the investigation is experimental and theoretical study of the 171Lu positron decay. 171Lu sources were prepared by two methods: chemical and chromatographic ones. In all the measurements a one-component positron spectrum was observed. The Fermi-Curie plot is a straight line within experimental errors. The intensity of positrons Isub(βsup(+)) with respect to the conversion electron spectrum Isub(c) was measured. The mean value of Isub(βsup(+))/Isub(c739)=0.074+-0.006. The mass difference 171Lu-171Yb was estimated from the β+-decay of 171Lu: Qsub(βsup(+))=1479+-3 keV. Mass differences of 171Lu - 171Yb, known from other investigations, are given for comparison. In the 171Lu β+- decay (ground state 7/2+[404]) the 95.26 keV (7/2+[633]) excited level of 171Yb is populated. The value of log ft for this β transition was found to be 8+-1. Theoretical calculations of log ft and the form factors of this transition were also made. Very good or satisfactory agreement between the theoretical and experimental values of log ft was obtained. The degree of agreement depends on the choice of wave functions in calculations. The experimental value of log ft for the 171Lu→171Yb β transition agrees well with the experimental values of log ft for the same type of β transitions in other nuclei

  12. Unprecedented intensity of a low-energy positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugenschmidt, C. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, ZWEFRM II/E21, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: Christoph.Hugenschmidt@frm2.tum.de; Loewe, B.; Mayer, J.; Piochacz, C.; Pikart, P.; Repper, R.; Stadlbauer, M.; Schreckenbach, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, ZWEFRM II/E21, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2008-08-11

    A new in-pile {gamma}-converter and Pt-moderator was recently installed at the neutron induced positron source NEPOMUC. The intensity of the moderated positron beam is unprecedented and amounts to (9.0{+-}0.8)x10{sup 8} moderated positrons per second at an energy of 1 keV. Hence, the beam facility NEPOMUC provides the world highest intensity of a monoenergetic positron beam reported so far. Up to now, no degradation of the positron yield has been observed for several weeks of operation. Thus, the long-term stability of the positron beam enables experiments with high reliability.

  13. Instrumentation for Longitudinal Beam Gymnastics in FEL's and at the CLIC Test Facility 3

    CERN Document Server

    Lefèvre, T; Bravin, E; Burger, S; Corsini, R; Döbert, S; Soby, L; Tecker, F A; Urschutz, P; Welsch, C P; Alesini, D; Biscari, C; Buonomo, B; Coiro, O; Ghigo, A; Marcellini, F; Preger, B; Dabrowski, A; Velasco, M; Craievich, P; Ferianis, M; Veronese, M; Ferrari, A

    2008-01-01

    Built at CERN by an international collaboration, the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) aims at demonstrating the feasibility of a high luminosity 3 TeV e+-e- collider by the year 2010. One of the main issues to be demonstrated is the generation of a high average current (30 A) high frequency (12 GHz) bunched beam by means of RF manipulation. At the same time, Free Electron Lasers (FEL) are developed in several places all over the world with the aim of providing high brilliance photon sources. These machines rely on the production of high peak current electron bunches. The required performances put high demands on the diagnostic equipment and innovative longitudinal monitors have been developed during the past years. This paper gives an overview of the longitudinal instrumentation developed at ELETTRA and CTF3, where a special effort was made in order to implement at the same time non-intercepting devices for online monitoring, and destructive diagnostics which have the advantage of providing more detailed informati...

  14. Positron tomographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specifications of position emission tomographs used for examination of brain and internal organs of human beings are presented. The tomograph comprises a detecting system, devices for detector displacement, sighting, calibration, electronics units (discriminators-formers, coincidence circuits, coders, buffer memory), detectors for detecting system position, bed for patient. Spatial resolution of the tomograph is determined by sizes of the detectors and their dispositin relatively to the object of examination. Besides, it depends on positron path in the investigated medium, deflections of the angle of scatter of annihilation quanta from 180 deg, distribution of points of gamma-quantum interaction by depth of the detector, filter and algorithm of image reconstruction, motion of organs of a patient, motion of labelled pharm-preparation in the organism. Such factors as absorption of annihilation radiation by substance of an object, radiation scattering and registration of random coincidences essentially affect the quality of tomographic image. It is shown that use of asseblies of microchannel plates and a scintillator on the base of barium fluoride permits to produce a coordinate-sensitive detector for a tomograph complying with highest requirements

  15. High-yield positron systems for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linear colliders, such as the SLC, are among those accelerators for which a high-yield positron source operating at the repetition rate of the accelerator is desired. The SLC, having electron energies up to 50 GeV, presents the possibility of generating positron bunches with useful charge even exceeding that of the initial electron bunch. The exact positron yield to be obtained depends on the particular capture, transport and damping system employed. Using 31 GeV electrons impinging on a W-type converter phase-space at the target to the acceptance of the capture rf section, the SLC source is capable of producing, for every electron, up to two positrons within the acceptance of the positron damping ring. The design of this source and the performance of the positron system as built are described. Also, future prospects and limitations for high-yield positron systems are discussed. 11 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Depolarization in the ILC Linac-To-Ring Positron beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Valentyn; Ushakov, Andriy [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Riemann, Sabine [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    To achieve the physics goals of future Linear Colliders, it is important that electron and positron beams are polarized. The positron source planned for the International Linear Collider (ILC) is based on a helical undulator system and can deliver a polarised beam with vertical stroke Pe{sup +} vertical stroke {>=} 60%. To ensure that no significant polarization is lost during the transport of the electron and positron beams from the source to the interaction region, spin tracking has to be included in all transport elements which can contribute to a loss of polarization. These are the positron source, the damping ring, the spin rotators, the main linac and the beam delivery system. In particular, the dynamics of the polarized positron beam is required to be investigated. The results of positron spin tracking and depolarization study at the Positron-Linac-To-Ring (PLTR) beamline are presented. (orig.)

  17. A New Technique For Information Processing of CLIC Technical Documentation

    CERN Document Server

    Tzermpinos, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    The scientific work presented in this paper could be described as a novel, systemic approach to the process of organization of CLIC documentation. The latter refers to the processing of various sets of archived data found on various CERN archiving services in a more friendly and organized way. From physics aspect, this is equal to having an initial system characterized by high entropy, which after some transformation of energy and matter will produce a final system of reduced entropy. However, this reduction in entropy can be considered valid for open systems only, which are sub-systems of grander isolated systems, to which the total entropy will always increase. Thus, using as basis elements from information theory, systems theory and thermodynamics, the unorganized form of data pending to be organized to a higher form, is modeled as an initial open sub-system with increased entropy, which, after the processing of information, will produce a final system with decreased entropy. This systemic approach to the ...

  18. Les mesures de métrologie pour le CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Cherif, A

    2008-01-01

    Le projet CLIC est en tout point un défi technique majeur ; c?est le cas également pour la mesure dimensionnelle. Quels sont les équipements et les méthodes qui permettent de caractériser les pièces avec une incertitude de mesure aussi réduite que possible, vu les tolérances micrométriques imposées ? Afin de répondre à cette question, une veille technologique a été maintenue sur une longue période. Les acteurs relevants ont été contactés pour bénéficier d?une ouverture sur les dernières avancées dans le domaine. Différentes techniques ont été étudiées et comparées telles que la digitalisation, la tomographie X, la mesure tridimensionnelle. L'assemblage de haute précision des composants est aussi primordial. Sa mise en ?uvre sous un microscope optique ou à l'aide d'une machine tridimensionnelle est en cours d?étude. L'exposé traitera aussi de la mesure de rugosité, un domaine où nous disposons de moyens adaptés aux exigences spécifiques du projet.

  19. The synchro laser system for the CLIC Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CLIC Test Facility at CERN uses a laser driven 3 GHz electron gun. Considerable effort has been spent to develop a laser system, which meets the requirements of the Test Facility. The laser is based on a diode-pumped ND:YLF mode-locked oscillator. It delivers a 250 MHz train of laser pulses at 1047 nm with a length of 6.6 ps. A phase-locked timing stabilizer is used to synchronize the laser with the rf-gun. One or two pulses are amplified to 10 mJ. The amplifier system is based on a regenerative amplifier and two single pass power amplifiers. A set of harmonic generators deliver laser pulses at 523 nm, 262 nm and optional at 209nm. The measured pulse length after amplification and harmonic generations is 8 ± 2 ps (FWHM). A good pointing stability and a reasonable uniform transverse profile is obtained by relay imaging and spatial filtering. For some experiments, a train of electron bunches is used. A new pulse train generator working at 262 nm was developed to split the laser beam into 12 pulses. The simultaneous amplification of two seed laser pulses gives the possibility to double the number of pulses in the train without the need to add further splitting stages

  20. Capacitively coupled hybrid pixel assemblies for the CLIC vertex detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, N. Alipour; Arfaoui, S.; Benoit, M.; Dannheim, D.; Dette, K.; Hynds, D.; Kulis, S.; Perić, I.; Petrič, M.; Redford, S.; Sicking, E.; Valerio, P.

    2016-07-01

    The vertex detector at the proposed CLIC multi-TeV linear e+e- collider must have minimal material content and high spatial resolution, combined with accurate time-stamping to cope with the expected high rate of beam-induced backgrounds. One of the options being considered is the use of active sensors implemented in a commercial high-voltage CMOS process, capacitively coupled to hybrid pixel ASICs. A prototype of such an assembly, using two custom designed chips (CCPDv3 as active sensor glued to a CLICpix readout chip), has been characterised both in the lab and in beam tests at the CERN SPS using 120 GeV/c positively charged hadrons. Results of these characterisation studies are presented both for single and dual amplification stages in the active sensor, where efficiencies of greater than 99% have been achieved at -60 V substrate bias, with a single hit resolution of 6.1 μm . Pixel cross-coupling results are also presented, showing the sensitivity to placement precision and planarity of the glue layer.

  1. Preliminary Report on the Evaluation of an Electron-Positron Collider as a source of Monoenergetic Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, James E.; Campbell, Luke W.

    2009-11-30

    Abstract Active interrogation methods are being investigated to detect shielded special nuclear material (SNM). These approaches utilize either neutron or photon beams to excite the SNM in concert with either neutron or gamma ray detectors to observe the stimulated emissions. The two primary methodologies with photon beams are photofission and nuclear resonance florescence (NRF). Photofission requires photons energies of 7-10 MeV while NRF requires photon energies around 2 MeV. For both techniques, photons that are not in the appropriate energy band, e.g. the low energy tail of a Bremsstrahlung photon beam, contribute unwanted additional radiation dose to cargo. Typically less than 10% of the photons are in the usable energy band. The additional photon production generates a commensurate amount of additional radiation dose in the source and target areas, impacting shielding requirements and/or dose to operators and equipment and at the expense of a similar increase in power consumption. Hence it is highly desirable to produce narrow energy (“monoenergetic”) photon beams with tunable energy in the range of ~2-20 MeV.

  2. Experimental study of DC vacuum breakdown and application to high-gradient accelerating structures for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Shipman, Nicholas; Jones, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) is a leading candidate for the next generation high energy linear collider. As any breakdown would result in a partial or full loss of luminosity for the pulse in which it occurs, obtaining a low breakdown rate in CLIC accelerating structures is a critical requirement for the successful operation of the proposed collider. This thesis presents investigations into the breakdown phenomenon primarily in the low breakdown rate regime of interest to CLIC, performed using the CERN DC spark systems between 2011 and 2014. The design, construction and commissioning of several new pieces of hardware, as well as the development of improved techniques to measuring the inter-electrode gap distance are detailed. These hardware improvements were fundamental in enabling the exciting new experiments mentioned below, which in turn have provided significant additional insight into the phenomenon of breakdown. Experiments were performed to measure fundamental parameters of individual breakdowns...

  3. Progressive hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation in CLIC5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seco, Celia Zazo; Oonk, Anne M M; Domínguez-Ruiz, María; Draaisma, Jos M T; Gandía, Marta; Oostrik, Jaap; Neveling, Kornelia; Kunst, Henricus P M; Hoefsloot, Lies H; del Castillo, Ignacio; Pennings, Ronald J E; Kremer, Hannie; Admiraal, Ronald J C; Schraders, Margit

    2015-02-01

    In a consanguineous Turkish family diagnosed with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI), a homozygous region of 47.4 Mb was shared by the two affected siblings on chromosome 6p21.1-q15. This region contains 247 genes including the known deafness gene MYO6. No pathogenic variants were found in MYO6, neither with sequence analysis of the coding region and splice sites nor with mRNA analysis. Subsequent candidate gene evaluation revealed CLIC5 as an excellent candidate gene. The orthologous mouse gene is mutated in the jitterbug mutant that exhibits progressive hearing impairment and vestibular dysfunction. Mutation analysis of CLIC5 revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation c.96T>A (p.(Cys32Ter)) that segregated with the hearing loss. Further analysis of CLIC5 in 213 arNSHI patients from mostly Dutch and Spanish origin did not reveal any additional pathogenic variants. CLIC5 mutations are thus not a common cause of arNSHI in these populations. The hearing loss in the present family had an onset in early childhood and progressed from mild to severe or even profound before the second decade. Impaired hearing is accompanied by vestibular areflexia and in one of the patients with mild renal dysfunction. Although we demonstrate that CLIC5 is expressed in many other human tissues, no additional symptoms were observed in these patients. In conclusion, our results show that CLIC5 is a novel arNSHI gene involved in progressive hearing impairment, vestibular and possibly mild renal dysfunction in a family of Turkish origin. PMID:24781754

  4. Detector optimization studies and light Higgs decay into muons at CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a concept for a future e+e- linear collider with a center-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The design of a CLIC experiment is driven by the requirements related to the physics goals, as well as by the experimental conditions. For example, the short time between two bunch crossings of 0.5 ns and the backgrounds due to beamstrahlung have direct impact on the design of a CLIC experiment. The Silicon Detector (SiD) is one of the concepts currently being discussed as a possible detector for the International Linear Collider (ILC). In this thesis we develop a modified version of the SiD simulation model for CLIC, taking into account the specific experimental conditions. In addition, we developed a software tool to investigate the impact of beam-related backgrounds on the detector by overlaying events from different simulated event samples. Moreover, we present full simulation studies, determining the performance of the calorimeter and tracking systems. We show that the track reconstruction in the all-silicon tracker of SiD is robust in the presence of the backgrounds at CLIC. Furthermore, we investigate tungsten as a dense absorber material for the hadronic calorimeter, which allows for the construction of a compact hadronic calorimeter that fulfills the requirements on the energy resolution and shower containment without a significant increase of the coil radius. Finally, the measurement of the decays of light Higgs bosons into two muons is studied in full simulation. We find that with an integrated luminosity of 2 ab-1, corresponding to 4 years of data taking at CLIC, the respective Higgs branching ratio can be determined with a statistical uncertainty of approximately 15%.

  5. Detector optimization studies and light Higgs decay into muons at CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grefe, Christian

    2013-09-15

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a concept for a future e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with a center-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The design of a CLIC experiment is driven by the requirements related to the physics goals, as well as by the experimental conditions. For example, the short time between two bunch crossings of 0.5 ns and the backgrounds due to beamstrahlung have direct impact on the design of a CLIC experiment. The Silicon Detector (SiD) is one of the concepts currently being discussed as a possible detector for the International Linear Collider (ILC). In this thesis we develop a modified version of the SiD simulation model for CLIC, taking into account the specific experimental conditions. In addition, we developed a software tool to investigate the impact of beam-related backgrounds on the detector by overlaying events from different simulated event samples. Moreover, we present full simulation studies, determining the performance of the calorimeter and tracking systems. We show that the track reconstruction in the all-silicon tracker of SiD is robust in the presence of the backgrounds at CLIC. Furthermore, we investigate tungsten as a dense absorber material for the hadronic calorimeter, which allows for the construction of a compact hadronic calorimeter that fulfills the requirements on the energy resolution and shower containment without a significant increase of the coil radius. Finally, the measurement of the decays of light Higgs bosons into two muons is studied in full simulation. We find that with an integrated luminosity of 2 ab{sup -1}, corresponding to 4 years of data taking at CLIC, the respective Higgs branching ratio can be determined with a statistical uncertainty of approximately 15%.

  6. Mechanical integration studies for the CLIC vertex and inner tracking detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Villarejo Bermudez, M.A.; Gerwig, H.

    2015-01-01

    Since the publication of the CLIC Conceptual Design Report, work has proceeded in order to establish a preliminary mechanical design for the innermost CLIC detector region. This note proposes a design for the main Carbon-Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) structural elements of the inner detectors, for the beam pipe and their supports. It also describes an assembly sequence for the integration of the sensors and the mechanical components. Mechanical simulations of different structural elements and a material budget estimation are appended. Details of a proposed cabling layout for all the subdetectors are included.

  7. Status of the Stripline Beam Position Monitor developement for the CLIC Drive Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Benot-Morell, A; Wendt, M; Faus-Golfe, A; Nappa, J M; Vilalte, S; Smith, S

    2013-01-01

    In collaboration with SLAC, LAPP and IFIC, a first prototype of a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the CLIC Drive Beam and its associated readout electronics has been successfully tested in the CLIC Test Facility linac (CTF3) at CERN. In addition, a modified prototype with downstream terminated striplines is under development to improve the suppression of unwanted RF signal interference. This paper presents the results of the beam tests, and the most relevant aspects for the modified stripline BPM design and its expected improvements.

  8. Energy and Beam-Offset dependence of the Luminosity weighted depolarization for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Esberg, Jakob; Uggerhoj, Ulrik; Dalena, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    We report on simulations of e+e- depolarization due to beam-beam effects. These effects are studied for CLIC at 3 TeV, using GUINEA PIG++. We find a strong energy dependence of the luminosity weighted depolarization. In the luminosity peak at CLIC the total luminosity weighted depolarization remains below the one per-mil level. The effect of a vertical offset on the energy dependent depolarization is investigated. The depolarization in the luminosity peak remains below per-cent level even for 5sy offsets.

  9. Experimental tests on the air cooling of the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Ramos, Fernando; Nuiry, Francois-Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The strict requirements in terms of material budget for the inner region of the CLIC detector concept require the use of a dry gas for the cooling of the respective sensors. This, in conjunction with the compactness of the inner volumes, poses several challenges for the design of a cooling system that is able to fulfil the required detector specifications. This note summarizes the results obtained from experimental tests on the air cooling of the CLIC vertex detector as well as their comparison with the corresponding computational fluid dynamics simulations.

  10. X-band crab cavities for the CLIC beam delivery system

    OpenAIRE

    Burt, Graeme; Ambattu, Praveen; Dexter, Amos; Abram, Thomas; Dolgashev, V.; Tantawi, S.; Jones, R. M.

    2008-01-01

    The CLIC machine incorporates a 20 mrad crossing angle at the IP to aid the extraction of spent beams. In order to recover the luminosity lost through the crossing angle a crab cavity is proposed to rotate the bunches prior to collision. The crab cavity is chosen to have the same frequency as the main linac (11.9942 GHz) as a compromise between size, phase stability requirements and beam loading. It is proposed to use a HE11 mode travelling wave structure as the CLIC crab cavity in order to m...

  11. Physics at the CLIC $e^{+}e^{-}$ Linear Collider - Input to the Snowmass process 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, Halina; Afanaciev, K.; Alexander, G.; Alipour Tehrani, N.; Alonso, O.; Andersen, K.K.; Arfaoui, S.; Balazs, C.; Barklow, T.; Battaglia, M.; Benoit, M.; Bilki, B.; Blaising, J.J.; Boland, M.; Boronat, M.; Bozovic Jelisavcic, I.; Burrows, P.; Chefdeville, M.; Contino, R.; Dannheim, D.; Demarteau, M.; Diaz Gutierrez, M.A.; Dieguez, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Eigen, G.; Elsener, K.; Feldman, D.; Felzmann, U.; Firlej, M.; Firu, E.; Fiutowski, T.; Francis, K.; Gaede, F.; Garcia Garcia, I.; Ghenescu, V.; Giudice, G.; Graf, N.; Grefe, C.; Grojean, C.; Gupta, R.S.; Hauschild, M.; Holmestad, H.; Idzik, M.; Joram, C.; Kananov, S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; Kraml, S.; Krupa, B.; Kulis, S.; Lastovicka, T.; LeBlanc, G.; Levy, A.; Levy, I.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci Timoce, A.; Lukic, S.; Makarenko, V.; Marshall, J.; Martin, V.; Mikkelsen, R.E.; Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, G.; Miyamoto, A.; Monig, K.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Moron, J.; Munnich, A.; Neagu, A.; Pandurovic, M.; Pappadopulo, D.; Pawlik, B.; Porod, W.; Poss, S.; Preda, T.; Rassool, R.; Rattazzi, R.; Redford, S.; Reichold, A.; Repond, J.; Riemann, S.; Robson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ros, E.; Rosten, J.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Rzehak, H.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Schulte, D.; Sefkow, F.; Seidel, K.; Shumeiko, N.; Sicking, E.; Simon, F.; Smith, J.; Soldner, C.; Stapnes, S.; Strube, J.; Suehara, T.; Swientek, K.; Szalay, M.; Tanabe, T.; Tesar, M.; Thamm, A.; Thomson, M.; Trenado Garcia, J.; Uggerhoj, U.I.; van der Kraaij, E.; Vila, I.; Vilella, E.; Villarejo, M.A.; Vogel Gonzalez, M.A.; Vos, M.; Watson, N.; Weerts, H.; Wells, J.D.; Weuste, L.; Wistisen, T.N.; Wootton, K.; Xia, L.; Zawiejski, L.; Zgura, I.S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the physics potential of the CLIC high-energy e+e- linear collider. It provides input to the Snowmass 2013 process for the energy-frontier working groups on The Higgs Boson (HE1), Precision Study of Electroweak Interactions (HE2), Fully Understanding the Top Quark (HE3), as well as The Path Beyond the Standard Model -- New Particles, Forces, and Dimensions (HE4). It is accompanied by a paper describing the CLIC accelerator study, submitted to the Frontier Capabilities group of the Snowmass process

  12. Physics at the CLIC e$^{+}$e$^{-}$ Linear Collider -- Input to the Snowmass process 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Abramowicz, Halina; Abusleme, Angel; Battaglia, Marco; Świentek, Krzysztof; Szalay, Marco; Tanabe, Tomohiko; Tesař, Michal; Thamm, Andrea; Thomson, Mark; Garcia, Juan Trenado; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; van der Kraaij, Erik; Vila, Iván; Benoit, Mathieu; Vilella, Eva

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the physics potential of the CLIC high-energy e+e- linear collider. It provides input to the Snowmass 2013 process for the energy-frontier working groups on The Higgs Boson (HE1), Precision Study of Electroweak Interactions (HE2), Fully Understanding the Top Quark (HE3), as well as The Path Beyond the Standard Model -- New Particles, Forces, and Dimensions (HE4). It is accompanied by a paper describing the CLIC accelerator study, submitted to the Frontier Capabilities gr...

  13. Positron Facilities in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Triftshäuser, W.

    1995-01-01

    Positron annihilation is a well established method in solid state physics and material science. The positron being a very sensitive probe, can give very precise information on the momentum distribution of electrons in metals and alloys as well as on lattice defects in crystals. Starting with the energy distribution of positrons from a radioactive decay, the current development is directed more to monoenergetic positrons of variable energy and of high intensity. Pulsed and continuous beams of ...

