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Sample records for clic drive beam

  1. CLIC Drive Beam Phase Stabilisation

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Schulte, Daniel

    The thesis presents phase stability studies for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and focuses in particular on CLIC Drive Beam longitudinal phase stabilisation. This topic constitutes one of the main feasibility challenges for CLIC construction and is an essential component of the current CLIC stabilisation campaign. The studies are divided into two large interrelated sections: the simulation studies for the CLIC Drive Beam stability, and measurements, data analysis and simulations of the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) Drive Beam phase errors. A dedicated software tool has been developed for a step-by-step analysis of the error propagation through the CLIC Drive Beam. It uses realistic RF potential and beam loading amplitude functions for the Drive and Main Beam accelerating structures, complete models of the recombination scheme and compressor chicane as well as of further CLIC Drive Beam modules. The tool has been tested extensively and its functionality has been verified. The phase error propagation at CLIC h...

  2. CLIC Drive Beam Position Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, S; Gudkov, D; Soby, L; Syratchev, I

    2011-01-01

    CLIC, an electron-positron linear collider proposed to probe the TeV energy scale, is based on a two-beam scheme where RF power to accelerate a high energy luminosity beam is extracted from a high current drive beam. The drive beam is efficiently generated in a long train at modest frequency and current then compressed in length and multiplied in frequency via bunch interleaving. The drive beam decelerator requires >40000 quadrupoles, each holding a beam position monitor (BPM). Though resolution requirements are modest (2 microns) these BPMs face several challenges. They must be compact and inexpensive. They must operate below waveguide cutoff to insure locality of position signals, ruling out processing at the natural 12 GHz bunch spacing frequency. Wakefields must be kept low. We find compact conventional stripline BPM with signals processed below 40 MHz can meet requirements. Choices of mechanical design, operating frequency, bandwidth, calibration and processing algorithm are presented. Calculations of wa...

  3. The CLIC Multi-Drive Beam Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, R

    1998-01-01

    The CLIC study of an e+ / e- linear collider in the TeV energy range is based on Two-Beam Acceleration (TBA) in which the RF power needed to accelerate the beam is extracted from high intensity relativistic electron beams, the so-called drive beams. The generation, acceleration and transport of the high-intensity drive beams in an efficient and reliable way constitute a challenging task. An overview of a potentially very effective scheme is presented. It is based on the generation of trains of short bunches, accelerated sequentially in low frequency superconducting cavities in a c.w. mode, stored in an isochronous ring and combined at high energy by funnelling before injection by sectors into the drive linac for RF power production. The various systems of the complex are discussed.

  4. Drive beam stabilisation in the CLIC Test Facility 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, L.; Corsini, R.; Persson, T.; Skowroński, P. K.; Adli, E.

    2018-06-01

    The proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) uses a high intensity, low energy drive beam to produce the RF power needed to accelerate a lower intensity main beam with 100 MV/m gradient. This scheme puts stringent requirements on drive beam stability in terms of phase, energy and current. The consequent experimental work was carried out in CLIC Test Facility CTF3. In this paper, we present a novel analysis technique in accelerator physics to find beam drifts and their sources in the vast amount of the continuously gathered signals. The instability sources are identified and adequately mitigated either by hardware improvements or by implementation and commissioning of various feedbacks, mostly beam-based. The resulting drive beam stability is of 0.2°@ 3 GHz in phase, 0.08% in relative beam energy and about 0.2% beam current. Finally, we propose a stabilisation concept for CLIC to guarantee the main beam stability.

  5. Permanent magnet quadrupoles for the CLIC Drive Beam decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Shepherd, Ben; Collomb, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    STFC in collaboration with CERN has developed a new type of adjustable permanent magnet based quadrupole for the CLIC Drive Beam Decelerator. It uses vertical movement of the permanent magnets to achieve an integrated gradient range of 3.6-14.6T, which will allow it to be used for the first 60% of the decelerator line. Construction of a prototype of this magnet has begun; following this, it will be measured magnetically at CERN and Daresbury Laboratory.

  6. Stability of the drive beam in the decelerator of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The RF power necessary to accelerate the main beam in the compact linear collider (CLIC) is generated by decelerating high-intensity low energy drive beams in 44 decelerators. Recently new decelerating structures (PETS, power extraction and transfer structures) have been developed. In these structures the RF energy travels with particularly high group velocity, which can affect efficiency and transverse stability. The paper considers the transverse beam stability in the decelerator as well as the longitudinal effects in the presence of dynamic and static imperfections.

  7. Design and characterization of a prototype stripline beam position monitor for the Clic Drive Beam*

    CERN Document Server

    Benot-Morell, A; Wendt, M; Nappa, J M; Tassan-Viol, J; Vilalte, S; Smith, S

    2012-01-01

    The prototype of a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) with its associated readout electronics is under development at CERN, in collaboration with SLAC, LAPP and IFIC. The anticipated position resolution and accuracy are expected to be below 2μm and 20μm respectively for operation of the BPM in the CLIC drive beam (DB) linac. This paper describes the particular CLIC DB conditions with respect to the beam position monitoring, presents the measurement concept, and summarizes electromagnetic simulations and RF measurements performed on the prototype.

  8. RF Design of the TW Buncher for the CLIC Drive Beam Injector (2nd report)

    CERN Document Server

    Shaker, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    CLIC is based on the two beams concept that one beam (drive beam) produces the required RF power to accelerate another beam (main beam). The drive beam is produced and accelerated up to 50MeV inside the CLIC drive beam injector. The drive beam injector main components are a thermionic electron gun, three sub-harmonic bunchers, a pre-buncher, a TW buncher, 13 accelerating structures and one magnetic chicane. This document is the second report of the RF structure design of the TW buncher. This design is based on the beam dynamic design done by Shahin Sanaye Hajari due to requirements mentioned in CLIC CDR. A disk-loaded tapered structure is chosen for the TW buncher. The axial electric field increases strongly based on the beam dynamic requirements. This second report includes the study of HOM effects, retuning the cells, study of dimensional tolerances and the heat dissipation on the surface.

  9. Beam-based alignment of CLIC drive beam decelerator using girders movers

    CERN Document Server

    Sterbini, G

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC drive beams will provide the rf power to accelerate the colliding beams: in order to reach the design performance, an efficient transport of the drive beam has to be ensured in spite of its challenging energy spread and large current intensity. As shown in previous studies, the specifications can be met by coupling a convenient optics design with the state-of-the-art of pre-alignment and beambased alignment techniques. In this paper we consider a novel beam-based alignment scheme that does not require quadrupole movers or dipole correctors but uses the motors already foreseen for the pre-alignment system. This implies potential savings in terms of complexity and cost at the expense of the alignment flexibility: the performance, limitations and sensitivity to pre-alignment tolerances of this method are discussed.

  10. Collective effects and experimental verification of the CLIC drive beam and decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00418229; Stapnes, Steinar; Adli, Erik

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a potential next-generation particle collider, in which electrons and positrons collide at a center-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. In order to reach a high accelerating gradient and reduce the length of the machine, CLIC uses a novel two-beam scheme. Here, the acceleration energy for the main beam is provided by energy extraction from a secondary electron drive beam, by the use of Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS). This Ph.D. thesis describes deceleration measurements from the CLIC Test Facility 3 at CERN, from a beam that had up to 37 % of its kinetic energy converted into 12 GHz rf power. The results are part of the feasibility demonstration of the CLIC scheme. The measured difference in beam energy of the decelerated beam is correlated with particle tracking simulations and with predictions based on analytical formulae, and a very good agreement is demonstrated. The evolution of the transverse emittance was also studied, since it is critical to contain th...

  11. Online optimisation of the CLIC Drive Beam bunch train recombination at CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082483; Tecker, Frank

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) design is the leading alternative for a future multi-TeV "e^+e^−" linear collider. One of the key aspects of the design is the use of a Drive Beam as power source for the acceleration of the colliding beams. This work is focused on the optimisation of the set-up and the operations of the CLIC Drive Beam recombination at the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN. The main effects that may affect the beam quality during the recombination are studied, with emphasis on orbit, transverse dynamics and beam energy effects. A custom methodology is used to analyse the problem, both from a theoretical and a numerical point of view. The aim is to provide first-order orbit and transverse optics constraints, which can be used as guidelines during the set-up of the beam recombination process. The developed techniques are applied at the CTF3, and the results are reported. The non-linear beam energy effects have been investigated by means of MAD-X simulations. The results show that these effe...

  12. The drive beam pulse compression system for the CLIC RF power source

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, R

    1999-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) is a high energy (0.5 to 5 TeV) e ± linear collider that uses a high- current electron beam (the drive beam) for 30 GHz RF power production by the Two-Beam Acceleration (TBA) method. Recently, a new cost­effective and efficient generation scheme for the drive beam has been developed. A fully­loaded normal­conducting linac operating at lower frequency (937 MHz) generates and accelerates the drive beam bunches, and a compression system composed of a delay­line and two combiner rings produces the proper drive beam time structure for RF power generation in the drive beam decelerator. In this paper, a preliminary design of the whole compression system is presented. In particular, the fundamental issue of preserving the bunch quality along the complex is studied and its impact on the beam parameters and on the various system components is assessed. A first design of the rings and delay­line lattice, including path length tuning chicanes, injection and extraction regions is a...

  13. Beam Stability in the Drive-Beam Decelerator of CLIC Using Structures of High-Order Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Millich, Antonio; Schulte, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The RF power necessary to accelerate the main beam of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is produced by decelerating a high-current drive beam in Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS). The reference structure is not cylindrically symmetric but has longitudinal waveguides carved into the inner surface. This gives rise to a transverse component of the main longitudinal mode which can not be damped, in contrast to the transverse dipole wake- field. The field is non-linear and couples the motion of the particles in the two planes. Limits of the stability of the decelerated beam are investigated for different structures.

  14. Drive Beam Quadrupoles for the CLIC Project: a Novel Method of Fiducialisation and a New Micrometric Adjustment System

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)411678; Duquenne, Mathieu; Sandomierski, Jacek; Sosin, Mateusz; Rude, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new method of fiducialisation applied to determine the magnetic axis of the Drive Beam quadrupole of the CLIC project with respect to external alignment fiducials, within a micrometric accuracy and precision. It introduces also a new micrometric adjustment system along 5 Degrees of Freedom, developed for the same Drive Beam quadrupole. The combination of both developments opens very interesting perspectives to get a more simple and accurate alignment of the quadrupoles.

  15. Low-level feedback control for the phase regulation of CLIC Drive Beam Klystrons

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)752526

    2015-01-01

    The requirement of luminosity loss below 1% raises tight tolerances for the phase and power stability of the CLIC drive beam (DB) klystrons and consequently for the high voltage pulse ripple of the modulators. A low-level RF (LLRF) feedback system needs to be developed and combined with the modulator in order to guarantee the phase and amplitude tolerances. To this aim, three feedback control strategies were investigated, i) Proportional Integral (PI) controller, ii) Linear Quadratic Integral Regulator (LQI) and iii) Model Predictive Controller (MPC). The klystron, as well as the incident phase noise were modelled and used for the design and evaluation of the controllers. First simulation results are presented along with future steps and directions.

  16. Studies of Cs3Sb cathodes for the CLIC drive beam photo injector option

    CERN Document Server

    Martini, Irene; Doebert, Steffen; Fedosseev, Valentine; Hessler, Christoph; Martyanov, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    Within the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project, feasibility studies of a photo injector option for the drive beam as an alternative to its baseline design using a thermionic electron gun are on-going. This R&D program covers both the laser and the photocathode side. Whereas the available laser pulse energy in ultra-violet (UV) is currently limited by the optical defects in the 4thharmonics frequency conversion crystal induced by the0.14 ms long pulse trains, recent measurements of Cs3Sbphotocathodes sensitive to green light showed their potential to overcome this limitation. Moreover, using visible laser beams leads to better stability of produced electron bunches and one can take advantages of the availability of higher quality optics. The studied Cs3Sbphotocathodes have been produced in the CERN photo emission laboratory using the co-deposition technique and tested in a DC gun set-up. The analysis of data acquired during the cathode production process will be presented in this paper, as well as the r...

  17. Two frequency beam-loading compensation in the drive-beam accelerator of the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Hans Heinrich

    1999-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility (CTF) is a prototype two-beam accelerator, in which a high-current "drive beam" is used to generate the RF power for the main-beam accelerator. The drive-beam accelerator consists of two S-band structures which accelerate a bunch train with a total charge of 500 nC. The substantial beam loading is compensated by operating the two accelerating structures at 7.81 MHz above and below the bunch repetition frequency, respectively. This introduces a change of RF phase from bunch to bunch, which leads, together with off-crest injection into the accelerator, to an approximate compensation of the beam loading. Due to the sinusoidal time-dependency of the RF field, an energy spread of about 7% remains in the bunch train. A set of idler cavities has been installed to reduce this residual energy spread further. In this paper, the considerations that motivated the choice of the parameters of the beam-loading compensation system, together with the experimental results, are presented.

  18. Phase and amplitude stability of a pulsed RF system on the example of the CLIC drive beam LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2132320; Prof. BANTEL, Michael

    The CLIC drive beam accelerator consists of the Drive Beam Injector (DBI) and two Drive Beam Linacs (DBLs). The drive beam injector is composed of a thermionic electron source, 3 Sub Harmonic Bunchers (SHBs), a pre-buncher, and several acceleration structures. In the electron source the DC electron beam is produced from a thermionic cathode. The following buncher cavities group ("bunch") the electrons to be accelerated by RF later on. Each electron bunch has an energy of 140 keV, a length of 3 mm, and a charge qb = 8.4 nC. Afterwards the electrons are accelerated in the 1 GHz accelerating structures up to 50MeV. The pulsed Radio Frequency (RF) power for this acceleration is provided by 1 GHz, 20MW modulator-klystron units, one per acceleration structure. A klystron is an RF amplifier based on a linear-beam vacuum tube. The high voltage modulator supplies the acceleration voltage to this tube. A DC electron beam gets modulated with an input signal, the modulation enhances in a drift space, and finally the powe...

  19. Dumping the decelerated beams of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanneret, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The spent drive beam must be cleanly extracted and bent away from the decelerator axis at the end of each CLIC decelerator in order to leave space for injecting a fresh beam train in the next sector. Then the spent beam must be safely absorbed. A compact extraction system made of a single dipole is proposed. The spent beam is driven to a water dump located at 20m downstream of the extraction point and transversely 6m away of the axis of the main linac. An adequate spread of the beam impact map on the dump offers small temperature excursions in both the dump and its entrance window, allowing for reliable operation and a long lifetime of the system.

  20. Design Studies for a High Current Bunching System for CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) Drive Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Thiery, Y.; Le Duff, J.

    2000-01-01

    A bunching system is proposed for the initial stage of CTF3 which consists of one (two) 3 GHz prebunchers and one 3 GHz travelling wave (TW) buncher with variable phase velocities. The electron beam is emitted from a 140 KV DC gun. Since the macropulse beam current (3.5 A) at the exit of the TW buncher is rather high, inside the TW buncher one has to take the beam loading effect into consideration. By using PARMELA, it is shown numerically that the bunching system can provide the bunches whose properties satisfy the design requirement of CTF3. The 0.8 m long TW buncher working at 2pi/3 mode has two phase velocities, 0.75 and 1. The dimensions of the caities in the two phase velocity regions are proposed considering the beam loading effect. The transient beam loading effect and the multibunch transverse instabilities are studied numerically, and it is concluded that higher order mode couplers should be installed in the TW buncher with the loaded quality factor of the dipole mode lower than 80.

  1. Simulation of Beam-Beam Background at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, Andre

    2010-01-01

    The dense beams used at CLIC to achieve a high luminosity will cause a large amount of background particles through beam-beam interactions. Generator level studies with GuineaPig and full detector simulation studies with an ILD based CLIC detector have been performed to evaluate the amount of beam-beam background hitting the vertex detector.

  2. Simulation of Beam-Beam Background at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, A

    2010-01-01

    The dense beams used at CLIC to achieve a high luminosity will cause a large amount of background particles through beam-beam interactions. Generator level studies with GUINEAPIG and full detector simulation studies with an ILD based CLIC detector have been performed to evaluate the amount of beam-beam back- ground hitting the vertex detector.

  3. Experimental Program for the CLIC test facility 3 test beam line

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Dobert, S; Olvegaard, M; Schulte, D; Syratchev, I; Lillestol, Reidar

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility 3 Test Beam Line is the first prototype for the CLIC drive beam decelerator. Stable transport of the drive beam under deceleration is a mandatory component in the CLIC two-beam scheme. In the Test Beam Line more than 50% of the total energy will be extracted from a 150 MeV, 28 A electron drive beam, by the use of 16 power extraction and transfer structures. A number of experiments are foreseen to investigate the drive beam characteristics under deceleration in the Test Beam Line, including beam stability, beam blow up and the efficiency of the power extraction. General benchmarking of decelerator simulation and theory studies will also be performed. Specially designed instrumentation including precision BPMs, loss monitors and a time-resolved spectrometer dump will be used for the experiments. This paper describes the experimental program foreseen for the Test Beam Line, including the relevance of the results for the CLIC decelerator studies.

  4. Experimental verification of the CLIC Decelerator with the test Beam Line in the CLIC test facility 3

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, R L; Olvegård, M; Rabiller, A N; Sterbini, G; Adli, E

    2012-01-01

    The Test Beam Line in the CLIC Test Facility 3 is the first prototype of the CLIC drive beam decelerator. The main purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate efficient 12 GHz rf power production and stable transport of an electron drive beam during deceleration. The Test Beam Line consists of a FODO structure with high precision BPMs and quadrupoles mounted on mechanical movers for precisebeam alignment. Nine out of the planned 16 Power Extraction and Transfer Structures have currently been installed and commissioned. We correlate rf power production measurements with the drive beam deceleration measurements, and compare the two measurements to the theoretical predictions. We also discuss the impact of the drive beam bunch length and bunch combination on the measurements.

  5. Cherenkov Fibers for Beam Loss Monitoring at the CLIC Two Beam Module

    CERN Document Server

    van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Holzer, E B

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is a feasibility study aiming at a nominal center of mass energy of 3TeV and is based on normal conducting travelling-wave accelerating structures, operating at very high field gradients of 100 MV/m. Such high fields require high peak power and hence a novel power source, the CLIC two beam system, has been developed, in which a high intensity, low energy drive beam (DB) supplies energy to a high energy, low intensity main beam (MB). At the Two Beam Modules (TBM), which compose the 2x21km long CLIC main linac, a protection against beam losses resulting from badly controlled beams is necessary and particularly challenging, since the beam power of both main beam (14 MW) and drive beam (70 MW) is impressive. To avoid operational downtimes and severe damages to machine components, a general Machine Protection System (MPS) scheme has been developed. The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is a key element of the CLIC machine protection system. Its main role will be to detect p...

  6. Impact of Dynamic Magnetic fields on the CLIC Main Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Snuverink, J; Jach, C; Jeanneret, JB; Schulte, D; Stulle, F

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) accelerator has strong precision requirements on the position of the beam. The beam position will be sensitive to external dynamic magnetic fields (stray fields) in the nanotesla regime. The impact of these fields on the CLIC main beam has been studied by performing simulations on the lattices and tolerances have been determined. Several mitigation techniques will be discussed.

  7. Development of a Beam-based Phase Feedforward Demonstration at the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083344; Christian, Glenn

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a proposal for a future linear electron--positron collider that could achieve collision energies of up to 3~TeV. In the CLIC concept the main high energy beam is accelerated using RF power extracted from a high intensity drive beam, achieving an accelerating gradient of 100~MV/m. This scheme places strict tolerances on the drive beam phase stability, which must be better than $0.2^\\circ$ at 12~GHz. To achieve the required phase stability CLIC proposes a high bandwidth (${>}17.5$~MHz), low latency drive beam ``phase feedforward'' (PFF) system. In this system electromagnetic kickers, powered by 500~kW amplifiers, are installed in a chicane and used to correct the phase by deflecting the beam on to longer or shorter trajectories. A prototype PFF system has been installed at the CLIC Test Facility, CTF3; the design, operation and commissioning of which is the focus of this work. Two kickers have been installed in the pre-existing chicane in the TL2 transfer line at CTF3 for t...

  8. Technical Specification for the CLIC Two-Beam Module

    CERN Document Server

    Riddone, G; Nousiainen, R; Samoshkin, A; Schulte, D; Syratchev, I; Wuensch, W; Zennaro, R

    2008-01-01

    A high-energy (0.5-3 TeV centre-of-mass), highluminosity Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is being studied at CERN [1]. The CLIC main linacs, 21-km long each, are composed of 2-m long two beam modules. This paper presents their current layout, the main requirements for the different sub-systems (alignment, supporting, stabilization, cooling and vacuum) as well as the status of their integration.

  9. Beam Dynamics Simulation for the CTF3 Drive Beam Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    A new CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN will serve to study the drive beam generation for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). CTF3 has to accelerate a 3.5 A electron beam in almost fully-loaded structures. The pulse contains more than 2000 bunches, one in every second RF bucket, and has a length of more than one microsecond. Different options for the lattice of the drive-beam accelerator are presented, based on FODO-cells and triplets as well as solenoids. The transverse stability is simulated, including the effects of beam jitter, alignment and beam-based correction.

  10. A Versatile Beam Loss Monitoring System for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Kastriotou, Maria; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Holzer, Eva Barbara; Nebot Del Busto, Eduardo; Tecker, Frank; Welsch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The design of a potential CLIC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system presents multiple challenges. To successfully cover the 48 km of beamline, ionisation chambers and optical fibre BLMs are under investigation. The former fulfils all CLIC requirements but would need more than 40000 monitors to protect the whole facility. For the latter, the capability of reconstructing the original loss position with a multi-bunch beam pulse and multiple loss locations still needs to be quantified. Two main sources of background for beam loss measurements are identified for CLIC. The two-beam accelerator scheme introduces so-called crosstalk, i.e. detection of losses originating in one beam line by the monitors protecting the other. Moreover, electrons emitted from the inner surface of RF cavities and boosted by the high RF gradients may produce signals in neighbouring BLMs, limiting their ability to detect real beam losses. This contribution presents the results of dedicated experiments performed in the CLIC Test Facility to qu...

  11. CLIC Test Facility 3

    CERN Multimedia

    Kossyvakis, I; Faus-golfe, A

    2007-01-01

    The design of CLIC is based on a two-beam scheme, where short pulses of high power 30 GHz RF are extracted from a drive beam running parallel to the main beam. The 3rd generation CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) will demonstrate the generation of the drive beam with the appropriate time structure, the extraction of 30 GHz RF power from this beam, as well as acceleration of a probe beam with 30 GHz RF cavities. The project makes maximum use of existing equipment and infrastructure of the LPI complex, which became available after the closure of LEP.

  12. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: - Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. - Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. - Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  13. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: -> Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. -> Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. -> Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  14. A prototype cavity beam position monitor for the CLIC Main Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Cullinany , F; Joshi, N; Lyapin, A; Bastard, D; Calvo, E; Chritin, N; Guillot-Vignot, F; Lefevre, T; Søby, L; Wendt, M; Lunin, A; Yakovlev, V P; Smith, S

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) places unprecedented demands on its diagnostics systems. A large number of cavity beam position monitors (BPMs) throughout the main linac and beam delivery system (BDS) must routinely perform with 50 nm spatial resolution. Multiple position measurements within a single 156 ns bunch train are also required. A prototype low-Q cavity beam position monitor has been designed and built to be tested on the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) probe beam. This paper presents the latest measurements of the prototype cavity BPM and the design and simulation of the radio frequency (RF) signal processing electronics with regards to the final performance. Installation of the BPM in the CTF3 probe beamline is also discussed.

  15. CTF3 Drive Beam Injector Optimisation

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082899; Doebert, S

    2015-01-01

    In the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) the RF power for the acceleration of the Main Beam is extracted from a high-current Drive Beam that runs parallel to the main linac. The main feasibility issues of the two-beam acceleration scheme are being demonstrated at CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3). The CTF3 Drive Beam injector consists of a thermionic gun followed by the bunching system and two accelerating structures all embedded in solenoidal magnetic field and a magnetic chicane. Three sub-harmonic bunchers (SHB), a prebuncher and a travelling wave buncher constitute the bunching system. The phase coding process done by the sub-harmonic bunching system produces unwanted satellite bunches between the successive main bunches. The beam dynamics of the CTF3 Drive Beam injector is reoptimised with the goal of improving the injector performance and in particular decreasing the satellite population, the beam loss in the magnetic chicane and the beam emittance in transverse plane compare to the original model based on P. Ur...

  16. CLIC Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electronpositron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV in order to make the multi-TeV range accessible for lepton physics. The current goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of the technology by the year 2010. Recently, important progress has been made concerning the high-gradient accelerating structure tests and the experiments with beam in the CLIC test facility, CTF3. On the organizational side, the CLIC international collaborations have significantly gained momentum considerably boosting the CLIC study.

  17. CLIC OVERVIEW

    CERN Document Server

    Tomas, R

    2009-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electronpositron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV in order to make the multi-TeV range accessible for lepton physics. The current goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of the technology by the year 2010. Recently, important progress has been made concerning the high-gradient accelerating structure tests and the experiments with beam in the CLIC test facility, CTF3. On the organizational side, the CLIC international collaborations have significantly gained momentum considerably boosting the CLIC study.

  18. Study of the supporting system for the CLIC Two-Beam Module

    CERN Document Server

    Gazis, Nick; Mainaud-Durand, Hélène; Gudkov, Dmitry; Samoshkin, Alexandre; Simopoulos, Simos; Hinis, Evangelos; Alexopoulos, Theodoros

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study aims at the development of a Multi-TeV e+ e-collider. The micro-precision CLIC structures will have an accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m and will be aligned on so-called girders. The girder construction constrains are mainly dictated by the beam physics and RF requirements. The study of such girders is a challenging case involving material choice, mechanical design as well as prototype fabrication and experimental testing.

  19. Experimental Study of the Effect of Beam Loading on RF Breakdown Rate in CLIC High-Gradient Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Tecker, F; Kelisani, M; Doebert, S; Grudiev, A; Quirante, J; Riddone, G; Syratchev, I; Wuensch, W; Kononenko, O; Solodko, A; Lebet, S

    2013-01-01

    RF breakdown is a key issue for the multi-TeV highluminosity e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Breakdowns in the high-gradient accelerator structures can deflect the beam and decrease the desired luminosity. The limitations of the accelerating structures due to breakdowns have been studied so far without a beam present in the structure. The presence of the beam modifies the distribution of the electrical and magnetic field distributions, which determine the breakdown rate. Therefore an experiment has been designed for high power testing a CLIC prototype accelerating structure with a beam present in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3). A special beam line allows extracting a beam with nominal CLIC beam current and duration from the CTF3 linac. The paper describes the beam optics design for this experimental beam line and the commissioning of the experiment with beam.

  20. Acquisition system for the CLIC Module

    CERN Document Server

    Vilalte, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    The status of R&D activities for CLIC module acquisition are discussed [1]. LAPP is involved in the design of the local CLIC module acquisition crate, described in the document Study of the CLIC Module Front-End Acquisition and Evaluation Electronics [2]. This acquisition system is a project based on a local crate, assigned to the CLIC module, including several mother boards. These motherboards are foreseen to hold mezzanines dedicated to the different subsystems. This system has to work in radiation environment. LAPP is involved in the development of Drive Beam stripline position monitors read-out, described in the document Drive Beam Stripline BPM Electronics and Acquisition [3]. LAPP also develops a generic acquisition mezzanine that allows to perform all-around acquisition and components tests for drive beam stripline BPM read-out.

  1. Energy and Beam-Offset dependence of the Luminosity weighted depolarization for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Esberg, Jakob; Uggerhoj, Ulrik; Dalena, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    We report on simulations of e+e- depolarization due to beam-beam effects. These effects are studied for CLIC at 3 TeV, using GUINEA PIG++. We find a strong energy dependence of the luminosity weighted depolarization. In the luminosity peak at CLIC the total luminosity weighted depolarization remains below the one per-mil level. The effect of a vertical offset on the energy dependent depolarization is investigated. The depolarization in the luminosity peak remains below per-cent level even for 5sy offsets.

  2. Recent Improvements to the Control of the CTF3 High-Current Drive Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Constance, B; Gamba, D; Skowronski, P K

    2013-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC multiTeV linear collider option, the drive beam complex at the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN is providing highcurrent electron pulses for a number of related experiments. By means of a system of electron pulse compression and bunch frequency multiplication, a fully loaded, 120 MeV linac is used to generate 140 ns electron pulses of around 28 Amperes. Subsequent deceleration of this high-current drive beam demonstrates principles behind the CLIC acceleration scheme, and produces 12 GHz RF power for experimental purposes. As the facility has progressed toward routine operation, a number of studies aimed at improving the drive beam performance have been carried out. Additional feedbacks, automated steering programs, and improved control of optics and dispersion have contributed to a more stable, reproducible drive beam with consequent benefits for the experiments.

  3. Stabilization of the Beam Intensity in the Linac at the CTF3 CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskiy, A; Bathe, BN; Srivastava, S

    2013-01-01

    A new electron beam stabilization system has been introduced in CTF3 in order to open new possibilities for CLIC beam studies in ultra-stable conditions and to provide a sustainable tool to keep the beam intensity and energy at its reference values for long term operations. The stabilization system is based on a pulse-to-pulse feedback control of the electron gun to compensate intensity deviations measured at the end of the injector and at the beginning of the linac. Thereby it introduces negligible beam distortions at the end of the linac and it significantly reduces energy deviations. A self-calibration mechanism has been developed to automatically configure the feedback controller for the optimum performance. The residual intensity jitter of 0.045% of the stabilized beam was measured whereas the CLIC requirement is 0.075%.

  4. Technologies and R&D for a High Resolution Cavity BPM for the CLIC Main Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Towler, J R; Soby, L; Wendt, M; Boogert, S T; Cullinan, F J; Lyapin, A

    2013-01-01

    The Main Beam (MB) linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a beam orbit measurement system with high spatial (50 nm) and high temporal resolution (50 ns) to resolve the beam position within the 156 ns long bunch train, traveling on an energy-chirped, minimum dispersive trajectory. A 15 GHz prototype cavity BPM has been commissioned in the probe beam-line of the CTF3 CLIC Test Facility. We discuss performance and technical details of this prototype installation, including the 15 GHz analogue downconverter, the data acquisition and the control electronics and software. An R&D outlook is given for the next steps, which requires a system of 3 cavity BPMs to investigate the full resolution potential.

  5. Beam dynamic simulations of the CLIC crab cavity and implications on the BDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinton, I.R.R., E-mail: ian.shinton@stfc.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute of Accelerator Science and Technology, Daresbury (United Kingdom); Burt, G. [Engineering Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute of Accelerator Science and Technology, Daresbury (United Kingdom); Glasman, C.J.; Jones, R.M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute of Accelerator Science and Technology, Daresbury (United Kingdom); Wolski, A. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute of Accelerator Science and Technology, Daresbury (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-21

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a proposed electron positron linear collider design aiming to achieve a centre of mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The main accelerating structures in CLIC operate at an X-band frequency of 11.994 GHz with an accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m. The present design requires the beams to collide at a small crossing angle of 10 mrad per line giving a resultant overall crossing angle of 20 mrad. Transverse deflecting cavities, referred to as 'Crab cavities', are installed in the beam delivery system (BDS) of linear collider designs in order to ensure the final luminosity at the interaction point (IP) is comparable to that in a head on collision. We utilise the beam tracking code PLACET combined with the beam-beam code GUINEA-PIG to calculate the resulting luminosity at the IP. We follow a similar tuning procedure to that used for the design of the ILC crab cavities and anitcrab cavities. However an unexpected loss in luminosity of 10% was observed for the 20 mrad design was observed. It was discovered that the action of the crab cavities can affect the geometric aberrations resulting from the sextupoles used to correct chromatic effects in the beam delivery system. This has direct consequences regarding the design of the present CLIC BDS.

  6. Engineering study, development and prototype fabrication of the supporting system for the CLIC Two-Beam Module

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068725; Karyotakis, Yannis; Dahoo, Pierre Richard; Alexopoulos, Theo; MEIS, Costantin; De Conto, Jean Marie; Jeremie, Andrea; Puzot, Patrique

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is based on the international collaboration in the field of high-energy particle physics research. The experiments carried out in its facilities are achieved through the existing particle accelerators. In addition, advanced accelerator research and development is one of the goals of CERN. For this reason, CLIC (the Compact LInear Collider) a new electron-positron linear accelerator is being studied at CERN. CLIC is built by the assembly of the Two-Beam Modules and takes advantage of an innovative acceleration principle, the Two-Beam acceleration. Each Module contains several technical systems that contribute to its successful operation. This thesis presents the development of the prototype supporting system for the CLIC Two-Beam Module. At first, the physics requirements are translated into technical specifications and the fundamental parts of the supporting system are defined. The CLIC operational conditions are identified and the corresponding boundaries...

  7. Technological challenges of CLIC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Döbert, Steffen; Arnau-Izquierdo, G; Redaelli, Stefano; Mainaud, Helène; Lefèvre, Thibaut

    2006-01-01

    Future e+e- Linear Colliders offer the potential to explore new physics at the TeV scale and beyond to very high precision. While the International Linear Collider (ILC) scheme of a collider in the 0.5 - 1 TeV range enters the engineering design phase, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study explores the technical feasibility of a collider capable of reaching into the multi-TeV energy domain. Key ingredients of the CLIC scheme are acceleration at high-frequency (30 GHz) and high-gradient (150 MV/m) in normal conducting structures and the use of the so-called Two Beam Acceleration concept, where a high-charge electron beam (drive beam) running parallel to the main beam is decelerated to provide the RF power to accelerate the main beam itself. A vigorous R&D effort is presently developed by the CLIC international collaboration to demonstrate its feasibility by 2010, when the first physics results from LHC should be available to guide the choice of the centre-of-mass energy better suited to explore the futu...

  8. ACE3P Computations of Wakefield Coupling in the CLIC Two-Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candel, Arno

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its novel two-beam accelerator concept envisions rf power transfer to the accelerating structures from a separate high-current decelerator beam line consisting of power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). It is critical to numerically verify the fundamental and higher-order mode properties in and between the two beam lines with high accuracy and confidence. To solve these large-scale problems, SLAC's parallel finite element electromagnetic code suite ACE3P is employed. Using curvilinear conformal meshes and higher-order finite element vector basis functions, unprecedented accuracy and computational efficiency are achieved, enabling high-fidelity modeling of complex detuned structures such as the CLIC TD24 accelerating structure. In this paper, time-domain simulations of wakefield coupling effects in the combined system of PETS and the TD24 structures are presented. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel CLIC two-beam accelerator scheme.

  9. Study of the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of the CLIC Two-Beam Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, F; Riddone, G; Österberg, K; Kossyvakis, I; Gudkov, D; Samochkine, A

    2013-01-01

    The final luminosity target of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) imposes a micron-level stability requirement on the two-meter repetitive two-beam modules constituting the main linacs. Two-beam prototype modules are being assembled to extensively study their thermo-mechanical behaviour under different operation modes. The power dissipation occurring in the modules will be reproduced and the efficiency of the corresponding cooling systems validated. At the same time, the real environmental conditions present in the CLIC tunnel will be studied. Air conditioning and ventilation systems have been installed in the dedicated laboratory. The air temperature will be changed from 20 to 40°C, while the air flow rate will be varied up to 0.8 m/s. During all experimental tests, the alignment of the RF structures will be monitored to investigate the influence of power dissipation and air temperature on the overall thermo-mechanical behaviour. \

  10. Fast Beam-ion Instabilities in CLIC Main Linac Vacuum Specifications

    CERN Document Server

    Oeftiger, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Specifications for the vacuum pressure in the CLIC electron Main Linac are determined by the onset of the fast beam-ion instability (FBII). When the electron beam is accelerated in the Main Linac, it ionizes the residual gas in the chamber through scattering ionization. If the density of ions around the beam exceeds a certain threshold, a resonant motion between the electron beam and the ions can be excited. A two-stream instability appears and as a result the beam acquires a coherent motion, which can quickly lead to beam quality degradation or even complete loss. Thus, the vacuum pressure must be kept below this threshold to prevent the excitation of FBII. The CLIC Main Linac poses an additional challenge with respect to previous FBII situations, because the gas ionization does not solely occur via scattering. The submicrometric beam sizes lead to extremely high electric fields around the beam and therefore result in field ionization beyond a certain threshold. The residual gas in the corresponding volume a...

  11. Thermo-Mechanical tests for the CLIC two-beam module study

    CERN Document Server

    Xydou, A; Riddone, G; Daskalaki, E

    2014-01-01

    The luminosity goal of CLIC requires micron level precision with respect to the alignment of the components on its two-meter long modules, composing the two main linacs. The power dissipated inside the module components introduces mechanical deformations affecting their alignment and therefore the resulting machine performance. Several two-beam prototype modules must be assembled to extensively measure their thermo-mechanical behavior under different operation modes. In parallel, the real environmental conditions present in the CLIC tunnel should be studied. The air conditioning and ventilation system providing specified air temperature and flow has been installed in the dedicated laboratory. The power dissipation occurring in the modules is being reproduced by the electrical heaters inserted inside the RF structure mock-ups and the quadrupoles. The efficiency of the cooling systems is being verified and the alignment of module components is monitored. The measurement results will be compared to finite elemen...

  12. CLIC: Status and Plan

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, Andre

    2014-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a high energy electron–positron col- lider with a maximal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. In order to achieve high luminosity small bunches with high intensity are necessary. These lead to strong beam-beam forces, which create a challenging background environment. The accelerator concept and the detectors designed for CLIC are presented. Results from detector benchmark studies presented in the CLIC conceptual design report are summarised.

  13. CLIC: developing a linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a CERN project to provide high-energy electron-positron collisions. Instead of conventional radio-frequency klystrons, CLIC will use a low-energy, high-intensity primary beam to produce acceleration.

  14. Beam dynamics simulations in the photo-cathode RF gun for the CLIC test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, P.; Rinolfi, L.

    1992-01-01

    The CERN CLIC Test Facility (CTF) uses an RF gun with a laser driven photo-cathode in order to generate electron pulses of high charge (≥10 nC) and short duration (≤20 ps). The RF gun consists of a 3 GHz 1 + 1/2 cell cavity based on the design originally proposed at BNL which minimizes the non-linearities in the transverse field. The beam dynamics in the cavity is simulated by means of the multiparticle tracking code PARMELA. The results are compared to previous simulations as well as to the first experimental data. (author). 4 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  15. Test-beam measurements and simulation studies of thin pixel sensors for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00574329; Dannheim, Dominik

    The multi-$TeV$ $e^{+}e^{-}$ Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is one of the options for a future high-energy collider for the post-LHC era. It would allow for searches of new physics and simultaneously offer the possibility for precision measurements of standard model processes. The physics goals and experimental conditions at CLIC set high precision requirements on the vertex detector made of pixel detectors: a high pointing resolution of 3 $\\mu m$, very low mass of 0.2% $X_{0}$ per layer, 10 ns time stamping capability and low power dissipation of 50 mW/$cm^{2}$ compatible with air-flow cooling. In this thesis, hybrid assemblies with thin active-edge planar sensors are characterised through calibrations, laboratory and test-beam measurements. Prototypes containing 50 $\\mu m$ to 150 $\\mu m$ thin planar silicon sensors bump-bonded to Timepix3 readout ASICs with 55 $\\mu m$ pitch are characterised in test beams at the CERN SPS in view of their detection efficiency and single-point resolution. A digitiser for AllP...

  16. A Multi-TeV Linear Collider Based on CLIC Technology : CLIC Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aicheler, M [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Burrows, P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Draper, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Garvey, T. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Lebrun, P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Peach, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Phinney, N. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Schmickler, H. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Schulte, D. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Toge, N. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-02-13

    This report describes the accelerator studies for a future multi-TeV e+e- collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) technology. The CLIC concept as described in the report is based on high gradient normal-conducting accelerating structures where the RF power for the acceleration of the colliding beams is extracted from a high-current Drive Beam that runs parallel with the main linac. The focus of CLIC R&D over the last years has been on addressing a set of key feasibility issues that are essential for proving the fundamental validity of the CLIC concept. The status of these feasibility studies are described and summarized. The report also includes a technical description of the accelerator components and R&D to develop the most important parts and methods, as well as a description of the civil engineering and technical services associated with the installation. Several larger system tests have been performed to validate the two-beam scheme, and of particular importance are the results from the CLIC test facility at CERN (CTF3). Both the machine and detector/physics studies for CLIC have primarily focused on the 3 TeV implementation of CLIC as a benchmark for the CLIC feasibility. This report also includes specific studies for an initial 500 GeV machine, and some discussion of possible intermediate energy stages. The performance and operation issues related to operation at reduced energy compared to the nominal, and considerations of a staged construction program are included in the final part of the report. The CLIC accelerator study is organized as an international collaboration with 43 partners in 22 countries. An associated report describes the physics potential and experiments at CLIC and a shorter report in preparation will focus on the CLIC implementation strategy, together with a plan for the CLIC R&D studies 2012–2016. Critical and important implementation issues such as cost, power and schedule will be addressed there.

  17. Numerical Verification of the Power Transfer and Wakefield Coupling in the CLIC Two-Beam Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Candel, Arno; NG, C; Rawat, V; Schussman, G; Ko, K; Syratchev, I; Grudiev, A; Wuensch, W

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept envisions complex 3D structures, which must be modeled to high accuracy so that simulation results can be directly used to prepare CAD drawings for machining. The required simulations include not only the fundamental mode properties of the accelerating structures but also the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), as well as the coupling between the two systems. Time-domain simulations will be performed to understand pulse formation, wakefield damping, fundamental power transfer and wakefield coupling in these structures. Applying SLAC’s parallel finite element code suite, these large-scale problems will be solved on some of the largest supercomputers available. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel two-beam accelerator scheme.

  18. CLIC main beam quadrupole active pre-alignment based on cam movers

    CERN Document Server

    Kemppinen, J; Leuxe, R; Mainaud Durand, H; Sandomierski, J; Sosin, M

    2012-01-01

    Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a study for a future 48 km long linear electron-positron collider in the multi TeV range. Its target luminosity can only be reached if the main beam quadrupoles (MB quads) are actively pre-aligned within 17 µm in sliding windows of 200 m with respect to a straight reference line. In addition to the positioning requirement, the pre-alignment system has to provide a rigid support for the nano-stabilization system to ensure that the first eigenfrequency is above 100 Hz. Re-adjustment based on cam movers was chosen for detailed studies to meet the stringent pre-alignment requirements. There are four different types of MB quads in CLIC. Their lengths and masses vary so that at least two types of cam movers have to be developed. The validation of the cams with less stringent space restrictions has proceeded to a test setup in 5 degrees of freedom (DOF). Prototypes of the more demanding, smaller cams have been manufactured and they are under tests in 1 DOF. This paper describes the...

  19. A Multi-TeV Linear Collider Based on CLIC Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aicheler, M [European Organ. ization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Burrows, P [Oxford University (United Kingdom); Draper, M; Garvey, T; Lebrun, P [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Peach, K [Oxford University (United Kingdom); Phinney, N [SLAC (United States); Schmickler, H; Schulte, D [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Toge, N [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    This report describes the accelerator studies for a future multi-TeV e+e- collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) technology. The CLIC concept as described in the report is based on high gradient normal-conducting accelerating structures where the RF power for the acceleration of the colliding beams is extracted from a high-current Drive Beam that runs parallel with the main linac. The focus of CLIC R&D over the last years has been on addressing a set of key feasibility issues that are essential for proving the fundamental validity of the CLIC concept. The status of these feasibility studies are described and summarized. The report also includes a technical description of the accelerator components and R&D to develop the most important parts and methods, as well as a description of the civil engineering and technical services associated with the installation. Several larger system tests have been performed to validate the two-beam scheme, and of particular importance are the results from the CLIC test facility at CERN (CTF3). Both the machine and detector/physics studies for CLIC have primarily focused on the 3 TeV implementation of CLIC as a benchmark for the CLIC feasibility. This report also includes specific studies for an initial 500 GeV machine, and some discussion of possible intermediate energy stages. The performance and operation issues related to operation at reduced energy compared to the nominal, and considerations of a staged construction program are included in the final part of the report. The CLIC accelerator study is organized as an international collaboration with 43 partners in 22 countries. An associated report describes the physics potential and experiments at CLIC and a shorter report in preparation will focus on the CLIC implementation strategy, together with a plan for the CLIC R&D studies 2012–2016. Critical and important implementation issues such as cost, power and schedule will be addressed there. (author)

  20. A Multi-TeV Linear Collider Based on CLIC Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aicheler, M; Burrows, P; Draper, M; Garvey, T; Lebrun, P; Peach, K; Phinney, N; Schmickler, H; Schulte, D; Toge, N

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the accelerator studies for a future multi-TeV e+e- collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) technology. The CLIC concept as described in the report is based on high gradient normal-conducting accelerating structures where the RF power for the acceleration of the colliding beams is extracted from a high-current Drive Beam that runs parallel with the main linac. The focus of CLIC R&D over the last years has been on addressing a set of key feasibility issues that are essential for proving the fundamental validity of the CLIC concept. The status of these feasibility studies are described and summarized. The report also includes a technical description of the accelerator components and R&D to develop the most important parts and methods, as well as a description of the civil engineering and technical services associated with the installation. Several larger system tests have been performed to validate the two-beam scheme, and of particular importance are the results from the CLIC test facility at CERN (CTF3). Both the machine and detector/physics studies for CLIC have primarily focused on the 3 TeV implementation of CLIC as a benchmark for the CLIC feasibility. This report also includes specific studies for an initial 500 GeV machine, and some discussion of possible intermediate energy stages. The performance and operation issues related to operation at reduced energy compared to the nominal, and considerations of a staged construction program are included in the final part of the report. The CLIC accelerator study is organized as an international collaboration with 43 partners in 22 countries. An associated report describes the physics potential and experiments at CLIC and a shorter report in preparation will focus on the CLIC implementation strategy, together with a plan for the CLIC R&D studies 2012–2016. Critical and important implementation issues such as cost, power and schedule will be addressed there. (author)

  1. CLIC accelerator modules under construction at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2012-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) study is dedicated to the design of an electron-positron (e- e+) linear accelerator, colliding particle beams at the energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC required luminosity can be reached with powerful particle beams (14 MW each) colliding with extremely small dimensions and high beam stability at the interaction point. The accelerated particle beams must have dimensions of 45 nm in the horizontal plane and 1 nm in the vertical plane. CLIC relies upon a novel two-beam acceleration concept in which the Radio Frequency (RF) power is extracted from a low energy but high-intensity particle beam, called Drive Beam (DB), and transferred to a parallel high energy accelerating particle beam, called Main Beam (MB). The extraction and transfer of the RF power is achieved by the Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS) and the particle beam acceleration is achieved with high precision RF-Accelerating Structures (AS), operating at 11.9942 GHz with an accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m, whi...

  2. Radiation and Background Levels in a CLIC Detector due to Beam-Beam Effects Optimisation of Detector Geometries and Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, André; Lohse, Thomas

    2013-01-10

    The high charge density---due to small beam sizes---and the high energy of the proposed CLIC concept for a linear electron--positron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of up to 3~TeV lead to the production of a large number of particles through beam-beam interactions at the interaction point during every bunch crossing (BX). A large fraction of these particles safely leaves the detector. A still significant amount of energy will be deposited in the forward region nonetheless, which will produce secondary particles able to cause background in the detector. Furthermore, some particles will be created with large polar angles and directly cause background in the tracking detectors and calorimeters. The main sources of background in the detector, either directly or indirectly, are the incoherent $mathrm{e}^{+}mathrm{e}^{-}$ pairs and the particles from $gammagamma ightarrow$ hadron events. The background and radiation levels in the detector have to be estimated, to study if a detector is feasible, that can han...

  3. Status of Wakefield Monitor Experiments at the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, Reidar; Aftab, Namra; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Grudiev, Alexej; Javeed, Sumera; Pfingstner, Juergen; Wuensch, Walter

    2016-01-01

    For the very low emittance beams in CLIC, it is vital to mitigate emittance growth which leads to reduced luminosity in the detectors. One factor that leads to emittance growth is transverse wakefields in the accelerating structures. In order to combat this the structures must be aligned with a precision of a few um. For achieving this tolerance, accelerating structures are equipped with wakefield monitors that measure higher-order dipole modes excited by the beam when offset from the structure axis. We report on such measurements, performed using prototype CLIC accelerating structures which are part of the module installed in the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. Measurements with and without the drive beam that feeds rf power to the structures are compared. Improvements to the experimental setup are discussed, and finally remaining measurements that should be performed before the completion of the program are summarized.

