WorldWideScience

Sample records for clean metal casting

  1. Clean Metal Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  2. Effect of Intraoral Mechanical Cleaning Techniques on Bond Strength of Cast Crowns to Metal Cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlZain, Sahar; Kattadiyil, Mathew T; AlHelal, Abdulaziz; Alqahtani, Ali

    2017-11-30

    To evaluate the effect of cleaning of metal cores from provisional cement, using an intraoral airborne-particle abrasion method, on the bond strength of permanent resin cement with cast crowns to cores. Thirty stainless steel models of a standard complete crown tooth preparation were fabricated. Thirty Type III gold crowns were fabricated. Each cast crown corresponded to one stainless steel crown preparation model. All crowns were cemented with noneugenol zinc oxide cement and stored for 7 days at 37°C. All crowns were debonded, and the cement was cleaned with airborne-particle abrasion using 50 μm aluminum oxide at 4.1 bar (0.41 MPa) followed by ultrasonic cleaning. Based on the mechanical cleaning technique of the remaining provisional cement on surfaces of cast cores, specimens were equally divided into 3 groups: hand cleaning (HC) with a dental excavator, hand cleaning followed by polishing using a brush and pumice (BP), and hand cleaning followed by intraoral airborne-particle abrasion (APA). All crowns were then cemented to their corresponding cores using universal resin cement. All crowns were stored for 7 days at 37°C. An Instron universal testing machine was used to record the bond strength of crowns. Airborne-particle abrasion method for intraoral mechanical cleaning revealed a statistically significantly higher bond strength compared to the other two methods. When comparing the three methods of provisional cement cleaning from metal cores, airborne-particle abrasion resulted in the highest bond strength for cast crowns. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. Clean ferrous casting technology research. Final technical report, September 29, 1993--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwonka, T.S. [ed.

    1996-01-01

    This report details results of a 30-month program to develop methods of making clean ferrous castings, i.e., castings free of inclusions and surface defects. The program was divided into 3 tasks: techniques for producing clean steel castings, electromagnetic removal of inclusions from ferrous melts, and study of causes of metal penetration in sand molds in cast iron.

  4. Monel Metal Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1935-07-17

    foot is adequate. A refractory , open sand should be used. Melting and Casting: The alloys are successfully produced from electro-nickel and copper...desirable if the charge is not chiefly Monel Metal scrap. About 0.1% magnesium should be ;ell stirred into the melt in the ladle before pouring. The addition...such as is used for the more refractory valve trim alloys. Carboloy tools probably can be used to advantage for the high silicon Monel Metal alloys

  5. Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. E. Bates; J. A. Griffin

    2000-05-01

    There were two main tasks in the Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer Project. These were (1) determine the processing facts that control the machinability of cast steel and (2) determine the ability of ladle stirring to homogenize ladle temperature, reduce the tap and pouring temperatures, and reduce casting scrap.

  6. Method for casting thin metal objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

    2015-04-14

    Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

  7. Cast erosion from the cleaning of debris after the use of a cast trimmer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Paul A; Beatty, Mark W

    2017-02-01

    Whether using tap water to rinse off debris will make a clinical difference to the surface detail of a gypsum cast is unknown. In addition, how best to remove debris from the cast is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the efficiency of different methods of cleaning a gypsum cast after trimming and the effect of short-term exposure to tap water on the surface quality of the cast. A die fitting American National Standards Institute/American Dental Association specification 25 (International Standards Organization specification 6873) for dental gypsum products was embedded in a Dentoform with the machined lines positioned at the same level as the occlusal surface of the posterior teeth. A flat plate was used to ensure that the plane of occlusion for the die was at the same position as the posterior teeth. Forty polyvinyl siloxane impressions of the Dentoform were made and poured with vacuum-mixed improved Type IV dental stone. Each cast was inspected for the accurate reproduction of the lines. The base of the 2-stage pour was trimmed with a cast trimmer with water, and surface debris was removed by rinsing by hand under tap water for 10 seconds, by brushing the cast with a soft toothbrush for 10 seconds, or by resoaking the cast and using a soft camel hair brush in slurry water for 10 seconds. The amount of debris was evaluated on a scale of 1 to 4, and the quality of the 20-μm line was evaluated on a scale of 1 to 4 under ×15 magnification. The nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis ranks test was used to identify significant differences among the different cleaning methods (α=.05). Results of the Kruskal-Wallis and Kruskal-Wallis Z-value tests demonstrated that all cleaning methods produced cleaner casts than were observed for uncleansed controls (Pcleaning methods (.065≤P≤.901). The ability to see the quality of a 20-μm line (P=.974) was not statistically different among the groups. Rinsing the cast under flowing tap water and brushing, or

  8. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.; Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.

    1987-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  9. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1988-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  10. Energy use in selected metal casting facilities - 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eppich, Robert E. [Eppich Technologies, Syracuse, IN (United States)

    2004-05-01

    This report represents an energy benchmark for various metal casting processes. It describes process flows and energy use by fuel type and processes for selected casting operations. It also provides recommendations for improving energy efficiency in casting.

  11. Casting routes for porous metals production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lichy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen growing interest in professional public about applications of porous metallic materials. Porous metals represent a new type of materials with low densities, large specific surface, and novel physical and mechanical properties, characterized by low density and large specific surface. They are very suitable for specific applications due to good combination of physical and mechanical properties such as high specific strength and high energy absorption capability. Since the discovery of metal foams have been developed many methods and techniques of production in liquid, solid and gas phases. Condition for the use of metal foams - advanced materials with unique usability features, are inexpensive ways to manage their production. Mastering of production of metallic foams with defined structure and properties using gravity casting into sand or metallic foundry moulds will contribute to an expansion of the assortment produced in foundries by completely new type of material, which has unique service properties thanks to its structure, and which fulfils the current demanding ecological requirements. The aim of research conducted at the department of metallurgy and foundry of VSB-Technical University Ostrava is to verify the possibilities of production of metallic foams by conventional foundry processes, to study the process conditions and physical and mechanical properties of metal foam produced. Two procedures are used to create porous metal structures: Infiltration of liquid metal into the mold cavity filled with precursors or preforms and two stage investment casting.

  12. Casting of Motorcycle Piston from Aluminium Piston Scrap using Metallic Mould

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Uchenna OZIOKO

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The casting of motorcycle piston was carried out using metallic mould. The prepared piston sand core was positioned in the mould to provide casting with contours and cavities. The molten metal of required composition was poured into the metallic mould, allowed to solidify and take the desired shape of the cavity. Aluminium silicon piston scraps were used as the casting material. Melting of the aluminium piston scraps was achieved using local crucible furnace and finally pouring the molten metal into the metallic mould having the prepared piston sand core in place to obtain the piston. After fettling and cleaning, the casting was found to be good. The composition test revealed that the scrap piston was made from LM29 aluminium alloy. The cast piston was machined and subjected to performance rating test in a Jincheng AX100 motorcycle engine. The rating used was based on a scale from 1 to 10. The higher the rating, the better the evaluation of the piston in the specific area rated. Deposits are evaluated by appearance, ranging from 10 (clean - absence of deposits to 0.0 (maximum deposits. In spite of various production constraints the result of the performance test was good. The rating showed that the locally cast piston compared favourably with imported piston.

  13. Cyanide poisoning from metal cleaning solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, A; Saxena, K

    1987-05-01

    We report two cases of cyanide poisoning from accidental ingestion of an imported metal cleaning solution used by some Southeast Asians for shining coins. Both patients received specific therapy and recovered completely after a dramatic sequence of sudden collapse and severe cardiovascular compromise.

  14. Best practices for making high integrity lightweight metal castings - molten metal composition and cleanliness control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qigui Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To make high integrity lightweight metal castings, best practices are required in various stages of casting and heat treatment processes, including liquid metal composition and quality control, casting and gating/riser system design, and process optimization. This paper presents best practices for liquid metal processing and quality assurance of molten metal in both melting and mold filling. Best practices for other aspects of lightweight metal casting will be published separately.

  15. Clean ferrous casting technology research. Final technical report, September 29, 1993--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, C.E.; Griffin, J.; Giese, S.R.; Lane, A.M. [and others

    1996-01-31

    This is the final report covering work performed on research into methods of attaining clean ferrous castings. In this program methods were developed to minimize the formation of inclusions in steel castings by using a variety of techniques which decreased the tendency for inclusions to form during melting, casting and solidification. In a second project, a reaction chamber was built to remove inclusions from molten steel using electromagnetic force. Finally, a thorough investigation of the causes of sand penetration defects in iron castings was completed, and a program developed which predicts the probability of penetration formation and indicates methods for avoiding it.

  16. Casting metal microstructures from a flexible and reusable mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Andrew H.; King, William P.

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes casting-based microfabrication of metal microstructures and nanostructures. The metal was cast into flexible silicone molds which were themselves cast from microfabricated silicon templates. Microcasting is demonstrated in two metal alloys of melting temperature 70 °C or 138 °C. Many structures were successfully cast into the metal with excellent replication fidelity, including ridges with periodicity 400 nm and holes or pillars with diameter in the range 10-100 µm and aspect ratio up to 2:1. The flexibility of the silicone mold permits casting of curved surfaces, which we demonstrate by fabricating a cylindrical metal roller of diameter 8 mm covered with microstructures. The metal microstructures can be in turn used as a reusable molding tool.

  17. Method and mold for casting thin metal objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

    2014-04-29

    Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

  18. Development of steel plate - cast iron hybrid casting process for recycling of low level radioactive metal waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, H.; Hirabayashi, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Akimoto, J.; Takahashi, K.; Shindo, H.; Sakurai, D. [Mitsubishi Materials Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Almansour, A.; Okane, T.; Umeda, T. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    For the purposes of recycling low-level radioactive waste arising from dismantling of nuclear reactors, applicability of steel plate - cast iron hybrid casting process has been investigated as a measure for producing a waste container using radioactive metal waste. This investigation consists of casting tests and analyses on the solidification and distortion of castings. This paper describes the concept of the casting process, casting test results, and understandings obtained from the analyses. (orig.)

  19. Study of Thermal Properties of Cast Metal- Ceramic Composite Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Gawdzińska K.; Chybowski L.; Przetakiewicz W.

    2017-01-01

    Owing to its properties, metallic foams can be used as insulation material. Thermal properties of cast metal-ceramic composite foams have applications in transport vehicles and can act as fire resistant and acoustic insulators of bulkheads. This paper presents basic thermal properties of cast and foamed aluminum, the values of thermal conductivity coefficient of selected gases used in foaming composites and thermal capabilities of composite foams (AlSi11/SiC). A certificate of non-combustibil...

  20. Preparation of open-cell metal foams by investment cast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucai WANG

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Metal foams are a new kind of materials with low densities and novel physical, mechanical, thermal, electrical and acoustic properties. They can be divided into closed and open cell structures. In this paper the open cell structures, called sponges, were treated. A new technique to manufacture sponges by plaster investment casting was described. Experimental results show that it is essential to make a sound plaster mould by casting plaster slurry into the polyurethane foams and infiltrate the open channels of the baked plaster mold by molten metal. The optimal processes include plaster slurry preparation, plaster mold baking, and molten metal infiltration. The sponge sample with porosity of 97% is presented.

  1. Knowledge Representation of Casting Metal Defects by Means of Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kluska-Nawarecka

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The scattered nature of information requires implementation of appropriate tools and system solutions. The conception of decentralized diagnostic system of casting metal defects, in which the methods of concept classification in the form of ontology are used, has been presented in the article. Also, the general rules of ontology creation, model division into modules, the hierarchy of classes and their instances have been introduced. There has been provided an example of ontology construction for casting defects.

  2. Preparation of open-cell metal foams by investment cast

    OpenAIRE

    Lucai WANG; Haijuan LI; Fang WANG

    2005-01-01

    Metal foams are a new kind of materials with low densities and novel physical, mechanical, thermal, electrical and acoustic properties. They can be divided into closed and open cell structures. In this paper the open cell structures, called sponges, were treated. A new technique to manufacture sponges by plaster investment casting was described. Experimental results show that it is essential to make a sound plaster mould by casting plaster slurry into the polyurethane foams and infiltrate the...