  14. Investigation and realization of a slow-positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis first proposes a presentation of the GBAR project (Gravitational Behaviour of Anti-hydrogen at Rest) within which this research took place, and which aims at performing the first direct test of the Weak Equivalence Principle on anti-matter by studying the free fall of anti-hydrogen atoms in the Earth gravitational field. The author presents different aspects of this project: scientific objective, experiment principle and structure, detailed structure (positron beam, positron trap, positron/positronium conversion, anti-proton beam, trapping, slowing down and neutralisation of anti-hydrogen ions). The author then reports the design of the positron beam: study of source technology, studies related to the fast positron source, design of the low positron line (approach, functions, simulations, technology). The two last chapters report the construction and the characterization of the slow-positron line

  15. Proposal for an alignment method of the CLIC linear accelerator - From geodesic networks to the active pre-alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) is the particle accelerator project proposed by the european organization for nuclear research (CERN) for high energy physics after the large hadron collider (LHC). Because of the nano-metric scale of the CLIC leptons beams, the emittance growth budget is very tight. It induces alignment tolerances on the positions of the CLIC components that have never been achieved before. The last step of the CLIC alignment will be done according to the beam itself. It falls within the competence of the physicists. However, in order to implement the beam-based feedback, a challenging pre-alignment is required: 10 μm at 3σ along a 200 m sliding window. For such a precision, the proposed solution must be compatible with a feedback between the measurement and repositioning systems. The CLIC pre-alignment will have to be active. This thesis does not demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC active pre-alignment but shows the way to the last developments that have to be done for that purpose. A method is proposed. Based on the management of the Helmert transformations between Euclidean coordinate systems, from the geodetic networks to the metrological measurements, this method is likely to solve the CLIC pre-alignment problem. Large scale facilities have been built and Monte-Carlo simulations have been made in order to validate the mathematical modeling of the measurement systems and of the alignment references. When this is done, it will be possible to extrapolate the modeling to the entire CLIC length. It will be the last step towards the demonstration of the CLIC pre-alignment feasibility. (author)

  16. Generation of a high-brightness pulsed positron beam for the Munich scanning positron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piochacz, Christian

    2009-11-20

    Within the present work the prerequisites for the operation of the Munich scanning positron microscope (SPM) at the high intense neutron induced positron source Munich (NEPOMUC) were established. This was accomplished in two steps: Firstly, a re-moderation device was installed at the positron beam facility NEPOMUC, which enhances the brightness of the positron beam for all connected experiments. The second step was the design, set up and initial operation of the SPM interface for the high efficient conversion of the continuous beam into a bunched beam. The in-pile positron source NEPOMUC creates a positron beam with a diameter of typically 7 mm, a kinetic energy of 1 keV and an energy spread of 50 eV. The NEPOMUC re-moderator generates from this beam a low energy positron beam (20 - 200 eV) with a diameter of less than 2 mm and an energy spread well below 2.5 eV. This was achieved with an excellent total efficiency of 6.55{+-}0.25 %. The re-moderator was not only the rst step to implement the SPM at NEPOMUc, it enables also the operation of the pulsed low energy positron beam system (PLEPS). Within the present work, at this spectrometer rst positron lifetime measurements were performed, which revealed the defect types of an ion irradiated uranium molybdenum alloy. Moreover, the instruments which were already connected to the positron beam facility bene ts considerably of the high brightness enhancement. In the new SPM interface an additional re-moderation stage enhances the brightness of the beam even more and will enable positron lifetime measurements at the SPM with a lateral resolution below 1 {mu}m. The efficiency of the re-moderation process in this second stage was 24.5{+-}4.5 %. In order to convert high efficiently the continuous positron beam into a pulsed beam with a repetition rate of 50 MHz and a pulse duration of less than 50 ps, a sub-harmonic pre-bucher was combined with two sine wave bunchers. Furthermore, the additional re-moderation stage of the

  17. Generation of a high-brightness pulsed positron beam for the Munich scanning positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the present work the prerequisites for the operation of the Munich scanning positron microscope (SPM) at the high intense neutron induced positron source Munich (NEPOMUC) were established. This was accomplished in two steps: Firstly, a re-moderation device was installed at the positron beam facility NEPOMUC, which enhances the brightness of the positron beam for all connected experiments. The second step was the design, set up and initial operation of the SPM interface for the high efficient conversion of the continuous beam into a bunched beam. The in-pile positron source NEPOMUC creates a positron beam with a diameter of typically 7 mm, a kinetic energy of 1 keV and an energy spread of 50 eV. The NEPOMUC re-moderator generates from this beam a low energy positron beam (20 - 200 eV) with a diameter of less than 2 mm and an energy spread well below 2.5 eV. This was achieved with an excellent total efficiency of 6.55±0.25 %. The re-moderator was not only the rst step to implement the SPM at NEPOMUc, it enables also the operation of the pulsed low energy positron beam system (PLEPS). Within the present work, at this spectrometer rst positron lifetime measurements were performed, which revealed the defect types of an ion irradiated uranium molybdenum alloy. Moreover, the instruments which were already connected to the positron beam facility bene ts considerably of the high brightness enhancement. In the new SPM interface an additional re-moderation stage enhances the brightness of the beam even more and will enable positron lifetime measurements at the SPM with a lateral resolution below 1 μm. The efficiency of the re-moderation process in this second stage was 24.5±4.5 %. In order to convert high efficiently the continuous positron beam into a pulsed beam with a repetition rate of 50 MHz and a pulse duration of less than 50 ps, a sub-harmonic pre-bucher was combined with two sine wave bunchers. Furthermore, the additional re-moderation stage of the SPM

  18. Benchmarking of the Placet and Dimad tracking codes using the CLIC Post-Collision line

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, I; Ferrari, A; Latina, A

    2009-01-01

    In this benchmarking study, two contemporary codes, DIMAD and PLACET, are compared. We consider the 20 mrad post-collision line of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and perform tracking studies of heavily disrupted post-collision electron beams. We successfully find that the two codes provide an equivalent description of the beam transport from the interaction point to the final dump.

  19. Development and testing of a double length pets for the CLIC experimental area

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, L; Gavela, D; Lara, A; Rodríguez, E; Gutiérrez, J L; Calero, J; Toral, F; Samoshkin, A; Gudkov, D; Riddone, G

    2014-01-01

    CLIC (compact linear collider) is a future e þ e collider based on normal-conducting technology, currently under study at CERN. Its design is based on a novel two-beam acceleration scheme. The main beam gets RF power extracted from a drive beam through power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The technical feasibility of CLIC is currently being proved by its Third Test Facility (CTF3) which includes the CLIC experimental area (CLEX). Two Double Length CLIC PETS will be installed in CLEX to validate their performance with beam. This paper is focused on the engineering design, fabrication and validation of this PETS fi rst prototype. The design consists of eight identical bars, separated by radial slots in which damping material is located to absorb transverse wake fi elds, and two compact couplers placed at both ends of the bars to extract the generated power. The PETS bars are housed inside a vacuum tank designed to make the PETS as compact as possible. Several joint techniques such as vacuum brazing...

  20. Development and testing of a double length pets for the CLIC experimental area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, L.; Carrillo, D.; Gavela, D.; Lara, A.; Rodríguez, E.; Gutiérrez, J. L.; Calero, J.; Toral, F.; Samoshkin, A.; Gudkov, D.; Riddone, G.

    2014-05-01

    CLIC (compact linear collider) is a future e+e- collider based on normal-conducting technology, currently under study at CERN. Its design is based on a novel two-beam acceleration scheme. The main beam gets RF power extracted from a drive beam through power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The technical feasibility of CLIC is currently being proved by its Third Test Facility (CTF3) which includes the CLIC experimental area (CLEX). Two Double Length CLIC PETS will be installed in CLEX to validate their performance with beam. This paper is focused on the engineering design, fabrication and validation of this PETS first prototype. The design consists of eight identical bars, separated by radial slots in which damping material is located to absorb transverse wakefields, and two compact couplers placed at both ends of the bars to extract the generated power. The PETS bars are housed inside a vacuum tank designed to make the PETS as compact as possible. Several joint techniques such as vacuum brazing, electron beam and arc welding were used to complete the assembly. Finally, several tests such as dimensional control and leak testing were carried out to validate design and fabrication methods. In addition, RF measurements at low power were made to study frequency tuning.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the damage potential of electron beam and tests of beam loss detector based on quartz Cherenkov radiator read out by a silicon photomultiplier on CLIC Test Facility 3(CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    Orfanelli, Styliani; Gazis, E

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is a feasibility study aiming at the development of an electron/positron linear collider with a centre of mass energy in the multi-TeV energy range. Each Linac will have a length of 21 km, which means that very high accelerating gradients (>100 MV/m) are required. To achieve the high accelerating gradients, a novel two-beam acceleration scheme, in which RF power is transferred from a high-current, low-energy drive beam to the low-current, high energy main accelerating beam is designed. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system will be designed for CLIC to meet the requirements of the accelerator complex. Its main role as part of the machine protection scheme will be to detect potentially dangerous beam instabilities and prevent subsequent injection into the main beam or drive beam decelerators. The first part of this work describes the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations performed to estimate the damage potential of high energy electron beams impacting a copper target. The second...

  2. Cosmic-ray positrons from millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Venter, C; Harding, A K; Gonthier, P L; Büsching, I

    2015-01-01

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of gamma-ray millisecond pulsar light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ~10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new millisecond pulsars, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic millisecond pulsars to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day millisecond pulsars. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow and redback systems. Since millisecond pulsars are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the p...

  3. Positron lifetime technique with applications in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with the positron lifetime technique as a method to measure extremely low concentrations of extremely small cavities in materials. The method is based upon the fact that the positron lieftime decreases as the electron density increases and upon the fact that a positron preferably annihilates in cavity-like defects in lattices. The theory of positron behaviour in materials and technical aspects of measuring positron liefetimes are described in ch.'s 2 and 3 respectively. Three methods for increasing the time resolution are discussed and some positron sources are described (ch.4). Some applications of the positron lifetime technique and experimental results are shown in chapter 5. 125 refs.; 61 figs.; 18 tabs

  4. Electrons and positrons from expanding supernova envelopes in dense clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    If antiprotons in cosmic rays are produced as secondary particles in sources, it is expected that positrons are also created by the same process. The interstellar spectra of positrons and electrons are calculated by taking into account such sources. Spectra are then compared with observations.

  5. Experimental Study of the Effect of Beam Loading on RF Breakdown Rate in CLIC High-Gradient Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Tecker, F; Kelisani, M; Doebert, S; Grudiev, A; Quirante, J; Riddone, G; Syratchev, I; Wuensch, W; Kononenko, O; Solodko, A; Lebet, S

    2013-01-01

    RF breakdown is a key issue for the multi-TeV highluminosity e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Breakdowns in the high-gradient accelerator structures can deflect the beam and decrease the desired luminosity. The limitations of the accelerating structures due to breakdowns have been studied so far without a beam present in the structure. The presence of the beam modifies the distribution of the electrical and magnetic field distributions, which determine the breakdown rate. Therefore an experiment has been designed for high power testing a CLIC prototype accelerating structure with a beam present in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3). A special beam line allows extracting a beam with nominal CLIC beam current and duration from the CTF3 linac. The paper describes the beam optics design for this experimental beam line and the commissioning of the experiment with beam.

  6. Material studies in the frame of CLIC Accelerating structures production conducted within the Mechanics program together with Metso Oy

    CERN Document Server

    Nurminen, Janne

    2012-01-01

    MeChanICs (Marie Curie Linking Industry to CERN) is an Industry to Academia Partnership and Pathways (IAPP) platform for precision manufacturing knowledge exchange bringing together five Finnish manufacturing companies with Helsinki Insitute of Physics (HIP) and CERN. The scientific objective of MeChanICs project is to contribute to the manufacturing RTD of CLIC enabling technologies. The focus is on the design, materials, machining, brazing and assembly of A CLIC accelerating structure. This study deals with the materials work package of the program and wants to explore the following items: 1) producing copper accelerating structures for CLIC from raw copper powder by near net shape hot isostatic pressing (HIP). 2) The feasibility to use HIP diffusion bonding of the accelerator structures as a function of surface quality and applied temperature and pressure. 3) Brazing for CLIC AS auxiliary systems, like water cooling or damping manifolds, to the disc stack by coating one of the brazing partners with an enab...

  7. Regulation of the membrane insertion and conductance activity of the metamorphic chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC1 by cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella M Valenzuela

    Full Text Available The Chloride Intracellular ion channel protein CLIC1 has the ability to spontaneously insert into lipid membranes from a soluble, globular state. The precise mechanism of how this occurs and what regulates this insertion is still largely unknown, although factors such as pH and redox environment are known contributors. In the current study, we demonstrate that the presence and concentration of cholesterol in the membrane regulates the spontaneous insertion of CLIC1 into the membrane as well as its ion channel activity. The study employed pressure versus area change measurements of Langmuir lipid monolayer films; and impedance spectroscopy measurements using tethered bilayer membranes to monitor membrane conductance during and following the addition of CLIC1 protein. The observed cholesterol dependent behaviour of CLIC1 is highly reminiscent of the cholesterol-dependent-cytolysin family of bacterial pore-forming proteins, suggesting common regulatory mechanisms for spontaneous protein insertion into the membrane bilayer.

  8. Positron decay of 153Dy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron spectrum of the 153Dy → 153Tb decay was investigated by means of the iron-free β-spectrometer with a toroidal magnetic field. Maximum spectrometer transmission constituted approximately 20% and resolving power was 1.1%. The 153Dy sources are preparaed by introduction of the 153Dy ions into the aluminium substrate 0.68 mgxcm-2 thick (four sources) and 1.85 mgxcm-2 thick (three sources). The positron decay spectrum was determined to be complicated; it consisted of three components with the boundary energies of 1069+-10, 886+-2 and 427+-22 keV and with relative intensities of 0.17+-0.03, 1.0 and 0.06+-0.02, respectively. The 153Dy → 153Tb mass difference is determined to be equal to 2171+-2 keV. Analysis of the data obtained and their comparison with the available data does not permit to make a conclusion about the positron 153Dy decay intensity and about epsilon/β+ value

  9. Identifying electrons and positrons with AMS-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AMS-02 experiment is a multi-purpose detector for cosmic ray particles mounted on the International Space Station. It recorded over 40 billion events since its installation in 2011. The bulk of these events are protons, which are most abundant in cosmic rays. Electrons are 100 times and positrons 1000 times less abundant. Measuring the positrons as function of energy is especially interesting, as an excess over the expected astrophysical background may hint at an additional source of positrons in the galaxy or a new phenomena responsible for the excess, e.g. dark-matter annihilation. In order to measure positrons accurately with a small uncertainty, a large proton rejection of 106 is needed. AMS-02 offers a transition radiation detector to separate positrons from protons and an electromagnetic calorimeter allowing a precise measurement of the kinetic energy of an incoming lepton. This talk covers the general strategy of identifying electrons/positrons with AMS-02 and presents the so-obtained electron/positron fluxes that were recently published.

  10. Positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, E J; Phelps, M E

    1979-01-01

    Conventional nuclear imaging techniques utilizing lead collimation rely on radioactive tracers with little role in human physiology. The principles of imaging based on coincidence detection of the annihilation radiation produced in positron decay indicate that this mode of detection is uniquely suited for use in emission computed tomography. The only gamma-ray-emitting isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are positron emitters, which yield energies too high for conventional imaging techniques. Thus development of positron emitters in nuclear medicine imaging would make possible the use of a new class of physiologically active, positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The application of these principles is described in the use of a physiologically active compound labeled with a positron emitter and positron-emission computed tomography to measure the local cerebral metabolic rate in humans. PMID:440173

  11. CLIC5 Stabilizes Membrane-Actin Filament Linkages at the Base of Hair Cell Stereocilia in a Molecular Complex with Radixin, Taperin, and Myosin VI

    OpenAIRE

    Salles, Felipe T.; Andrade, Leonardo R.; Tanda, Soichi; Grati, M’hamed; Plona, Kathleen L.; Gagnon, Leona H.; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Kachar, Bechara; Berryman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride intracellular channel 5 protein (CLIC5) was originally isolated from microvilli in complex with actin binding proteins including ezrin, a member of the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) family of membrane-cytoskeletal linkers. CLIC5 concentrates at the base of hair cell stereocilia and is required for normal hearing and balance in mice, but its functional significance is poorly understood. This study investigated the role of CLIC5 in postnatal development and maintenance of hair bundles. Co...

  12. Apparatus for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2007-06-12

    Non-destructive testing apparatus according to one embodiment of the invention comprises a photon source. The photon source produces photons having predetermined energies and directs the photons toward a specimen being tested. The photons from the photon source result in the creation of positrons within the specimen being tested. A detector positioned adjacent the specimen being tested detects gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons with electrons. A data processing system operatively associated with the detector produces output data indicative of a lattice characteristic of the specimen being tested.

  13. Positron kinetics in an idealized PET environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, R. E.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; Garcia, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; White, R. D.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetic theory of non-relativistic positrons in an idealized positron emission tomography PET environment is developed by solving the Boltzmann equation, allowing for coherent and incoherent elastic, inelastic, ionizing and annihilating collisions through positronium formation. An analytic expression is obtained for the positronium formation rate, as a function of distance from a spherical source, in terms of the solutions of the general kinetic eigenvalue problem. Numerical estimates of the positron range - a fundamental limitation on the accuracy of PET, are given for positrons in a model of liquid water, a surrogate for human tissue. Comparisons are made with the ‘gas-phase’ assumption used in current models in which coherent scattering is suppressed. Our results show that this assumption leads to an error of the order of a factor of approximately 2, emphasizing the need to accurately account for the structure of the medium in PET simulations.

  14. Solvated Positron Chemistry. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.

    1979-01-01

    The reaction of the hydrated positron, eaq+ with Cl−, Br−, and I− ions in aqueous solutions was studied by means of positron The measured angular correlation curves for [Cl−, e+], [Br−, e+, and [I−, e+] bound states were in good agreement with th Because of this agreement and the fact that the ca...

  15. Positron annihilation microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canter, K.F. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Advances in positron annihilation microprobe development are reviewed. The present resolution achievable is 3 {mu}m. The ultimate resolution is expected to be 0.1 {mu}m which will enable the positron microprobe to be a valuable tool in the development of 0.1 {mu}m scale electronic devices in the future. (author)

  16. Stabilization of the Beam Intensity in the Linac at the CTF3 CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskiy, A; Bathe, BN; Srivastava, S

    2013-01-01

    A new electron beam stabilization system has been introduced in CTF3 in order to open new possibilities for CLIC beam studies in ultra-stable conditions and to provide a sustainable tool to keep the beam intensity and energy at its reference values for long term operations. The stabilization system is based on a pulse-to-pulse feedback control of the electron gun to compensate intensity deviations measured at the end of the injector and at the beginning of the linac. Thereby it introduces negligible beam distortions at the end of the linac and it significantly reduces energy deviations. A self-calibration mechanism has been developed to automatically configure the feedback controller for the optimum performance. The residual intensity jitter of 0.045% of the stabilized beam was measured whereas the CLIC requirement is 0.075%.

  17. Wakefield and surface electromagnetic field optimisation of manifold damped accelerating structures for CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main travelling wave linacs of the compact linear collider (CLIC) operate at a frequency of 11.9942 GHz with a phase advance per cell of 2π/3. In order to minimise the overall footprint of the accelerator, large accelerating gradients are sought. The present baseline design for the main linacs of CLIC demands an average electric field of 100 MV/m. To achieve this in practical cavities entails the dual challenges of minimising the potential for electrical breakdown and ensuring the beam excited wakefield is sufficiently suppressed. We present a design to meet both of these conditions, together with a description of the structure, CLICDDSA, expressively designed to experimentally test the ability of the structure to cope with high powers.

  18. Technologies and R&D for a High Resolution Cavity BPM for the CLIC Main Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Towler, J R; Soby, L; Wendt, M; Boogert, S T; Cullinan, F J; Lyapin, A

    2013-01-01

    The Main Beam (MB) linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a beam orbit measurement system with high spatial (50 nm) and high temporal resolution (50 ns) to resolve the beam position within the 156 ns long bunch train, traveling on an energy-chirped, minimum dispersive trajectory. A 15 GHz prototype cavity BPM has been commissioned in the probe beam-line of the CTF3 CLIC Test Facility. We discuss performance and technical details of this prototype installation, including the 15 GHz analogue downconverter, the data acquisition and the control electronics and software. An R&D outlook is given for the next steps, which requires a system of 3 cavity BPMs to investigate the full resolution potential.

  19. Production of excited electrons at TESLA and CLIC based egamma colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kirca, Z; Cakir, O

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the potential of TESLA and CLIC based electron-photon colliders to search for excited spin-1/2 electrons. The production of excited electrons in the resonance channel through the electron- photon collision and their subsequent decays to leptons and electroweak gauge bosons are investigated. We study in detail the three signal channels of excited electrons and the corresponding backgrounds through the reactions egamma yields egamma, egamma yields eZ and egamma yields vW. Excited electrons with masses up to about 90% of the available collider energy can be probed down to the coupling f = f prime = 0.05(0.1) at TESLA(CLIC) based egamma colliders. 22 Refs.

  20. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: -> Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. -> Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. -> Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  1. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: - Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. - Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. - Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  2. Beam dynamics and wakefield suppression in interleaved damped and detuned structures for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    D'Elia, A; Khan, V F; Jones, R M; Latina, A; Nesmiyan, I; Riddone, G

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration of multiple bunches of charged particles in the main linacs of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) with high accelerating fields provides two major challenges: firstly, to ensure the surface electromagnetic fields do not cause electrical breakdown and subsequent surface damage, and secondly, to ensure the beam-excited wakefields are sufficiently suppressed to avoid appreciable emittance dilution. In the baseline design for CLIC, heavy wakefield suppression is used (Q ~ 10) [1] and this ensures the beam quality is well-preserved [2]. Here we discuss an alternative means to suppress the wakefield which relies on strong detuning of the cell dipole frequencies, together with moderate damping, effected by manifolds which are slot-coupled to each accelerating cell. This damped and detuned wakefield suppression scheme is based on the methodology developed for the Japanese Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider (JLC/NLC) [3]. Here we track the multi-bunch beam down the complete collider, u...

  3. Status of vertex and tracking detector R&D at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Firu, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The physics aims at the future CLIC high-energy linear e+e- collider set very high precision requirements on the performance of the vertex and tracking detectors. Moreover, these detectors have to be well adapted to the experimental conditions, such as the bunch train structure of the beam and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of a few micron, ultra-low mass (~0.2% X0 per layer for the inner vertex region), very low power dissipation (compatible with air-flow cooling in the inner vertex region) and pulsed power operation, complemented with ~10 ns time stamping capabilities. An overview of the R&D program for pixel and tracking detectors at CLIC will be presented, including recent results on an innovative hybridisation concept based on capacitive coupling between active sensors (HV-CMOS) and readout ASICs (CLICpix).

  4. TCAD simulations of High-Voltage-CMOS Pixel structures for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Buckland, Matthew Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The requirements for precision physics and the experimental conditions at CLIC result in stringent constraints for the vertex detector. Capacitively coupled active pixel sensors with 25 μm pitch implemented in a commercial 180 nm High-Voltage CMOS (HV-CMOS) process are currently under study as a candidate technology for the CLIC vertex detector. Laboratory calibration measurements and beam tests with prototypes are complemented by detailed TCAD and electronic circuit simulations, aiming for a comprehensive understanding of the signal formation in the HV-CMOS sensors and subsequent readout stages. In this note 2D and 3D TCAD simulation results of the prototype sensor, the Capacitively Coupled Pixel Detector version three (CCPDv3), will be presented. These include the electric field distribution, leakage current, well capacitance, transient response to minimum ionising particles and charge-collection.

  5. Thermo-mechanical Analysis of the CLIC Post-Linac Energy Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, J; Latina, A

    2012-01-01

    The post-linac energy collimation system of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) has been designed for passive protection of the Beam Delivery System (BDS) against miss-steered beams due to failure modes in the main linac. In this paper, a thermo-mechanical analysis of the CLIC energy collimators is presented. This study is based on simulations using the codes FLUKA and ANSYS when an entire bunch train hits the collimators. Different failure mode scenarios in the main linac are considered. The aim is to improve the collimator in order to make a reliable and robust design so that survives without damage the impact of a full bunch train in case of likely events generating energy errors.

  6. Design of the Injection and extraction system and related machine protection for the Clic Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Apsimon, Robert; Barnes, Mike; Borburgh, Jan; Goddard, Brennan; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Uythoven, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Linear machines such as CLIC have relatively low rates of collision between bunches compared to their circular counterparts. In order to achieve the required luminosity, a very small spot size is envisaged at the interaction point, thus a low emittance beam is needed. Damping rings are essential for producing the low emittances needed for the CLIC main beam. It is crucial that the beams are injected and extracted from the damping rings in a stable and repeatable fashion to minimise emittance blow-up and beam jitter at the interaction point; both of these effects will deteriorate the luminosity at the interaction point. In this paper, the parameters and constraints of the injection and extraction systems are considered and the design of these systems is optimised within this parameter space. Related machine protection is considered in order to prevent damage from potential failure modes of the injection and extraction systems.

  7. Study of the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of the CLIC Two-Beam Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, F; Riddone, G; Österberg, K; Kossyvakis, I; Gudkov, D; Samochkine, A

    2013-01-01

    The final luminosity target of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) imposes a micron-level stability requirement on the two-meter repetitive two-beam modules constituting the main linacs. Two-beam prototype modules are being assembled to extensively study their thermo-mechanical behaviour under different operation modes. The power dissipation occurring in the modules will be reproduced and the efficiency of the corresponding cooling systems validated. At the same time, the real environmental conditions present in the CLIC tunnel will be studied. Air conditioning and ventilation systems have been installed in the dedicated laboratory. The air temperature will be changed from 20 to 40°C, while the air flow rate will be varied up to 0.8 m/s. During all experimental tests, the alignment of the RF structures will be monitored to investigate the influence of power dissipation and air temperature on the overall thermo-mechanical behaviour. \

  8. Thermo-Mechanical tests for the CLIC two-beam module study

    CERN Document Server

    Xydou, A; Riddone, G; Daskalaki, E

    2014-01-01

    The luminosity goal of CLIC requires micron level precision with respect to the alignment of the components on its two-meter long modules, composing the two main linacs. The power dissipated inside the module components introduces mechanical deformations affecting their alignment and therefore the resulting machine performance. Several two-beam prototype modules must be assembled to extensively measure their thermo-mechanical behavior under different operation modes. In parallel, the real environmental conditions present in the CLIC tunnel should be studied. The air conditioning and ventilation system providing specified air temperature and flow has been installed in the dedicated laboratory. The power dissipation occurring in the modules is being reproduced by the electrical heaters inserted inside the RF structure mock-ups and the quadrupoles. The efficiency of the cooling systems is being verified and the alignment of module components is monitored. The measurement results will be compared to finite elemen...

  9. Power pulsing scheme for analog and digital electronics of the vertex detectors at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchot, Georges

    2015-01-01

    The precision requirements of the vertex detector at CLIC impose strong limitations on the mass of such a detector (< 0.2% of a radiation length, Xo, per layer). To achieve such a low material budget, ultra-thin hybrid pixel detectors are foreseen, while the mass for cooling and services will be reduced by implementing a power pulsing scheme that takes advantage of the low duty cycle of the accelerator. The principal aim is to achieve significant power reduction without compromising the power integrity supplied to the front-end electronics. This report summarises the study of a power pulsing scheme to power the vertex barrel electronics of the future CLIC experiment. Its main goal is to describe in more detail what has been already presented in TWEPP conferences and other presentations. The report can therefore serve as an operator manual for future use and development of the system

  10. Laser Wire Scanner Basic Process and Perspectives for the CTF's and CLIC Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Lefèvre, T

    2002-01-01

    In a laser wire scanner, the basic idea is to replace the solid wire classically used in a standard wire scanner by a narrow laser beam. The basic process involved is the Thomson-Compton scattering process, where photons are scattered from the laser beam by the incoming electrons. By counting the number of scattered photons or degraded electrons as a function of laser position the bunch profile can be reconstructed. In this note the Compton scattering mechanism is first presented. In the framework of the CLIC project, a laser wire scanner (LWS) could be used as a non-interfering beam profile measurement both on the Drive Beam for a high current electron beam and on the Main Beam for very small electron beam sizes. A design for a LWS on the CTF2 and CTF3 machines is proposed and some considerations for the use of a LWS on the CLIC main beam are also mentioned.