  4. CLIC Luminosity Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Apyan, Armen; Gschwendtner, Edda; Lefevre, Thibault; Tygier, Sam; Appleby, Robert B

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC post-collision line is designed to transport the un-collided beams and the products of the collided beams with a total power of 14 MW to the main beam dump. Luminosity monitoring for CLIC is based on high energy muons produced by beamstrahlung photons in the main dump. Threshold Cherenkov counters are proposed for the detection of these muons. The expected rates and layout for these detectors is presented. Another method for luminosity monitoring is to directly detect the beamstrahlung photons in the post-collision line. Full Monte Carlo simulation has been performed to address its feasibility.

  5. Results from the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, H; Bossart, Rudolf; Chautard, F; Corsini, R; Delahaye, J P; Godot, J C; Hutchins, S; Kamber, I; Madsen, J H B; Rinolfi, Louis; Rossat, G; Schreiber, S; Suberlucq, Guy; Thorndahl, L; Wilson, Ian H; Wuensch, Walter

    1996-01-01

    In order to study the principle of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) based on the Two Beam Acceleration (TBA) scheme at high frequency, a CLIC Test Facility (CTF) has been set-up at CERN. After four years of successful running, the experimental programme is now fully completed and all its objectives reached, particularly the generation of a high intensity drive beam with short bunches by a photo-injector, the production of 30 GHz RF power and the acceleration of a probe beam by 30 GHz structures. A summary of the CTF results and their impact on linear collider design is given. This covers 30 GHz high power testing, study of intense, short single bunches; as well as RF-Gun, photocathode and beam diagnostic developments. A second phase of the test facility (CTF2) is presently being installed to demonstrate the feasibility of the TBA scheme by constructing a fully engineered, 10 m long, test section very similar to the CLIC drive and main linacs, producing up to 480 MW of peak RF power at 30 GHz and acceleratin...

  6. Overview of CLIC and CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, R

    2002-01-01

    The CLIC study aims at the design of a high-energy (0.5-5 TeV), high luminosity e+e- linear collider, as a possible facility for the post-LHC era. The beams are accelerated using high-frequency (30 GHz) normal-conducting structures operating at high accelerating gradients to reduce the length and, in consequence, the cost of the linac. The RF power for these structures is generated using the so-called Two-Beam Acceleration (TBA) scheme, where a low-energy, high-intensity electron beam (drive beam) runs parallel to the main linacs and is decelerated in resonant structures, which extract RF power from the drive beam. The drive beam is first accelerated in a low-frequency fully-loaded normal-conducting linac. Its time structure is then obtained by funneling in isochronous rings using transverse RF deflectors. CTF3, a new generation CLIC Test Facility, is being built at CERN to demonstrate the technical feasibility of this novel drive beam generation and RF power production scheme, albeit on a much smaller scale....

  7. Development of Stripline Kickers for Low Emittance Rings: Application to the Beam Extraction Kicker for CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)728476; Toral Fernandez, Fernando

    In the framework of the design study of Future Linear Colliders, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) aims for electron-positron collisions with high luminosity at a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. To achieve the luminosity requirements, Pre-Damping Rings (PDRs) and Damping Rings (DRs) are required: they reduce the beam emittance before the beam is accelerated in the main linac. Several injection and extraction systems are needed to inject and extract the beam from the PDRs and DRs. The work of this Thesis consists of the design, fabrication and laboratory tests of the first stripline kicker prototype for beam extraction from the CLIC DRs, although the methodology proposed can be extended to stripline kickers for any low emittance ring. The excellent field homogeneity required, as well as a good transmission of the high voltage pulse through the electrodes, has been achieved by choosing a novel electrode shape. With this new geometry, it has been possible to benefit from all the advantages that the most...

  8. Academic Training - Technological challenges of CLIC

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Technological challenges of CLIC R. Corsini, S. Doebert, S. Redaelli, T.Lefevre, CERN-AB and G. Arnau Izquierdo, H. Mainaud, CERN-TS Future e+e- Linear Colliders offer the potential to explore new physics at the TeV scale and beyond to very high precision. While the International Linear Collider (ILC) scheme of a collider in the 0.5 - 1 TeV range enters the engineering design phase, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study explores the technical feasibility of a collider capable of reaching into the multi-TeV energy domain. Key ingredients of the CLIC scheme are acceleration at high-frequency (30 GHz) and high-gradient (150 MV/m) in normal conducting structures and the use of the so-called Two Beam Acceleration concept, where a high-charge electron beam (drive beam) running parallel to the main beam is decelerated to provide the RF power to accelerate the main beam itself. A vigorous R&...

  9. Test of the beam effect on vacuum arc occurrence in a high-gradient accelerating structure for the CLIC project

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2130409; Gagliardi, Martino

    A new generation of lepton colliders capable of reaching TeV energies is pres- ently under development, and to succeed in this task it is necessary to show that the technology for such a machine is available. The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a possible design option among the future lepton collider projects. It consists of two normal-conducting linacs. Accelerating structures with a gradient of the order of 100 MV/m are necessary to reach the required high energies within a reasonable machine length. One of the strictest require- ments for such accelerating structures is a relatively low occurrence of vacuum arcs. CLIC prototype structures have been tested in the past, but only in absence of beam. In order to proof the feasibility of the high gradient technology for building a functional collider, it is necessary to understand the effect of the beam presence on the vacuum breakdowns. Tests of this type have never been performed previously. The main goal of this work is to provide a first measurement of t...

  10. CLIC Quadrupole Module final report

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Mainaud-Durand, H

    2013-01-01

    Future Linear colliders will need particle beam sizes in the nanometre range. The beam also needs to be stable all along the beam line. The CLIC Main Beam Quadrupole (MBQ) module has been defined and studied. It is meant as a test stand for stabilisation and pre-alignment with a MB Quadrupole. The main topic that has been tackled concerns the Quadrupole magnet stabilisation to 1nm at 1Hz. This is needed to obtain the desired CLIC luminosity of 2.1034 cm-2m-1. The deliverable was demonstrated by procuring a MBQ and by stabilising a powered and cooled CLIC MBQ quadrupole. In addition, the stabilisation system has to be compatible with the pre-alignment procedures. Pre-alignment movement resolution has been demonstrated to 1m. The last step is the combined test of stability with a quadrupole on a CLIC Module with the pre-alignment.

  11. Development of an Eccentric CAM Based Active Pre-Alignment System for the CLIC Main Beam Quadrupole Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Lackner, F; Collette, C; Mainaud Durand, H; Hauviller, C; Kemppinen, J; Leuxe, R

    2010-01-01

    CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) is a study for a future electron-positron collider that would allow physicists to explore a new energy region beyond the capabilities of today's particle accelerators. The demanding transverse and vertical beam sizes and emittance specifications are resulting in stringent alignment and a nanometre stability requirement. In the current feasibility study, the main beam quadrupole magnets have to be actively pre-aligned with a precision of 1 µm in 5 degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) before being mechanically stabilized to the nm scale above 1 Hz. This contribution describes the approach of performing this active pre-alignment based on an eccentric cam system. In order to limit the amplification of the vibration sources at resonant frequencies a sufficiently high Eigenfrequency is required. Therefore the contact region between cam and support was optimized for adequate stiffness based on the Hertzian theory. Furthermore, practical tests performed on a single degree of freedom mock-up wil...

  12. Conceptual Design for CLIC Gun Pulser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Tao [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-01-08

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a proposed future electron-positron collider, designed to perform collisions at energies from 0.5 to 5 TeV, with a nominal design optimized for 3 TeV (Dannheim, 2012). The Drive Beam Accelerator consists of a thermionic DC gun, bunching section and an accelerating section. The thermionic gun needs deliver a long (~143us) pulse of current into the buncher. A pulser is needed to drive grid of the gun to generate a stable current output. This report explores the requirements of the gun pulser and potential solutions to regulate grid current.

  13. Proposal to negotiate extensions to four collaboration agreements for the design of key components of the beam-delivery and linac systems for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) for a duration of two years

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate extensions to four collaboration agreements for the design of key components of the beam-delivery and linac systems for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) for a duration of two years

  14. CERN: Making CLIC tick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) scheme for counter-rotating proton beams in a new superconducting ring to be built in CERN's existing 27-kilometre LEP tunnel is being pushed as the Laboratory's main construction project for the 1990s, research and development continues in parallel for an eventual complementary attack on new physics frontiers with CERN's Linear Collider - CLIC - firing TeV electron and positron beams at each other

  15. Detector Systems at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider CLIC is designed to deliver e+e- collisions at a center of mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The detector systems at this collider have to provide highly efficient tracking and excellent jet energy resolution and hermeticity for multi-TeV final states with multiple jets and leptons. In addition, the detector systems have to be capable of distinguishing physics events from large beam-induced background at a crossing frequency of 2 GHz. Like for the detector concepts at the ILC, CLIC detectors are based on event reconstruction using particle flow algorithms. The two detector concepts for the ILC, ILD and SID, were adapted for CLIC using calorimeters with dense absorbers limiting leakage through increased compactness, as well as modified forward and vertex detector geometries and precise time stamping to cope with increased background levels. The overall detector concepts for CLIC are presented, with particular emphasis on the main detector and engineering challenges, such as: the ultra-thi...

  16. CLIC expands to include the Southern Hemisphere

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    Australia has recently joined the CLIC collaboration: the enlargement will bring new expertise and resources to the project, and is especially welcome in the wake of CERN budget redistributions following the recent adoption of the Medium Term Plan.   The countries involved in CLIC collaboration With the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding on 26 August 2010, the ACAS network (Australian Collaboration for Accelerator Science) became the 40th member of in the multilateral CLIC collaboration making Australia the 22nd country to join the collaboration. “The new MoU was signed by the ACAS network, which includes the Australian Synchrotron and the University of Melbourne”, explains Jean-Pierre Delahaye, CLIC Study Leader. “Thanks to their expertise, the Australian institutes will contribute greatly to the CLIC damping rings and the two-beam test modules." Institutes from any country wishing to join the CLIC collaboration are invited to assume responsibility o...

  17. Neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoto, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks is reviewed. Experiments are discussed where neutral beams have been used to drive current directly and also indirectly through neoclassical effects. Application of the theory to an experimental test reactor is described. It is shown that neutral beams formed from negative ions accelerated to 500 to 700 keV are needed for this device

  18. Neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoto, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    The theory of neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks is reviewed. Experiments are discussed where neutral beams have been used to drive current directly and also indirectly through neoclassical effects. Application of the theory to an experimental test reactor is described. It is shown that neutral beams formed from negative ions accelerated to 500-700 keV are needed for this device

  19. CLIC CDR - physics and detectors: CLIC conceptual design report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, E.; Demarteau, M.; Repond, J.; Xia, L.; Weerts, H. (High Energy Physics); (Many)

    2012-02-10

    This report forms part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC). The CLIC accelerator complex is described in a separate CDR volume. A third document, to appear later, will assess strategic scenarios for building and operating CLIC in successive center-of-mass energy stages. It is anticipated that CLIC will commence with operation at a few hundred GeV, giving access to precision standard-model physics like Higgs and top-quark physics. Then, depending on the physics landscape, CLIC operation would be staged in a few steps ultimately reaching the maximum 3 TeV center-of-mass energy. Such a scenario would maximize the physics potential of CLIC providing new physics discovery potential over a wide range of energies and the ability to make precision measurements of possible new states previously discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main purpose of this document is to address the physics potential of a future multi-TeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider based on CLIC technology and to describe the essential features of a detector that are required to deliver the full physics potential of this machine. The experimental conditions at CLIC are significantly more challenging than those at previous electron-positron colliders due to the much higher levels of beam-induced backgrounds and the 0.5 ns bunch-spacing. Consequently, a large part of this report is devoted to understanding the impact of the machine environment on the detector with the aim of demonstrating, with the example of realistic detector concepts, that high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC. Since the impact of background increases with energy, this document concentrates on the detector requirements and physics measurements at the highest CLIC center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. One essential output of this report is the clear demonstration that a wide range of high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC with detectors which are challenging, but

  20. The PHIN photoinjector for the CTF3 Drive beam

    CERN Document Server

    Losito, R; Braun, H; Champault, N; Chevallay, E; Divall, M; Fedosseev, V; Hirst, G; Kumar, A; Kurdi, G; Martin, W; Masi, A; Mercier, B; Musgrave, I; Prevost, C; Ross, I; Roux, R; Springate, E; Suberlucq, Guy

    2006-01-01

    A new photoinjector for the CTF3 drive beam has been designed and is now being constructed by a collaboration among LAL, CCLRC and CERN within PHIN, the second Joint Research Activity of CARE. The photoinjector will provide a train of 2332 pulses at 1.5 GHz with a complex timing structure (sub-trains of 212 pulses spaced from one another by 333 ps or 999 ps) to allow the frequency multiplication scheme, which is one of the features of CLIC, to be tested in CTF3. Each pulse of 2.33 nC will be emitted by a Cs2Te photocathode deposited by a co-evaporation process to allow high quantum efficiency in operation (>3% for a minimum of 40 h). The 3 GHz, 2 1/2 cell RF gun has a 2 port coupler to minimize emittance growth due to asymmetric fields, racetrack profile of the irises and two solenoids to keep the emittance at the output below 20 p.mm.mrad. The laser has to survive very high average powers both within the pulse train (15 kW) and overall (200 W before pulse slicing). Challenging targets are also for amplitude ...

  1. Physics and Detectors at CLIC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    CLIC represents an attractive option for the future particle physics programme at the energy frontier. CLIC is a proposed electron-positron linear collider, based on a novel two beam accelerating structure, with the capability of operating at centre-of-mass energies of up to 3 TeV. The Physics and Detector volume of the CLIC conceptual design report was recently published as a CERN yellow report. In this seminar, I will review the conclusions of this report, focussing on four main areas. Firstly, I will give an overview of the physics potential at CLIC, and will place this in the context of a possible scenario for the staged construction of the machine. Secondly, I will discuss the challenges for a detector operating in the CLIC machine environment. I will then present detailed studies of possible detector concepts, based on high granularity particle flow calorimetry, which demonstrate that the required detector performance goals at CLIC can be met. Finally, I will highlight the main issues for the future R&a...

  2. Study and application of micrometric alignment on the prototype girders of the CLIC Two-Beam Module

    CERN Document Server

    Gazis, Nikolaos; Mainaud-Durand, Hélène; Samochkine, Alexandre; Anastasopoulos, Michail

    2011-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider (CLIC), currently under study at CERN, aims at the development of a Multi-TeV e+ e- collider. The micro-precision CLIC RF-structures will have an accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m and will be mounted and aligned on specially developed supporting girders. The girder fabrication constraints are dictated by stringent physics requirements. The micrometric pre-alignment over several kilometers of girders, allow for the CLIC structures to fulfill their acceleration and collision functionality. Study of such girders and their sophisticated alignment method, is a challenging case involving dedicated mechanical design as well as prototype production and experimental testing.

  3. Physics at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)669060; Roloff, Philipp Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    CLIC is a concept for a future linear collider which would use two-beam acceleration to produce e+e- collisions with a centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. A staging scenario would also provide collisions at lower centre-of-mass energies, provisionally 350 GeV and 1.4 TeV. In order to demonstrate the wide range of physics processes available at such a linear collider, and to benchmark the performance of proposed detector models, a campaign of simulated physics analyses including Higgs, top and beyond the Standard Model processes has been undertaken at these three energy stages. These proceedings present the current status of these studies and illustrate the potential for precision physics measurements at CLIC.

  4. CLICdp Overview. Overview of physics potential at CLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy Aharon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CLICdp, the CLIC detector and physics study, is an international collaboration presently composed of 23 institutions. The collaboration is addressing detector and physics issues for the future Compact Linear Collider (CLIC, a high-energy electron-positron accelerator which is one of the options for the next collider to be built at CERN. Precision physics under challenging beam and background conditions is the key theme for the CLIC detector studies. This leads to a number of cutting-edge R&D activities within CLICdp. The talk includes a brief introduction to CLIC, accelerator and detectors, hardware R&D as well as physics studies at CLIC.

  5. Successful start for new CLIC test facility

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    A new test facility is being built to study key feasibility issues for a possible future linear collider called CLIC. Commissioning of the first part of the facility began in June 2003 and nominal beam parameters have been achieved already.

  6. CLIC Brochure

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086185

    2015-01-01

    After the discovery of the Higgs boson and with upgrades to higher energy and luminosity, the LHC is mapping the route of particle physics into the future. The next step in this journey of discovery could be a linear electron-positron collider, which would complement the LHC and allow high precision measurements of the Higgs boson, the top quark and electroweak processes in addition to possible new physics beyond the Standard Model. The Compact Linear Collider is under development by two worldwide collaborations, pushing the limits of particle acceleration and detection. Technological R&D, physics simulations and engineering studies must all come together to make CLIC a reality.

  7. Simulation and Optimisation of CLIC's recombination complex

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Raul; Barroso, Manuel

    In this thesis we present the first Placet2 recombination simulations of the drive beam recombination complex (DBRC) design for the compact linear collider (CLIC). We start by presenting a review of the CLIC project and the DBRC’s role and design within it. We then discuss some of the core principles of beam dynamics and how tracking codes like Placet2 implement them. We follow that by presenting the design issues raised by our simulations and our proposed strategy to address them, key among which is a previously unknown parabolic dependency of the longitudinal position to the momentum (T 566 ), which threat- ens the efficiency of the power extraction structures. Through iterative opti- misation of the design, we eliminated this aberration both in the delay loop and in combiner ring 1. We also found the beam’s horizontal emittance to be significantly over the design budget (150 μm) and attempted to meet that budget, reaching 157 μm. In order to obtain this emittance value, an update to the combiner ring...

  8. High RF Power Production for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Syratchev, I; Adli, E; Taborelli, M

    2007-01-01

    The CLIC Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) is a passive microwave device in which bunches of the drive beam interact with the impedance of the periodically loaded waveguide and excite preferentially the synchronous mode. The RF power produced (several hundred MW) is collected at the downstream end of the structure by means of the Power Extractor and delivered to the main linac structure. The PETS geometry is a result of multiple compromises between beam stability and main linac RF power needs. Another requirement is to provide local RF power termination in case of accelerating structure failure (ON/OFF capability). Surface electric and magnetic fields, power extraction method, HOM damping, ON/OFF capability and fabrication technology were all evaluated to provide a reliable design

  9. 30 GHz High Power Production for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Syratchev, I V

    2006-01-01

    The CLIC Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) is a passive microwave device in which bunches of the drive beam interact with the impedance of the periodically loaded waveguide and excite preferentially the synchronous TM01 mode at 30 GHz. The RF power produced (several hundred MW) is collected at the downstream end of the structure by means of the Power Extractor and conveyed to the main linac structure. The PETS geometry is a result of multiple compromises between beam stability along a single decelerator sector (600 m) and the active length of the structure to match the main linac RF power needs and layout. Surface electric and magnetic fields, power extraction method, HOM damping, ON/OFF capability and fabrication technology were all evaluated to provide a reliable design.

  10. A sensitiviy analysis for the stabilization of the CLIC main beam quadrupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Janssens, S; Artoos, K; Fernandez Carmona, P; Hauviller, C

    2010-01-01

    In particle colliders (like the LHC), particles are highly accelerated in a circular beam pipe before the collision. However, due to the curved trajectory of the particles, they are also loosing energy because of the so-called Bremsstrahlung. In order to bypass this fundamental limitation imposed by circular beams, the next generation of particle colliders will accelerate two straight beams of particles before the collision. One of them, the Compact Linear Collider, is currently under study at CERN. The machine is constituted of a huge number of accelerating structures (used to accelerate the particles) and quadrupoles (electromagnets used to focus the particles). The latter ones are required to be stable at the nanometer level. This extreme stability has to be guaranteed by active vibration isolation from all types of disturbances like ground vibrations, ventilation, cooling system, or acoustic noise. Because of the huge number of quadrupoles (about 4000), it is critical that the strategy adopted for the act...

  11. Development and testing of a double length pets for the CLIC experimental area

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, L; Gavela, D; Lara, A; Rodríguez, E; Gutiérrez, J L; Calero, J; Toral, F; Samoshkin, A; Gudkov, D; Riddone, G

    2014-01-01

    CLIC (compact linear collider) is a future e þ e collider based on normal-conducting technology, currently under study at CERN. Its design is based on a novel two-beam acceleration scheme. The main beam gets RF power extracted from a drive beam through power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The technical feasibility of CLIC is currently being proved by its Third Test Facility (CTF3) which includes the CLIC experimental area (CLEX). Two Double Length CLIC PETS will be installed in CLEX to validate their performance with beam. This paper is focused on the engineering design, fabrication and validation of this PETS fi rst prototype. The design consists of eight identical bars, separated by radial slots in which damping material is located to absorb transverse wake fi elds, and two compact couplers placed at both ends of the bars to extract the generated power. The PETS bars are housed inside a vacuum tank designed to make the PETS as compact as possible. Several joint techniques such as vacuum brazing...

  12. Accelerator Physics for ILC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the second part of the “accelerator physics lectures” delivered at the Ambleside Linear Collider School 2009. It discusses more specific linear-collider issues: superconducting and room-temperature linear accelerators, particle sources for electrons and positrons, synchrotron radiation and damping, intensity limits, beam stability, and beam delivery system – including final focus, collimation, and beam-beam effects. It also presents an overview of the International Linear Collider (ILC), a description of the two beam acceleration scheme of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), and a comparison of the ILC and CLIC parameters.

  13. First phase of CLIC R&D complete

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Let’s turn back the clocks to 2002: the LHC is still under construction, the wrap-up of the LEP physics programme is still in recent memory and the future of electron-positron accelerators at CERN is ambiguous. It was then that CLIC set out to prove the feasibility of their novel accelerator design in the CTF3 test facility. Though once a tall order for the collaboration, the recently released CLIC Conceptual Design Report has proven many of the major design elements… bringing to an end the first phase of CLIC R&D and pointing toward detailed performance optimisation studies in the next phase.   Streak camera images of the final beam, illustrating the combination of beams in the Combiner Ring. Over a decade ago, the CTF3 team set up shop in the vacated LIL injector site, once home to the weathered machine that delivered electrons and positrons to LEP. Rebuilding and upgrading the machine piece by piece, the CTF3 team converted this mA linac into a high-current drive b...

  14. LHC and CLIC LLRF final reports

    CERN Document Server

    Dexter, A; Woolley, B; Ambattu, P; Tahir, I; Syratchev, Igor; Wuensch, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Crab cavities rotate bunches from opposing beams to achieve effective head-on collision in CLIC or collisions at an adjustable angle in LHC. Without crab cavities 90% of achievable luminosity at CLIC would be lost. In the LHC, the crab cavities allow the same or larger integrated luminosity while reducing significantly the requested dynamic range of physics detectors. The focus for CLIC is accurate phase synchronisation of the cavities, adequate damping of wakefields and modest amplitude stability. For the LHC, the main LLRF issues are related to imperfections: beam offsets in cavities, RF noise, measurement noise in feedback loops, failure modes and mitigations. This report develops issues associated with synchronising the CLIC cavities. It defines an RF system and experiments to validate the approach. It reports on the development of hardware for measuring the phase performance of the RF distributions system and cavities. For the LHC, the hardware being very close to the existing LLRF, the report focuses on...

  15. Validation of CLIC Re-Adjustment System Based on Eccentric Cam Movers One Degree of Freedom Mock-Up

    CERN Document Server

    Kemppinen, J; Lackner, F

    2011-01-01

    Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a 48 km long linear accelerator currently studied at CERN. It is a high luminosity electron-positron collider with an energy range of 0.5-3 TeV. CLIC is based on a two-beam technology in which a high current drive beam transfers RF power to the main beam accelerating structures. The main beam is steered with quadrupole magnets. To reach CLIC target luminosity, the main beam quadrupoles have to be actively pre-aligned within 17 µm in 5 degrees of freedom and actively stabilised at 1 nm in vertical above 1 Hz. To reach the pre-alignment requirement as well as the rigidity required by nano-stabilisation, a system based on eccentric cam movers is proposed for the re-adjustment of the main beam quadrupoles. Validation of the technique to the stringent CLIC requirements was started with tests in one degree of freedom on an eccentric cam mover. This paper describes the dedicated mock-up as well as the tests and measurements carried out with it. Finally, the test results are present...

  16. CLIC Physics Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Pandurovic, Mila

    2017-01-01

    The CLICdp is an international collaboration that investigates the physics potential of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and performs research and development of the CLIC detector. CLIC is a future multi-TeV linear electron-positron collider, designed to cover a physics program of the Standard model physics, with the emphasis on Higgs and top as well as to address the wide range of open questions of the phenomena beyond the Standard model with high precision. The CLIC is designed to be build and operated at three discrete energy stages, sort(s) = 380 GeV, 1.5 and 3.0 TeV, which are optimized for the foreseen physics program. In this talk the CLIC accelerator, detector and experimental environment of CLIC will be presented, as well as, the number of the full-simulation measurements in the Higgs, top and beyond Standard model sector, presenting the capabilities of CLIC for high precision measurements.

  17. Neutral beam current drive with balanced injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhartt, D.

    1990-01-01

    Current drive with fast ions has proved its capability to sustain a tokamak plasma free of externally induced electric fields in a stationary state. The suprathermal ion population within the toroidal plasma was created by quasi-tangential and uni-directional injection of high-energy neutral atoms, their ionisation and subsequent deceleration by collisions with the background plasma particles. In future large tokamaks of the NET/INTER-type, with reactor-relevant values of plasma density and temperature, this current drive scheme is expected to maintain the toroidal current at the plasma centre, as current drive by lower hybrid waves will be restricted to the outer plasma regions owing to strong wave damping. Adequate penetration of the neutral atoms through the dense plasma requires particle energies of several hundred kilovolts per nucleon since beam absorption scales roughly with the ratio beam energy over density. The realisation of such high-energy high-power neutral beams, based on negative ion technology, is now under study. (author) 7 refs., 2 figs

  18. CLIC Project Overview (In Conjunction with the Muon Collider Workshop)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latina, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV in order to make the multi-TeV range accessible for physics. The current goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of the technology by the year 2010. Recently, important progress has been made concerning the high-gradient accelerating structure tests and the experiments with beam in the CLIC test facility, CTF3. On the organizational side, the CLIC international collaborations have significantly gained momentum, boosting the CLIC study.

  19. CLIC: The CLIC accelerator design and performance

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a future electron-positron collider under study. It foresees e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies ranging from a few hundred GeV up to 3 TeV. The CLIC study is an international collaboration hosted by CERN. The lectures provide a broad overview of the CLIC project, covering the physics potential, the particle detectors and the accelerator. An overview of the CLIC physics opportunities is presented. These are best exploited in a staged construction and operation scenario of the collider. The detector technologies, fulfilling CLIC performance requirements and currently under study, are described. The accelerator design and performance, together with its major technologies, are presented in the light of ongoing component tests and large system tests. The status of the optimisation studies (e.g. for cost and power) of the CLIC complex for the proposed energy staging is included. One lecture is dedicated to the use of CLIC technologies in free electron lasers and other ...

  20. Achievements and Future Plans of CLIC Test Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Hans Heinrich

    2001-01-01

    CTF2 was originally designed to demonstrate the feasibility of two-beam acceleration with high current drive beams and a string of 30 GHz CLIC accelerating structure prototypes (CAS). This goal was achieved in 1999 and the facility has since been modified to focus on high gradient testing of CAS's and 30 GHz single cell cavities (SCC). With these modifications, it is now possible to provide 30 GHz RF pulses of more than 150 MW and an adjustable pulselength from 3 to 15 ns. While the SCC results are promising, the testing of CAS's revealed problems of RF breakdown and related surface damage. As a consequence, a new R&D program has been launched to advance the understanding of RF breakdown processes, to improve surface properties, investigate new materials and to optimise the structure geometries of the CAS's. In parallel the construction of a new facility named CTF3 has started. CTF3 will mainly serve two purposes. The first is the demonstration of the CLIC drive beam generation scheme. CTF3 will acceler-a...

  1. Analysis of test-beam data with hybrid pixel detector prototypes for the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pequegnot, Anne-Laure

    2013-01-01

    The LHC is currently the most powerful accelerator in the world. This proton-proton collider is now stoppped to increase significantly its luminosity and energy, which would provide a larger discovery potential in 2014 and beyond. A high-energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider, such as CLIC, is an option to complement and to extend the LHC physics programme. Indeed, a lepton collider gives access to additional physics processes, beyond those observable at the LHC, and therefore provides new discovery potential. It can also provide complementary and/or more precise information about new physics uncovered at the LHC. Many essential features of a detector are required to deliver the full physics potential of this CLIC machine. In this present report, I present my work on the vertex detector R\\&D for this future linear collider, which aims at developping highly granular and ultra-thin position sensitive detection devices with very low power consumption and fast time-stamping capability. We tested here thin silicon pixel...

  2. New clic-g structure design

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082335

    2016-01-01

    The baseline design of the Compact Linear Collider main linac accelerating structure is called ‘CLIC-G’. It is described in the CLIC Conceptual Design Report (CDR) [1]. As shown in Fig. 1, a regular cell of the structure has four waveguides to damp unwanted high-order-modes (HOMs). These waveguides are dimensioned to cut off the fundamental working frequency in order to prevent the degradation of the fundamental mode Q-factor. The cell geometry and HOM damping loads had been extensively optimized in order to maximize the RF-to-beam efficiency, to minimize the cost, and to meet the beam dynamics and the high gradient RF constraints [2

  3. Strategy and validation of fiducialisation for the pre-alignment of CLIC components

    CERN Document Server

    Griffet, S; Kemppinen, J; Mainaud Durand, H; Rude, V; Sterbini, G

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of the high energy e+ e- linear collider CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) is very dependent on the ability to accurately pre-align its components. There are two 20 km long Main Linacs which meet in an interaction point (IP). The Main Linacs are composed of thousands of 2 m long modules. One of the challenges is to meet very tight alignment tolerances at the level of CLIC module: for example, the magnetic centre of a Drive Beam Quad needs to be aligned within 20 µm rms with respect to a straight line. Such accuracies cannot be achieved using usual measurement devices. Thus it is necessary to work in close collaboration with the metrology lab. To test and improve many critical points, including alignment, a CLIC mock-up is being assembled at CERN. This paper describes the application of the strategy of fiducialisation for the pre-alignment of CLIC mock-up components. It also deals with the first results obtained by performing measurements using a CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine) to ensure the f...

  4. Light-flavor squark reconstruction at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)548062; Weuste, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a simulation study of the prospects for the mass measurement of TeV-scale light- flavored right-handed squark at a 3 TeV e+e collider based on CLIC technology. The analysis is based on full GEANT4 simulations of the CLIC_ILD detector concept, including Standard Model physics backgrounds and beam-induced hadronic backgrounds from two- photon processes. The analysis serves as a generic benchmark for the reconstruction of highly energetic jets in events with substantial missing energy. Several jet finding algorithms were evaluated, with the longitudinally invariant kt algorithm showing a high degree of robustness towards beam-induced background while preserving the features typically found in algorithms developed for e+e- collisions. The presented study of the reconstruction of light-flavored squarks shows that for TeV-scale squark masses, sub-percent accuracy on the mass measurement can be achieved at CLIC.

  5. Electron-beam direct drive for rf accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahemow, M.D.; Humphries, S. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a Program to Demonstrate Electron-Beam Direct Drive for Radio Frequency (RF) Linear Accelerators at the Westinghouse R and D Center. The experimental program was undertaken using an existing electron beam facility at the Westinghouse R and C Center to demonstrate the potential of the Direct Drive RF Cavities for High Power Beams concept discussed as part of a program to develop a viable alternate concept for driving RF linear accelerators

  6. Preparing for CLIC tests

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The Canon 5 undergoes first brazing for preparation in the CLIC study at the CLIC Test Facility 2 (CTF2). This will test injection for a proposed linear collider that will further explore discoveries made at the LHC. Electric fields in the canon will boost electrons into the acceleration fields of the collider.

  7. Summary of the BDS and MDI CLIC08 Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; Ahmed, I; Ambatu, PK; Angal-Kalinin, D; Barlow, R; Baud, J P; Bolzon, B; Braun, H; Burkhardt, H; Burt, GC; Corsini, R; Dalena, B; Dexter, AC; Dolgashev, V; Elsener, K; Fernandez Hernando, JL; Gaillard, G; Geffroy, N; Jackson, F; Jeremie, A; Jones, RM; McIntosh, P; Moffeit, K; Peltier, F; Resta-López, J; Rumolo, G; Schulte, D; Seryi, A; Toader, A; Zimmermann, F

    2008-01-01

    This note summarizes the presentations held within the Beam Delivery System and Machine Detector Interface working group of the CLIC08 workshop. The written contributions have been provided by the presenters on a voluntary basis.

  8. R and D for the Feasibility Study of CLIC Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, H; Geschonke, Günther; Guignard, Gilbert; Hübner, K; Wilson, Ian H

    2004-01-01

    An overview is given of the necessary R&D and particularly of the CLIC test facility CTF3 which is presently under construction for demonstrating the key issues related to the CLIC technology and to the two-beam scheme. The results concerning the commissioning of the injector and of the first part of the linac already built are summarized. The main R&D topics to be covered with this test infrastructure are described and the planned road-map in order to reach the pre-defined goals is indicated. The potential of CTF3 for checking the bunch-train recombination, testing RF accelerating structures, investigating the use of a drive-beam for RF power production, for bench-marking simulation codes and possibly making low-energy experiments related to linear collider R&D is presented. The activities required for the feasibility programme planned are given in the form of work packages, together with the needed but not available resources and the time schedule.

  9. Data supporting characterization of CLIC1, CLIC4, CLIC5 and DmCLIC antibodies and localization of CLICs in endoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devasena Ponnalagu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chloride intracellular channel (CLICs proteins show 60–70% sequence identity to each other, and exclusively localize to the intracellular organelle membranes and cytosol. In support of our recent publication, “Molecular identity of cardiac mitochondrial chloride intracellular channel proteins” (Ponnalagu et al., 2016 [1], it was important to characterize the specificity of different CLIC paralogs/ortholog (CLIC1, CLIC4, CLIC5 and DmCLIC antibodies used to decipher their localization in cardiac cells. In addition, localization of CLICs in the other organelles such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER of cardiomyocytes was established. This article also provides data on the different primers used to show the relative abundance of CLIC paralogs in cardiac tissue and the specificity of the various CLIC antibodies used. We demonstrate that the predominant CLICs in the heart, namely CLIC1, CLIC4 and CLIC5, show differential distribution in endoplasmic reticulum. CLIC1 and CLIC4 both show co-localization to the endoplasmic reticulum whereas CLIC5 does not.

  10. Physics Signatures at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Marco

    2001-01-01

    A set of signatures for physics processes of potential interests for the CLIC programme at = 1 - 5 TeV are discussed. These signatures, that may correspond to the manifestation of different scenarios of new physics as well as to Standard Model precision tests, are proposed as benchmarks for the optimisation of the CLIC accelerator parameters and for a first definition of the required detector response.

  11. CLIC brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    The world's biggest and most powerful accelerator, the LHC, is mapping the route of particle physics for the future. The next step, to complement the LHC in exploring this new region, is most likely to be a linear electron-positron collider. The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a novel approach to such a collider. It is currently under development by the CLIC collaboration, which is hosted at CERN.

  12. Physics at CLIC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a high-energy e+e- collider under development. The CLIC conceptual design report, published in 2012, concentrated on 3 TeV centre-of-mass energy. At that time operation at lower energies was not yet studied at the same level. Following the discovery of the Higgs boson, the CLIC potential for precision Higgs measurements was addressed for several centre-of-mass energies. In parallel, the scope for precision top quark physics was further explored. As a result an optimised CLIC staging scenario was defined in collaboration between accelerator and detector experts. The staging scenario aims at a maximum physics output and maximum luminosity yield with a collider built and operated in three energy steps: 380 GeV, 1.5 TeV, 3 TeV. The seminar will comprise a short status report on the CLIC accelerator and detector. Emphasis will be on the CLIC physics potential for Higgs, top quark and BSM physics in the new staging scenario.

  13. Occupancy in the CLIC ILD Time Projection Chamber using Pixelised Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Killenberg, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The occupancy in the CLIC ILD TPC caused by the beam induced background from gamma gamma -> hadrons, e+e- pairs and beam halo muons is very high for conventional pad readout. We show that the occupancy for a pixelised TPC readout is moderate and might be a viable solution to operate a TPC at CLIC.

  14. CLIC Telescope optimization with ALLPIX simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Wu

    2015-01-01

    A simulation study of CLIC-EUDET telescope resolution with MIMOSA 26 as reference sensors under DESY (5.6 GeV electron beam) and CERN-SPS (120-180 GeV pion^{-} beam) conditions. During the study, a virtual DUT sensor with cylindrical sensing area was defined and used with ALLPIX software. By changing the configuration of telescope, some results for DESY's setup were found agreeing with the theoretical calculation.

  15. Status of Ground Motion Mitigation Techniques for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Snuverink, J; Collette, C; Duarte Ramos, F; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Janssens, S; Pfingstner, J; Schulte, D; Balik, G; Brunetti, L; Jeremie, A; Burrows, P; Caron, B; Resta-Lopez, J

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) accelerator has strong stability requirements on the position of the beam. In particular, the beam position will be sensitive to ground motion. A number of mitigation techniques are proposed - quadrupole stabilisation and positioning, final doublet stabilisation as well as beam based orbit and interaction point (IP) feedback. Integrated studies of the impact of the ground motion on the CLIC Main Linac (ML) and Beam Delivery System (BDS) have been performed, which model the hardware and beam performance in detail. Based on the results future improvements of the mitigation techniques are suggested and simulated. It is shown that with the current design the tight luminosity budget for ground motion effects is fulfilled and accordingly, an essential feasibility issue of CLIC has been addressed.

  16. First Full Beam Loading Operation with the CTF3 Linac

    CERN Multimedia

    Corsini, R; Bienvenu, G; Braun, H; Carron, G; Ferrari, A; Forstner, O; Garvey, Terence; Geschonke, Günther; Groening, L; Jensen, E; Koontz, R; Lefèvre, T; Miller, R; Rinolfi, Louis; Roux, R; Ruth, Ronald D; Schulte, Daniel; Tecker, F A; Thorndahl, L; Yeremian, A D

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) Study is to investigate the feasibility of a high luminosity, multi-TeV linear e+e- collider. CLIC is based on a two-beam method, in which a high current drive beam is decelerated to produce 30 GHz RF power needed for high-gradient acceleration of the main beam running parallel to it. To demonstrate the outstanding feasibility issues of the scheme a new CLIC Test Facility, CTF3, is being constructed at CERN by an international collaboration. In its final configuration CTF3 will consist of a 150 MeV drive beam linac followed by a 42 m long delay loop and an 84 m combiner ring. The installation will include a 30 GHz high power test stand, a representative CLIC module and a test decelerator. The first part of the linac was installed and commissioned with beam in 2003. The first issue addressed was the generation and acceleration of a high-current drive beam in the "full beam loading" condition where RF power is converted into beam power with an efficiency of more tha...

  17. Preliminary design of the pulse generator for the CLIC damping ring extraction system

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne; Ovaska, Seppo

    2011-01-01

    The spent drive beam must be cleanly extracted and bent away from the decelerator axis at the end of each CLIC decelerator in order to leave space for injecting a fresh beam train in the next sector. Then the spent beam must be safely absorbed. A compact extraction system made of a single dipole is proposed. The spent beam is driven to a water dump located at 20m downstream of the extraction point and transversely 6m away of the axis of the main linac. An adequate spread of the beam impact map on the dump offers small temperature excursions in both the dump and its entrance window, allowing for reliable operation and a long lifetime of the system.

  18. CLIC e+e- Linear Collider Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Dannheim, Dominik; Linssen, Lucie; Schulte, Daniel; Simon, Frank; Stapnes, Steinar; Toge, Nobukazu; Weerts, Harry; Wells, James

    2012-01-01

    This document provides input from the CLIC e+e- linear collider studies to the update process of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. It is submitted on behalf of the CLIC/CTF3 collaboration and the CLIC physics and detector study. It describes the exploration of fundamental questions in particle physics at the energy frontier with a future TeV-scale e+e- linear collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) two-beam acceleration technique. A high-luminosity high-energy e+e- collider allows for the exploration of Standard Model physics, such as precise measurements of the Higgs, top and gauge sectors, as well as for a multitude of searches for New Physics, either through direct discovery or indirectly, via high-precision observables. Given the current state of knowledge, following the observation of a \\sim125 GeV Higgs-like particle at the LHC, and pending further LHC results at 8 TeV and 14 TeV, a linear e+e- collider built and operated in centre-of-mass energy stages from a few-hundred GeV up t...

  19. Effects of the beam loading in the rf deflectors of the CLIC test facility CTF3 combiner ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Alesini

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the impact of the rf deflectors beam loading on the transverse beam dynamics of the CTF3 combiner ring. A general expression for the single-passage wake field is obtained. Different approximated formulas are derived applying linearization of the rf deflector dispersion curve either on a limited or an unlimited frequency range. A dedicated tracking code has been written to study the multibunch multiturn effects on the transverse beam dynamics. The numerical simulations reveal that the beam emittance growth due to the wake field in the rf deflectors is a small fraction of the design emittance if the trains are injected perfectly on axis. Nevertheless in case of injection errors the final emittance growth strongly depends on the betatron phase advance between the rf deflectors. If the finite bunch length is included in the tracking code, the scenario for the central part of the bunches does not change. However, for some particular injection errors, the tails of the bunches can increase the total transverse bunch emittances.

  20. Material studies for CLIC RF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Taborelli, M

    2004-01-01

    Following the EST/SM suggestion of replacing copper by molybdenum or tungsten for the construction of the RF cavity irises, different CLIC main beam accelerating structures were produced, extensively operated and disassembled for iris surface inspection. The observed surface modifications were found to be very similar to those obtained by sparking in a dedicated laboratory set-up, showing the superior behaviour of both Mo and W with respect to Cu, in terms of surface erosion and conditioning. The iris thermomechanical fatigue due to RF heating was simulated by high power pulsed laser irradiation. A CuZr alloy was found to be much more resistant than pure Cu. Measurements at higher pulse number will be performed on CuZr in order to extrapolate its fatigue behaviour up to the nominal CLIC duration. Finally a possible future development of a hybrid probe beam acceleration structure will be presented.

  1. CLIC project timeline

    CERN Multimedia

    CLIC, Compact Linear Collider Project

    2018-01-01

    The CLIC project timeline. Current plan is to start at sqrt(s)=380 GeV for Higgs and top quark precision physics and upgrade up to 3 TeV. This timeline represent a purely technical schedule and assumes support at the European Strategy for Particle Physics (ESPP) in 2020 and available funding.

  2. Silicon technologies for the CLIC vertex detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spannagel, S.

    2017-06-01

    CLIC is a proposed linear e+e- collider designed to provide particle collisions at center-of-mass energies of up to 3 TeV. Precise measurements of the properties of the top quark and the Higgs boson, as well as searches for Beyond the Standard Model physics require a highly performant CLIC detector. In particular the vertex detector must provide a single point resolution of only a few micrometers while not exceeding the envisaged material budget of around 0.2% X0 per layer. Beam-beam interactions and beamstrahlung processes impose an additional requirement on the timestamping capabilities of the vertex detector of about 10 ns. These goals can only be met by using novel techniques in the sensor and ASIC design as well as in the detector construction. The R&D program for the CLIC vertex detector explores various technologies in order to meet these demands. The feasibility of planar sensors with a thickness of 50-150 μm, including different active edge designs, are evaluated using Timepix3 ASICs. First prototypes of the CLICpix readout ASIC, implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology and with a pixel size of 25×25μm 2, have been produced and tested in particle beams. An updated version of the ASIC with a larger pixel matrix and improved precision of the time-over-threshold and time-of-arrival measurements has been submitted. Different hybridization concepts have been developed for the interconnection between the sensor and readout ASIC, ranging from small-pitch bump bonding of planar sensors to capacitive coupling of active HV-CMOS sensors. Detector simulations based on Geant 4 and TCAD are compared with experimental results to assess and optimize the performance of the various designs. This contribution gives an overview of the R&D program undertaken for the CLIC vertex detector and presents performance measurements of the prototype detectors currently under investigation.

  3. Occupancy in the CLIC_ILD Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    KILLENBERG, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the occupancy in the CLIC ILD TPC caused by the beam induced background from gg !hadrons, e+e- pairs and beam halo muons. In addition the particle composition of the backgrounds and the origin of back-scattering particles have been studied.

  4. Silicon Technologies for the CLIC Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Spannagel, Simon

    2017-01-01

    CLIC is a proposed linear e$^+$e$^−$ collider designed to provide particle collisions at center-of-mass energies of up to 3 TeV. Precise measurements of the properties of the top quark and the Higgs boson, as well as searches for Beyond the Standard Model physics require a highly performant CLIC detector. In particular the vertex detector must provide a single point resolution of only a few micrometers while not exceeding the envisaged material budget of around 0.2%$~X_0$ per layer. Beam-beam interactions and beamstrahlung processes impose an additional requirement on the timestamping capabilities of the vertex detector of about 10 ns. These goals can only be met by using novel techniques in the sensor and ASIC design as well as in the detector construction. The R&D program for the CLIC vertex detector explores various technologies in order to meet these demands. The feasibility of planar sensors with a thickness of 50–150$~\\mu$m, including different active edge designs, are evaluated using Timepix3 A...

  5. Alignment Methods Developed for the Validation of the Thermal and Mechanical Behaviour of the Two Beam Test Modules for the CLIC Project

    CERN Document Server

    Mainaud Durand, Helene; Sosin, Mateusz; Rude, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    CLIC project will consist of more than 20 000 two meters long modules. A test setup made of three modules is being built at CERN to validate the assembly and integration of all components and technical systems and to validate the short range strategy of pre-alignment. The test setup has been installed in a room equipped with a sophisticated system of ventilation able to reproduce the environmental conditions of the CLIC tunnel. Some of the components have been equipped with electrical heaters to simulate the power dissipation, combined with a water cooling system integrated in the RF components. Using these installations, to have a better understanding of the thermal and mechanical behaviour of a module under different operation modes, machine cycles have been simulated; the misalignment of the components and their supports has been observed. This paper describes the measurements methods developed for such a project and the results obtained.

  6. Neutral beam current drive scaling in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, G.D.; Bhadra, D.K.; Burrell, K.H.

    1989-03-01

    Neutral beam current drive scaling experiments have been carried out on the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics. These experiments were performed using up to 10 MW of 80 keV hydrogen beams. Previous current drive experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated beam driven currents up to 340 kA. In the experiments reported here we achieved beam driven currents of at least 500 kA, and have obtained operation with record values of poloidal beta (εβ/sub p/ = 1.4). The beam driven current reported here is obtained from the total plasma current by subtracting an estimate of the residual Ohmic current determined from the measured loop voltage. In this report we discuss the scaling of the current drive efficiency with plasma conditions. Using hydrogen neutral beams, we find the current drive efficiency is similar in Deuterium and Helium target plasmas. Experiments have been performed with plasma electron temperatures up to T/sub e/ = 3 keV, and densities in the range 2 /times/ 10 19 m/sup /minus/3/ 19 m/sup /minus/3/. The current drive efficiency (nIR/P) is observed to scale linearly with the energy confinement time on DIII-D to a maximum of 0.05 /times/ 10 20 m/sup /minus/2/ A/W. The measured efficiency is consistent with a 0-D theoretical model. In addition to comparison with this simple model, detailed analysis of several shots using the time dependent transport code ONETWO is discussed. This analysis indicates that bootstrap current contributes approximately 10--20% of the the total current. Our estimates of this effect are somewhat uncertain due to limited measurements of the radial profile of the density and temperatures. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  7. CLIC transfer structure (CTS) simulations using open-quotes MAFIAclose quotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millich, A.