  3. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Clean Steel Casting Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuyucak, Selcuk [CanmetMATERIALS; Li, Delin [CanmetMATERIALS

    2013-12-31

    Inclusions in steel castings can cause rework, scrap, poor machining, and reduced casting performance, which can obviously result in excess energy consumption. Significant progress in understanding inclusion source, formation and control has been made. Inclusions can be defined as non-metallic materials such as refractory, sand, slag, or coatings, embedded in a metallic matrix. This research project has focused on the mold filling aspects to examine the effects of pouring methods and gating designs on the steel casting cleanliness through water modeling, computer modeling, and melting/casting experiments. Early in the research project, comprehensive studies of bottom-pouring water modeling and low-alloy steel casting experiments were completed. The extent of air entrainment in bottom-poured large castings was demonstrated by water modeling. Current gating systems are designed to prevent air aspiration. However, air entrainment is equally harmful and no prevention measures are in current practice. In this study, new basin designs included a basin dam, submerged nozzle, and nozzle extension. The entrained air and inclusions from the gating system were significantly reduced using the new basin method. Near the end of the project, there has been close collaboration with Wescast Industries Inc., a company manufacturing automotive exhaust components. Both computer modeling using Magma software and melting/casting experiments on thin wall turbo-housing stainless steel castings were completed in this short period of time. Six gating designs were created, including the current gating on the pattern, non-pressurized, partially pressurized, naturally pressurized, naturally pressurized without filter, and radial choke gating without filter, for Magma modeling. The melt filling velocity and temperature were determined from the modeling. Based on the simulation results, three gating designs were chosen for further melting and casting experiments on the same casting pattern using

  4. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J.R.

    1987-10-28

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a model within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. 8 figs.

  5. Implementation of Metal Casting Best Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eppich, Robert [Eppich Technologies, Syracuse, IN (United States); Naranjo, Robert D. [BCS, Inc., Laurel, MD (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The project examined cases where metal casters had implemented ITP research results and the benefits they received due to that implementation. In cases where casters had not implemented those results, the project examined the factors responsible for that lack of implementation. The project also informed metal casters of the free tools and service offered by the ITP Technology Delivery subprogram.

  6. Casting Routes for Porous Metals Production

    OpenAIRE

    Lichy P.; Bednarova V.; Elbel T.

    2012-01-01

    The last decade has seen growing interest in professional public about applications of porous metallic materials. Porous metals represent a new type of materials with low densities, large specific surface, and novel physical and mechanical properties, characterized by low density and large specific surface. They are very suitable for specific applications due to good combination of physical and mechanical properties such as high specific strength and high energy absorption capability. Since t...

  7. Manufacturing of Cast Metal Foams with Irregular Cell Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroupová I.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metallic foams are materials of which the research is still on-going, with the broad applicability in many different areas (e.g. automotive industry, building industry, medicine, etc.. These metallic materials have specific properties, such as large rigidity at low density, high thermal conductivity, capability to absorb energy, etc. The work is focused on the preparation of these materials using conventional casting technology (infiltration method, which ensures rapid and economically feasible method for production of shaped components. In the experimental part we studied conditions of casting of metallic foams with open pores and irregular cell structure made of ferrous and nonferrous alloys by use of various types of filler material (precursors.

  8. Casting Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) casting technology as it relates to industry, with comparisons of shell casting, shell molding, and die casting; (2) evaporative pattern casting for metals; and (3) high technological casting with silicone rubber. (JOW)

  9. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1989-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a mold within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. The magnetic fields associated with the currents in the aforementioned coils levitate the molten metal sheet while the mold provides for its lateral and vertical confinement. A leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the molten metal sheet is used to start the casing process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the yoke/coil arrangement and mold and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The yoke/coil arrangement may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of spaced, facing bedstead coils.

  10. Casting technology for manufacturing metal rods from simulated metallic spent fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeand, Y. S.; Lee, D. B.; Kim, C. K.; Shin, Y. J.; Lee, J. H.

    2000-09-01

    A uranium metal rod 13.5 mm in diameter and 1,150 mm long was produced from simulated metallic spent fuels with advanced casting equipment using the directional-solidification method. A vacuum casting furnace equipped with a four-zone heater to prevent surface oxidation and the formation of surface shrinkage holes was designed. By controlling the axial temperature gradient of the casting furnace, deformation by the surface shrinkage phenomena was diminished, and a sound rod was manufactured. The cooling behavior of the molten uranium was analyzed using the computer software package MAGMAsoft.

  11. Study of Thermal Properties of Cast Metal- Ceramic Composite Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawdzińska K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Owing to its properties, metallic foams can be used as insulation material. Thermal properties of cast metal-ceramic composite foams have applications in transport vehicles and can act as fire resistant and acoustic insulators of bulkheads. This paper presents basic thermal properties of cast and foamed aluminum, the values of thermal conductivity coefficient of selected gases used in foaming composites and thermal capabilities of composite foams (AlSi11/SiC. A certificate of non-combustibility test of cast aluminum-ceramic foam for marine applications was included inside the paper. The composite foam was prepared by the gas injection method, consisting in direct injection of gas into liquid metal. Foams with closed and open cells were examined. The foams were foaming with foaming gas consisting of nitrogen or air. This work is one of elements of researches connected with description of properties of composite foams. In author's other works acoustic properties of these materials will be presented.

  12. In situ purification, alloying and casting methodology for metallic plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashley, Jason C.; Blau, Michael S.; Staudhammer, Karl P.; Pereyra, Ramiro A.

    Plutonium metal that has been double ER (electrorefined/electrorefining) was further purified via zone refining, using a floating molten zone to minimize the introduction of impurities. The temperature of the molten zone was 750°C, and the atmosphere was 10 -5 Pa. A total of ten zone refining passes were made at a travel rate of 1.5 cm/h. There were 19 elements reduced to quantities below the minimum detectable limits (MDL) by zone refining, while P, K, and W were significantly reduced. The zone-refined metal was then used in an in situ distillation, alloying, and casting step to prepare tapered specimens for single-crystal growth experiments. Specifically, 241Am was distilled from Pu metal by levitating Pu metal with 1 wt% Ga in the melt in a Crystallox vertical electromagnetic levitation crucible at 10 -5 Pa. The Pu is alloyed with Ga to stabilize the δ phase (fcc symmetry) upon solidification. The Pu was chill-cast directly from the electromagnetic levitation field into 1- cm tapered specimens. A water-cooled ceramic mold was used, and the Pu metal was cooled at a rate of 100°C/min. A microstructure examination of the specimen showed 10 × 25 μm acicular grains with a density of 15.938 g/cm 3 (±0.002 g/cm 3).

  13. Effect of hydrogen on the frequency of breaks in a metal during continuous casting of steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. N.; Epishev, M. V.; Kislitsa, V. V.; Nagornyi, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    Data from a number of metallurgical works in Ukraine are used to analyze the possibility of break formation in a metal at a various hydrogen content in a liquid steel during continuous casting. A critical hydrogen content in the metal to be cast at which the probability of breaks in the metal increases sharply is revealed. Possible mechanisms of the suspension of the skin of an ingot in a continuous-casting mold and of breaks in a metal are considered.

  14. Cleaning Challenges of High-κ/Metal Gate Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2010-12-20

    High-κ/metal gates are used as transistors for advanced logic applications to improve speed and eliminate electrical issues associated with polySi and SiO2 gates. Various integration schemes are possible and will be discussed, such as dual gate, gate-first, and gate-last, both of which require specialized cleaning and etching steps. Specific areas of discussion will include cleaning and conditioning of the silicon surface, forming a high-quality chemical oxide, removal of the high-κ dielectric with selectivity to the SiO2 layer, cleaning and residue removal after etching, and prevention of galvanic corrosion during cleaning. © 2011 Scrivener Publishing LLC. All rights reserved.

  15. Dry ice blasting for the conservation cleaning of metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, R.; Joosten, I.; Beentjes, T.; Megens, L.; Mardikian, P.; Chemello, C.; Watters, C.; Hull, P.

    2011-01-01

    This research was carried out to assess the feasibility of dry ice blasting as a replacement for solvent cleaning for the removal of organic layers from metal cultural heritage objects. The effects of dry ice blasting on test samples of aluminium, bronze and weathering steel were studied along with

  16. Tribological Properties of Al-SiC Metal Matrix Composites: A Comparison Between Sand Cast and Squeeze Cast Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S.; Sahoo, P.; Sutradhar, G.

    2014-10-01

    Tribological behaviour of Al-SiC metal matrix composites prepared using two different fabrication techniques, viz. sand cast and squeeze cast techniques are studied in a multi- tribotester (TR-25, DUCOM, India) under dry sliding conditions and ambient atmosphere for varying volume fraction of reinforcement, applied load and sliding speed. Friction increases with increase in applied load and sliding speed and volume fraction of reinforcement. Wear test results show increased wear rates at higher load and speed, while increase in SiC volume fraction yields decrease in wear rate. Corrosion study conducted in 3.5 % NaCl solution shows that squeeze cast composites have better corrosion resistance than sand cast composites. Vickers's microhardness test shows improved hardness properties for squeeze cast composites compared to sand cast ones. The microstructure study of wear tracks reveals domination of abrasive wear with minor traces of adhesive wear.

  17. Cleaning Historical Metals: Performance of Laser Technology in Monument Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, A.; Meier, M.; Mottner, P.; Wiedemann, G.; Conrad, W.; Haber, G.

    In practical restoration - depending on the object in question and the regional attitude to monument restoration - widely differing techniques and restoration philosophies have been, and still are, applied to the exposure of metal. Depending on the type of metal, this results in differing working materials as well as highly diverging definitions of the required degree of exposure as far as removing corrosive deposits is concerned. Therefore, particularly where metallic or heat sensitive cultural assets are concerned, the applicability of an efficient cleaning procedure using contact-free laser beam technology, which is also gentle on the material, should be examined.

  18. High pressure die casting of Fe-based metallic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Parthiban; Szabo, Attila; Borzel, Stefan; Eckert, Jürgen; Stoica, Mihai; Bárdos, András

    2016-10-11

    Soft ferromagnetic Fe-based bulk metallic glass key-shaped specimens with a maximum and minimum width of 25.4 and 5 mm, respectively, were successfully produced using a high pressure die casting (HPDC) method, The influence of die material, alloy temperature and flow rate on the microstructure, thermal stability and soft ferromagnetic properties has been studied. The results suggest that a steel die in which the molten metal flows at low rate and high temperature can be used to produce completely glassy samples. This can be attributed to the laminar filling of the mold and to a lower heat transfer coefficient, which avoids the skin effect in the steel mold. In addition, magnetic measurements reveal that the amorphous structure of the material is maintained throughout the key-shaped samples. Although it is difficult to control the flow and cooling rate of the molten metal in the corners of the key due to different cross sections, this can be overcome by proper tool geometry. The present results confirm that HPDC is a suitable method for the casting of Fe-based bulk glassy alloys even with complex geometries for a broad range of applications.

  19. High pressure die casting of Fe-based metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Parthiban; Szabo, Attila; Borzel, Stefan; Eckert, Jürgen; Stoica, Mihai; Bárdos, András

    2016-10-01

    Soft ferromagnetic Fe-based bulk metallic glass key-shaped specimens with a maximum and minimum width of 25.4 and 5 mm, respectively, were successfully produced using a high pressure die casting (HPDC) method, The influence of die material, alloy temperature and flow rate on the microstructure, thermal stability and soft ferromagnetic properties has been studied. The results suggest that a steel die in which the molten metal flows at low rate and high temperature can be used to produce completely glassy samples. This can be attributed to the laminar filling of the mold and to a lower heat transfer coefficient, which avoids the skin effect in the steel mold. In addition, magnetic measurements reveal that the amorphous structure of the material is maintained throughout the key-shaped samples. Although it is difficult to control the flow and cooling rate of the molten metal in the corners of the key due to different cross sections, this can be overcome by proper tool geometry. The present results confirm that HPDC is a suitable method for the casting of Fe-based bulk glassy alloys even with complex geometries for a broad range of applications.