  11. Status of a study of stabilization and fine positioning of CLIC quadrupoles to the nanometre level

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Esposito, M; Fernandez Carmona, P; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, C; Janssens, S; Kuzmin, A; Leuxe, R; Moron Ballester, R

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical stability to the nanometre and below is required for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) quadrupoles to frequencies as low as 1 Hz. An active stabilization and positioning system based on very stiff piezo electric actuators and inertial reference masses is under study for the Main Beam Quadrupoles (MBQ). The stiff support was selected for robustness against direct forces and for the option of incrementally repositioning the magnet with nanometre resolution. The technical feasibility was demonstrated by a representative test mass being stabilized and repositioned to the required level in the vertical and lateral direction. Technical issues were identified and the development programme of the support, sensors, and controller was continued to increase the performance, integrate the system in the overall controller, adapt to the accelerator environment, and reduce costs. The improvements are implemented in models, test benches, and design of the first stabilized prototype CLIC magnet. The characterizati...

  12. Implications of a Curved Tunnel for the Main Linac of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Latina, Andrea; Schulte, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary studies of a linac that follows the earth curvature are presented for the CLIC main linac. The curvature of the tunnel is modeled in a realistic way by use of geometry changing elements. The emittance preservation is studied for a perfect machine as well as taking into account imperfections. Results for a curved linac are compared with those for a laser-straight machine.

  13. Study of a 5-Tesla large aperture coil for the CLIC detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cure, B

    2011-01-01

    The present design of a CLIC detector foresees a large solenoid magnet with a 6 m aperture and a magnetic induction of 5 T at the interaction point. This can be achieved by a thin superconducting coil. This report gives the typical main parameters of such a coil and presents the feasibility based on and compared with the CMS and Atlas solenoid coil designs, indicating the limits on the conductor and the identified R&D prospects.

  14. Analyzing the Anomalous Dipole Moment Type Couplings of Heavy Quarks with FCNC Interactions at the CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine both anomalous magnetic and dipole moment type couplings of a heavy quark via its single production with subsequent dominant standard model decay modes at the compact linear collider (CLIC). The signal and background cross sections are analyzed for heavy quark masses 600 and 700 GeV. We make the analysis to delimitate these couplings as well as to find the attainable integrated luminosities for 3σ observation limit

  15. Parameter scan for the CLIC Damping rings under the infleunce of intrabeam scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniou, F; Papaphilippou, Y; Vivoli, A

    2010-01-01

    Due to the high bunch density, the output emittances of the CLIC Damping Rings (DR) are strongly dominated by the effect of Intrabeam Scattering (IBS). In an attempt to optimize the ring design, the bench-marking of the multiparticle tracking code SIRE with the classical IBS formalisms and approximations is first considered. The scaling of the steady state emittances and IBS growth rates is also studied, with respect to several ring parameters including energy, bunch charge and wiggler characteristics.

  16. Gluino Pair Production in $e^+ e^-$ and Photon-Photon Collisions at CERN CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Berge, S; 10.1140/epjc/s2003-01194-4

    2003-01-01

    We confront the generally small cross sections for gluino pair production in e^+e^- annihilation with the much larger ones in photon-photon scattering at a multi-TeV linear collider like CERN CLIC. The larger rates and the steeper rise of the cross section at threshold may allow for a precise gluino mass determination in high-energy photon-photon collisions for a wide range of squark masses and post-LEP SUSY benchmark points.

  17. Nonlinear Optimization of CLIC DRS New Design with Variable Bends and High Field Wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasem, H.; Alabau-Gonzalvo, J.; Papadopoulou, S.; Papaphilippou, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The new design of CLIC damping rings is based on longitudinal variable bends and high field superconducting wiggler magnets. It provides an ultra-low horizontal normalised emittance of 412 nm-rad at 2.86 GeV. In this paper, nonlinear beam dynamics of the new design of the damping ring (DR) with trapezium field profile bending magnets have been investigated in detail. Effects of the misalignment errors have been studied in the closed orbit and dynamic aperture.

  18. Z Resonance and Associated Zh Production at Future Higgs Boson Factory: ILC and CLIC

    OpenAIRE

    A. Gutiérrez-Rodríguez; Hernández-Ruíz, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the prospects of the B-L model with an additional Z′ boson to be a Higgs boson factory at high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron colliders, such as the ILC and CLIC, through the Higgs-strahlung process e+e-→(Z,Z′)→Zh , including both the resonant and the nonresonant effects. We evaluate the total cross section of Zh and we calculate the total number of events for integrated luminosities of 500–2000 fb−1 and center of mass energies between 500 and 3000 GeV. We find t...

  19. ACE3P Computations of Wakefield Coupling in the CLIC Two-Beam Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2010-10-27

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its novel two-beam accelerator concept envisions rf power transfer to the accelerating structures from a separate high-current decelerator beam line consisting of power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). It is critical to numerically verify the fundamental and higher-order mode properties in and between the two beam lines with high accuracy and confidence. To solve these large-scale problems, SLAC's parallel finite element electromagnetic code suite ACE3P is employed. Using curvilinear conformal meshes and higher-order finite element vector basis functions, unprecedented accuracy and computational efficiency are achieved, enabling high-fidelity modeling of complex detuned structures such as the CLIC TD24 accelerating structure. In this paper, time-domain simulations of wakefield coupling effects in the combined system of PETS and the TD24 structures are presented. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel CLIC two-beam accelerator scheme.

  20. X-band crab cavities for the CLIC beam delivery system

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Dexter, A C; Abram, T; Dolgashev, V; Tantawi, S; Jones, R M

    2009-01-01

    The CLIC machine incorporates a 20 mrad crossing angle at the IP to aid the extraction of spent beams. In order to recover the luminosity lost through the crossing angle a crab cavity is proposed to rotate the bunches prior to collision. The crab cavity is chosen to have the same frequency as the main linac (11.9942 GHz) as a compromise between size, phase stability requirements and beam loading. It is proposed to use a HE11 mode travelling wave structure as the CLIC crab cavity in order to minimise beam loading and mode separation. The position of the crab cavity close to the final focus enhances the effect of transverse wake-fields so effective wake-field damping is required. A damped detuned structure is proposed to suppress and de-cohere the wake-field hence reducing their effect. Design considerations for the CLIC crab cavity will be discussed as well as the proposed high power testing of these structures at SLAC.

  1. En route vers la nano stabilisation de CLIC faisceau principale et focalisation finale

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, Claude; Lackner, F; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2008-01-01

    Pour atteindre la luminosité voulue de CLIC, la taille transversale du faisceau doit être de l?ordre du nanomètre. Ceci nécessite une stabilité vibratoire des quadripôles du faisceau principal de 1 nm et même 0.1 nm pour les doublets de la focalisation finale. La nano technologie et la nano stabilisation sont des activités qui évoluent rapidement dans l?industrie et centres de recherche pour des applications très variées comme l?électronique, l?optique, la chimie voire la médecine. Cette présentation décrit les avancées techniques nécessaires pour atteindre l?objectif de CLIC et les projets et collaborations R&D prévus pour démontrer la faisabilité de la nano stabilisation de CLIC en 2010.

  2. A positron camera for industrial application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A positron camera for application to flow tracing and measurement in mechanical subjects is described. It is based on two 300 x 600 mm2 hybrid multiwire detectors; the cathodes are in the form of lead strips planted onto printed-circuit board, and delay lines are used to determine the location of photon interactions. Measurements of the positron detection efficiency (30 Hz μCi-1 for a centred unshielded source), the maximum data logging rate (3 kHz) and the spatial resolving power (point source response = 5.7 mm fwhm) are presented and discussed, and results from initial demonstration experiments are shown. (orig.)

  3. Measurement of the H$\\rightarrow$WW$^*$ Branching Ratio at 1.4TeV using the semileptonic final state at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)762723; Watson, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    This note summarises a study to evaluate the potential to measure the H$\\rightarrow$WW$^*$ branching fraction at CLIC, 1.4TeV centre-of-mass energy, with the CLIC_ILD detector, using the WW$\\rightarrow$qql$\

  4. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of chloride intracellular channel 2 (CLIC2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chloride intracellular channel 2 (CLIC2) belongs to a family of intracellular chloride-channel proteins that can exist in a soluble form. The expression, purification and crystallization in two different crystal forms of human CLIC2 is reported. The chloride intracellular channel (CLIC) family of proteins are unusual in that they can exist in either an integral membrane-channel form or a soluble form. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis of CLIC2, one of the least-studied members of this family, are reported. Human CLIC2 was crystallized in two different forms, both in the presence of reduced glutathione and both of which diffracted to better than 1.9 Å resolution. Crystal form A displayed P212121 symmetry, with unit-cell parameters a = 44.0, b = 74.7, c = 79.8 Å. Crystal form B displayed P21 symmetry, with unit-cell parameters a = 36.0, b = 66.9, c = 44.1 Å. Structure determination will shed more light on the structure and function of this enigmatic family of proteins

  5. Influence of the Ore slot on the positron energy distribution function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of Bolzmann kinetic equation a theory of positron subsystems in gases with positron sources and run off in energy space is developed. Nonequilibrium stationary function of positron distribution in gases which permits to calculate probability of positronium production in gases is derived. 5 refs

  6. Positron-emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron-emission tomography (PET) combines early biochemical assessment of pathology achieved by nuclear medicine with the precise localization achieved by computerized image reconstruction. In this technique a chemical compound with the desired biological activity is labeled with a radioactive isotope that decays by emitting a positron, or positive electron. With suitable interpretation PET images can provide a noninvasive, regional assessment of many biochemical processes that are essential to the functioning of the organ that is being visualized

  7. Formation of a high intensity low energy positron string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Syresin, E. M.; Itahashi, T.; Dubinov, A. E.

    2004-05-01

    The possibility of a high intensity low energy positron beam production is discussed. The proposed Positron String Trap (PST) is based on the principles and technology of the Electron String Ion Source (ESIS) developed in JINR during the last decade. A linear version of ESIS has been used successfully for the production of intense highly charged ion beams of various elements. Now the Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) concept is under study and this opens really new promising possibilities in physics and technology. In this report, we discuss the application of the tubular-type trap for the storage of positrons cooled to the cryogenic temperatures of 0.05 meV. It is intended that the positron flux at the energy of 1-5 eV, produced by the external source, is injected into the Tubular Positron Trap which has a similar construction as the TESIS. Then the low energy positrons are captured in the PST Penning trap and are cooled down because of their synchrotron radiation in the strong (5-10 T) applied magnetic field. It is expected that the proposed PST should permit storing and cooling to cryogenic temperature of up to 5×109 positrons. The accumulated cooled positrons can be used further for various physics applications, for example, antihydrogen production.

  8. A low energy positron accumulator for the plasma confinement in a compact magnetic mirror trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higaki, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hhigaki@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Kaga, Chikato; Nagayasu, Katsushi; Okamoto, Hiromi [Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 Japan (Japan); Nagata, Yugo; Kanai, Yasuyuki; Yamazaki, Yasunori [Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, 1-2 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 Japan (Japan)

    2015-06-29

    A low energy positron accumulator was constructed at RIKEN for the purpose of confining an electron-positron plasma. The use of 5 mCi {sup 22}Na RI source with a standard solid Ne moderator and N{sub 2} buffer gas cooling resulted in a low energy positron yield of ∼ 3 × 10{sup 5} e+/s. So far, 2 × 10{sup 6} positrons have been accumulated in 120s.

  9. Positron Interactions with Biologically Relevant Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palihawadana, P.; Machacek, J. R.; Anderson, E.; Makochekanwa, C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Garcia, G.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.

    2011-05-01

    A series of measurements of positron interactions with biologically relevant molecules have been undertaken. We present both total scattering and differential scattering cross sections for Uracil (C4H4N2O2) , Tetrahydrofuran or THF (C4H8O), 3-hydroxy-THF(C4H8O2) and Pyrimidine (C4H4N2) . These measurements are absolute and include the positronium formation cross section which is important to investigations of positron transport in biological systems. The energy of the magnetically confined positron beam can be tuned between 1 and 200 eV, and the energy resolution of the beam is between 60 and 100 meV. We will discuss the experimental techniques, the sources of systematic errors which limit the current results, and prospects for the future. This work is supported by the Australian Research Council and the Australian Government's ISL Program.

  10. Progressive hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation in CLIC5

    OpenAIRE

    Seco, Celia Zazo; Oonk, Anne MM; Domínguez-Ruiz, María; Draaisma, Jos MT; Gandía, Marta; Oostrik, Jaap; Neveling, Kornelia; Kunst, Henricus PM; Hoefsloot, Lies H.; del Castillo, Ignacio; Pennings, Ronald JE; Kremer, Hannie; Admiraal, Ronald JC; Schraders, Margit

    2014-01-01

    In a consanguineous Turkish family diagnosed with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI), a homozygous region of 47.4 Mb was shared by the two affected siblings on chromosome 6p21.1-q15. This region contains 247 genes including the known deafness gene MYO6. No pathogenic variants were found in MYO6, neither with sequence analysis of the coding region and splice sites nor with mRNA analysis. Subsequent candidate gene evaluation revealed CLIC5 as an excellent candidate gen...

  11. Production of excited electrons at TESLA and CLIC based $e\\gamma$ colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Aydin, Z Z; Kirca, Z

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the potential of TESLA and CLIC based electron-photon colliders to search for excited spin-1/2 electrons. The production of excited electrons in the resonance channel through the electron-photon collision and their subsequent decays to leptons and electroweak gauge bosons are investigated. We study in detail the three signal channels of excited electrons and the corresponding backgrounds through the reactions e gamma --> e gamma, e gamma --> eZ and e gamma --> nu W. Excited electrons can be discovered with the masses up to about 90% of the available collider energy.

  12. A Search for Leptophilic Vector Boson Z_l at CLIC by Using Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Akkoyun, S

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the possible dynamics associated with leptophilic Z_l boson at CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) have been investigated by using artificial neural networks (ANNs). These hypotetic massive boson Z_l have been shown through the process e+e- -> M+M-. Furthermore, the invariant mass distributions for final muons have been consistently predicted by using ANN. For these highly non-linear data, we have constructed consistent empirical physical formulas (EPFs) by appropriate feed- forward ANN. These ANN-EPFs can be used to derive further physical functions which could be relevant to studying Z_l.

  13. Anomalous production of top quarks at CLIC+LHC based gamma p colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Cakir, O

    2003-01-01

    The single production of top quark due to flavor changing neutral current (FCNC) interaction and its decay to bW are studied at CLIC+LHC based gamma-p colliders. We consider both t-c-gamma and t-u-gamma anomalous couplings. The anomalous charm (up) quark anomalous coupling parameter kappa_gamma^c (kappa_gamma^u) can be probed down to 9.5x10^-3 (8.0x10^-3) at a gamma-p collider with sqrt{s_ep}=6.48 TeV and L_int=100 fb^-1.

  14. X-Band Crab Cavities for the CLIC Beam Delivery System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CLIC machine incorporates a 20 mrad crossing angle at the IP to aid the extraction of spent beams. In order to recover the luminosity lost through the crossing angle a crab cavity is proposed to rotate the bunches prior to collision. The crab cavity is chosen to have the same frequency as the main linac (11.9942 GHz) as a compromise between size, phase stability requirements and beam loading. It is proposed to use a HE11 mode travelling wave structure as the CLIC crab cavity in order to minimise beam loading and mode separation. The position of the crab cavity close to the final focus enhances the effect of transverse wake-fields so effective wake-field damping is required. A damped detuned structure is proposed to suppress and de-cohere the wake-field hence reducing their effect. Design considerations for the CLIC crab cavity will be discussed as well as the proposed high power testing of these structures at SLAC. Design of a crab cavity for CLIC is underway at the Cockcroft Institute in collaboration with SLAC. This effort draws on a large degree of synergy with the ILC crab cavity developed at the Cockcroft Institute and other deflecting structure development at SLAC. A study of phase and amplitude variations in the cavity suggests that the tolerances are very tight and require a 'beyond state of the art' LLRF control system. A study of cavity geometry and its effect on the cavity fields has been performed using Microwave studio. This study has suggested that for our cavity an iris radius between 4-5 mm is optimum with an iris thickness of 2-3 mm based on group velocity and peak fields. A study of the cavity wakefields show that the single bunch wakes are unlikely to be a problem but the short bunch spacing may cause the multi-bunch wakefields to be an issue. This will require some of the modes to be damped strongly so that the wake is damped significantly before any following bunch arrives. Various methods of damping have been investigated and suggest that

  15. Feed Forward Orbit Correction in the CLIC Ring to Main LINAC Transfer lines

    CERN Document Server

    Apsimon, R; Schulte, D; Uythoven, J

    2014-01-01

    The emittance growth in the betatron collimation system of the 27 km long transfer lines between the CLIC damping rings and the main LINAC depends strongly on the transverse orbit jitter. The resulting stability requirements of the damping ring extraction elements seem extremely difficult to achieve. Position and angle feed forward systems in these long transfer lines bring the specified parameters of the extraction elements within reach. The designs of the optics and feed forward hardware are presented together with tracking simulations of the systems.

  16. Fluka and thermo-mechanical studies for the CLIC main dump

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, Alessio; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2011-01-01

    In order to best cope with the challenge of absorbing the multi-MW beam, a water beam dump at the end of the CLIC post-collision line has been proposed. The design of the dump for the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) was checked against with a set of FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations, for the estimation of the peak and total power absorbed by the water and the vessel. Fluence spectra of escaping particles and activation rates of radio-nuclides were computed as well. Finally, the thermal transient behavior of the water bath and a thermo-mechanical analysis of the preliminary design of the window were done.

  17. X-Band Crab Cavities for the CLIC Beam Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dexter, A.C.; Abram, T.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Dolgashev, V.; Tantawi, S.; /SLAC; Jones, R.M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.

    2011-11-22

    The CLIC machine incorporates a 20 mrad crossing angle at the IP to aid the extraction of spent beams. In order to recover the luminosity lost through the crossing angle a crab cavity is proposed to rotate the bunches prior to collision. The crab cavity is chosen to have the same frequency as the main linac (11.9942 GHz) as a compromise between size, phase stability requirements and beam loading. It is proposed to use a HE11 mode travelling wave structure as the CLIC crab cavity in order to minimise beam loading and mode separation. The position of the crab cavity close to the final focus enhances the effect of transverse wake-fields so effective wake-field damping is required. A damped detuned structure is proposed to suppress and de-cohere the wake-field hence reducing their effect. Design considerations for the CLIC crab cavity will be discussed as well as the proposed high power testing of these structures at SLAC. Design of a crab cavity for CLIC is underway at the Cockcroft Institute in collaboration with SLAC. This effort draws on a large degree of synergy with the ILC crab cavity developed at the Cockcroft Institute and other deflecting structure development at SLAC. A study of phase and amplitude variations in the cavity suggests that the tolerances are very tight and require a 'beyond state of the art' LLRF control system. A study of cavity geometry and its effect on the cavity fields has been performed using Microwave studio. This study has suggested that for our cavity an iris radius between 4-5 mm is optimum with an iris thickness of 2-3 mm based on group velocity and peak fields. A study of the cavity wakefields show that the single bunch wakes are unlikely to be a problem but the short bunch spacing may cause the multi-bunch wakefields to be an issue. This will require some of the modes to be damped strongly so that the wake is damped significantly before any following bunch arrives. Various methods of damping have been investigated and

  18. Evaluation of 65nm technology for CLIC pixel front-end

    CERN Document Server

    Valerio, P; Ballabriga, R; Campbell, M; Llopart, X

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC vertex detector design requires a high single point resolution (~ 3 μm) and a precise time stamp (≤ 10 ns). In order to achieve this spatial resolution, small pixels (in the order of 20 μm pitch) must be used, together with the measurement of the charge deposition of neighbouring channels. Designing such small pixels requires the use of a deep downscaled CMOS technology. This note describes the design and characterisation of suitable building blocks implemented in a commercial 65 nm process. The characterisation included an evaluation of the radiation hardness of the blocks.

  19. Simulation of Phase Stability at the Flat Top of the CLIC Drive Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbershagen, A; Burrows, P

    2011-01-01

    The drive beam phase stability is one of the critical issues of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). In this paper the generation and propagation of drive beam phase errors is studied for effects that vary during the drive beam pulse. This includes the influence of drive beam current and phase errors as well as of drive beam accelerator RF phase and amplitude errors on the drive beam phase after the compressor chicanes and the analysis of the propagation of these errors through the drive beam combination scheme. The impact of the imperfections on the main beam is studied including the possible correction with help of a feedforward system.

  20. Digital positron annihilation spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the high speed development of digital signal process, the technique of the digitization and processing of signals was applied in the domain of a broad class of nuclear technique. The development of digital positron lifetime spectrometer (DPLS) is more promising than the conventional positron lifetime spectrometer equipped with nuclear instrument modules. And digital lifetime spectrometer has many advantages, such as low noise, long term stability, flexible online or offline digital processing, simple setup, low expense, easy to setting, and more physical information. Digital constant fraction discrimination is for timing. And a new method of optimizing energy windows setting for digital positron lifetime spectrometer is also developed employing the simulated annealing for the convenient use. The time resolution is 220ps and the count rate is 200cps. (authors)

  1. The chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC5 is expressed at high levels in hair cell stereocilia and is essential for normal inner ear function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Leona H; Longo-Guess, Chantal M; Berryman, Mark; Shin, Jung-Bum; Saylor, Katherine W; Yu, Heping; Gillespie, Peter G; Johnson, Kenneth R

    2006-10-01

    Although CLIC5 is a member of the chloride intracellular channel protein family, its association with actin-based cytoskeletal structures suggests that it may play an important role in their assembly or maintenance. Mice homozygous for a new spontaneous recessive mutation of the Clic5 gene, named jitterbug (jbg), exhibit impaired hearing and vestibular dysfunction. The jbg mutation is a 97 bp intragenic deletion that causes skipping of exon 5, which creates a translational frame shift and premature stop codon. Western blot and immunohistochemistry results confirmed the predicted absence of CLIC5 protein in tissues of jbg/jbg mutant mice. Histological analysis of mutant inner ears revealed dysmorphic stereocilia and progressive hair cell degeneration. In wild-type mice, CLIC5-specific immunofluorescence was detected in stereocilia of both cochlear and vestibular hair cells and also along the apical surface of Kolliker's organ during cochlear development. Refined immunolocalization in rat and chicken vestibular hair cells showed that CLIC5 is limited to the basal region of the hair bundle, similar to the known location of radixin. Radixin immunostaining appeared reduced in hair bundles of jbg mutant mice. By mass spectrometry and immunoblotting, CLIC5 was shown to be expressed at high levels in stereocilia of the chicken utricle, in an approximate 1:1 molar ratio with radixin. These results suggest that CLIC5 associates with radixin in hair cell stereocilia and may help form or stabilize connections between the plasma membrane and the filamentous actin core. PMID:17021174

  2. Positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Paans, A M J

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for measuring biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a coincidence technique. This includes also the measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labelled drugs and the measurement of the effects of drugs on metabolism. Also deviations of normal metabolism can be measured and insight into biological processes responsible for diseases can be obtained. At present the combined PET/CT scanner is the most frequently used scanner for whole-body scanning in the field of oncology.

  3. 50 years of positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This year marks the 50th anniversary of one of the major landmarks of modern physics - the discovery of the positron, the antimatter counterpart of the electron. This provided the first evidence for antimatter, and it was also unprecedented for the existence of a new particle to have been predicted by theory. The positron and the concepts behind it were to radically change our picture of Nature. It led to the rapid advancement or our understanding, culminating some fifteen years later with the formulation of quantum electrodynamics as we now know it. (orig./HSI).

  4. Development and testing of a positron accumulator for antihydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A positron accumulator based on a modified Penning-Malmberg trap has been constructed and undergone preliminary testing prior to being shipped to CERN in Geneva where it will be a part of an experiment to synthesize low-energy antihydrogen. It utilises nitrogen buffer gas to cool and trap a continuous beam of positrons emanating from a 22Na radioactive source. A solid neon moderator slows the positrons from the source down to epithermal energies of a few eV before being injected into the trap. It is estimated that around 108 positrons can be trapped and cooled to ambient temperature within 5 minutes in this scheme using a 10 mCi source

  5. Simulation of the annihilation emission of galactic positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positrons annihilate in the central region of our Galaxy. This has been known since the detection of a strong emission line centered on an energy of 511 keV in the direction of the Galactic center. This gamma-ray line is emitted during the annihilation of positrons with electrons from the interstellar medium. The spectrometer SPI, onboard the INTEGRAL observatory, performed spatial and spectral analyses of the positron annihilation emission. This thesis presents a study of the Galactic positron annihilation emission based on models of the different interactions undergone by positrons in the interstellar medium. The models are relied on our present knowledge of the properties of the interstellar medium in the Galactic bulge, where most of the positrons annihilate, and of the physics of positrons (production, propagation and annihilation processes). In order to obtain constraints on the positrons sources and physical characteristics of the annihilation medium, we compared the results of the models to measurements provided by the SPI spectrometer. (author)

  6. Fast Beam-ion Instabilities in CLIC Main Linac Vacuum Specifications

    CERN Document Server

    Oeftiger, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Specifications for the vacuum pressure in the CLIC electron Main Linac are determined by the onset of the fast beam-ion instability (FBII). When the electron beam is accelerated in the Main Linac, it ionizes the residual gas in the chamber through scattering ionization. If the density of ions around the beam exceeds a certain threshold, a resonant motion between the electron beam and the ions can be excited. A two-stream instability appears and as a result the beam acquires a coherent motion, which can quickly lead to beam quality degradation or even complete loss. Thus, the vacuum pressure must be kept below this threshold to prevent the excitation of FBII. The CLIC Main Linac poses an additional challenge with respect to previous FBII situations, because the gas ionization does not solely occur via scattering. The submicrometric beam sizes lead to extremely high electric fields around the beam and therefore result in field ionization beyond a certain threshold. The residual gas in the corresponding volume a...