    1993-01-01

    In the two-beam accelerator scheme of CLIC the Transfer Structure serves the purpose of extracting 30 GHz power from the drive beam. The purpose of the 3D simulations of the 30 GHz CTS using the MAFIA set of codes has been to assist the designers in the choice of the final dimensions by appreciating the sensitivity of the RF characteristics to the mechanical parameters. The results of the frequency domain analysis have allowed plotting of the dispersion curves of the waveguides and appreciation the relative importance of higher modes. The time domain investigations have produced results on the shape and magnitude of the beam-induced longitudinal and transverse wake fields and of the loss factors

  8. Particle Identification algorithm for the CLIC ILD and CLIC SiD detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nardulli, J

    2011-01-01

    This note describes the algorithm presently used to determine the particle identification performance for single particles for the CLIC ILD and CLIC SiD detector concepts as prepared in the CLIC Conceptual Design Report.

  9. Particle mis-identification rate algorithm for the CLIC ILD and CLIC SiD detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nardulli, J

    2011-01-01

    This note describes the algorithm presently used to determine the particle mis- identification rate and gives results for single particles for the CLIC ILD and CLIC SiD detector concepts as prepared for the CLIC Conceptual Design Report.

  10. CLIC: Detector technology R&D for CLIC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a future electron-positron collider under study. It foresees e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies ranging from a few hundred GeV up to 3 TeV. The CLIC study is an international collaboration hosted by CERN. The lectures provide a broad overview of the CLIC project, covering the physics potential, the particle detectors and the accelerator. An overview of the CLIC physics opportunities is presented. These are best exploited in a staged construction and operation scenario of the collider. The detector technologies, fulfilling CLIC performance requirements and currently under study, are described. The accelerator design and performance, together with its major technologies, are presented in the light of ongoing component tests and large system tests. The status of the optimisation studies (e.g. for cost and power) of the CLIC complex for the proposed energy staging is included. One lecture is dedicated to the use of CLIC technologies in free electron lasers and other ...

  11. CLIC: Key technology developments for the CLIC accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a future electron-positron collider under study. It foresees e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies ranging from a few hundred GeV up to 3 TeV. The CLIC study is an international collaboration hosted by CERN. The lectures provide a broad overview of the CLIC project, covering the physics potential, the particle detectors and the accelerator. An overview of the CLIC physics opportunities is presented. These are best exploited in a staged construction and operation scenario of the collider. The detector technologies, fulfilling CLIC performance requirements and currently under study, are described. The accelerator design and performance, together with its major technologies, are presented in the light of ongoing component tests and large system tests. The status of the optimisation studies (e.g. for cost and power) of the CLIC complex for the proposed energy staging is included. One lecture is dedicated to the use of CLIC technologies in free electron lasers and other ...

  12. Transverse stability in multibunch mode for CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guignard, G.

    1993-01-01

    In order to reach the desired luminosity with 250 GeV per beam, multibunch operation (limited to 4 bunches, say) might have to be considered in the CERN linear collider (CLIC). One limitation comes from the coupling of the bunch motion with the long-range transverse wake fields that may induce beam breakup. These wake fields have therefore to be controlled, and means of reducing their effects on the beam are discussed in a companion paper. One possibility consists in detuning the dipole modes in the cells to obtain decoherent contributions and hence reduce the field amplitude at the downstream bunch location. The important question is to know below which value this amplitude must be limited to prevent intolerable beam breakup. In a first attempt at estimating this threshold for CLIC two approaches are considered, i.e. the criterion developed at SLAC and based on the convergence of the multibunch-motion solution, and numerical simulations of two-bunch motion in a focusing lattice

  13. Theoretical temperature model with experimental validation for CLIC Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2126138; Vamvakas, Alex; Alme, Johan

    Micron level stability of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) components is one of the main requirements to meet the luminosity goal for the future $48 \\,km$ long underground linear accelerator. The radio frequency (RF) power used for beam acceleration causes heat generation within the aligned structures, resulting in mechanical movements and structural deformations. A dedicated control of the air- and water- cooling system in the tunnel is therefore crucial to improve alignment accuracy. This thesis investigates the thermo-mechanical behavior of the CLIC Accelerating Structure (AS). In CLIC, the AS must be aligned to a precision of $10\\,\\mu m$. The thesis shows that a relatively simple theoretical model can be used within reasonable accuracy to predict the temperature response of an AS as a function of the applied RF power. During failure scenarios or maintenance interventions, the RF power is turned off resulting in no heat dissipation and decrease in the overall temperature of the components. The theoretica...

  14. CLIC Detector and Physics Status

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)627941

    2017-01-01

    This contribution to LCWS2016 presents recent developments within the CLICdp collaboration. An updated scenario for the staged operation of CLIC has been published; the accelerator will operate at 380 GeV, 1.5 TeV and 3 TeV. The lowest energy stage is optimised for precision Higgs and top physics, while the higher energy stages offer extended Higgs and BSM physics sensitivity. The detector models CLIC_SiD and CLIC_ILD have been replaced by a single optimised detector; CLICdet. Performance studies and R&D in technologies to meet the requirements for this detector design are ongoing.

  15. Higgs Physics at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073690

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an attractive option for a future multi-TeV linear electron-positron collider, offering the potential for a rich precision physics programme, combined with sensitivity to a wide range of new phenomena. The physics reach of CLIC has been studied in the context of three distinct centre-of-mass energies, √s = 350 GeV, 1.4 TeV and 3.0 TeV. This staged scenario provides an excellent environment for precise studies of the properties of the 126 GeV Higgs boson. Operation at √s = 350 GeV allows, on the one hand, for a determination of the couplings and width of the Higgs boson in a model-independent manner through the study of the Higgsstrahlung process, and on the other hand, for a study of Higgs bosons produced in W+W− fusion for the most common Higgs decay modes. Operation at higher centre-of-mass energies, √s = 1.4 TeV and 3 TeV, provides high statistics W+W− fusion samples allowing for high precision measurements of many Higgs couplings and a study of rare Higgs de...

  16. CLIC, a Multi-TeV $e^{\\pm}$ Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Bossart, Rudolf; Braun, Hans Heinrich; Carron, G; Coosemans, Williame; Corsini, R; D'Amico, T E; Godot, J C; Guignard, Gilbert; Hutchins, S; Jensen, E; Millich, Antonio; Pearce, P; Potier, J P; Riche, A J; Rinolfi, Louis; Schulte, Daniel; Suberlucq, Guy; Thorndahl, L; Valentini, M; Wuensch, Walter; Zimmermann, Frank; Napoly, O; Raubenheimer, T O; Ruth, Ronald D; Syratchev, I V

    1999-01-01

    The CLIC study of a high energy (0.5 - 5 TeV), high luminosity (1034 - 1035 cm-2 sec-1) e± linear collider is presented. Beam acceleration using high frequency (30 GHz) normal-conducting structures operating at high accelerating fields (150 MV/m) significantly reduces the length and, in consequence, the cost of the linac. Based on new beam and linac parameters derived from a recently developed set of general scaling laws for linear colliders, the beam stability is shown to be similar to lower frequency designs in spite of the strong wake-field dependency on frequency. A new cost-effective and efficient drive beam generation scheme for RF power production by the so-called "Two Beam Acceleration (TBA)" method is described. It uses a thermionic gun and a fully-loaded normal-conducting linac operating at low frequency (937 MHz) to generate and accelerate the drive beam bunches, and RF multiplication by funnelling in compressor rings to produce the desired bunch structure. Recent 30 GHz hardware developments and ...

  17. CLIC, a 0.5 to 5 TeV e$^{\\pm}$ Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Braun, Hans Heinrich; Carron, G; Chautard, F; Coosemans, Williame; Corsini, R; D'Amico, T E; Dehler, M; Godot, J C; Guignard, Gilbert; Hagel, J; Hutchins, S; Johnson, C D; Jensen, E; Kamber, I; Millich, Antonio; Pearce, P; Potier, J P; Riche, A J; Rinolfi, Louis; Schulte, Daniel; Suberlucq, Guy; Thorndahl, L; Valentini, M; Warner, D J; Wilson, Ian H; Wuensch, Walter; Napoly, O; Raubenheimer, T O; Ruth, Ronald D

    1998-01-01

    The CLIC study of a high energy (0.5 - 5 TeV), high luminosity (10^34 - 10^35 cm^-2 sec^-1) e± linear collider is presented. Beam acceleration using high frequency (30 GHz) normal-conducting structure s operating at high accelerating fields (100 to 200 MV/m) significantly reduces the length and, in consequence the cost of the linac. Based on new beam and linac parameters derived from a recently dev eloped set of general scaling laws for linear colliders, the beam stability is shown to be similar to lower frequency designs in spite of the strong wake-field dependency on frequency. A new cost effe ctive and very efficient drive beam generation scheme for RF power production by the so-called "Two Beam Acceleration (TBA)" method is described. It uses a conventional thermionic gun and a fully-load ed normal-conducting linac operating at low frequency (937 MHz) to generate and accelerate the drive beam bunches and RF multiplication by funneling in compressor rings to produce the desired bunch st ructure. Recent 30...

  18. Wakefield monitor development for CLIC accelerating structure

    CERN Document Server

    Peauger, F; Girardot, P; Andersson, A; Riddone, G; Samoshkin, A; Solodko, A; Zennaro, R; Ruber, R

    2010-01-01

    Abstract To achieve high luminosity in CLIC, the accelerating structures must be aligned to an accuracy of 5 μm with respect to the beam trajectory. Position detectors called Wakefield Monitors (WFM) are integrated to the structure for a beam based alignment. This paper describes the requirements of such monitors. Detailed RF design and electromagnetic simulations of the WFM itself are presented. In particular, time domain computations are performed and an evaluation of the resolution is done for two higher order modes at 18 and 24 GHz. The mechanical design of a prototype accelerating structure with WFM is also presented as well as the fabrication status of three complete structures. The objective is to implement two of them in CTF3 at CERN for a feasibility demonstration with beam and high power rf.

  19. SM-like Higgs decay into two muons at 1.4 TeV CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, Gordana

    2016-06-02

    The branching fraction measurement of the SM-like Higgs boson decay into two muons at 1.4 TeV CLIC will be described in this paper contributed to the LCWS13. The study is performed in the fully simulated ILD detector concept for CLIC, taking into consideration all the relevant physics and the beam-induced backgrounds, as well as the instrumentation of the very forward region to tag the high-energy electrons. Higgs couplings are known to be sensitive to BSM physics and we prove that BR times the Higgs production cross section can be measured with approximately 35.5% statistical accuracy in four years of the CLIC operation at 1.4 TeV centre-of-mass energy with unpolarised beams. The result is preliminary as the equivalent photon approximation is not considered in the cross-section calculations. This study complements the Higgs physics program foreseen at CLIC.

  20. Damping rings for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Jowett, John M; Zimmermann, Frank; Owen, H

    2001-01-01

    The Compact Linear Colider (CLIC) is designed to operate at 3 TeV centre-of-mass energy with a total luminosity of 10^35 cm^-2 s^-1. The overall system design leads to extremely demanding requirements on the bunch trains injected into the main libac at frequency of 100 Hz. In particular, the emittances of the intense bunches have to be about an order of magnitude smaller than presently achieved. We describe our approach to finding a damping ring design capable of meeting these requirements. Besides lattice design, emittance and damping rate considerations, a number of scattering and instability effects have to be incorporated into the optimisation of parameters. Among these, intra-bem scattering and the electron cloud effect are two of the most significant.

  1. A 12 GHz RF Power Source for the CLIC Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirm, Karl; /CERN; Curt, Stephane; /CERN; Dobert, Steffen; /CERN; McMonagle, Gerard; /CERN; Rossat, Ghislain; /CERN; Syratchev, Igor; /CERN; Timeo, Luca; /CERN; Haase, Andrew /SLAC; Jensen, Aaron; /SLAC; Jongewaard, Erik; /SLAC; Nantista, Christopher; /SLAC; Sprehn, Daryl; /SLAC; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC; Hamdi, Abdallah; /Saclay; Peauger, Franck; /Saclay; Kuzikov, Sergey; /Nizhnii Novgorod, IAP; Vikharev, Alexandr; /Nizhnii Novgorod, IAP

    2012-07-03

    The CLIC RF frequency has been changed in 2008 from the initial 30 GHz to the European X-band 11.9942 GHz permitting beam independent power production using klystrons for CLIC accelerating structure testing. A design and fabrication contract for five klystrons at that frequency has been signed by different parties with SLAC. France (IRFU, CEA Saclay) is contributing a solid state modulator purchased in industry and specific 12 GHz RF network components to the CLIC study. RF pulses over 120 MW peak at 230 ns length will be obtained by using a novel SLED-I type pulse compression scheme designed and fabricated by IAP, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. The X-band power test stand is being installed in the CLIC Test Facility CTF3 for independent structure and component testing in a bunker, but allowing, in a later stage, for powering RF components in the CTF3 beam lines. The design of the facility, results from commissioning of the RF power source and the expected performance of the Test Facility are reported.

  2. A 12 GHZ RF Power source for the CLIC study

    CERN Document Server

    Peauger, F; Curt, S; Doebert, S; McMonagle, G; Rossat, G; Schirm, KM; Syratchev, I; Timeo, L; Kuzikhov, S; Vikharev, AA; Haase, A; Sprehn, D; Jensen, A; Jongewaard, EN; Nantista, CD; Vlieks, A

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC RF frequency has been changed in 2008 from the initial 30 GHz to the European X-band 11.9942 GHz permitting beam independent power production using klystrons for CLIC accelerating structure testing. A design and fabrication contract for five klystrons at that frequency has been signed by different parties with SLAC. France (IRFU, CEA Saclay) is contributing a solid state modulator purchased in industry and specific 12 GHz RF network components to the CLIC study. RF pulses over 120 MW peak at 230 ns length will be obtained by using a novel SLED-I type pulse compression scheme designed and fabricated by IAP, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. The X-band power test stand is being installed in the CLIC Test Facility CTF3 for independent structure and component testing in a bunker, but allowing, in a later stage, for powering RF components in the CTF3 beam lines. The design of the facility, results from commissioning of the RF power source and the expected performance of the Test Facility are reported.

  3. Physics and Detectors at CLIC CLIC Conceptual Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Akiya; Stanitzki,Marcel; Weerts, Harry

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the physics potential and experiments at a future multi- TeV e+e− collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) technology. The physics scenarios considered include precision measurements of known quantities as well as the discovery potential of physics beyond the Standard Model. The report describes the detector performance required at CLIC, taking into account the interaction point environment and especially beaminduced backgrounds. Two detector concepts, designed around highly granular calorimeters and based on concepts studied for the International Linear Collider (ILC), are described and used to study the physics reach and potential of such a collider. Detector subsystems and the principal engineering challenges are illustrated. The overall performance of these CLIC detector concepts is demonstrated by studies of the performance of individual subdetector systems as well as complete simulation studies of six benchmark physics processes. These full detector simulation and rec...

  4. Simulation of an all silicon tracker for CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenker, Magdalena; Nuernerg, Andreas [CERN (Switzerland); University of Bonn (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    CLIC is a proposed future electron-positron linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy up to 3 TeV. The aim of high precision measurements at CLIC is driving the design of the detector for CLIC. To perform a precise measurement of the Higgs recoil mass a momentum resolution of σ{sub p{sub T}}/p{sub T}{sup 2} ∝2 . 10{sup -5} GeV{sup -1} is required. This imposes a single point tracking resolution of ∝7 μm. To reach this aim an all silicon tracker is foreseen for CLIC. A simulation chain has been set up to study the performance of different silicon sensor designs. This simulation chain consists of a GEANT4 simulation to model the energy deposit in silicon, a finite element simulation of the charge drift and signal formation with TCAD and a fast parametric modelling of the front-end electronics. By that energy fluctuations, electronic noise and the digitalisation of the readout signal are taken into account. Furthermore this tool is used to predict the sensor performance in terms of efficiency, cluster-size and resolution. This framework is used to study the performance of e.g. sensors with different pitch and thickness. Various incident angles of charged particles with respect to the sensor surface and the effect of a magnetic field are taken into account. The simulation chain is validated with data.

  5. Impedance effects in the CLIC damping rings

    CERN Document Server

    Koukovini-Platia, E; Mounet, N; Rumolo, G; Salvant, B

    2011-01-01

    Due to the unprecedented brilliance of the beams, the performance of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) damping rings (DR) is affected by collective effects. Single bunch instability thresholds based on a broad-band resonator model and the associated coherent tune shifts have been evaluated with the HEADTAIL code. Simulations performed for positive and negative values of chromaticity showed that higher order bunch modes can be potentially dangerous for the beam stability. This study also includes the effects of high frequency resistive wall impedance due to different coatings applied on the chambers of the wigglers for e-cloud mitigation and/or ultra-low vacuum pressure. The impact of the resistive wall wake fields on the transverse impedance budget is finally discussed.

  6. Pulse Power Modulator development for the CLIC Damping Ring Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity (10-34 – 10-35 cm-2s-1) and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV: CLIC would complement LHC physics in the multi-TeV range. The CLIC design relies on Pre-Damping Rings (PDR) and Damping Rings (DR) to achieve the very low emittance, through synchrotron radiation, needed for the luminosity requirements of CLIC. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse power modulators for the DR kickers must provide extremely flat, high-voltage pulses: the 2 GHz specification called for a 160 ns duration flat-top of 12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 %. In order to meet these demanding specifications, a combination of broadband impedance matching, optimized electrical circuit layout and advanced control techniques is required. A solid-state modulator, the inductive adder, is the most promising approach to meeting the demanding specifications...

  7. Intense relativistic electron beam injector system for tokamak current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, V.L.; Creedon, J.M.; Ecker, B.M.; Helava, H.I.

    1983-01-01

    We report experimental and theoretical studies of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) injection system designed for tokamak current drive experiments. The injection system uses a standard high-voltage pulsed REB generator and a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) to drive an REB-accelerating diode in plasma. A series of preliminary experiments has been carried out to test the system by injecting REBs into a test chamber with preformed plasma and applied magnetic field. REBs were accelerated from two types of diodes: a conventional vacuum diode with foil anode, and a plasma diode, i.e., an REB cathode immersed in the plasma. REB current was in the range of 50 to 100 kA and REB particle energy ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 MeV. MITL power density exceeded 10 GW/cm 2 . Performance of the injection system and REB transport properties is documented for plasma densities from 5 x 10 12 to 2 x 10 14 cm -3 . Injection system data are compared with numerical calculations of the performance of the coupled system consisting of the generator, MITL, and diode

  8. Common ground in ILC and CLIC detector concepts

    CERN Multimedia

    Daisy Yuhas

    2013-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider will accelerate particles and create collisions in different ways. Nonetheless, the detector concepts under development share many commonalities.   Timepix chips under scrutiny in the DESY test beam with the help of the beam telescope. CERN physicist Dominik Dannheim explains that the CLIC detector plans are adaptations of the ILC detector designs with a few select modifications. “When we started several years ago, we did not want to reinvent the wheel,” says Dannheim. “The approved ILC detector concepts served as an excellent starting point for our designs.” Essential differences Both CLIC and ILC scientists foresee general-purpose detectors that make measurements with exquisite precision. These colliders, however, have very different operating parameters, which will have important consequences for the various detector components. The ILC’s collision energy is set at 500 GeV ...

  9. Integrated CMOS sensor technologies for the CLIC tracker

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)754303

    2017-01-01

    Integrated technologies are attractive candidates for an all silicon tracker at the proposed future multi-TeV linear e+e- collider CLIC. In this context CMOS circuitry on a high resistivity epitaxial layer has been studied using the ALICE Investigator test-chip. Test-beam campaigns have been performed to study the Investigator performance and a Technology Computer Aided Design based simulation chain has been developed to further explore the sensor technology.

  10. Vertex and Tracker Research and Development for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Munker, M

    2017-01-01

    Challenging detector requirements are imposed by the physics goals at the future multi-TeV e+e− Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). A single point resolution of 3 μm for the vertex detector and 7 μm for the tracker is required. Moreover, the CLIC vertex detector and tracker need to be extremely light weighted with a material budget of 0.2%X0 per layer in the vertex detector and 1 - 2%X0 in the tracker. A fast time slicing of 10 ns is further required to suppress background from beam-beam interactions. A wide range of sensor and readout ASIC technologies are investigated within the CLIC silicon pixel R&D; effort. Various hybrid planar sensor assemblies with a pixel size of 25 × 25 μm2 and 55 × 55 μm2 have been produced and characterised by laboratory measurements and during test-beam campaigns. Experimental and simulation results for thin (50 μm- 500 μm) slim edge and active-edge planar, and High-Voltage CMOS sensors hybridised to various readout ASICs (Timepix, Timepix3, CLICpix) are presented.

  11. The Baseline Positron Production and Capture Scheme for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Dadoun, Olivier; Lepercq, Pierre; Poirier, Freddy; Variola, Alessandro; Chehab, Robert; Rinolfi, Louis; Vivoli, Alessandro; Strakhovenko, Vladimir; Xu, Chengai

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC study considers the hybrid source using channeling as the baseline for unpolarised positron production. The hybrid source uses a few GeV electron beam impinging on a tungsten crystal target. With the crystal oriented on its axis it results an intense relatively low energy photon beam. The later is then impinging on an amorphous tungsten target producing positrons by e+e− pair creation. Downstream the amorphous target, a capture section based on an adiabatic matching device followed by a 2 GHz Pre- Injector Linac focuses and accelerates the positron beam up to around 200 MeV

  12. Silicon pixel R&D for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)718101

    2017-01-01

    The physics aims at the proposed future CLIC high-energy linear e+e− collider pose challenging demands on the performance of the vertex and tracking detector system. In particular the detectors have to be well adapted to the experimental conditions, such as the time structure of the collisions and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The requirements include ultra-low mass, facilitated by power pulsing and air cooling in the vertex-detector region, small cell sizes and precision hit timing at the few-ns level. A highly granular all- silicon vertex and tracking detector system is under development, following an integrated approach addressing simultaneously the physics requirements and engineering constraints.

  13. Proposal for an alignment method of the CLIC linear accelerator - From geodesic networks to the active pre-alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touze, T.

    2011-01-01

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) is the particle accelerator project proposed by the european organization for nuclear research (CERN) for high energy physics after the large hadron collider (LHC). Because of the nano-metric scale of the CLIC leptons beams, the emittance growth budget is very tight. It induces alignment tolerances on the positions of the CLIC components that have never been achieved before. The last step of the CLIC alignment will be done according to the beam itself. It falls within the competence of the physicists. However, in order to implement the beam-based feedback, a challenging pre-alignment is required: 10 μm at 3σ along a 200 m sliding window. For such a precision, the proposed solution must be compatible with a feedback between the measurement and repositioning systems. The CLIC pre-alignment will have to be active. This thesis does not demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC active pre-alignment but shows the way to the last developments that have to be done for that purpose. A method is proposed. Based on the management of the Helmert transformations between Euclidean coordinate systems, from the geodetic networks to the metrological measurements, this method is likely to solve the CLIC pre-alignment problem. Large scale facilities have been built and Monte-Carlo simulations have been made in order to validate the mathematical modeling of the measurement systems and of the alignment references. When this is done, it will be possible to extrapolate the modeling to the entire CLIC length. It will be the last step towards the demonstration of the CLIC pre-alignment feasibility. (author)

  14. Golden Jubilee Photos: A CLIC for the future

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ Prototype copper accelerating structures for CLIC. New accelerator projects take many years to make and mature. When the LHC project was still only a twinkle in CERN's eye, research was already starting on a new machine. A small team at CERN was setting about the task of studying a high-energy, compact, lepton linear collider, known as CLIC. This is possibly set to become the collider of the future. A machine of this kind has all the advantages of a collider (the total collision energy is equal to the sum of the energies of the two colliding beams) without the drawback of synchrotron radiation, which is produced when particles are accelerated around a ring and thus puts a limit on the energy of such colliders. But in a project as technically challenging as CLIC, considerable technological hurdles must be overcome. To limit the linear collider's length to some tens of kilometres, the beams must acquire a considerable quantity of energy per metre travelled. The collision rate (lumi...

  15. Sensitivity Analysis for the CLIC Damping Ring Inductive Adder

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings will produce, through synchrotron radiation, ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge, necessary for the luminosity performance of the collider. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse generators for the damping ring kickers must provide extremely flat, high-voltage pulses. The specifications for the extraction kickers of the CLIC damping rings are particularly demanding: the flattop of the output pulse must be 160 ns duration, 12.5 kV and 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 %. An inductive adder allows the use of different modulation techniques and is therefore a very promising approach to meeting the specifications. PSpice has been utilised to carry out a sensitivity analysis of the predicted output pulse to the value of both individual and groups of circuit compon...

  16. Phase detection electronics for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, A

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires very tight RF phase synchronisation in order to preserve high luminosity. The electronics required for processing the signals delivered from the phase pick-ups present a significant challenge. This paper discusses the strategy adopted to achieve a sufficiently accurate measurement of the phase. Performance measurements performed in the lab of some of the sub-systems are also presented.

  17. Study of an hybrid positron source using channeling for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Dadoun, O; Chehab, R; Poirier, F; Rinolfi, L; Strakhovenko, V; Variola, A; Vivoli, A

    2009-01-01

    The CLIC study considers the hybrid source using channeling as the baseline for positron production. The hybrid source uses a few GeV electron beam impinging on a crystal tungsten radiator. With the tungsten crystal oriented on its axis it results an intense, relatively low energy photon beam due mainly to channeling radiation. Those photons are then impinging on an amorphous tungsten target producing positrons by e+e− pair creation. In this note the optimization of the positron yield and the peak energy deposition density in the amorphous target are studied according to the distance between the crystal and the amorphous targets, the primary electron energy and the amorphous target thickness.

  18. MEMS vibrating-beam accelerometer with piezoelectric drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehlow, John; MacGugan, Doug

    2017-09-12

    A high-temperature drive component for a double-ended tuning fork (DETF). The drive component attaches to a surface of at least one of the tines. The drive component includes at least one piezoelectric trace sandwiched at least partially between two electrical traces. At least one of the tines includes a doped silicon base with drive component located thereon. One of the electrical traces is electrically connected to the doped silicon base and the other is electrically isolated from the doped silicon base.

  19. The CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) which allowed the first electron beam recombination in order to multiply the RF frequency from 3 GHz up to 15 GHz.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 0210005_11: The CTF3 linac accelerates an electron beam up to 350 MeV. Photo 0210005_1: At the front, the yellow dipole is used for the spectrometer line. At the back, a doublet of blue quadrupole for the matching. Photo 0210005_03: The CTF3 transfer line between the electron linac and the isochronous ring. Photo 0210005_04: One arc of the EPA isochronous ring. Photo 0210005_06: The CTF3 bunching system. The first RF wave guide feeds the Pre-Buncher while the second RF wave guide feeds the Buncher. They provide a bunched electron beam at 4 MeV. The blue magnet is a solenoid around the Buncher. Photo 0210005_07: A LIL accelerating structure used for CTF3. It is 4.5 meters long and provides an energy gain of 45 MeV. One can see 3 quadrupoles around the RF structure.

  20. Tilapia and human CLIC2 structures are highly conserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jiao; Li, Zhengjun; Lui, Eei Yin; Lam, Siew Hong; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam

    2018-01-08

    Chloride intracellular channels (CLICs) exist in soluble and membrane bound forms. We have determined the crystal structure of soluble Clic2 from the euryhaline teleost fish Oreochromis mossambicus. Structural comparison of tilapia and human CLIC2 with other CLICs shows that these proteins are highly conserved. We have also compared the expression levels of clic2 in selected osmoregulatory organs of tilapia, acclimated to freshwater, seawater and hypersaline water. Structural conservation of vertebrate CLICs implies that they might play conserved roles. Also, tissue-specific responsiveness of clic2 suggests that it might be involved in iono-osmoregulation under extreme conditions in tilapia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Demonstration of two-beam acceleration in CTF II

    CERN Document Server

    Bossart, Rudolf; Carron, G; Chanudet, M; Chautard, F; Delahaye, J P; Godot, J C; Hutchins, S; Kamber, I; Martínez, C; Suberlucq, Guy; Tenenbaum, P G; Thorndahl, L; Valentini, M; Wilson, Ian H; Wuensch, Walter

    1999-01-01

    The second phase of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF II) at CERN has demon-strated the feasibility of two-beam acceleration at 30 GHz using a high-charge drive beam, running paral lel to the main beam, as the RF power source. To date accelerating gradients of 59 MV/m at 30 GHz have been achieved. In CTF II, the two beams are generated by 3 GHz RF photo-injectors and are acceler ated in 3 GHz linacs, before injection into the 30 GHz modules. The drive beam linac has to accelerate a 16 ns long train of 48 bunches, each with a nominal charge of 13.4 nC. To cope with the very su bstantial beam-loading special accelerating structures are used (running slightly off the bunch repetition frequency). A magnetic chicane compresses the bunches to less than 5 ps fwhm, this is needed for efficient 30 GHz power generation. The 30 GHz modules are fully-engineered representative sections of CLIC, they include a 30 GHz decelerator for the drive beam, a 30 GHz accelerator for the main beam, high resolution...

  2. The CLIC programme: Towards a staged $e^{+}e^{−}$ linear collider exploring the terascale CLIC conceptual design report

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.; Schulte, D.; Simon, F.; Stapnes, S.; Toge, N.; Weerts, H.; Wells, J.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the exploration of fundamental questions in particle physics at the energy frontier with a future TeV-scale $e^+e^-$ linear collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) two-beam acceleration technology. A high-luminosity high-energy $e^+e^-$ collider allows for the exploration of Standard Model physics, such as precise measurements of the Higgs, top and gauge sectors, as well as for a multitude of searches for New Physics, either through direct discovery or indirectly, via high-precision observables. Given the current state of knowledge, following the observation of a 125 GeV Higgs-like particle at the LHC, and pending further LHC results at 8 TeV and 14 TeV, a linear $e^+e^-$ collider built and operated in centre-of-mass energy stages from a few-hundred GeV up to a few TeV will be an ideal physics exploration tool, complementing the LHC. In this document, an overview of the physics potential of CLIC is given. Two example scenarios are presented for a CLIC accelerator built in th...

  3. Current drive by neutral beams, rotating magnetic fields and helicity injection in compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farengo, R.; Arista, N.R.; Lifschitz, A.F.; Clemente, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    The use of neutral beams (NB) for current drive and heating in spheromaks, the relaxed states of flux core spheromaks (FCS) sustained by helicity injection and the effect of ion dynamics on rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive in spherical tokamaks (ST) are studied. (author)

  4. CLIC-ACM: Acquisition and Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Bielawski, B; Magnoni, S

    2014-01-01

    CLIC [1] (Compact Linear Collider) is a world-wide collaboration to study the next terascale lepton collider, relying upon a very innovative concept of two-beamacceleration. In this scheme, the power is transported to the main accelerating structures by a primary electron beam. The Two Beam Module (TBM) is a compact integration with a high filling factor of all components: RF, Magnets, Instrumentation, Vacuum, Alignment and Stabilization. This paper describes the very challenging aspects of designing the compact system to serve as a dedicated Acquisition & Control Module (ACM) for all signals of the TBM. Very delicate conditions must be considered, in particular radiation doses that could reach several kGy in the tunnel. In such severe conditions shielding and hardened electronics will have to be taken into consideration. In addition, with more than 300 ADC&DAC channels per ACM and about 21000 ACMs in total, it appears clearly that power consumption will be an important issue. It is also obvious that...

  5. High frequency electromagnetic characterization of NEG properties for the CLIC damping rings

    CERN Document Server

    Koukovini-Platia, E; Zannini, C

    2014-01-01

    Coating materials will be used in the CLIC damping rings (DR) to suppress two-stream effects. In particular, NEG coating is necessary to suppress fast beam ion instabilities in the electron damping ring (EDR). The electromagnetic (EM) characterization of the material properties up to high frequencies is required for the impedance modeling of the CLIC DR components. The EM properties for frequencies of few GHz are determined with the waveguide method, based on a combination of experimental measurements of the complex transmission coefficient S21 and CST 3D EM simulations. The results obtained from a NEG-coated copper (Cu) waveguide are presented in this paper.

  6. Mechanical integration studies for the CLIC vertex and inner tracking detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Villarejo Bermudez, M.A.; Gerwig, H.

    2015-01-01

    Since the publication of the CLIC Conceptual Design Report, work has proceeded in order to establish a preliminary mechanical design for the innermost CLIC detector region. This note proposes a design for the main Carbon-Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) structural elements of the inner detectors, for the beam pipe and their supports. It also describes an assembly sequence for the integration of the sensors and the mechanical components. Mechanical simulations of different structural elements and a material budget estimation are appended. Details of a proposed cabling layout for all the subdetectors are included.

  7. Photoinjector beam quality improvement by shaping the wavefront of a drive laser with oblique incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhigang; Wang Xiaohui; Jia Qika

    2012-01-01

    To increase the quantum efficiency (QE) of a copper photocathode and reduce the thermal emittance of an electron beam, a drive laser with oblique incidence was adopted in a BNL type photocathode rf gun. The disadvantageous effects on the beam quality caused by oblique incidence were analyzed qualitatively. A simple way to solve the problems through wavefront shaping was introduced and the beam quality was improved. (authors)

  8. An Injector for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, H; Rinolfi, Louis; Zhou, F; Mouton, B; Miller, R; Yeremian, A D

    2000-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) is an intermediate step to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the key concepts of the new RF power source for CLIC. CTF3 will use electron beams with an energy range adjustable from 170 MeV (3.5 A) to 380 MeV (with low current). The injector is based on a thermionic gun followed by a classical bunching system embedded in a long solenoidal field. As an alternative, an RF photo-injector is also being studied. The beam dynamics studies on how to reach the stringent beam parameters at the exit of the injector are presented. Simulations performed with the EGUN code showed that a current of 7 A can be obtained with an emittance less than 10 mm.mrad at the gun exit. PARMELA results are presented and compared to the requested beam performance at the injector exit. Sub-Harmonic Bunchers (SHB) are foreseen, to switch the phase of the bunch trains by 180 degrees from even to odd RF buckets. Specific issues of the thermionic gun and of the SHB with fast phase switch are discussed.

  9. An Injector for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Roger H.

    2001-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) is an intermediate step to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the key concepts of the new RF power source for CLIC. CTF3 will use electron beams with an energy range adjustable from 170 MeV (3.5 A) to 380 MeV (with low current). The injector is based on a thermionic gun followed by a classical bunching system embedded in a long solenoidal field. As an alternative, an RF photo-injector is also being studied. The beam dynamics studies on how to reach the stringent beam parameters at the exit of the injector are presented. Simulations performed with the EGUN code showed that a current of 7 A can be obtained with an emittance less than 10 mm.mrad at the gun exit. PARMELA results are presented and compared to the requested beam performance at the injector exit. Sub-Harmonic Bunchers (SHB) are foreseen, to switch the phase of the bunch trains by 180 degrees from even to odd RF buckets. Specific issues of the thermionic gun and of the SHB with fast phase switch are discussed

  10. An injector for the CLIC test Facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Hans-Heinrich; Rinolfi, L.; Zhou, F.; Mouton, B.; Miller, R.; Yeremian, D.

    2008-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) is an intermediate step to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the key concepts of the new RF power source for CLIC. CTF3 will use electron beams with an energy range adjustable from 170 MeV (3.5 A) to 380 MeV (with low current). The injector is based on a thermionic gun followed by a classical bunching system embedded in a long solenoidal field. As an alternative, an RF photo-injector is also being studied. The beam dynamics studies on how to reach the stringent beam parameters at the exit of the injector are presented. Simulations performed with the EGUN code showed that a current of 7 A can be obtained with an emittance less than 10 mm.mrad at the gun exit. PARMELA results are presented and compared to the requested beam performance at the injector exit. Sub-Harmonic Bunchers (SHB) are foreseen, to switch the phase of the bunch trains by 180 degrees from even to odd RF buckets. Specific issues of the thermionic gun and of the SHB with fast phase switch are discussed.

  11. Production of high power microwaves for particle acceleration with an FEL bunched electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Gardelle, J; Marchese, G; Padois, M; Rullier, J L; Donohue, J T

    1999-01-01

    Among the studies in the framework of high gradient linear electron-positron collider research, the Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) is a very promising concept, and two projects are in progress, the Compact Linear Collider project at CERN (W. Schnell, Report no. CERN SL/92-51 and CLIC note 184; K. Huebner, CERN/PS 92-43, CLIC note 176; S. Van der Meer, CERN/PS 89-50, CLIC note 97.) and the Relativistic Klystron-TBA project at LBNL (Technical Review Committee, International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee Report 1995, SLAC-R-95-471, 1995). In a TBA an extremely intense low-energy electron beam, called the drive beam, is bunched at the desired operating frequency, and upon passing through resonant cavities generates radio-frequency power for accelerating the main beam. Among the different approaches to the production of a suitable drive beam, the use of an FEL has been proposed and is under active study at CEA/CESTA.

  12. Vector boson scattering at CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, Wolfgang; Fleper, Christian [Department Physik, Universitaet Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Reuter, Juergen [DESY Theory Group, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Sekulla, Marco [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Linear colliders operating in a range of multiple TeV are able to investigate the details of vector boson scattering and electroweak symmetry breaking. We calculate cross sections with the Monte Carlo generator WHIZARD for vector boson scattering processes at the future linear e{sup +} e{sup -} collider CLIC. By finding suitable cuts, the vector boson scattering signal processes are isolated from the background. Finally, we are able to determine exclusion sensitivities on the non-Standard Model parameters of the relevant dimension eight operators.

  13. Status of the CLIC study on magnet stabilisation and time-dependent luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R W; Guignard, Gilbert; Leros, Nicolas; Redaelli, S; Schnell, Wolfgang; Schulte, Daniel; Wilson, Ian H; Zimmermann, Frank

    2002-01-01

    The nanometer beam size at the CLIC interaction point imposes magnet vibration tolerances that range from 0.2 nm to a few nanometers. This is well below the floor vibra-tion usually observed. A test stand for magnet stability was set-up at CERN in the immediate neighborhood of roads, operating accelerators, manual shops, and regular office space. It was equipped with modern stabilization tech-nology. First results are presented, demonstrating signif-icant damping of floor vibration. CLIC quadrupoles have been stabilized vertically to an rms motion of (0.9 ± 0.1) n above 4 Hz, or (1.3 ± 0.2) nm with a nominal flow of cooling water. For the horizontal and longitudinal directions respectively, a CLIC quadrupole was stabilized to (0.4 ± 0.1) nm and (3.2 ± 0.4) nm.

  14. SM-like Higgs decay into two muons at 1.4 TeV CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, G

    2014-01-01

    The potential for measuring the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson decay into two muons at a 1.4 TeV CLIC e+e− collider is addressed in this paper, that was presented at ICHEP2014. The study is performed in the full Geant4 detector simulations of CLIC_ILD, taking into consideration all the relevant physics and the beam-induced background processes, as well as the instrumentation of the very forward region to tag forward electrons. In this analysis we show that the branching ratio BR(H-->mu+mu-) times the Higgs production cross-section can be measured with 38% statistical accuracy at √s =1.4 TeV using an integrated luminosity of 1.5 ab-1. This study is part of an ongoing comprehensive Higgs physics benchmark study covering various Higgs production processes and decay modes, currently being carried out to estimate the full Higgs physics potential of CLIC.

  15. Symmetry issues in a class of ion beam targets using short direct drive pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.K.; Lindl, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    We address a class of modified ion beam targets where the symmetry issues are ameliorated in the regime of short bursts of direct drive pulses. Short pulses are here defined so that the fractional change in target radii of peak beam energy deposition are assumed to be small (during each such direct drive burst with a fixed beam focal radius). This requirement is actually not stringent on the temporal pulse-length. In fact we show an explicit example where this can be satisfied by a ≥ 60 ns direct drive pulse-train. A new beam placement scheme is used which systematically eliminated low order spherical harmonic asymmetries. The residual asymmetries of such pulses are studied with both simple model and numerical simulations

  16. CLIC's three-step plan

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    In early October, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) collaboration published its final Conceptual Design Report. Accompanying it was a strategic summary document that describes a whole new approach to the project: developing the linear e+e− collider in three energy stages. Though CLIC’s future still depends on signs from the LHC, its new staged approach to high-energy electron-positron physics for the post-LHC era is nothing short of convincing.   Instead of asking for a 48-kilometre-long commitment right off the bat, the CLIC collaboration is now presenting an accelerator that can be constructed in stages. For example, it could begin as an 11-kilometre 500 GeV accelerator that could later be extended to a 27-kilometre 1.5 TeV machine. Finally, after a decade or so of data taking, it could be taken up to the full 48-kilometre 3 TeV facility (see image 2). “Not only is the approach technically and financially practical, it also offers a very convincing physics prog...

  17. Design study of longitudinal dynamics of the drive beam in 1 TeV relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Yu, S.S.; Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    In this paper the authors present a design study on the longitudinal dynamics of a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) scheme which has been proposed as a power source candidate for a 1 TeV next linear collider (NLC). They address the issue of maintaining stable power output at desired level for a 300-m long TBA with 150 extraction cavities and present their simulation results to demonstrate that it can be achieved by inductively detuning the extraction cavities to counter the space charge debunching effect on the drive beam. They then carry out simulation study to show that the beam bunches desired by the RK-TBA can be efficiently obtained by first chopping an initially uniform beam of low energy into a train of beam bunches with modest longitudinal dimension and then using the open-quotes adiabatic captureclose quotes scheme to bunch and accelerate these beam bunches into tight bunches at the operating energy of the drive beam. The authors have also examined the open-quotes after burnerclose quotes scheme which is implemented in their RK-TBA design for efficiency enhancement

  18. Brilliant positron sources for CLIC and other collider projects

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, Louis; Dadoun, Olivier; Kamitani, Takuya; Strakhovenko, Vladimir; Variola, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider), as future linear collider, requires an intense positron source. A brief history is given up to the present baseline configuration which assumes unpolarized beams. A conventional scheme, with a single tungsten target as source of e-e+ pairs, has been studied several years ago. But, in order to reduce the beam energy deposition on the e+ target converter, a double-target system has been studied and proposed as baseline for CLIC. With this ‘‘hybrid target’’, the positron production scheme is based on the channeling process. A 5 GeV electron beam impinges on a thin crystal tungsten target aligned along its axis, enhancing the photon production by channeling radiation. A large number of photons are sent to a thick amorphous tungsten target, generating large number of e-e+ pairs, while the charged particles are bent away, reducing the deposited energy and the PEDD (Peak Energy Deposition Density). The targets parameters are optimized for the positron production. Polarize...

  19. Validation of the CLIC alignment strategy on short range

    CERN Document Server

    Mainaud Durand, H; Griffet, S; Kemppinen, J; Rude, V; Sosin, M

    2012-01-01

    The pre-alignment of CLIC consists of aligning the components of linacs and beam delivery systems (BDS) in the most accurate possible way, so that a first pilot beam can circulate and allow the implementation of the beam based alignment. Taking into account the precision and accuracy needed: 10 µm rms over sliding windows of 200m, this pre-alignment must be active and it can be divided into two parts: the determination of a straight reference over 20 km, thanks to a metrological network and the determination of the component positions with respect to this reference, and their adjustment. The second part is the object of the paper, describing the steps of the proposed strategy: firstly the fiducialisation of the different components of CLIC; secondly, the alignment of these components on common supports and thirdly the active alignment of these supports using sensors and actuators. These steps have been validated on a test setup over a length of 4m, and the obtained results are analysed.

  20. Beam dynamics simulations for linacs driving short-wavelength FELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrario, M.; Tazzioli, F.

    1999-01-01

    The fast code HOMDYN has been recently developed, in the framework of the TTF (Tesla test facility) collaboration, in order to study the beam dynamics of linacs delivering high brightness beams as those needed for short wavelength Fel experiments. These linacs are typically driven by radio-frequency photo-injectors, where correlated time dependent space charge effects are of great relevance: these effects cannot be studied by standard beam optics codes (TRACE3D, etc.) and they have been modeled so far by means of multi-particle (Pic or quasistatic) codes requiring heavy cpu time and memory allocations. HOMDYN is able to describe the beam generation at the photo-cathode and the emittance compensation process in the injector even running on a laptop with very modest running rimes (less than a minute). In this paper it is showed how this capability of the code is exploited so to model a whole linac up to the point where the space charge dominated regime is of relevance (200 MeV)

  1. Design of the Injection and extraction system and related machine protection for the Clic Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Apsimon, Robert; Barnes, Mike; Borburgh, Jan; Goddard, Brennan; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Uythoven, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Linear machines such as CLIC have relatively low rates of collision between bunches compared to their circular counterparts. In order to achieve the required luminosity, a very small spot size is envisaged at the interaction point, thus a low emittance beam is needed. Damping rings are essential for producing the low emittances needed for the CLIC main beam. It is crucial that the beams are injected and extracted from the damping rings in a stable and repeatable fashion to minimise emittance blow-up and beam jitter at the interaction point; both of these effects will deteriorate the luminosity at the interaction point. In this paper, the parameters and constraints of the injection and extraction systems are considered and the design of these systems is optimised within this parameter space. Related machine protection is considered in order to prevent damage from potential failure modes of the injection and extraction systems.

  2. Electron Cloud Build Up and Instability in the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Rumolo, G; Papaphilippou, Y

    2008-01-01

    Electron cloud can be formed in the CLIC positron damping ring and cause intolerable tune shift and beam instability. Build up simulations with the Faktor2 code, developed at CERN, have been done to predict the cloud formation in the arcs and wigglers of the damping rings. HEADTAIL simulations have been used to study the effect of this electron cloud on the beam and assess the thresholds above which the electron cloud instability would set in.

  3. The CLIC Positron Capture and Acceleration in the Injector Linac.

    CERN Document Server

    Vivoli, Alessandro; Chehab, Robert; Dadoun, Olivier; Lepercq, Pierre; Poirier, Freddy; Rinolfi, Louis; Strakhovenko, Vladimir; Variola, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    The baseline of the CLIC study considers non-polarized e+ for the 3 TeV centre of mass energy. The e+ source is based on the hybrid targets scheme, where a crystal-radiator target is followed by an amorphous-converter target. Simulations have been performed from the exit of the amorphous target up to the entrance of the Pre-Damping Ring. Downstream the amorphous target, there is an Adiabatic Matching Device (AMD) followed by a Pre-Injector Linac accelerating the e+ beam up to around 200 MeV. Then a common Injector Linac (for both e+ and e-) accelerates the beams up to 2.86 GeV before being injected into the Pre-Damping Ring. In this note, the characteristics of the AMD and the other sections are described and the beam parameters at the entrance of the Pre-Damping Ring are given.

  4. ISSUES AND FEASIBILITY DEMONSTRATION OF CLIC SUPPORTING SYSTEM CHAIN ACTIVE PRE-ALIGNMENT USING A MULTI-MODULE TEST SETUP (MOCK-UP)

    CERN Document Server

    Sosin, Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    The implementation study of the CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is under way at CERN with a focus on the challenging issues. The pre-alignment precision and accuracy requirements are part of these technical challenges: the permissible transverse position errors of the linac components are typically 14 micrometers over sliding windows of 200m. To validate the proposed methods and strategies, the Large Scale Metrology section at CERN has performed campaigns of measurements on the CLIC Two Beam Test Modules, focusing inter alia on the alignment performance of the CLIC “snake”- girders configuration and the Main Beam Quadrupoles supporting structures. This paper describes the activities and results of tests which were performed on the test mock-up for the qualification of the CLIC supporting system chain for active pre-alignment. The lessons learnt (“know how”), the issues encountered in the girder position determination as well as the behaviour of the mechanical components are presented.