  20. Nonhazardous solvent composition and method for cleaning metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Googin, J.M.; Simandl, R.F.; Thompson, L.M.

    1993-05-04

    A solvent composition for displacing greasy and oily contaminants as well as water and/or aqueous residue from metallic surfaces, especially surfaces of radioactive materials so that such surfaces can be wiped clean of the displaced contaminants, water and/or aqueous residue. The solvent composition consists essentially of a blend of nonpolar aliphatic hydrocarbon solvent having a minimum flash point of about 140 F and 2 to 25 volume percent of a polar solvent having a flash point sufficiently high so as to provide the solvent composition with a minimum flash point of at least 140 F. The solvent composition is nonhazardous so that when it is used to clean the surfaces of radioactive materials the waste in the form of paper or cloth wipes, lab coats and the like used in the cleaning operation is not considered to be mixed waste composed of a hazardous solvent and a radioactive material.

  1. Semi-solid high pressure die casting of metal matrix composites produced by liquid state processing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ivanchev, L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available There are two main technologies for manufacturing of particulate reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC), solid state and liquid state processing. The great challenge of producing cast metal matrix composites is to prevent agglomeration...

  2. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people

  3. Casting of weldable graphite/magnesium metal matrix composites with built-in metallic inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Kashalikar, Uday; Majkowski, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    Technology innovations directed at the advanced development of a potentially low cost and weldable graphite/magnesium metal matrix composites (MMC) through near net shape pressure casting are described. These MMC components uniquely have built-in metallic inserts to provide an innovative approach for joining or connecting other MMC components through conventional joining techniques such as welding, brazing, mechanical fasteners, etc. Moreover, the metallic inserts trapped within the MMC components can be made to transfer the imposed load efficiently to the continuous graphite fiber reinforcement thus producing stronger, stiffer, and more reliable MMC components. The use of low pressure near net shape casting is economical compared to other MMC fabrication processes. These castable and potentially weldable MMC components can provide great payoffs in terms of high strength, high stiffness, low thermal expansion, lightweight, and easily joinable MMC components for several future NASA space structural, industrial, and commercial applications.

  4. Influence of S. mutans on base-metal dental casting alloy toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, E L; Dowling, A H; Moran, G P; Fleming, G J P

    2013-01-01

    We have highlighted that exposure of base-metal dental casting alloys to the acidogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans significantly increases cellular toxicity following exposure to immortalized human TR146 oral keratinocytes. With Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), S. mutans-treated nickel-based (Ni-based) and cobalt-chromium-based (Co-Cr-based) dental casting alloys were shown to leach elevated levels of metal ions compared with untreated dental casting alloys. We targeted several biological parameters: cell morphology, viable cell counts, cell metabolic activity, cell toxicity, and inflammatory cytokine expression. S. mutans-treated dental casting alloys disrupted cell morphology, elicited significantly decreased viable cell counts (p casting alloys induced elevated levels of cellular toxicity compared with S. mutans-treated Co-Cr-based dental casting alloys. While our findings indicated that the exacerbated release of metal ions from S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys was the likely result of the pH reduction during S. mutans growth, the exact nature of mechanisms leading to accelerated dissolution of alloy-discs is not yet fully understood. Given the predominance of S. mutans oral carriage and the exacerbated cytotoxicity observed in TR146 cells following exposure to S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys, the implications for the long-term stability of base-metal dental restorations in the oral cavity are a cause for concern.

  5. Simulation of the Continuous Casting and Cooling Behavior of Metallic Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zhipu; Ju, Dongying

    2017-04-17

    The development of melt spinning technique for preparation of metallic glasses was summarized. The limitations as well as restrictions of the melt spinning embodiments were also analyzed. As an improvement and variation of the melt spinning method, the vertical-type twin-roll casting (VTRC) process was discussed. As the thermal history experienced by the casting metals to a great extent determines the qualities of final products, cooling rate in the quenching process is believed to have a significant effect on glass formation. In order to estimate the ability to produce metallic glasses by VTRC method, temperature and flow phenomena of the melt in molten pool were computed, and cooling rates under different casting conditions were calculated with the simulation results. Considering the fluid character during casting process, the material derivative method based on continuum theory was adopted in the cooling rate calculation. Results show that the VTRC process has a good ability in continuous casting metallic glassy ribbons.

  6. Microabrasion of cast metal margins--a warning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansueto, Michael A; Verrett, Ronald G; Phoenix, Rodney D

    2007-01-01

    Plastic test patterns were milled to simulate casting margins and were cast in a variety of dental alloys. The cast specimens were exposed to horizontal and vertical streams of low-pressure microabrasion with 50 microm aluminum oxide particles. Post-exposure measurements show all specimens were affected by microabrasion. Dentists and laboratory technicians who use microabrasion must be aware of the potential damage to casting margins.

  7. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 2, Die casting research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, D. [University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Technology] [comp.

    1994-06-01

    Four subprojects were completed: development and evaluation of die coatings, accelerated die life characterization of die materials, evaluation of fluid flow and solidification modeling programs, selection and characterization of Al-based die casting alloys, and influence of die materials and coatings on die casting quality.

  8. Rate of solidification of aluminium casting in varying wall thickness of cylindrical metallic moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsina Christopher BALA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The quality of final casting mainly depends on the rate of solidification as rapid solidification produces fine grains structures with better mechanical properties. The analysis of heat transfer during the casting and solidification of aluminium alloy as well as the experimental investigation of the rate of solidification in varying thicknesses of cylindrical metallic mould was carried out. The temperature variation with time of the casting was recorded from which cooling curves were obtained for the determination of solidification time of the cast. The results showed that as the cylindrical mould thickness increases the solidification time decreases due to the chilling effect of the mould.

  9. Application of FMEA in the Quality Estimation of Metal Matrix Composite Castings Produced by Squeeze Infiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawdzińska K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composites (MMCs are still scarcely described due to various combinations of used materials and a wide array of technologies. Applying the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA method to describe the quality of metal composite castings may contribute to eliminating specific (characteristic only to these materials defects. This part of the analysis determines the criticality numbers, meaning the frequency of a given failure, detectability level and significance of a given failure to the group of specific composite casting failures. It contributes to establishing the priority number (P, which is a measure used to assess risk, a notion essential in discussing quality in a composite casting.

  10. Characterization of functionally graded Al-SiCp metal matrix composites manufactured by centrifugal casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. El-Galy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The design of metal matrix composites can be enhanced by integrating the concept of functionally graded materials (FGM to produce engineering materials with tailored contradictory properties that suit multifunctioning components. The present investigation focuses on characterization of functionally graded metal matrix composites (FGMMCs based on pure aluminium matrix reinforced with different percentages and sizes of SiC particles. The investigated FGMs have been produced by horizontal centrifugal casting process under different conditions. Microstructure investigation, tensile, hardness and wear rate measurements have been correlated with the size and percentage of SiC particles and their distribution/gradient across the thickness of the cast tubes resulting from the used casting parameters. Keywords: Metal matrix composites (MMC, Functionally graded materials (FGM, Centrifugal casting, Aluminium, Silicon carbide, Wear resistance

  11. [Evaluation method with radiographic image quality indicator for internal defects of dental casting metallic restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Zheng, G; Lin, H

    2014-12-18

    To develop a new kind of dental radiographic image quality indicator (IQI) for internal quality of casting metallic restoration to influence on its usage life. Radiographic image quality indicator method was used to evaluate the depth of the defects region and internal quality of 127 casting metallic restoration and the accuracy was compared with that of conventional callipers method. In the 127 cases of casting metallic restoration, 9 were found the thickness less than 0.7 mm and the thinnest thickness only 0.2 mm in 26 casting metallic crowns or bridges' occlusal defects region. The data measured by image quality indicator were consistent with those measured by conventional gauging. Two metal inner crowns were found the thickness less than 0.3 mm in 56 porcelain crowns or bridges. The thickness of casting removable partial denture was more than 1.0 mm, but thinner regions were not found. It was found that in a titanium partial denture, the X-ray image of clasp was not uniform and there were internal porosity defects in the clasp. Special dental image quality indicator can solve the visual error problems caused by different observing backgrounds and estimate the depth of the defects region in the casting.

  12. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Light Metals Permanent Mold Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasoyinu, Yemi [CanmetMATERIALS

    2014-03-31

    Current vehicles use mostly ferrous components for structural applications. It is possible to reduce the weight of the vehicle by substituting these parts with those made from light metals such as aluminum and magnesium. Many alloys and manufacturing processes can be used to produce these light metal components and casting is known to be most economical. One of the high integrity casting processes is permanent mold casting which is the focus of this research report. Many aluminum alloy castings used in automotive applications are produced by the sand casting process. Also, aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are the most widely used alloy systems for automotive applications. It is possible that by using high strength aluminum alloys based on an aluminum-copper (Al-Cu) system and permanent mold casting, the performance of these components can be enhanced significantly. This will also help to further reduce the weight. However, many technological obstacles need to be overcome before using these alloys in automotive applications in an economical way. There is very limited information in the open literature on gravity and low-pressure permanent mold casting of high strength aluminum alloys. This report summarizes the results and issues encountered during the casting trials of high strength aluminum alloy 206.0 (Al-Cu alloy) and moderate strength alloy 535.0 (Al-Mg alloy). Five engineering components were cast by gravity tilt-pour or low pressure permanent mold casting processes at CanmetMATERIALS (CMAT) and two production foundries. The results of the casting trials show that high integrity engineering components can be produced successfully from both alloys if specific processing parameters are used. It was shown that a combination of melt processing and mold temperature is necessary for the elimination of hot tears in both alloys.

  13. Vertical marginal discrepancies of metal castings obtained using different pattern materials: A scanning electron microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sushma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Dental Casting involves various stages of processing, out of which any may affect the dimensional accuracy. The fit of a casting depends not only on the method of fabrication employed but also on the type of materials utilized. One important variable in the casting process is the type of pattern material employed. This study was carried out to determine and compare the effect of different pattern materials on the vertical marginal accuracy of complete cast crowns. Materials and Methods: A standardized metal master die simulating a prepared crown was used to prepare 60 models on which patterns were fabricated using Inlay Pattern Wax; Auto-polymerized Pattern Resin and Light Cured Modeling Resin and cast immediately. Castings of the patterns were subjected to analysis of marginal fit using a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Results: One-way ANOVA result showed a significant difference in the gap observed between the castings fabricated using the three types of pattern materials (P 0.05. Conclusion: With strict adherence to the principles of pattern fabrication and immediate casting, Inlay wax can still be the pattern material of choice to produce a casting with minimal marginal discrepancy with added advantages of being user friendly and cost effective.

  14. Weld microstructure in cast AlSi9/SiC(p metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wysocki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Welded joint in cast AlSi9/SiC/20(p metal matrix composite by manual TIG arc welding using AlMg5 filler metal has been described inhis paper. Cooling curves have been stated, and the influence in distribution of reinforced particles on crystallization and weldmicrostructure. Welded joint mechanical properties have been determined: hardness and tensile.