  7. A Study of the Beam Physics in the CLIC Drive Beam Decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, Erik; Stapnes, Steinar

    2009-01-01

    CLIC is a study for a Multi-TeV e+e- linear collider, in which the rf power for the main linacs is extracted from 100 ampere electron drive beams, by the use of specially designed power extraction structures. Up to 90% of the beam energy is extracted from the drive beams along one kilometer long decelerator sectors, rendering the beam transport challenging. We have identified two major challenges for robust beam transport: the significant transverse wakes in the power extraction structures, and the large energy spread induced by the power extraction process. By beam dynamics studies we have qualified power extraction structure designs, leading to the present CLIC baseline structure in which the transverse wakes are sufficiently mitigated. We have further shown that the beam energy spread induced by the deceleration implies that standard 1-to-1 correction might not ensure satisfactory drive beam transport. As alternative, we propose a decelerator orbit correction scheme based on dispersion-free steering and ex...

  8. Studies on high-precision machining and assembly of CLIC RF structures

    CERN Document Server

    Huopana, J; Riddone, G; Österberg, K

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is currently under development at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e– collider. The manufacturing and assembly tolerances for the required RF components are essential for the final efficiency and for the operation of CLIC. The proper function of an accelerating structure is sensitive to mechanical errors in the shape and the alignment of the accelerating cavity. The current tolerances are in the micron range. This raises challenges in the field of mechanical design and demands special manufacturing technologies and processes. Currently the mechanical design of the accelerating structures is based on a disk design. Alternatively, it is possible to create the accelerating assembly from quadrants, which has the potential to be favoured for the mass production due to simplicity and cost. In this case, the functional shape inside of the accelerating structure remains the same and a single assembly uses less parts. This paper focuses on the development work done in design and sim...

  9. Stabilisation and precision pointing quadrupole magnets in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Janssens, Stef; van den Brand, Jo; Bertolini, Alessandro; Artoos, Kurt

    This thesis describes the research done to provide stabilisation and precision positioning for the main beam quadrupole magnets of the Compact Linear Collider CLIC. The introduction describes why new particle accelerators are needed to further the knowledge of our universe and why they are linear. A proposed future accelerator is the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) which consists of a novel two beam accelerator concept. Due to its linearity and subsequent single pass at the interaction point, this new accelerator requires a very small beam size at the interaction point, in order to increase collision effectiveness. One of the technological challenges, to obtain these small beam sizes at the interaction point, is to keep the quadrupole magnets aligned and stable to 1.5 nm integrated r.m.s. in vertical and 5 nm integrated root mean square (r.m.s.) in lateral direction. Additionally there is a proposal to create an intentional offset (max. 50 nm every 20 ms with a precision of +/- 1 nm), for several quadrupole ma...

  10. Integration of the PHIN RF Gun into the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Döbert, Steffen

    2006-01-01

    CERN is a collaborator within the European PHIN project, a joint research activity for Photo injectors within the CARE program. A deliverable of this project is an rf Gun equipped with high quantum efficiency Cs2Te cathodes and a laser to produce the nominal beam for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3). The nominal beam for CTF3 has an average current of 3.5 A, 1.5 GHz bunch repetition frequency and a pulse length of 1.5 ìs (2332 bunches) with quite tight stability requirements. In addition a phase shift of 180 deg is needed after each train of 140 ns for the special CLIC combination scheme. This rf Gun will be tested at CERN in fall 2006 and shall be integrated as a new injector into the CTF3 linac, replacing the existing injector consisting of a thermionic gun and a subharmonic bunching system. The paper studies the optimal integration into the machine trying to optimize transverse and longitudinal phase space of the beam while respecting the numerous constraints of the existing accelerator. The presented scheme...

  11. CLIC Main Linac Beam-Loading Compensation by Drive Beam Phase Modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, R; Syratchev, I V

    1999-01-01

    The CLIC final focus momentum acceptance of ± 0.5 % limits the bunch-to-bunch energy variation in the main beam to less than ± 0.1 %, since the estimated single-bunch contribution is ± 0.4 %. On the other hand, a relatively high beam-loading of the main accelerating structures (about 16 %) is unavoidable in order to optimize the RF-to-beam efficiency. Therefore, a compensation method is needed to reduce the resulting bunch-to-bunch energy spread of the main beam. Up to now, it has been planned to obtain the RF pulse shape needed for compensation by means of a charge ramp in the drive beam pulse. On the other hand, the use of constant-current drive beam pulses would make the design and operation of the drive beam injector considerably simpler. In this paper we present a possible solution adapted to the CLIC two-beam scheme with constant-current pulses, based on phase modulation of the drive beam bunches.

  12. CLIC a Two-Beam Multi-TeV $e\\pm$ Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Assmann, R W; Becker, F; Bossart, Rudolf; Braun, H; Burkhardt, H; Carron, G; Coosemans, Williame; Corsini, R; D'Amico, T E; Döbert, Steffen; Fartoukh, Stéphane David; Ferrari, A; Geschonke, Günther; Godot, J C; Groening, L; Guignard, Gilbert; Hutchins, S; Jeanneret, J B; Jensen, E; Jowett, John M; Kamitani, T; Millich, Antonio; Pearce, P; Perriollat, F; Pittin, R; Potier, J P; Riche, A; Rinolfi, Louis; Risselada, Thys; Royer, P; Ruggiero, F; Schulte, Daniel; Suberlucq, Guy; Syratchev, I V; Thorndahl, L; Trautner, H; Verdier, A; Wuensch, Walter; Zhou, F; Zimmermann, Frank; Napoly, O

    2000-01-01

    The CLIC study of a high-energy (0.5 - 5 TeV), high-luminosity (1034 - 1035 cm-2 sec-1) e± linear collider is presented. Beam acceleration using high frequency (30 GHz) normal-conducting structures operating at high accelerating fields (150 MV/m) significantly reduces the length and, in consequence, the cost of the linac. Using parameters derived from general scaling laws for linear colliders, the beam stability is shown to be similar to lower frequency designs in spite of the strong wake-field dependency on frequency. A new cost-effective and efficient drive beam generation scheme for RF power production by the so-called "Two-Beam Acceleration" method is described. It uses a thermionic gun and a fully-loaded normal-conducting linac operating at low frequency (937 MHz) to generate and accelerate the drive beam bunches, and RF multiplication by funnelling in compressor rings to produce the desired bunch structure. Recent 30 GHz hardware developments and CLIC Test Facility (CTF) results are described.

  13. Prospects for the measurement of the Higgs Yukawa couplings to b and c quarks, and muons at CLIC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grefe, C.; Laštovička, Tomáš; Strube, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 2 (2013), s. 1-7. ISSN 1434-6044 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Higgs * branching * ratio * Yukawa * couplings * quarks * muons * CLIC * inear collider Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 5.436, year: 2013

  14. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this project is to provide a simple summary of new trends in positron emission tomography and its basic physical principles. It provides thereby compendious introduction of the trends of the present development in diagnostics using PET systems. A review of available literature was performed. (author)

  15. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a method for quantitative imaging of regional physiological and biochemical parameters. Positron emitting radioactive isotopes can be produced by a cyclotron, eg. the biologically important carbon (11C), oxygen (15O), and nitrogen (13N) elements. With the tomographic principles of the PET scanner the quantitative distribution of the administered isotopes can be determined and images can be provided as well as dynamic information on blood flow, metabolism and receptor function. In neurology PET has been used for investigations on numerous physiological processes in the brain: circulation, metabolism and receptor studies. In Parkinson's disease PET studies have been able to localize the pathology specifically, and in early stroke PET technique can outline focal areas with living but non-functioning cells, and this could make it possible to intervene in this early state. With positron emission tomography a quantitative evaluation of myocardial blood flow, glucose and fatty acid metabolism can be made as well as combined assessments of blood flow and metabolism. Combined studies of blood flow and metabolism can determine whether myocardial segments with abnormal motility consist of necrotic or viable tissue, thereby delineating effects of revascularisation. In the future it will probably be possible to characterize the myocardial receptor status in different cardiac diseases. The PET technique is used in oncology for clinical as well as more basic research on tumor perfusion and metabolism. Further, tumor uptake of positron labelled cytotoxic drugs might predict the clinical benefit of treatment. (au) (19 refs.)

  16. Studies of the formation of slow positrons in MgO-coated moderators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitzewitz, P.W.

    1980-02-01

    Studies have been made of the production of slow (approx.1 eV) positrons by high-energy positrons from a radioactive source. Moderators consisting of thin metallic foils coated with MgO smoke were used in the transmission mode. The thinnest foils gave the largest fluxes of slow positrons. A double moderator, consisting of a MgO-coated grid following the MgO-coated thin foil, gave a flux almost double that of either the foil or grid alone. The positron beam machine used is described. It has electrostatic optics for the collection, analysis, and transmission of the slow positrons.

  17. Progress toward positron-electron pair plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron-positron plasmas have been of theoretical interest for decades, due to the unique plasma physics that arises from all charged particles having precisely identical mass. It is only recently, though, that developments in non-neutral plasma physics (both in linear and toroidal geometries) and in the flux of sources for cold positrons have brought the goal of conducting electron-positron pair plasma experiments within reach. The APEX/PAX collaboration is working on a number of projects in parallel toward that goal; this paper provides an overview of recent, current, and upcoming activities

  18. Progress toward positron-electron pair plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenson, E. V.; Stanja, J.; Hergenhahn, U. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald and Garching (Germany); Saitoh, H. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald and Garching (Germany); Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa (Japan); Niemann, H.; Pedersen, T. Sunn [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald and Garching (Germany); Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Greifswald (Germany); Marx, G. H.; Schweikhard, L. [Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Greifswald (Germany); Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA USA (United States); Hugenschmidt, C. [Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)

    2015-06-29

    Electron-positron plasmas have been of theoretical interest for decades, due to the unique plasma physics that arises from all charged particles having precisely identical mass. It is only recently, though, that developments in non-neutral plasma physics (both in linear and toroidal geometries) and in the flux of sources for cold positrons have brought the goal of conducting electron-positron pair plasma experiments within reach. The APEX/PAX collaboration is working on a number of projects in parallel toward that goal; this paper provides an overview of recent, current, and upcoming activities.

  19. Origin and annihilation physics of positrons in the Galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gamma radiation at 511 keV is observed since the early 1970's toward the Galactic bulge region. This emission is the signature of a large number of electron-positron annihilations, the positron being the electron's antiparticle. Unfortunately, the origin of the positrons responsible for this emission is still a mystery. Many positron-source candidates have been suggested but none of them can account for the galactic annihilation emission. The spatial distribution of this emission is indeed very atypical. Since 2002, the SPI spectrometer onboard the INTEGRAL space laboratory revealed an emission strongly concentrated toward the galactic bulge and a weaker emission from the galactic disk. This morphology is unusual because it does not correspond to any of the known galactic astrophysical-object or interstellar-matter distributions. The assumption that positrons annihilate close to their sources (i.e. the spatial distribution of the annihilation emission reflects the spatial distribution of the sources) has consequently been called into question. Recent studies suggest that positrons could propagate far away from their sources before annihilating. This physical aspect could be the key point to solve the riddle of the galactic positron origin. This thesis is devoted to the modelling of the propagation and annihilation of positrons in the Galaxy, in order to compare simulated spatial models of the annihilation emission with recent measurements provided by SPI/INTEGRAL. This method allows to put constraints on the origin of galactic positrons. We therefore developed a propagation Monte-Carlo code of positrons within the Galaxy in which we implemented all the theoretical and observational knowledge about positron physics (sources, transport modes, energy losses, annihilation modes) and the interstellar medium of our Galaxy (interstellar gas distributions, galactic magnetic fields, structures of the gaseous phases). Due to uncertainties in several physical parameters

  20. Study of the e0-electron yield from the surface of 64Cu radioactive sources of various thicknesses at their positron decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The (eγ)-coincidence method was used to study the yield of e0-electrons from the surface of 64Cu radioactive sources of various thicknesses. The values of 0.120 (7), 0.076 (4), 0.044 (4), 0.034 (10), and 0.034 (2) for the e0-electron yield per a single event of β+-decay were obtained for the source thicknesses of 1.1, 2.0, 4.8, 11.0, and 14.5 μg/cm2, respectively. These values are several times lower than the known e0-electron yield at β- -decay under the same experimental conditions

  1. Positron emission tomography of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography enables the distribution of positron emitting isotopes to be imaged in a transverse plane through the body and the regional concentration of the isotope to be measured quantitatively. This thesis reports some applications of positron emission tomography to studies of pulmonary pathophysiology. Measurements in lung phantoms showed that regional lung density could be measured from a transmission tomogram obtained with an external source of positron emitting isotope. The regional, fractional blood volume was measured after labelling the blood with carbon-11-monoxide. Regional extravascular lung density (lung tissue and interstitial water per unit thoracic volume) was obtained by subtracting fractional blood volume from lung density. Measurements in normal subjects revealed large regional variations in lung density and fractional blood volume in the supine posture. Extravascular lung density showed a more uniform distribution. The technique has been used to study patients with chronic interstitial pulmonary oedema, pulmonary sarcoidosis and fibrosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension and patients with intracardiac, left-to-right shunt. Tomographic measurements of pulmonary tissue concentration of radionuclides are difficult, since corrections for the blood content and the inflation of the lung must be applied. A simultaneous measurement of lung density and fractional blood volume allows such corrections to be made and the extravascular tracer concentration to be calculated. This has been applied to measurements of the tissue penetration of carbon-11-labelled erythromycin in patients with lobar pneumonia. (author)

  2. A mega watt electron positron conversion target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intense sources of positrons are required to achieve in high energy electron-positron colliders the desired elevated luminosities. Positrons are produced by diverting part of the high energy electrons onto a target, from which low energy positrons are collected and re-injected into the e--e+ collider. Within the frame of a design study for a high luminosity beauty factory, ARES [1] presently under consideration at FRASCATI, a conceptual design has been worked out for the targeting of a 2 GeV- electron beam with an average current of 770 μA and an average power of 1.5 MW. In order to handle these extreme power densities, a rotating wheel is considered intercepting the beam at its periphery such that the beam power is spread around its circumference. The target concept has already been described earlier. In this paper the authors summarize the principle features, consider certain critical technical aspects and discusses in some detail the prevailing radiation problems

  3. Construction of a pulsed MeV positron beam line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuno, Shin-ichi; Okada, Sohei; Kawasuso, Atsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    To develop a fast (1 MeV) and short pulsed (100 ps) positron beam which enables defect behavior analysis of bulk states of materials even at high temperatures where a usual positron source would melt, we have been performing design study and construction of the beam line in a three-year program since 1994. This report describes the components, design study results and experimental results of the completed parts until now. (author)

  4. Digital positron lifetime spectroscopy at EPOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the digital equipment to measure positron lifetimes gets cheaper and more widely used, it is decided that EPOS, the ELBE positron source will sample the signals from the photomultipliers directly and evaluate it online or offline by digital means. Still using isotope sources, the EPOS lifetime spectrometer results in a timing resolution of around 170 ps (with 60Co), which compares good to analog equipment. A distinct improvement is expected when a coincidence setup will be used at ELBE. However, also the software needs further improvement: while one of the goals is of course to achieve the best time resolution, there is also the aspect of runtime and expandability. Results of evaluations will be presented and compared with results from other groups

  5. Tomography by positrons emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tomography by positrons emission is a technology that allows to measure the concentration of positrons emission in a tri dimensional body through external measurements. Among the isotope emissions have carbon isotopes are (11C), of the oxygen (15O), of the nitrogen (13N) that are three the element that constitute the base of the organic chemistry. Theses have on of the PET's most important advantages, since many biological interesting organic molecules can be tracer with these isotopes for the metabolism studies 'in vivo' through PET, without using organic tracers that modify the metabolism. The mentioned isotopes, also possess the characteristic of having short lifetime, that constitute on of PET's advantages from the dosimetric point of view. Among 11C, 15O, and 13N, other isotopes that can be obtained of a generator as the 68Ga and 82Rb

  6. Positron scattering from tetrahydrofuran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunger, M. J.; Chiari, L.; Tattersall, W.; Anderson, E.; Machacek, J.; Makochekanwa, C.; Sullivan, J.; Buckman, S. J.

    2012-10-01

    We present recent experimental results for positron scattering from tetrahydrofuran. Being a model for the deoxyribose sugar rings in the nucleic acids backbone, tetrahydrofuran is of particular interest for investigating radiation damage in biomolecular systems. The measurements on this species were carried out using the atomic and molecular trap-based positron beamline at The Australian National University with an energy resolution of ˜60 meV. Total cross sections and integral cross sections for the positronium formation, elastic and inelastic (direct ionization and electronic excitation) scattering channels are presented over the energy range of 1-190 eV. Low-energy elastic differential cross sections are also presented at selected energies between 1 eV and 25 eV. A fairly good agreement is found with the total cross section results from the only existing previous experimental investigation on this target species by the Trento group.

  7. Results from the CLIC X-BAND structure test program at the NLCTA

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, Chris; Dolgashev, Valery; Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Wang, Faya; Wang, W Juwen; Doebert, Steffen; Grudiev, Alexej; Riddone, Germana; Wuensh, Walter; Zennaro, Riccardo; Higashi, Yasuo; Higo, Toshiyasu

    2010-01-01

    As part of a SLAC-CERN-KEK col­lab­o­ra­tion on high gra­di­ent X-band struc­ture re­search, sev­er­al pro­to­type struc­tures for the CLIC lin­ear col­lid­er study have been test­ed using two of the high power (300 MW) X-band rf sta­tions in the NLCTA fa­cil­i­ty at SLAC. These struc­tures dif­fer in terms of their man­u­fac­tur­ing (brazed disks and clamped quad­rants), gra­di­ent pro­file (amount by which the gra­di­ent in­creas­es along the struc­ture which op­ti­mizes ef­fi­cien­cy and max­i­mizes sus­tain­able gra­di­ent) and HOM damp­ing (use of slots or waveg­uides to rapid­ly dis­si­pate dipole mode en­er­gy). The CLIC goal in the next few years is to demon­strate the fea­si­bil­i­ty of a CLIC-ready base­line de­sign and to in­ves­ti­gate al­ter­na­tives which could bring even high­er ef­fi­cien­cy. This paper sum­ma­rizes the high gra­di­ent test re­sults from the NLCTA in sup­port of this ef­fort.

  8. Beam Tests of a Prototype Stripline Beam Position Monitoring System for the Drive Beam of the CLIC Two-beam Module at CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Benot-Morell, Alfonso; Nappa, Jean-Marc; Vilalte, Sebastien; Wendt, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with LAPP and IFIC, two units of a prototype stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the CLIC Drive Beam (DB), and its associated readout electronics have been successfully installed and tested in the Two-Beam-Module (TBM) at the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. This paper gives a short overview of the BPM system and presents the performance measured under different Drive Beam configurations.

  9. New techniques of positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on new techniques of positron annihilation and its application to various fields are presented. First, production of slow positron and its characteristic features are described. The slow positron can be obtained from radioisotopes by using a positron moderator, proton beam bombardment on a boron target, and pair production by using an electron linear accelerator. Bright enhancement of the slow positron beam is studied. Polarized positron beam can be used for the study of the momentum distribution of an electron in ferromagnetic substances. Production of polarized positrons and measurements of polarization are discussed. Various phases of interaction between slow positrons and atoms (or molecules) are described. A comparative study of electron scavenging effects on luminescence and on positronium formation in cyclohexane is presented. The positron annihilation phenomena are applicable for the surface study. The microscopic information on the surface of porous material may be obtained. The slow positrons are also useful for the surface study. Production and application of slow muon (positive and negative) are presented in this report. (Kato, T.)

  10. HI-positron production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New results concerning the spectrum of positrons produced in U-U, U-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions - the inherent experimental problems and the initiative taken in overcoming these - are presented. The production probabilities obtained so far follow an interesting exponential behavior. The characteristic parameters, time and energy, describing these can be derived from a simplified picture for the monopole pair production which follows the theory of Greiner et al. (orig.)

  11. CLIC5 stabilizes membrane-actin filament linkages at the base of hair cell stereocilia in a molecular complex with radixin, taperin, and myosin VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Felipe T; Andrade, Leonardo R; Tanda, Soichi; Grati, M'hamed; Plona, Kathleen L; Gagnon, Leona H; Johnson, Kenneth R; Kachar, Bechara; Berryman, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Chloride intracellular channel 5 protein (CLIC5) was originally isolated from microvilli in complex with actin binding proteins including ezrin, a member of the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) family of membrane-cytoskeletal linkers. CLIC5 concentrates at the base of hair cell stereocilia and is required for normal hearing and balance in mice, but its functional significance is poorly understood. This study investigated the role of CLIC5 in postnatal development and maintenance of hair bundles. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy of CLIC5-deficient jitterbug (jbg) mice revealed progressive fusion of stereocilia as early as postnatal day 10. Radixin (RDX), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Q (PTPRQ), and taperin (TPRN), deafness-associated proteins that also concentrate at the base of stereocilia, were mislocalized in fused stereocilia of jbg mice. TPRQ and RDX were dispersed even prior to stereocilia fusion. Biochemical assays showed interaction of CLIC5 with ERM proteins, TPRN, and possibly myosin VI (MYO6). In addition, CLIC5 and RDX failed to localize normally in fused stereocilia of MYO6 mutant mice. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which these proteins work together as a complex to stabilize linkages between the plasma membrane and subjacent actin cytoskeleton at the base of stereocilia. PMID:24285636

  12. Proposition d'une méthode d'alignement de l'accélérateur linéaire CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, Thomas; Mainaud-Durand, H

    2011-01-01

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) is the particles accelerator project proposed by the european organization for nuclear research (CERN) for high energy physics after the large hadron collider (LHC). Because of the nanometric scale of the CLIC leptons beams, the emittance growth budget is very tight. It induces alignment tolerances on the positions of the CLIC components that have never been achieved. The last step of the CLIC alignment will be done according to the beam itself. It falls within the competence of the physicists. However, in order to implement the beam-based feedback, a challenging pre-alignment is required : 10 μm at 3σ along a 200 m sliding window. For such a precision, the proposed solution must be compatible with a feedback between the measurement and repositioning systems. The CLIC pre-alignment will have to be active. This thesis does not demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC active prealignment but shows the way to the last developments that have to be done for that purpose. A metho...

  13. The millisecond pulsar contribution to the rising positron fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Venter, Christo; Harding, Alice K; Gonthier, Peter L; Buesching, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Pair cascades from millisecond pulsars (MSPs) may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons that contribute to the increase in positron flux above 10 GeV as observed by PAMELA and AMS-02. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has increased the number of detected gamma-ray MSPs tremendously. Light curve modelling furthermore favours abundant pair production in MSP magnetospheres, so that models of primary cosmic-ray positrons from pulsars should include the contribution from the larger numbers of MSPs and their potentially higher positron output per source. We model the contribution of Galactic MSPs to the terrestrial cosmic-ray electron / positron flux by using a population synthesis code to predict the source properties of present-day MSPs. We simulate pair spectra assuming an offset-dipole magnetic field which boosts pair creation rates. We also consider positrons and electrons that have additionally been accelerated to very high energies in the strong intrabinary shocks in black widow (BW) and...

  14. Polarized Sources, Targets and Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciullo, Guiseppe; Contalbrigo, Marco; Lenisa, P.

    2011-01-01

    Remarks on the history of workshops on "spin tools" / E. Steffens -- Polarized proton beams in RHIC / A. Zelenski -- The COSY/Julich polarized H[symbol] and D[symbol] ion source / O. Felden -- The new source of polarized ions for the JINR accelerator complex / V. V. Fimushkin -- Resonance effects in nuclear dichroism - an inexpensive source of tensor-polarized deuterons / H. Seyfarth -- Polarized electrons and positrons at the MESA accelerator / K. Aulenbacher -- Status report of the Darmstadt polarized electron injector / Y. Poltoratska -- The Mott polarimeter at MAMI / V. Tioukine -- Proton polarimetry at the relativistic heavy ion collider / Y. Makdisi -- Polarisation and polarimetry at HERA / B. Sobloher -- Polarisation measurement at the ILC with a Compton polarimeter / C. Bartels -- Time evolution of ground motion-dependent depolarisation at linear colliders / A. Hartin -- Electron beam polarimetry at low energies and its applications / R. Barday -- Polarized solid targets: recent progress and future prospects / C. D. Keith -- HD gas distillation and analysis for HD frozen spin targets / A. D'Angelo -- Electron spin resonance study of hydrogen and alkyl free radicals trapped in solid hydrogen aimed for dynamic nuclear polarization of solid HD / T. Kumada -- Change of ultrafast nuclear-spin polarization upon photoionization by a short laser pulse / T. Nakajima -- Radiation damage and recovery in polarized [symbol]NH[symbol] ammonia targets at Jefferson lab / J. D. Maxwell.Polarized solid proton target in low magnetic field and at high temperature / T. Uesaka -- Pulse structure dependence of the proton spin polarization rate / T. Kawahara -- Proton NMR in the large COMPASS [symbol]NH[symbol] target / J. Koivuniemi -- DNP with TEMPO and trityl radicals in deuterated polystyrene / L. Wang -- The CLIC electron and positron polarized sources / L. Rinolfi -- Status of high intensity polarized electron gun at MIT-Bates / E. Tsentalovich -- Target section for spin

  15. The Climate and Cryosphere Project (CliC): Helping bring sea ice Models and Observations together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, V.; Goodison, B.; Worby, A.; Ryabinin, V.; Prick, A.; Villinger, T.