  5. Detector optimization studies and light Higgs decay into muons at CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grefe, Christian

    2013-09-15

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a concept for a future e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with a center-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The design of a CLIC experiment is driven by the requirements related to the physics goals, as well as by the experimental conditions. For example, the short time between two bunch crossings of 0.5 ns and the backgrounds due to beamstrahlung have direct impact on the design of a CLIC experiment. The Silicon Detector (SiD) is one of the concepts currently being discussed as a possible detector for the International Linear Collider (ILC). In this thesis we develop a modified version of the SiD simulation model for CLIC, taking into account the specific experimental conditions. In addition, we developed a software tool to investigate the impact of beam-related backgrounds on the detector by overlaying events from different simulated event samples. Moreover, we present full simulation studies, determining the performance of the calorimeter and tracking systems. We show that the track reconstruction in the all-silicon tracker of SiD is robust in the presence of the backgrounds at CLIC. Furthermore, we investigate tungsten as a dense absorber material for the hadronic calorimeter, which allows for the construction of a compact hadronic calorimeter that fulfills the requirements on the energy resolution and shower containment without a significant increase of the coil radius. Finally, the measurement of the decays of light Higgs bosons into two muons is studied in full simulation. We find that with an integrated luminosity of 2 ab{sup -1}, corresponding to 4 years of data taking at CLIC, the respective Higgs branching ratio can be determined with a statistical uncertainty of approximately 15%.

  6. Detector optimization studies and light Higgs decay into muons at CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grefe, Christian

    2013-09-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a concept for a future e + e - linear collider with a center-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The design of a CLIC experiment is driven by the requirements related to the physics goals, as well as by the experimental conditions. For example, the short time between two bunch crossings of 0.5 ns and the backgrounds due to beamstrahlung have direct impact on the design of a CLIC experiment. The Silicon Detector (SiD) is one of the concepts currently being discussed as a possible detector for the International Linear Collider (ILC). In this thesis we develop a modified version of the SiD simulation model for CLIC, taking into account the specific experimental conditions. In addition, we developed a software tool to investigate the impact of beam-related backgrounds on the detector by overlaying events from different simulated event samples. Moreover, we present full simulation studies, determining the performance of the calorimeter and tracking systems. We show that the track reconstruction in the all-silicon tracker of SiD is robust in the presence of the backgrounds at CLIC. Furthermore, we investigate tungsten as a dense absorber material for the hadronic calorimeter, which allows for the construction of a compact hadronic calorimeter that fulfills the requirements on the energy resolution and shower containment without a significant increase of the coil radius. Finally, the measurement of the decays of light Higgs bosons into two muons is studied in full simulation. We find that with an integrated luminosity of 2 ab -1 , corresponding to 4 years of data taking at CLIC, the respective Higgs branching ratio can be determined with a statistical uncertainty of approximately 15%.

  7. Hidden Valley searches at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Kucharczyk, Marcin

    2018-01-01

    Several beyond the Standard Model theoretical models predict the decay of Higgs bosons decaying into heavy long-lived particles. The sensitivity to observe such long-lived particles has been determined using a data sample of e$^+$e$^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$3 TeV, simulated with the CLIC_ILD detector model and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 ab$^{-1}$. The analysis identifies secondary vertices which can be associated with the decay of such particles. Decay products are subsequently combined to reconstruct the parent bosons. The sensitivity range covers long-lived particle lifetimes from 1 to 300 ps, masses between 25 and 50 GeV/c$^2$, and a parent Higgs mass of 126 GeV/c$^2$.

  8. Study of the ALICE Investigator chip in view of the requirements at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)754303; Dannheim, Dominik; Fiergolski, Adrian; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Hynds, Daniel; Klempt, Wolfgang; Nurnberg, Andreas Matthias; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Snoeys, Walter

    2017-01-01

    CLIC is an option for a future high energy linear $e^{+}e^{−}$ collider at CERN in the post-LHC era. The CLIC machine is designed to reach centre-of-mass energies ranging from a few hundred GeV up to 3 TeV. To achieve high precision measurements, e.g. of the Higgs- width, challenging requirements are imposed on the CLIC detector. A single point tracking resolution of 7 μm and a material budget of 1-2%$X_{0}$ per layer are required for the tracker. Moreover, to suppress background hits from beam-beam interactions, a precise time slicing of hits of 10 ns is needed. To address these requirements, a large area silicon tracker is foreseen for the detector at CLIC. In this context, integrated technologies are promising candidates to achieve large scale production and low material budget. The Investigator chip is a test chip developed for the ALICE Inner Tracking System upgrade, implemented in a 180 nm CMOS process on a high resistivity substrate. It contains various test-matrices with analogue functionality, whi...

  9. Low emittance design of the electron gun and the focusing channel of the Compact Linear Collider drive beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dayyani Kelisani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For the Compact Linear Collider project at CERN, the power for the main linacs is extracted from a drive beam generated from a high current electron source. The design of the electron source and its subsequent focusing channel has a great impact on the beam dynamic considerations of the drive beam. We report the design of a thermionic electron source and the subsequent focusing channels with the goal of production of a high quality beam with a very small emittance.

  10. Preliminary Design of an Inductive Adder for CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC damping rings will produce ultra-low emittance beam, with high bunch charge, necessary for the luminosity performance of the collider. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse power modulators for the damping rings kickers must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses: specifications call for a 160 ns duration flattop of 12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 %. A solid-state modulator, the inductive adder, is a very promising approach to meeting the demanding specifications; this topology allows the use of both digital and analogue modulation. To effectively use modulation techniques to achieve such low ripple and droop requires an in-depth knowledge of the behaviour of the solid-state switching components and their gate drivers, as well as a good understanding of the overa...

  11. Feasibility study of multipoint based laser alignment system for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, G; Mainaud-Durand, H; Piedigrossi, D; Geiger, A

    2012-01-01

    CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is a study for a future electron-positron collider that would allow physicists to explore a new energy region beyond the capabilities oftoday’s particle accelerators. Alignment is one of the major challenges within the CLIC study in order to achieve the high requirement of a multi-TeV center of mass colliding beam energy range (nominal 3 TeV). To reach this energy in a realistic and cost efficient scenario all accelerator components have to be aligned with an accuracy of 10 μm over a sliding window of 200 m. The demand for a straight line reference is so far based on stretched wires coupled with Wire Positioning Sensors (WPS). These solutions are currently further developed inorder to reduce the drawbacks which are mainly given by their costs and difficult implementation. However, it should be validated through inter-comparison with a solution ideally based on a different physical principle. Therefore, a new metrological approach is proposed using a laser beam as straight lin...

  12. Fast-ion transport and neutral beam current drive in ASDEX upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiger, B.; Weiland, M.; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2015-01-01

    The neutral beam current drive efficiency has been investigated in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak by replacing on-axis neutral beams with tangential off-axis beams. A clear modification of the radial fast-ion profiles is observed with a fast-ion D-alpha diagnostic that measures centrally peaked profiles...... during on-axis injection and outwards shifted profiles during off-axis injection. Due to this change of the fast-ion population, a clear modification of the plasma current profile is predicted but not observed by a motional Stark effect diagnostic. The fast-ion transport caused by MHD activity has been...

  13. Proposition d'une méthode d'alignement de l'accélérateur linéaire CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, Thomas; Mainaud-Durand, H

    2011-01-01

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) is the particles accelerator project proposed by the european organization for nuclear research (CERN) for high energy physics after the large hadron collider (LHC). Because of the nanometric scale of the CLIC leptons beams, the emittance growth budget is very tight. It induces alignment tolerances on the positions of the CLIC components that have never been achieved. The last step of the CLIC alignment will be done according to the beam itself. It falls within the competence of the physicists. However, in order to implement the beam-based feedback, a challenging pre-alignment is required : 10 μm at 3σ along a 200 m sliding window. For such a precision, the proposed solution must be compatible with a feedback between the measurement and repositioning systems. The CLIC pre-alignment will have to be active. This thesis does not demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC active prealignment but shows the way to the last developments that have to be done for that purpose. A metho...

  14. Commissioning status of the decelerator test beam line in CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Lillestol, R; Olvegaard, M; Syratchev, I; Carrillo, D; Toral, F; Faus-Golfe, A; Garcia-Garrigos, J J; Kubyshin, Y; Montoro, G

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN was constructed by the CTF3 collaboration to study the feasibility of the concepts for a compact linear collider. The test beam line (TBL) recently added to the CTF3 machine was designed to study the CLIC decelerator beam dynamics and 12 GHz power production. The beam line consists of a FODO lattice with high precision BPM’s and quadrupoles on movers for precise beam alignment. A total of 16 Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS) will be installed in between the quadrupoles to extract 12 GHz power from the drive beam provided by the CTF3 machine. The CTF3 drive beam with a bunch-train length of 140 ns, 12 GHz bunch repetition frequency and an average current over the train of up to 28 A will be injected into the test beam line. Each PETS structure will produce 135 MW of 12 GHz power at nominal current. The beam will have lost more than 50 % of its initial energy of 150 MeV at the end of the beam line and will contain particles with energies between 65 MeV and 1...

  15. Particle Identification performance for leptons in jets for the CLIC ILD and CLIC SiD detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nardulli, J

    2011-01-01

    This note describes the particle identification performance for particles in jets for the CLIC ILD and CLIC SiD detector concepts as prepared in the CLIC Conceptual Design Report. The results are presented with and without the presence of the γγ → hadrons background events.

  16. Capacitively coupled hybrid pixel assemblies for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)734627; Benoit, Mathieu; Dannheim, Dominik; Dette, Karola; Hynds, Daniel; Kulis, Szymon; Peric, Ivan; Petric, Marko; Redford, Sophie; Sicking, Eva; Valerio, Pierpaolo

    2016-01-01

    The vertex detector at the proposed CLIC multi-TeV linear e+e- collider must have minimal material content and high spatial resolution, combined with accurate time-stamping to cope with the expected high rate of beam-induced backgrounds. One of the options being considered is the use of active sensors implemented in a commercial high-voltage CMOS process, capacitively coupled to hybrid pixel ASICs. A prototype of such an assembly, using two custom designed chips (CCPDv3 as active sensor glued to a CLICpix readout chip), has been characterised both in the lab and in beam tests at the CERN SPS using 120 GeV/c positively charged hadrons. Results of these characterisation studies are presented both for single and dual amplification stages in the active sensor. Pixel cross-coupling results are also presented, showing the sensitivity to placement precision and planarity of the glue layer.

  17. Overview of the CLIC detector and its physics potential

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)786425

    2016-01-01

    The CLIC detector and physics study (CLICdp) is an international collaboration that investigates the physics potential of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). CLIC is a high-energy electron-positron collider under development, aiming for centre-of-mass energies from a few hundred GeV to 3 TeV. In addition to physics studies based on full Monte Carlo simulations of signal and background processes, CLICdp performs cutting-edge hardware R&D. In this contribution CLICdp will present recent results from physics prospect studies, emphasising Higgs studies. Additionally the new CLIC detector model and the recently updated CLIC baseline staging scenario will be presented.

  18. Overview of the CLIC detector and its physics potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ström, Rickard

    2017-12-01

    The CLIC detector and physics study (CLICdp) is an international collaboration that investigates the physics potential of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). CLIC is a high-energy electron-positron collider under development, aiming for centre-of-mass energies from a few hundred GeV to 3 TeV. In addition to physics studies based on full Monte Carlo simulations of signal and background processes, CLICdp performs cuttingedge hardware R&D. In this contribution CLICdp will present recent results from physics prospect studies, emphasising Higgs studies. Additionally the new CLIC detector model and the recently updated CLIC baseline staging scenario will be presented.

  19. Muon System Design Studies for Detectors at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    van der Kraaij, E

    2011-01-01

    The two concepts for CLIC detectors inherited their design of the muon systems from the ILC community. In this note the outcome of a reevaluation of the design for the CLIC environment is presented. Based on a full detector simulation, the muon identification performance is analysed for different detector layouts and different cellsizes. As a result, nine layers are suggested for the muon systems of the CLIC ILD and CLIC SiD detectors, which are arranged in three groups of three layers. The cellsizes have been kept at 30×30 mm2. These layouts are used for the performance studies of the CLIC Conceptual Design Report (CDR).

  20. Compensation of head-on beam-beam induced resonance driving terms and tune spread in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fischer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A head-on beam-beam compensation scheme was implemented for operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 264801 (2015PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.115.264801]. The compensation consists of electron lenses for the reduction of the beam-beam induced tune spread, and a lattice for the minimization of beam-beam generated resonance driving terms. We describe the implementations of the lattice and electron lenses, and report on measurements of lattice properties and the effect of the electron lenses on the hadron beam.

  1. Finite Element Model for Thermal-Structural analysis of CLIC Lab Module type 0#2

    CERN Document Server

    Moilanen, Antti; Vamvakas, Alex; Vainola, Jukka Ilmari; Doebert, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Temperature changes lead to unwanted thermo-mechanical deformations in the components of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) module. There are several sources and sinks of heat around the CLIC two-beam module. Heat is generated in the components that produce, transfer, and extract radio frequency (RF) power. Excess heat is removed from the components by cooling water as well as dissipated to air by convection from the outer surfaces of the components. The ambient temperature might also vary along the tunnel during the operation of CLIC. Due to tight assembling and alignment tolerances, it is necessary to minimize the thermo-mechanical deformations in the components. In this paper, the steps of thermal-structural Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of CLIC lab module type 0#2 are described from geometry model simplification to setting up the simulation. The description is accompanied by useful hints for CATIA and ANSYS users performing similar modelling tasks. A reliable computer simulation is important for studying ...

  2. WAKEFIELD DAMPING FOR THE CLIC CRAB CAVITY

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Dexter, A; Carter, R; Khan, V; Jones, R; Dolgashev, V

    2009-01-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  3. Physics highlights at ILC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukić, Strahinja

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture, the physics potential for the e+e- linear collider experiments ILC and CLIC is reviewed. The experimental conditions are compared to those at hadron colliders and their intrinsic value for precision experiments, complementary to the hadron colliders, is discussed. The detector concepts for ILC and CLIC are outlined in their most important aspects related to the precision physics. Highlights from the physics program and from the benchmark studies are given. It is shown that linear colliders are a promising tool, complementing the LHC in essential ways to test the Standard Model and to search for new physics.

  4. Progress of neutral beam R and D for plasma heating and current drive at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Recent progress and future plans regarding development of a high power negative ion source at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) are described. The neutral beam injection system, which is expected to play an important role not only in plasma heating but also in the plasma current drive in the fusion reactor, requires a high power negative ion source which can produce negative deuterium ion beams with current of order 20A at energy above 1MeV. In order to realize such a high power negative ion beam, intensive research and development has been carried out at JAERI since 1984. The negative hydrogen ion beam current of 10A achieved in recent years almost equals the value required for the fusion reactor. With regard to the negative ion acceleration, a high current negative ion beam of 0.2A has been accelerated up to 350keV electrostatically. On the basis of this recent progress, two development plans have been initiated as an intermediate step towards the fusion reactor. One is to develop a 500keV, 10MW negative ion based neutral beam injection system for JT-60U to demonstrate the neutral beam current drive in a high density plasma. The other is to develop a 1MeV, 1A ion source to demonstrate high current negative ion acceleration up to 1MeV. On the basis of this research and development, an efficient and reactor relevant neutral beam injection system will be developed for an experimental fusion reactor such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. ((orig.))

  5. Status of vertex and tracking detector R&D at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)754272

    2015-01-01

    The physics aims at the future CLIC high-energy linear e+e- collider set very high precision requirements on the performance of the vertex and tracking detectors. Moreover, these detectors have to be well adapted to the experimental conditions, such as the bunch train structure of the beam and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of a few micron, ultra-low mass (~0.2% X0 per layer for the inner vertex region), very low power dissipation (compatible with air-flow cooling in the inner vertex region) and pulsed power operation, complemented with ~10 ns time stamping capabilities. An overview of the R&D program for pixel and tracking detectors at CLIC will be presented, including recent results on an innovative hybridisation concept based on capacitive coupling between active sensors (HV-CMOS) and readout ASICs (CLICpix).

  6. Beam Dynamics Studies in Recirculating Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Pellegrini, Dario; Latina, A

    The LHeC and the CLIC Drive Beam share not only the high-current beams that make them prone to show instabilities, but also unconventional lattice topologies and operational schemes in which the time sequence of the bunches varies along the machine. In order to asses the feasibility of these projects, realistic simulations taking into account the most worrisome effects and their interplays, are crucial. These include linear and non-linear optics with time dependent elements, incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation, short and long-range wakefields, beam-beam effect and ion cloud. In order to investigate multi-bunch effects in recirculating machines, a new version of the tracking code PLACET has been developed from scratch. PLACET2, already integrates most of the effects mentioned before and can easily receive additional physics. Its innovative design allows to describe complex lattices and track one or more bunches accordingly to the machine operation, reproducing the bunch train splitting and recombinat...

  7. High performance electronics for alignment regulation on the CLIC 30GHz modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrica, D.; Coosemans, W.; Pittin, R.

    1999-01-01

    CERN is studying a linear collider (CLIC) to obtain electron-positron collisions with centre-of-mass energies in the TeV range. To demonstrate the feasibility of CLIC, a test facility (CTF2) is being constructed. CTF2 consists of 4 identical modules, each 1.4 m long module consists of 2 linac with a girder and a doublet or a triplet quadrupole. Girders are elements that support mechanically the cavities of the accelerator while the main objective of the quadrupole is to focus particle beams. The alignment system has 2 principal utilities. The first is to pre-align the elements to make the beam pass through the aperture and produce signals in beam position monitors. In respect to these signals the girders and the quadrupoles are moved for making the definitive alignment. The second utility is to maintain the elements in this position. The alignment control system of CTF2 must regulate the position of the girders and quadrupoles with a precision < 10 μm. In fact an accuracy of 1 μ has been obtained on CTF2. Thanks to its flexibility and its simplicity, the system is expected to adapt easily to CLIC even if it means to control modules that involve up to a maximum of 384 motors and 896 sensors

  8. CLIC preparations go up a notch

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider gears up for post-LHC physics with an international workshop. A schematic diagram of CLIC.In June CERN gained a new building: number 2010. And as chance would have it, this is more than just a number to its new residents. By the year 2010, teams working at the new CLIC Experimental Area, along with the already established CLIC Test Facility Three (CTF3), hope to have demonstrated the feasibility of the Compact Linear Collider and, depending on results from the LHC, embark on its final design and proposal. A workshop on 16t-18 October brought people from all around the world to CERN to exchange ideas and hear how the ambitious project is progressing. CLIC is a project that aims to extend lepton collider technology to multi-TeV energy physics, colliding leptons with a centre-of-mass-energy up to 3TeV, more than ten times the energy of the LEP. This is only possible in a linear collider, where no energy is lo...

  9. Nested folded-beam suspensions with low longitudinal stiffness for comb-drive actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Max T; Huang, Ming-Xian; Chang, Chao-Min

    2014-01-01

    Nested folded-beam suspensions with a low longitudinal spring constant and a high lateral spring constant have been used in comb-drive actuators. In the new design, every two flexible beams and two stiff members form a parallelogram flexure, which is considered as an ‘element’ of the nested folded-beam suspension. A set of these flexures of increasing size were placed one outside another to compose a nested structure. In this way, a serial mechanical connection between adjacent parallelogram flexures was formed; thus, a longer output stroke was obtained by combining the stroke displacements of all flexures in an additive fashion. The designed suspensions were theoretically analyzed and numerically simulated. Furthermore, comb-drive actuators with conventional and new suspensions were fabricated and tested to verify the predicted function. In the testing cases, the longitudinal spring constants of suspensions with two (conventional), three and four parallelogram flexures on each side were measured as 2.77, 1.75 and 1.36 N m −1 . The ratio among these three values was approximately 6:4:3, which is consistent with the theoretical predictions and simulation results. Microfabricated folded beams in series were achieved. (paper)

  10. Standardization of the Experimental Methodology for Quality Assurance and Quality Control (QA-QC of the CLIC Structural Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gazis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main linear accelerators (linacs of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC are constituted of sequential two-beam modules (of approximate length of two meters. The CLIC linacs need to be firmly stabilized on their supports with a micron-level requirement, essential for maintaining the final target luminosity close to the required XXX value. Real scale two-beam prototype modules have been designed, manufactured and commissioned to study their behaviour under different operation modes and experimental conditions. The CLIC machine will work for continuous runs under conditions of high radiation background. The structural materials of the systems of the accelerator have to sustain the significant fatigue and activation due to the radiation, generated mainly by the losses of the particle beam. Extensive testing has taken place with a combination of mechanical experiments and irradiation sessions on samples of structural materials, focusing on the micro-precise CLIC module supporting system. The followed experimentally strategy was standardized in a series of sequential steps.

  11. A Vertex and Tracking Detector System for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)718101

    2017-01-01

    The physics aims at the proposed future CLIC high-energy linear $e^+e^−$ collider pose challenging demands on the performance of the detector system. In particular the vertex and tracking detectors have to combine precision measurements with robustness against the expected high rates of beam-induced backgrounds. The requirements include ultra-low mass, facilitated by power pulsing and air cooling in the vertex-detector region, small cell sizes and precision hit timing at the few-ns level. A detector concept meeting these requirements has been developed and an integrated R&D program addressing the challenges is progressing in the areas of ultra-thin sensors and readout ASICs, interconnect technology, mechanical integration and cooling.

  12. A New Damped and Tapered Accelerating Structure for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Raguin, J Y; Syratchev, I V; Wilson, Ian H; Wuensch, Walter

    2002-01-01

    The main performance limits when designing accelerating structures for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) for an average accelerating gradient above 100 MV/m are electrical breakdown and material fatigue caused by pulsed surface heating. In addition, for stable beam operation, the structures should have low short-range transverse wakefields and much-reduced transverse and longitudinal long-range wakefields. Two damped and tapered accelerating structures have been designed. The first has an accelerating gradient of 112 MV/m with the surface electrical field limited to 300 MV/m and the maximum temperature increase limited to 100°C. The second, with an accelerating gradient of 150 MV/m, has a peak surface electrical field of 392 MV/m and a maximum temperature increase of 167°C. Innovations to the cell and damping waveguide geometry and to the tapering of the structures are presented, and possible further improvements are proposed.

  13. PACMAN – an Innovative Doctoral Programme for CLIC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    The final network project funded under the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7), Marie Curie Actions, held its kick-off meeting at CERN on 20 November 2013.   PACMAN – a study on Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometre scale – is in the final stage of recruiting 10 PhD students to do research on beam instrumentation, metrology, micrometric alignment, magnetic measurements, nano-positioning and high-precision engineering. The students will acquire multi-disciplinary expertise in advanced engineering combined with a broad span of transferable skills. “PACMAN gives us the opportunity to attract students to CERN at a key moment in the CLIC study,” said Frédérick Bordry, Head of CERN’s Technology Department. “This is also an ideal opportunity to further develop CERN’s networks with industry and universities.” “The project is...

  14. Fiducialisation and initial alignment of CLIC component with micrometric accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Mainaud Durand, Helene; Buzio, Marco; Caiazza, Domenico; Catalan Lasheras, Nuria; Cherif, Ahmed; Doytchinov, Iordan Petrov; Fuchs, Jean-Frederic; Gaddi, Andrea; Galindo Munoz, Natalia; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Kamugasa, Solomon William; Modena, Michele; Novotny, Peter; Sanz, Claude; Severino, Giordana; Russenschuck, Stephan; Tshilumba, David; Vlachakis, Vasileios; Wendt, Manfred; Zorzetti, Silvia; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new solution to fiducialise the three major components of the CLIC collider: quadrupoles, beam-position monitors (BPM), and accelerating structures (AS). This solution is based on the use of a copper-beryllium (CuBe) wire to locate the reference position, i.e. the symmetry axes of the components (their magnetic, respectively electromagnetic centre axis), and to determine their position in the common support assembly defining a local coordinate system, with respect to the fiducials. These alignment targets will be used later to align the support assembly in the tunnel. With such a method, several accelerator components of different types, supported by a dedicated adjustment system, can be simultaneously fiducialised and pre-aligned using the same wire, enabling a micrometric accuracy with help of a 3D coordinate measurement machine (CMM). Alternative solutions based on frequency scanning interferometry (FSI) and micro-triangulation are also under development, to perform such fiducialisation and in...

  15. Dynamics on the positron capture and accelerating sections of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Poirier, Freddy; Vivoli, Alessandro; Dadoun, Olivier; Lepercq, Pierre; Variola, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC Pre-Injector Linac for the e+ beam is composed of an Adiabatic Matching Device (AMD) followed by 4 (or 5) accelerating RF structures embedded in a solenoidal magnetic field. The accelerating sections are based on 2 GHz long travelling wave structures. In this note, the positrons capture strategy downstream the AMD is reviewed. The first RF structure can be phased either for full acceleration or for deceleration. In the latter case, the simulations results show that the number of e+ capture at the end of the 200 MeV Pre-Injector Linac is increased. Then the impact of the space charge is presented. Additional techniques are also studied to explore the potentiality of increasing the number of e+ namely an extra RF field at the beginning of the capture section and a higher solenoidal field.

  16. CLIC crab cavity design optimisation for maximum luminosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, A.C., E-mail: a.dexter@lancaster.ac.uk [Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K. [Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Dolgashev, V. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Jones, R. [University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-21

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  17. The Bootstrap Current and Neutral Beam Current Drive in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Politzer, P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Noninductive current drive is an essential part of the implementation of the DIII-D Advanced Tokamak program. For an efficient steady-state tokamak reactor, the plasma must provide close to 100% bootstrap fraction (f bs ). For noninductive operation of DIII-D, current drive by injection of energetic neutral beams [neutral beam current drive (NBCD)] is also important. DIII-D experiments have reached ∼80% bootstrap current in stationary discharges without inductive current drive. The remaining current is ∼20% NBCD. This is achieved at β N [approximately equal to] β p > 3, but at relatively high q 95 (∼10). In lower q 95 Advanced Tokamak plasmas, f bs ∼ 0.6 has been reached in essentially noninductive plasmas. The phenomenology of high β p and β N plasmas without current control is being studied. These plasmas display a relaxation oscillation involving repetitive formation and collapse of an internal transport barrier. The frequency and severity of these events increase with increasing β, limiting the achievable average β and causing modulation of the total current as well as the pressure. Modeling of both bootstrap and NBCD currents is based on neoclassical theory. Measurements of the total bootstrap and NBCD current agree with calculations. A recent experiment based on the evolution of the transient voltage profile after an L-H transition shows that the more recent bootstrap current models accurately describe the plasma behavior. The profiles and the parametric dependences of the local neutral beam-driven current density have not yet been compared with theory

  18. Fast wave current drive in neutral beam heated plasmas on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Forest, C.B.; Pinsker, R.I.

    1997-04-01

    The physics of non-inductive current drive and current profile control using the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on the DIII-D tokamak. In non-sawtoothing discharges formed by neutral beam injection (NBI), the radial profile of the fast wave current drive (FWCD) was determined by the response of the loop voltage profile to co, counter, and symmetric antenna phasings, and was found to be in good agreement with theoretical models. The application of counter FWCD increased the magnetic shear reversal of the plasma and delayed the onset of sawteeth, compared to co FWCD. The partial absorption of fast waves by energetic beam ions at high harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency was also evident from a build up of fast particle pressure near the magnetic axis and a correlated increase in the neutron rate. The anomalous fast particle pressure and neutron rate increased with increasing NBI power and peaked when a harmonic of the deuterium cyclotron frequency passed through the center of the plasma. The experimental FWCD efficiency was highest at 2 T where the interaction between the fast waves and the beam ions was weakest; as the magnetic field strength was lowered, the FWCD efficiency decreased to approximately half of the maximum theoretical value

  19. Current drive by neutral beams, rotating magnetic fields and helicity injection in compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farengo, R.

    2002-01-01

    A Monte-Carlo code is used to study neutral beam current drive in Spheromaks. The exact particle trajectories are followed in the self-consistent equilibria calculated including the beam current. Reducing Z(eff) does not increase the current drive efficiency because the reduction of the stopping cross section is compensated by an increase in the electron canceling current. Significant changes in the safety factor profile can be produced with relatively low beam currents. Minimum dissipation states of a flux core spheromak sustained by helicity injection are presented. Helicity balance is used as a constraint and the resistivity is considered to be non-uniform. Two types of relaxed states are found; one has a central core of open flux surrounded by a toroidal region of closed flux surfaces and the other has the open flux wrapped around the closed flux surfaces. Non-uniform resistivity effects can be very important due to the changes they produce in the safety factor profile. A hybrid, fluid electrons particle ions, code is employed to study ion dynamics in FRCs sustained by rotating magnetic fields. (author)

  20. Status of a study of stabilization and fine positioning of CLIC quadrupoles to the nanometre level

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Esposito, M; Fernandez Carmona, P; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, C; Janssens, S; Kuzmin, A; Leuxe, R; Moron Ballester, R

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical stability to the nanometre and below is required for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) quadrupoles to frequencies as low as 1 Hz. An active stabilization and positioning system based on very stiff piezo electric actuators and inertial reference masses is under study for the Main Beam Quadrupoles (MBQ). The stiff support was selected for robustness against direct forces and for the option of incrementally repositioning the magnet with nanometre resolution. The technical feasibility was demonstrated by a representative test mass being stabilized and repositioned to the required level in the vertical and lateral direction. Technical issues were identified and the development programme of the support, sensors, and controller was continued to increase the performance, integrate the system in the overall controller, adapt to the accelerator environment, and reduce costs. The improvements are implemented in models, test benches, and design of the first stabilized prototype CLIC magnet. The characterizati...

  1. TCAD simulations of High-Voltage-CMOS Pixel structures for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Buckland, Matthew Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The requirements for precision physics and the experimental conditions at CLIC result in stringent constraints for the vertex detector. Capacitively coupled active pixel sensors with 25 μm pitch implemented in a commercial 180 nm High-Voltage CMOS (HV-CMOS) process are currently under study as a candidate technology for the CLIC vertex detector. Laboratory calibration measurements and beam tests with prototypes are complemented by detailed TCAD and electronic circuit simulations, aiming for a comprehensive understanding of the signal formation in the HV-CMOS sensors and subsequent readout stages. In this note 2D and 3D TCAD simulation results of the prototype sensor, the Capacitively Coupled Pixel Detector version three (CCPDv3), will be presented. These include the electric field distribution, leakage current, well capacitance, transient response to minimum ionising particles and charge-collection.

  2. Stable operating regimes in NET with respect to Alfven wave instabilities during neutral beam current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhartt, D.

    1989-01-01

    Supra-thermal ions can contribute to the steady-state current in future large tokamak machines like NET or ITER. The fast-ion population is generated by collisional slowing-down of high-energy ions which were injected as neutral atoms in quasi-tangential direction and ionized by plasma interactions. Depending on the initial beam shape these fast ions can excite microinstabilities of the Alfven-wave type which are driven by the gradients in velocity-space. The ensuring plasma turbulence is expected to slow down the fast ions very quickly. This effect reduces the current drive efficiency which otherwise is comparable to that of other current drive schemes like lower hybrid waves where the toroidal current is carried by high-energy resonant electrons. (author) 3 refs., 1 fig

  3. Electron and ion heat transport with lower hybrid current drive and neutral beam injection heating in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeldner, F.X.; Pereverzev, G.V.; Bartiromo, R.; Fahrbach, H.U.; Leuterer, F.; Murmann, H.D.; Staebler, A.; Steuer, K.H.

    1993-01-01

    Transport code calculations were made for experiments with the combined operation of lower hybrid current drive and heating and of neutral beam injection heating on ASDEX. Peaking or flattening of the electron temperature profile are mainly explained by modifications of the MHD induced electron heat transport. They originate from current profile changes due to lower hybrid and neutral beam current drive and to contributions from the bootstrap current. Ion heat transport cannot be described by one single model for all heating scenarios. The ion heat conductivity is reduced during lower hybrid heated phases with respect to Ohmic and neutral beam heating. (author). 13 refs, 5 figs

  4. Fluka and thermo-mechanical studies for the CLIC main dump

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, Alessio; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2011-01-01

    In order to best cope with the challenge of absorbing the multi-MW beam, a water beam dump at the end of the CLIC post-collision line has been proposed. The design of the dump for the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) was checked against with a set of FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations, for the estimation of the peak and total power absorbed by the water and the vessel. Fluence spectra of escaping particles and activation rates of radio-nuclides were computed as well. Finally, the thermal transient behavior of the water bath and a thermo-mechanical analysis of the preliminary design of the window were done.

  5. Plasma Heating and Current Drive by Neutral Beam and Alpha Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, M; Okumura, Y [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of plasma heating is to raise the plasma temperature enough to produce a deuterium and tritium reaction (D + T {yields} {sup 4}He + n). The required plasma temperature T is in the range of 10-30 keV. Since the high temperature plasma is confined by a strong magnetic field, injection of energetic ions from outside to heat the plasma is difficult due to the Lorenz force. The most efficient way to heat the plasma by energetic particles is to inject high energy 'neutrals' which get ionized in the plasma. Neutral beam injection (NBI) with a beam energy much above the average kinetic energy of the plasma electrons or ions is used (beam energy typically {approx}40 keV - 1 MeV). This heating scheme is similar to warming up cold water by pouring in hot water. There are two types of neutral beam, called P-NBI and N-NBI (P- and N- means 'positive' and 'negative', respectively). P-NBI uses the acceleration of positively charged ions and their neutralization, while N-NBI uses the acceleration of negative ions (electrons attached to neutral atoms) and their neutralization. Details are given in NBI technology Section. The first demonstration of plasma heating by P-NBI was made in ORMAK and ATC in 1974, while that by N-NBI was made in JT-60U for the first time in 1996. ITER has also adopted the N-NBI system as the heating and current drive system with a beam energy of 1 MeV. Figure A typical bird's eye view of a tokamak with N-NBI and N-NBI (JT-60U) is shown. (author)

  6. Top Quark Pair Production at a 500 GeV CLIC Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Seidel, K; Simon, F

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of the capability of a 500 GeV e+e− collider based on the CLIC technology for precision measurements of top quark properties. The analysis is based on full detector simulations of the CLIC ILD detector concept using Geant4, including realistic beam-induced background contributions from two photon processes. Event reconstruction is performed using a particle flow algorithm with stringent cuts to control the influence of background. The mass and width of the top quark are studied in fully-hadronic and semi-leptonic decays of tt ̄ pairs using event samples of signal and standard model background processes corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 100fb−1. Statistical uncertainties of the top mass of 0.08 GeV and 0.09 GeV were obtained for the fully-hadronic channel and the semi-leptonic channel, respectively. The results are compared to a similar analysis performed within the framework of the ILC, showing that a similar precision can be achieved at CLIC despite less favorable experimen...

  7. From glutathione transferase to pore in a CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Cromer, B A; Morton, C J; Parker, M W; 10.1007/s00249-002-0219-1

    2002-01-01

    Many plasma membrane chloride channels have been cloned and characterized in great detail. In contrast, very little is known about intracellular chloride channels. Members of a novel class of such channels, called the CLICs (chloride intracellular channels), have been identified over the last few years. A striking feature of the CLIC family of ion channels is that they can exist in a water- soluble state as well as a membrane-bound state. A major step forward in understanding the functioning of these channels has been the recent crystal structure determination of one family member, CLIC1. The structure confirms that CLICs are members of the glutathione S- transferase superfamily and provides clues as to how CLICs can insert into membranes to form chloride channels. (69 refs).

  8. The physics benchmark processes for the detector performance studies used in CLIC CDR Volume 3

    CERN Document Server

    Allanach, B.J.; Desch, K.; Ellis, J.; Giudice, G.; Grefe, C.; Kraml, S.; Lastovicka, T.; Linssen, L.; Marschall, J.; Martin, S.P.; Muennich, A.; Poss, S.; Roloff, P.; Simon, F.; Strube, J.; Thomson, M.; Wells, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    This note describes the detector benchmark processes used in volume 3 of the CLIC conceptual design report (CDR), which explores a staged construction and operation of the CLIC accelerator. The goal of the detector benchmark studies is to assess the performance of the CLIC ILD and CLIC SiD detector concepts for different physics processes and at a few CLIC centre-of-mass energies.

  9. CLIC crab cavity final report

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G et al

    2013-01-01

    A high gradient 12 GHz, normal‐conducting travelling‐wave structure, with a high group‐velocity to minimise the effects of beam loading, has been developed. Appropriate input coupler and wakefield damping processes have been incorporated and two ‘undamped’ structures have been fabricated, one in the UK by Shakespeare Engineering Ltd and the other by VDL at CERN. Systematic high gradient tests are planned at SLAC and CERN, to study breakdown differences between deflecting and accelerating structures.

  10. CLIC-ACM: generic modular rad-hard data acquisition system based on CERN GBT versatile link

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielawski, B.; Locci, F.; Magnoni, S.

    2015-01-01

    CLIC is a world-wide collaboration to study the next ''terascale'' lepton collider, relying upon a very innovative concept of two-beam-acceleration. This accelerator, currently under study, will be composed of the subsequence of 21000 two-beam-modules. Each module requires more than 300 analogue and digital signals which need to be acquired and controlled in a synchronous way. CLIC-ACM (Acquisition and Control Module) is the 'generic' control and acquisition module developed to accommodate the controls of all these signals for various sub-systems and related specification in term of data bandwidth, triggering and timing synchronization. This paper describes the system architecture with respect to its radiation-tolerance, power consumption and scalability

  11. Comparative Study of the Tuning Performances of the Nominal and Long L* CLIC Final Focus System at √s = 380 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Plassard, F; Marin, E; Tomás, R

    2017-01-01

    Mitigation of static imperfections for emittance preservation is one of the most important and challenging tasks faced by the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) beam delivery system. A simulation campaign has been performed to recover the nominal luminosity by means of different alignment procedures. The state of the art of the tuning studies is drawn up. Comparative studies of the tuning performances and a tuning-based final focus system design optimization for two L options are presented. The effectiveness of the tuning techniques applied to these different lattices will be decisive for the final layout of the CLIC final focus system at √s = 380 GeV.

  12. Stabilisation and precision pointing quadrupole magnets in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Janssens, Stef; Linde, Frank; van den Brand, Jo; Bertolini, Alessandro; Artoos, Kurt

    This thesis describes the research done to provide stabilisation and precision positioning for the main beam quadrupole magnets of the Compact Linear Collider CLIC. The introduction describes why new particle accelerators are needed to further the knowledge of our universe and why they are linear. A proposed future accelerator is the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) which consists of a novel two beam accelerator concept. Due to its linearity and subsequent single pass at the interaction point, this new accelerator requires a very small beam size at the interaction point, in order to increase collision effectiveness. One of the technological challenges, to obtain these small beam sizes at the interaction point, is to keep the quadrupole magnets aligned and stable to 1.5 nm integrated r.m.s. in vertical and 5 nm integrated root mean square (r.m.s.) in lateral direction. Additionally there is a proposal to create an intentional offset (max. 50 nm every 20 ms with a precision of +/- 1 nm), for several quadrupole ma...

  13. Study of non-inductive current drive using high energy neutral beam injection on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Toshihiro

    2004-01-01

    The negative ion based neutral beam (N-NB) current drive was experimentally studied. The N-NB driven current density was determined over a wide range of electron temperatures by using the motional Stark effect spectroscopy. Theoretical prediction of the NB current drive increasing with beam energy and electron temperature was validated. A record value of NB current drive efficiency 1.55 x 10 19 Am -2 W -1 was achieved simultaneously with high confinement and high beta at at a plasma current of 1.5 MA under a fully non-inductively current driven condition. The experimental validation of NB current drive theory for MHD quiescent plasmas gives greater confidence in predicting the NB current drive in future reactors. However, it was also found that MHD instabilities caused a degradation of NB current drive. A beam-driven instability expelled N-NB fast ions carrying non-inductive current from the central region. The lost N-NB driven current was estimated to be 7% of the total N-NB driven current. For the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM), comparisons of the measured neutron yield and fast ion pressure profile with transport code calculations revealed that the loss of fast ions increases with the NTM activity and that fast ions at higher energies suffer larger transport than at lower energies. (author)

  14. M10.3.4: CLIC crab cavity specifications completed

    CERN Document Server

    Dexter, A; Ambattu, P; Shinton, I; Jones, R

    2010-01-01

    The starting point of Sub-task 2 is to document the currently anticipated requirements for the CLIC crab cavity system. This milestone concerns completion of the basic specifications for the CLIC crab cavity system. This comprises kick, power requirement, phase and amplitude stability, technology choice, and RF layout. The wakefield calculations of a baseline CLIC cavity will be used to estimate the required damping of the higher order modes as well as other special modes in crab cavities (the lower and same order modes).

  15. CLIC CRAB CAVITY SPECIFICATIONS MILESTONE: M10.3.4

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Dexter, A; Jones, R; McIntosh, P; Shinton, I

    2010-01-01

    The starting point of Sub-task 2 is to document the currently anticipated requirements for the CLIC crab cavity system. This milestone concerns completion of the basic specifications for the CLIC crab cavity system. This comprises kick, power requirement, phase and amplitude stability, technology choice, and RF layout. The wakefield calculations of a baseline CLIC cavity will be used to estimate the required damping of the higher order modes as well as other special modes in crab cavities (the lower and same order modes).

  16. Mechanical design of a pre-isolator for the CLIC final focusing magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Gaddi, A; Ramos, F; Siegrist, N

    2012-01-01

    Due to the very small vertical beam sizes, the final focusing elements at the future CLIC linear collider need to be stable against vibrations to below 0.15 nanometres at frequencies above about 4 Hz. One of the key elements in the strategy to achieve such a stable environment is a passive, heavy pre-isolator. In this report, the results from the dynamic finite element analyses of the proposed design for such a passive preisolator are summarized. Furthermore, the results from a low frequency, heavy mass passive vibration isolation test set-up used to validate the calculations are shown.

  17. The CLIC stability study on the feasibility of colliding high energy nanobeams

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R W; Guignard, Gilbert; Leros, Nicolas; Redaelli, S; Schulte, Daniel; Wilson, Ian H; Zimmermann, Frank

    2002-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study at CERN proposes a linear collider with nanometer-size colliding beams at an energy of 3 TeV c.m. ("colliding high energy nanobeams"). The transport, demagnification and collision of these nanobeams imposes magnet vibration tolerances that range from 0.2 nm to a few nanometers. This is well below the floor vibration usually observed. A test stand for magnet stability was set-up at CERN in the immediate neighborhood of roads, operating accelerators, workshops, and regular office space. It was equipped with modern stabilization equipment. The experimental setup and first preliminary results are presented. (10 refs).

  18. Integration of the PHIN RF Gun into the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Döbert, Steffen

    2006-01-01

    CERN is a collaborator within the European PHIN project, a joint research activity for Photo injectors within the CARE program. A deliverable of this project is an rf Gun equipped with high quantum efficiency Cs2Te cathodes and a laser to produce the nominal beam for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3). The nominal beam for CTF3 has an average current of 3.5 A, 1.5 GHz bunch repetition frequency and a pulse length of 1.5 ìs (2332 bunches) with quite tight stability requirements. In addition a phase shift of 180 deg is needed after each train of 140 ns for the special CLIC combination scheme. This rf Gun will be tested at CERN in fall 2006 and shall be integrated as a new injector into the CTF3 linac, replacing the existing injector consisting of a thermionic gun and a subharmonic bunching system. The paper studies the optimal integration into the machine trying to optimize transverse and longitudinal phase space of the beam while respecting the numerous constraints of the existing accelerator. The presented scheme...

  19. Physics potential for the measurement of σ (Hνν) × BR(H → μ+μ−) at a 1.4 TeV CLIC collider

    CERN Document Server

    Milutinović-Dumbelović, G; Grefe, C; Lukić, S; Pandurović, M; Roloff, P

    2014-01-01

    The potential for the measurement of the branching ratio of the Standard Model-like Higgs boson decay into a μ+μ− pair at 1.4 TeV CLIC is analysed. The study is performed using the fully simulated CLIC_ILD detector concept, taking into consideration all the relevant physics and the beam-induced backgrounds. Despite the very low branching ratio of the H → μ+μ− decay, we show that the product of the branching ratio times the Higgs production cross section can be measured with a statistical uncertainty of 38 %, assuming an integrated luminosity of 1.5 ab−1 collected in five years of the detector operation at the 1.4 TeV CLIC with unpolarised beams. With polarised beams (+80 %, -30 %), the statistical uncertainty is better than 25%

  20. Silicon pixel-detector R&D for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)718101

    2016-01-01

    The physics aims at the future CLIC high-energy linear e+e- collider set very high precision requirements on the performance of the vertex and tracking detectors. Moreover, these detectors have to be well adapted to the experimental conditions, such as the time structure of the collisions and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of a few μm, ultra-low mass (∼ 0.2% X${}_0$ per layer for the vertex region and ∼ 1 % X${}_0$ per layer for the outer tracker), very low power dissipation (compatible with air-flow cooling in the inner vertex region) and pulsed power operation, complemented with ∼ 10 ns time stamping capabilities. A highly granular all-silicon vertex and tracking detector system is under development, following an integrated approach addressing simultaneously the physics requirements and engineering constraints. For the vertex-detector region, hybrid pixel detectors with small pitch (25 μm) and analog readout are explored. For the outer trac...

  1. Silicon pixel R&D for the CLIC detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)674552

    2017-01-01

    The physics aims at the future CLIC high-energy linear $e^{+}e^{−}$ collider set very high precision requirements on the performance of the vertex and tracking detectors. Moreover, these detectors have to be well adapted to the experimental conditions, such as the time structure of the collisions and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The main challenges are: a point resolution of a few microns, ultra-low mass (~0.2% X$_{0}$ per layer for the vertex region and ~1% X$_{0}$ per layer for the outer tracker), very low power dissipation (compatible with air-flow cooling in the inner vertex region) and pulsed power operation, complemented with ~10 ns time stamping capabilities. A highly granular all-silicon vertex and tracking detector system is under development, following an integrated approach addressing simultaneously the physics requirements and engineering constraints. For the vertex-detector region, hybrid pixel detectors with small pitch (25 μm) and analogue readout are explored. For the outer tra...

  2. Technologies for Future Vertex and Tracking Detectors at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Spannagel, Simon

    2018-01-01

    CLIC is a proposed linear e$^{+}$e$^{-}$ collider with center-of-mass energies of up to 3 TeV. Its main objectives are precise top quark and Higgs boson measurements, as well as searches for Beyond Standard Model physics. To meet the physics goals, the vertex and tracking detectors require not only a spatial resolution of a few micrometers and a very low material budget, but also timing capabilities with a precision of a few nanoseconds to allow suppression of beam-induced backgrounds. Different technologies using hybrid silicon detectors are explored for the vertex detectors, such as dedicated readout ASICs, small-pitch active edge sensors as well as capacitively coupled High-Voltage CMOS sensors. Monolithic sensors are considered as an option for the tracking detector, and a prototype using a CMOS process with a high-resistivity epitaxial layer is being designed. Different designs using a silicon-on-insulator process are under investigation for both vertex and tracking detector. All prototypes are evaluate...

  3. CLICdet: The post-CDR CLIC detector model

    CERN Document Server

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar; Cure, Benoit; Dannheim, Dominik; Duarte Ramos, Fernando; Elsener, Konrad; Gaddi, Andrea; Gerwig, Hubert; Green, Steven; Grefe, Christian; Hynds, Daniel; Klempt, Wolfgang; Linssen, Lucie; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nurnberg, Andreas Matthias; Marshall, John Stuart; Petric, Marko; Redford, Sophie; Roloff, Philipp Gerhard; Sailer, Andre; Sefkow, Felix; Sicking, Eva; Siegrist, Nicolas; Simon, Frank Richard; Simoniello, Rosa; Spannagel, Simon; Sroka, Szymon Krzysztof; Strom, Lars Rickard; Weber, Matthias Artur

    2017-01-01

    A new model for the CLIC detector has been defined based on lessons learnt while working with the CDR detector models and after a series of simulation studies. The new model, dubbed "CLICdet", also incorporates the experience from various R&D activities linked to a future experiment at CLIC. This note describes the studies and thoughts leading to the new detector model, and gives details on all of its sub-detector systems.

  4. Accelerator and Technical Sector Seminar: Mechanical stabilization and positioning of CLIC quadrupoles with sub-nanometre resolution

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Thursday 24 November 2010 Accelerator and Technical Sector Seminar at 14:15  -  BE Auditorium, bldg. 6 (Meyrin) – please note unusual place Mechanical stabilization and positioning of CLIC quadrupoles with sub-nanometre resolution Stef Janssens /EN-MME Abstract: To reach the required luminosity at the CLIC interaction point, about 4000 quadrupoles are needed to obtain a vertical beam size of 1 nm at the interaction point. The mechanical jitter of the quadrupole magnets will result in an emittance growth. An active vibration isolation system is required to reduce vibrations from the ground and from external forces to about 1.5 nm integrated root mean square (r.m.s.) vertical displacement at 1 Hz. A short overview of vibration damping and isolation strategies will be presented as well as a comparison of existing systems. The unprecedented resolution requirements and the instruments enabling these measurements will be discussed. The vibration sources from which the magnets need to...