  15. Development of an expert system for the simulation model for casting metal substructure of a metal-ceramic crown design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matin, Ivan; Hadzistevic, Miodrag; Vukelic, Djordje; Potran, Michal; Brajlih, Tomaz

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, the integrated CAD/CAE systems are favored solutions for the design of simulation models for casting metal substructures of metal-ceramic crowns. The worldwide authors have used different approaches to solve the problems using an expert system. Despite substantial research progress in the design of experts systems for the simulation model design and manufacturing have insufficiently considered the specifics of casting in dentistry, especially the need for further CAD, RE, CAE for the estimation of casting parameters and the control of the casting machine. The novel expert system performs the following: CAD modeling of the simulation model for casting, fast modeling of gate design, CAD eligibility and cast ability check of the model, estimation and running of the program code for the casting machine, as well as manufacturing time reduction of the metal substructure. The authors propose an integration method using common data model approach, blackboard architecture, rule-based reasoning and iterative redesign method. Arithmetic mean roughness values was determinated with constant Gauss low-pass filter (cut-off length of 2.5mm) according to ISO 4287 using Mahr MARSURF PS1. Dimensional deviation between the designed model and manufactured cast was determined using the coordinate measuring machine Zeiss Contura G2 and GOM Inspect software. The ES allows for obtaining the castings derived roughness grade number N7. The dimensional deviation between the simulation model of the metal substructure and the manufactured cast is 0.018mm. The arithmetic mean roughness values measured on the casting substructure are from 1.935µm to 2.778µm. The realized developed expert system with the integrated database is fully applicable for the observed hardware and software. Values of the arithmetic mean roughness and dimensional deviation indicate that casting substructures are surface quality, which is more than enough and useful for direct porcelain veneering. The

  16. Fabricating Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Microcomponent by Suction Casting Using Silicon Micromold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijing Zhu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A suction casting process for fabricating Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 bulk metallic glass microcomponent using silicon micromold has been studied. A complicated BMG microgear with 50 μm in module has been cast successfully. Observed by scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy, we find that the cast microgear duplicates the silicon micromold including the microstructure on the surface. The amorphous state of the microgear is confirmed by transmission election microscopy. The nanoindentation hardness and elasticity modulus of the microgear reach 6.5 GPa and 94.5 GPa. The simulation and experimental results prove that the suction casting process with the silicon micromold is a promising one-step method to fabricate bulk metallic glass microcomponents with high performance for applications in microelectromechanical system.

  17. Does the casting mode influence microstructure, fracture and properties of different metal ceramic alloys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, José Roberto de Oliveira; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda; Rodrigues-Filho, Leonardo Eloy; Pinto, Marcelo Mendes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tensile strength, elongation, microhardness, microstructure and fracture pattern of various metal ceramic alloys cast under different casting conditions. Two Ni-Cr alloys, Co-Cr and Pd-Ag were used. The casting conditions were as follows: electromagnetic induction under argon atmosphere, vacuum, using blowtorch without atmosphere control. For each condition, 16 specimens, each measuring 25 mm long and 2.5 mm in diameter, were obtained. Ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation (EL) tests were performed using a Kratos machine. Vickers Microhardness (VM), fracture mode and microstructure were analyzed by SEM. UTS, EL and VM data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. For UTS, alloy composition had a direct influence on casting condition of alloys (Wiron 99 and Remanium CD), with higher values shown when cast with Flame/Air (p casting condition" influenced the EL and VM results, generally presenting opposite results, i.e., alloy with high elongation value had lower hardness (Wiron 99), and casting condition with the lowest EL values had the highest VM values (blowtorch). Both factors had significant influence on the properties evaluated, and prosthetic laboratories should select the appropriate casting method for each alloy composition to obtain the desired property.

  18. Slip casting and extruding shapes of rhenium with metal oxide additives. 1: Feasibility demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, F. A.; Page, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating small rhenium parts with metal oxide additives by means of slip casting and extrusion techniques is described. The metal oxides, ZrO2 and HfO2 were stabilized into the cubic phase with Y2O3. Additions of metal oxide to the rhenium of up to 15 weight percent were used. Tubes of 17 mm diameter with 0.5 mm walls were slip cast by adapting current ceramic oxide techniques. A complete cast double conical nozzle demonstrated the ability to meet shapes and tolerances. Extrusion of meter long tubing lengths of 3.9 mm o.d. x 2.3 mm i.d. final dimension is documented. Sintering schedules are presented to produce better than 95% of theoretical density parts. Finished machining was found possible were requried by electric discharge machining and diamond grinding.

  19. EXAMPLES OF 3D-TECHNOLOGIES IN FOUNDRY PROCESSES. DECREASE IN METAL CONSUMPTION IN CASTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Doroshenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review describes the design of metal castings produced by use of 3D-technologies. Some new ways of 3D-processing of materials connected with additive processes are described, which represents the next step in environmental resource-saving production. Examples of patterns and casting of complex design with an optimal combination of materials, durability and attractive appearance are shown. Described 3D high-tech processes are expanding the existing range of metal products and the ways of its production.

  20. Ductile iron castings fabricated using metallic moulds; Fabricacion de piezas de fundicion con grafito esferoidal en molde metalico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urrestarazu, A.; Sertucha, J.; Suarez, R.; Alvarez-Ilzarbe, I.

    2013-07-01

    The features and suitability of high requirements ductile iron castings production using metallic moulds have been studied in the present work. The structural and mechanical properties of the produced castings have been analysed and compared to the corresponding ones but fabricated using green sand moulds according to a conventional production process. The higher cooling rate in the metallic moulds is the main cause for the appearance of the detected structural changes in castings. The mechanical and microstructural properties obtained directly on castings are remarkable due to the higher nodule count among other factors. Finally, the benefits and inconveniences found in this kind of production methodology using metallic moulds are also discussed. (Author)

  1. Clean cast steel technology. Determination of transformation diagrams for duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumbley, S. L. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-09-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as sigma ( can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling- transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe 22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ( formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations, The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities, a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by local

  2. Interfacial heat transfer behavior at metal/die in finger-plated casting during high pressure die casting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-bo Yu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer at the metal-die interface has a great influence on the solidification process and casting structure. As thin-wall components are extensively produced by high pressure die casting process (HPDC, the B390 alloy finger-plate casting was cast against an H13 steel die on a cold-chamber HPDC machine. The interfacial heat transfer behavior at different positions of the die was carefully studied using an inverse approach based on the temperature measurements inside the die. Furthermore, the filling process and the solidification rate in different finger-plates were also given to explain the distribution of interfacial heat flux (q and interfacial heat transfer coefficient (h. Measurement results at the side of sprue indicates that qmax and hmax could reach 9.2 MW昺-2 and 64.3 kW昺-2昁-1, respectively. The simulation of melt flow in the die reveals that the thinnest (T1 finger plate could accelerate the melt flow from 50 m晄-1 to 110 m晄-1. Due to this high velocity, the interfacial heat flux at the end of T1 could firstly reach a highest value 7.92 MW昺-2 among the ends of Tn (n=2,3,4,5. In addition, the qmax and hmax values of T2, T4 and T5 finger-plates increase with the increasing thickness of the finger plate. Finally, at the rapid decreasing stage of interfacial heat transfer coefficient (h, the decreasing rate of h has an exponential relationship with the increasing rate of solid fraction (f.

  3. Machinability of clean thin-wall gray and ductile iron castings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, C.E.; Littleton, H.E.; Eleftheriou, E.; Griffin, R.D.; Dwyer, Z.B.; DelSorbo, C.; Sprague, J.

    1997-02-01

    First phase was to develop a laboratory technique for evaluating the machinability of gray and ductile iron; longer term goal is to learn how to modify the foundry process to produce castings meeting all specified mechanical properties while providing improved machining behavior. Microcarbides present in the irons were found to dominate the machinability of iron. Pearlitic irons with acceptable machinability contain 8.9 to 10.5 wt% microcarbides. The weight fraction microcarbides in the iron is influenced by carbide forming element concentrations, presence of elements that retard carbon diffusion, and cooling rate from the eutectic through the eutectoid temperature range. Tool wear rate increased at higher surface machining speeds and fraction microcarbides; all irons containing above 11.5% microcarbides had poor machinability. Graphite size, shape, distribution, etc. had a lesser effect on machinability. Reducing the addition of a foundry grade Ca and Al bearing 75% FeSi inoculant from 0.5 to 0.2% increased the tool life 100%. Inoculation test castings were also poured in a class 40 gray iron; laboratory analysis is currently underway. Exploratory studies were conducted to determine if tool force could be used to predict tool life: torque and feed forces were found to correlate with machinability.

  4. Surface Crystallization in Mg-Based Bulk Metallic Glass during Copper Mold Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The localized crystallization of Mg54Cu28Ag7Y11 bulk metallic glass (BMG in the injection casting process using a copper mold was investigated. It has been found that several crystalline phases were formed close to the as-cast surface but did not exist in the internal part of the BMG plate. It is abnormal that the as-cast surface is partially crystallized with higher cooling rate than that of inside. Overheating of the melt and nucleation induced by the surface of copper mold play key roles in the abnormal crystallization. It is suggested that the function of copper mold to trigger heterogeneous nucleation cannot be totally ignored, although it provides the high cooling rate for the glass formation during casting.

  5. Surface Analysis of the Laser Cleaned Metal Threads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhan, M.; Hartog, F.; McPhail, D.

    The laser cleaning of the tarnished silver threads was carried out using Nd:YAG laser radiation at IR (1064 nm) and visible wavelengths (532 nm). The preliminary tests were made on the piece of silk with the silver embroidery with the clean and tarnished areas. FIBS and SIMS analysis were used for analysing the condition of the surface before and after laser irradiation. It was found that irradiation below 0.4 J/cm-2 and higher than 1.0 J/cm-2 fluences aggravates the process of tarnishing and leads to the yellowing effect. The results of preliminary tests were used for finding the optimum cleaning regime for the laser cleaning of the real museum artefact: "Women Riding Jacket" dated to the beginning of 18th century.

  6. Characterization of metal powder based rapid prototyping components under aluminium high pressure die casting process conditions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pereira, MFVT

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available used in metal high pressure die casting toolsets. The specimens were subjected to a program of cyclic immersion in molten aluminium alloy and cooling in water based die release medium. The heat checking and soldering phenomena were analyzed through...

  7. [(Semi-)precision attachments for cast metal frame removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, R. den; Battistuzzi, P.G.F.C.M.; Witter, D.J.; Baat, C. de; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    When compared to a conventional attachment, a (semi)precision attachment for a cast metal frame removable partial denture can perform a number of functions better. Proper assessment of the condition of the abutment teeth is needed for an adequate indication. Selecting the type of (semi-)precision

  8. Metallic Reinforcement of Direct Squeeze Die Casting Aluminum Alloys for Improved Strength and Fracture Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Schwam: J.F. Wallace: Y. Zhu: J.W. Ki

    2004-10-01

    The utilization of aluminum die casting as enclosures where internal equipment is rotating inside of the casting and could fracture requires a strong housing to restrain the fractured parts. A typical example would be a supercharger. In case of a failure, unless adequately contained, fractured parts could injure people operating the equipment. A number of potential reinforcement materials were investigated. The initial work was conducted in sand molds to create experimental conditions that promote prolonged contact of the reinforcing material with molten aluminum. Bonding of Aluminum bronze, Cast iron, and Ni-resist inserts with various electroplated coatings and surface treatments were analyzed. Also toughening of A354 aluminum cast alloy by steel and stainless steel wire mesh with various conditions was analyzed. A practical approach to reinforcement of die cast aluminum components is to use a reinforcing steel preform. Such performs can be fabricated from steel wire mesh or perforated metal sheet by stamping or deep drawing. A hemispherical, dome shaped casting was selected in this investigation. A deep drawing die was used to fabricate the reinforcing performs. The tendency of aluminum cast enclosures to fracture could be significantly reduced by installing a wire mesh of austenitic stainless steel or a punched austenitic stainless steel sheet within the casting. The use of reinforcements made of austenitic stainless steel wire mesh or punched austenitic stainless steel sheet provided marked improvement in reducing the fragmentation of the casting. The best strengthening was obtained with austenitic stainless steel wire and with a punched stainless steel sheet without annealing this material. Somewhat lower results were obtained with the annealed punched stainless steel sheet. When the annealed 1020 steel wire mesh was used, the results were only slightly improved because of the lower mechanical properties of this unalloyed steel. The lowest results were

  9. Effect of mold designs on molten metal behaviour in high-pressure die casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, M. D.; Rahman, M. R. A.; Khan, A. A.; Mohamad, M. R.; Suffian, M. S. Z. M.; Yunos, Y. S.; Wong, L. K.; Mohtar, M. Z.