    2007-12-01

    The Climate and Cryosphere Project is sponsored by the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and the Scientific Committee for Antarctic Research (SCAR). One of the four themes within the CliC project is the Marine Cryosphere Theme (MarC). This paper will review the recent projects and workshops held within this Theme and how they relate to other, international initiatives. Recent recommendations on sea ice thickness are being implemented, and groups have been formed to work towards improvements in models, particularly in their representation of the Southern Ocean. SOPHOCLES (Southern Ocean Physical Oceanography and Cryosphere Processes and Climate) will work with other modeling groups to improve the representation of the Southern Ocean in climate models. This will include cooperation with other modeling and observational groups to develop metrics to help evaluate models. In the Arctic, we are working to help develop, standardize, and implement observation and measurement protocols for Arctic sea ice in coastal, seasonal, and perennial ice zones.

  16. Measurements and Laboratory Tests on a Prototype Stripline Kicker for the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Belver-Aguilar, C; Toral, F; Barnes, MJ; Day, H

    2014-01-01

    The Pre-Damping Rings (PDRs) and Damping Rings (DRs) of CLIC are required to reduce the beam emittances to the small values required for the main linacs. The injection and extraction, from the PDRs and DRs, are performed by kicker systems. To achieve both low beam coupling impedance and reasonable broadband impedancematching to the electrical circuit, striplines have been chosen for the kicker elements. Prototype striplines have been built: tests and measurements of these striplines have started. The goal of these tests is to characterize, without beam, the electromagnetic response of the striplines. The tests have been carried out at CERN. To study the signal transmission through the striplines, the measured S-parameters have been compared with simulations. In addition, measurements of longitudinal beam coupling impedance, using the coaxial wire method, are reported and compared with simulations.

  17. Simulation Study of Cool-Down of the CLIC Wiggler Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, L; van Weelderen, R; Xiong, L

    2013-01-01

    The cryogenic system for the CLIC wiggler magnets is under design. The cooldown process is one of the main dimensioning factors for the system. In this paper, the heat transfer model used to simulate the cool-down process is presented. Different configurations are then investigated and a detailed analysis of the corresponding temperature evolutions along the magnet strings is calculated. The temperature profiles are evaluated for the flowing helium as well as for the magnets allowing a detailed analysis of the temperature gradients. The impact of some key parameters, like the mass-flow rate, the diameter of the cooling channels and of the thermal coupling between the helium and the magnets is also investigated.

  18. Present status of development of damping ring extraction kicker system for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne; Belver-Aguilar, Caroline; Faus-Golfe, Angeles; Toral, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC damping rings will produce ultra-low emittance beam, with high bunch charge, necessary for the luminosity performance of the collider. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse power modulators for the damping ring kickers must provide extremely flat, high-voltage pulses: specifications call for a 160 ns duration and a flattop of 12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than \\pm0.02 %. The stripline design is also extremely challenging: the field for the damping ring kicker system must be homogenous to within \\pm0.01 % over a 1 mm radius, and low beam coupling impedance is required. The solid-state modulator, the inductive adder, is a very promising approach to meeting the demanding specifications for the field pulse ripple and droop. This paper describes the initial design of the inductive adder and the striplines of the kicker system.

  19. Present status of development of damping ring extraction kicker system for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne; Belver-Aguilar, Caroline; Faus-Golfe, Angeles; Toral, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC damping rings will produce ultra-low emittance beam, with high bunch charge, necessary for the luminosity performance of the collider. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse power modulators for the damping ring kickers must provide extremely flat, high-voltage pulses: specifications call for a 160 ns duration and a flattop of 12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 %. The stripline design is also extremely challenging: the field for the damping ring kicker system must be homogenous to within ±0.01 % over a 1 mm radius, and low beam coupling impedance is required. The solid-state modulator, the inductive adder, is a very promising approach to meeting the demanding specifications for the field pulse ripple and droop. This paper describes the initial design of the inductive adder and the striplines of the kicker system.

  20. Experience on Fabrication and Assembly of the First CLIC Two-Beam Module Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Gudkov, D; Riddone, G; Rossi, F; Lebet, S

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC two-beam module prototypes are intended to prove the design of all technical systems under the different operation modes. Two validation programs are currently under way and they foresee the construction of four prototype modules for mechanical tests without beam and three prototype modules for tests with RF and beam. The program without beam will show the capability of the technical solutions proposed to fulfil the stringent requirements on radio-frequency, supporting, pre-alignment, stabilization, vacuum and cooling systems. The engineering design was performed with the use of CAD/CAE software. Dedicated mock-ups of RF structures, with all mechanical interfaces and chosen technical solutions, are used for the tests and therefore reliable results are expected. The components were fabricated by applying different technologies and methods for manufacturing and joining. The first full-size prototype module was assembled in 2012. This paper is focused on the production process including the comparison o...

  1. Recent results with HV-CMOS and planar sensors for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)734627

    2016-01-01

    The physics aims for the future multi-TeV e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) impose high precision requirements on the vertex detector which has to match the experimental conditions, such as the time structure of the collisions and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of 3μm, 10 ns time stamping capabilities, low mass (⇠0.2% X0 per layer), low power dissipation and pulsed power operation. Recent results of test beam measurements and GEANT4 simulations for assemblies with Timepix3 ASICs and thin active-edge sensors are presented. The 65 nm CLICpix readout ASIC with 25μm pitch was bump bonded to planar silicon sensors and also capacitively coupled through a thin layer of glue to active HV-CMOS sensors. Test beam results for these two hybridisation concepts are presented.

  2. Imperfection Tolerances For On-line Dipsersion Free Steering in the Main LINAC of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Pfingstner, J; Schulte, D

    2013-01-01

    Long-term ground motion misaligns the elements of the main linac of CLIC over time. Especially the misaligned quadrupoles create dispersion and hence the beam quality is decreased gradually due to an effect called chromatic dilution. Over longer time periods, orbit feedback systems are not capable to fully recover the beam quality and have to be supplemented by dispersion correction algorithms. In this paper, such and dispersion correction algorithm is presented, which is an extended version of the well-known dispersion free steering algorithm. This extended algorithm can recover the beam quality over long time scaled without stopping the accelerator operation (on-line). Tolerances for different imperfections of the system have been identified and a strong sensitivity to the resolution of the wake field monitors of the main linac accelerating structures has been identified. This problem can be mitigated by using a local excitation scheme as will be shown in this work.

  3. Numerical Verification of the Power Transfer and Wakefield Coupling in the Clic Two-Beam Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2011-08-19

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept envisions complex 3D structures, which must be modeled to high accuracy so that simulation results can be directly used to prepare CAD drawings for machining. The required simulations include not only the fundamental mode properties of the accelerating structures but also the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), as well as the coupling between the two systems. Time-domain simulations will be performed to understand pulse formation, wakefield damping, fundamental power transfer and wakefield coupling in these structures. Applying SLAC's parallel finite element code suite, these large-scale problems will be solved on some of the largest supercomputers available. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel two-beam accelerator scheme.

  4. High-Gradient test results from a CLIC prototype accelerating structure : TD26CC

    CERN Document Server

    Degiovanni, A; Farabolini, W; Grudiev, A; Kovermann, J; Montessinos, E; Riddone, G; Syratchev, I; Wegner, R; Wuensch, W; Solodko, A; Woolley, B

    2014-01-01

    The CLIC study has progressively tested prototype accelerating structures which incorporate an ever increasing number of features which are needed for a final version ready to be installed in a linear collider. The most recent high power test made in the CERN X-band test stand, Xbox-1, is of a CERN-built prototype which includes damping features but also compact input and output power couplers, which maximize the overall length to active gradient ratio of the structure. The structure’s high-gradient performance, 105 MV/m at 250 ns pulse length and low breakdown rate, matches previously tested structures validating both CERN fabrication and the compact coupler design.

  5. Stabilization and positioning of CLIC quadrupole magnets with sub-nanometre resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Janssens, S; Collette, C; Esposito, M; Fernandez Carmona, P; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, C; Kuzmin, A; Leuxe, R; Moron Ballester, R

    2011-01-01

    To reach the required luminosity at the CLIC interaction point, about 2000 quadrupoles along each linear collider are needed to obtain a vertical beam size of 1 nm at the interaction point. Active mechanical stabilization is required to limit the vibrations of the magnetic axis to the nanometre level in a frequency range from 1 to 100 Hz. The approach of a stiff actuator support was chosen to isolate from ground motion and technical vibrations acting directly on the quadrupoles. The actuators can also reposition the quadrupoles between beam pulses with nanometre resolution. A first conceptual design of the active stabilization and nano positioning based on the stiff support and seismometers was validated in models and experimentally demonstrated on test benches. Lessons learnt from the test benches and information from integrated luminosity simulations using measured stabilization transfer functions lead to improvements of the actuating support, the sensors used and the system controller. The controller elect...

  6. CLIC simulations from the start of the linac to the interaction point

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Daniel; Blair, G A; D'Amico, T E; Leros, Nicolas; Redaelli, S; Risselada, Thys; Zimmermann, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Simulations for linear colliders are traditionally performed separately for the different sub-systems, like damping ring, bunch compressor, linac, and beam delivery. The beam properties are usually passed from one sub-system to the other via bunch charge, RMS transverse emittances, RMS bunch length, average energy and RMS energy spread. It is implicitly assumed that the detailed 6D correlations in the beam distribution are not relevant for the achievable luminosity. However, it has recently been shown that those correlations can have a strong effect on the beam-beam interaction. We present first results on CLIC simulations that integrate linac, beam delivery, and beam-beam interaction. These integrated simulations also allow a better simulation of time-dependent effects, like ground perturbations and interference between several beam-based feedbacks.

  7. A closer look at the beam-beam processes at ILC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Hartin, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The strength of the electromagnetic fields in the bunch collision at a linear collider will have a significant effect, yielding large numbers of beamstrahlung photons and associated coherent pair production. These effects are limited in the proposed ILC beam parameters which limit the strength of the bunch field to $\\Upsilon_{\\text{ave}}=0.27$. The CLIC 3 Tev design by comparison has a $\\Upsilon_{\\text{ave}}=3.34$ yielding huge number of coherent pairs. In terms of the precision physics programs of these proposed colliders there is an imperative to investigate the effect of the strong bunch fields on higher order processes. From the exact wavefunctions used in the calculation of transition rates within the Furry interaction picture, and using appropriate simplifications, a multiplicative factor to the coupling constants was obtained. This indicates a significant variation to the transition rate near threshold energies. Further studies are in progress to calculate the exact effect on expected observables.

  8. Annihilation Of Fast Channeled Positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, A W

    2000-01-01

    Energetic positrons propagating along low index directions in a crystal interact strongly with the periodic array of atoms via a process known as channeling. These channeled positrons are focused into the interstices of a crystal by a series of highly correlated small angle scattering events, thereby suppressing close nuclear collision processes and increasing interactions with valence electrons. Moreover, the positron trajectories can be manipulated to sample different spatial regions in the crystal, simply by changing the direction of the incident positron beam. As this direction deviates from that of the low index crystal direction the positron momentum transverse to this crystal direction increases, and the trajectories penetrate closer to the atomic nuclei of the crystal's atoms. Thus when observing the angular yield of close encounter events with the atomic nuclei, like wide angle Rutherford scattering, a characteristic channeling dip is obtained for positive ions and positrons traversing thin crystals[...

  9. Physics potential of the BR(H →WW∗) measurement at a √s=350 GeV and √s=1.4 TeV CLIC collider

    CERN Document Server

    Pandurovic, Mila

    2016-01-01

    Precision measurements of the number of properties of the Higgs boson, like invariant mass and couplings to the Standard Model particles, represent one of the key measurements of the CLIC physic program. The CLIC energy staging scenario allows to perform these meas- urements using different Higgs production channels. The Higgs decay to a WW pair, which is analysed at two CLIC energy stages, plays an important role in this program, as it gives access to the relative Higgs couplings to the vector bosons and to the total Higgs decay width. The studies presented here are part of an ongoing effort to investigate the full physics potential of the CLIC collider.

  10. Applications of positron depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM)

  11. Positron emission tomography. Basic principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic principles of positron emission tomography (PET) technique are reviewed. lt allows to obtain functional images from gamma rays produced by annihilation of a positron, a positive beta particle. This paper analyzes positron emitters production in a cyclotron, its general mechanisms, and the various detection systems. The most important clinical applications are also mentioned, related to oncological uses of fluor-l8-deoxyglucose

  12. Applications of positron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakvoort, R.A.

    1993-12-23

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM).

  13. Atomic collisions involving pulsed positrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J. P.; Bluhme, H.; Field, D.;

    2000-01-01

    Conventional slow positron beams have been widely and profitably used to study atomic collisions and have been instrumental in understanding the dynamics of ionization. The next generation of positron atomic collision studies are possible with the use of charged particle traps. Not only can large...... instantaneous intensities be achieved with in-beam accumulation, but more importantly many orders of magnitude improvement in energy and spatial resolution can be achieved using positron cooling. Atomic collisions can be studied on a new energy scale with unprecedented precion and control. The use of...... accelerators for producing intense positron pulses will be discussed in the context of atomic physics experiments....

  14. Mining the bulk positron lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aourag, H.; Guittom, A. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger (CRNA), Alger Gare - Algiers (Algeria)

    2009-02-15

    We introduce a new approach to investigate the bulk positron lifetimes of new systems based on data-mining techniques. Through data mining of bulk positron lifetimes, we demonstrate the ability to predict the positron lifetimes of new semiconductors on the basis of available semiconductor data already studied. Informatics techniques have been applied to bulk positron lifetimes for different tetrahedrally bounded semiconductors in order to discover computational design rules. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Mining the bulk positron lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a new approach to investigate the bulk positron lifetimes of new systems based on data-mining techniques. Through data mining of bulk positron lifetimes, we demonstrate the ability to predict the positron lifetimes of new semiconductors on the basis of available semiconductor data already studied. Informatics techniques have been applied to bulk positron lifetimes for different tetrahedrally bounded semiconductors in order to discover computational design rules. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Impact of the New CLIC Beam Parameters on the Design of the Post-Collision Line and its Exit Window

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, A

    2008-01-01

    Following the recent modification of the CLIC beam parameters, we present an updated design of the post-collision line. As a result of the increase of the beamstrahlung photon cone size, the separation of the outgoing beams by the vertical magnetic chicane is more difficult, but still possible. The main changes in the post-collision line design include the implementation of a common dump for the wrong-sign charged particles of the coherent pairs and for the low-energy tails of the disrupted beam, as well as a significant reduction of the overall lattice length (allowing removal of the large refocusing quadrupoles). The thermal and mechanical stresses in the new exit window, 150 m downstream of the interaction point, were computed. We conclude that, despite the recent changes of the CLIC beam parameters and the necessary modifications of the post-collision line and its exit window, their performance is not significantly affected.

  17. Design of the 15 GHz BPM test bench for the CLIC test facility to perform precise stretchedwire RF measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Silvia Zorzetti, Silvia; Galindo Muño, Natalia; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a low emittance beam transport and preservation, thus a precise control of the beam orbit along up to 50 km of the accelerator components in the sub-m regime is required. Within the PACMAN3 (Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometer Scale) PhD training action a study with the objective of pre-aligning the electrical centre of a 15 GHz cavity beam position monitor (BPM) to the magnetic centre of the main beam quadrupole is initiated. Of particular importance is the design of a specific test bench to study the stretched-wire setup for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) BPM, focusing on the aspects of microwave signal excitation, transmission and impedance-matching, as well as the mechanical setup and reproducibility of the measurement method.

  18. CLIC-ACM: generic modular rad-hard data acquisition system based on CERN GBT versatile link

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CLIC is a world-wide collaboration to study the next ''terascale'' lepton collider, relying upon a very innovative concept of two-beam-acceleration. This accelerator, currently under study, will be composed of the subsequence of 21000 two-beam-modules. Each module requires more than 300 analogue and digital signals which need to be acquired and controlled in a synchronous way. CLIC-ACM (Acquisition and Control Module) is the 'generic' control and acquisition module developed to accommodate the controls of all these signals for various sub-systems and related specification in term of data bandwidth, triggering and timing synchronization. This paper describes the system architecture with respect to its radiation-tolerance, power consumption and scalability

  19. Electron-positron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental information available on e+e- interactions at the time of the Tbilisi Conference (Juli 1976) is reviewed. The topics of these lectures are: electron-positron storage rings, purely electromagnetic ee-interactions, phenomenology of hadron production, e+e- annihilation at low energies, nonresonant hadron production, the new particles psi-3105 and psi-3695, research for other vector states, radiative decays of psi-3105 and psi-3695, anti Q-Q model and predictions, the bound states of heavy quarks, data on new states with even charge conjugation, mesons with open charm, experimental evidence for charmed mesons and for a new lepton. (BJ)

  20. Positron scattering by potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupled-state calculations in a K(4s, 4p, 5s, 5p, 3d) + Ps(1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p, 3d) approximation are reported for positron scattering by ground-state potassium in the energy range 0.5-60.0 eV. Comparison is made with the earlier work of Hewitt et al (1993, 1994) in a K(4s, 4p, 5s, 5p) + Ps(1s, 2s, 2p) approximation. For the first time cross sections for positronium formation in n = 3 states are obtained. (author)

  1. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs

  2. Wakefield Simulation of CLIC PETS Structure Using Parallel 3D Finite Element Time-Domain Solver T3P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; /CERN

    2009-06-19

    In recent years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic time-domain code T3P. Higher-order Finite Element methods on conformal unstructured meshes and massively parallel processing allow unprecedented simulation accuracy for wakefield computations and simulations of transient effects in realistic accelerator structures. Applications include simulation of wakefield damping in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) power extraction and transfer structure (PETS).

  3. The lowest energy positron decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, et al have presented γ-ray coincidence spectra from the HERA Ge array using a long-lived 68Ge-68Ga, source. A well known level at 1883 keV in 68Zn, believed to be directly populated only by a 0.218% electron capture decay, appears on the basis of Ref. 1 to also have a ∼10-7 positron (e+) branch. The maximum energy of this feed would be (15.9±1.2) keV, a very low energy transition. The evidence the e+ branch is the presence of 511 keV γ-rays from e+ e-- annihilation in coincidence with 1883 keV γ rays. Systematic effects due to open-quote pile-up close-quote are believed to be responsible for at least part, if not all of the e+ decay signal. Further, a theoretical calculation of the e+ branching ratio yields ∼10-11 for the 1883 keV level, in strong disagreement with the apparent ∼10-11 observation. A list of long-lived candidate isotopes for lowest energy e+ decay will be presented. A tagged source of extremely low energy neutrinos is one possible future use for such decays

  4. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  5. Positron production within our atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Positrons are commonly produced within our atmosphere by cosmic rays and the decay radioactive isotopes. Energetic positrons are also produced by pair production from the gamma rays generated by relativistic runaway electrons. Indeed, such positrons have been detected in Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs) in the inner magnetosphere by Fermi/GBM. In addition, positrons play an important role in relativistic feedback discharges (also known as dark lightning). Relativistic feedback models suggest that these discharges may be responsible for Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) and some gamma-ray glows. When producing TGFs, relativistic feedback discharges may generate large, lightning-like currents with current moments reaching hundreds of kA-km. In addition, relativistic feedback discharges also may limit the electric field that is possible in our atmosphere, affecting other mechanisms for generating runaway electrons. It is interesting that positrons, often thought of as exotic particles, may play an important role in thunderstorm processes. In this presentation, the role of positrons in high-energy atmospheric physics will be discussed. The unusual observation of positron clouds inside a thunderstorm by the ADELE instrument on an NCAR/NSF Gulfstream V aircraft will also be described. These observations illustrate that we still have much to learn about positron production within our atmosphere.

  6. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs

  7. Cosmic-ray Positrons from Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, C.; Kopp, A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.; Büsching, I.

    2015-07-01

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of γ-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP) light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ∼10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new MSPs, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic MSPs to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day MSPs. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow (BW) and redback (RB) systems. Since MSPs are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the pairs freely escape and undergo losses only in the intergalactic medium. We compute the transported pair spectra at Earth, following their diffusion and energy loss through the Galaxy. The predicted particle flux increases for non-zero offsets of the magnetic polar caps. Pair cascades from the magnetospheres of MSPs are only modest contributors around a few tens of GeV to the lepton fluxes measured by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, PAMELA, and Fermi, after which this component cuts off. The contribution by BWs and RBs may, however, reach levels of a few tens of percent at tens of TeV, depending on model parameters.

  8. Positron driven plasma wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; Huang, C.; An, W.; Mori, W. B.; Muggli, P.

    2010-11-01

    The LHC is producing high-energy, high-charge proton bunches (1e11 protons at 1-7 TeV each) that could be used to accelerate ``witness'' electron bunches to TeV range eneregies via a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA). Simulations [1] suggest that a proton ``drive'' bunch is able to excite large wakefields if the bunch size is on the order of 100 μm; however, the LHC paramters are currently on the 1 cm scale. SLAC'S FACET is able to supply positorn bunchs with the ideal parameters for driving a PWFA. Although at lower energy (2e10 positrons at 23 GeV each), initial simiulations in QuickPIC show that the physics of a positron drive bunch is very similar to that of a proton drive bunch. Differences in the physics arise from the mass difference: slower dephasing but faster transverse bunch evolution. Other considerations include driver head erosion and purity of the wakefield ion column. The physics of positive drivers for PWFA and the viability of this scheme for future high-energy colliders will be investigated at SLAC's FACET.[4pt] [1] Caldwell, et al. Nature Physics 5, 363 (2009).[0pt] [2] C.H. Huang, et al., J. Comp. Phys., 217(2), 658, (2006).

  9. Positron research at the University of Texas at Austin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktepeli, Sinan

    The objective of the research presented in this dissertation is to advance the applications of positron annihilation research. An intense positron beam facility was designed and constructed, and a method was developed to better analyze the defect structure of solids. The Texas Reactor-based Intense Positron beam facility (TRIP) was designed to provide a monoenergetic/monodirectional beam of at least 108 e +/sec on a sample. This increase in beam intensity will enhance many positron research techniques both in atomic physics and materials science. The TRIP facility, the result of a collaboration between UT Austin and UT Arlington, is being developed around the concept of multiple scattering of positrons from solid krypton. A large area copper source will be irradiated in a beam port of the 1 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor at UT Austin. The source will form the bottom face of a cube with the remaining faces made of tungsten. All surfaces will be cooled down to 22 K and coated with krypton. The top face of the cube has a 1 cm diameter hole to allow for the passage of positrons. The fast beta particles emitted from the β+ decay of 64Cu will be moderated while passing through the krypton. The non- moderated positrons will lose their energy while interacting with the remaining walls. The positrons will be removed from the box by an electric field and electrostatically delivered to the sample. The work on the TRIP facility is ongoing. The results of early measurements at UT Arlington have shown that the facility will be able to achieve its goals. The method developed to better analyze the positron depth profiling (PDP) experiments uses the difference spectra of the measured Doppler broadened annihilation peaks. The difference spectra, which are obtained by subtracting the bulk peak shape from the peaks recorded for each incident positron energy, enhance the differences of the observed peaks, while removing the bulk annihilation term from the multi-state annihilation

  10. Beam instability induced by rf deflectors in the combiner ring of the CLIC test facility and mitigation by damped deflecting structures

    CERN Document Server

    Alesini, D; Biscari, C; Ghigo, A; Corsini, R

    2011-01-01

    In the CTF3 (CLIC test facility 3) run of November 2007, a vertical beam instability has been found in the combiner ring during operation. After a careful analysis, the source of the instability has been identified in the vertical deflecting modes trapped in the rf deflectors and excited by the beam passage. A dedicated tracking code that includes the induced transverse wakefield and the multibunch multipassage effects has been written and the results of the beam dynamics analysis are presented in the paper. The mechanism of the instability was similar to the beam breakup in a linear accelerator or in an energy recovery linac. The results of the code allowed identifying the main key parameters driving such instability and allowed finding the main knobs to mitigate it. To completely suppress such beam instability, two new rf deflectors have been designed, constructed, and installed in the ring. In the new structures the frequency separation between the vertical and horizontal deflecting modes has been increase...

  11. High Efficiency Positron Accumulation for High-Precision Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Hoogerheide, S Fogwell; Novitski, E; Gabrielse, G

    2015-01-01

    Positrons are accumulated within a Penning trap designed to make more precise measurements of the positron and electron magnetic moments. The retractable radioactive source used is weak enough to require no license for handling radioactive material and the radiation dosage one meter from the source gives an exposure several times smaller than the average radiation dose on the earth's surface. The 100 mK trap is mechanically aligned with the 4.2 K superconducting solenoid that produces a 6 tesla magnetic trapping field with a direct mechanical coupling.

  12. A new look at the cosmic ray positron fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Boudaud, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The positron fraction in cosmic rays was found to be steadily increasing in function of energy, above $\\sim$10 GeV. This behaviour contradicts standard astrophysical mechanisms, in which positrons are secondary particles, produced in the interactions of primary cosmic rays during the propagation in the interstellar medium. The observed anomaly in the positron fraction triggered a lot of excitement, as it could be interpreted as an indirect signature of the presence of dark matter species in the Galaxy. Alternatively, it could be produced by nearby astrophysical sources, such as pulsars. Both hypotheses are probed in this work in light of the latest AMS-02 positron fraction measurements. The transport of primary and secondary positrons in the Galaxy is described using a semi-analytic two-zone model. MicrOMEGAs is used to model the positron flux generated by dark matter species. We provide mass and annihilating cross section that best fit AMS-02 data for each single annihilating channel as well as for combinati...