  5. Recent results with HV-CMOS and planar sensors for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)734627

    2017-01-01

    The physics aims for the future multi-TeV e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) impose high precision requirements on the vertex detector which has to match the experimental conditions, such as the time structure of the collisions and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of 3μm, 10 ns time stamping capabilities, low mass (⇠0.2% X0 per layer), low power dissipation and pulsed power operation. Recent results of test beam measurements and GEANT4 simulations for assemblies with Timepix3 ASICs and thin active-edge sensors are presented. The 65 nm CLICpix readout ASIC with 25μm pitch was bump bonded to planar silicon sensors and also capacitively coupled through a thin layer of glue to active HV-CMOS sensors. Test beam results for these two hybridisation concepts are presented.

  6. Breakdown Studies for the CLIC Accelerating

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, S; Kovermann, J; Taborelli, M; Timko, H; Wuensch, W; Durabekova, F; Nordlund, K; Pohjonen, A; Kuronen, A

    2010-01-01

    Optimizing the design and the manufacturing of the CLIC RF accelerating structures for achieving the target value of breakdown rate at the nominal accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m requires a detailed understanding of all the steps involved in the mechanism of breakdown. These include surface modification under RF fields, electron emission and neutral evaporation in the vacuum, arc ignition and consequent surface modification due to plasma bombardment. Together with RF tests, experiments are conducted in a simple DC test set-up instrumented with electrical diagnostics and optical spectroscopy. The results are also used for validating simulations which are performed using a wide range of numerical tools (MD coupled to electrostatic codes, PIC plasma simulations) able to include all the above phenomena. Some recent results are presented in this paper

  7. Initial measurements on a prototype inductive adder for the CLIC kicker systems

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings will produce, through synchrotron radiation, ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the damping ring kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the extraction kickers of the DRs are particularly demanding: the flattops of the pulses must be ±12.5 kV with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 % (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications. To achieve ultra-flat pulses with a fast rise time the output impedance of the inductive adder needs to be well matched to the system impedance. The parasitic circuit elements of the inductive adder have a significant effect upon the output impedance and these values are very difficult to calculate accurately analytically. To predict these paramet...

  8. Measurements on Prototype Inductive Adders with Ultra-Flat-Top Output Pulses for CLIC DR Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J; Belver-Aguilar, C

    2014-01-01

    The CLIC study is investigating the technical feasibility of an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings (DRs) will produce ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the DR kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the DR extraction kickers call for a 160 ns duration flat-top pulses of ±12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 % (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications because this topology allows the use of both passive and analogue modulation methods to adjust the output waveform. Recently, two five-layer, 3.5 kV, prototype inductive adders have been built at CERN. The first of these has been used to test the passive and active analogue modulation methods to compensate voltage droop and ripple of the output pulses. Pulse waveforms have been reco...

  9. The Prototype Inductive Adder With Droop Compensation for the CLIC Kicker Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J

    2014-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC predamping rings and damping rings (DRs) will produce, through synchrotron radiation, an ultralow emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the DR kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the extraction kickers of the DRs are particularly demanding: the flattops of the pulses must be ±12.5 kV with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02% (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications. Recently, a five-layer prototype has been built at CERN. Passive analog modulation has been applied to compensate the voltage droop, for example of the pulse capacitors. The output waveforms of the prototype inductive adder have been compared with predictions of the voltage droop and pulse shape. Conclusions are drawn concern...

  10. Status report of the baseline collimation system of CLIC. Part I

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, J.; Dalena, B.; Fernandez-Hernando, J.L.; Jackson, F.; Schulte, D.; Seryi, A.; Tomas, R.

    2011-01-01

    Important efforts have recently been dedicated to the characterisation and improvement of the design of the post-linac collimation system of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). This system consists of two sections: one dedicated to the collimation of off-energy particles and another one for betatron collimation. The energy collimation system is further conceived as protection system against damage by errant beams. In this respect, special attention is paid to the optimisation of the energy collimator design. The material and the physical parameters of the energy collimators are selected to withstand the impact of an entire bunch train. Concerning the betatron collimation section, different aspects of the design have been optimised: the transverse collimation depths have been recalculated in order to reduce the collimator wakefield effects while maintaining a good efficiency in cleaning the undesired beam halo; the geometric design of the spoilers has been reviewed to minimise wakefields; in addition, the opti...

  11. Status report of the baseline collimation system of CLIC. Part II

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, J.; Dalena, B.; Fernandez-Hernando, J.L.; Jackson, F.; Schulte, D.; Seryi, A.; Tomas, R.

    2011-01-01

    Important efforts have recently been dedicated to the characterisation and improvement of the design of the post-linac collimation system of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). This system consists of two sections: one dedicated to the collimation of off-energy particles and another one for betatron collimation. The energy collimation system is further conceived as protection system against damage by errant beams. In this respect, special attention is paid to the optimisation of the energy collimator design. The material and the physical parameters of the energy collimators are selected to withstand the impact of an entire bunch train. Concerning the betatron collimation section, different aspects of the design have been optimised: the transverse collimation depths have been recalculated in order to reduce the collimator wakefield effects while maintaining a good efficiency in cleaning the undesired beam halo; the geometric design of the spoilers has been reviewed to minimise wakefields; in addition, the opti...

  12. Multi-step lining-up correction of the CLIC trajectory

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amico, T E

    1999-01-01

    In the CLIC main linac it is very important to minimise the trajectory excursion and consequently the emittance dilution in order to obtain the required luminosity. Several algorithms have been proposed and lately the ballistic method has proved to be very effective. The trajectory correction method described hereafter retains the main advantages of the latter while adding some interesting features. It is based on the separation of the unknown variables like the quadrupole misalignments, the offset and slope of the injection straight line and the misalignments of the beam position monitors (BPM). This is achieved by referring the trajectory relatively to the injection line and not to the average pre-alignment line and by using two trajectories each corresponding to slightly different quadrupole strengths. A reference straight line is then derived onto which the beam is bent by a kick obtained by moving the first quadrupole. The other quadrupoles are then aligned on that line. The quality of the correction dep...

  13. The CLIC Study of a Multi-TeV $e^\\pm$ Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bossart, Rudolf; Carron, G; Coosemans, Williame; Corsini, R; D'Amico, T E; Delahaye, J P; Godot, J C; Guignard, Gilbert; Hagel, J; Hutchins, S; Jensen, E; Luong, M; Millich, Antonio; Pearce, P; Potier, J P; Riche, A J; Rinolfi, Louis; Schulte, Daniel; Suberlucq, Guy; Thorndahl, L; Valentini, M; Wilson, Ian H; Wuensch, Walter; Napoly, O; Raubenheimer, T O; Ruth, Ronald D; Syratchev, I V

    1999-01-01

    The progress of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) study of a multi-TeV (0.5 - 5 TeV) high-luminosity (5'1033 to 1.5'1035 cm-2 sec-1) e± linear collider based on Two-Beam Acceleration (TBA) is presented. The length and, in consequence, the cost of the overall complex is reduced by the use of high accelerating fields (150 MV/m), which are generated by specially damped 30 GHz normal-conducting accelerating structures. The large amount of RF power (400 MW/m) required to generate these high fields is provided by a novel RF power generating scheme which is potentially both cost and power efficient. After summarising the progress made in the developments of 30 GHz components and the performance obtained in the present phase of the CLIC Test Facility (CTF2), the design of a new test facility (CTF3), which will demonstrate the feasibility of the RF power generating scheme, is described

  14. CLIC/ILC Researchers Explore New Avenues for Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Researchers from CLIC and ILC met for their first common International Workshop on Linear Colliders, which was held in Geneva from 18 to 22 October. Although the talks were mostly scientific and technical, the political message behind them was a breakthrough, as the workshop showed the progress made in unifying the two communities.   The International Workshop on Linear Colliders (IWLC), which was organised by the European Committee for Future Accelerators, hosted by CERN, and held at CERN and the International Conference Centre in Geneva, attracted a large audience of about 500 experts. Although there have been other joint conferences between the CLIC and ILC communities before, they have all been focused on specific technical and/or managerial issues. The IWLC was part of an ongoing effort by CLIC and ILC to provide an environment in which researchers can exchange ideas, inform their peers about their most recent achievements and work together on common issues. Given the possible technical ov...

  15. Vertex-Detector R&D for CLIC

    OpenAIRE

    Dannheim, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    A detector concept based on hybrid planar pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC vertex detector. It comprises fast, low-power and small-pitch readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology (CLICpix) coupled to ultra-thin sensors via low-mass interconnects. The power dissipation of the readout chips is reduced by means of power pulsing, allowing for a cooling system based on forced gas flow. In this paper the CLIC vertex-detector requirements are reviewed and the curr...

  16. Tuning of Clic accelerating structure prototypes at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, J; Olyunin, A; Wuensch, W

    2010-01-01

    An RF measurement system has been set up at CERN for use in the X-band accelerating structure development program of the CLIC study. Using the system, S-parameters are measured and the field distribution is obtained automatically using a bead-pull technique. The corrections for tuning the structure are calculated from an initial measurement and cell-by-cell tuning is applied to obtain the correct phase advance and minimum reflection at the operation frequency. The detailed tuning procedure is presented and explained along with an example of measurement and tuning of CLIC accelerating structure prototypes.

  17. Propagation error simulations concerning the CLIC active prealignment

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, T; Missiaen, D

    2009-01-01

    The CLIC1 components will have to be prealigned within a thirty times more demanding tolerance than the existing CERNmachines. It is a technical challenge and a key issue for the CLIC feasibility. Simulations have been undertaken concerning the propagation error due to the measurement uncertainties of the prealignment systems. The uncertainties of measurement, taken as hypothesis for the simulations, are based on the data obtained on several dedicated facilities. This paper introduces the simulations and the latest results obtained, as well as the facilities.

  18. Electron cloud buildup driving spontaneous vertical instabilities of stored beams in the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Romano

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of the 2016 run, an anomalous beam instability was systematically observed at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC. Its main characteristic was that it spontaneously appeared after beams had been stored for several hours in collision at 6.5 TeV to provide data for the experiments, despite large chromaticity values and high strength of the Landau-damping octupole magnet. The instability exhibited several features characteristic of those induced by the electron cloud (EC. Indeed, when LHC operates with 25 ns bunch spacing, an EC builds up in a large fraction of the beam chambers, as revealed by several independent indicators. Numerical simulations have been carried out in order to investigate the role of the EC in the observed instabilities. It has been found that the beam intensity decay is unfavorable for the beam stability when LHC operates in a strong EC regime.

  19. High-Efficiency Klystron Design for the CLIC Project

    CERN Document Server

    Mollard, Antoine; Peauger, Franck; Plouin, Juliette; Beunas, Armel; Marchesin, Rodolphe

    2017-01-01

    The CLIC project requests new type of RF sources for the high power conditioning of the accelerating cavities. We are working on the development of a new kind of high-efficiency klystron to fulfill this need. This work is performed under the EuCARD-2 European program and involves theoretical and experimental study of a brand new klystron concept.

  20. Physics potential for the measurement of sigma(H nu antinu ̄) x BR(H -->μ+μ-) at a 1.4 TeV CLIC collider

    CERN Document Server

    Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, Gordana; Grefe, Christian; Kacarevic, Goran; Lukic, Strahinja; Pandurovic, Mila; Roloff, Philipp Gerhard; Smiljanic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of Higgs couplings at CLIC will offer the potential for a rich precision phys- ics programme and for the search for physics beyond the Standard Model(SM). The poten- tial for measuring the SM Higgs boson decay into two muons at a 1.4 TeV CLIC collider is addressed in this paper. The study is performed using a full Geant4 detector simulation of the CLIC_ILD detector model, taking into consideration all the relevant physics and beam-induced background processes, as well as the instrumentation of the very forward region to identify high-energy electrons. In this analysis, we show that the branching ratio BR(H-->μ+μ-) times the Higgs production cross-section in W+W- fusion can be measured with 38% statistical accuracy at sqrt(s) = 1.4 TeV assuming an integrated luminosity of 1.5 ab-1 with unpolarised beams. If 80% electron beam polarisation is considered, as planned for CLIC, the statistical uncertainty of the measurement is 27%. Systematic uncertainties are negligible.

  1. Simulation of the pressure recovery time in a CLIC standard module

    CERN Document Server

    Costa-Pinto, P

    2008-01-01

    Vacuum pressure inside the CLIC accelerating structures (AS) is crucial for both beam and RF stability. Gas molecules released during RF breakdown must be evacuated from the cells of the AS before the arrival of the next train of particles. Due to its complex geometry, accurate analytical calculations are not viable. In this paper we introduce a calculation method based on the combination of analytical vacuum equations with Monte Carlo test particle simulations, implemented in a PSpice environment via the vacuum-electrical network analogy. Pressure recovery times are calculated for the main gas species released during a breakdown. The number and type of molecules used for the calculation is the result of measurements performed in the DC spark test system.

  2. Correction of vertical dispersion and betatron coupling for the CLIC damping ring

    CERN Document Server

    Korostelev, M S

    2006-01-01

    The sensitivity of the CLIC damping ring to various kinds of alignment errors has been studied. Without any correction, fairly small vertical misalignments of the quadrupoles and, in particular, the sextupoles, introduce unacceptable distortions of the closed orbit as well as intolerable spurious vertical dispersion and coupling due to the strong focusing optics of the damping ring. A sophisticated beam-based correction scheme has been developed to bring the design target emittances and the dynamic aperture back to the ideal value. The correction using dipolar correctors and several skew quadrupole correctors allows a minimization of the closed-orbit distortion, the cross-talk between vertical and horizontal closed orbits, the residual vertical dispersion and the betatron coupling.

  3. Flow induced vibrations of the CLIC X-Band accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, Tessa; Boland, Mark; Riddone, Germana; Samoshkin, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Turbulent cooling water in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) accelerating structures will inevitably induce some vibrations. The maximum acceptable amplitude of vibrations is small, as vibrations in the accelerating structure could lead to beam jitter and alignment difficulties. A Finite Element Analysis model is needed to identify the conditions under which turbulent instabilities and significant vibrations are induced. Due to the orders of magnitude difference between the fluid motion and the structure’s motion, small vibrations of the structure will not contribute to the turbulence of the cooling fluid. Therefore the resonant conditions of the cooling channels presented in this paper, directly identify the natural frequencies of the accelerating structures to be avoided under normal operating conditions. In this paper a 2D model of the cooling channel is presented finding spots of turbulence being formed from a shear layer instability. This effect is observed through direct visualization and wavelet ana...

  4. submitter Measurements on a 20-layer 12.5 kV prototype inductive adder for the CLIC DR kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J

    2018-01-01

    The CLIC study is investigating the technical feasibility of an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The predamping rings and damping rings (DRs) will produce ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the DR kicker systems must provide extremely stable field pulses during injection and extraction of bunches. The DR extraction kicker system consists of a stripline kicker and two pulse modulators. The present specification for the modulators calls for pulses with 160 ns or 900 ns flat-top duration of nominally ±12.5 kV and 305 A, with ripple of not more than ±0.02% (±2.5 V). In addition, there is a proposal to use the same modulators and striplines for dumping the beam, with ±17.5 kV stripline pulse voltage. An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the CLIC DR extraction kicker specifications because analogue modulation methods can be applied to adjust the shape of the flat-top of the output w...

  5. X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Adli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We discuss X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the CLIC test facility at CERN. The rf power is extracted from an electron drive beam by a specially designed power extraction structure. In order to test the structures at high-power levels, part of the generated power is recirculated to an input port, thus allowing for increased deceleration and power levels within the structure. The degree of recirculation is controlled by a splitter and phase shifter. We present a model that describes the system and validate it with measurements over a wide range of parameters. Moreover, by correlating rf power measurements with the energy lost by the electron beam, as measured in a spectrometer placed after the power extraction structure, we are able to identify system parameters, including the form factor of the electron beam. The quality of the agreement between model and reality gives us confidence to extrapolate the results found in the present test facility towards the parameter regime of CLIC.

  6. Feasibility Study for the CERN "CLIC" Photo-Injector Laser System

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, I N

    2000-01-01

    This study is designed to contribute to the development of the Cern Linear Collider (CLIC). One route to the generation of the required electron injection into this system is through the use of photo-cathodes illuminated with a suitably designed laser system. The requirements of the accelerator and photo-cathodes have led to a specification for the laser system given in Table 1. Because CLIC will not be built directly but in stages, notably via CLIC Test Facilities (CTF), this table also includes the specification for a photo-injector laser system for CTF3 which will be required before the final system for CLIC. Although there are significant differences between these two specifications it will be necessary to design the CTF3 system such that it can be easily upgraded to the system for CLIC and will be able to check all the critical issues necessary for CLIC.

  7. Issues and Feasibility Demonstration of Positioning Closed Loop Control for the CLIC Supporting System Using a Test Mock-up with Five Degrees of Freedom

    CERN Document Server

    Sosin, M; Chritin, N; Griffet, S; Kemppinen, J; Mainaud Durand, H; Rude, V; Sterbini, G

    2012-01-01

    Since several years, CERN is studying the feasibility of building a high energy e+ e- linear collider: the CLIC (Compact LInear Collider). One of the challenges of such a collider is the pre-alignment precision and accuracy requirement on the transverse positions of the linac components, which is typically 14 μm over a window of 200 m. To ensure the possibility of positioning within such tight constraints, CERN Beams Department’s Survey team has worked intensively at developing the methods and technology needed to achieve that objective. This paper describes activities which were performed on a test bench (mock-up) with five degrees of freedom (DOF) for the qualification of control algorithms for the CLIC supporting system active-pre-alignment. Present understanding, lessons learned (“know how”), issues of sensors noise and mechanical components nonlinearities are presented.

  8. Wavelength-detuning cross-beam energy transfer mitigation scheme for direct drive: Modeling and evidence from National Ignition Facility implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozas, J. A.; Hohenberger, M.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Turnbull, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Radha, P. B.; McKenty, P. W.; Zuegel, J. D.; Marshall, F. J.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Campbell, E. M.; Goncharov, V. N.; Bowers, M. W.; Di Nicola, J.-M. G.; Erbert, G.; MacGowan, B. J.; Pelz, L. J.; Moody, J.; Yang, S. T.

    2018-05-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) results from two-beam energy exchange via seeded stimulated Brillouin scattering, which detrimentally reduces laser-energy absorption for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Consequently, ablation pressure and implosion velocity suffer from the decreased absorption, reducing target performance in both symmetric and polar direct drive. Additionally, CBET alters the time-resolved scattered-light spectra and redistributes absorbed and scattered-light-changing shell morphology and low-mode drive symmetry. Mitigating CBET is demonstrated in inertial confinement implosions at the National Ignition Facility by detuning the laser-source wavelengths (±2.3 Å UV) of the interacting beams. In polar direct drive, wavelength detuning was shown to increase the equatorial region velocity experimentally by 16% and to alter the in-flight shell morphology. These experimental observations are consistent with design predictions of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that indicate a 10% increase in the average ablation pressure. These results indicate that wavelength detuning successfully mitigates CBET. Simulations predict that optimized phase plates and wavelength-detuning CBET mitigation utilizing the three-legged beam layout of the OMEGA Laser System significantly increase absorption and achieve >100-Gbar hot-spot pressures in symmetric direct drive.

  9. Beam-Beam Simulations with GUINEA-PIG

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    While the bunches in a linear collider cross only once, due to their small size they experience a strong beam-beam effect. GUINEA-PIG is a code to simulate the impact of this effect on luminosity and back ground. A short overview of the program is given with examples of its application to the back ground strudies for TESLA, the top quark threshold scan and a possible luminosity monitor, as well as some results for CLIC.

  10. Simulation of the Beam Dump for a High Intensity Electron Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Doebert, S; Lefevre, T; Pepitone, K

    2014-01-01

    The CLIC Drive Beam is a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. A test facility for the Drive Beam electron gun will soon be commissioned at CERN. In this contribution we outline the design of a beam dump / Faraday cup capable of resisting the beam’s thermal load. The test facility will operate initially up to 140 keV. At such low energies, the electrons are absorbed very close to the surface of the dump, leading to a large energy deposition density in this thin layer. In order not to damage the dump, the beam must be spread over a large surface. For this reason, a small-angled cone has been chosen. Simulations using Geant4 have been performed to estimate the distribution of energy deposition in the dump. The heat transport both within the electron pulse and between pulses has been modelled using finite element methods to check the resistance of the dump at high repetition rates. In addition, the possibility of using a moveable dump to measure the beam profile and emittance is discussed.

  11. Progress on low emittance tuning for the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Alabau-Gonzalvo, J; Papaphilippou, Y

    2014-01-01

    In the frame of the CLIC main Damping Ring a study on the sensitivity of the lattice to different sources of misalignment is presented. The minimum equilibrium emittance is simulated and analytically estimated under dipole and quadrupole rolls, and quadrupole and sextupole vertical offsets. The result of this study establishes alignment tolerances to preserve the vertical emittance below the design value (1 pmrad). Non-linear dynamics studies have been done to determine the dynamic aperture in the presence of misalignments.

  12. A silicon pixel detector prototype for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00714258

    2017-01-01

    A silicon pixel detector prototype for CLIC, currently under study for the innermost detector surrounding the collision point. The detector is made of a High-Voltage CMOS sensor (top) and a CLICpix2 readout chip (bottom) that are glued to each other. Both parts have a size of 3.3 x 4.0 $mm^2$ and consist of an array of 128 x 128 pixels of 25 x 25 $\\micro m^2$ size.

  13. Performance-Optimization Studies for the CLIC Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085406; Roloff, Philipp

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a mutli-TeV linear e+e- collider currently under development at CERN. In the post-LHC era, CLIC will allow to explore a great number of searches for New Physics such as the precise measurements of the Higgs boson. In this master thesis, we mainly focus on the development and the improvement of the vertex detector. The vertex detector requires excellent spatial resolution, low mass, geometrical coverage down to low polar angles, high rate readout for the sensors and new cooling technologies for heat removal. Considering such requirements, the CLIC vertex detector technology is far more advanced in comparison to the technologies currently used in particle physics. This project consists of two main parts. In the first part, we study the vertex detector and optimize its geometry for the use of airflow cooling techniques and also for flavor tagging. In the second part, we implement a decoder which can respect the timing constraints for the CLICpix chip, a silicon pixel detect...

  14. Higgs physics at the CLIC electron-positron linear collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, H; Abusleme, A; Afanaciev, K; Alipour Tehrani, N; Balázs, C; Benhammou, Y; Benoit, M; Bilki, B; Blaising, J-J; Boland, M J; Boronat, M; Borysov, O; Božović-Jelisavčić, I; Buckland, M; Bugiel, S; Burrows, P N; Charles, T K; Daniluk, W; Dannheim, D; Dasgupta, R; Demarteau, M; Díaz Gutierrez, M A; Eigen, G; Elsener, K; Felzmann, U; Firlej, M; Firu, E; Fiutowski, T; Fuster, J; Gabriel, M; Gaede, F; García, I; Ghenescu, V; Goldstein, J; Green, S; Grefe, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Kačarević, G; Kalinowski, J; Kananov, S; Klempt, W; Kopec, M; Krawczyk, M; Krupa, B; Kucharczyk, M; Kulis, S; Laštovička, T; Lesiak, T; Levy, A; Levy, I; Linssen, L; Lukić, S; Maier, A A; Makarenko, V; Marshall, J S; Martin, V J; Mei, K; Milutinović-Dumbelović, G; Moroń, J; Moszczyński, A; Moya, D; Münker, R M; Münnich, A; Neagu, A T; Nikiforou, N; Nikolopoulos, K; Nürnberg, A; Pandurović, M; Pawlik, B; Perez Codina, E; Peric, I; Petric, M; Pitters, F; Poss, S G; Preda, T; Protopopescu, D; Rassool, R; Redford, S; Repond, J; Robson, A; Roloff, P; Ros, E; Rosenblat, O; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Sailer, A; Schlatter, D; Schulte, D; Shumeiko, N; Sicking, E; Simon, F; Simoniello, R; Sopicki, P; Stapnes, S; Ström, R; Strube, J; Świentek, K P; Szalay, M; Tesař, M; Thomson, M A; Trenado, J; Uggerhøj, U I; van der Kolk, N; van der Kraaij, E; Vicente Barreto Pinto, M; Vila, I; Vogel Gonzalez, M; Vos, M; Vossebeld, J; Watson, M; Watson, N; Weber, M A; Weerts, H; Wells, J D; Weuste, L; Winter, A; Wojtoń, T; Xia, L; Xu, B; Żarnecki, A F; Zawiejski, L; Zgura, I-S

    2017-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future [Formula: see text] collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to [Formula: see text], providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper is the first comprehensive presentation of the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating at three energy stages: [Formula: see text], 1.4 and [Formula: see text]. The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung ([Formula: see text]) and [Formula: see text]-fusion ([Formula: see text]), resulting in precise measurements of the production cross sections, the Higgs total decay width [Formula: see text], and model-independent determinations of the Higgs couplings. Operation at [Formula: see text] provides high-statistics samples of Higgs bosons produced through [Formula: see text]-fusion, enabling tight constraints on the Higgs boson couplings. Studies of the rarer processes [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] allow measurements of the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs boson self-coupling. This paper presents detailed studies of the precision achievable with Higgs measurements at CLIC and describes the interpretation of these measurements in a global fit.

  15. Higgs physics at the CLIC electron-positron linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H.; Benhammou, Y.; Borysov, O.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Levy, I.; Rosenblat, O. [Tel Aviv University, Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel); Abusleme, A.; Diaz Gutierrez, M.A.; Vogel Gonzalez, M. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Afanaciev, K.; Makarenko, V.; Shumeiko, N. [Belarusian State University, National Scientific and Educational Centre of Particle and High Energy Physics, Minsk (Belarus); Alipour Tehrani, N.; Dannheim, D.; Elsener, K.; Grefe, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hynds, D.; Klempt, W.; Kulis, S.; Linssen, L.; Maier, A.A.; Muenker, R.M.; Muennich, A.; Nikiforou, N.; Nuernberg, A.; Perez Codina, E.; Petric, M.; Pitters, F.; Poss, S.G.; Redford, S.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Schulte, D.; Sicking, E.; Simoniello, R.; Stapnes, S.; Stroem, R.; Strube, J.; Weber, M.A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Balazs, C.; Charles, T.K. [Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Benoit, M.; Vicente Barreto Pinto, M. [Universite de Geneve, Departement de Physique Nucleaire et Corpusculaire (DPNC), Geneva (Switzerland); Bilki, B.; Demarteau, M.; Repond, J.; Weerts, H.; Xia, L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Blaising, J.J. [Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Boland, M.J.; Felzmann, U.; Rassool, R. [University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Boronat, M.; Fuster, J.; Garcia, I.; Ros, E.; Vos, M. [CSIC-University of Valencia, IFIC, Valencia (Spain); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Kacarevic, G.; Lukic, S.; Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, G.; Pandurovic, M. [University of Belgrade, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Buckland, M.; Vossebeld, J. [University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Bugiel, S.; Dasgupta, R.; Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kopec, M.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.P. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Crakow (Poland); Burrows, P.N. [Oxford University, Oxford (United Kingdom); Daniluk, W.; Krupa, B.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lesiak, T.; Moszczynski, A.; Pawlik, B.; Sopicki, P.; Wojton, T.; Zawiejski, L. [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Crakow (Poland); Eigen, G.; Kraaij, E. van der [University of Bergen, Department of Physics and Technology, Bergen (Norway); Firu, E.; Ghenescu, V.; Neagu, A.T.; Preda, T.; Zgura, I.S. [Institute of Space Science, Bucharest (Romania); Gabriel, M.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Kolk, N. van der; Weuste, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Gaede, F. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Goldstein, J. [University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Green, S.; Marshall, J.S.; Mei, K.; Thomson, M.A.; Xu, B. [University of Cambridge, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hawkes, C.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Watson, M.; Watson, N.; Winter, A. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Kalinowski, J.; Krawczyk, M.; Zarnecki, A.F. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Lastovicka, T. [Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Martin, V.J. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Moya, D.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Vila, I. [CSIC-University of Cantabria, IFCA, Santander (Spain); Peric, I. [Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik (IPE), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Protopopescu, D.; Robson, A. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Trenado, J. [University of Barcelona, Barcelona (ES); Uggerhoej, U.I. [Aarhus University, Aarhus (DK); Wells, J.D. [University of Michigan, Physics Department, Ann Arbor, MI (US)

    2017-07-15

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 TeV, providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper is the first comprehensive presentation of the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating at three energy stages: √(s) = 350 GeV, 1.4 and 3 TeV. The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung (e{sup +}e{sup -} → ZH) and WW-fusion (e{sup +}e{sup -} → Hν{sub e} anti ν{sub e}), resulting in precise measurements of the production cross sections, the Higgs total decay width Γ{sub H}, and model-independent determinations of the Higgs couplings. Operation at √(s) > 1 TeV provides high-statistics samples of Higgs bosons produced through WW-fusion, enabling tight constraints on the Higgs boson couplings. Studies of the rarer processes e{sup +}e{sup -} → t anti tH and e{sup +}e{sup -} → HHν{sub e} anti ν{sub e} allow measurements of the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs boson self-coupling. This paper presents detailed studies of the precision achievable with Higgs measurements at CLIC and describes the interpretation of these measurements in a global fit. (orig.)

  16. Top Mass Measurement at CLIC at 500 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Frank; Poss, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of the capability of a 500 GeV e+e- collider based on CLIC technology for precision measurements of top quark properties. The analysis is based on full detector simulations of the CLIC_ILD detector concept using Geant4, including realistic background contributions from two photon processes. Event reconstruction is performed using a particle flow algorithm with stringent cuts to control the influence of background. The mass and width of the top quark are studied in fully-hadronic and semi-leptonic decays of ttbar pairs using event samples of signal and standard model background processes corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 100/fb. Statistical uncertainties of the top mass given by the invariant mass of its decay products of 0.08 GeV and 0.09 GeV are obtained for the fully-hadronic and the semi-leptonic decay channel, respectively, demonstrating that similar precision to that at ILC can be achieved at CLIC despite less favorable experimental conditions.

  17. Development and Validation of a Multipoint Based Laser Alignment System for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, G; Lackner, F; Mainaud-Durand, H; Piedigrossi, D; Sandomierski, J; Sosin, M; Geiger, A; Guillaume, S

    2013-01-01

    Alignment is one of the major challenges within CLIC study, since all accelerator components have to be aligned with accuracy up to 10 μm over sliding windows of 200 m. So far, the straight line reference concept has been based on stretched wires coupled with Wire Positioning Sensors. This concept should be validated through inter-comparison with an alternative solution. This paper proposes an alternative concept where laser beam acts as straight line reference and optical shutters coupled with cameras visualise the beam. The principle was first validated by a series of tests using low-cost components. Yet, in order to further decrease measurement uncertainty in this validation step, a high-precision automatised micrometric table and reference targets have been added to the setup. The paper presents the results obtained with this new equipment, in terms of measurement precision. In addition, the paper gives an overview of first tests done at long distance (up to 53 m), having emphasis on beam divergence

  18. CLIC Detector Concepts as described in the CDR: Differences between the GEANT4 and Engineering Models

    CERN Document Server

    Elsener, K; Schlatter, D; Siegrist, N

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC_ILD and CLIC_SiD detector concepts as used for the CDR Vol. 2 in 2011 exist both in GEANT4 simulation models and in engineering layout drawings. At this early stage of a conceptual design, there are inevitably differences between these models, which are described in this note.

  19. Oxidation promotes insertion of the CLIC1 chloride intracellular channel into the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodchild, Sophia C; Howell, Michael W; Cordina, Nicole M; Littler, Dene R; Breit, Samuel N; Curmi, Paul M G; Brown, Louise Jennifer

    2009-12-01

    Members of the chloride intracellular channel (CLIC) family exist primarily as soluble proteins but can also auto-insert into cellular membranes to form ion channels. While little is known about the process of CLIC membrane insertion, a unique feature of mammalian CLIC1 is its ability to undergo a dramatic structural metamorphosis between a monomeric glutathione-S-transferase homolog and an all-helical dimer upon oxidation in solution. Whether this oxidation-induced metamorphosis facilitates CLIC1 membrane insertion is unclear. In this work, we have sought to characterise the role of oxidation in the process of CLIC1 membrane insertion. We examined how redox conditions modify the ability of CLIC1 to associate with and insert into the membrane using fluorescence quenching studies and a sucrose-loaded vesicle sedimentation assay to measure membrane binding. Our results suggest that oxidation of monomeric CLIC1, in the presence of membranes, promotes insertion into the bilayer more effectively than the oxidised CLIC1 dimer.

  20. Separation of hadronic W and Z decays in the CLIC_ILD and the CLICdet detector models at 1.4 and 3TeV

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)793139; Roloff, Philipp Gerhard; Strom, Lars Rickard; Weber, Matthias Artur

    2017-01-01

    A study of the W and Z separation was performed for the CLIC_ILD and the CLICdet detector models for the proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Comparisons were done for fully-hadronic WW and ZZ events at the collision energies of 1.4 and 3 TeV. Particle flow objects are reconstructed using a full simulation of the events including relevant beam-induced background processes. Several different collections of particles, with varying level of background suppression, were compared for each of the detector models and optimal jet clustering parameters were found in each case, resulting in the best separation of the W and Z mass peaks. The CLICdet detector model performs similar to CLIC_ILD with an achieved jet mass separation of around 1.6 $\\sigma$ at 1.4 TeV and 1.3 $\\sigma$ at 3 TeV. For both detector models we achieve a better separation at 1.4 TeV when comparing dijet masses rather than large-R jet masses. At 3 TeV jets with a radius around R=0.5 perform similarly well as dijets.

  1. CLIC project R&D studies: the magnet system for the 3 TEV

    CERN Document Server

    Modena, Michele

    2017-01-01

    This Note presents the R&D activities done and coordinated by TE-MSC Group on the magnetic system for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project. The main aspects investigated are: the magnetic system definition, basic design for all magnets (i.e. a CLIC Magnet Catalogue), powering and cost evaluation, advanced design and prototyping for the most critical magnet variants. The CLIC layout here considered is the one for the highest collision energy of 3 TeV. This layout was the one studied in detail as baseline for the CLIC Conceptual Design Report that was released in 2012. This Note summarize the activities of about 6 years (2010-2016) done with the contribution of CERN staff (part-time), the contribution of some CERN Project Associates sponsored by the CLIC Project and in collaboration with STCF Daresbury Laboratory (UK).

  2. First Observation of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation for Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions Using Wavelength Detuning at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozas, J A; Hohenberger, M; Rosenberg, M J; Turnbull, D; Collins, T J B; Radha, P B; McKenty, P W; Zuegel, J D; Marshall, F J; Regan, S P; Sangster, T C; Seka, W; Campbell, E M; Goncharov, V N; Bowers, M W; Di Nicola, J-M G; Erbert, G; MacGowan, B J; Pelz, L J; Yang, S T

    2018-02-23

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) results from two-beam energy exchange via seeded stimulated Brillouin scattering, which detrimentally reduces ablation pressure and implosion velocity in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Mitigating CBET is demonstrated for the first time in inertial-confinement implosions at the National Ignition Facility by detuning the laser-source wavelengths (±2.3  Å UV) of the interacting beams. We show that, in polar direct-drive, wavelength detuning increases the equatorial region velocity experimentally by 16% and alters the in-flight shell morphology. These experimental observations are consistent with design predictions of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that indicate a 10% increase in the average ablation pressure.

  3. Cam Mover Alignment System positioning with the Wire Positioning with the Wire Position Sensor Feedback for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2077936; Mainaud Durand, Helene; Kostka, Z.S.

    2016-01-01

    Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a study of an electron-positron collider with nominal energy of 3 TeV and luminosity of 2 ∙ 1034 cm-2s-1. The luminosity goal leads to stringent alignment requirements for single quadrupole magnets. Vertical and lateral offset deviations with regards to a given orbit reference in both ends of a quadrupole shall be below 1 μm and quadrupole roll deviation shall be below 100 μrad. Translation in the direction of particle beam is not controlled but mechanically locked. A parallel kinematic platform based on cam movers was chosen as system for detailed studies. Earlier studies have shown that cam movers can reach the CLIC requirements through an iterative process. The paper presents new modular off-the-shelf control electronics and software including three optional positioning algorithms based on iterations as well as a more advanced algorithm which can reach target position in one movement. The advanced algorithm reads wire position sensors (WPS), calculates quadrupole orien...

  4. Online Resources for High School Teachers--A CLIC Away

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    2000-04-01

    "I'm a high school teacher. I don't have time to sift through all of JCE to find what I need. I don't have enough time as it is!" If you need to find things in a hurry, go to JCE HS CLIC, the JCE High School Chemed Learning Information Center, http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/HS/. You will find good solid, reliable information, and you will find it fast. CLIC is open 24 hours every day, all over the world. What You Will Find at JCE CLIC We know teachers are pressed for time. During the few minutes between classes or at the end of the day, information needs to be found very quickly. Perhaps you are looking for a demo that illustrates electrochemistry using Cu, Mg, orange juice, and a clock; or a student activity on chromatography that is ready to copy and hand out; or a video to illustrate the action of aqua regia on gold, because you can't use aqua regia and can't afford gold. You can find each of these quickly at CLIC. The Journal has always provided lots of articles designed with high school teachers in mind. What the new JCE HS CLIC does is collect the recent materials at one address on JCE Online, making it quicker and easier for you to find them. Information has been gathered from both print and online versions of the Journal, from JCE Software, and from JCE Internet. It is organized as shown at the bottom of the page. Getting Access to Information You have located something that interests you, perhaps a list of tested demonstrations that pertain to consumer chemistry. Now it is time to get it. JCE subscribers (individuals and libraries) can read, download, and print the full versions of the articles as well as all supplemental materials, including student handouts and instructor's notes. You will need the username and password that are on the mailing label that comes with your Journaleach month. JCE HS CLIC home page: http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/HS/ Your Suggestions, Please Our plans for JCE HS CLIC do not end with what you find now. Other resources and features

  5. High Frequency Effects of Impedances and Coatings in the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Koukovini Platia, Eirini; Rumolo, G

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a 3 TeV eÅe¡ machine, currently under design at CERN, that targets to explore the terascale particle physics regime. The experiment requires a high luminosity of 2£1034 cm2 s¡1, which can be achieved with ultra low emittances delivered from the Damping Rings (DRs) complex. The high bunch brightness of the DRs gives rise to several collective effects that can limit the machine performance. Impedance studies during the design stage of the DR are of great importance to ensure safe operation under nominal parameters. As a first step, the transverse impedance model of the DRis built, accounting for the wholemachine. Beam dynamics simulations are performedwith HEADTAIL to investigate the effect on beam dynamics. For the correct impedancemodeling of the machine elements, knowledge of the material properties is essential up to hundreds of GHz, where the bunch spectrum extends. Specifically, Non Evaporable Getter (NEG) is a commonly used coating for good vacuumbut its properti...

  6. A Trajectory Correction based on Multi-Step Lining-up for the CLIC Main Linac

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amico, T E

    1999-01-01

    In the CLIC main linac it is very important to minimise the trajectory excursion and consequently the emittance dilution in order to obtain the required luminosity. Several algorithms have been proposed and lately the ballistic method has proved to be very effective. The trajectory method described in this Note retains the main advantages of the latter while adding some interesting features. It is based on the separation of the unknown variables like the quadrupole misalignments, the offset and slope of the injection straight line and the misalignments of the beam position monitors (BPM). This is achieved by referring the trajectory relatively to the injection line and not to the average pre-alignment line and by using two trajectories each corresponding to slightly different quadrupole strengths. A reference straight line is then derived onto which the beam is bent by a kick obtained by moving the first quadrupole. The other quadrupoles are then aligned on that line. The quality of the correction depends mai...

  7. Plasma simulation by macroscale, electromagnetic particle code and its application to current-drive by relativistic electron beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, M.; Sato, T.

    1985-01-01

    A new implicit macroscale electromagnetic particle simulation code (MARC) which allows a large scale length and a time step in multi-dimensions is described. Finite mass electrons and ions are used with relativistic version of the equation of motion. The electromagnetic fields are solved by using a complete set of Maxwell equations. For time integration of the field equations, a decentered (backward) finite differencing scheme is employed with the predictor - corrector method for small noise and super-stability. It is shown both in analytical and numerical ways that the present scheme efficiently suppresses high frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves in a plasma, and that it accurately reproduces low frequency waves such as ion acoustic waves, Alfven waves and fast magnetosonic waves. The present numerical scheme has currently been coded in three dimensions for application to a new tokamak current-drive method by means of relativistic electron beam injection. Some remarks of the proper macroscale code application is presented in this paper

  8. Frequency scanning interferometry for CLIC component fiducialisation

    CERN Document Server

    Kamugasa, Solomon William; Mainaud Durand, Helene; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    We present a strategy for the fiducialisation of CLIC’s Main Beam Quadrupole (MBQ) magnets using Frequency Scanning Interferometry (FSI). We have developed complementary device for a commercial FSI system to enable coordinate determination via multilateration. Using spherical high index glass retroreflectors with a wide acceptance angle, we optimise the geometry of measurement stations with respect to fiducials -- thus improving the precision of coordinates. We demonstrate through simulations that the 10 μm uncertainty required in the vertical and lateral axes for the fiducialisation of the MBQ can be attained using FSI multilateration.

  9. Ring Coils on the Endcap Yoke of a CLIC Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gerwig, H

    2011-01-01

    Ring coils on the endcap return yoke can be useful in several ways. Depending on their size and the current chosen, they may either be used to reduce the fringe-field outside the return yoke of a detector, or to reduce considerably the thickness of the endcap yoke. The main focus of this note is the analysis of the ring coils, with the aim to reduce the overall length of the CLIC_ILD detector. In addition, some results concerning the fringe field in the vicinity of the detector are shown.

  10. CLIC: Physics potential of a high-energy e+e- collider

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a future electron-positron collider under study. It foresees e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies ranging from a few hundred GeV up to 3 TeV. The CLIC study is an international collaboration hosted by CERN. The lectures provide a broad overview of the CLIC project, covering the physics potential, the particle detectors and the accelerator. An overview of the CLIC physics opportunities is presented. These are best exploited in a staged construction and operation scenario of the collider. The detector technologies, fulfilling CLIC performance requirements and currently under study, are described. The accelerator design and performance, together with its major technologies, are presented in the light of ongoing component tests and large system tests. The status of the optimisation studies (e.g. for cost and power) of the CLIC complex for the proposed energy staging is included. One lecture is dedicated to the use of CLIC technologies in free electron lasers and other ...

  11. CLIC: Overview of applications using high-gradient acceleration, from photon sources to medical physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a future electron-positron collider under study. It foresees e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies ranging from a few hundred GeV up to 3 TeV. The CLIC study is an international collaboration hosted by CERN. The lectures provide a broad overview of the CLIC project, covering the physics potential, the particle detectors and the accelerator. An overview of the CLIC physics opportunities is presented. These are best exploited in a staged construction and operation scenario of the collider. The detector technologies, fulfilling CLIC performance requirements and currently under study, are described. The accelerator design and performance, together with its major technologies, are presented in the light of ongoing component tests and large system tests. The status of the optimisation studies (e.g. for cost and power) of the CLIC complex for the proposed energy staging is included. One lecture is dedicated to the use of CLIC technologies in free electron lasers and other ...

  12. Design of the CLIC Quadrupole Vacuum Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider, under study, requires vacuum chambers with a very small aperture, of the order of 8 mm in diameter, and with a length up to around 2 m for the main beam quadrupoles. To keep the very tight geometrical tolerances on the quadrupoles, no bake out is allowed. The main issue is to reach UHV conditions (typically 10-9 mbar static pressure) in a system where the vacuum performance is driven by water outgassing. For this application, a thinwalled stainless steel vacuum chamber with two ante chambers equipped with NEG strips, is proposed. The mechanical design, especially the stability analysis, is shown. The key technologies of the prototype fabrication are given. Vacuum tests are carried out on the prototypes. The test set-up as well as the pumping system conditions are presented.

  13. Top physics at CLIC and ILC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)442572

    2016-11-11

    Measurements of top quark production at $e^+e^-$ colliders can provide a leap in precision in our knowledge of top quark properties and open a new window on physics beyond the Standard Model. In this contribution the top quark physics prospects of linear colliders is reviewed. Progress in detailed full-simulation studies is reported for the highlights of the program. We present the prospects for a measurement of the top quark mass and width in a scan of the beam energy through the pair production threshold, and discuss new studies of alternative measurements in continuum production, which are also capable of a precise determination of the mass in a rigorously defined mass scheme. A precision of 50 MeV on the $\\overline{MS}$ mass is expected when taking into account the dominant systematic uncertainties. Another key measurement is the study of the top quark couplings to electroweak gauge bosons, where form factors can be determined to 1% precision, an order of magnitude better than those from the full LHC prog...

  14. Study of the electronics architecture for the mechanical stabilisation of the quadrupoles of the CLIC linear accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Fernandez Carmona, P; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, C; Janssens, S; Kuzmin, A; Slaathaug, A

    2010-01-01

    To reach a sufficient luminosity, the transverse beam sizes and emittances in future linear particle accelerators should be reduced to the nanometer level. Mechanical stabilisation of the quadrupole magnets is of the utmost importance for this. The piezo actuators used for this purpose can also be used to make fast incremental orientation adjustments with a nanometer resolution. The main requirements for the CLIC stabilisation electronics is a robust, low noise, low delay, high accuracy and resolution, low band and radiation resistant feedback control loop. Due to the high number of controllers (about 4000) a cost optimization should also be made. Different architectures are evaluated for a magnet stabilisation prototype, including the sensors type and configuration, partition between software and hardware for control algorithms, and optimization of the ADC/DAC converters. The controllers will be distributed along the 50 km long accelerator and a communication bus should allow external control. Furthermore, o...

  15. An automatic driving system for a Baker's garlic [Allium chinense] planter: Development of the infrared beam guidance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Iwasaki, M.; Takeda, H.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a tractor attachment type semi-automatic Baker's garlic (shallot) planter to save hard labor requirement during planting. The velocity of the tractor in operation is so slow (2 to 3m/min) that the tractor driver is forced to tie his hands for a long time. This is an obstacle to its diffusion, because farm managers have to drive their own tractors by themselves in most Japanese farmhouses, yet they have to do other jobs during the planting season. We designed a new automatic driving system that consists of one infrared beam radiator and two infrared beam receivers to solve this problem. The infrared radiator is located in front of the tractor and shows the infrared guideline of tractor path. The infrared receivers are equipped on the front of the tractor and detect the infrared from the radiator. The receivers are arranged symmetrically at 4.5 degree from the center of the tractor. So the misalignment of the tractor creates a difference in sensitivity and it is possible to distinguish the tractor direction against the infrared beam. This system was tested under the sand dune field conditions with the tractor that was converted to automatic driving. The results show the system can effectively steer about 80 m automatically with an almost straight path, and the error from the starting point is within 0.1 m

  16. Physics performances for Scalar Electron, Scalar Muon and Scalar Neutrino searches at 3 TeV and 1.4 TeV at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, M.; Marshall, J.S.; Poss, S.; Sailer, A.; Thomson, M.; van der Kraaij, E.

    2013-01-01

    The determination of scalar lepton and gaugino masses is an important part of the programme of spectroscopic studies of Supersymmetry at a high energy e+e- linear collider. In this article we present results of a study of the processes: e+e- -> eR eR -> e+e- chi0 chi, e+e- -> muR muR -> mu mu- chi0 chi0, e+e- -> eL eL -> e e chi0 chi0 and e+e- -> snu_e snu_e -> e e chi+ chi-in two Supersymmetric benchmark scenarios at 3 TeV and 1.4 TeV at CLIC. We characterize the detector performance, lepton energy resolution and boson mass resolution. We report the accuracy of the production cross section measurements and the eR muR, snu_e, chi+ and chi0 mass determination, estimate the systematic errors affecting the mass measurement and discuss the requirements on the detector time stamping capability and beam polarization. The analysis accounts for the CLIC beam energy spectrum and the dominant beam-induced background. The detector performances are incorporated by full simulation and reconstruction of the events within t...