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a research study conducted in a local automotive component manufacturer that produces aluminium alloy steering housing local and global markets. This study is to investigate the effect of design modification of mold in die casting as to improve the production rate. Design modification is carried out on the casting shot of the mold. Computer flow simulation was carried out to study the flow of molten metal in the mold with respect to the mold design modification. The design parameters of injection speed, die temperature and clamping force has been included in the study. The result of the simulation showed that modifications of casting shot give significant impact towards the molten flow behaviour in casting process. The capabilities and limitations of die casting process simulation to conduct defect analysis had been optimized. This research will enhance the efficiency of the mass production of the industry of die casting with the understanding of defect analysis, which lies on the modification of the mold design, a way early in its stages of production.

  10. Modelling and diagnostic of pulsed laser cleaning of oxidized metallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltra, R.; Yavaş, O.; Cruz, F.; Boquillon, J. P.; Sartori, C.

    1996-04-01

    Laser cleaning appears to be a suitable replacement for solvent based cleaning techniques in a wide range of technological domains. The short pulsed laser irradiation (few nanoseconds or shorter) in the range of 1-100 MW cm -2 has been tentatively applied in a large range of wavelengths (from UV to IR) for cleaning of various kinds of contaminated surfaces, e.g. metallic surface, ceramic surface, stone, etc. This paper will be focused on the modelling and development of diagnostics of pulsed laser-solid interactions to be applied to laser cleaning of oxidized metallic surfaces. Removal of thin oxide films (thickness below 1 μm) has been studied following a methodological approach which is based on three steps: (1) definition of a cleaning strategy, (2) analysis of the physical and chemical changes of the cleaned surfaces, and (3) development of new techniques for the cleaning diagnostics. Concerning the thin oxide films, the physical and chemical mechanisms of laser-induced removal have been modeled taking into account the role of the environment (gaseous or liquid). Momentum transfer induced by the laser irradiation of the short laser pulse was studied by acoustical methods demonstrating the thermoelastic regime for the removal of the film. Mechanical sensors, such as piezoelectric sensor or interferometric probe, have been used to quantify this mechanical regime and it was shown that they can be used to follow the laser cleaning efficiency. Examples of technological transfer will be mentioned.

  11. Laser-assisted surface cleaning of metallic components

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-09

    Feb 9, 2014 ... Decontamination efficiency was found to be critically dependent on the wavelength of the coherent radiation and number of exposures. The mechanism of cleaning of ThO2 particulates from the zircaloy surface at different wavelengths of the incident radiation has been explained qualitatively.

  12. PERSPECTIVES OF USING OF HIGH-SPEED STEELS FOR PRODUCTION OF CAST METAL-CUTTING INSTRUMENT. THE PECULIARITIES OF STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF CAST AND DEFORMED STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Chaus

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article there are examined the different ways of improvement of the structure and properties of the high-speed steels, intended for production of the cast metal-cutting instrument. It is shown, that effective methods of improving of impact elasticity of the cast high-speed steel are modification and accelerated cooling of melt at primary crystallization, electroslag remelting with using of magnetic field, and also using of steels with decreased structure dissimilarity.

  13. Influence of cast surface finishing process on metal-ceramic bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Vojvodić,

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To investigate the influence of different cast surface finishingprocess on metal-ceramics bond strength.Methods Six Co-Cr alloy sample groups were cast (Wirobond C,BEGO, Bremen, Germany and randomly selected for use in oneof the six different final processing of the casting surface (oxidation,sandblasting with 110 and 250 µm Al2O3, bonding agent,hydrochloric acid solution prior to application of feldspathic ceramic(Duceram Kiss, DeguDent, Hanau-Wolfgang, Germany.The testing was carried out with a tensile testing machine (LRXwith Nexygen software, Lloyd Instr., Fareham, UK (ISO 9693.Results The highest force (66.902 N for the separation of ceramicsmeasured with the sample sandblasted with 250µm Al2O3,oxidised and repeatedly sandblasted with 250 µm, and the lowestforce (36.260 N with the sample treated with hydrochloric acidsolution. With all sample groups except the group with the bondingagent (cohesive fracture, an adhesive fracture of the mediumand an adhesive-cohesive fracture of the peripheral part of thefracture surface were observed. The oxidation, prolonged oxidationand the bonding agent do not influence the bond strength ofthe tested metal-ceramic system.Conclusion Different casting surface treatments have an importantrole on the bond strength of the ceramic-metal interface.

  14. Review of Grain Refinement of Cast Metals Through Inoculation: Theories and Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhilin

    2017-10-01

    The inoculation method of grain refinement is widely used in research and industry. Because of its commercial and engineering importance, extensive research on the mechanisms/theories of grain refinement and development of effective grain refiners for diverse cast metals/alloys has been conducted. In 1999, Easton and St. John reviewed the mechanisms of grain refinement of cast Al alloys. Since then, grain refinement in alloys of Al, Mg, Fe, Ti, Cu, and Zn has evolved a lot. However, there is still no full consensus on the mechanisms/theories of grain refinement. Moreover, some new grain refiners developed based on the theories do not ensure efficient grain refinement. Thus, the factors that contribute to grain refinement are still not fully understood. Clarification of the prerequisite issues that occur in grain refinement is required using recent theories. This review covers multiple metals/alloys and developments in grain refinement from the last twenty years. The characteristics of effective grain refiners are considered from four perspectives: effective particle/matrix wetting configuration, sufficiently powerful segregating elements, preferential crystallographic matching, and geometrical features of effective nucleants. Then, recent mechanisms/theories on the grain refinement of cast metals/alloys are reviewed, including the peritectic-related, hypernucleation, inert nucleant, and constitutional supercooling-driven theories. Further, developments of deterministic and probabilistic modeling and nucleation crystallography in the grain refinement of cast metals are reviewed. Finally, the latest progress in the grain refinement of cast Zn and its alloys is described, and future work on grain refinement is summarized.

  15. Laser cleaning as a conservation technique for corroded metal artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Yang Sook

    2006-01-01

    Preservation of cultural property for the future is one of the most important activities of our society. The information which we can gather from such materials is a valuable key to understanding the past. Conservation is a process which includes a range of different treatments. Cleaning is one of the critical steps of the conservation process and involves stabilizing the material and the exposure of hidden details on the surface of the artifact in question. As the artifacts are often fragile...

  16. Preparation of gradually componential metal electrode on solution-casted Nafion membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ren-Jei; Chin, Tsung-Shune; Chen, Li-Chun; Hsieh, Ming-Fa

    2007-11-01

    A typical ionic polymer-metal composite consists of a thin perfluorinated ionomer membrane and noble metal electrodes plated on both surfaces. It undergoes a large bending motion when an electric field is applied hence exhibits deformation by a certain amount of cation. With proper arrangement and package, a great number of "smart devices" are anticipated. In this study, a solution-cast route was used to prepare the electro-active polymer membrane and platinum electrodes were fabricated onto the membrane through electro-less plating. The ionic polymer used is the commercial Nafion, the perfluoro-sulfonated ionomer membrane, developed by DuPont Co. Nafion membrane was cast by the solution-casting route and then loaded with different weights simultaneously. The optimized processing conditions, membrane properties and electrodes behaviors were investigated. The results of shift in WAXD peaks showed that weights delineated the crystallinity of the solution-cast membranes. The number and size of the crystalline domains of solution-cast membrane decrease as studied by SAXS. The Young's modulus of solution-cast membrane decreases as increasing weight because of the loss of crystallinity (180-140 MPa). A finely dispersed platinum particle deeper and gradient penetrating within the near-boundary region with a smaller average particle size and more uniform distribution could be obtained through a reverse electro-less plating. Its surface roughness is 3 nm comparing to 52 nm of a typical process. But its surface resistance is too high (3.5 Omega) to activate the bending motion. To solve this problem, we coated the second Pt electrodes by a typical electro-less plating, and the resistance decreased to 0.7 Omega. The results depicted that the fabricated IPMC shows longer bending lifetime than typical IPMC. In a 0.09% NaCl solution, the device was able to vibrate for 8h under a 5 V, 0.1 Hz actuation.

  17. The effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration on metal ion release from dental casting alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salehi, S K; Hatton, P V; Johnson, A; Cox, A G; McLeod, C

    2008-04-01

    There are concerns that tooth bleaching agents may adversely affect dental materials. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that increasing concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) are more effective than water at increasing metal ion release from two typical dental casting alloys during bleaching. Discs (n = 28 for each alloy) were prepared by casting and heat treated to simulate a typical porcelain-firing cycle. Discs (n = 7) of each alloy were immersed in either 0%, 3%, 10% or 30% (w/v) HP solutions for 24 h at 37 degrees C. Samples were taken for metal ion release determination using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and the data analysed using a two-way anova followed by a one-way anova. The surface roughness of each disc was measured using a Talysurf contact profilometer before and after bleaching and the data analysed using a paired t-test. With the exception of gold, the differences in metal ion concentration after treatment with 0% (control) and each of 3%, 10% and 30% HP (w/v) were statistically significant (P 0.05) Exposure of the two dental casting alloys to HP solutions increased metal ion release of all the elements except gold.

  18. Apparatus for injection casting metallic nuclear energy fuel rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Bobby R.; Tracy, Donald B.; Griffiths, Vernon

    1991-01-01

    Molds for making metallic nuclear fuel rods are provided which present reduced risks to the environment by reducing radioactive waste. In one embodiment, the mold is consumable with the fuel rod, and in another embodiment, part of the mold can be re-used. Several molds can be arranged together in a cascaded manner, if desired, or several long cavities can be integrated in a monolithic multiple cavity re-usable mold.

  19. Effects of different cleaning treatments on heavy metal removal of Panax notoginseng (Burk) F. H. Chen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahui, Liu; Na, Xu; Li, Wang; Xiuming, Cui; Lanping, Guo; Zhihui, Zhang; Jiajin, Wang; Ye, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The quality and safety of Panax notoginseng products has become a focus of concern in recent years. Contamination with heavy metals is one of the important factors as to P. notoginseng safety. Cleaning treatments can remove dust, soil, impurities or even heavy metals and pesticide residues on agricultural products. But effects of cleaning treatments on the heavy metal content of P. notoginseng roots have still not been studied. In order to elucidate this issue, the effects of five different cleaning treatments (CK, no treatment; T1, warm water (50°C) washing; T2, tap water (10°C) washing; T3, drying followed by polishing; and T4, drying followed by tap water (10°C) washing) on P. notoginseng roots' heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Cd, As and Hg) contents were studied. The results showed that heavy metal (all five) content in the three parts all followed the order of hair root > rhizome > root tuber under the same treatment. Heavy metal removals were in the order of Hg > As > Pb > Cu > Cd. Removal efficiencies of the four treatments were in the order of T2 > T1 > T3 > T4. Treatments (T1-T4) could decrease the contents of heavy metal in P. notoginseng root significantly. Compared with the requirements of WM/T2-2004, P. notoginseng roots' heavy metal contents of Cu, Pb, As and Hg were safe under treatments T1 and T2. In conclusion, the cleaning process after production was necessary and could reduce the content of heavy metals significantly. Fresh P. notoginseng root washed with warm water (T2) was the most efficient treatment to remove heavy metal and should be applied in production.

  20. CONSIDERATION OF MECHANISMS OF FORMING THE SURFACE OF CASTING IN THE ZONE CONTACT METAL-MOLD CORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Odarchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considered physico-mechanical, physico-chemical processes occurring in the zone contact metal-mold core at all stages of the formation of the casting. The degree of influence of these processes on the formation of internal surfaces of castings.

  1. Computer Simulation of the Formation of Non-Metallic Precipitates During a Continuous Casting of Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalisz D.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors own computer software, based on the Ueshima mathematical model with taking into account the back diffusion, determined from the Wołczyński equation, was developed for simulation calculations. The applied calculation procedure allowed to determine the chemical composition of the non-metallic phase in steel deoxidised by means of Mn, Si and Al, at the given cooling rate. The calculation results were confirmed by the analysis of samples taken from the determined areas of the cast ingot. This indicates that the developed computer software can be applied for designing the steel casting process of the strictly determined chemical composition and for obtaining the required non-metallic precipitates.