  13. Planned Contributions of The Wcrp Climate and Cryosphere (clic) Project To Mountain Hydrological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, R. G.

    Formal discussions within the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) since 1997 have addressed the question of the role of the cryosphere in the climate system. An outcome has been the approval in March 2000 of a Science and Co-ordination Plan for a new Climate and Cryosphere (CliC) project by the WCRP Joint Scientific Com- mittee in March 2000. The concept of this plan (WCRP, 2001) and particular topics of concern for high-mountain hydrology are discussed here. The proposed definition of the cryosphere is that portion of the climate system consisting of the world's ice masses and snow deposits. of relevance for mountains are: ice caps and glaciers, sea- sonal snow cover, lake and river ice, and seasonally frozen ground and permafrost. Existing projects both within the framework of the WCRP, as well as of the IGBP are mainly regional and links into the global climate research effort are not sufficiently comprehensive. The WCRP GEWEX project has cryospheric components concerning the high latitude hydrological cycle, but mountain studies are currently only in Ti- bet. Other relevant programs include: the IGBP-BAHC Mountain Research Initiative, Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS), and Permafrost and Climate in Europe (PACE), for example. Integration of existing cryospheric projects within a global research structure, together with new efforts addressing current gaps, is re- quired in order to: - enhance links between regional and global climatic components studies, - promote appropriate treatment of cryospheric processes in climate models, and - assemble and make accessible quality controlled, well documented, comprehen- sive and coherent global gridded data sets necessary for driving and validating climate models. The principal scientific questions relating to the cryosphere in mountain re- gions concern: - glacier melt contributions to global sea level change, - the energy and water cycle in regions with land ice, snow cover and frozen ground, - the

  14. Positron emission mammography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.

    2003-10-02

    This paper examines current trends in Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) instrumentation and the performance tradeoffs inherent in them. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules. They subtend a larger solid angle around the breast than conventional PET cameras, and so have both higher efficiency and lower cost. Extensions to this geometry include encircling the breast, measuring the depth of interaction (DOI), and dual-modality imaging (PEM and x-ray mammography, as well as PEM and x-ray guided biopsy). The ultimate utility of PEM may not be decided by instrument performance, but by biological and medical factors, such as the patient to patient variation in radiotracer uptake or the as yet undetermined role of PEM in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Positron mobility in perylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on Doppler-shift measurements we have determined the positron drift velocity u in a high-purity monoclinic α-perylene single crystal as a function of applied electric field F and temperature. The electric field is applied as a triangular wave with a maximum field Fmax. At low fields the drift velocity displays a linear field dependence, while it assumes a sublinear field dependence above a characteristic velocity vs=50 km/s and finally tends to saturate at 110 km/s, presumably due to optical-phonon generation above a certain threshold kinetic energy. Unlike in the case of diamond, vs is much greater than the longitudinal sound velocity in the solid. By fitting the observed nonlinear electric-field dependence of u to a Shockley expression for acoustic deformation potential scattering of ''warm'' charge carriers we extract the zero-field limit of the positron mobility μ0 along the crystallographic c' axis (c'parallel axb). At 297 K μ0=(136±3±14) cm2 V-1 s-1, where the first error is statistical and the second is an estimated ±10% calibration uncertainty. Over the temperature range 100--350 K the mobility exhibits a Tn temperature dependence with n=-1.04±0.03, showing a clear departure from the T-3/2 dependence one might expect. Below 100 K μ0 still increases with decreasing temperature, but at a given temperature its value decreases as the maximum applied field Fmax increases, possibly indicating interference caused by the presence of a field-enhanced accumulation of trapped carriers that cause scattering at low temperatures

  16. Positron emitting pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of physiology at the molecular level bridges the gap between laboratory science and clinical medicine by providing the most specific and sensitive means for imaging molecular pathways and interactions in tissues of man. PET-imaging requires the use Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals (PRPs), which are radioactively labeled 'true metabolites' i.e., sugars, amino acids, fatty acids etc., essentially made of H, C, N and O which the cells in the body can metabolize. The PET-isotopes: 11C, 15O, 13N and 18F (instead of H) are cyclotron produced and are short-lived, which places several constraints on the synthesis time for the PRPs, quality control and their clinical use as compared to the conventional 99mTc- and other SPECT-RPs widely used in nuclear medicine. There are large number of published reports showing the utility of several PRPs labeled with 18F (T1/2 = 110 min) and 11C (T1/2 = 20 min). A few PRPs have been labeled with 13N (T1/2 = 10 min). 15O (T1/2 = 2min) is used mostly as H215O, C15 or C15O2. 18F-radiopharmaceuticals can be made at a medical cyclotron facility and sent to PET -imaging centres, which can be reached in a couple of hours. The sensitivity of PET -imaging has encouraged R and D in several other PRPs, labeled with viz., 68Ga (generator produced, T1/2 68 min), 124I (cyclotron, T1/2 4.2 d), 82Rb (generator, T1/2 75s), 64Cu (cyclotron, T1/2 12h), and 94mTc (cyclotron, T1/2 52 min). Due to its relevance in several diseases, particularly cancer, PET-imaging has made major scientific contribution to drug development, particularly for neurological diseases and cancer treatment. (author)

  17. Fundamentals of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography is a modern radionuclide method of measuring physiological quantities or metabolic parameters in vivo. The methods is based on: (1) Radioactive labelling with positron emitters; (2) the coincidence technique for the measurement of the annihilation radiation following positron decay; (3) analysis of the data measured using biological models. The basic aspects and problems of the method are discussed. The main fields of future research are the synthesis of new labelled compounds and the development of mathematical models of the biological processes to be investigated. (orig.)

  18. [Fundamentals of positron emission tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostertag, H

    1989-07-01

    Positron emission tomography is a modern radionuclide method of measuring physiological quantities or metabolic parameters in vivo. The method is based on: (1) radioactive labelling with positron emitters; (2) the coincidence technique for the measurement of the annihilation radiation following positron decay; (3) analysis of the data measured using biological models. The basic aspects and problems of the method are discussed. The main fields of future research are the synthesis of new labelled compounds and the development of mathematical models of the biological processes to be investigated. PMID:2667029

  19. Ultrarelativistic Electron-Positron Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Thoma, Markus H

    2008-01-01

    Ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasmas can be produced in high-intensity laser fields and play a role in various astrophysical situations. Their properties can be calculated using QED at finite temperature. Here we will use perturbative QED at finite temperature for calculating various important properties, such as the equation of state, dispersion relations of collective plasma modes of photons and electrons, Debye screening, damping rates, mean free paths, collision times, transport coefficients, and particle production rates, of ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasmas. In particular, we will focus on electron-positron plasmas produced with ultra-strong lasers.

  20. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A positron camera is a device intended to image the distribution of positron-emitting radionuclides in the...

  1. Radio frequency elevator for a pulsed positron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickmann, Marcel; Mitteneder, Johannes; Kögel, Gottfried; Egger, Werner; Sperr, Peter; Ackermann, Ulrich; Piochacz, Christian; Dollinger, Günther

    2016-06-01

    An elevator increases the potential energy of a particle beam with respect to ground potential without any alteration of kinetic energy and other beam parameters. This elevator is necessary for the implementation of the Munich Scanning Positron Microscope (SPM) at the intense positron source NEPOMUC at the research reactor FRM II in Munich. The principles of the rf elevator for pure electrostatically guided positrons are described. Measurements of beam quality behind the elevator are reported, which confirm that after the implementation of elevator and SPM at NEPOMUC the SPM can be operated at a considerably improved resolution (~ 0.3 μm) and event rate (~3.7 kHz) compared to the laboratory based β+-source.

  2. Overview of slow positron beam based research in BARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy distributed positrons emitted from the beta decay of radioisotopes provide averaged information about the bulk of the sample. With the advent of slow positron beams, it has become possible to monoenergize positrons emitted from the radioisotope sources and probe surfaces, buried interfaces and multilayer structures. The positron emitted from the source are made to thermalize and transported to the sample as a monochromatic beam with the help of electric and magnetic field assemblies to carry out depth dependent studies. The slow positron beam at Radiochemistry Division, BARC is currently being utilized for depth profile studies in organic semiconductor (OSC) thin films and defect structure in metallic samples. In addition, pore architecture in membranes referring to pore interconnectivities have been addressed. The present talk entails studies on nanoscale organics and touches upon the utility of positron beam technique to address pore architecture. Single and multilayer nanoscale films of metal phthalocyanines (MPc) have been studied to probe buried interfaces and nanostructural variations as a function of different growth parameters. The sensitivity of positron to defects helped in identifying structural disorder resulting due to the heteroepitaxy between different materials. The ability to control the depth of penetration has helped to probe buried interfaces in these organic heterostructures. The positron diffusion length is derived from the Doppler broadening profiles (S-E) arid compared with charge carrier mobility in OSCs. Effect of post deposition annealing temperature on the nanostructure of MPc thin films has also been studied. The S-E profile together with S-W correlation helped in identifying nanostructural inhomogeneities in the film. In another study, the defect structure at the interface of OSC and the dielectric substrate has been examined for the films grown on SiO2/Si substrates, unmodified and modified, as the case may be, using self

  3. Proposal for an intense slow positron beam facility at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the domain of condensed matter physics and materials sciences monoenergetic slow positrons in the form of highest intensity beams are demonstrated to be extreamly useful and considered to be highly needed. This conclusion has been reached and the scientific relevance of the positron probe has been highlighted at an international workshop in November 1989 at PSI, where the state of the art and the international situation on slow positron beams, the fields of application of intense beams and the technical possibilities at PSI for installing intense positron sources have been evaluated. The participants agreed that a high intensity beam as a large-scale user facility at PSI would serve fundamental and applied research. The analysis of responses given by numerous members of a widespread positron community has revealed a large research potential in the domain of solid-state physics, atomic physics and surface, thin-film and defect physics, for example. The excellent feature of slow positron beams to be a suitable probe also for lattice defects near surfaces or interfaces has attracted the interest not only of science but also of industry.In this report we propose the installation of an intense slow positron beam facility at PSI including various beam lines of different qualities and based on the Cyclotron production of β+ emitting source material and on a highest efficiency moderation scheme which exceeds standard moderation efficiencies by two orders of magnitude. In its proposed form, the project is estimated to be realizable in the nineties and costs will amount to between 15 and 20 MSFr. (author) 10 figs., 6 tabs., 78 refs

  4. Recent development of positron annihilation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Doyama, M

    2002-01-01

    When positron comes into solid or liquid, it moves in the matter and emitted two gamma rays at the opposite direction, by pair annihilation with electron. Each gamma ray is about 511 keV. The experiments of positron annihilation has been developed by three methods such as angular correlation between two gamma rays, energy analysis of emission gamma ray and positron lifetime. The angular correlation between two gamma rays is determined by gamma ray position detector.The energy analysis was measured by S-W analysis and Coincidence Doppler Broadening (CDB) method. Positron lifetime are determined by gamma-gamma lifetime measurement method, beta sup + -gamma lifetime measurement method and other method using waveform of photomultiplier, and determination of time and frequency of gamma-ray. Positron beam is applied to positron scattering, positron diffraction, low energy positron diffraction (LEPD), PELS, LEPSD, PAES, positron re-emission imaging microscope (PRIM) and positron channeling. The example of CDB method...

  5. High Frequency Effects of Impedances and Coatings in the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Koukovini Platia, Eirini; Rumolo, G

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a 3 TeV eÅe¡ machine, currently under design at CERN, that targets to explore the terascale particle physics regime. The experiment requires a high luminosity of 2£1034 cm2 s¡1, which can be achieved with ultra low emittances delivered from the Damping Rings (DRs) complex. The high bunch brightness of the DRs gives rise to several collective effects that can limit the machine performance. Impedance studies during the design stage of the DR are of great importance to ensure safe operation under nominal parameters. As a first step, the transverse impedance model of the DRis built, accounting for the wholemachine. Beam dynamics simulations are performedwith HEADTAIL to investigate the effect on beam dynamics. For the correct impedancemodeling of the machine elements, knowledge of the material properties is essential up to hundreds of GHz, where the bunch spectrum extends. Specifically, Non Evaporable Getter (NEG) is a commonly used coating for good vacuumbut its properti...

  6. Transverse Beam Polarizationas an Alternate View into New Physics at CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    In e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions, transverse beam polarization can be a useful tool in studying the properties of particles associated with new physics beyond the Standard Model(SM). However, unlike in the case of measurements associated with longitudinal polarization, the formation of azimuthal asymmetries used to probe this physics in the case of transverse polarization requires both e{sup {+-}} beams to be simultaneously polarized. In this paper we discuss the further use of transverse polarization as a probe of new physics models at a high energy, {radical}s = 3 TeV version of CLIC. In particular, we show (i) how measurements of the sign of these asymmetries is sufficient to discriminate the production of spin-0 supersymmetric states from the spin-1/2 Kaluza-Klein excitations of Universal Extra Dimensions. Simultaneously, the contribution to this asymmetry arising from the potentially large SM W{sup +}W{sup -} background can be made negligibly small. We then show (ii) how measurements of such asymmetries and their associated angular distributions on the peak of a new resonant Z{prime}-like state can be used to extract precision information on the Z{prime} couplings to the SM fermions.

  7. Development and Validation of a Multipoint Based Laser Alignment System for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, G; Lackner, F; Mainaud-Durand, H; Piedigrossi, D; Sandomierski, J; Sosin, M; Geiger, A; Guillaume, S

    2013-01-01

    Alignment is one of the major challenges within CLIC study, since all accelerator components have to be aligned with accuracy up to 10 μm over sliding windows of 200 m. So far, the straight line reference concept has been based on stretched wires coupled with Wire Positioning Sensors. This concept should be validated through inter-comparison with an alternative solution. This paper proposes an alternative concept where laser beam acts as straight line reference and optical shutters coupled with cameras visualise the beam. The principle was first validated by a series of tests using low-cost components. Yet, in order to further decrease measurement uncertainty in this validation step, a high-precision automatised micrometric table and reference targets have been added to the setup. The paper presents the results obtained with this new equipment, in terms of measurement precision. In addition, the paper gives an overview of first tests done at long distance (up to 53 m), having emphasis on beam divergence

  8. A Gas-Jet Profile Monitor for the CLIC Drive Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Jeff, A; Lefevre, T; Tzoganis, V; Welsch, C P

    2013-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) will use a novel acceleration scheme in which energy extracted from a very intense beam of relatively low-energy electrons (the Drive Beam) is used to accelerate a lower intensity Main Beam to very high energy. The high intensity of the Drive Beam, with pulses of more than 1015 electrons, poses a challenge for conventional profile measurements such as wire scanners. Thus, new non-invasive profile measurements are being investigated. Profile monitors using gas ionisation or fluorescence have been used at a number of accelerators. Typically, extra gas must be injected at the monitor and the rise in pressure spreads for some distance down the beam pipe. In contrast, a gas jet can be fired across the beam into a receiving chamber, with little gas escaping into the rest of the beam pipe. In addition, a gas jet shaped into a thin plane can be used like a screen on which the beam crosssectionis imaged. In this paper we present some arrangements for the generation of such a jet. In ...

  9. Studies of Cs3Sb cathodes for the CLIC drive beam photo injector option

    CERN Document Server

    Martini, Irene; Doebert, Steffen; Fedosseev, Valentine; Hessler, Christoph; Martyanov, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    Within the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project, feasibility studies of a photo injector option for the drive beam as an alternative to its baseline design using a thermionic electron gun are on-going. This R&D program covers both the laser and the photocathode side. Whereas the available laser pulse energy in ultra-violet (UV) is currently limited by the optical defects in the 4thharmonics frequency conversion crystal induced by the0.14 ms long pulse trains, recent measurements of Cs3Sbphotocathodes sensitive to green light showed their potential to overcome this limitation. Moreover, using visible laser beams leads to better stability of produced electron bunches and one can take advantages of the availability of higher quality optics. The studied Cs3Sbphotocathodes have been produced in the CERN photo emission laboratory using the co-deposition technique and tested in a DC gun set-up. The analysis of data acquired during the cathode production process will be presented in this paper, as well as the r...

  10. Is There a Dark Matter Signal in the Galactic Positron Annihilation Radiation?

    OpenAIRE

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Higdon, J. C.; Rothschild, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    Assuming Galactic positrons do not go far before annhilating, a difference between the observed 511 keV annihilation flux distribution and that of positron production, expected from beta-plus decay in Galactic iron nucleosynthesis, was evoked as evidence of a new source and a signal of dark matter. We show, however, that the dark mater sources can not account for the observed positronium fraction without extensive propagation. Yet with such propagation, standard nucleosynthetic sources can fu...

  11. Deconvolution of Positrons' Lifetime spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we explain the iterative method previously develop for the deconvolution of Doppler broadening spectra using the mathematical optimization theory. Also, we start the adaptation and application of this method to the deconvolution of positrons' lifetime annihilation spectra

  12. Parkinson disease and positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physiopathologic investigations of Parkinson disease and parkinsonian syndrome using positron tomography are briefly reviewed: study of cerebral blood flow and metabolism; effects of L-DOPA; study of dopaminergic receptors and of 18F-Fluoro-L-DOPA incorporation

  13. Resolvability of positron decay channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many data analysis treatments of positron experiments attempt to resolve two or more positron decay or exist channels which may be open simultaneously. Examples of the need to employ such treatments of the experimental results can be found in the resolution of the constituents of a defect ensemble, or in the analysis of the complex spectra which arise from the interaction of slow positrons at or near the surfaces of solids. Experimental one- and two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation experiments in Al single crystals have shown that two defect species (mono- and divacancies) can be resolved under suitable conditions. Recent experiments at LLNL indicate that there are a variety of complex exit channels open to positrons interacting at surfaces, and ultimely these decay channels must also be suitably resolved from one another. 6 refs., 4 figs

  14. Personnel exposure from positron emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emitters may contribute considerably to the radiation from induced radioactivity in accelerator environments. In most cases of thick radiating objects (magnets, shielding walls) the dose rate from gamma emitters, including the 511 keV annihilation photons from positron emitters, dominates the radiation field. Direct positron interaction in skin tissue and in the lens of the eye may be an important contribution to absorbed dose in cases of thin targets and beam separating septa. Results of calculations and measurements show, however, that the dose to the lens of the eye is limited by limitations placed on whole-body doses. Irradiation from positron emitters gives rise to about the same absorbed doses as those experienced in the case of an electron exposure. (author)

  15. Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

    1962-03-01

    A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

  16. Probing Positron Gravitation at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Gharibyan, Vahagn

    2015-01-01

    An equality of particle and antiparticle gravitational interactions holds in general relativity and is supported by indirect observations. Here I develop a method based on high energy Compton scattering to measure the gravitational interaction of accelerated charged particles. Within that formalism the Compton spectra measured at HERA rule out the positron's anti-gravity and hint for a positron's 1.3(0.2)\\% weaker coupling to the gravitational field relative to an electron.

  17. Probing Positron Gravitation at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharibyan, Vahagn

    2015-07-15

    An equality of particle and antiparticle gravitational interactions holds in general relativity and is supported by indirect observations. Here I develop a method based on high energy Compton scattering to measure the gravitational interaction of accelerated charged particles. Within that formalism the Compton spectra measured at HERA rule out the positron's anti-gravity and hint for a positron's 1.3(0.2)% weaker coupling to the gravitational field relative to an electron.

  18. Photon correlations in positron annihilation

    OpenAIRE

    Gauthier, Isabelle; Hawton, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    The two-photon positron annihilation density matrix is found to separate into a diagonal center of energy factor implying maximally entangled momenta, and a relative factor describing decay. For unknown positron injection time, the distribution of the difference in photon arrival times is a double exponential at the para-Ps decay rate, consistent with experiment (V. D. Irby, Meas. Sci. Technol. 15, 1799 (2004)).

  19. Effect of positron wave function on positron annihilation rates and electron-positron momentum densities in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubaszek, A. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. Niskich Temperatur i Badan Strukturalnych; Szotek, Z.; Temmerman, W.M. [Daresbury Lab. (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    To interpret positron annihilation data in solids in terms of the electron momentum density and electron charge distribution, both the electron-positron interaction and positron wave function have to be considered explicitly. In the present work we discuss the effect of the shape of the positron wave function on the calculated positron annihilation rates in a variety of solids, for different types of electrons (core, s, p, d, f). We show that the form of the positron distribution in the Wigner-Seitz cell has a crucial effect on the resulting core electron contribution to the positron annihilation characteristics. The same is observed for the localised d and f electrons in transition metals Finally we study the influence of the positron wave function on the electron-positron momentum density in elemental Si. (orig.)

  20. Atomic and molecular physics using positron accumulation techniques - Summary and a look to the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of current techniques to accumulate and cool large numbers of positrons from a radioactive 22Na source and neon moderator, and the first operation of a new generation of positron accumulator is described. Experiments are discussed that use these techniques to study the interaction of positrons with atoms and molecules at low energies (i.e., below the threshold for positronium formation), including systematic studies of the dependence of positron annihilation on chemical composition. By measuring the Doppler-broadening of gamma-ray annihilation radiation, the quantum state of the annihilating electrons in atoms and molecules was identified. These experiments indicate that positrons annihilate with approximately equal probability on any valence electron. Annihilation with inner shell electrons is infrequent, but is measurable at the level of a few percent in heavier atoms. Measurements of annihilation rates in molecules as a function of positron temperature revealed a number of interesting trends that are briefly discussed. We have developed a new technique to make a cold, bright positron beam. This technique is now being used for a new generation of scattering experiments in the range of energies ≤1 eV. Other possible experiments to study aspects of atomic and molecular physics using positron accumulation techniques and this cold positron beam are briefly discussed

  1. Simulation of the annihilation emission of galactic positrons; Modelisation de l'emission d'annihilation des positrons Galactiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, W

    2008-01-15

    Positrons annihilate in the central region of our Galaxy. This has been known since the detection of a strong emission line centered on an energy of 511 keV in the direction of the Galactic center. This gamma-ray line is emitted during the annihilation of positrons with electrons from the interstellar medium. The spectrometer SPI, onboard the INTEGRAL observatory, performed spatial and spectral analyses of the positron annihilation emission. This thesis presents a study of the Galactic positron annihilation emission based on models of the different interactions undergone by positrons in the interstellar medium. The models are relied on our present knowledge of the properties of the interstellar medium in the Galactic bulge, where most of the positrons annihilate, and of the physics of positrons (production, propagation and annihilation processes). In order to obtain constraints on the positrons sources and physical characteristics of the annihilation medium, we compared the results of the models to measurements provided by the SPI spectrometer. (author)

  2. Application of positron annihilation techniques in non-destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The investigation of the material damage state is very important for industrial application. Most mechanical damage starts with a change in the microstructure of the material. Positron annihilation techniques are very sensitive probes for detecting defects and damage on an atomic scale in materials, which are of great concern in the engineering applications. Additionally they are apparatus of non-destruction, high-sensitivity and easy-use. Purpose: Our goal is to develop a system to exploit new non-destructive testing (NDT) methods using positron annihilation spectroscopy, a powerful tool to detect vacancy-type defects and their chemical environment. Methods: A positron NDT system was designed and constructed by modifying the 'sandwich structure' of sample-source-sample in conventional Doppler broadening and positron lifetime spectrometers. Doppler broadening and positron lifetime spectra of a single sample can be measured and analyzed by subtracting the contribution of a reference sample. Results: The feasibility and reliability of positron NDT system have been tested by analyzing nondestructively deformation and damage caused by mechanical treatment or by irradiation of metal alloys. This system can be used for detecting defects and damage in thick or large-size samples, as well as for measuring the two-dimension distribution of defects in portable, sensitive, fast way. Conclusion: Positron NDT measurement shows changes in real atomic-scale defects prior to changes in the mechanical properties, which are detectable by other methods of NDT, such as ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing. This system can be developed for use in both the laboratory and field in the future. (authors)

  3. A fiber-optically coupled positron-sensitive surgical probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals such as 18F-labeled 2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) have considerable utility in the noninvasive imaging of cancers due to their rapid and excellent tumor-localizing properties. In addition, the relatively short range of positrons in tissue facilitates the precise delineation of FDG-avid tumors. Therefore, FDG used in conjunction with a positron-sensitive probe may be capable of guiding surgical procedures. Many of the current probe systems, however, are sensitive to the intense flux of background photons produced by positron annihilation. The authors describe the design, manufacture and initial in vitro and in vivo testing of a probe well-suited to the detection of positron-emitting isotopes in a high-photon background. The device consists of a small piece of plastic scintillator coupled by fiber-optic cable to a photomultiplier tube. Measurements of resolution and detector sensitivity were obtained. In addition, the reduction in resolution caused by the effects of various levels of background photon flux was determined. These measurements indicate that resolution is degraded minimally (∼5% with a background-to-source ratio of 2:1) due to annihilation photon background. Sensitivity for positrons is good, detecting amounts of radioactivity as low as 10.2 nCi of FDG in vitro. In rats given FDG subcutaneously, lymph nodes containing as little as 11 nCi of FDG could be detected above the background activity levels present in normal surrounding tissues. A plastic scintillator probe system has been devised which may be highly suitable for intraoperative FDG-guided (or other positron or beta emitting-tracer) surgery. 29 refs., 7 figs

  4. High power X-band RF test stand development and high power testing of the CLIC crab cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Woolley, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and operation of multiple high power X-band RF test facilities for high gradient acceleration and deflecting structures at CERN, as re-quired for the e+ e- collider research programme CLIC (Compact Linear Collider). Signif-icant improvements to the control system and operation of the first test stand, Xbox-1 are implemented. The development of the second X-band test stand at CERN, Xbox-2 is followed from inception to completion. The LLRF (Low Level Radio ...