  17. Simulated top-quark pair production in the CLIC_ILD detector

    CERN Multimedia

    CLIC, Compact Linear Collider Project

    2017-01-01

    Simulated production of a top-quark pair with a nominal collision energy of 3 TeV, in the CLIC_ILD detector. The event display show the reconstructed particles used as input for a jet clustering algorithm.

  18. Two-Beam Linear Colliders - Special Issues

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The path towards a multi-TeV e+e- linear collider proposed by the CLIC study is based on the Two-Beam Acceleration (TBA) scheme. Such a scheme is promising in term of efficiency, reliability and cost. The rationale behind the two-beam scheme is discussed in the paper, together with the special issues related to this technology and the R&D needed to demonstrate its feasibility.

  19. RF-Breakdown kicks at the CTF3 two-beam test stand

    CERN Document Server

    Palaia, Andrea; Muranaka, Tomoko; Ruber, Roger; Ziemann, V; Farabolini, W

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of the effects of RF-breakdown on the beam in CLIC prototype accelerator structures is one of the key aspects of the CLIC two-beam acceleration scheme being addressed at the Two-beam Test Stand (TBTS) at CTF3. RF-breakdown can randomly cause energy loss and transverse kicks to the beam. Transverse kicks have been measured by means of a screen intercepting the beam after the accelerator structure. In correspondence of a RFbreakdown we detect a double beam spot which we interpret as a sudden change of the beam trajectory within a single beam pulse. To time-resolve such effect, the TBTS has been equipped with five inductive Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) and a spectrometer line to measure both relative changes of the beam trajectory and energy losses. Here we discuss the methodology used and we present the latest results of such measurements

  20. Measurement of Higgs decay to WW$^{*}$ in Higgsstrahlung at $\\sqrt{s}=500$ GeV ILC and in WW-fusion at $\\sqrt{s}=3$ TeV CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)718111

    2017-01-01

    This talk presents results of the two independent analyses evaluating the measurement accuracy of the branching ratio for the Standard model Higgs boson decay to a W-pair, at the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The considered Higgs production channels are the WW-fusion for the highest energy stage of CLIC, $\\sqrt{s}=3$ TeV, and the Higgsstrahlung process for the nominal ILC energy, $\\sqrt{s}=500$ GeV. Both studies are performed using the full simulation of the detector. The realistic experimental conditions have been simulated including beam energy spectrum, initial state radiation and the background from $\\gamma \\gamma \\rightarrow hadrons$ processes, which are overlaid on simulated events. The multivariate analysis technique is used for the final event selection and the expected relative statistical uncertainty, $\\Delta ( \\sigma \\cdot BR)/(\\sigma \\cdot BR)$, of the measured Higgs production cross sections is estimated.

  1. High Field Studies for CLIC Accelerating Structures Development

    CERN Document Server

    Profatilova, I

    2017-01-01

    Compact Linear Collider RF structures need to be able to achieve the very high average accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m. One of the main challenges in reaching such high accelerating gradients is to avoid vacuum electrical breakdown within CLIC accelerating structures. Accelerating structure tests are carried out in the klystron-based test stands known as the XBoxes. In order to investigate vacuum breakdown phenomena and its statistical characteristics in a simpler system and get results in a faster way, pulsed dc systems have been developed at CERN. To acquire sufficient breakdown data in a reasonable period of time, high repetition rate pulse generators are used in the systems for breakdown studies, so-called pulsed dc system. This paper describes the pulsed dc systems and the two high repetition rate circuits, which produce high-voltage pulses for it, available at CERN.

  2. Vacuum arc localization in CLIC prototype radio frequency accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091976; Koivunen, Visa

    2016-04-04

    A future linear collider capable of reaching TeV collision energies should support accelerating gradients beyond 100 MV/m. At such high fields, the occurrence of vacuum arcs have to be mitigated through conditioning, during which an accelerating structure’s resilience against breakdowns is slowly increased through repeated radio frequency pulsing. Conditioning is very time and resource consuming, which is why developing more efficient procedures is desirable. At CERN, conditioning related research is conducted at the CLIC high-power X-band test stands. Breakdown localization is an important diagnostic tool of accelerating structure tests. Abnormal position distributions highlight issues in structure design, manufacturing or operation and may consequently help improve these processes. Additionally, positioning can provide insight into the physics of vacuum arcs. In this work, two established positioning methods based on the time-difference-ofarrival of radio frequency waves are extended. The first method i...

  3. Beam delivery system tuning and luminosity monitoring in the Compact Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dalena

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Emittance preservation in the beam delivery system (BDS is one of the major challenges in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC. The fast detuning of the final focus optics requires an on-line tuning procedure in order to keep luminosity close to the maximum. In this paper we discuss different tuning techniques to mitigate the displacement of magnets in the CLIC BDS and in particular in the final focus system. Some of them require a fast luminosity measurement. Here we study the possibility to use beam-beam background processes at CLIC 3 TeV c.m. energy as a fast luminosity signal. In particular, the hadron multiplicity in the detector region is investigated.

  4. Measurement of the branching ratios for the Standard Model Higgs decays into muon pairs and into Z boson pairs at a 1.4 TeV CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)701211; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Grefe, Christian; Kacarevic, Goran; Lukic, Strahinja; Pandurovic, Mila; Roloff, Philipp Gerhard; Smiljanic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the Higgs production cross-section times the branching ratios for its decays into μ+μ- and ZZ* pairs at a 1.4 TeV CLIC collider is investigated in this paper. The Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass of 126 GeV is dominantly produced via WW fusion in e+e- collisions at 1.4 TeV centre-of-mass energy. Analyses for both decay channels are based on a full simulation of the CLIC_ILD detector. All relevant physics and beam-induced background processes are taken into account. An integrated luminosity of 1.5 ab 1 and unpolarised beams are assumed. For the H-->ZZ* decay, the purely hadronic final state (ZZ*--> qq ̄qq ̄) is considered as well as ZZ* decays into two jets and two leptons (ZZ*--> qq ̄l+l- ). It is shown that the branching ratio for the Higgs decay into a muon pair times the Higgs production cross-section can be measured with 38% statistical uncertainty. It is also shown that the statistical uncertainty of the Higgs branching fraction for decay into a Z boson pair times the Hi...

  5. Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region are described. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises dt, dd, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 1017 to 1020 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 mev, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner

  6. Wavelength Detuning Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation Scheme for Direct-Drive: Modeling and Evidence from National Ignition Facility Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozas, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) has been shown to significantly reduce the laser absorption and implosion speed in direct-drive implosion experiments on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Mitigating CBET assists in achieving ignition-relevant hot-spot pressures in deuterium-tritium cryogenic OMEGA implosions. In addition, reducing CBET permits lower, more hydrodynamically stable, in-flight aspect ratio ignition designs with smaller nonuniformity growth during the acceleration phase. Detuning the wavelengths of the crossing beams is one of several techniques under investigation at the University of Rochester to mitigate CBET. This talk will describe these techniques with an emphasis on wavelength detuning. Recent experiments designed and predicted using multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET on the NIF have exploited the wavelength arrangement of the NIF beam geometry to demonstrate CBET mitigation through wavelength detuning in polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions. Shapes and trajectories inferred from time-resolved x-ray radiography of the imploding shell, scattered-light spectra, and hard x-ray spectra generated by suprathermal electrons all indicate a reduction in CBET. These results and their implications for direct-drive ignition will be presented and discussed. In addition, hydrodynamically scaled ignition-relevant designs for OMEGA implosions exploiting wavelength detuning will be presented. Changes required to the OMEGA laser to permit wavelength detuning will be discussed. Future plans for PDD on the NIF including more-uniform implosions with CBET mitigation will be explored. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  7. Limits on top FCNC decay t$\\rightarrow$cH and t$\\rightarrow$c$\\gamma$ from CLIC at 380 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Zarnecki, Aleksander

    2018-01-01

    FCNC top decays are very strongly suppressed in the Standard Model and the observation of any such decay would be a direct signature of physics beyond SM. Many "new physics" scenarios predict contributions to FCNC processes and the largest enhancement in many models is for t$\\rightarrow$cH decay. Enhancements for the decay channel t$\\rightarrow$c$\\gamma$ are more modest, but the decay still has a clearly identifiable kinematic signature. Prospects for measuring these decays at CLIC running at 380 GeV were studied with full detector simulation, taking the luminosity distribution, beam polarization and beam induced background into account. Top pair production events with t$\\rightarrow$cH decays can be identified based on the kinematic constraints and flavour tagging information. The analysis was divided into three steps: classification of top pair candidate events, event quality determination and kinematic reconstruction based on signal or background hypotheses, and final separation of signal from background. T...

  8. High Charge PHIN Photo Injector at CERN with Fast Phase switching within the Bunch Train for Beam Combination

    CERN Document Server

    Csatari Divall, M; Bolzon, B; Bravin, E; Chevallay, E; Dabrowski, A; Doebert, S; Drozdy, A; Fedosseev, V; Hessler, C; Lefevre, T; Livesley, S; Losito, R; Olvegaard, M; Petrarca, M; Rabiller, A N; Egger, D; Mete, O

    2011-01-01

    The high charge PHIN photo-injector was developed within the framework of the European CARE program to provide an alternative to the drive beam thermionic gun in the CTF3 (CLIC Test Facility) at CERN. In PHIN 1908 electron bunches are delivered with bunch spacing of 1.5 GHz and 2.33 nC charge per bunch. Furthermore the drive beam generated by CTF3 requires several fast 180 deg phase-shifts with respect to the 1.5 GHz bunch repetition frequency in order to allow the beam combination scheme developed at CTF3. A total of 8 subtrains, each 140 ns long and shifted in phase with respect to each other, have to be produced with very high phase and amplitude stability. A novel fiber modulator based phase-switching technique developed on the laser system provides this phase-shift between two consecutive pulses much faster and cleaner than the base line scheme, where a thermionic electron gun and sub-harmonic bunching are used. The paper describes the fiber-based switching system and the measurements verifying the schem...

  9. Results from the CLIC X-Band Structure Test Program at NLCTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adolphsen, C.

    2009-01-01

    As part of a SLAC-CERN-KEK collaboration on high gradient X-band structure research, several prototype structures for the CLIC linear collider study have been tested using two of the high power (300 MW) X-band rf stations in the NLCTA facility at SLAC. These structures differ in terms of their fabrication (brazed disks and clamped quadrants), gradient profile (amount by which the gradient increases along the structure, which optimizes efficiency and maximizes sustainable gradient) and HOM damping (use of slots or waveguides to rapidly dissipate dipole mode energy). The CLIC goal in the next few years is to demonstrate the feasibility of a CLIC-ready baseline design and to investigate alternatives that could increase efficiency. This paper summarizes the high gradient test results from NLCTA in support of this effort.

  10. Experimental study of DC vacuum breakdown and application to high-gradient accelerating structures for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Shipman, Nicholas; Jones, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) is a leading candidate for the next generation high energy linear collider. As any breakdown would result in a partial or full loss of luminosity for the pulse in which it occurs, obtaining a low breakdown rate in CLIC accelerating structures is a critical requirement for the successful operation of the proposed collider. This thesis presents investigations into the breakdown phenomenon primarily in the low breakdown rate regime of interest to CLIC, performed using the CERN DC spark systems between 2011 and 2014. The design, construction and commissioning of several new pieces of hardware, as well as the development of improved techniques to measuring the inter-electrode gap distance are detailed. These hardware improvements were fundamental in enabling the exciting new experiments mentioned below, which in turn have provided significant additional insight into the phenomenon of breakdown. Experiments were performed to measure fundamental parameters of individual breakdowns...

  11. Les mesures de métrologie pour le CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Cherif, A

    2008-01-01

    Le projet CLIC est en tout point un défi technique majeur ; c?est le cas également pour la mesure dimensionnelle. Quels sont les équipements et les méthodes qui permettent de caractériser les pièces avec une incertitude de mesure aussi réduite que possible, vu les tolérances micrométriques imposées ? Afin de répondre à cette question, une veille technologique a été maintenue sur une longue période. Les acteurs relevants ont été contactés pour bénéficier d?une ouverture sur les dernières avancées dans le domaine. Différentes techniques ont été étudiées et comparées telles que la digitalisation, la tomographie X, la mesure tridimensionnelle. L'assemblage de haute précision des composants est aussi primordial. Sa mise en ?uvre sous un microscope optique ou à l'aide d'une machine tridimensionnelle est en cours d?étude. L'exposé traitera aussi de la mesure de rugosité, un domaine où nous disposons de moyens adaptés aux exigences spécifiques du projet.

  12. A New Technique For Information Processing of CLIC Technical Documentation

    CERN Document Server

    Tzermpinos, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    The scientific work presented in this paper could be described as a novel, systemic approach to the process of organization of CLIC documentation. The latter refers to the processing of various sets of archived data found on various CERN archiving services in a more friendly and organized way. From physics aspect, this is equal to having an initial system characterized by high entropy, which after some transformation of energy and matter will produce a final system of reduced entropy. However, this reduction in entropy can be considered valid for open systems only, which are sub-systems of grander isolated systems, to which the total entropy will always increase. Thus, using as basis elements from information theory, systems theory and thermodynamics, the unorganized form of data pending to be organized to a higher form, is modeled as an initial open sub-system with increased entropy, which, after the processing of information, will produce a final system with decreased entropy. This systemic approach to the ...

  13. Sensitivity of CLIC at 380 GeV to the top FCNC decay $t\\rightarrow cH$

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)442572

    2017-01-01

    In the Standard Model (SM), flavour changing neutral current (FCNC) top decays, possible at loop level only, are very strongly suppressed. Observation of any such decay would be a direct signature of physics beyond the SM. Large enhancements are possible in many "new physics" scenarios and the largest enhancement is in most cases expected for the $t\\rightarrow cH$ decay. A full study for CLIC was based on the WHIZARD simulation of FCNC top decays within the 2HDM(III) model. Beam polarization and beam-induced background were taken into account. Top pair production events with the FCNC decay $t\\rightarrow cH$ can be identified based on kinematic constrains and flavour tagging information. Due to a large overlap in the kinematic space with standard top pair events, the final signal selection-efficiency is small, at the 10% level. Expected limits on $BR(t\\rightarrow cH)\\times BR(H\\rightarrow b\\bar{b})$ are compared with earlier results based on parton level simulation.

  14. The transverse and longitudinal beam characteristics of the PHIN photo-injector at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Mete, Ö; Dabrowski, A; Divall, M; Döbert, S; Egger, D; Elsener, K; Fedosseev, V; Lefèvre, T; Petrarca, M

    2010-01-01

    A new photo-injector, capable to deliver a long pulse train with a high charge per bunch for CTF3, has been designed and installed by a collaboration between LAL, CCLRC and CERN within the framework of the second Joint Research Activity PHIN of the European CARE program. The demonstration of the high charge and the stability along the pulse train are the important goals for CTF3 and the CLIC drive beam. The nominal beam for CTF3 has an average current of 3.5 A, a 1.5 GHz bunch repetation frequency and a pulse length of 1.27 μs (1908 bunches). The existing CTF3 injector consists of a thermionic gun and a subharmonic bunching system. The PHIN photo-injector is being tested in a dedicated test-stand at CERN to replace the existing CTF3 injector that is producing unwanted satellite bunches during the bunching process. A phase-coding scheme is planned to be implemented to the PHIN laser system providing the required beam temporal structure by CTF3. RF photo-injectors are high-brightness, low-emittance electron so...

  15. Point mutations in the transmembrane region of the clic1 ion channel selectively modify its biophysical properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Averaimo

    Full Text Available Chloride intracellular Channel 1 (CLIC1 is a metamorphic protein that changes from a soluble cytoplasmic protein into a transmembrane protein. Once inserted into membranes, CLIC1 multimerises and is able to form chloride selective ion channels. Whilst CLIC1 behaves as an ion channel both in cells and in artificial lipid bilayers, its structure in the soluble form has led to some uncertainty as to whether it really is an ion channel protein. CLIC1 has a single putative transmembrane region that contains only two charged residues: arginine 29 (Arg29 and lysine 37 (Lys37. As charged residues are likely to have a key role in ion channel function, we hypothesized that mutating them to neutral alanine to generate K37A and R29A CLIC1 would alter the electrophysiological characteristics of CLIC1. By using three different electrophysiological approaches: i single channel Tip-Dip in artificial bilayers using soluble recombinant CLIC1, ii cell-attached and iii whole-cell patch clamp recordings in transiently transfected HEK cells, we determined that the K37A mutation altered the single-channel conductance while the R29A mutation affected the single-channel open probability in response to variation in membrane potential. Our results show that mutation of the two charged amino acids (K37 and R29 in the putative transmembrane region of CLIC1 alters the biophysical properties of the ion channel in both artificial bilayers and cells. Hence these charged residues are directly involved in regulating its ion channel activity. This strongly suggests that, despite its unusual structure, CLIC1 itself is able to form a chloride ion channel.

  16. Beam dynamics study of a 30 MeV electron linear accelerator to drive a neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Yang, Haeryong; Kang, Heung-Sik

    2014-02-01

    An experimental neutron facility based on 32 MeV/18.47 kW electron linac has been studied by means of PARMELA simulation code. Beam dynamics study for a traveling wave constant gradient electron accelerator is carried out to reach the preferential operation parameters (E = 30 MeV, P = 18 kW, dE/E E-gun, pre-buncher, buncher, and 2 accelerating columns. A disk-loaded, on-axis-coupled, 2π/3-mode type accelerating rf cavity is considered for this linac. After numerous optimizations of linac parameters, 32 MeV beam energy is obtained at the end of the linac. As high electron energy is required to produce acceptable neutron flux. The final neutron flux is estimated to be 5 × 1011 n/cm2/s/mA. Future development will be the real design of a 30 MeV electron linac based on S band traveling wave.

  17. Beam dynamics study of a 30 MeV electron linear accelerator to drive a neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Yang, Haeryong; Kang, Heung-Sik, E-mail: hskang@postech.ac.kr [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, San31, Hyoja-dong, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-14

    An experimental neutron facility based on 32 MeV/18.47 kW electron linac has been studied by means of PARMELA simulation code. Beam dynamics study for a traveling wave constant gradient electron accelerator is carried out to reach the preferential operation parameters (E = 30 MeV, P = 18 kW, dE/E < 12.47% for 99% particles). The whole linac comprises mainly E-gun, pre-buncher, buncher, and 2 accelerating columns. A disk-loaded, on-axis-coupled, 2π/3-mode type accelerating rf cavity is considered for this linac. After numerous optimizations of linac parameters, 32 MeV beam energy is obtained at the end of the linac. As high electron energy is required to produce acceptable neutron flux. The final neutron flux is estimated to be 5 × 10{sup 11} n/cm{sup 2}/s/mA. Future development will be the real design of a 30 MeV electron linac based on S band traveling wave.

  18. Investigation into diode pumped modelocked Nd based laser oscillators for the CLIC-3 photoinjector system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentine, G.J.; Burns, D.; Bente, E.A.J.M.; Berghmans, F.; Thienpont, H.; Danckaert, J.; Desmet, L.

    2001-01-01

    The photo-injector system envisaged for the proposed CLIC linear e+-e- accelerator at CERN has a demanding set of specifications on output pulse structure, power and timing stability. This paper reports on results obtained with quasi-CW diode pumped laser oscillators with output stabilisation. A

  19. The CLIC ILD CDR Geometry for the CDR Monte Carlo Mass Production

    CERN Document Server

    Muennich, A

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC ILD CDR detector for the Monte Carlo event simulation is described in a GEANT4 application, with some parameters available in a database and XML files. This makes it difficult to quickly “look up” interesting parameters of the detector geometry used for the simulation. This note summarises the important geometrical parameters and some details of the implemented detector components.

  20. Towards TeV-scale electron-positron collisions: the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doebert, Steffen; Sicking, Eva

    2018-02-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), a future electron-positron collider at the energy frontier, has the potential to change our understanding of the universe. Proposed to follow the Large Hardron Collider (LHC) programme at CERN, it is conceived for precision measurements as well as for searches for new phenomena.

  1. arXiv Dimension-6 Operator Analysis of the CLIC Sensitivity to New Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Sanz, Veronica; You, Tevong

    2017-05-17

    We estimate the possible accuracies of measurements at the proposed CLIC e$^{+}$ e$^{−}$ collider of Higgs and W$^{+}$ W$^{−}$ production at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 TeV, incorporating also Higgsstrahlung projections at higher energies that had not been consid-ered previously, and use them to explore the prospective CLIC sensitivities to decoupled new physics. We present the resulting constraints on the Wilson coefficients of dimension-6 operators in a model-independent approach based on the Standard Model effective field theory (SM EFT). The higher centre-of-mass energy of CLIC, compared to other projects such as the ILC and CEPC, gives it greater sensitivity to the coefficients of some of the operators we study. We find that CLIC Higgs measurements may be sensitive to new physics scales $ \\Lambda =\\mathcal{O}(10) $ TeV for individual operators, reduced to $ \\mathcal{O}(1) $ TeV sensitivity for a global fit marginalising over the coefficients of all contributing operators. We give some examples of...

  2. Dimension-6 operator analysis of the CLIC sensitivity to new physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, John; Roloff, Philipp; Sanz, Verónica; You, Tevong

    2017-01-01

    We estimate the possible accuracies of measurements at the proposed CLIC e + e − collider of Higgs and W + W − production at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 TeV, incorporating also Higgsstrahlung projections at higher energies that had not been considered previously, and use them to explore the prospective CLIC sensitivities to decoupled new physics. We present the resulting constraints on the Wilson coefficients of dimension-6 operators in a model-independent approach based on the Standard Model effective field theory (SM EFT). The higher centre-of-mass energy of CLIC, compared to other projects such as the ILC and CEPC, gives it greater sensitivity to the coefficients of some of the operators we study. We find that CLIC Higgs measurements may be sensitive to new physics scales Λ=O(10) TeV for individual operators, reduced to O(1) TeV sensitivity for a global fit marginalising over the coefficients of all contributing operators. We give some examples of the corresponding prospective constraints on specific scenarios for physics beyond the SM, including stop quarks and the dilaton/radion.

  3. Validation of a Micrometric remotely controlled pre-alignment system for the CLIC Linear Collider using a test setup (Mock-Up) with 5 degrees of freedom

    CERN Document Server

    Mainaud Durand, H; Griffet, S; Kemppinen, J; Leuxe, R; Sosin, M

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC main beam quadrupoles need to be prealigned within 17 um rms with respect to a straight reference line along a sliding window of 200 m. A readjustment system based on eccentric cam movers, which will provide stiffness to the support assembly, is being studied. The cam movers were qualified on a 1 degree of freedom (DOF) test setup, where a repeatability of adjustment below 1um was measured along their whole range. This paper presents the 5 DOF mock-up, built for the validation of the eccentric cam movers, as well as the first results of tests carried out: resolution of displacement along the whole range, measurements of the support eigenfrequencies.

  4. Material studies in the frame of CLIC Accelerating structures production conducted within the Mechanics program together with Metso Oy

    CERN Document Server

    Nurminen, Janne

    2012-01-01

    MeChanICs (Marie Curie Linking Industry to CERN) is an Industry to Academia Partnership and Pathways (IAPP) platform for precision manufacturing knowledge exchange bringing together five Finnish manufacturing companies with Helsinki Insitute of Physics (HIP) and CERN. The scientific objective of MeChanICs project is to contribute to the manufacturing RTD of CLIC enabling technologies. The focus is on the design, materials, machining, brazing and assembly of A CLIC accelerating structure. This study deals with the materials work package of the program and wants to explore the following items: 1) producing copper accelerating structures for CLIC from raw copper powder by near net shape hot isostatic pressing (HIP). 2) The feasibility to use HIP diffusion bonding of the accelerator structures as a function of surface quality and applied temperature and pressure. 3) Brazing for CLIC AS auxiliary systems, like water cooling or damping manifolds, to the disc stack by coating one of the brazing partners with an enab...

  5. X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Dubrovskiy, A; Syratchev, I; Ruber, R; Ziemann, V

    2011-01-01

    We discuss X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the CLIC test facility at CERN. The rf power is extracted from an electron drive beam by a specially designed power extraction structure. In order to test the structures at high-power levels, part of the generated power is recirculated to an input port, thus allowing for increased deceleration and power levels within the structure. The degree of recirculation is controlled by a splitter and phase shifter. We present a model that describes the system and validate it with measurements over a wide range of parameters. Moreover, by correlating rf power measurements with the energy lost by the electron beam, as measured in a spectrometer placed after the power extraction structure, we are able to identify system parameters, including the form factor of the electron beam. The quality of the agreement between model and reality gives us confidence to extrapolate the results found in the present test facility towards the parameter reg...

  6. Inhibition of CLIC4 enhances autophagy and triggers mitochondrial and ER stress-induced apoptosis in human glioma U251 cells under starvation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiateng Zhong

    Full Text Available CLIC4/mtCLIC, a chloride intracellular channel protein, localizes to mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER, nucleus and cytoplasm, and participates in the apoptotic response to stress. Apoptosis and autophagy, the main types of the programmed cell death, seem interconnected under certain stress conditions. However, the role of CLIC4 in autophagy regulation has yet to be determined. In this study, we demonstrate upregulation and nuclear translocation of the CLIC4 protein following starvation in U251 cells. CLIC4 siRNA transfection enhanced autophagy with increased LC3-II protein and puncta accumulation in U251 cells under starvation conditions. In that condition, the interaction of the 14-3-3 epsilon isoform with CLIC4 was abolished and resulted in Beclin 1 overactivation, which further activated autophagy. Moreover, inhibiting the expression of CLIC4 triggered both mitochondrial apoptosis involved in Bax/Bcl-2 and cytochrome c release under starvation and endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis with CHOP and caspase-4 upregulation. These results demonstrate that CLIC4 nuclear translocation is an integral part of the cellular response to starvation. Inhibiting the expression of CLIC4 enhances autophagy and contributes to mitochondrial and ER stress-induced apoptosis under starvation.

  7. Effects of rf breakdown on the beam in the Compact Linear Collider prototype accelerator structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Palaia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of rf breakdown in high-gradient accelerator structures on the accelerated beam is an extremely relevant aspect in the development of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC and is one of the main issues addressed at the Two-beam Test Stand at the CLIC Test Facility 3 at CERN. During a rf breakdown high currents are generated causing parasitic magnetic fields that interact with the accelerated beam affecting its orbit. The beam energy is also affected because the power is partly reflected and partly absorbed thus reducing the available energy to accelerate the beam. We discuss here measurements of such effects observed on an electron beam accelerated in a CLIC prototype structure. Measurements of the trajectory of bunch trains on a nanosecond time scale showed fast changes in correspondence of breakdown that we compare with measurements of the relative beam spots on a scintillating screen. We identify different breakdown scenarios for which we offer an explanation based also on measurements of the power at the input and output ports of the accelerator structure. Finally we present the distribution of the magnitude of the observed changes in the beam position and we discuss its correlation with rf power and breakdown location in the accelerator structure.

  8. Clinical Computer Systems Survey (CLICS): learning about health information technology (HIT) in its context of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtner, Valentina; Cornford, Tony; Klecun, Ela

    2013-01-01

    Successful health information technology (HIT) implementations need to be informed on the context of use and on users' attitudes. To this end, we developed the CLinical Computer Systems Survey (CLICS) instrument. CLICS reflects a socio-technical view of HIT adoption, and is designed to encompass all members of the clinical team. We used the survey in a large English hospital as part of its internal evaluation of the implementation of an electronic patient record system (EPR). The survey revealed extent and type of use of the EPR; how it related to and integrated with other existing systems; and people's views on its use, usability and emergent safety issues. Significantly, participants really appreciated 'being asked'. They also reminded us of the wider range of administrative roles engaged with EPR. This observation reveals pertinent questions as to our understanding of the boundaries between administrative tasks and clinical medicine - what we propose as the field of 'administrative medicine'.

  9. Thermo-mechanical modelling and experimental validation of CLIC prototype module type 0

    CERN Document Server

    Kortelainen, Lauri; Koivurova, Hannu; Riddone, Germana; Österberg, Kenneth

    Micron level stability of the two-meter repetitive modules constituting the two main linacs is one of the most important requirements to achieve the luminosity goal for the Compact Linear Collider. Structural deformations due to thermal loads and related to the RF power dissipated inside the modules affect the alignment of the linacs and therefore the resulting luminosity performance. A CLIC prototype module has been assembled in a dedicated laboratory and a thermal test program has been started in order to study its thermo-mechanical behaviour. This thesis focuses on the finite elements modelling of the first CLIC prototype module 0. The aim of the modelling is to examine the temperature distributions and the resulting deformations of the module in different operating conditions defined in the thermal test program. The theoretical results have been compared to the experimental ones; the comparison shows that the results are in good agreement both for the thermal behaviour of the module and for the resulting ...

  10. Analyzing the Anomalous Dipole Moment Type Couplings of Heavy Quarks with FCNC Interactions at the CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senol, A.; Tasci, A. T.; Verep, C.

    2014-01-01

    We examine both anomalous magnetic and dipole moment type couplings of a heavy quark via its single production with subsequent dominant standard model decay modes at the compact linear collider (CLIC). The signal and background cross sections are analyzed for heavy quark masses 600 and 700 GeV. We make the analysis to delimitate these couplings as well as to find the attainable integrated luminosities for 3σ observation limit

  11. Parameter scan for the CLIC Damping rings under the infleunce of intrabeam scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Antoniou, F; Martini, M; Papaphilippou, Y; Vivoli, A

    2010-01-01

    Due to the high bunch density, the output emittances of the CLIC Damping Rings (DR) are strongly dominated by the effect of Intrabeam Scattering (IBS). In an attempt to optimize the ring design, the bench-marking of the multiparticle tracking code SIRE with the classical IBS formalisms and approximations is first considered. The scaling of the steady state emittances and IBS growth rates is also studied, with respect to several ring parameters including energy, bunch charge and wiggler charac...

  12. Parameter scan for the CLIC Damping rings under the infleunce of intrabeam scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniou, F; Papaphilippou, Y; Vivoli, A

    2010-01-01

    Due to the high bunch density, the output emittances of the CLIC Damping Rings (DR) are strongly dominated by the effect of Intrabeam Scattering (IBS). In an attempt to optimize the ring design, the bench-marking of the multiparticle tracking code SIRE with the classical IBS formalisms and approximations is first considered. The scaling of the steady state emittances and IBS growth rates is also studied, with respect to several ring parameters including energy, bunch charge and wiggler characteristics.

  13. Tracking Performance in High Multiplicity Environment for the CLIC ILD Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Killenberg, M

    2012-01-01

    We report on the tracking efficiency and the fraction of badly reconstructed tracks in the CLIC ILD detector for high multiplicity events (tt ̄@3 TeV) with and without the presence of γγ →hadrons background. They have been studied for the silicon tracking, the TPC tracking and the so called FullLDC tacking, which combines silicon and TPC measurements.

  14. Study of a 5-Tesla large aperture coil for the CLIC detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cure, B

    2011-01-01

    The present design of a CLIC detector foresees a large solenoid magnet with a 6 m aperture and a magnetic induction of 5 T at the interaction point. This can be achieved by a thin superconducting coil. This report gives the typical main parameters of such a coil and presents the feasibility based on and compared with the CMS and Atlas solenoid coil designs, indicating the limits on the conductor and the identified R&D prospects.

  15. En route vers la nano stabilisation de CLIC faisceau principale et focalisation finale

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, Claude; Lackner, F; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2008-01-01

    Pour atteindre la luminosité voulue de CLIC, la taille transversale du faisceau doit être de l?ordre du nanomètre. Ceci nécessite une stabilité vibratoire des quadripôles du faisceau principal de 1 nm et même 0.1 nm pour les doublets de la focalisation finale. La nano technologie et la nano stabilisation sont des activités qui évoluent rapidement dans l?industrie et centres de recherche pour des applications très variées comme l?électronique, l?optique, la chimie voire la médecine. Cette présentation décrit les avancées techniques nécessaires pour atteindre l?objectif de CLIC et les projets et collaborations R&D prévus pour démontrer la faisabilité de la nano stabilisation de CLIC en 2010.

  16. Mass and Cross Section Measurements of light-flavored Squarks at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    WEUSTE, L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the prospects for the measurement of TeV-scale light-flavored right-squark masses and and the production cross sections at a 3 TeV e+e- collider based on CLIC technology. The analysis, performed in the framework of the CLIC Conceptual Design Report, is based on full Geant4 simulations of the CLIC ILD detector concept, including standard model physics background and machine related hadronic background from two-photon processes. The events were reconstructed using particle flow event reconstruction, and the mass and cross sections were obtained from a template fit built from generator-level simulations with smearing to parametrize the detector response. For an integrated luminosity of 2 ab^-1, a statistical precision of 5.9 GeV, corresponding to 0.52%, was obtained for unseparated first and second generation right squarks. For the combined cross section, a precision of 0.07 fb, corresponding to 5%, was obtained.

  17. Measurement of the H$\\rightarrow$WW$^*$ Branching Ratio at 1.4TeV using the semileptonic final state at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)762723; Watson, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    This note summarises a study to evaluate the potential to measure the H$\\rightarrow$WW$^*$ branching fraction at CLIC, 1.4TeV centre-of-mass energy, with the CLIC_ILD detector, using the WW$\\rightarrow$qql$\

  18. Noninductive current drive in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    Various current drive mechanisms may be grouped into four classes: (1) injection of energetic particle beams; (2) launching of rf waves; (3) hybrid schemes, which are combinations of various rf schemes (rf plus beams, rf and/or beam plus ohmic heating, etc.); and (4) other schemes, some of which are specific to reactor plasma conditions requiring the presence of alpha particle or intense synchrotron radiation. Particle injection schemes include current drive by neutral beams and relativistic electron beams. The rf schemes include current drive by the lower hybrid (LH) waves, the electron waves, the waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies, etc. Only a few of these approaches, however, have been tested experimentally, with the broadest data base available for LH waves. Included in this report are (1) efficiency criteria for current drive, (2) current drive by neutral beam injection, (3) LH current drive, (4) electron cyclotron current drive, (5) current drive by ion cyclotron waves - minority species heating, and (6) current drive by other schemes (such as hybrids and low frequency waves)

  19. An Experimental Approach to Simulations of the CLIC Interaction Point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esberg, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    with respect to the luminosity weighted depolarization is discussed. In the chapter on muons, the implementation of the production of incoherent muons in GUINEA-PIG++ will be discussed. Comments on the correctness and completeness of the implementation of muon production will be presented. The chapter...... experiments conducted at MAMI will be presented. Furthermore the chapter discusses the performance of new CMOS based detectors to be used in future experiments by the NA63 collaboration. The chapter on collider simulations introduces the beam-beam simulation codes GUINEA-PIG and GUINEA-PIG++, their methods...... of operation and their features. The characteristics of the simulated particles are presented and a comparison between the outputs of these codes with those from CAIN. \\item In the chapter on tridents, the implementation of the direct trident process in GUINEA-PIG++ is described. The results are compared...

  20. Long bunch trains measured using a prototype cavity beam position monitor for the Compact Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Cullinan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC requires beam position monitors (BPMs with 50 nm spatial resolution for alignment of the beam line elements in the main linac and beam delivery system. Furthermore, the BPMs must be able to make multiple independent measurements within a single 156 ns long bunch train. A prototype cavity BPM for CLIC has been manufactured and tested on the probe beam line at the 3rd CLIC Test Facility (CTF3 at CERN. The transverse beam position is determined from the electromagnetic resonant modes excited by the beam in the two cavities of the pickup, the position cavity and the reference cavity. The mode that is measured in each cavity resonates at 15 GHz and has a loaded quality factor that is below 200. Analytical expressions for the amplitude, phase and total energy of signals from long trains of bunches have been derived and the main conclusions are discussed. The results of the beam tests are presented. The variable gain of the receiver electronics has been characterized using beam excited signals and the form of the signals for different beam pulse lengths with the 2/3  ns bunch spacing has been observed. The sensitivity of the reference cavity signal to charge and the horizontal position signal to beam offset have been measured and are compared with theoretical predictions based on laboratory measurements of the BPM pickup and the form of the resonant cavity modes as determined by numerical simulation. Finally, the BPM was calibrated so that the beam position jitter at the BPM location could be measured. It is expected that the beam jitter scales linearly with the beam size and so the results are compared to predicted values for the latter.

  1. Long bunch trains measured using a prototype cavity beam position monitor for the Compact Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinan, F. J.; Boogert, S. T.; Farabolini, W.; Lefevre, T.; Lunin, A.; Lyapin, A.; Søby, L.; Towler, J.; Wendt, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires beam position monitors (BPMs) with 50 nm spatial resolution for alignment of the beam line elements in the main linac and beam delivery system. Furthermore, the BPMs must be able to make multiple independent measurements within a single 156 ns long bunch train. A prototype cavity BPM for CLIC has been manufactured and tested on the probe beam line at the 3rd CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN. The transverse beam position is determined from the electromagnetic resonant modes excited by the beam in the two cavities of the pickup, the position cavity and the reference cavity. The mode that is measured in each cavity resonates at 15 GHz and has a loaded quality factor that is below 200. Analytical expressions for the amplitude, phase and total energy of signals from long trains of bunches have been derived and the main conclusions are discussed. The results of the beam tests are presented. The variable gain of the receiver electronics has been characterized using beam excited signals and the form of the signals for different beam pulse lengths with the 2 /3 ns bunch spacing has been observed. The sensitivity of the reference cavity signal to charge and the horizontal position signal to beam offset have been measured and are compared with theoretical predictions based on laboratory measurements of the BPM pickup and the form of the resonant cavity modes as determined by numerical simulation. Finally, the BPM was calibrated so that the beam position jitter at the BPM location could be measured. It is expected that the beam jitter scales linearly with the beam size and so the results are compared to predicted values for the latter.

  2. La construcción de audiencias en Internet a través de los cebos de clics

    OpenAIRE

    Gracia Biarge, Pablo

    2018-01-01

    El presente trabajo tiene como objetivo estudiar el papel de los cebos de clics en la prensa digital y su influencia en la calidad y veracidad de la información publicada. Para ello se analizarán diversos casos ilustrativos y se realizarán entrevistas a profesionales, además de contar con el apoyo teórico de autores y otros profesionales conocedores de este fenómeno. El present treball té com a objectiu estudiar el paper dels esquers de clics en la premsa digital i la seva influència en...

  3. Hosing Instability of the Drive Electron Beam in the E157 Plasma-Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blue, Brent Edward

    2005-01-01

    In the plasma-wakefield experiment at SLAC, known as E157, an ultra-relativistic electron beam is used to both excite and witness a plasma wave for advanced accelerator applications. If the beam is tilted, then it will undergo transverse oscillations inside of the plasma. These oscillations can grow exponentially via an instability know as the electron hose instability. The linear theory of electron-hose instability in a uniform ion column predicts that for the parameters of the E157 experiment (beam charge, bunch length, and plasma density) a growth of the centroid offset should occur. Analysis of the E157 data has provided four critical results. The first was that the incoming beam did have a tilt. The tilt was much smaller than the radius and was measured to be 5.3 (micro)m/(delta) z at the entrance of the plasma (IP1.) The second was the beam centroid oscillates in the ion channel at half the frequency of the beam radius (betatron beam oscillations), and these oscillations can be predicted by the envelope equation. Third, up to the maximum operating plasma density of E157 (∼2 x 10 14 cm -3 ), no growth of the centroid offset was measured. Finally, time-resolved data of the beam shows that up to this density, no significant growth of the tail of the beam (up to 8ps from the centroid) occurred even though the beam had an initial tilt

  4. Hosing Instability of the Drive Electron Beam in the E157 Plasma-Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, Brent Edward; /SLAC /UCLA

    2005-10-10

    In the plasma-wakefield experiment at SLAC, known as E157, an ultra-relativistic electron beam is used to both excite and witness a plasma wave for advanced accelerator applications. If the beam is tilted, then it will undergo transverse oscillations inside of the plasma. These oscillations can grow exponentially via an instability know as the electron hose instability. The linear theory of electron-hose instability in a uniform ion column predicts that for the parameters of the E157 experiment (beam charge, bunch length, and plasma density) a growth of the centroid offset should occur. Analysis of the E157 data has provided four critical results. The first was that the incoming beam did have a tilt. The tilt was much smaller than the radius and was measured to be 5.3 {micro}m/{delta}{sub z} at the entrance of the plasma (IP1.) The second was the beam centroid oscillates in the ion channel at half the frequency of the beam radius (betatron beam oscillations), and these oscillations can be predicted by the envelope equation. Third, up to the maximum operating plasma density of E157 ({approx}2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}), no growth of the centroid offset was measured. Finally, time-resolved data of the beam shows that up to this density, no significant growth of the tail of the beam (up to 8ps from the centroid) occurred even though the beam had an initial tilt.

  5. Drive Stands

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electrical Systems Laboratory (ESL)houses numerous electrically driven drive stands. A drive stand consists of an electric motor driving a gearbox and a mounting...

  6. Results on the interaction of an intense bunched electron beam with resonant cavities at 35 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Gardelle, J; Rullier, J L; Vermare, C; Wuensch, Walter; Lidia, S M; Westenskow, G A; Donohue, J T; Meurdesoif, Y; Lekston, J M; MacKay, W W

    1999-01-01

    The Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) concept is currently being investigated both at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and at CERN. As part of this program, a 7 MeV, 1-kA electron beam produced by the PIVAIR accelerator at CESTA has been used to power a free electron laser (FEL) amplifier at 35 GHz. At the FEL exit, the bunched electron beam is transported and focused into a resonant cavity built by the CLIC group at CERN. The power and frequency of the microwave output generated when the bunched beam traverses two different cavities are measured. (7 refs).

  7. Prospects for the measurement of the Higgs Yukawa couplings to b and c quarks, and muons at CLIC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grefe, C.; Laštovička, Tomáš; Strube, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 2 (2013), s. 1-7 ISSN 1434-6044 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Higgs * branching * ratio * Yukawa * couplings * quarks * muons * CLIC * inear collider Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 5.436, year: 2013

  8. CLICs-dependent chloride efflux is an essential and proximal upstream event for NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tiantian; Lang, Xueting; Xu, Congfei; Wang, Xiaqiong; Gong, Tao; Yang, Yanqing; Cui, Jun; Bai, Li; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Wei; Zhou, Rongbin

    2017-08-04

    The NLRP3 inflammasome can sense different pathogens or danger signals, and has been reported to be involved in the development of many human diseases. Potassium efflux and mitochondrial damage are both reported to mediate NLRP3 inflammasome activation, but the underlying, orchestrating signaling events are still unclear. Here we show that chloride intracellular channels (CLIC) act downstream of the potassium efflux-mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) axis to promote NLRP3 inflammasome activation. NLRP3 agonists induce potassium efflux, which causes mitochondrial damage and ROS production. Mitochondrial ROS then induces the translocation of CLICs to the plasma membrane for the induction of chloride efflux to promote NEK7-NLRP3 interaction, inflammasome assembly, caspase-1 activation, and IL-1β secretion. Thus, our results identify CLICs-dependent chloride efflux as an essential and proximal upstream event for NLRP3 activation.The NLRP3 inflammasome is key to the regulation of innate immunity against pathogens or stress, but the underlying signaling regulation is still unclear. Here the authors show that chloride intracellular channels (CLIC) interface between mitochondria stress and inflammasome activation to modulate inflammatory responses.

  9. Dementia & Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have to give up driving. Many people associate driving with self-reliance and freedom; the loss of driving privileges ... familiar roads and avoid long distances. Avoid heavy traffic and heavily traveled roads. Avoid driving at night and in bad weather. Reduce the ...

  10. Assembly Test of Elastic Averaging Technique to Improve Mechanical Alignment for Accelerating Structure Assemblies in CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Huopana, J

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is being studied at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e- collider [1]. The manufacturing and assembly tolerances for the required RF-components are important for the final efficiency and for the operation of CLIC. The proper function of an accelerating structure is very sensitive to errors in shape and location of the accelerating cavity. This causes considerable issues in the field of mechanical design and manufacturing. Currently the design of the accelerating structures is a disk design. Alternatively it is possible to create the accelerating assembly from quadrants, which favour the mass manufacturing. The functional shape inside of the accelerating structure remains the same and a single assembly uses less parts. The alignment of these quadrants has been previously made kinematic by using steel pins or spheres to align the pieces together. This method proved to be a quite tedious and time consuming method of assembly. To limit the number of different error sources, a meth...

  11. RGA studies on aluminium chambers for transport line-2 of CLIC facility at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, K.V.A.N.P.S.; Yadav, Praveen Kumar; Sindal, B.K.; Tiwari, S.K.; Tripti, B.; Shukla, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    The Aluminium Chambers for Transport Line-2 (TL-2) of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) facility were developed by RRCAT, Indore under the CERN-DAE collaboration work. The ultimate vacuum required for these chambers is in 10 -10 mbar range. The design and fabrication of the chambers were done at Workshop-A, RRCAT, Indore. Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) Section at RRCAT, Indore was involved in qualifying tests of these chambers for their ultimate vacuum testing and the residual gas spectrum studies as per CERN requirements. The UHV testing part was established and the RGA studies were conducted using Residual Gas Analyser (RGA, 1-100 AMU range, Make: Spectra/MKS, USA). The RGAs were used for vacuum diagnostics like checking for leaks and the vacuum quality in the chambers. Using the RGA, we could also observe out the pumping speed behaviour of a UHV Gauge (Varian UHV-24 type) and the retention-cum-evaluation of captured gases by Sputter Ion Pump was also studied. In this paper, these experiences are reported during ultimate testing of TL-2 chambers for CLIC facility. (author)

  12. Distracted driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including maps) The Dangers of Talking on the Phone While Driving You are four times more likely to get ... of reach. If you are caught using a phone while driving, you may risk a ticket or fine. Most ...

  13. Distracted Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and increased awareness of distracted driving using radio advertisements, news stories, and similar media. After the projects ... available at www.trafficsafetymarketing.gov . Distracted Driving Enforcement – TV Ads (Paid). For re-tagging, go to: www. ...

  14. CLIC5 stabilizes membrane-actin filament linkages at the base of hair cell stereocilia in a molecular complex with radixin, taperin, and myosin VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Felipe T; Andrade, Leonardo R; Tanda, Soichi; Grati, M'hamed; Plona, Kathleen L; Gagnon, Leona H; Johnson, Kenneth R; Kachar, Bechara; Berryman, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Chloride intracellular channel 5 protein (CLIC5) was originally isolated from microvilli in complex with actin binding proteins including ezrin, a member of the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) family of membrane-cytoskeletal linkers. CLIC5 concentrates at the base of hair cell stereocilia and is required for normal hearing and balance in mice, but its functional significance is poorly understood. This study investigated the role of CLIC5 in postnatal development and maintenance of hair bundles. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy of CLIC5-deficient jitterbug (jbg) mice revealed progressive fusion of stereocilia as early as postnatal day 10. Radixin (RDX), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Q (PTPRQ), and taperin (TPRN), deafness-associated proteins that also concentrate at the base of stereocilia, were mislocalized in fused stereocilia of jbg mice. TPRQ and RDX were dispersed even prior to stereocilia fusion. Biochemical assays showed interaction of CLIC5 with ERM proteins, TPRN, and possibly myosin VI (MYO6). In addition, CLIC5 and RDX failed to localize normally in fused stereocilia of MYO6 mutant mice. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which these proteins work together as a complex to stabilize linkages between the plasma membrane and subjacent actin cytoskeleton at the base of stereocilia. © Published 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  15. Summary and Conclusions of the First DESY Test Beam User Workshop arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Arling, Jan-Hendrik; Bandiera, Laura; Behnke, Ties; Dannheim, Dominik; Diener, Ralf; Dreyling-Eschweiler, Jan; Ehrlichmann, Heiko; Gerbershagen, Andreas; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Hayrapetyan, Avetik; Kaminski, Jochen; Kroll, Jiri; Martinengo, Paolo; Meyners, Norbert; Müntz, Christian; Poley, Luise; Schwenker, Benjamin; Stanitzki, Marcel

    On October 5/6, 2017, DESY hosted the first DESY Test Beam User Workshop [1] which took place in Hamburg. Fifty participants from different user communities, ranging from LHC (ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, LHCb) to FAIR (CBM, PANDA), DUNE, Belle-II, future linear colliders (ILC, CLIC) and generic detector R&D presented their experiences with the DESY II Test Beam Facility, their concrete plans for the upcoming years and a first estimate of their needs for beam time in the long-term future beyond 2025. A special focus was also on additional improvements to the facility beyond its current capabilities.