  2. Application of permeable metal die for non-ferrous alloy casting; Tsukisei kanagata no keigokin kanagata chuzo eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T. [Shinto Kogyo Ltd., Nagoya (Japan)

    1997-05-25

    This paper introduces a permeable metal die developed to apply to casting non-ferrous alloys. Gas is discharged through micropores distributed uniformly on a die material. The die is classified into a die having pores with a diameter of 7 {mu}m used for die-casting, and another having pores with a diameter of 30 {mu}m used for gravity casting and low-pressure casting. Cr/Mo-based high-alloy special steel powder is mixed with high-alloy special steel short fibers of the same system for reinforcement to make a die material through compressive formation and sintering. The material undergoes cutting and grinding to fabricate a metal die. Its structure is martensite. Basic tests were given on the die to test heat check resisting performance, molten metal running performance, and mechanical properties of casts. In addition, discussions were given on effects of coating of die release agent and refractories on air permeability. The following effects were verified: inadequate molten metal run is improved; gas defects are eliminated; transcribability of die shape is enhanced; surface grade of casts is improved; and casting cycle time is shortened. Aluminum automotive parts and aluminum containers are mass-produced by using this metal. 4 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Use of X-ray radiography in finding defects in metal-matrix composite casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gawdziñska

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the carried out studies was to establish in what degree X-ray radiography is useful for finding defects in metal-matrix composite materials. These materials have various defects due to their specific composition. Especially when we take composites produced with casting methods into consideration. An effort to establish a degree of the influence of the phenomenon of electromagnetic diffusion on the boundary of matrix/ reinforcement phases was made in the results analysis of the studies.

  4. Surface chemistry and fundamental limitations on the plasma cleaning of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Bin, E-mail: bindong@my.unt.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle 305070, Denton, TX, 76203 (United States); Driver, M. Sky, E-mail: Marcus.Driver@unt.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle 305070, Denton, TX, 76203 (United States); Emesh, Ismail, E-mail: Ismail_Emesh@amat.com [Applied Materials Inc., 3050 Bowers Ave, Santa Clara, CA, 95054 (United States); Shaviv, Roey, E-mail: Roey_Shaviv@amat.com [Applied Materials Inc., 3050 Bowers Ave, Santa Clara, CA, 95054 (United States); Kelber, Jeffry A., E-mail: Jeffry.Kelber@unt.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle 305070, Denton, TX, 76203 (United States)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • O{sub 2}-free plasma treatment of air-exposed Co or Cu surfaces yields remnant C layers inert to further plasma cleaning. • The formation of the remnant C layer is graphitic (Cu) or carbidic (Co). • The formation of a remnant C layer is linked to plasma cleaning of a metal surface. - Abstract: In-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies reveal that plasma cleaning of air-exposed Co or Cu transition metal surfaces results in the formation of a remnant C film 1–3 monolayers thick, which is not reduced upon extensive further plasma exposure. This effect is observed for H{sub 2} or NH{sub 3} plasma cleaning of Co, and He or NH{sub 3} plasma cleaning of Cu, and is observed with both inductively coupled (ICP) and capacitively-coupled plasma (CCP). Changes in C 1 s XPS spectra indicate that this remnant film formation is accompanied by the formation of carbidic C on Co and of graphitic C on Cu. This is in contrast to published work showing no such remnant carbidic/carbon layer after similar treatments of Si oxynitride surfaces. The observation of the remnant carbidic C film on Co and graphitic film on Cu, but not on silicon oxynitride (SiO{sub x}N{sub y}), regardless of plasma chemistry or type, indicates that this effect is due to plasma induced secondary electron emission from the metal surface, resulting in transformation of sp{sup 3} adventitious C to either a metal carbide or graphite. These results suggest fundamental limitations to plasma-based surface cleaning procedures on metal surfaces.

  5. Comparison of internal fit between implant abutments and cast metal crowns vs laser-sintered crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliçarslan, Mehmet Ali; Özkan, Pelin; Uludag, Bülent; Mumcu, Emre

    2014-07-01

    A common problem related to cemented single crowns is the internal misfit, which may cause inadequate retention, especially when seated on the implant abutment. The aim of this study was to compare the internal fit of Co-Cr crowns using a traditional lost-wax casting technique from laser-sintered Co-Cr alloy crowns. Twelve metallic crowns per each technique were fabricated. The effect of the thickness of cement, originated internal gap was evaluated. Crowns were cemented on the implant abutments with resin cement, and the internal fit of crowns was measured at five areas with an optical microscope. The data were analyzed, and the means were compared with a t-test (pcrowns obtained through the lost wax method (min. 65.50 ± 9.54 μm and max. 313.46 ± 48.12 μm). The fit of the metal crown likely varies with the fabrication technique. The use of techniques that enable the adjustment of crown parameters, such as the laser sintering technique, maintains the desired fit between casting and implant abutments. This study investigated which technique affects the internal fit of cemented implant-supported crowns, comparing the use of lost wax casting and laser-sintered metal dental alloys. The results of this study indicate that the use of laser-sintered crowns can improve for crown accuracy.

  6. Effects of Rare Earth Metal Addition on Wear Resistance of Chromium-Molybdenum Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasinska J.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses changes in the microstructure and abrasive wear resistance of G17CrMo5-5 cast steel modified with rare earth metals (REM. The changes were assessed using scanning microscopy. The wear response was determined in the Miller test to ASTM G75. Abrasion tests were supplemented with the surface profile measurements of non-modified and modified cast steel using a Talysurf CCI optical profilometer. It was demonstrated that the modification substantially affected the microstructure of the alloy, leading to grain size reduction and changed morphology of non-metallic inclusions. The observed changes in the microstructure resulted in a three times higher impact strength (from 33 to 99 kJ/cm2 and more than two times higher resistance to cracking (from 116 to 250 MPa. The following surface parameters were computed: Sa: Arithmetic mean deviation of the surface, Sq: Root-mean-square deviation of the surface, Sp: Maximum height of the peak Sv: Maximum depth of the valley, Sz: Ten Point Average, Ssk: Asymmetry of the surface, Sku: Kurtosis of the surface. The findings also indicated that the addition of rare earth metals had a positive effect on the abrasion behaviour of G17CrMo5-5 cast steel.

  7. In situ cleaning of metal cathodes using a hydrogen ion beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Dowell

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal photocathodes are commonly used in high-field rf guns because they are robust, straightforward to implement, and tolerate relatively poor vacuum compared to semiconductor cathodes. However, these cathodes have low quantum efficiency (QE even at UV wavelengths, and still require some form of cleaning after installation in the gun. A commonly used process for improving the QE is laser cleaning. In this technique the UV-drive laser is focused to a small diameter close to the metal’s damage threshold and then moved across the surface to remove contaminants. This method does improve the QE, but can produce nonuniform emission and potentially damage the cathode. Ideally, an alternative process which produces an atomically clean, but unaltered, surface is needed. In this paper we explore using a hydrogen ion (H-ion beam to clean a copper cathode. We describe QE measurements over the wavelength range of interest as a function of integrated exposure to an H-ion beam. We also describe the data analysis to obtain the work function and derive a formula of the QE for metal cathodes. Our measured work function for the cleaned sample is in good agreement with published values, and the theoretical QE as a function of photon wavelength is in excellent agreement with the cleaned copper experimental results. Finally, we propose an in situ installation of an H-ion gun compatible with existing s-band rf guns.

  8. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  9. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing via Novel Tool-less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Metal matrix composites for propulsion components offer high performance and affordability, resulting in low weight and cost. The following sections in this viewgraph presentation describe the pressure infiltration casting of a metal matrix composite LOX turbopump housing: 1) Baseline Pump Design and Stress Analysis; 2) Tool-less Advanced Pressure Infiltration Casting Process; 3) Preform Splicing and Joining for Large Components such as Pump Housing; 4) Fullscale Pump Housing Redesign.

  10. Improved Sand-Compaction Method for Lost-Foam Metal Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiyarov, Sayavur I.; Overfelt, Ruel A.

    2008-01-01

    An improved method of filling a molding flask with sand and compacting the sand around a refractory-coated foam mold pattern has been developed for incorporation into the lost-foam metal-casting process. In comparison with the conventional method of sand filling and compaction, this method affords more nearly complete filling of the space around the refractory-coated foam mold pattern and more thorough compaction of the sand. In so doing, this method enables the sand to better support the refractory coat under metallostatic pressure during filling of the mold with molten metal.

  11. The ancient Chinese casting techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Tan Derui; Lian Haiping

    2011-01-01

    In the course of Chinese civilization, which lasted more than 5,000 years, casting production has made a huge contribution. In this paper, some representative metal castings were presented. According to their forming techniques, they can be grouped into stone mould casting, clay mould casting, ablation casting, lost wax casting, stack casting, permanent mould casting, sand casting, etc. According to their materials, they can be categorized into tin bronze, bimetallic bronze, malleable cast ir...

  12. In-Situ Cleaning of Metal Cathodes Using a Hydrogen Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Dowell, D H; Kirby, R E; Schmerge, J F

    2005-01-01

    Improving and maintaining the quantum efficiency (qe) of a metal photocathode in an s-band RF gun requires a process for cleaning the surface. In this type of gun, the cathode is typically installed and the system is vacuum baked to ~200°C. If the qe is too low, the cathode is cleaned with the UV-drive laser. While laser cleaning does increase the cathode qe, it requires fluences close to the damage threshold and rastering the small diameter beam, both of which can produce non-uniform electron emission and potentially damage the cathode. This paper investigates the efficacy of a low-energy hydrogen ion beam to produce high-qe metal cathodes. Measurements of the qe vs. wavelength, surface contaminants using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and surface roughness were performed on copper samples, and the results showed a significant increase in qe after cleaning with a 1keV hydrogen ion beam. The H-ion beam cleans an area approximately 1cm in diameter and has no effect on the surface roughness while ...

  13. Comparison of the bond strength of laser-sintered and cast base metal dental alloys to porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akova, Tolga; Ucar, Yurdanur; Tukay, Alper; Balkaya, Mehmet Cudi; Brantley, William A

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strengths of cast Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys and the laser-sintered Co-Cr alloy to dental porcelain. Dental porcelain was applied on two cast and one laser-sintered base metal alloy. Ten specimens were prepared for each group for bond strength comparison. ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD multiple comparison test (alpha=0.05) was used for statistical analysis. Fractured specimens were observed with a stereomicroscope to classify the type of failure after shear bond testing. While the mean shear bond strength was highest for the cast Ni-Cr metal-ceramic specimens (81.6+/-14.6 MPa), the bond strength was not significantly different (P>0.05) from that for the cast Co-Cr metal-ceramic specimens (72.9+/-14.3 MPa) and the laser-sintered Co-Cr metal-ceramic specimens (67.0+/-14.9 MPa). All metal-ceramic specimens prepared from cast Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys exhibit a mixed mode of cohesive and adhesive failure, whereas five of the metal-ceramic specimens prepared from the laser-sintered Co-Cr alloy exhibited the mixed failure mode and five specimens exhibited adhesive failure in the porcelain. The new laser-sintering technique for Co-Cr alloy appears promising for dental applications, but additional studies of properties of the laser-sintered alloy and fit of castings prepared by this new technique are needed before its acceptance into dental laboratory practice. Laser sintering of Co-Cr alloy seems to be an alternative technique to conventional casting of dental alloys for porcelain fused to metal restorations.