  5. Wakefield Computations for the CLIC PETS using the Parallel Finite Element Time-Domain Code T3P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; /CERN

    2009-06-19

    In recent years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the high-performance parallel 3D electromagnetic time-domain code, T3P, for simulations of wakefields and transients in complex accelerator structures. T3P is based on advanced higher-order Finite Element methods on unstructured grids with quadratic surface approximation. Optimized for large-scale parallel processing on leadership supercomputing facilities, T3P allows simulations of realistic 3D structures with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design of the next generation of accelerator facilities. Applications to the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) are presented.

  6. Production And Characterization Of Tungsten-Based Positron Moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments of interest in Atomic Physics require production of well-defined low-energy positron beams through a moderation process of high-energy positrons, which can be produced by either the use of a radioactive source or by accelerator based pair production process. Tungsten is one of the most commonly used moderator materials because of its reasonable efficiency, high work function and relatively low cost. In this work we present different methods to produce tungsten-based candidate moderators in a variety of shapes. We also present results from characterizing these candidate moderators by ion beam analysis and microscopy techniques.

  7. Cyclinac medical accelerators using pulsed C6+/H2+ ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charged particle therapy, or so-called hadrontherapy, is developing very rapidly. There is large pressure on the scientific community to deliver dedicated accelerators, providing the best possible treatment modalities at the lowest cost. In this context, the Italian research Foundation TERA is developing fast-cycling accelerators, dubbed 'cyclinacs'. These are a combination of a cyclotron (accelerating ions to a fixed initial energy) followed by a high gradient linac boosting the ions energy up to the maximum needed for medical therapy. The linac is powered by many independently controlled klystrons to vary the beam energy from one pulse to the next. This accelerator is best suited to treat moving organs with a 4D multipainting spot scanning technique. A dual proton/carbon ion cyclinac is here presented. It consists of an Electron Beam Ion Source, a superconducting isochronous cyclotron and a high-gradient linac. All these machines are pulsed at high repetition rate (100-400 Hz). The source should deliver both C6+ and H2+ ions in short pulses (1.5 μs flat-top) and with sufficient intensity (at least 108 fully stripped carbon ions per pulse at 300 Hz). The cyclotron accelerates the ions to 120 MeV/u. It features a compact design (with superconducting coils) and a low power consumption. The linac has a novel C-band high-gradient structure and accelerates the ions to variable energies up to 400 MeV/u. High RF frequencies lead to power consumptions which are much lower than the ones of synchrotrons for the same ion extraction energy. This work is part of a collaboration with the CLIC group, which is working at CERN on high-gradient electron-positron colliders.

  8. Coincidence Doppler Broadening of Positron Annihilation Radiation in Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, E.; Vanin, V. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Helene, O.

    2013-06-01

    We measured the Doppler broadening annihilation radiation spectrum in Fe, using 22NaCl as a positron source, and two Ge detectors in coincidence arrangement. The two-dimensional coincidence energy spectrum was fitted using a model function that included positron annihilation with the conduction band and 3d electrons, 3s and 3p electrons, and in-flight positron annihilation. Detectors response functions included backscattering and a combination of Compton and pulse pileup, ballistic deficit and shaping effects. The core electrons annihilation intensity was measured as 16.4(3) %, with almost all the remainder assigned to the less bound electrons. The obtained results are in agreement with published theoretical values.

  9. Users' guide to the positron camera DDP516 computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is a guide to the operation, use and software for a DDP516 computer system provided by the Data Handling Group primarily for the development of a Positron Camera. The various sections of the publication fall roughly into three parts. (1) Sections forming the Operators Guide cover the basic operation of the machine, system utilities and back-up procedures. Copies of these sections are kept in a 'Nyrex' folder with the computer. (2) Sections referring to the software written particularly for Positron Camera Data Collection describe the system in outline and lead to details of file formats and program source files. (3) The remainder of the guide, describes General-Purpose Software. Much of this has been written over some years by various members of the Data Handling Group, and is available for use in other applications besides the positron camera. (UK)

  10. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention involves a new strategy for imagining and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography

  11. Instrumentation in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a three-dimensional medical imaging technique that noninvasively measures the concentration of radiopharmaceuticals in the body that are labeled with positron emitters. With the proper compounds, PET can be used to measure metabolism, blood flow, or other physiological values in vivo. The technique is based on the physics of positron annihilation and detection and the mathematical formulations developed for x-ray computed tomography. Modern PET systems can provide three-dimensional images of the brain, the heart, and other internal organs with resolutions on the order of 4 to 6 mm. With the selectivity provided by a choice of injected compounds, PET has the power to provide unique diagnostic information that is not available with any other imaging modality. This is the first five reports on the nature and uses of PET that have been prepared for the American Medical Association's Council on Scientific Affairs by an authoritative panel

  12. Positrons trapped in polyethylene: Electric field effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intensity of the iot2-component of positrons annihilated in polyethylene is found to increase with increasing electric field, while the formation probability of the positron state responsible for this component remains independent of the field. (orig.) 891 HPOE

  13. NMF on positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bödvarsson, Bjarni; Hansen, Lars Kai; Svarer, Claus;

    2007-01-01

    In positron emission tomography, kinetic modelling of brain tracer uptake, metabolism or binding requires knowledge of the cerebral input function. Traditionally, this is achieved with arterial blood sampling in the arm or as shown in (Liptrot, M, et al., 2004) by non-invasive K-means clustering....... We propose another method to estimate time-activity curves (TAC) extracted directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). Since the scaling of the basis curves is lost in the NMF the estimated TAC is scaled by a vector alpha which is...

  14. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy of High Performance Polymer Films under CO2 Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.A. Quarles; John R. Klaehn; Eric S. Peterson; Jagoda M. Urban-Klaehn

    2010-08-01

    Positron annihilation Lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements are reported for six polymer films as a function of carbon dioxide absolute pressure ranging from 0 to 45 psi. Since the polymer films were thin and did not absorb all positrons, corrections were made in the lifetime analysis for the absorption of positrons in the positron source and sample holder using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. Different polymers are found to behave differently. Some polymers studied form positronium and some, such as the polyimide structures, do not. For those samples that form positronium an interpretation in terms of free volume is possible; for those that don’t form positronium, further work is needed to determine how best to describe the behavior in terms of the bulk positron annihilation parameters. Some polymers exhibit changes in positron lifetime and intensity under CO2 pressure which may be described by the Henry or Langmuir sorption models, while the positron response of other polymers is rather insensitive to the CO2 pressure. The results demonstrate the usefulness of positron annihilation spectroscopy in investigating the sorption of CO2 into various polymers at pressures up to about 3 atm.

  15. Facility for positron computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The positron computed tomography facility has got scintillator detector rings simultaneously recording more than one tomogrphic image of different cross-sections of the patient. The detectors in neighboring rings are staggered and can be rotated with respect to each other in order to increase the count rate without loss of efficiency. (DG)

  16. Clinical applications of positron scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are only a few ways in which the radiopharmaceuticals carrying the positron-emitting isotope can be applied. a. intravenous bolus injection, b. continuous intravenous injection until equilibrium is reached, c. inhalation of a bolus of radioactive gases, d. continuous inhalation until equilibrium is reached. (orig./VJ)

  17. Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the sources of radiation in the narrow perspective of radioactivity and the even narrow perspective of those sources that concern environmental management and restoration activities at DOE facilities, as well as a few related sources. Sources of irritation, Sources of inflammatory jingoism, and Sources of information. First, the sources of irritation fall into three categories: No reliable scientific ombudsman to speak without bias and prejudice for the public good, Technical jargon with unclear definitions exists within the radioactive nomenclature, and Scientific community keeps a low-profile with regard to public information. The next area of personal concern are the sources of inflammation. This include such things as: Plutonium being described as the most dangerous substance known to man, The amount of plutonium required to make a bomb, Talk of transuranic waste containing plutonium and its health affects, TMI-2 and Chernobyl being described as Siamese twins, Inadequate information on low-level disposal sites and current regulatory requirements under 10 CFR 61, Enhanced engineered waste disposal not being presented to the public accurately. Numerous sources of disinformation regarding low level radiation high-level radiation, Elusive nature of the scientific community, The Federal and State Health Agencies resources to address comparative risk, and Regulatory agencies speaking out without the support of the scientific community

  18. Design of the Slow POsitron faciliTy (SPOT) in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A slow positron beam is being built in the Hebrew University, the Slow POsitron faciliTy (SPOT). In Israel, the beam will introduce a new tool for both fundamental and applied research. Here we present the design process of the beam, where the leading goals are safety and high efficiency, with a flexible choice of the positron source. The challenges in the design of a moderator unit, based on frozen Neon, the pre-accelerator section and the full beam-line were addressed by simulation programs using various packages: COMSOL, SIMION and GEANT4. First measurements in SPOT are expected within a year.

  19. Cyclotron, positrons and PET [positron emission tomography]. An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET (positron emission tomography) is a powerful new scientific tool which is capable of revealing biochemical transformations while they are occurring in the brain and other organs in the living human body. The application of PET to problems in biology and medicine is dominated by the short half-life of the isotopes used to prepare the radiotracers. The most commonly used positron emitting isotopes are carbon-11, fluorine-18, nitrogen-13, and oxygen-15 which have half-lives of 20.4, 110, 10 and 2 minutes, respectively. Their incorporation into radiotracers having diverse chemical structures and biochemical specificities has allowed the study of blood flow, sugar metabolism, oxygen metabolism, neurotransmission, enzyme activity and binding sites for therapeutic drugs and substances of abuse. PET research is most commonly carried out at a Cyclotron-PET Center (cyclotron, positron emission tomography, chemistry laboratory) where the short-lived isotopes can be produced and used efficiently. The number of Cyclotron-PET Centers has grown from 4 in 1976 to several dozen in 1988 and the number is expected to double in the next five years attesting to the vitality of the field and the current and anticipated contributions to research in biology and medicine

  20. Automated radiopharmaceutical production systems for positron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provides information that will lead towards the widespread availability of systems for routine production of positron emitting isotopes and radiopharmaceuticals in a medical setting. The first part describes the collection, evaluation, and preparation in convenient form of the pertinent physical, engineering, and chemical data related to reaction yields and isotope production. The emphasis is on the production of the four short-lived isotopes C-11, N-13, O-15 and F-18. The second part is an assessment of radiation sources including cyclotrons, linear accelerators, and other more exotic devices. Various aspects of instrumentation including ease of installation, cost, and shielding are included. The third part of the study reviews the preparation of precursors and radiopharmaceuticals by automated chemical systems. 182 refs., 3 figs., 15 tabs

  1. Positron emitters for in vivo plant research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adopting a systems approach in analysis of the behavior of a biological system is a prime importance because all factors are considered simultaneously. Feedback is an important phenomenon occurring in dynamic biological systems, enabling appropriate regulatory and control functions to be maintained. In plants, the question whether photosynthesis or translocation controls carbon partitioning and hence productivity is of great agronomic importance, because many efforts are directed at selecting plant varieties with high rates of photosynthesis via genetic engineering and/or selective breeding. By use of short-lived positron emitting isotopes, such as C-11 and N-13, coupled with time-dependent and steady-state compartmental kinetic models, such dynamic biophysical plant problems are being unravelled. Questions such as: (i) source-sink complexities, (ii) experimental tests of the Munich-Horwitz theory of phloem transport (iii) uptake, transport and kinetics of nitrate and ammonium ions, and (iv) effects of ecological factors on growth rates were answered

  2. Analytical considerations for linear and nonlinear optimization of the TME cells. Application to the CLIC pre-damping rings

    CERN Document Server

    Fanouria, Antoniou

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical minimum emittance cells are the optimal configurations for achieving the absolute minimum emittance, if specific optics constraints are satisfied at the middle of the cell's dipole. Linear lattice design options based on an analytical approach for the theoretical minimum emittance cells are presented in this paper. In particular the parametrization of the quadrupole strengths and optics functions with respect to the emittance and drift lengths is derived. A multi-parametric space can be then created with all the cell parameters, from which one can chose any of them to be optimized. An application of this approach are finally presented for the linear and non-linear optimization of the CLIC Pre-damping rings.

  3. The influence of antioxidant on positron annihilation in polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to check the influence of the carbonyl groups (CG), created by oxygen naturally dissolved in a polymer matrix and by the source irradiation, on annihilation characteristics of free positrons using the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and coincidence Doppler-broadening spectroscopy (CDBS). Positron annihilation in a pure polypropylene (PP) and in an antioxidant-containing polypropylene (PPA) sample at room and low temperatures has been studied by CDBS. PALS has been used as an o-Ps (orth-positronium) formation monitor. The momentum density distributions of electrons obtained by CDBS at the beginning of measurements have been compared to that at the o-Ps intensity saturation level. It has been shown that the initial concentration of carbonyl groups in a PP sample is high, while for an antioxidant-containing sample, PPA, carbonyl groups are not detected by CDBS. CDBS spectra for a PP can be explained by annihilation of free positrons with the oxygen contained in the carbonyl groups. For a PPA sample, no significant contribution of annihilation with oxygen core electrons can be concluded. (Y. Kazumata)

  4. Testing astrophysical models for the PAMELA positron excess with cosmic ray nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Mertsch, Philipp; Sarkar, Subir

    2009-01-01

    The excess in the positron fraction reported by the PAMELA collaboration has been interpreted as due to annihilation or decay of dark matter in the Galaxy. More prosaically, it has been ascribed to direct production of positrons by nearby pulsars, or due to pion production during stochastic acceleration of hadronic cosmic rays in nearby sources. We point out that measurements of secondary nuclei produced by cosmic ray spallation can discriminate between these possibilities. New data on the ti...

  5. Gamma-Ray Constraint on Galactic Positron Production by MeV Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Beacom, John F.; Bell, Nicole F.; Bertone, Gianfranco

    2005-01-01

    The Galactic positrons, as observed by their annihilation gamma-ray line at 0.511 MeV, are difficult to account for with astrophysical sources. It has been proposed that they are produced instead by dark matter annihilation or decay in the inner Galactic halo. To avoid other constraints, these processes are required to occur "invisibly," such that the eventual positron annihilation is the only detectable signal. However, electromagnetic radiative corrections to these processes inevitably prod...

  6. Radiation-damage study of a monocrystalline tungsten positron converter

    CERN Document Server

    Artru, X; Chehab, R; Johnson, B; Keppler, P; Major, J V; Rinolfi, Louis; Jejcic, A

    1998-01-01

    The exploitation of the enhancement of positron sources by channeling effects, in particular for Linear Colliders (LC), relies on the long term resistance of the crystal to radiation damage. Such dama ge has been tested on a 0.3 mm thick tungsten monocrystal exposed during 6 months to the 30 Gev incident electron beam of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The crystal was placed in the converter region , orientated in a random direction and received an integrated flux of e- (fluence) of 2 x 10^18 e-/mm^2. The crystal was analyzed before and after irradiation by X and Gamma diffractometry. No damage was observed, the mosaic spread remained unchanged during irradiation (0.4 mrad FWHM). Implications for use of orientated crystal as converter for positron sources of future LCs are discussed.

  7. Progress of the intense positron beam project EPOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EPOS (the ELBE POsitron Source) is a running project to build an intense, bunched positron beam for materials research. It makes use of the bunched electron beam of the ELBE radiation source (Electron Linac with high Brilliance and low Emittance) at the Research Centre Dresden-Rossendorf (40 MeV, 1 mA). ELBE has unique timing properties, the bunch length is <5 ps and the repetition time is 77 ns. In contrast to other Linacs made for Free Electron Lasers (e.g., TTF at DESY, Hamburg), ELBE can be operated in full cw-mode, i.e., with an uninterrupted sequence of bunches. The article continues an earlier publication. It concentrates on details of the timing system and describes issues of radiation protection

  8. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  9. Electron-Positron Accumulator (EPA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1986-01-01

    After acceleration in the low-current linac LIL-W, the electrons and positrons are accumulated in EPA to obtain a sufficient intensity and a suitable time-structure, before being passed on to the PS for further acceleration to 3.5 GeV. Electrons circulate from right to left, positrons in the other direction. Dipole bending magnets are red, focusing quadrupoles blue, sextupoles for chromaticity-control orange. The vertical tube at the left of the picture belongs to an optical transport system carrying the synchrotron radiation to detectors for beam size measurement. Construction of EPA was completed in spring 1986. LIL-W and EPA were conceived for an energy of 600 MeV, but operation was limited to 500 MeV.

  10. PEBS - Positron Electron Balloon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Von Doetinchem, P; Kirn, T; Yearwood, G R; Schael, S

    2007-01-01

    The best measurement of the cosmic ray positron flux available today was performed by the HEAT balloon experiment more than 10 years ago. Given the limitations in weight and power consumption for balloon experiments, a novel approach was needed to design a detector which could increase the existing data by more than a factor of 100. Using silicon photomultipliers for the readout of a scintillating fiber tracker and of an imaging electromagnetic calorimeter, the PEBS detector features a large geometrical acceptance of 2500 cm^2 sr for positrons, a total weight of 1500 kg and a power consumption of 600 W. The experiment is intended to measure cosmic ray particle spectra for a period of up to 20 days at an altitude of 40 km circulating the North or South Pole. A full Geant 4 simulation of the detector concept has been developed and key elements have been verified in a testbeam in October 2006 at CERN.

  11. Alignement général du CLIC: stratégie et progrès

    CERN Document Server

    Mainaud-Durand, H

    2008-01-01

    La faisabilité concernant le pré-alignement actif du CLIC sera démontrée si l?on peut prouver qu?il existe une référence et ses capteurs associés permettant l?alignement des composants à mieux que 3 microns (1?). Pour répondre à ce challenge, une méthode de mesure d?écarts à un fil tendu est proposée, basée sur 40 ans de pratique de cette technique au CERN. Quelques problèmes demeurent concernant cette méthode : la connaissance de la forme du fil tendu utilisé comme référence droite, la détermination du géoïde à la précision souhaitée et le développement de capteurs bas coût permettant des mesures sub-micrométriques. Des études ont été entreprises afin de lever les derniers points en suspens, pendant que cette solution est intégrée dans une proposition concernant l?alignement général du CLIC. Cela implique un grand nombre d?interactions au niveau du projet, dans des domaines aussi différents que le génie civil, l?intégration, la physique du faisceau, la métrologie des �...

  12. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Sources Fondation Pablo Iglesias. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Archives privées de Manuel ArijaArchives extérieuresArchives FNJS de EspañaPrensa Archives Générales de l’Administration. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Opposition au franquismeSig. 653 Sig TOP 82/68.103-68.602.Índice de las cartas colectivas, Relaciones, Cartas al Ministro de Información de Marzo de 1965. c.662. Sources cinématographiques Filmothèque Nationale d’Espagne.NO.DO. N° 1157C. 08/03/1965.aguirre Javier, Blanco vertical....

  13. Nonplanar positron-acoustic Gardner solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M. J., E-mail: josim.phys2007@gmail.com; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka-1342 (Bangladesh)

    2015-02-15

    Nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) positron-acoustic (PA) Gardner solitary waves (SWs) in an unmagnetized plasma system consisting of immobile positive ions, mobile cold positrons, and superthermal (kappa distributed) hot positrons and electrons are investigated. The modified Gardner equation is derived by using the reductive perturbation technique. The effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries, superthermal parameter of hot positrons and electrons, relative temperature ratios, and relative number density ratios on the PA Gardner SWs are studied by using the numerical simulations. The implications of our results in various space and laboratory plasma environments are briefly discussed.

  14. Development of a transmission positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A practical transmission positron microscope (TPM) JEM-1011B has been developed to survey differences in the interaction of positron and electron beams with materials, and is installed in the Slow Positron Facility of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The TPM can share positron and electron beams, and can also be used as a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Positron transmission images up to magnification 10,000x (resolution: 50 nm) and positron diffraction patterns up to 044 family were successfully obtained by the TPM comparing them with those of electrons. The differences in material transmittances for both beams have been measured, and can be explained by the calculated results of the Monte Carlo simulation code PENELOPE-2008.

  15. Design of a transmission electron positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the plans and design of positron-electron microscopes being built at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), Tsukuba, Japan. A used electron microscope is altered. The kinetic energies of positrons produced by accelerators or by nuclear decays are not a unique value but show a spread over in a wide range. Positron beam is guided to a transmission electron microscope (JEM100SX). Positrons are moderated by a tungsten foil, are accelerated and are focused on a nickel sheet. The monochromatic focused beam is injected into an electron microscope. The focusing and aberration of positrons are the same as electrons in a magnetic system which are used in commercial electron microscopes. Imaging plates are used to record positron images for the transmission electron microscope. (author)

  16. Positron annihilation studies of organic superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The positron lifetimes of two organic superconductors, κ-(ET)2Cu(NCS)2 and κ-(ET)2Cu[N(CN)2]Br, are measured as a function of temperature across Tc. A drop of positron lifetime below Tc is observed. Positron-electron momentum densities are measured by using 2D-ACAR to search for the Fermi surface in κ-(ET)2Cu[N(CN)2]Br. Positron density distributions and positron-electron overlaps are calculated by using the orthogonalized linear combination atomic orbital (OLCAO) method to interprete the temperature dependence due to the local charge transfer which is inferred to relate to the superconducting transition. 2D-ACAR results in κ-(ET)2Cu[N(CN)2]Br are compared with theoretical band calculations based on a first-principles local density approximation. Importance of performing accurate band calculations for the interpretation of positron annihilation data is emphasized

  17. Development of a transmission positron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuya, M., E-mail: matsuya@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino, 3-Chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Jinno, S. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Chiba University, Yayoi, Inage, Chiba, Chiba 263-8552 (Japan); Ootsuka, T.; Inoue, M. [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino, 3-Chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Kurihara, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Doyama, M.; Inoue, M. [Teikyo University of Science and Technology, Uenohara, Yamanashi 409-0913 (Japan); Fujinami, M. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Chiba University, Yayoi, Inage, Chiba, Chiba 263-8552 (Japan)

    2011-07-21

    A practical transmission positron microscope (TPM) JEM-1011B has been developed to survey differences in the interaction of positron and electron beams with materials, and is installed in the Slow Positron Facility of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The TPM can share positron and electron beams, and can also be used as a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Positron transmission images up to magnification 10,000x (resolution: 50 nm) and positron diffraction patterns up to 044 family were successfully obtained by the TPM comparing them with those of electrons. The differences in material transmittances for both beams have been measured, and can be explained by the calculated results of the Monte Carlo simulation code PENELOPE-2008.

  18. Design of the 15 GHz BPM test bench for the CLIC test facility to perform precise stretched-wire RF measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzetti, Silvia; Fanucci, Luca; Galindo Muñoz, Natalia; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a low emittance beam transport and preservation, thus a precise control of the beam orbit along up to 50 km of the accelerator components in the sub-μm regime is required. Within the PACMAN3 (Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometer Scale) PhD training action a study with the objective of pre-aligning the electrical centre of a 15 GHz cavity beam position monitor (BPM) to the magnetic centre of the main beam quadrupole is initiated. Of particular importance is the design of a specific test bench to study the stretched-wire setup for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) BPM, focusing on the aspects of microwave signal excitation, transmission and impedance-matching, as well as the mechanical setup and reproducibility of the measurement method.

  19. Design of the 15 GHz BPM test bench for the CLIC test facility to perform precise stretched-wire RF measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a low emittance beam transport and preservation, thus a precise control of the beam orbit along up to 50 km of the accelerator components in the sub-μm regime is required. Within the PACMAN3 (Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometer Scale) PhD training action a study with the objective of pre-aligning the electrical centre of a 15 GHz cavity beam position monitor (BPM) to the magnetic centre of the main beam quadrupole is initiated. Of particular importance is the design of a specific test bench to study the stretched-wire setup for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) BPM, focusing on the aspects of microwave signal excitation, transmission and impedance-matching, as well as the mechanical setup and reproducibility of the measurement method. (paper)

  20. Alignment Methods Developed for the Validation of the Thermal and Mechanical Behaviour of the Two Beam Test Modules for the CLIC Project

    CERN Document Server

    Mainaud Durand, Helene; Sosin, Mateusz; Rude, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    CLIC project will consist of more than 20 000 two meters long modules. A test setup made of three modules is being built at CERN to validate the assembly and integration of all components and technical systems and to validate the short range strategy of pre-alignment. The test setup has been installed in a room equipped with a sophisticated system of ventilation able to reproduce the environmental conditions of the CLIC tunnel. Some of the components have been equipped with electrical heaters to simulate the power dissipation, combined with a water cooling system integrated in the RF components. Using these installations, to have a better understanding of the thermal and mechanical behaviour of a module under different operation modes, machine cycles have been simulated; the misalignment of the components and their supports has been observed. This paper describes the measurements methods developed for such a project and the results obtained.

  1. Pressure dependence of positron annihilation in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pressure dependence of the electron-positron and the electron-electron momentum densities in silicon are studied. The observations that the electron-positron momentum density increases more rapidly with pressure than the electron-electron momentum density alone is explained in terms of increased positron penetration into the ion cores. The computational technique used here is based on the independent-particle model (IPM) coupled with the use of the electron pseudo-wave functions. (orig.)

  2. Solvated Positron Chemistry. The Reaction of Hydrated Positrons with Chloride Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Shantarovich, V. P.