  16. What extent will small-scale laser-beam fluctuations seed the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in direct-drive targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skupsky, S.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    The nonuniformity in laser energy deposition on a spherical target is calculated for multiple overlapping beams having small-scale fluctuations. Such nonuniformities can imprint themselves on the target surface and ''seed'' the Rayleigh-Taylor instability early in the pulse before an adequate, smoothing plasma-atmosphere has been established. The resulting growth of target deformation during the implosion is estimated

  17. Electric drives

    CERN Document Server

    Boldea, Ion

    2005-01-01

    ENERGY CONVERSION IN ELECTRIC DRIVESElectric Drives: A DefinitionApplication Range of Electric DrivesEnergy Savings Pay Off RapidlyGlobal Energy Savings Through PEC DrivesMotor/Mechanical Load MatchMotion/Time Profile MatchLoad Dynamics and StabilityMultiquadrant OperationPerformance IndexesProblemsELECTRIC MOTORS FOR DRIVESElectric Drives: A Typical ConfigurationElectric Motors for DrivesDC Brush MotorsConventional AC MotorsPower Electronic Converter Dependent MotorsEnergy Conversion in Electric Motors/GeneratorsPOWER ELECTRONIC CONVERTERS (PECs) FOR DRIVESPower Electronic Switches (PESs)The

  18. Test facility for investigation of heating of 30 GHz accelerating structure imitator for the CLIC project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elzhov, A.V.; Ginzburg, N.S.; Kaminsky, A.K.; Kuzikov, S.V.; Perelstein, E.A.; Peskov, N.Yu.; Petelin, M.I.; Sedykh, S.N.; Sergeev, A.P.; Sergeev, A.S.; Syratchev, I.; Zaitsev, N.I.

    2004-01-01

    Since 2001 an experimental test facility for investigation of lifetime of a copper material, with respect to multiple RF pulse actions, was set up on the basis of the JINR (Dubna) FEM oscillator, in collaboration with IAP RAS (Nizhny Novgorod). A high-Q copper cavity, which simulates the parameters of the accelerating structure of the collider CLIC at an operating frequency of 30 GHz, is used in the investigation. The experimental setup consists of a wavebeam injector--FEM oscillator (power of ∼25 MW, pulse duration up to 200 ns, spectral bandwidth not higher than 0.1%), a quasi-optic two-mirror transmission line, a wave-type converter, and a testing cavity. The frequency and transmission features of the components of the quasi-optic line were analyzed

  19. Test facility for investigation of heating of 30 GHz accelerating structure imitator for the CLIC project

    CERN Document Server

    Elzhov, A V; Kaminsky, A K; Kuzikov, S V; Perelshtejn, E A; Peskov, N Yu; Petelin, M I; Sedykh, S N; Sergeev, A P; Sergeev, A S; Syratchev, I V; Zaitsev, N I

    2004-01-01

    Since 2001 an experimental test facility for investigation of lifetime of a copper material, with respect to multiple RF pulse actions, was set up on the basis of the JINR (Dubna) FEM oscillator, in collaboration with IAP RAS (Nizhny Novgorod). A high-Q copper cavity, which simulates the parameters of the accelerating structure of the collider CLIC at an operating frequency of 30GHz, is used in the investigation. The experimental setup consists of a wavebeam injector - FEM oscillator (power of similar to 25MW, pulse duration up to 200ns, spectral bandwidth not higher than 0.1%), a quasi-optic two-mirror transmission line, a wave-type converter, and a testing cavity. The frequency and transmission features of the components of the quasi-optic line were analyzed.

  20. Beam-Beam Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, W; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities

  1. Thermo-structural analysis of the rf-induced pulsed surface heating of the CLIC accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Huopana, Jouni Juhani

    2006-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is being studied at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e- collider. The acceleration of the particles is done by RF (Radio Frequency). The surfaces of the RF (radio frequency) accelerating cavities are exposed to high pulsed RF currents which induce cyclic thermal stresses. These cyclic stresses are crucial for the fatigue lifetime of the cavities. To study the fatigue phenomenon properly the induced stresses must be well known. ANSYS FEM simulations were made to study the thermo-structural behaviour of the CLIC accelerating structure in copper zirconium, bimetallic and diamond coated constructions. The simulations showed the existence of high thermal stresses and low stress level shockwaves. It was also shown that the bimetallic structure increases stress values due to the differences in material properties. Diamond coating was found to reduce the thermal stresses.

  2. Investigation of Hadronic Higgs Decays at CLIC at 350 GeV & Scintillator Studies for a Highly Granular Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081006; Simon, Frank

    The energy frontier of accelerator-based physics has been dominated, for the best part of the last ten years, by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This remarkable accelerator has provided scientists with proton-proton collisions up to 13 TeV in energy, that led to exciting progress in the understanding of particle physics, culminating in the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012. Despite its successes, the LHC carries an intrinsic limitation: since it collides composite particles, the initial conditions of each interaction cannot be completely determined. This limits the precision with which some observables can be measured. A new generation of colliders, designed for the acceleration of elementary electrons and positrons, is being developed to reach higher precision and to provide complementary discovery potential for new phenomena. The two most mature projects in this category are the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). One key component of the physics program at CLIC i...

  3. Special session on environment and energy, and repeated emphasis from early-'80s onwards, hybrid-drive targets for penetrating beams, that encompasses ultra high intensity lasers and/or particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    In this special session, we discuss global climate change concerns, as well as cleanup of wastes and/or toxic materials, their relations to energy and other technologies. We especially bring together scientists to discuss available and/or developable technologies of amelioration or cleanup, for consideration of unusual uses of Lasers, Particle Beams and other plasma Phenomena. copyright American Institute of Physics 1994

  4. Pile Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Machine-oriented structural engineering firm TERA, Inc. is engaged in a project to evaluate the reliability of offshore pile driving prediction methods to eventually predict the best pile driving technique for each new offshore oil platform. Phase I Pile driving records of 48 offshore platforms including such information as blow counts, soil composition and pertinent construction details were digitized. In Phase II, pile driving records were statistically compared with current methods of prediction. Result was development of modular software, the CRIPS80 Software Design Analyzer System, that companies can use to evaluate other prediction procedures or other data bases.

  5. Design and Construction of a Beam Position Monitor Prototype for the Test Beam Line of the CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Garrigos, Juan Jose

    2008-01-01

    A prototype of Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the Test Beam Line (TBL) of the 3rd CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN has been designed and constructed at IFIC in collaboration with the CERN CTF3 team. The design is a scaled version of the BPMs of the CTF3 linac. The design goals are a resolution of 5 μm, an overall precision of 50 μm, in a circular vacuum chamber of 24 mm, in a frequency bandwidth between 10 kHz and 100MHz.The BPMis an inductive type BPM. Beam positions are derived from the image current created by a high frequency electron bunch beam into four electrodes surrounding the vacuum chamber. In this work we describe the mechanical design and construction, the description of the associated electronics together with the first calibration measurements performed in a wire test bench at CERN.

  6. Impaired Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Get the Facts What Works: Strategies to Increase Car Seat and Booster Seat ... narcotics. 3 That’s one percent of the 111 million self-reported episodes of alcohol-impaired driving among U.S. ...

  7. Fundamental Design Principles of Linear Collider Damping Rings, with an Application to CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Potier, J P

    2000-01-01

    Damping Rings for Linear Colliders have to produce very small normalised emittances at a high repetition rate. A previous paper presented analytical expressions for the equilibrium emittance of an arc cell as a function of the deflection angle per dipole. In addition, an expression for the lattice parameters providing the minimum emittance, and a strategy to stay close to this, were proposed. This analytical approach is extended to the detailed design of Damping Rings, taking into account the straight sections and the damping wigglers. Complete rings, including wiggler and injection insections, were modelled with the MAD [1] program, and their performance was found to be in good agreement with the analytical calculation. With such an approach it is shown that a Damping Ring corresponding to the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) parameters at 0.5 and 1 TeV centre-of-mass energy, and tunable for two different sets of emittance and injection repetition rate, can be designed using the same ring layout.

  8. Characterisation of capacitively coupled HV/HR-CMOS sensor chips for the CLIC vertex detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremastiotis, I.

    2017-12-01

    The capacitive coupling between an active sensor and a readout ASIC has been considered in the framework of the CLIC vertex detector study. The CLICpix Capacitively Coupled Pixel Detector (C3PD) is a High-Voltage CMOS sensor chip produced in a commercial 180 nm HV-CMOS process for this purpose. The sensor was designed to be connected to the CLICpix2 readout chip. It therefore matches the dimensions of the readout chip, featuring a matrix of 128×128 square pixels with 25μm pitch. The sensor chip has been produced with the standard value for the substrate resistivity (~20 Ωcm) and it has been characterised in standalone testing mode, before receiving and testing capacitively coupled assemblies. The standalone measurement results show a rise time of ~20 ns for a power consumption of 5μW/pixel. Production of the C3PD HV-CMOS sensor chip with higher substrate resistivity wafers (~20, 80, 200 and 1000 Ωcm) is foreseen. The expected benefits of the higher substrate resistivity will be studied using future assemblies with the readout chip.

  9. Characterisation of capacitively coupled HV/HR-CMOS sensor chips for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)756402

    2017-01-01

    The capacitive coupling between an active sensor and a readout ASIC has been considered in the framework of the CLIC vertex detector study. The CLICpix Capacitively Coupled Pixel Detector (C3PD) is a High-Voltage CMOS sensor chip produced in a commercial 180 nm HV-CMOS process for this purpose. The sensor was designed to be connected to the CLICpix2 readout chip. It therefore matches the dimensions of the readout chip, featuring a matrix of 128 × 128 square pixels with 25 μm pitch. The sensor chip has been produced with the standard value for the substrate resistivity (∼ 20 Ωcm) and it has been characterised in standalone testing mode, before receiving and testing capacitively coupled assemblies. The standalone measurement results show a rise time of ∼ 20 ns for a power consumption of 5 μW/pixel. Production of the C3PD HV-CMOS sensor chip with higher substrate resistivity wafers (∼ 20, 80, 200 and 1000 Ωcm) is foreseen. The expected benefits of the higher substrate resistivity will be studied using...

  10. Driving things

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard

    2015-01-01

    I explore how participants organise involvement with objects brought into the car, relative to the demands of driving and social activity. Objects in cars commonly include phones or other technologies, food, body care products, texts, clothing, bags and carry items, toys, and even animals...... 2004, Haddington et al. 2012). I focus here especially on how the practical and interactional work of locating, seeing, placing, handling, hearing, and relinquishing, is ordered and accomplished relative to the emerging and contingent demands of both driving and social participation......, such that involvement with objects is constituted as secondary to driving in a multiactivity setting (e.g. Haddington et al. 2014). We see how events with, for, of, and even by objects can occur as predictable, planned and even designed for (e.g. changing glasses, applying body lotion), or might be unexpected...

  11. Study of the hybrid controller electronics for the nano-stabilization of mechanical vibrations of CLIC quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona, P Fernandez; Artoos, K; Esposito, M; Guinchard, M; Janssens, S; Kuzmin, A; Ballester, R Moron; Collette, C

    2011-01-01

    In order to achieve the required levels of luminosity in the CLIC linear collider, mechanical stabilization of quadrupoles to the nanometre level is required. The paper describes a design of hybrid electronics combining an analogue controller and digital communication with the main machine controller. The choice of local analogue control ensures the required low latency while still keeping sufficiently low noise level. Furthermore, it reduces the power consumption, rack space and cost. Sensitivity to radiation single events upsets is reduced compared to a digital controller. The digital part is required for fine tuning and real time monitoring via digitization of critical parameters.

  12. Beam Delivery Simulation - Recent Developments and Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00232566; Boogert, Stewart Takashi; Garcia-Morales, H; Gibson, Stephen; Kwee-Hinzmann, Regina; Nevay, Laurence James; Deacon, Lawrence Charles

    2015-01-01

    Beam Delivery Simulation (BDSIM) is a particle tracking code that simulates the passage of particles through both the magnetic accelerator lattice as well as their interaction with the material of the accelerator itself. The Geant4 toolkit is used to give a full range of physics processes needed to simulate both the interaction of primary particles and the production and subsequent propagation of secondaries. BDSIM has already been used to simulate linear accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), but it has recently been adapted to simulate circular accelerators as well, producing loss maps for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this paper the most recent developments, which extend BDSIM’s functionality as well as improve its efficiency are presented. Improvement and refactorisation of the tracking algorithms are presented alongside improved automatic geometry construction for increased particle tracking speed.

  13. Comb-drive actuators for large displacements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legtenberg, Rob; Legtenberg, R.; Groeneveld, A.W.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    The design, fabrication and experimental results of lateral-comb-drive actuators for large displacements at low driving voltages is presented. A comparison of several suspension designs is given, and the lateral large deflection behaviour of clamped-clamped beams and a folded flexure design is

  14. Community Drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke

    2018-01-01

    Schools and educational institutions are challenged by not adequately educating students for independent knowledge collaboration and solving of complex societal challenges (Bundsgaard & Hansen, 2016; Slot et al., 2017). As an alternative strategy to formal learning has Community-driven research...... opportunity to break boundaries between research institutions and surrounding communities through the involvement of new types of actors, knowledge forms and institutions (OECD, 2011). This paper presents the project Community Drive a three year cross disciplinary community-driven game– and data-based project....... In the paper we present how the project Community Drive initiated in May 2018 is based on results from pilot projects conducted from 2014 – 2017. Overall these studies showed that it is a strong motivational factor for students to be given the task to change their living conditions through redesign...

  15. Polar-Direct-Drive Experiments on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, F.J.; Craxton, R.S.; Bonino, M.J.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Knauer, J.P.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Noyes, S.G.; Radha, P.B.; Seka, W.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk

    2006-01-01

    Polar direct drive (PDD), a promising ignition path for the NIF while the beams are in the indirect-drive configuration, is currently being investigated on the OMEGA laser system by using 40 beams in six rings repointed to more uniformly illuminate the target. The OMEGA experiments are being performed with standard, ''warm'' targets with and without the use of an equatorial ''Saturn-like'' toroidally shaped CH ring. Target implosion symmetry is diagnosed with framed x-ray backlighting using additional OMEGA beams and by time-integrated x-ray imaging of the stagnating core

  16. CTF3 Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Ronald D

    2003-03-13

    The design of CLIC is based on a two-beam scheme, where short pulses of high power 30 GHz RF are extracted from a drive beam running parallel to the main beam. The 3rd generation CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) will demonstrate the generation of the drive beam with the appropriate time structure, the extraction of 30 GHz RF power from this beam, as well as acceleration of a probe beam with 30 GHz RF cavities. The project makes maximum use of existing equipment and infrastructure of the LPI complex, which became available after the closure of LEP.

  17. Electric drives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-10-01

    Several electric vehicles have been tested in long-term tests, i.e. an electric passenger car (maximum speed 115 km/h) and several busses for use in pedestrians' zones, spas, airports, natural reserves, and urban transportation (DUO busses). The ICE high-speed train is discussed in some detail, i.e. its aeroacoustic and aerodynamic design, running gear, computer-controlled drives and brakes, diagnostic systems, and electrical equipment. The Berlin Maglev system is mentioned as well as current inverters in rail vehicles. (HWJ).

  18. Lower hybrid current drive in shaped tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesner, J.

    1993-01-01

    A time dependent lower hybrid current drive tokamak simulation code has been developed. This code combines the BALDUR tokamak simulation code and the Bonoli/Englade lower hybrid current drive code and permits the study of the interaction of lower hybrid current drive with neutral beam heating in shaped cross-section plasmas. The code is time dependent and includes the beam driven and bootstrap currents in addition to the current driven by the lower hybrid system. Examples of simulations are shown for the PBX-M experiment which include the effect of cross section shaping on current drive, ballooning mode stabilization by current profile control and sawtooth stabilization. A critical question in current drive calculations is the radial transport of the energetic electrons. The authors have developed a response function technique to calculate radial transport in the presence of an electric field. The consequences of the combined influences of radial diffusion and electric field acceleration are discussed

  19. Heating and current drive on NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. R.; Batchelor, D.; Carter, M.; Hosea, J.; Ignat, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Majeski, R.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Rogers, J. H.; Schilling, G.

    1997-04-01

    Low aspect ratio tokamaks pose interesting new challenges for heating and current drive. The NSTX (National Spherical Tokamak Experiment) device to be built at Princeton is a low aspect ratio toroidal device that has the achievement of high toroidal beta (˜45%) and non-inductive operation as two of its main research goals. To achieve these goals significant auxiliary heating and current drive systems are required. Present plans include ECH (Electron cyclotron heating) for pre-ionization and start-up assist, HHFW (high harmonic fast wave) for heating and current drive and eventually NBI (neutral beam injection) for heating, current drive and plasma rotation.

  20. Heating and current drive on NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.R.; Batchelor, D.; Carter, M.; Hosea, J.; Ignat, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Majeski, R.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.

    1997-01-01

    Low aspect ratio tokamaks pose interesting new challenges for heating and current drive. The NSTX (National Spherical Tokamak Experiment) device to be built at Princeton is a low aspect ratio toroidal device that has the achievement of high toroidal beta (∼45%) and non-inductive operation as two of its main research goals. To achieve these goals significant auxiliary heating and current drive systems are required. Present plans include ECH (Electron cyclotron heating) for pre-ionization and start-up assist, HHFW (high harmonic fast wave) for heating and current drive and eventually NBI (neutral beam injection) for heating, current drive and plasma rotation. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  1. Safe driving for teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driving and teenagers; Teens and safe driving; Automobile safety - teenage drivers ... months before taking friends as passengers. Teenage-related driving deaths occur more often in certain conditions. OTHER SAFETY TIPS FOR TEENS Reckless driving is still a ...

  2. Design and standalone characterisation of a capacitively coupled HV-CMOS sensor chip for the CLIC vertex detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremastiotis, I.; Ballabriga, R.; Campbell, M.; Dannheim, D.; Fiergolski, A.; Hynds, D.; Kulis, S.; Peric, I.

    2017-09-01

    The concept of capacitive coupling between sensors and readout chips is under study for the vertex detector at the proposed high-energy CLIC electron positron collider. The CLICpix Capacitively Coupled Pixel Detector (C3PD) is an active High-Voltage CMOS sensor, designed to be capacitively coupled to the CLICpix2 readout chip. The chip is implemented in a commercial 180 nm HV-CMOS process and contains a matrix of 128×128 square pixels with 25μm pitch. First prototypes have been produced with a standard resistivity of ~20 Ωcm for the substrate and tested in standalone mode. The results show a rise time of ~20 ns, charge gain of 190 mV/ke- and ~40 e- RMS noise for a power consumption of 4.8μW/pixel. The main design aspects, as well as standalone measurement results, are presented.

  3. Theoretical and practical feasibility demonstration of a micrometric remotely controlled pre-alignment system for the CLIC linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mainaud Durand, H; Chritin, N; Griffet, S; Kemppinen, J; Sosin, M; Touze, T

    2011-01-01

    The active pre-alignment of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is one of the key points of the project: the components must be pre-aligned w.r.t. a straight line within a few microns over a sliding window of 200 m, along the two linacs of 20 km each. The proposed solution consists of stretched wires of more than 200 m, overlapping over half of their length, which will be the reference of alignment. Wire Positioning Sensors (WPS), coupled to the supports to be pre-aligned, will perform precise and accurate measurements within a few microns w.r.t. these wires. A micrometric fiducialisation of the components and a micrometric alignment of the components on common supports will make the strategy of pre-alignment complete. In this paper, the global strategy of active pre-alignment is detailed and illustrated by the latest results demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed solution.

  4. Efficient Collimation and Machine Protection for the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R W

    2006-01-01

    We present a new approach to machine protection and collimation in CLIC, separating these two functions: If emergency dumps in the linac protect the downstream beam line against drive-beam failures, the energy collimation only needs to clean the beam tails and can be compact. Overall, the length of the beam-delivery system (BDS) is significantly reduced.

  5. Alignement général du CLIC: stratégie et progrès

    CERN Document Server

    Mainaud-Durand, H

    2008-01-01

    La faisabilité concernant le pré-alignement actif du CLIC sera démontrée si l?on peut prouver qu?il existe une référence et ses capteurs associés permettant l?alignement des composants à mieux que 3 microns (1?). Pour répondre à ce challenge, une méthode de mesure d?écarts à un fil tendu est proposée, basée sur 40 ans de pratique de cette technique au CERN. Quelques problèmes demeurent concernant cette méthode : la connaissance de la forme du fil tendu utilisé comme référence droite, la détermination du géoïde à la précision souhaitée et le développement de capteurs bas coût permettant des mesures sub-micrométriques. Des études ont été entreprises afin de lever les derniers points en suspens, pendant que cette solution est intégrée dans une proposition concernant l?alignement général du CLIC. Cela implique un grand nombre d?interactions au niveau du projet, dans des domaines aussi différents que le génie civil, l?intégration, la physique du faisceau, la métrologie des �...

  6. Prediction for CP violation via electric dipole moment of τ lepton in γγ→τ{sup +}τ{sup −} process at CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atağ, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University,06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey); Gürkanlı, E. [Department of Physics, Sinop University,57000 Sinop (Turkey); Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University,06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-06-21

    Pair production of tau leptons in two photon collision γγ→τ{sup +}τ{sup −} is studied at CLIC to test CP violating QED couplings of tau leptons. CP violating effects are investigated using tau pair spin correlations which are observed through the hadronic decay of each τ into πν. Competitive bounds with previous works on the electric dipole moment from CP odd terms have been obtained.

  7. Beam-beam phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.

    1980-01-01

    In colliding beam storage rings the beam collision regions are generally so short that the beam-beam interaction can be considered as a series of evenly spaced non-linear kicks superimposed on otherwise stable linear oscillations. Most of the numerical studies on computers were carried out in just this manner. But for some reason this model has not been extensively employed in analytical studies. This is perhaps because all analytical work has so far been done by mathematicians pursuing general transcendental features of non-linear mechanics for whom this specific model of the specific system of colliding beams is too parochial and too repugnantly physical. Be that as it may, this model is of direct interest to accelerator physicists and is amenable to (1) further simplification, (2) physical approximation, and (3) solution by analogy to known phenomena

  8. Radiation therapy apparatus having retractable beam stopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coad, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to a radiation therapy apparatus which utilized a linear translation mechanism for positioning a beam stopper. An apparatus is described wherein the beam stopper is pivotally attached to the therapy machine with an associated drive motor in such a way that the beam stopper retracts linearly

  9. Beam dynamics in the final focus section of the future linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)739431; TOMAS, Rogelio

    The exploration of new physics in the ``Tera electron-Volt''~(TeV) scale with precision measurements requires lepton colliders providing high luminosities to obtain enough statistics for the particle interaction analysis. In order to achieve design luminosity values, linear colliders feature nanometer beam spot sizes at the Interaction~Point~(IP).\\par In addition to several effects affecting the luminosity, three main issues to achieve the beam size demagnification in the Final Focus Section (FFS) of the accelerator are the chromaticity correction, the synchrotron radiation effects and the correction of the lattice errors.\\par This thesis considers two important aspects for linear colliders: push the limits of linear colliders design, in particular the chromaticity correction and the radiation effects at 3~TeV, and the instrumentation and experimental work on beam stabilization in a test facility.\\par The current linear collider projects, CLIC~\\cite{CLICdes} and ILC~\\cite{ILCdes}, have lattices designed using...

  10. Beam dynamics studies and emittance optimization in the CTF3 linac at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Urschütz, Peter; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Ferrari, Arnaud; Tecker, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Small transverse beam emittances and well-known lattice functions are crucial for the 30 GHz power production in the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) and for the commissioning of the Delay Loop of the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3). Following beam dynamics simulation results, two additional solenoids were installed in the CTF3 injector in order to improve the emittance. During the runs in 2005 and 2006, an intensive measurement campaign to determine Twiss parameters and beam sizes was launched. The results obtained by means of quadrupole scans for different modes of operation suggest emittances well below the nominal .n,rms = 100 ?Î?Êm and a good agreement with PARMELA simulations.

  11. Extended driving impairs nocturnal driving performances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Sagaspe

    Full Text Available Though fatigue and sleepiness at the wheel are well-known risk factors for traffic accidents, many drivers combine extended driving and sleep deprivation. Fatigue-related accidents occur mainly at night but there is no experimental data available to determine if the duration of prior driving affects driving performance at night. Participants drove in 3 nocturnal driving sessions (3-5 am, 1-5 am and 9 pm-5 am on open highway. Fourteen young healthy men (mean age [+/-SD] = 23.4 [+/-1.7] years participated Inappropriate line crossings (ILC in the last hour of driving of each session, sleep variables, self-perceived fatigue and sleepiness were measured. Compared to the short (3-5 am driving session, the incidence rate ratio of inappropriate line crossings increased by 2.6 (95% CI, 1.1 to 6.0; P<.05 for the intermediate (1-5 am driving session and by 4.0 (CI, 1.7 to 9.4; P<.001 for the long (9 pm-5 am driving session. Compared to the reference session (9-10 pm, the incidence rate ratio of inappropriate line crossings were 6.0 (95% CI, 2.3 to 15.5; P<.001, 15.4 (CI, 4.6 to 51.5; P<.001 and 24.3 (CI, 7.4 to 79.5; P<.001, respectively, for the three different durations of driving. Self-rated fatigue and sleepiness scores were both positively correlated to driving impairment in the intermediate and long duration sessions (P<.05 and increased significantly during the nocturnal driving sessions compared to the reference session (P<.01. At night, extended driving impairs driving performances and therefore should be limited.

  12. Positron sources for electron-positron colliders application to the ILC and CLIC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    The increased demanding qualities for positron sources dedicated to e+e- colliders pushed on investigations oriented on new kinds of e+ sources. The different kinds of positron sources polarized and no polarized are considered. Their main features (intensity, emittance) are described and analysed. Comparison between the different sources is worked out. The characteristics of the positron beam available in the collision point are greatly depending on the capture device and on the positron accelerator. Different kinds of capture systems are considered and their qualities, compared. Intense positron sources which are necessary for the colliders require intense incident beams (electrons or photons). The large number of pairs created in the targets leads to important energy deposition and so, thermal heating, which associated to temperature gradients provoke mechanical stresses often destructive. Moreover, the important Coulomb collisions, can affect the atomic structure in crystal targets and the radiation resist...

  13. High-voltage pixel detectors in commercial CMOS technologies for ATLAS, CLIC and Mu3e experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Peric,I et al.

    2013-01-01

    High-voltage particle detectors in commercial CMOS technologies are a detector family that allows implementation of low-cost, thin and radiation-tolerant detectors with a high time resolution. In the R/D phase of the development, a radiation tolerance of 1015 neq=cm2 , nearly 100% detection efficiency and a spatial resolution of about 3 μm were demonstrated. Since 2011 the HV detectors have first applications: the technology is presently the main option for the pixel detector of the planned Mu3e experiment at PSI (Switzerland). Several prototype sensors have been designed in a standard 180 nm HV CMOS process and successfully tested. Thanks to its high radiation tolerance, the HV detectors are also seen at CERN as a promising alternative to the standard options for ATLAS upgrade and CLIC. In order to test the concept, within ATLAS upgrade R/D, we are currently exploring an active pixel detector demonstrator HV2FEI4; also implemented in the 180 nm HV process.

  14. Effect of PYTHIA8 tunes on event shapes and top-quark reconstruction in e$^+$e$^-$ annihilation at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, Sergei; Fischer, Andrew; Zhang, Jinlong

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of PYTHIA8 tunes on event simulation of e$^+$e$^-$ collisions with center-of-mass (CM) energies of 380 GeV and 3 TeV at the proposed CLIC collider. Event shapes, such as thrust, thrust major, thrust minor, oblateness, as well as particle multiplicities have been analyzed and relative differences with respect to the default PYTHIA8 tune were determined. The effect of tunes on top-mass reconstruction in the resolved and boosted regimes was analyzed. No statistically significant variation for reconstructed top masses using invariant masses of three jets was found for events with a CM energy of 380 GeV. For the fully boosted top reconstruction at a CM energy of 3 TeV, a significant shift in reconstructed top mass of about 700 MeV for the "Montull" tune was observed. This shift correlates with an increase in particle multiplicity compared to all other PYTHIA8 tunes.

  15. High-voltage pixel detectors in commercial CMOS technologies for ATLAS, CLIC and Mu3e experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Peric, Ivan; Backhaus, Malte; Barbero, Marlon; Benoit, Mathieu; Berger, Niklaus; Bompard, Frederic; Breugnon, Patrick; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Dannheim, Dominik; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feigl, Simon; Fischer, Peter; Fougeron, Denis; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Heim, Timon; Hügging, Fabian; Kiehn, Moritz; Kreidl, Christian; Krüger, Hans; La Rosa, Alessandro; Liu, Jian; Lütticke, Florian; Mariñas, Carlos; Meng, Lingxin; Miucci, Antonio; Münstermann, Daniel; Nguyen, Hong Hanh; Obermann, Theresa; Pangaud, Patrick; Perrevoort, Ann-Kathrin; Rozanov, Alexandre; Schöning, André; Schwenker, Benjamin; Wiedner, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    High-voltage particle detectors in commercial CMOS technologies are a detector family that allows implementation of low-cost, thin and radiation-tolerant detectors with a high time resolution. In the R/D phase of the development, a radiation tolerance of 10 15 n eq = cm 2 , nearly 100% detection ef fi ciency and a spatial resolution of about 3 μ m were demonstrated. Since 2011 the HV detectors have fi rst applications: the technology is presently the main option for the pixel detector of the planned Mu3e experiment at PSI (Switzerland). Several prototype sensors have been designed in a standard 180 nm HV CMOS process and successfully tested. Thanks to its high radiation tolerance, the HV detectors are also seen at CERN as a promising alternative to the standard options for ATLAS upgrade and CLIC. In order to test the concept, within ATLAS upgrade R/D, we are currently exploring an active pixel detector demonstrator HV2FEI4; also implemented in the 180 nm HV process

  16. Isochronous cyclotron for thermonuclear reactors driving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alenitskij, Yu.G.

    1998-01-01

    The main requirements to an accelerator as a part of an electronuclear power plant are considered. The range of the parameters of the accelerated proton and deuteron beams, for which the isochronous cyclotron is the most profitable, is proposed. An opportunity of using the cyclotron to drive the research reactors of various types is considered

  17. HARMONIC DRIVE SELECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr FOLĘGA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The variety of types and sizes currently in production harmonic drive is a problem in their rational choice. Properly selected harmonic drive must meet certain requirements during operation, and achieve the anticipated service life. The paper discusses the problems associated with the selection of the harmonic drive. It also presents the algorithm correct choice of harmonic drive. The main objective of this study was to develop a computer program that allows the correct choice of harmonic drive by developed algorithm.

  18. Coherent beam-beam effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    There are two physical pictures that describe the beam-beam interaction in a storage ring collider: The weak-strong and the strong-strong pictures. Both pictures play a role in determining the beam-beam behavior. This review addresses only the strong-strong picture. The corresponding beam dynamical effects are referred to as the coherent beam-beam effects. Some basic knowledge of the weak-strong picture is assumed. To be specific, two beams of opposite charges are considered. (orig.)

  19. Measurement of Beam Loss at the Australian Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, EB; Kastriotou, M; Boland, MJ; Jackson, PD; Rasool, RP; Schmidt, J; Welsch, CP

    2014-01-01

    The unprecedented requirements that new machines are setting on their diagnostic systems is leading to the development of new generation of devices with large dynamic range, sensitivity and time resolution. Beam loss detection is particularly challenging due to the large extension of new facilities that need to be covered with localized detector. Candidates to mitigate this problem consist of systems in which the sensitive part of the radiation detectors can be extended over long distance of beam lines. In this document we study the feasibility of a BLM system based on optical fiber as an active detector for an electron storage ring. The Australian Synchrotron (AS) comprises a 216m ring that stores electrons up to 3GeV. The Accelerator has recently claimed the world record ultra low transverse emittance (below pm rad) and its surroundings are rich in synchrotron radiation. Therefore, the AS provides beam conditions very similar to those expected in the CLIC/ILC damping rings. A qualitative benchmark of beam l...

  20. Superconducting wiggler magnets for beam-emittance damping rings

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-low emittance beams with a high bunch charge are necessary for the luminosity performance of linear electron-positron colliders, such as the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). An effective way to create ultra-low emittance beams with a high bunch charge is to use damping rings, or storage rings equipped with strong damping wiggler magnets. The remanent field of the permanent magnet materials and the ohmic losses in normal conductors limit the economically achievable pole field in accelerator magnets operated at around room temperature to below the magnetic saturation induction, which is 2.15 T for iron. In wiggler magnets, the pole field in the center of the gap is reduced further like the hyperbolic cosine of the ratio of the gap size and the period length multiplied by pi. Moreover, damping wiggler magnets require relatively large gaps because they have to accept the un-damped beam and to generate, at a small period length, a large magnetic flux density amplitude to effectively damp the beam emittance....

  1. Multi-beam linear accelerator EVT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teryaev, Vladimir E., E-mail: vladimir_teryaev@mail.ru [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Kazakov, Sergey Yu. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A novel electron multi-beam accelerator is presented. The accelerator, short-named EVT (Electron Voltage Transformer) belongs to the class of two-beam accelerators. It combines an RF generator and essentially an accelerator within the same vacuum envelope. Drive beam-lets and an accelerated beam are modulated in RF modulators and then bunches pass into an accelerating structure, comprising uncoupled with each other and inductive tuned cavities, where the energy transfer from the drive beams to the accelerated beam occurs. A phasing of bunches is solved by choice correspond distances between gaps of the adjacent cavities. Preliminary results of numerical simulations and the initial specification of EVT operating in S-band, with a 60 kV gun and generating a 2.7 A, 1.1 MV beam at its output is presented. A relatively high efficiency of 67% and high design average power suggest that EVT can find its use in industrial applications.

  2. Simulations of the effects of a superconducting damping wiggler on a short bunched electron beam at ANKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gethmann, Julian; Bernhard, Axel; Blomley, Edmund; Hillenbrand, Steffen; Mueller, Anke-Susanne; Smale, Nigel [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT) (Germany); Zolotarev, Konstantin [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    (As a part of the CLIC collaboration) A CLIC damping wiggler prototype has been installed at the ANKA synchrotron light source in order to validate the technical design of the 3 T superconducting conduction cooled wiggler and its cryostat and to cary out studies on beam dynamical aspects including collective effects. The latter one will be the main focus in this talk. Collective effects that will occur in damping rings are an issue in ANKA's short bunch operation as well. To simulate these effects the accelerator's model including its insertion device has to be very accurate. Such a model of the ANKA storage ring in short bunch operation mode has been developed in elegant. Simulations with the damping wiggler switched on and off have been performed in order to investigate effects of the wiggler on different machine parameters. These new results will be discussed with regard to the question if on the one hand the wiggler could be used for diagnostic purposes and if on the other hand the wiggler's impact on the beam dynamics is changed by the collective effects.

  3. Electric Vehicle - Economical driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, VCE, Steen V.; Schøn, Henriette

    1999-01-01

    Instruct the reader in getting most satisfaction out of an EV, especially concerning driving and loading.......Instruct the reader in getting most satisfaction out of an EV, especially concerning driving and loading....

  4. Dementia and driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000028.htm Dementia and driving To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. If your loved one has dementia , deciding when they can no longer drive may ...

  5. Gear bearing drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor); Weinberg, Brian (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  6. Antihistamines and driving safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, J F

    1988-10-27

    The results of two placebo-controlled driving performance studies confirm laboratory data showing that the nonsedating antihistamine terfenadine does not influence the driving performance of users. The amplitude of vehicle weaving calculated for drivers who received this agent did not differ from control values. Neither terfenadine nor loratadine, another nonsedating antihistamine, potentiated the adverse effects of alcohol on driving performance.

  7. Driving After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 23,2015 Can I drive after a stroke? Driving is often a major concern after someone has a stroke. It’s not unusual for stroke survivors to want to drive. Being able to get around after a stroke is important. Safety behind the wheel is even more important after ...

  8. Sequential Dependencies in Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Anup; Tran, Cuong; Wilder, Matthew H.; Mozer, Michael C.; Trivedi, Mohan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of recent experience on current behavior has been studied extensively in simple laboratory tasks. We explore the nature of sequential effects in the more naturalistic setting of automobile driving. Driving is a safety-critical task in which delayed response times may have severe consequences. Using a realistic driving simulator, we find…

  9. Simple Driving Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Mads

    2002-01-01

    -like language. Our aim is to extract a simple notion of driving and show that even in this tamed form it has much of the power of more general notions of driving. Our driving technique may be used to simplify functional programs which use function composition and will often be able to remove intermediate data...

  10. Multiple-beam laser–plasma interactions in inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myatt, J. F., E-mail: jmya@lle.rochester.edu; Zhang, J.; Maximov, A. V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Short, R. W.; Seka, W.; Edgell, D. H.; Michel, D. T.; Igumenshchev, I. V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627-0171 (United States); Hinkel, D. E.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The experimental evidence for multiple-beam laser-plasma instabilities of relevance to laser driven inertial confinement fusion at the ignition scale is reviewed, in both the indirect and direct-drive approaches. The instabilities described are cross-beam energy transfer (in both indirectly driven targets on the NIF and in direct-drive targets), multiple-beam stimulated Raman scattering (for indirect-drive), and multiple-beam two-plasmon decay instability (in direct drive). Advances in theoretical understanding and in the numerical modeling of these multiple beam instabilities are presented.

  11. Beam loading

    OpenAIRE

    Boussard, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superco...

  12. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendelbury, J.M.; Smith, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Studies with directed collision-free beams of particles continue to play an important role in the development of modern physics and chemistry. The deflections suffered by such beams as they pass through electric and magnetic fields or laser radiation provide some of the most direct information about the individual constituents of the beam; the scattering observed when two beams intersect yields important data about the intermolecular forces responsible for the scattering. (author)

  13. Schottky Noise and Beam Transfer Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaskiewicz M.; Blaskiewicz M.

    2016-12-01

    Beam transfer functions (BTF)s encapsulate the stability properties of charged particle beams. In general one excites the beam with a sinusoidal signal and measures the amplitude and phase of the beam response. Most systems are very nearly linear and one can use various Fourier techniques to reduce the number of measurements and/or simulations needed to fully characterize the response. Schottky noise is associated with the finite number of particles in the beam. This signal is always present. Since the Schottky current drives wakefields, the measured Schottky signal is influenced by parasitic impedances.

  14. High-energy tritium beams as current drivers in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Grisham, L.R.

    1983-04-01

    The effect on neutral-beam design and reactor performance of using high-energy (approx. 3-10 MeV) tritium neutral beams to drive steady-state tokamak reactors is considered. The lower current of such beams leads to several advantages over lower-energy neutral beams. The major disadvantage is the reduction of the reactor output caused by the lower current-drive efficiency of the high-energy beams

  15. OMEGA polar-drive target designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Shvydky, A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2012-01-01

    Low-adiabat polar-drive (PD) [Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] implosion designs for the OMEGA [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] laser are described. These designs for cryogenic deuterium–tritium and warm plastic shells use a temporal laser pulse shape with three pickets followed by a main pulse [Goncharov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 165001 (2010)]. The designs are at two different on-target laser intensities, with different in-flight aspect ratios (IFARs). These designs permit studies of implosion energetics and target performance closer to ignition-relevant intensities (∼7 × 10 14 W/cm 2 at the quarter-critical surface, where nonlocal heat conduction and laser–plasma interactions can play an important role) but at lower values of IFAR ∼ 22 or at lower intensity (∼3 × 10 14 W/cm 2 ) but at a higher IFAR (IFAR ∼ 32, where shell instability can play an important role). PD geometry requires repointing of laser beams to improve shell symmetry. The higher-intensity designs optimize target performance by repointing beams to a lesser extent, compensating for the reduced equatorial drive by increasing the energies of the repointed beams. They also use custom beam profiles that improve equatorial illumination at the expense of irradiation at higher latitudes. These latter designs will be studied when new phase plates for the OMEGA Laser System, corresponding to the custom beam profiles, are obtained.

  16. Control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okutani, Tetsuro.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a simple and economical control rod drive using a control circuit requiring no pulse circuit. Constitution: Control rods in a BWR type reactor are driven by hydraulic pressure and inserted or withdrawn in the direction of applying the hydraulic pressure. The direction of the hydraulic pressure is controlled by a direction control valve. Since the driving for the control rod is extremely important in view of the operation, a self diagnosis function is disposed for rapid inspection of possible abnormality. In the present invention, two driving contacts are disposed each by one between the both ends of a solenoid valve of the direction control valve for driving the control rod and the driving power source, and diagnosis is conducted by alternately operating them. Therefore, since it is only necessary that the control circuit issues a driving instruction only to one of the two driving contacts, the pulse circuit is no more required. Further, since the control rod driving is conducted upon alignment of the two driving instructions, the reliability of the control rod drive can be improved. (Horiuchi, T.)

  17. Using driving simulators to assess driving safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Linda Ng; Lee, John D

    2010-05-01

    Changes in drivers, vehicles, and roadways pose substantial challenges to the transportation safety community. Crash records and naturalistic driving data are useful for examining the influence of past or existing technology on drivers, and the associations between risk factors and crashes. However, they are limited because causation cannot be established and technology not yet installed in production vehicles cannot be assessed. Driving simulators have become an increasingly widespread tool to understand evolving and novel technologies. The ability to manipulate independent variables in a randomized, controlled setting also provides the added benefit of identifying causal links. This paper introduces a special issue on simulator-based safety studies. The special issue comprises 25 papers that demonstrate the use of driving simulators to address pressing transportation safety problems and includes topics as diverse as neurological dysfunction, work zone design, and driver distraction. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the open-quotes Boosterclose quotes and open-quotes ATLASclose quotes linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates

  19. Superluminal warp drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F. [Colina de los Chopos, Centro de Fisica ' Miguel A. Catalan' , Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: p.gonzalezdiaz@imaff.cfmac.csic.es

    2007-09-20

    In this Letter we consider a warp drive spacetime resulting from that suggested by Alcubierre when the spaceship can only travel faster than light. Restricting to the two dimensions that retains most of the physics, we derive the thermodynamic properties of the warp drive and show that the temperature of the spaceship rises up as its apparent velocity increases. We also find that the warp drive spacetime can be exhibited in a manifestly cosmological form.

  20. Hybrid indirect-drive/direct-drive target for inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, Lindsay John

    2018-02-27

    A hybrid indirect-drive/direct drive for inertial confinement fusion utilizing laser beams from a first direction and laser beams from a second direction including a central fusion fuel component; a first portion of a shell surrounding said central fusion fuel component, said first portion of a shell having a first thickness; a second portion of a shell surrounding said fusion fuel component, said second portion of a shell having a second thickness that is greater than said thickness of said first portion of a shell; and a hohlraum containing at least a portion of said fusion fuel component and at least a portion of said first portion of a shell; wherein said hohlraum is in a position relative to said first laser beam and to receive said first laser beam and produce X-rays that are directed to said first portion of a shell and said fusion fuel component; and wherein said fusion fuel component and said second portion of a shell are in a position relative to said second laser beam such that said second portion of a shell and said fusion fuel component receive said second laser beam.

  1. Medications and impaired driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetland, Amanda; Carr, David B

    2014-04-01

    To describe the association of specific medication classes with driving outcomes and provide clinical recommendations. The MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for articles published from January 1973 to June 2013 on classes of medications associated with driving impairment. The search included outcome terms such as automobile driving, motor vehicle crash, driving simulator, and road tests. Only English-language articles that contained findings from observational or interventional designs with ≥ 10 participants were included in this review. Cross-sectional studies, case series, and case reports were excluded. Driving is an important task and activity for the majority of adults. Some commonly prescribed medications have been associated with driving impairment measured by road performance, driving simulation, and/or motor vehicle crashes. This review of 30 studies identified findings with barbiturates, benzodiazepines, hypnotics, antidepressants, opioid and nonsteroidal analgesics, anticonvulsants, antipsychotics, antiparkinsonian agents, skeletal muscle relaxants, antihistamines, anticholinergic medications, and hypoglycemic agents. Additional studies of medication impact on sedation, sleep latency, and psychomotor function, as well as the role of alcohol, are also discussed. Psychotropic agents and those with central nervous system side effects were associated with measures of impaired driving performance. It is difficult to determine if such associations are actually a result of medication use or the medical diagnosis itself. Regardless, clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of impaired driving with specific classes of medications, educate their patients, and/or consider safer alternatives.

  2. Universal Drive Train Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This vehicle drive train research facility is capable of evaluating helicopter and ground vehicle power transmission technologies in a system level environment. The...

  3. Multi-bunch effect of resistive wall in the Beam Delivery System of the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mutzner, R; Rumolo, G; Tomas, R; Pieloni, T

    2010-01-01

    Wake fields in the CLIC Beam Delivery System (BDS) can cause severe single or multi-bunch effects leading to luminosity loss. The main contributors in the BDS are geometric and resistive wall wake fields of the collimators and resistive wall wakes of the beam pipe. The present work focuses only on the multi-bunch effects from resistive wall. Using particle tracking with wake fields through the BDS, we have established the aperture radius, above which the effect of the wake fields becomes negligible. Our simulations were later extended to include a realistic aperture model along the BDS as well as the collimators. The two cases of 3 TeV and 500 GeV have been examined.

  4. Multi-Bunch effect of resistive wall in the beam delivery system of the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mutzner, Raphael; Pieloni, Tatiana; Rivkin, Leonid

    2010-01-01

    Wake fields in the CLIC Beam Delivery System (BDS) can cause severe single or multi-bunch effects leading to luminosity loss. The main contributors in the BDS are geometric and resistive wall wake fields of the collimators and resistive wall wakes of the beam pipe. The present master thesis focuses only on the multi-bunch effects from resistive wall. Using particle tracking with wake fields through the BDS, we have established the aperture radius, above which the effect of the wake fields becomes negligible. Simulations were later extended to include a realistic aperture model along the BDS as well as the collimators. We examine the two cases of 3 TeV and 500 GeV in this work, for stainless steel and copper pipes.

  5. Plasma auxiliary heating and current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Heating and current drive systems must fulfil several roles in ITER operating scenarios: heating through the H-mode transition and to ignition; plasma burn control; current drive and current profile control in steady state scenarios; and control of MHD instabilities. They must also perform ancillary functions, such as assisting plasma start-up and wall conditioning. It is recognized that no one system can satisfy all of these requirements with the degree of flexibility that ITER will require. Four heating and current drive systems are therefore under consideration for ITER: electron cyclotron waves at a principal frequency of 170 GHz; fast waves operating in the range 40-70 MHz (ion cyclotron waves); lower hybrid waves at 5 GHz; and neutral beam injection using negative ion beam technology for operation at 1 MeV energy. It is likely that several of these systems will be employed in parallel. The systems have been chosen on the basis of the maturity of physics understanding and operating experience in current experiments and on the feasibility of applying the relevant technology to ITER. Here, the fundamental physics describing the interaction of these heating systems with the plasma is reviewed, the relevant experimental results in the exploitation of the heating and current drive capabilities of each system are discussed, key aspects of their application to ITER are outlined, and the major technological developments required in each area are summarized. (author)

  6. Dynamic neutral beam current and voltage control to improve beam efficacy in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, D. C.; Austin, M. E.; Bardoczi, L.; Collins, C. S.; Crowley, B.; Davis, E.; Du, X.; Ferron, J.; Grierson, B. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Holcomb, C. T.; McKee, G. R.; Pawley, C.; Petty, C. C.; Podestà, M.; Rauch, J.; Scoville, J. T.; Spong, D. A.; Thome, K. E.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Varela, J.; Victor, B.