  14. Determination of the metal/die interfacial heat transfer coefficient of high pressure die cast B390 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yongyou; Guo, Zhipeng; Xiong, Shoumei

    2012-07-01

    High-pressure die cast B390 alloy was prepared on a 350 ton cold chamber die casting machine. The metal/die interfacial heat transfer coefficient of the alloy was investigated. Considering the filling process, a "finger"-shaped casting was designed for the experiments. This casting consisted of five plates with different thicknesses (0.05 inch or 1.27 mm to 0.25 inch or 6.35 mm) as well as individual ingates and overflows. Experiments under various operation conditions were conducted, and temperatures were measured at various specific locations inside the die. Based on the results, the interfacial heat transfer coefficient and heat flux were determined by solving the inverse heat transfer problem. The influence of the mold-filling sequence, sensor locations, as well as processing parameters including the casting pressure, die temperature, and fast/slow shot speeds on the heat transfer coefficient were discussed.

  15. Evaluation of the pattern dimensions of cast-metal posts in uniradicular teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Assunção Vital

    Full Text Available Introduction Accurate dimensions of cast-metal posts are relevant to the survival of dental prostheses. Objective The aim of this study was to verify if the dimensions of cast-metal posts accord with ideal clinical criteria. Material and method For the evaluation, 285 periapical radiographs, from a total of 80 teeth, were taken from the charts of patients that attended the clinics at the Dental School of the Federal University of Goiás, from March 2008 to October 2012. Only periapical radiographs of single-rooted teeth with post and core were included in the study. The radiographic evaluation was conducted with the assistance of a magnifying glass and a view box, in a room with low luminosity. The dimensions of the post and core were established with the help of a digital caliper, and the following measurements were considered: a LR (Length Remnant; b LP (Length Post; c BS (Bone Support; d DR (Diameter Root; e DP (mesiodistal diameter post. The post and core were classified as acceptable or deficient by reference values with a margin of error of 0.2 mm. For descriptive analysis, the data were cataloged using SPSS software (version 17.0. Result With regard to the length of the post and core, only 26.25% and 43.75% of the post and core were classified as acceptable according to the two-thirds rule and fulcrum dental rule, respectively. With regard to the mesiodistal diameter of the post and core, 55% were classified as acceptable. Conclusion Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that the cast-metal posts evaluated do not accord with the ideal clinical criteria.

  16. Effect of axial groove and resin luting cements on the retention of complete cast metal crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rajkumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The design of the tooth preparation and the cementing medium are important consid-erations in the retention of crowns and fixed partial dentures. The purpose of this invitro study was to determine the effect of axial groove on the retention of complete cast metal crowns using two resin luting cements. Methods: Forty freshly extracted intact human molar teeth were prepared in their long axis to receive complete cast metal crowns. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (one control and one study group. An axial groove of uniform size and shape was made on the prepared teeth under the study group. Axial surface area of prepared teeth specimens was measured. Complete cast metal crowns were fabricated for each specimen. Specimens of each group were divided into subgroups of 10 samples and were cemented with two resin luting cements, RelyX Unicem® and Calibra®, re-spectively. The cemented crowns were loaded in tension using a Universal Instron testing machine. The maximal tensile strength was recorded. Data were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test (α=0.05. Results: No significant differences in the tensile stress values were noted between the control (mean: 5.76±0.392 MPa and study (mean: 5.93±0.751 MPa groups cemented with RelyX Unicem. No sig-nificant differences in the tensile stress values were noted between the control (mean: 4.92±0.641 MPa and study (mean: 5.15 ±0.478 MPa groups cemented with Calibra. However, significant dif-ference in the tensile stress values was found between the two resin cements in the control and study groups. Conclusion: Axial groove placed in tooth preparations for resin bonded complete cast metal crowns had no statistically significant effect on retention. The use of (RelyX Unicem® yielded greater reten-tion values when compared to Calibra®.

  17. ''Heat Transfer at the Mold-Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Aluminum Alloys'' Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor R. D. Pehlke, Principal Investigator, Dr. John M. Cookson, Dr. Shouwei Hao, Dr. Prasad Krishna, Kevin T. Bilkey

    2001-12-14

    This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting has been conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigation of squeeze casting at CMI-Tech Center (Now Hayes-Lemmerz Technical Center) and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive.

  18. The influence of the pure metal components of four different casting alloys on the electrochemical properties of the alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Süleyman H; Pekmez, Nuran Ozçiçek; Keyf, Filiz; Canli, Fulya

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the pure metal components of the four different casting alloys on the corrosion behaviors of these alloys tested. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out on four different types of casting alloys and their pure metals at 37 degrees C in an artificial saliva solution. The ions released from the alloys into the solutions during the polarization test were also determined quantitatively using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Ni-Cr (M1) and Co-Cr (M2) alloys had a more homogenous structure than palladium based (M3) and gold based (M4) alloys in terms of the pitting potentials of the casting alloys and those of the pure metals composing the alloys. The total ion concentration released from M3 and M4 was less than from M1 and M2. This may be because M3 and M4 alloys contained noble metals. It was also found that the noble metals in the M3 and M4 samples decreased the current density in the anodic branch of the potentiodynamic polarization curves. In other words, noble metals contributed positively to dental materials. Corrosion resistance of the casting alloys can be affected by the pure metals they are composed of. Au and Pd based noble alloys dissolved less than Ni-Cr and Co-Cr based alloys.

  19. Clean and efficient extraction of copper ions and deposition as metal

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan H. Elsentriecy; Abraham F. Jalbout; Dominic F. Gervasio

    2015-01-01

    A simple, clean and efficient one-pot process is offered as an alternative to the conventional complex processing presently used to extract copper ions from copper containing materials, like copper concentrate or slag, and to form copper metal. The alternative process uses a eutectic molten salt of potassium chloride, sodium chloride and zinc chloride as the reaction fluid which is recyclable, low in cost, environmentally benign, low melting (melting point 204°), high boiling (vapor pressure ...

  20. Deep cleaning of a metallurgical zinc leaching residue and recovery of valuable metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Peng; Ma, Bao-zhong; Zeng, Peng; Wang, Cheng-yan; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Yong-lu; Chen, Yong-qiang; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Qiu-yin

    2017-11-01

    Huge quantities of zinc leaching residues (ZLRs) generated from zinc production are dumped continuously around the world and pose a potential environmental threat because of their considerable amounts of entrained heavy metals (mainly lead). Most ZLRs have not been properly treated and the valuable metals in them have not yet been effectively recovered. Herein, the deep cleaning of a ZLR and recovery of valuable metals via a hydrometallurgical route were investigated. The cleaning process consists of two essential stages: acid leaching followed by calcium chloride leaching. The optimum conditions for extracting zinc, copper, and indium by acid leaching were a sulfuric acid concentration of 200 g·L-1, a liquid/solid ratio of 4:1 (mL/g), a leaching time of 2 h, and a temperature of 90°C. For lead and silver extractions, the optimum conditions were a calcium chloride concentration of 400 g·L-1, a pH value of 1.0, a leaching time of 1 h, and a temperature of 30°C. After calcium chloride leaching, silver and lead were extracted out and the lead was finally recovered as electrolytic lead by electrowinning. The anglesite phase, which poses the greatest potential environmental hazard, was removed from the ZLR after deep cleaning, thus reducing the cost of environmental management of ZLRs. The treatment of chlorine and spent electrolyte generated in the process was discussed.

  1. Clean and efficient extraction of copper ions and deposition as metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan H. Elsentriecy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A simple, clean and efficient one-pot process is offered as an alternative to the conventional complex processing presently used to extract copper ions from copper containing materials, like copper concentrate or slag, and to form copper metal. The alternative process uses a eutectic molten salt of potassium chloride, sodium chloride and zinc chloride as the reaction fluid which is recyclable, low in cost, environmentally benign, low melting (melting point 204°, high boiling (vapor pressure is only a few psi at 800° and chemically, thermally and physically stable. The metal completely dissolves out of copper concentrate or slag in the aerobic eutectic molten chloride salt in a graphite or glassy carbon pot, which serves as a cathode, with a graphite anode, to reduce the metal ions to metal which sinks to the bottom of the graphite pot. The total efficiency for extraction and deposition is virtually 100% as determined by elemental and gravimetric analyses.

  2. Quantitative analysis of leaching of different metals in human saliva from dental casting alloys: An in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramashanker Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Metal-based dentures show maximum leaching immediately after wearing of the prosthesis which decreased significantly over the period of 3 days. Cr and Mn were the metal ions mainly found in saliva of cast partial denture wearer. No concentration of cobalt, molybdenum (Mo and iron (Fe was found in saliva of metal base denture wearer. There was a significant change in concentration of elutes in saliva in first 72 h/3 days making time an effective variable was observed.

  3. In vitro fracture resistance of glass-fiber and cast metal posts with different lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovani, Alessandro Rogério; Vansan, Luiz Pascoal; de Sousa Neto, Manoel Damião; Paulino, Silvana Maria

    2009-03-01

    Dental fractures can occur in endodontically treated teeth restored with posts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro fracture resistance of roots with glass-fiber and metal posts of different lengths. Sixty endodontically treated maxillary canines were embedded in acrylic resin, except for 4 mm of the cervical area, after removing the clinical crowns. The post spaces were opened with a cylindrical bur at low speed attached to a surveyor, resulting in preparations with lengths of 6 mm (group 6 mm), 8 mm (group 8 mm), or 10 mm (group 10 mm). Each group was divided into 2 subgroups according to the post material: cast post and core or glass-fiber post (n=30). The posts were luted with dual-polymerizing resin cement (Panavia F). Cast posts and cores of Co-Cr (Resilient Plus) crowns were made and cemented with zinc phosphate. Specimens were subjected to increasing compressive load (N) until fracture. Data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer test (alpha =.05). The ANOVA analysis indicated significant differences (Pposts of 6-mm length (26.5 N +/-13.4), 8-mm length (25.2 N +/-13.9), and 10-mm length (17.1 N +/-5.2). Also, in the glass-fiber post group, there was no significant difference when posts of 8-mm length (13.4 N +/-11.0) were compared with the 6-mm (6.9 N +/-4.6) and 10-mm (31.7 N +/-13.1) groups. The 10-mm-long post displayed superior fracture resistance, and the 6-mm-long post showed significantly lower mean values (Pglass-fiber post represents a viable alternative to the cast metal post, increasing the resistance to fracture of endodontically treated canines.

  4. Effect of graphite on folded metal occurrence in honed surfaces of grey and compacted cast irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Vale, João Luiz; da Silva, Carlos Henrique; Pintaúde, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    Grey cast iron (GCI) and compacted graphite iron (CGI) are the most employed materials to manufacture cylinder liners. The use of diamond tools to hone the surfaces resulted in an increase of the so-called folded metal occurrence. This irregularity can reduce the performance of engines and investigations to understand it have been made. In this sense, the current study aims to correlate the variation of graphite and the folded metal occurrence. Different samples of GCI and CGI were extracted directly of engine blocks, resulting in four metallurgical conditions. Topographical analysis was conducted in an optical interferometer and a dedicated routine to count the folded metal was developed using 3D images. Folded metal occurrence can be associated to a specific region of topography and to an increase in the graphite area fraction. Experimental evidences were provided revealing cross-sectional images of grooves using a scanning electron microscope. In addition, the present investigation shows that a larger amount of folded metal was related to the microstructure of thicker walls of compact graphite iron.

  5. Nodular cast iron and casting monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper quality monitoring of nodular cast iron and casting made of it is presented. A control system of initial liquid cast iron to spheroidization, after spheroidization and inoculation with using of TDA method was shown. An application of an ultrasonic method to assessment of the graphite form and the metal matrix microstructure of castings was investigated.