    1974-01-01

    The reaction of hydrated positrons (caq+ with cloride ions in aqueous solutions has been studied by means of positron annihilation angular correlation measurements. A rate constant of k = (2.5 ± 0.5) × 1010 M−1 s−1 was found. Probably the reacting positrons annihilated from an e+ Cl− bound state ...... resulting in an angular correlation curve 8% narrower than for the hydrated positron. Carbontetrachloride in benzene seems to give similar, but smaller effect....

  3. Measurement of Higgs couplings and mass in e+e- collisions at CLIC in the sqrt(s) range of 350 GeV - 3 TeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laštovička, Tomáš

    Trieste: S I S S A, 2013, s. 1-7, 295. ISSN 1824-8039. [EPS-HEP 2013 - The European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics 2013. Stockholm (SE), 17.07.2013- 24.07.2013] Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Higgs boson * CLIC * CERN * Higgs branching ratios * Higgs mass * linear accelerator Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics http://pos.sissa.it/archive/conferences/180/295/EPS-HEP%202013_295.pdf

  4. Toward a European Network of Positron Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karwasz Grzegorz P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Some applications of controlled-energy positron beams in material studies are discussed. In porous organic polysilicates, measurements of 3γ annihilation by Doppler broadening (DB method at the Trento University allowed to trace pore closing and filling by water vapor. In silicon coimplanted by He+ and H+, DB data combined with positron lifetime measurements at the München pulsed positron beam allowed to explain Si blistering. Presently measured samples of W for applications in thermonuclear reactors, irradiated by W+ and electrons, show vast changes of positron lifetimes, indicating complex dynamics of defects.

  5. Low-energy contributions to positron implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed knowledge of low-energy positron implantation is of considerable importance for depth profiling and data analysis in slow positron experiments. Existing Monte Carlo models are capable of simulating the behavior of positrons incident at keV energies, then following the energy-loss process to final kinetic energies of from 20 to 100 eV. A Monte Carlo calculation of the final stages of positron thermalization in Al, Cu, and Au, from 25 eV to thermal energies, is described via the mechanisms of conduction-electron and longitudinal acoustic-phonon scattering. This calculation produces a wide variety of data, including implantation profiles, fraction and energy distribution of reemitted positrons, and the mean thermalization time. A way to obtain information about positron energy loss by considering the time evolution of a point concentration (delta-function distribution) of positrons is described. Diffusion coefficients are obtained that are in good agreement with experiment. The effects of a positive positron work function are examined in the context of a positron Monte Carlo calculation. It is shown that the latter stages of thermalization can have important effects on the stopping profiles and mean depth. In particular, calculated stopping profiles and mean implantation depth are not adequately described by the Makhovian distribution, in agreement with recent experimental findings. A parameterization of these profiles is provided which will be of use in the analysis of experimental data

  6. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyodo, T; Wada, K; Yagishita, A; Kosuge, T; Saito, Y; Kurihara, T; Kikuchi, T; Shirakawa, A; Sanami, T; Ikeda, M; Ohsawa, S; Kakihara, K; Shidara, T, E-mail: toshio.hyodo@kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps{sup -}). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a {sup 22}Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  7. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps-). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a 22Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  8. Development of a positron probe micro analyzer with a high intensity positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A positron probe micro analyzer (PPMA) has been developed in AIST. When a positron microbeam is injected into a specimen, radiations including secondary electrons, back scattered positrons, and annihilation gamma-rays are emitted from the beam injected point. In the PPMA, these radiations are detected to characterize small area of specimens. We report on details of designs and specifications of the PPMA. (author)

  9. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The

  10. A Doppler-broadening facility for positron spin relaxation (e{sup +}SR) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessmann, Th.; Harmat, P.; Major, J.; Seeger, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Institut fuer Physik, Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1997-05-14

    A set-up is described for the determination of the spin polarization of positrons emitted from radioactive sources that makes use of the dependence of the Doppler broadening of the 511 keV annihilation photon line on the strength and direction (with regard to the spin polarization) of an applied magnetic field. In the so-called e{sup +}SR (positron spin relaxation) technique the sample to be investigated is part of the e{sup +}-spin polarimeter. Its application to the investigation of positronium formation in condensed matter is illustrated using crystalline quartz as an example. The method earlier applied to the positron annihilation in magnetized ferromagnets is now transferred to the detection of positronium (Ps) in condensed matter. This new approach makes use of the fact, that the ratio of Ps atoms in the singlet and the triplet states is larger in a magnetic field applied parallel to the positron-spin polarization than in an antiparallel field.

  11. A Doppler-broadening facility for positron spin relaxation (e+SR) experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set-up is described for the determination of the spin polarization of positrons emitted from radioactive sources that makes use of the dependence of the Doppler broadening of the 511 keV annihilation photon line on the strength and direction (with regard to the spin polarization) of an applied magnetic field. In the so-called e+SR (positron spin relaxation) technique the sample to be investigated is part of the e+-spin polarimeter. Its application to the investigation of positronium formation in condensed matter is illustrated using crystalline quartz as an example. The method earlier applied to the positron annihilation in magnetized ferromagnets is now transferred to the detection of positronium (Ps) in condensed matter. This new approach makes use of the fact, that the ratio of Ps atoms in the singlet and the triplet states is larger in a magnetic field applied parallel to the positron-spin polarization than in an antiparallel field

  12. Confronting recent AMS-02 positron fraction and Fermi-LAT extragalactic γ-ray background measurements with gravitino dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carquín, Edson; Díaz, Marco A.; Gómez-Vargas, Germán A.; Panes, Boris; Viaux, Nicolás

    2016-03-01

    Recent positron flux fraction measurements in cosmic-rays (CR) made by the AMS-02 detector confirm and extend the evidence on the existence of a new (yet unknown) source of high energy electrons and positrons. We test the gravitino dark matter of bilinear R-parity violating supersymmetric models as this electrons/positrons source. Being a long lived weak-interacting and spin 3/2 particle, it offers several particularities which makes it an attractive dark matter candidate. We compute the electron, positron and γ-ray fluxes produced by each gravitino decay channel as it would be detected at the Earth's position. Combining the flux from the different decay modes we are able to reproduce AMS-02 measurements of the positron fraction, as well as the electron and positron fluxes, with a gravitino dark matter mass in the range 1-3 TeV and lifetime of ˜1.0-0.7×1026 s. The high statistics measurement of electron and positron fluxes, and the flattening in the behaviour of the positron fraction recently found by AMS-02 allow us to determine that the preferred gravitino decaying mode by the fit is W±τ∓, unlike previous analyses. Then we study the viability of these scenarios through their implication in γ-ray observations. For this we use the Extragalactic γ-ray Background recently reported by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration and a state-of-the-art model of its known contributors. Based on the γ-ray analysis we exclude the gravitino parameter space which provides an acceptable explanation of the AMS-02 data. Therefore, we conclude that the gravitino of bilinear R-parity violating models is ruled out as the unique primary source of electrons and positrons needed to explain the rise in the positron fraction.

  13. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    A. SOURCES STATISTIQUES 1. Statistiques générales Annuaire statistique international, SDN (à partir de 1926). Mémorandum sur le commerce international et sur les balances des paiements, annuel à partir de 1927 (numéros rétrospectifs 1912-1926, 1913-1927), [3 volumes : aperçu général ; balances des paiements ; statistiques du commerce extérieur ; utilise les données nationales disponibles. Très utile]. Annuaire statistique de la France. Annuaire statistique de la Belgique. Statistiques économi...

  14. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    I–SOURCES MANUSCRITES Archivio di Stato di Roma (ASR) Presidenza dell’Annona e Grascia : bb. 67-68, Lista dei misuratori del grano, 1658-1660. bb. 352-377, Nota dei grani introdotti e venduti in Roma, 1657-1715. bb. 412-419, Ristretto delle assegne dei grani date dai mercanti, 1680-1687. b. 1470, Registro delle lettere del Prefetto dell’Annona, 1659-1660. b. 1706, Libri di entrata e uscita dei grani dell’abbondanza (Ripetta), 16581670. bb. 1930-1931, Debiti e crediti dei fornai, 1658-1660. b....

  15. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Sources éditées : ABADAL i de VINYALS, Ramon d', Catalunya carolingia, II, Els diplomes carolingis a Catalunya, 2 vol., Barcelone, 1926-1952, cit. CC. ACHERY, D', Luc, Spicilegium sive collectio veterum aliquot scriptorum..., E. Baluze et E. Martène éd., Paris, 1723, tome 3. ALART, Bernard, Privilèges et titres relatifs aux franchises, institutions et propriétés communales de Roussillon et de Cerdagne depuis le xie siècle jusqu 'à l'an 1660... Première partie, Perpignan, 1878. ALART, Bernard,...

  16. On positron annihilation in zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to understand Mogensen's and Petersen's positron annihilation curves for zinc. Mijnarends approach is used as an auxiliary method of localizing inhomogeneities of the electronic density in momentum space, as defined in the paper. Evidence is found for a new effect consisting of a strong enhancement of the annihilation probability in the lenses obtained by the intersection of the Fermi surface with HMC surfaces. This effect, not the anisotropy of the Fermi surface, is the main reason for the anisotropy of the annihilation curves. (orig.)

  17. Facility for positron computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For positron computed tomography two or more rings of scintillation detectors are used by which three or more sections of the object may be determined at a time. The rings are placed in parallel planes having got some distance from each other, axially movable collimator rings being provided for. Each collimator can be moved towards the opposite collimator and towards a central collimator which also is ring-shaped and is placed between the rows of detectors. The external and internal collimator are used for data selection and image-forming. (DG)

  18. The Galactic Positron Annihilation Radiation and the Propagation of Positrons in the Interstellar Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Higdon, J. C.; Lingenfelter, R. E.; Rothschild, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The ratio of the luminosity of diffuse 511 keV positron annihilation radiation, measured by INTEGRAL in its four years, from a Galactic "positron bulge" (3.5 kpc), the cascade of the magnetic turbulence, which scatters the positrons, is damped by ion-neutral friction, allowing positrons to stream along magnetic flux tubes. We find that nearly 1/2 of the positrons produced in the disk escape from it into the halo. On the other hand, we show that within the extended, or interstellar, bulge (

  19. Bruno Touschek, from Betatrons to Electron-positron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardini, Carlo; Pellegrini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Bruno Touschek's life as a physicist spanned the period from World War II to the 1970s. He was a key figure in the developments of electron-positron colliders, storage rings, and gave important contributions to theoretical high energy physics. Storage rings, initially developed for high energy physics, are being widely used in many countries as synchrotron radiation sources and are a tool for research in physics, chemistry, biology environmental sciences and cultural heritage studies. We describe Touschek's life in Austria, where he was born, Germany, where he participated to the construction of a betatron during WWII, and Italy, where he proposed and led to completion the first electron-positron storage ring in 1960, in Frascati. We highlight how his central European culture influenced his life style and work, and his main contributions to physics, such as the discovery of the Touschek effect and beam instabilities in the larger storage ring ADONE.

  20. The positron camera in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography is making headway in health care delivery. With improvements in instrumentation and physiologic tracers and with the development of hospital-based compact cyclotrons, 'physiopathologic tomography' is around the corner in nuclear medicine. This paper is a brief review of positron emission tomography: instrumentation and applications

  1. Nanometer cavities studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positronium (Ps) is trapped in cavities in insulating solids, and the lifetime of ortho Ps is determined by the size of the cavity. The information on the properties of the cavities obtained by use of the standard slow positron beam and the 'normal' positron annihilation techniques is compared for several selected cases. (author)

  2. Positron spectroscopy after heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reviews the theoretical and experimental results on positron production in heavy ion collisions. After a discussion of the quasi-atomic picture, the possible observation of the axion, and the inverse Bhabha scattering, the positron spectrometer EPOS of the GSI Darmstadt is described. Thereafter the experimental results are presented. (HSI)

  3. Positron prevacancy effects in pure annealed metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low-temperature prevacancy effects sometimes observed with positrons in well-annealed high-purity metals are discussed. It is shown that these effects are not experimental artifacts, but are due to trapping of the positrons. It is suggested that dislocations are responsible for these trapping effects. 46 references, 5 figures

  4. Gas Permeations Studied by Positron Annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jen-Pwu; Cao, Huimin; Jean, X.; Yang, Y. C.

    1997-03-01

    The hole volumes and fractions of PC and PET polymers are measured by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Direct correlations between the measured hole properties and gas permeabilities are observed. Applications of positron annihilation spectroscopy to study gas transport and separation of polymeric materials will be discussed.

  5. Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 7 NIST Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials (PC database for purchase)   The EPSTAR database provides rapid calculations of stopping powers (collisional, radiative, and total), CSDA ranges, radiation yields and density effect corrections for incident electrons or positrons with kinetic energies from 1 keV to 10 GeV, and for any chemically defined target material.

  6. Descriptions of positron defect analysis capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of descriptive papers and graphics appropriate for distribution to potential collaborators has been assembled. These describe the capabilities for defect analysis using positron annihilation spectroscopy. The application of positrons to problems in the polymer and semiconductor industries is addressed

  7. Slow positron beam at the JINR, Dubna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horodek Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Low Energy Positron Toroidal Accumulator (LEPTA at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR proposed for generation of positronium in flight has been adopted for positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS. The positron injector generates continuous slow positron beam with positron energy range between 50 eV and 35 keV. The radioactive 22Na isotope is used. In distinction to popular tungsten foil, here the solid neon is used as moderator. It allows to obtain the beam intensity of about 105 e+/s width energy spectrum characterized by full width at half maximum (FWHM of 3.4 eV and a tail to lower energies of about 30 eV. The paper covers the characteristic of variable energy positron beam at the LEPTA facility: parameters, the rule of moderation, scheme of injector, and transportation of positrons into the sample chamber. Recent status of the project and its development in the field of PAS is discussed. As an example, the measurement of the positron diffusion length in pure iron is demonstrated.

  8. Positron acoustic shock waves in four-component plasmas with nonthermal electrons and positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, M. M.; Mamun, A. A. [Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Alam, M. S. [Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Santosh, Tangail (Bangladesh)

    2014-06-15

    Positron acoustic shock waves (PASWs) in an unmagnetized four-component plasma system consisting of a cold mobile viscous positron fluid, hot positrons and electrons following the nonthermal distributions of Cairns et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett. 22, 2709 (1995)], and immobile positive ions are studied both analytically and numerically. The well-known reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Burgers equation. The basic features of the PASWs are significantly modified by the effects of the kinematic viscosity, the nonthermal electrons and hot positrons, the ratio of the electron temperature to the hot positron temperature σ, and the ratio of the hot positron (electron) number density to the cold positron number density μ{sub 1} (μ{sub 2}). The importance of our results to various astrophysical and laboratory plasmas are concisely discussed.

  9. Applications of slow positrons to cancer research: Search for selectivity of positron annihilation to skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean, Y.C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 205 Spenscer Chemistry Building, 5009 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)]. E-mail: jeany@umkc.edu; Li Ying [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 205 Spenscer Chemistry Building, 5009 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Liu Gaung [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 205 Spenscer Chemistry Building, 5009 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Chen, Hongmin [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 205 Spenscer Chemistry Building, 5009 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Zhang Junjie [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 205 Spenscer Chemistry Building, 5009 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Gadzia, Joseph E. [Dermatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66103 (United States); Kansas Medical Clinic, Topeka, KS 66614 (United States)

    2006-02-28

    Slow positrons and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) have been applied to medical research in searching for positron annihilation selectivity to cancer cells. We report the results of positron lifetime and Doppler broadening energy spectroscopies in human skin samples with and without cancer as a function of positron incident energy (up to 8 {mu}m depth) and found that the positronium annihilates at a significantly lower rate and forms at a lower probability in the samples having either basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) than in the normal skin. The significant selectivity of positron annihilation to skin cancer may open a new research area of developing positron annihilation spectroscopy as a novel medical tool to detect cancer formation externally and non-invasively at the early stages.

  10. Positron injectors for high-luminosity storage-ring colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on high-luminosity B-factories utilizing storage rings operating at unequal energies which require high-energy, low-emittance sources of positrons, and electrons suitable to fill the storage rings. As an example, consider the proposed characteristics of a collider with a luminosity of 1034 cm-2s-1 using the PEP facility at SLAC as studied by LBL (Apiary-III) and summarized. The collider consists of two rings, a large 9-GeV ring (PEP or a modification thereof) plus a 3.1-GeV ring of one-third the circumference, each with a circulating current of 3 A. Ideally, the time to fill the positron ring should be much shorter than the luminosity lifetime (set by the size of the low-energy ring). Since the luminosity lifetime of the collider is not expected to be very high, the PEP-based B-factory should have a powerful, dedicated injector. In the estimate of the characteristics of the injection system the maximum time for a complete fill of the positron ring is taken as ∼100 seconds. In the design of the injection system several choices are possible: injection by linacs at full energy of the rings or use of an intermediate booster synchrotron; accelerating e+ and e- to high energy using conventional linacs or using high-gradient linacs plus gigawatt power RF-sources being developed for linear colliders; and using a conventional (warm magnet) damping ring for cooling the positron beam at an intermediate energy or a full energy ring with a radius equal to that of the low-energy ring

  11. Positronic complexes with unnatural parity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of the unnatural parity states of PsH, LiPs, NaPs, and KPs are investigated with the configuration interaction and stochastic variational methods. The binding energies (in hartree) are found to be 8.17x10-4, 4.42x10-4, 15.14x10-4, and 21.80x10-4, respectively. These states are constructed by first coupling the two electrons into a configuration which is predominantly 3Pe, and then adding a p-wave positron. All the active particles are in states in which the relative angular momentum between any pair of particles is at least L=1. The LiPs state is Borromean since there are no three-body bound subsystems (of the correct symmetry) of the (Li+, e-, e-, e+) particles that make up the system. The dominant decay mode of these states will be radiative decay into a configuration that autoionizes or undergoes positron annihilation

  12. Probing the Pulsar Origin of the Anomalous Positron Fraction with AMS-02 and Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Linden, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations by PAMELA, Fermi-LAT, and AMS-02 have conclusively indicated a rise in the cosmic-ray positron fraction above 10 GeV, a feature which is impossible to mimic under the paradigm of secondary positron production with self-consistent Galactic cosmic-ray propagation models. A leading explanation for the rising positron fraction is an additional source of electron-positron pairs, for example one or more mature, energetic, and relatively nearby pulsars. We point out that any one of two well-known nearby pulsars, Geminga and Monogem, can satisfactorily provide enough positrons to reproduce AMS-02 observations. A smoking-gun signature of this scenario is an anisotropy in the arrival direction of the cosmic-ray electrons and positrons, which may be detectable by existing, or future, telescopes. The predicted anisotropy level is, at present, consistent with limits from Fermi-LAT and AMS-02. We argue that the large collecting area of Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (ACTs) makes them optimal tools for...

  13. Reconcile the AMS-02 positron fraction and Fermi-LAT/HESS total $e^{\\pm}$ spectra by the primary electron spectrum hardening

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Qiang; Bi, Xiao-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The recently reported positron fraction up to $\\sim 350$ GeV by AMS-02 seems to have tension with the total electron/positron spectra detected by Fermi and HESS, for either pulsar or dark matter annihilation/decay scenario as the primary positron sources. In this work we will show that the tension will be removed by an adjustment of the primary electron spectrum. If the primary electron spectrum becomes harder above $\\sim50$ GeV, similar as the cosmic ray nuclei spectrum, the AMS-02 positron ...

  14. High-voltage pixel detectors in commercial CMOS technologies for ATLAS, CLIC and Mu3e experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Peric,I et al.

    2013-01-01

    High-voltage particle detectors in commercial CMOS technologies are a detector family that allows implementation of low-cost, thin and radiation-tolerant detectors with a high time resolution. In the R/D phase of the development, a radiation tolerance of 1015 neq=cm2 , nearly 100% detection efficiency and a spatial resolution of about 3 μm were demonstrated. Since 2011 the HV detectors have first applications: the technology is presently the main option for the pixel detector of the planned Mu3e experiment at PSI (Switzerland). Several prototype sensors have been designed in a standard 180 nm HV CMOS process and successfully tested. Thanks to its high radiation tolerance, the HV detectors are also seen at CERN as a promising alternative to the standard options for ATLAS upgrade and CLIC. In order to test the concept, within ATLAS upgrade R/D, we are currently exploring an active pixel detector demonstrator HV2FEI4; also implemented in the 180 nm HV process.

  15. High-voltage pixel detectors in commercial CMOS technologies for ATLAS, CLIC and Mu3e experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Peric, Ivan; Backhaus, Malte; Barbero, Marlon; Benoit, Mathieu; Berger, Niklaus; Bompard, Frederic; Breugnon, Patrick; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Dannheim, Dominik; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feigl, Simon; Fischer, Peter; Fougeron, Denis; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Heim, Timon; Hügging, Fabian; Kiehn, Moritz; Kreidl, Christian; Krüger, Hans; La Rosa, Alessandro; Liu, Jian; Lütticke, Florian; Mariñas, Carlos; Meng, Lingxin; Miucci, Antonio; Münstermann, Daniel; Nguyen, Hong Hanh; Obermann, Theresa; Pangaud, Patrick; Perrevoort, Ann-Kathrin; Rozanov, Alexandre; Schöning, André; Schwenker, Benjamin; Wiedner, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    High-voltage particle detectors in commercial CMOS technologies are a detector family that allows implementation of low-cost, thin and radiation-tolerant detectors with a high time resolution. In the R/D phase of the development, a radiation tolerance of 10 15 n eq = cm 2 , nearly 100% detection ef fi ciency and a spatial resolution of about 3 μ m were demonstrated. Since 2011 the HV detectors have fi rst applications: the technology is presently the main option for the pixel detector of the planned Mu3e experiment at PSI (Switzerland). Several prototype sensors have been designed in a standard 180 nm HV CMOS process and successfully tested. Thanks to its high radiation tolerance, the HV detectors are also seen at CERN as a promising alternative to the standard options for ATLAS upgrade and CLIC. In order to test the concept, within ATLAS upgrade R/D, we are currently exploring an active pixel detector demonstrator HV2FEI4; also implemented in the 180 nm HV process

  16. Positron emission tomography and migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a brain imaging technique that allows in vivo studies of numerous physiological parameters. There have been few PET studies in migraine patients. Cerebral blood flow changes with no variations in brain oxygen consumption have been reported in patients with prolonged neurologic manifestations during migraine attacks. Parenteral administration of reserpine during migraine headache has been followed by a fall in the overall cerebral uptake of glucose. The small sample sizes and a number of methodologic problems complicate the interpretation of these results. Recent technical advances and the development of new PET tracers can be expected to provide further insight into the pathophysiology of migraine. Today cerebral cortex 5 HT2 serotonin receptors can be studied in migraine patients with PET

  17. Positron emission tomography wrist detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlyer, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois

    2006-08-15

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal representing a time-of-occurrence of an annihilation event, generating an address signal representing a channel detecting the annihilation event, and generating a channel signal including the time and address signals. The method also includes generating a composite signal including the channel signal and another similarly generated channel signal concerning another annihilation event. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information includes a time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator. The time signal is asynchronous and the address signal is synchronous to a clock signal. A PET scanner includes a scintillation array, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoders include the time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator.

  18. Positron and positronium in insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy has been widely applied to study the microstructure in various insulators: polymers, oxides, ceramics, molecular substances, zeolites and so on. The most important experimental observation is that the positronium (Ps) can be formed in those materials and then localized in the regions with lower electron density. The Ps annihilation parameter is used to characterize the microstructure in nanometer scale, and related to physical and chemical properties of insulators. In this paper the Ps formation and localization, the Ps interaction with dopants and gases, the recent results in studying the free volume in polymers and micro-voids in porous materials will be briefly reviewed. The unique information explored by Ps probe and its fundamental importance and potential industrial application will be presented. (orig.)

  19. Positron emission tomography basic sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, D W; Valk, P E; Maisey, M N

    2003-01-01

    Essential for students, science and medical graduates who want to understand the basic science of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), this book describes the physics, chemistry, technology and overview of the clinical uses behind the science of PET and the imaging techniques it uses. In recent years, PET has moved from high-end research imaging tool used by the highly specialized to an essential component of clinical evaluation in the clinic, especially in cancer management. Previously being the realm of scientists, this book explains PET instrumentation, radiochemistry, PET data acquisition and image formation, integration of structural and functional images, radiation dosimetry and protection, and applications in dedicated areas such as drug development, oncology, and gene expression imaging. The technologist, the science, engineering or chemistry graduate seeking further detailed information about PET, or the medical advanced trainee wishing to gain insight into the basic science of PET will find this book...

  20. Induced Positron Annihiliation Investigation of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Crystal Microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. W. Akers

    2005-06-01

    Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) crystals are used in semiconductor radiation detectors for the detection of x-ray and gamma radiation. However, production of detector grade crystals is difficult as small variations in compositional uniformity and primarily the zinc content can significantly affect the ability of the CZT crystal to function as a radiation detector. Currently there are no known nondestructive methods that can be used to identify detector grade crystals. The current test method is to fabricate and test the detector to determine if the crystal is sufficiently uniform and of the correct composition to be considered a detector grade crystal. Consequently, nondestructive detection methods are needed to identify detector grade crystals prior to the fabrication process. The purpose of this feasibility study was to perform a preliminary assessment of the ability of several new, nondestructive technologies based on Induced Positron Annihilation (IPA) to determine if detector grade CZT crystals can be identified. Results of measurements performed on specimens from Fisk University and EV Products, Inc. indicate that both the near surface Distributed Source Positron Annihilation (up to 3 mm penetration) and the volumetric Photon Induced Positron Annihilation methods may be suitable for determining CZT crystal quality. Further work on CZT crystals with a broader range of compositions and detector characteristics is needed to provide a well defined, calibrated, method for assessing CZT crystal quality.