    2018-05-01

    An engineering upgrade to the neutral beam system at the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] enables time-dependent programming of the beam voltage and current. Initial application of this capability involves pre-programmed beam voltage and current injected into plasmas that are known to be susceptible to instabilities that are driven by energetic ( E ≥ 40 keV) beam ions. These instabilities, here all Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs), increase the transport of the beam ions beyond a classical expectation based on particle drifts and collisions. Injecting neutral beam power, P beam ≥ 2 MW, at reduced voltage with increased current reduces the drive for Alfvénic instabilities and results in improved ion confinement. In lower-confinement plasmas, this technique is applied to eliminate the presence of AEs across the mid-radius of the plasmas. Simulations of those plasmas indicate that the mode drive is decreased and the radial extent of the remaining modes is reduced compared to a higher beam voltage case. In higher-confinement plasmas, this technique reduces AE activity in the far edge and results in an interesting scenario of beam current drive improving as the beam voltage reduces from 80 kV to 65 kV.

  7. Piezoelectric drive circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treu, C.A. Jr.

    1999-08-31

    A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes. 7 figs.

  8. Wrong-way driving.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2006-01-01

    Wrong-way driving is a phenomenon that mainly happens on motorways. Although the number of wrong-way crashes is relatively limited, their consequences are much more severe than the consequences of other motorway injury crashes. The groups most often causing wrong-way driving accidents are young,

  9. Recognizing driving in haste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rendón-Vélez, E.

    2014-01-01

    One can often hear people discussing the reasons why a road accident has happened: “She had to pick up her kids in the school before four o’clock and she was driving in haste and careless”, “He was stressed, he wanted to reach the beginning of the football match, tried to drive faster and didn't

  10. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futatsugi, Masao.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To secure the reactor operation safety by the provision of a fluid pressure detecting section for control rod driving fluid and a control rod interlock at the midway of the flow pass for supplying driving fluid to the control rod drives. Constitution: Between a driving line and a direction control valve are provided a pressure detecting portion, an alarm generating device, and a control rod inhibition interlock. The driving fluid from a driving fluid source is discharged by way of a pump and a manual valve into the reactor in which the control rods and reactor fuels are contained. In addition, when the direction control valve is switched and the control rods are inserted and extracted by the control rod drives, the pressure in the driving line is always detected by the pressure detection section, whereby if abnormal pressure is resulted, the alarm generating device is actuated to warn the abnormality and the control rod inhibition interlock is actuated to lock the direction control valve thereby secure the safety operation of the reactor. (Seki, T.)

  11. Switched reluctance motor drives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Davis RM, Ray WF, Blake RJ 1981 Inverter drive for switched reluctance: circuits and component ratings. Inst. Elec. Eng. Proc. B128: 126-136. Ehsani M. 1991 Position Sensor elimination technique for the switched reluctance motor drive. US Patent No. 5,072,166. Ehsani M, Ramani K R 1993 Direct control strategies based ...

  12. Self-driving carsickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diels, C.; Bos, J.E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the predicted increase in the occurrence and severity of motion sickness in self-driving cars. Self-driving cars have the potential to lead to significant benefits. From the driver's perspective, the direct benefits of this technology are considered increased comfort and

  13. Self-driving carsickness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diels, C.; Bos, J.E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the predicted increase in the occurrence and severity of motion sickness in self-driving cars. Self-driving cars have the potential to lead to significant benefits. From the driver's perspective, the direct benefits of this technology are considered increased comfort and

  14. Fundamentals of electrical drives

    CERN Document Server

    Veltman, André; De Doncker, Rik W

    2007-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive introduction to various aspects of electrical drive systems. This volume provides a presentation of dynamic generic models that cover all major electrical machine types and modulation/control components of a drive as well as dynamic and steady state analysis of transformers and electrical machines.

  15. Electric Vehicle - Economical driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, VCE, Steen V.; Schøn, Henriette

    1999-01-01

    How do you reduce the energy-wast when driving and loading EV's - or rather: How do I get more km/l out of an EV......How do you reduce the energy-wast when driving and loading EV's - or rather: How do I get more km/l out of an EV...

  16. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akira.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to monitor the coupling state between a control rod and a control rod drive. Constitution: After the completion of a control rod withdrawal, a coolant pressure is applied to a control rod drive being adjusted so as to raise only the control rod drive and, in a case where the coupling between the control rod drive and the control rod is detached, the former is elevated till it contacts the control rod and then stopped. The actual stopping position is detected by an actual position detection circuit and compared with a predetermined position stored in a predetermined position detection circuit. If both of the positions are not aligned with each other, it is judged by a judging circuit that the control rod and the control rod drives are not combined. (Sekiya, K.)

  17. Beam loading

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  18. Beam loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed. (author)

  19. LHC Report: Beam on

    CERN Multimedia

    Rossano Giachino for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The powering tests described in the last edition of the Bulletin were successfully finished at the end of the first week of March opening the way for 4 TeV operations this year. The beam was back in the machine on Wednesday 14 March. The first collisions at 4 TeV are scheduled for the first week of April.   The first beam of 2012 is dumped after making a few rounds in the LHC. The magnet powering tests were followed by the machine checkout phase. Here the operations team in collaboration with the equipment groups performs a sequence of tests to ensure the readiness of the LHC for beam. The tests include driving all the LHC systems – beam dump, injection, collimation, RF, power converters, magnet circuits, vacuum, interlocks, controls, timing and synchronization – through the operational cycle. The “checkout phase” is really a massive de-bugging exercise, which is performed with the objective of ensuring the proper functioning of the whole machine and t...

  20. Application of Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM) Photodetectors for Transverse and Longitudinal Intra-Bunch Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhagen, R J; Boland, M J; Lucas, T G; Rassool, R P

    2013-01-01

    The performance reach of modern accelerators is often governed by the ability to reliably measure and control the beam stability. In high-brightness lepton and high-energy hadron accelerators, the use of optical diagnostic techniques is becoming more widespread as the required bandwidth, resolution and high RF beam power level involved limit the use of traditional electro-magnetic RF pick-up based methods. This contribution discusses the use of fibre-coupled ultra-fast Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Photodetectors (MSM-PD) as an alternative, dependablemeans to measure signals derived from electro-optical and synchrotron-light based diagnostics systems. It describes the beam studies performed at CERN’s CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) and the Australian Synchrotron to assess the feasibility of this technology as a robust, wide-band and sensitive technique for measuring transverse intra-bunch and bunch-by-bunch beam oscillations, longitudinal beam profiles, un-bunched beam population and beam-halo profiles. The amplifica...

  1. S100A4 and BMP-2 Co-Dependently Induce Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration via pERK and Chloride Intracellular Channel 4 (CLIC4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiekerkoetter, Edda; Guignabert, Christophe; de Jesus Perez, Vinicio; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Powers, Janine M; Wang, Lingli; Lawrie, Allan; Ambartsumian, Noona; Schmidt, Ann-Marie; Berryman, Mark; Ashley, Richard H; Rabinovitch, Marlene

    2009-01-01

    Rationale S100A4/Mts1 is implicated in motility of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (hPASMC), through an interaction with the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Objective We hypothesized that S100A4/Mts1-mediated hPASMC motility might be enhanced by loss of function of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor (R) II, observed in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Methods and Results Both S100A4/Mts1 (500ng/ml) and BMP-2 (10ng/ml) induce migration of hPASMCS in a novel co-dependent manner, in that the response to either ligand is lost with anti-RAGE or BMPRII siRNA. Phosphorylation of ERK is induced by both ligands and is required for motility by inducing MMP2 activity, but phosphoERK1/2 is blocked by anti-RAGE and not by BMPRII siRNA. In contrast, BMPRII siRNA, but not anti-RAGE, reduces expression of intracellular chloride channel 4 (CLIC4), a scaffolding molecule necessary for motility in response to S100A4/Mts1 or BMP-2. Reduced CLIC4 expression does not interfere with S100A4/Mts1 internalization or its interaction with myosin heavy chain IIA (MHCIIA), but does alter alignment of MHCIIA and actin filaments creating the appearance of vacuoles. This abnormality is associated with reduced peripheral distribution and/or delayed activation of RhoA and Rac1, small GTPases required for retraction and extension of lamellipodiae in motile cells. Conclusions Our studies demonstrate how a single ligand (BMP-2 or S100A4/Mts1) can recruit multiple cell surface receptors to relay signals that coordinate events culminating in a functional response, i.e., cell motility. We speculate that this carefully controlled process limits signals from multiple ligands, but could be subverted in disease. PMID:19713532

  2. Trajectory measurements and correlations in the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renier, Y.; Bambade, P.; Tauchi, T.; White, G. R.; Boogert, S.

    2013-06-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) commissioning group aims to demonstrate the feasibility of the beam delivery system of the next linear colliders (ILC and CLIC) as well as to define and to test the tuning methods. As the design vertical beam sizes of the linear colliders are about few nanometers, the stability of the trajectory as well as the control of the aberrations are very critical. ATF2 commissioning started in December 2008, and thanks to submicron resolution beam position monitors (BPMs), it has been possible to measure the beam position fluctuation along the final focus of ATF2 during the 2009 runs. The optics was not the nominal one yet, with a lower focusing to make the tuning easier. In this paper, a method to measure the noise of each BPM every pulse, in a model-independent way, will be presented. A method to reconstruct the trajectory’s fluctuations is developed which uses the previously determined BPM resolution. As this reconstruction provides a measurement of the beam energy fluctuations, it was also possible to measure the horizontal and vertical dispersion function at each BPMs parasitically. The spatial and angular dispersions can be fitted from these measurements with uncertainties comparable with usual measurements.

  3. Trajectory measurements and correlations in the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Renier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2 commissioning group aims to demonstrate the feasibility of the beam delivery system of the next linear colliders (ILC and CLIC as well as to define and to test the tuning methods. As the design vertical beam sizes of the linear colliders are about few nanometers, the stability of the trajectory as well as the control of the aberrations are very critical. ATF2 commissioning started in December 2008, and thanks to submicron resolution beam position monitors (BPMs, it has been possible to measure the beam position fluctuation along the final focus of ATF2 during the 2009 runs. The optics was not the nominal one yet, with a lower focusing to make the tuning easier. In this paper, a method to measure the noise of each BPM every pulse, in a model-independent way, will be presented. A method to reconstruct the trajectory’s fluctuations is developed which uses the previously determined BPM resolution. As this reconstruction provides a measurement of the beam energy fluctuations, it was also possible to measure the horizontal and vertical dispersion function at each BPMs parasitically. The spatial and angular dispersions can be fitted from these measurements with uncertainties comparable with usual measurements.

  4. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of a Gaussian beam (GB) into a symmetrical higher order TEMp0 Laguerre Gaussian beam (LGB) intensity distribution of which is further rectified and transformed into a Gaussian intensity distribution in the plane of a converging...

  5. Polar-Drive Experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenberger, M.

    2014-10-01

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-drive (PD) concept has been proposed. It requires direct-drive-specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments testing the performance of ignition-relevant PD implosions at the NIF have been performed. The goal of these early experiments was to develop a stable, warm implosion platform to investigate laser deposition and laser-plasma instabilities at ignition-relevant plasma conditions, and to develop and validate ignition-relevant models of laser deposition and heat conduction. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beam geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Warm, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ~ 350 to 750 kJ with peak powers of 60 to 180 TW and peak on-target intensities from 4 ×1014 to 1 . 2 ×1015 W/cm2. Results from these initial experiments are presented, including the level of hot-electron preheat, and implosion symmetry and shell trajectory inferred via self-emission imaging and backlighting. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray trace to model oblique beams, and a model for cross-beam energy transfer (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  6. Turbulent current drive mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Christopher J.; Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2017-08-01

    Mechanisms through which plasma microturbulence can drive a mean electron plasma current are derived. The efficiency through which these turbulent contributions can drive deviations from neoclassical predictions of the electron current profile is computed by employing a linearized Coulomb collision operator. It is found that a non-diffusive contribution to the electron momentum flux as well as an anomalous electron-ion momentum exchange term provide the most efficient means through which turbulence can modify the mean electron current for the cases considered. Such turbulent contributions appear as an effective EMF within Ohm's law and hence provide an ideal means for driving deviations from neoclassical predictions.

  7. Fast wave current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Horton, R.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.

    1985-07-01

    Fast wave current drive is demonstrated in the Princeton ACT-I toroidal device. The fast Alfven wave, in the range of high ion-cyclotron harmonics, produced 40 A of current from 1 kW of rf power coupled into the plasma by fast wave loop antenna. This wave excites a steady current by damping on the energetic tail of the electron distribution function in the same way as lower-hybrid current drive, except that fast wave current drive is appropriate for higher plasma densities

  8. A beam scraper using a linear motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beadle, E.R.; Rodger, E.S.; Thern, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    A beam scraper using a linear motor drive has been developed for use in the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The device is used to measure beam size by moving a target to a predetermined location and measuring the intercepted beam with nearby loss monitors or by noting the decrease in the circulating beam current. This device has excellent vacuum characteristics, as the motor and sensor coils are outside the vacuum, coupled magnetically to the moving parts which, are inside. There are no bellows or dynamic seals required. The position-time profile is controlled by a closed-loop servo system which uses position feedback. 2 refs., 4 figs

  9. Progress towards polar-drive ignition for the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrory, R. L.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Casey, D. T.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Kessler, T. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Li, C. K.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Nilson, P. M.; Padalino, S. J.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Séguin, F. H.; Seka, W.; Short, R. W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Soures, J. M.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2013-11-01

    The University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) performs direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. LLE's Omega Laser Facility is used to study direct-drive ICF ignition concepts, developing an understanding of the underlying physics that feeds into the design of ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The baseline symmetric-illumination, direct-drive-ignition target design consists of a 1.5 MJ multiple-picket laser pulse that generates four shock waves (similar to the NIF baseline indirect-drive design) and is predicted to produce a one-dimensional (1D) gain of 48. LLE has developed the polar-drive (PD) illumination concept (for NIF beams in the x-ray-drive configuration) to allow the pursuit of direct-drive ignition without significant reconfiguration of the beam paths on the NIF. Some less-invasive changes in the NIF infrastructure will be required, including new phase plates, polarization rotators, and a PD-specific beam-smoothing front end. A suite of PD ignition designs with implosion velocities from 3.5 to 4.3 × 107 cm s-1 are predicted to have significant 2D gains (Collins et al 2012 Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 57 155). Verification of the physics basis of these simulations is a major thrust of direct-drive implosion experiments on both OMEGA and the NIF. Many physics issues are being examined with symmetric beam irradiation on OMEGA, varying the implosion parameters over a wide region of design space. Cryogenic deuterium-tritium target experiments with symmetric irradiation have produced areal densities of ˜0.3 g cm-2, ion temperatures over 3 keV, and neutron yields in excess of 20% of the ‘clean’ 1D predicted value. The inferred Lawson criterion figure of merit (Betti R. et al 2010 Phys. Plasmas 17 058102) has increased from 1.7 atm s (IAEA 2010) to 2.6 atm s.

  10. Identifying Method of Drunk Driving Based on Driving Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Zhao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Drunk driving is one of the leading causes contributing to traffic crashes. There are numerous issues that need to be resolved with the current method of identifying drunk driving. Driving behavior, with the characteristic of real-time, was extensively researched to identify impaired driving behaviors. In this paper, the drives with BACs above 0.05% were defined as drunk driving state. A detailed comparison was made between normal driving and drunk driving. The experiment in driving simulator was designed to collect the driving performance data of the groups. According to the characteristics analysis for the effect of alcohol on driving performance, seven significant indicators were extracted and the drunk driving was identified by the Fisher Discriminant Method. The discriminant function demonstrated a high accuracy of classification. The optimal critical score to differentiate normal from drinking state was found to be 0. The evaluation result verifies the accuracy of classification method.

  11. Linear step drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haniger, L.; Elger, R.; Kocandrle, L.; Zdebor, J.

    1986-01-01

    A linear step drive is described developed in Czechoslovak-Soviet cooperation and intended for driving WWER-1000 control rods. The functional principle is explained of the motor and the mechanical and electrical parts of the drive, power control, and the indicator of position are described. The motor has latches situated in the reactor at a distance of 3 m from magnetic armatures, it has a low structural height above the reactor cover, which suggests its suitability for seismic localities. Its magnetic circuits use counterpoles; the mechanical shocks at the completion of each step are damped using special design features. The position indicator is of a special design and evaluates motor position within ±1% of total travel. A drive diagram and the flow chart of both the control electronics and the position indicator are presented. (author) 4 figs

  12. Fundamentals of electrical drives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, A.; Pulle, D.W.J.; de Doncker, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive, user-friendly, color illustrated introductory text for electrical drive systems that simplifies the understanding of electrical machine principles Updated edition covers innovations in machine design, power semi-conductors, digital signal processors and simulation software Presents

  13. Science of driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The Science of Driving project focused on developing a collaborative relationship to develop curriculum units for middle school and high school students to engage them in exciting real-world scenarios. This effort involved faculty, staff, and student...

  14. Drugs and driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walsh, J. Michael; De Gier, Johan J.; Christopherson, Asbjørg S.; Verstraete, Alain G.

    The authors present a global overview on the issue of drugs and driving covering four major areas: (1) Epidemiology and Prevalence-which reviews epidemiological research, summarizes available information, discusses the methodological shortcomings of extant studies, and makes recommendations for

  15. Coherent beam-beam effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.; Keil, E.

    1979-06-01

    The stability of the coherent beam-beam effect between rigid bunches is studied analytically and numerically for a linear force by evaluating eigenvalues. For a realistic force, the stability is investigated by following the bunches for many revolutions. 4 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Instant Google Drive starter

    CERN Document Server

    Procopio, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This book is a Starter which teaches you how to use Google Drive practically. This book is perfect for people of all skill levels who want to enjoy the benefits of using Google Drive to safely store their files online and in the cloud. It's also great for anyone looking to learn more about cloud computing in general. Readers are expected to have an Internet connection and basic knowledge of using the internet.

  17. Control rod driving mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooshima, Yoshio.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To perform reliable scram operation, even if abnormality should occur in a system instructing scram operation in FBR type reactors. Constitution: An aluminum alloy member to be melt at a predetermined temperature (about 600sup(o)C) is disposed to a connection part between a control rod and a driving mechanism, whereby the control rod is detached from the driving mechanism and gravitationally fallen to the reactor core. (Ikeda, J.)

  18. Modulated Current Drive Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Prater, R.; Cox, W.A.; Forest, C.B.; Jayakumar, R.J.; Makowski, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    A new measurement approach is presented which directly determines the noninductive current profile from the periodic response of the motional Stark effect (MSE) signals to the slow modulation of the external current drive source. A Fourier transform of the poloidal magnetic flux diffusion equation is used to analyze the MSE data. An example of this measurement technique is shown using modulated electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) discharges from the DIII-D tokamak

  19. Belt drive construction improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Yu. Khomenko

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of the traction capacity increase of the belt drive TRK is examined. This was done for the purpose of air conditioning system of passenger car with double-generator system energy supplying. Belts XPC (made by the German firm «Continental ContiTech» testing were conducted. The results confirmed the possibility of their usage in order to improve belt drive TRK characteristics.

  20. Nuclear astrophysics with radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C.A.; Gade, A.

    2010-01-01

    The quest to comprehend how nuclear processes influence astrophysical phenomena is driving experimental and theoretical research programs worldwide. One of the main goals in nuclear astrophysics is to understand how energy is generated in stars, how elements are synthesized in stellar events and what the nature of neutron stars is. New experimental capabilities, the availability of radioactive beams and increased computational power paired with new astronomical observations have advanced the present knowledge. This review summarizes the progress in the field of nuclear astrophysics with a focus on the role of indirect methods and reactions involving beams of rare isotopes.

  1. Self-driving carsickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diels, Cyriel; Bos, Jelte E

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the predicted increase in the occurrence and severity of motion sickness in self-driving cars. Self-driving cars have the potential to lead to significant benefits. From the driver's perspective, the direct benefits of this technology are considered increased comfort and productivity. However, we here show that the envisaged scenarios all lead to an increased risk of motion sickness. As such, the benefits this technology is assumed to bring may not be capitalised on, in particular by those already susceptible to motion sickness. This can negatively affect user acceptance and uptake and, in turn, limit the potential socioeconomic benefits that this emerging technology may provide. Following a discussion on the causes of motion sickness in the context of self-driving cars, we present guidelines to steer the design and development of automated vehicle technologies. The aim is to limit or avoid the impact of motion sickness and ultimately promote the uptake of self-driving cars. Attention is also given to less well known consequences of motion sickness, in particular negative aftereffects such as postural instability, and detrimental effects on task performance and how this may impact the use and design of self-driving cars. We conclude that basic perceptual mechanisms need to be considered in the design process whereby self-driving cars cannot simply be thought of as living rooms, offices, or entertainment venues on wheels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Dementia and driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, D; Neubauer, K; Boyle, M; Gerrard, J; Surmon, D; Wilcock, G K

    1992-04-01

    Many European countries test cars, but not their drivers, as they age. There is evidence to suggest that human factors are more important than vehicular factors as causes of motor crashes. The elderly also are involved in more accidents per distance travelled than middle-aged drivers. As the UK relies on self-certification of health by drivers over the age of 70 years, we examined the driving practices of patients with dementia attending a Memory Clinic. Nearly one-fifth of 329 patients with documented dementia continued to drive after the onset of dementia, and impaired driving ability was noted in two-thirds of these. Their families experienced great difficulty in persuading patients to stop driving, and had to invoke outside help in many cases. Neuropsychological tests did not help to identify those who drove badly while activity of daily living scores were related to driving ability. These findings suggest that many patients with dementia drive in an unsafe fashion after the onset of the illness. The present system of self-certification of health by the elderly for driver-licensing purposes needs to be reassessed.

  3. Predictions of of fast wave heating, current drive, and current drive antenna arrays for advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Baity, F.W.; Carter, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the advanced tokamak program is to optimize plasma performance leading to a compact tokamak reactor through active, steady state control of the current profile using non-inductive current drive and profile control. To achieve this objective requires compatibility and flexibility in the use of available heating and current drive systems - ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF), neutral beams, and lower hybrid. For any advanced tokamak, the following are important challenges to effective use of fast waves in various role of direct electron heating, minority ion heating, and current drive: (1) to employ the heating and current drive systems to give self-consistent pressure and current profiles leading to the desired advanced tokamak operating modes; (2) to minimize absorption of the fast waves by parasitic resonances, which limit current drive; (3) to optimize and control the spectrum of fast waves launched by the antenna array for the required mix of simultaneous heating and current drive. The paper addresses these issues using theoretical and computational tools developed at a number of institutions by benchmarking the computations against available experimental data and applying them to the specific case of TPX. (author). 6 refs, 3 figs

  4. Predictions of fast wave heating, current drive, and current drive antenna arrays for advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Baity, F.W.; Carter, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the advanced tokamak program is to optimize plasma performance leading to a compact tokamak reactor through active, steady state control of the current profile using non-inductive current drive and profile control. To achieve these objectives requires compatibility and flexibility in the use of available heating and current drive systems--ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF), neutral beams, and lower hybrid. For any advanced tokamak, the following are important challenges to effective use of fast waves in various roles of direct electron heating, minority ion heating, and current drive: (1) to employ the heating and current drive systems to give self-consistent pressure and current profiles leading to the desired advanced tokamak operating modes; (2) to minimize absorption of the fast waves by parasitic resonances, which limit current drive; (3) to optimize and control the spectrum of fast waves launched by the antenna array for the required mix of simultaneous heating and current drive. The authors have addressed these issues using theoretical and computational tools developed at a number of institutions by benchmarking the computations against available experimental data and applying them to the specific case of TPX

  5. Control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    A reactor core, one or more control rods, and a control rod drive are described for selectively inserting and withdrawing the one or more control rods into and from the reactor core, which consists of: a support structure secured beneath the reactor core; control rod positioning means supported by the support structure for movably supporting the control rod for movement between a lower position wherein the control rod is located substantially beneath the reactor core and an upper position wherein at least an upper portion of the control rod extends into the reactor core; transmission means; primary drive means connected with the control rod positioning means by the transmission means for positioning the control rod under normal operating conditions; emergency drive means for moving the control rod from the lower position to the upper position under emergency conditions, the emergency drive means including a weight movable between an upper and a lower position, means for movably supporting the weight, and means for transmitting gravitational force exerted on the weight to the control rod positioning means to move the control rod upwardly when the weight is pulled downwardly by gravity; the transmission means connecting the control rod positioning means with the emergency drive means so that the primary drive means effects movement of the weight and the control rod in opposite directions under normal conditions, thus providing counterbalancing to reduce the force required for upward movement of the control rod under normal conditions; and restraint means for restraining the fall of the weight under normal operating conditions and disengaging the primary drive means to release the weight under emergency conditions

  6. B-factory via conversion of 1-TeV electron beams into 1-TeV photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mtingwa, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the study of CP violation and rare decays of beauty particles which are pressing problems in high-energy physics. It is known that one should analyze beauty decays of at least the order of 10 8 or 19 9 . Thus, numerous proposals for beauty factories are being discussed now, although some of these projects are likely to supply much smaller numbers of beauty events. At the same time, at present several projects, such as CLIC (Cern Linear Collider), expect to build linear e + e - colliders with beam energies up to 1 TeV. The aim of this work is to show that the possibility exists of using the unique features of the discussed teraelectron volt electron linacs to obtain a facility for the production of beauty via photoproduction of nuclei. Unique features of high-energy photoproduction are as follows. The rather large fraction (∼2 x 10 -4 ) of events with beauty at E γ ∼ 1 TeV. Beauty particles are produced with about equally large momenta ∼0.05 E γ and at rather large transverse momenta p t ∼ m b . The following scheme can be envisioned. The 1-TeV electron beam is Compton scattered off a low-energy (∼ 1-eV) laser pulse. The laser photons are thus converted into a highly collimated beam of energy E γ ∼ E e , directed along the electron's original line of motion. Such schemes to produce high-energy photon beams have been discussed. These 1-TeV photons are subsequently scattered onto a nuclear target to produce b bar b pairs

  7. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Considerable experience has now been gained with the various beam transport lines, and a number of minor changes have been made to improve the ease of operation. These include: replacement of certain little-used slits by profile monitors (harps or scanners); relocation of steering magnets, closer to diagnostic harps or profile scanners; installation of a scanner inside the isocentric neutron therapy system; and conversion of a 2-doublet quadrupole telescope (on the neutron therapy beamline) to a 2-triplet telescope. The beam-swinger project has been delayed by very late delivery of the magnet iron to the manufacturer, but is now progressing smoothly. The K=600 spectrometer magnets have now been delivered and are being assembled for field mapping. The x,y-table with its associated mapping equipment is complete, together with the driver software. One of the experimental areas has been dedicated to the production of collimated neutron beams and has been equipped with a bending magnet and beam dump, together with steel collimators fixed at 4 degrees intervals from 0 degrees to 16 degrees. Changes to the target cooling and shielding system for isotope production have led to a request for much smaller beam spot sizes on target, and preparations have been made for rearrangement of the isotope beamline to permit installation of quadrupole triplets on the three beamlines after the switching magnet. A practical system of quadrupoles for matching beam properties to the spectrometer has been designed. 6 figs

  8. Optimisation analysis and improvement of the effective beam sizes in Accelerator Test Facility 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082063; Kisiel, Adam

    2016-10-20

    A lepton linear collider is considered by the accelerator and particle physics communities as an appropriate machine to perform high precision particle physics research in the TeV energy regime. There are two proposals for the future e+e- linear collider: the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC), both developed by two wide international collaborations with strong overlap between them. Both designs satisfy the particle physics requirements. At the TeV energy regime the cross sections of many processes of interest are small, therefore large luminosities on the order of 10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1} at the interaction point (IP) are required to deliver the required event rates. The luminosity inversely depends on the transverse size of the colliding beams which restricts the beam sizes at the IP to the nanometer level. The strong focusing of the beams occurs in the final focus system (FFS), the most inner part of a linear collider, where the beams are focused at the IP by means of t...

  9. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Hiroyasu.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable rapid control in a simple circuit by providing a motor control device having an electric capacity capable of simultaneously driving all of the control rods rapidly only in the inserting direction as well as a motor controlling device capable of fine control for the insertion and extraction at usual operation. Constitution: The control rod drives comprise a first motor control device capable of finely controlling the control rods both in inserting and extracting directions, a second motor control device capable of rapidly driving the control rods only in the inserting direction, and a first motor switching circuit and a second motor switching circuit switched by switches. Upon issue of a rapid insertion instruction for the control rods, the second motor switching circuit is closed by the switch and the second motor control circuit and driving motors are connected. Thus, each of the control rod driving motors is driven at a high speed in the inserting direction to rapidly insert all of the control rods. (Yoshino, Y.)

  10. Epilepsy and driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Mavrič

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy poses a risk for all participants in road traffic; therefore people with epilepsy do not meet the criteria for an unlimited driving license. Their driving is affected not only by epileptic seizures causing impaired consciousness and involuntary movements, but also by antiepileptic drugs with their many unwanted affects. The experts have not yet agreed on whether people with epilepsy have an increased risk of experiencing a road traffic accident. However, recent data suggests that the overall risk is lower compared to other medical conditions. Scientific evidence forms the basis of legislation, which by limiting people with epilepsy, enables all participants in road traffic to drive in the safest possible environment. The legislation that governs epilepsy and driving in Slovenia has been recently thoroughly reformed and thus allows a less discriminatory management of people with epilepsy. Although people with epilepsy experience many issues in their daily life, including their personal relationships and employment, they often list the need for driving as a top concern in surveys. General physicians play an important role in managing the issues of people with epilepsy.

  11. Self-rated Driving and Driving Safety in Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Lesley A.; Dodson, Joan; Edwards, Jerri D.; Ackerman, Michelle L.; Ball, Karlene

    2012-01-01

    Many U.S. states rely on older adults to self-regulate their driving and determine when driving is no longer a safe option. However, the relationship of older adults’ self-rated driving in terms of actual driving competency outcomes is unclear. The current study investigates self-rated driving in terms of (1) systematic differences between older adults with high (good/excellent) versus low (poor/fair/average) self-ratings, and (2) the predictive nature of self-rated driving to adverse driving...

  12. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator to drive the future FEL Light Source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, C.; Power, J.; Zholents, A. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)); ( HEP); (LLC)

    2011-04-20

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and a large part of the cost of the entire facility is driven by the accelerator. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may provide a significant cost saving and reduction of the facility size. In this article, we investigate using a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator to provide a high repetition rate, high current, high energy beam to drive a future FEL x-ray light source. As an initial case study, a {approx}100 MV/m loaded gradient, 850 GHz quartz dielectric based 2-stage, wakefield accelerator is proposed to generate a main electron beam of 8 GeV, 50 pC/bunch, {approx}1.2 kA of peak current, 10 x 10 kHz (10 beamlines) in just 100 meters with the fill factor and beam loading considered. This scheme provides 10 parallel main beams with one 100 kHz drive beam. A drive-to-main beam efficiency {approx}38.5% can be achieved with an advanced transformer ratio enhancement technique. rf power dissipation in the structure is only 5 W/cm{sup 2} in the high repetition rate, high gradient operation mode, which is in the range of advanced water cooling capability. Details of study presented in the article include the overall layout, the transform ratio enhancement scheme used to increase the drive to main beam efficiency, main wakefield linac design, cooling of the structure, etc.

  13. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive–specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beam geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D{sub 2} gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ∼500 to 750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 × 10{sup 14} to 1.2 × 10{sup 15 }W/cm{sup 2}. Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of spring softening and hardening in folded-mems comb drive resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.; Khirallah, Kareem; Tawfik, Hani H.; Emira, Ahmed; Abdel Aziz, Ahmed K S; Sedky, Sherif M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies analytically and numerically the spring softening and hardening phenomena that occur in electrostatically actuated microelectromechanical systems comb drive resonators utilizing folded suspension beams. An analytical expression

  15. Gears and gear drives

    CERN Document Server

    Jelaska, Damir T

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how gears are formed and how they interact or 'mesh' with each other is essential when designing equipment that uses gears or gear trains. The way in which gear teeth are formed and how they mesh is determined by their geometry and kinematics, which is the topic of this book.  Gears and Gear Drives provides the reader with comprehensive coverage of gears and gear drives. Spur, helical, bevel, worm and planetary gears are all covered, with consideration given to their classification, geometry, kinematics, accuracy control, load capacity and manufacturing. Cylindric

  16. Toyota hybrid synergy drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautschi, H.

    2008-07-01

    This presentation made at the Swiss 2008 research conference on traffic by Hannes Gautschi, director of service and training at the Toyota company in Switzerland, takes a look at Toyota's hybrid drive vehicles. The construction of the vehicles and their combined combustion engines and electric generators and drives is presented and the combined operation of these components is described. Braking and energy recovery are discussed. Figures on the performance, fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} output of the hybrid vehicles are compared with those of conventional vehicles.

  17. Beam instrumentation for an ISOL test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackenzie, G.H.; Dombsky, M.; Rawnsley, W.; Stanford, G.; Yin, Y.; Novikov, A.

    1995-09-01

    TRIUMF is constructing a test bed for the first stages of the proposed TISAC accelerated radioactive beam facility. The authors will present the requirements for the diagnostic system for this test stand and describe the design and development work underway. Scintillators, beamstops and a Faraday Cup have been tested using stable, mass analyzed, 12 keV beams of ions from mass 14 to 132. The design of a linear drive, with 10 microm resolution, for scanning wires and slits has begun

  18. Beam instrumentation for an ISOL test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackenzie, G.H.; Dombsky, M.; Rawnsley, W.; Stanford, G.; Yin, Y.; Novikov, A.

    1995-09-01

    TRIUMF is constructing a test bed for the first stages of the proposed TISAC accelerated radioactive beam facility. We will present the requirements for the diagnostic system for this test stand and describe the design and development work underway. Scintillators, beamstops and Faraday Cup have been tested using stable, mass analyzed, 12 keV beams of ions from mass 14 to 132. The design of a linear drive, with 10 μm resolution, for scanning wires and slits has begun. (author)

  19. Applications of neutral beam and rf technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haselton, H.H.

    1987-04-01

    This presentation provides an update on the applications of neutral beams and radiofrequency (rf) power in the fusion program; highlights of the ion cyclotron heating (ICH) experiments now in progress, as well as the neutral beam experiments; and heating requirements of future devices and some of the available options. Some remarks on current drive are presented because this area of technology is one that is being considered for future devices

  20. The effects of betatron phase advances on beam-beam and its compensation in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-03-28

    In this article we perform simulation studies to investigate the effects of betatron phase advances between the beam-beam interaction points on half-integer resonance driving term, second order chromaticty and dynamic aperture in RHIC. The betatron phase advances are adjusted with artificial matrices inserted in the middle of arcs. The lattices for the 2011 RHIC polarized proton (p-p) run and 2010 RHIC Au-Au runs are used in this study. We also scan the betatron phase advances between IP8 and the electron lens for the proposed Blue ring lattice with head-on beam-beam compensation.

  1. Quantum beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    Present state and future prospect are described on quantum beams for medical use. Efforts for compactness of linac for advanced cancer therapy have brought about the production of machines like Accuray's CyberKnife and TOMOTHERAPY (Tomo Therapy Inc.) where the acceleration frequency of X-band (9-11 GHz) is used. For cervical vein angiography by the X-band linac, a compact hard X-ray source is developed which is based on the (reverse) Compton scattering through laser-electron collision. More intense beam and laser are necessary at present. A compact machine generating the particle beam of 10 MeV-1 GeV (laser-plasma accelerator) for cancer therapy is also developed using the recent compression technique (chirped-pulse amplification) to generate laser of >10 TW. Tokyo University is studying for the electron beam with energy of GeV order, for the laser-based synchrotron X-ray, and for imaging by the short pulse ion beam. Development of advanced compact accelerators is globally attempted. In Japan, a virtual laboratory by National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), a working group of universities and research facilities through the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, started in 2001 for practical manufacturing of the above-mentioned machines for cancer therapy and for angiography. Virtual Factory (Inc.), a business venture, is to be stood in future. (N.I.)

  2. Measurements of laser-imprinting sensitivity to relative beam mistiming in planar plastic foils driven by multiple overlapping laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Goncharov, V.N.; Boehly, T.R.; Delettrez, J.A.; Li, D.Y.; Marozas, J.A.; Maximov, A.V.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    In a direct-drive, inertial confinement fusion implosion, a spherical target is irradiated by a large number of overlapped laser beams. Imprinting of laser modulations depends on the relative arrival time of laser beams and their angles of incidence. This dependence was measured in planar plastic targets using six overlapping beams on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, R. L. Keck, J. P. Knauer, J. H. Kelly, T. J. Kessler, S. A. Kumpan, S. J. Loucks, S. A. Letzring, F. J. Marshall, R. L. McCrory, S. F. B. Morse, W. Seka, J. M. Soures, and C. P. Verdon, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. One of the beams (the imprint beam) had a special phase plate that produced two-dimensional modulations on the target, easily distinguishable from the features imprinted by the other five drive beams. The timing of the imprint beam was varied with respect to the drive beams to study imprinting sensitivity to beam mistiming. Shifting the imprint beam to arrive before the other beams significantly increased the imprint efficiency. The results are in very good agreement with the model predictions

  3. Importance of beam-beam tune spread to collective beam-beam instability in hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Lihui; Shi Jicong

    2004-01-01

    In hadron colliders, electron-beam compensation of beam-beam tune spread has been explored for a reduction of beam-beam effects. In this paper, effects of the tune-spread compensation on beam-beam instabilities were studied with a self-consistent beam-beam simulation in model lattices of Tevatron and Large Hodron Collider. It was found that the reduction of the tune spread with the electron-beam compensation could induce a coherent beam-beam instability. The merit of the compensation with different degrees of tune-spread reduction was evaluated based on beam-size growth. When two beams have a same betatron tune, the compensation could do more harm than good to the beams when only beam-beam effects are considered. If a tune split between two beams is large enough, the compensation with a small reduction of the tune spread could benefit beams as Landau damping suppresses the coherent beam-beam instability. The result indicates that nonlinear (nonintegrable) beam-beam effects could dominate beam dynamics and a reduction of beam-beam tune spread by introducing additional beam-beam interactions and reducing Landau damping may not improve the stability of beams

  4. Beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abell, D; Adelmann, A; Amundson, J; Dragt, A; Mottershead, C; Neri, F; Pogorelov, I; Qiang, J; Ryne, R; Shalf, J; Siegerist, C; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E; Venturini, M; Walstrom, P

    2006-01-01

    We describe some of the accomplishments of the Beam Dynamics portion of the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology project. During the course of the project, our beam dynamics software has evolved from the era of different codes for each physical effect to the era of hybrid codes combining start-of-the-art implementations for multiple physical effects to the beginning of the era of true multi-physics frameworks. We describe some of the infrastructure that has been developed over the course of the project and advanced features of the most recent developments, the interplay betwen beam studies and simulations and applications to current machines at Fermilab. Finally we discuss current and future plans for simulations of the International Linear Collider

  5. Comparing Expert and Novice Driving Behavior in a Driving Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiran B. Ekanayake

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study focused on comparing driving behavior of expert and novice drivers in a mid-range driving simulator with the intention of evaluating the validity of driving simulators for driver training. For the investigation, measurements of performance, psychophysiological measurements, and self-reported user experience under different conditions of driving tracks and driving sessions were analyzed. We calculated correlations between quantitative and qualitative measures to enhance the reliability of the findings. The experiment was conducted involving 14 experienced drivers and 17 novice drivers. The results indicate that driving behaviors of expert and novice drivers differ from each other in several ways but it heavily depends on the characteristics of the task. Moreover, our belief is that the analytical framework proposed in this paper can be used as a tool for selecting appropriate driving tasks as well as for evaluating driving performance in driving simulators.

  6. Polar Direct Drive-Ignition at 1 MJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skupsky, S.; Craxton, R.S.; Marshall, F.J.; Betti, R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V.N.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Radha, P.B.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Sangster, T.C.; McCrory, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    Target designs to achieve direct-drive ignition on the NIF using the x-ray-drive beam configuration are examined. This approach, known as polar direct drive (PDD), achieves the required irradiation uniformity by repointing some of the beams toward the target equator, and by increasing the laser intensity at the equator to compensate for the reduced laser coupling from oblique irradiation. Techniques to increase the equatorial intensity can include using phase plates that produce elliptical spot shapes, increasing the power in beams directed toward the equator, and using a ring offset from the equator to redirect rays toward the target normal. The requirements for beam pointing, power balance, single-beam smoothing, and inner-ice-surface roughness are examined. Designs with an incident laser energy of 1.0 MJ are presented. The simulations use the 2-D hydrocode DRACO with 3-D ray trace to model the laser irradiation and Monte Carlo alpha particle transport to model the thermonuclear burn

  7. Driving skills after whiplash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimse, R; Bjørgen, I A; Straume, A

    1997-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that some persons with longlasting problems after whiplash have changed eye movements. These changes have been related to disturbance of the posture control system. The question raised in the present study is whether such disturbances can influence daily life functions connected with balance, position and external movements, such as car driving. A group of 23 persons with disturbed eye movements due to whiplash injury, was tested in a driving simulator, together with a closely matched control group. The results revealed significant differences between the two groups with respect to response times to the traffic signs presented, identification of type of sign, as well as steering precision while the subjects' attention was directed to the process of identifying the signs. Alternative explanations such as driving experience, pain, medication or malingering are at least partly controlled for, but cannot completely be ruled out. A distorted posture control system leading to disturbance of eye movements seems to be the most likely primary causative factor, but these disturbances are most certainly complexly determined. Reduced attention capacity is considered to be a mediating secondary factor. Registration of eye movements may be a useful diagnostic tool to evaluate driving skill after whiplash.

  8. Gaze-controlled Driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tall, Martin; Alapetite, Alexandre; San Agustin, Javier

    2009-01-01

    We investigate if the gaze (point of regard) can control a remote vehicle driving on a racing track. Five different input devices (on-screen buttons, mouse-pointing low-cost webcam eye tracker and two commercial eye tracking systems) provide heading and speed control on the scene view transmitted...

  9. Gas turbine drives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    Developments in gas turbine drives are reviewed, e.g., low weight per unit power and thrust-weight ratio, fast availability of the maximum speed, absolute resistance to cold and to droplet formation vibrationeless run, and low exhaust gas temperatures. Applications in aeronautic engineering (turbofan), power stations, marine propulsion systems, railways and road transportation vehicles are mentioned.

  10. Chaos in drive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kratochvíl C.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to provide an elementary introduction to the subject of chaos in the electromechanical drive systems. In this article, we explore chaotic solutions of maps and continuous time systems. These solutions are also bounded like equilibrium, periodic and quasiperiodic solutions.

  11. Electric Drive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    compound promises to reduce weight of future permanent magnet motors by 20 to 30 percent; a similar reduction is expected in size (approximately 20...drive systems. The AC permanent magnet (brushless DC motor) is rapidly evolving and will replace most electrically excited machines. Permanent magnet motors using

  12. Electric-Drive Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Septon, Kendall K [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-11

    Electric-drive vehicles use electricity as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. These vehicles can be divided into three categories: Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), All-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, PHEVs and EVs can also be referred to as plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs).

  13. Electric-Drive Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-09-01

    Electric-drive vehicles use electricity as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. These vehicles can be divided into three categories: Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), All-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, PHEVs and EVs can also be referred to as plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs).

  14. Driving While Intoxicated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brick, John

    Alcohol intoxication increases the risk of highway accidents, the relative risk of crash probability increasing as a function of blood alcohol content (BAC). Because alcohol use is more prevalent than use of other drugs, more is known about the relationship between alcohol use and driving. Most states presume a BAC of .10% to be evidence of drunk…

  15. Rod drive and latching mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronesi, L.; Sherwood, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Hydraulic drive and latching mechanisms for driving reactivity control mechanisms in nuclear reactors are described. Preferably, the pressurized reactor coolant is utilized to raise the drive rod into contact with and to pivot the latching mechanism so as to allow the drive rod to pass the latching mechanism. The pressure in the housing may then be equalized which allows the drive rod to move downwardly into contact with the latching mechanism but to hold the shaft in a raised position with respect to the reactor core. Once again, the reactor coolant pressure may be utilized to raise the drive rod and thus pivot the latching mechanism so that the drive rod passes above the latching mechanism. Again, the mechanism pressure can be equalized which allows the drive rod to fall and pass by the latching mechanism so that the drive rod approaches the reactor core. (author)

  16. Measurement of beam driven hydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Black, E.; Bandura, L.; Errede, D.; Cummings, M. A. C.

    2003-01-01

    Cooling intense muon beams in liquid hydrogen absorbers introduces kW of heating to the cold fluid, which will drive turbulent flow. The amount of turbulence may be sufficient to help cool the liquid, but calculations are difficult. We have used a 20 MeV electron beam in a water tank to look at the scale of the beam driven convection and turbulence. The density and flow measurements are made with schlieren and Ronchi systems. We describe the optical systems and the turbulence measured. These data are being used to calibrate hydrodynamic calculations of convection driven and forced flow cooling in muon cooling absorbers

  17. A 12 kV, 1 kHz, Pulse Generator for Breakdown Studies of Samples for CLIC RF Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Soares, R H; Kovermann, J; Calatroni, S; Wuensch, W

    2012-01-01

    Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) RF structures must be capable of sustaining high surface electric fields, in excess of 200 MV/m, with a breakdown (BD) rate below 3×10-7 breakdowns/pulse/m. Achieving such a low rate requires a detailed understanding of all the steps involved in the mechanism of breakdown. One of the fundamental studies is to investigate the statistical characteristics of the BD rate phenomenon at very low values to understand the origin of an observed dependency of the surface electric field raised to the power of 30. To acquire sufficient BD data, in a reasonable period of time, a high repetition rate pulse generator is required for an existing d.c. spark system at CERN. Following BD of the material sample the pulse generator must deliver a current pulse of several 10’s of Amperes for ~2 μs. A high repetition rate pulse generator has been designed, built and tested; this utilizes pulse forming line technology and employs MOSFET switches. This paper describes the design of the pulse generat...

  18. Jet Reconstruction and Kinematic Fitting of the Top Quark Pair Production at CLIC at √s = 3 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Galy-Fajou, Theo; Bay, Aurelio

    Top quark physics, due to its possible link with new physics, is a critical topic now that the Standard Model has been experimentally verified. A complete method to reconstruct top quarks pairs at the proposed Compact LInear Collider project is presented here. In this study, MC generated events of e+e− → tt have been used to tune and optimize algorithms in order to reconstruct faithfully the decay products of the top quarks. An emphasis is made on the flavour identification of the jets since it is critical to identify correctly identify the jets to remove most of the background. The reconstructed jets are fitted to the topology with the KLFitter algorithms that have been adapted for CLIC. Using a multi-variable analysis, it finds the best permutation of jets with the best set of parameters using the kinematics of the event. The results of this technique applied on a sample of 49500 e+e− → tt events (corresponding to 850 fb−1 at √s = 3 TeV) is presented here.

  19. Design study of a microwave driver for a Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houck, T.L.

    1993-05-01

    In two-beam accelerators, the reacceleration of a modulated drive beam can enable high conversion efficiency of electron beam energy to rf energy. However, the stability issues involved with the transport of high current electron beams through rf extraction structures and induction accelerator cells are critical. The author reports on theoretical studies and computer simulations of a two-beam accelerator design using traveling-wave extraction structures. Specific issues addressed include regenerative and cumulative transverse instabilities

  20. Electrical drives for direct drive renewable energy systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Wind turbine gearboxes present major reliability issues, leading to great interest in the current development of gearless direct-drive wind energy systems. Offering high reliability, high efficiency and low maintenance, developments in these direct-drive systems point the way to the next generation of wind power, and Electrical drives for direct drive renewable energy systems is an authoritative guide to their design, development and operation. Part one outlines electrical drive technology, beginning with an overview of electrical generators for direct drive systems. Principles of electrical design for permanent magnet generators are discussed, followed by electrical, thermal and structural generator design and systems integration. A review of power electronic converter technology and power electronic converter systems for direct drive renewable energy applications is then conducted. Part two then focuses on wind and marine applications, beginning with a commercial overview of wind turbine drive systems and a...