  6. Marginal accuracy of nickel chromium copings fabricated by conventional and accelerated casting procedures, produced with ringless and metal ring investment procedures: A comparative in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Deepa; Shetty, Y Bharath; Miranda, Glynis Anita; Prabhu, M Bharath; Karkera, Reshma

    2015-01-01

    Conventional investing and casting techniques are time-consuming and usually requires 2-4 h for completion. Accelerated nonstandard, casting techniques have been reported to achieve similar quality results in significantly less time, namely, in 30-40 min. During casting, it is essential to achieve compensation for the shrinkage of solidifying alloy by investment expansion. The metal casting ring restricts the thermal expansion of investment because the thermal expansion of the ring is lesser than that of the investment. The use of casting ring was challenged with the introduction of the ringless technique. A total of 40 test samples of nickel chromium (Ni-Cr) cast copings were obtained from the patterns fabricated using inlay casting wax. The 20 wax patterns were invested using metal ring and 20 wax patterns were invested using the ringless investment system. Of both the groups, 10 samples underwent conventional casting, and the other 10 underwent accelerated casting. The patterns were casted using the induction casting technique. All the test samples of cast copings were evaluated for vertical marginal gaps at four points on the die employing a stereo optical microscope. The vertical marginal discrepancy data obtained were tabulated. Mean and standard deviations were obtained. Vertical discrepancies were analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significantly different. The data obtained were found to be very highly significant (P cast copings fabricated with the conventional casting using ringless investment system showed significantly better marginal fit than that of cast copings fabricated from conventional and accelerated casting with metal ring investment and accelerated casting using ringless investment since those copings had shown the least vertical marginal discrepancies among the four methods evaluated in this study.

  7. ASSESSMENT OF SURFACE FINISH AND DIMENSIONAL ACCURACY OF TOOLS MANUFACTURED BY METAL CASTING IN RAPID PROTOTYPING SAND MOULDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyembwe, K.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an initial assessment of the quality parameters of the surface finish and dimensional accuracy of tools made by metal casting in rapid prototyping (RP sand moulds is undertaken. A case study from a local tool room, dealing with the manufacturing of an aluminium die for the lost wax process, is employed. Modern techniques, including surface roughness analysis and three dimensional scanning, are used to determine and understand how each manufacturing step influences the final quality of the cast tool. The best surface finish obtained for the cast die had arithmetic average roughness (Ra and mean average roughness (Rz respectively equal to 3.23m and 11.38m. In terms of dimensional accuracy, 82% of cast-die points coincided with the Computer Aided Design (CAD data, which is within the typical tolerances of sand cast products. The investigation shows that mould coating contributes slightly to the improvement of the cast tool surface finish. The study also found that the additive manufacturing of the sand mould was the chief factor responsible for the loss of dimensional accuracy. These findings indicate that machining will always be required to improve the surface finish and the dimensional accuracy of cast tools in RP sand moulds.

  8. Damage evolution in freeze cast metal/ceramic composites exhibiting lamellar microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Simpson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The damage evolution in a single domain aluminium/alumina freeze-cast composite has been examined using 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT. A single domain was extracted and loaded incrementally at an orientation of 45° to the lamellae, with the damage being assessed after each of eight compressive loading steps. Prior to loading, significant damage was observed at the metal-ceramic interface – this is thought to have formed during machining and can be ascribed to weak interfacial bonding associated with the Cu coating applied to the ceramic preform prior to metal infiltration. Further interfacial damage was seen to initiate after loading to 170MPa and to develop with each subsequent load step. Damage was also observed in the ceramic lamellae, with a series of parallel cracks forming across the alumina, perpendicular to the domain orientation. These sets of parallel, intra-lamellae cracks were closely spaced, but initiated independently, with coalescence only occurring at higher loads. Both the interfacial and intra-lamellae cracking initiated after loading to 170MPa, with the intra-lamellae cracks propagating into the metal matrix after loading to 240MPa. The cracks in the ceramic lamellae were found to form and develop independent of the interfacial cracks, with discrete crack paths and morphologies being observed in each case. Despite this, the underlying driving force was the same for each damage mode, with crack propagation being driven by an elastic-plastic mismatch between the metal matrix and ceramic lamellae.

  9. Different cardiac response to copper in limpets from metal polluted and clean shores of Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelazzi, G; De Pirro, M; Williams, G A

    2004-07-01

    The gastropod limpet, Cellana grata, is common on moderately exposed to exposed Hong Kong rocky shores. On the basis of the existing literature on trace metal contamination in Hong Kong, four sites were identified, representative of highly polluted (Aberdeen and Lei Yue Mun) and clean (Cape d'Aguilar and Clear Water Bay) conditions. Limpets from the two polluted sites showed similar, but significantly higher body concentrations of copper than limpets from the two clean sites, which were also similar. Non-invasive measurements of cardiac activity of limpets from the four sites showed between site differences in baseline heart rates under standard seawater, irrespective of pollution level. When acutely exposed to water borne copper (2 h, 0.5+/-0.06 SD ppm), however, limpets from clean sites showed a significantly higher increase in inter-beating time (bradycardia) than those from polluted sites. These results highlight the potential use of cardiac activity to assess the exposure of natural populations of limpets to trace metal pollution.

  10. Effect of electric arc, gas oxygen torch and induction melting techniques on the marginal accuracy of cast base-metal and noble metal-ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Cogolludo, Pablo; Castillo-Oyagüe, Raquel; Lynch, Christopher D; Suárez-García, María-Jesús

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most appropriate alloy composition and melting technique by evaluating the marginal accuracy of cast metal-ceramic crowns. Seventy standardised stainless-steel abutments were prepared to receive metal-ceramic crowns and were randomly divided into four alloy groups: Group 1: palladium-gold (Pd-Au), Group 2: nickel-chromium-titanium (Ni-Cr-Ti), Group 3: nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and Group 4: titanium (Ti). Groups 1, 2 and 3 were in turn subdivided to be melted and cast using: (a) gas oxygen torch and centrifugal casting machine (TC) or (b) induction and centrifugal casting machine (IC). Group 4 was melted and cast using electric arc and vacuum/pressure machine (EV). All of the metal-ceramic crowns were luted with glass-ionomer cement. The marginal fit was measured under an optical microscope before and after cementation using image analysis software. All data was subjected to two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Duncan's multiple range test was run for post-hoc comparisons. The Student's t-test was used to investigate the influence of cementation (α=0.05). Uncemented Pd-Au/TC samples achieved the best marginal adaptation, while the worst fit corresponded to the luted Ti/EV crowns. Pd-Au/TC, Ni-Cr and Ti restorations demonstrated significantly increased misfit after cementation. The Ni-Cr-Ti alloy was the most predictable in terms of differences in misfit when either torch or induction was applied before or after cementation. Cemented titanium crowns exceeded the clinically acceptable limit of 120μm. The combination of alloy composition, melting technique, casting method and luting process influences the vertical seal of cast metal-ceramic crowns. An accurate use of the gas oxygen torch may overcome the results attained with the induction system concerning the marginal adaptation of fixed dental prostheses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of Graded Impedance Gas Gun Impactors from Tape Cast Metal Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, L P; Nguyen, J H

    2005-11-21

    Fabrication of compositionally graded structures for use as light-gas gun impactors has been demonstrated using a tape casting technique. Mixtures of metal powders in the Mg-Cu system were cast into a series of tapes with uniform compositions ranging from 100% Mg to 100% Cu. The individual compositions were fabricated into monolithic pellets for characterization by laminating multiple layers together, thermally removing the organics, and hot-pressing to near-full density. The pellets were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and measurement of density and sound wave velocity. The density and acoustic impedance were observed to vary monotonically (and nearly linearly) with composition. Graded structures were fabricated by stacking layers of different compositions in a sequence calculated to yield a desired acoustic impedance profile. The measured physical properties of the graded structures compare favorably with those predicted from the monolithic-pellet characteristics. Fabrication of graded impactors by this technique is of significant interest for providing improved control of the pressure profile in gas gun experiments.

  12. Influence of Rare Earth Metals on Microstructure and Inclusions Morphology G17CrMo5-5 Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasińska J.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents influence of rare earth metals (REM on the microstructure and morphology of non-metallic inclusions of G17CrMo5-5 cast carbon steel The research has been performed on successive industrial melts. Each time about 2000 kg of liquid metal was modified. The REM was in the form of mishmetal of the composition 49, 8% Ce, 21, 8% La, 17, 1% Nd, 5, 5% Pr and 5, 35% the rest of REM. Therareearth metals were put into the ladle during tapping of heat melt from the furnace.

  13. Technical cost modelling for a novel semi-solid metal (SSM) casting processes for automotive component manufacturing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlale, NS

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The cost structure and benefits of a new billet preparation process in semi-solid metal (SSM) casting of automotive components were investigated. The process was developed by the CSIR, a government research and development agency in South Africa...

  14. THE PROCESSES OF THE LIQUID METAL AND THE MOLD CORE INTERACTION DURING THE FORMATION OF THEINTERNAL CAVITY OFTHE CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Odarchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the relation of physical-mechanical and chemical processes occurring in the metal-core contact area with perfection factors of the mold core is presented. The nature of interrelation of these processes with the formation of dimensional accuracy, geometric relationship, roughness and absence of defects on the internal surface of the casting is defined.

  15. Fabrication and Tribological Behavior of Stir Cast Mg/B4C Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amandeep; Bala, Niraj

    2017-10-01

    Magnesium-based metal matrix composites (MMMCs) have emerged as good alternative material to conventional materials due to their promising advanced properties. In the present work, magnesium-based metal matrix composites (MMMCs) reinforced with B4C particles were successfully fabricated by cost-effective conventional stir casting technique. MMMCs with an average particle size of 63 µm and different weight percent (wt pct) of B4C between 3 and 12 were fabricated. Wear tests were carried out using a pin-on-disk against a steel disk under dry sliding condition at loads that varied between 1 and 5 kg at fixed sliding velocity of 1 m/s. The wear data clearly showed that wear resistance of cast composites is better than that of unreinforced magnesium, which is attributed to dispersion hardening caused by carbide particles. An increase in wt pct of B4C showed the wear resistance and hardness to increase significantly. The wear rate and coefficient of friction increased with an increase in applied load. The SEM and EDS analysis of the worn surfaces delineated the dominant wear mechanisms to be abrasion, adhesion, and oxidation under the different sliding conditions. At lower loads, the wear mechanism transformed from severe abrasive wear in pure magnesium (Mg) to mild abrasion, slight delamination, and oxidation in the Mg/12 wt pct B4C fabricated composite. At higher loads, severe abrasion, adhesion, delamination, and oxidation were found to be the major wear mechanisms in pure Mg, whereas in the Mg/12 wt pct B4C fabricated composites the corresponding mechanisms were mild abrasion, mild adhesion, slight delamination, and oxidation.

  16. Nano-casted Metal Oxide Aerogels as Dual Purpose Structural Components for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilaras, Plousia E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA missions and space exploration rely on strong, ultra lightweight materials. Such materials are needed for building up past and present space vehicles such as the Sojourner Rover (1997) or the two MERs (2003), but also for a number of components and/or systems including thermal insulators, Solar Sails, Rigid Aeroshells, and Ballutes. The purpose of my internship here at Glenn Research Center is to make dual purpose materials; materials that in addition to being lightweight have electronic, photophysical and magnetic properties and, therefore, act as electronic components and sensors as well as structural components. One type of ultra lightweight material of great interest is aerogels, which have densities ranging from 0.003 g/cc to 0.8 g/cc . However, aerogels are extremely fragile and, as a result, have limited practical applications. Recently, Glenn Research Center has developed a process of nano-casting polymers onto the inorganic network of silica-based aerogels increasing the strength 300 fold while only increasing the density 3 fold. By combining the process of nano-casting polymers with inorganic oxide networks other than silica, we are actively pursuing lightweight dual purpose materials. To date, thirty different inorganic oxide aerogels have been prepared using either standard sol-gel chemistry or a non-alkoxide method involving metal chloride precursors and an epoxide; epichlorohydrin, propylene oxide or trimethylene oxide, as proton scavengers. More importantly, preliminary investigations show that the residual surface hydroxyl groups on each of these inorganic oxide aerogels can be successfully crosslinked with urethane. In addition to characterizing physical and mechanical properties such as density, strength and flexibility, each of these metal oxide aerogels are being characterized for thermal and electronic conductivity and magnetic and optical properties.

  17. Alternative granular media for the metal casting industry. Final report, September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guichelaar, P.J.; Ramrattan, S.N.; Tieder, R.E. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Silica sand for foundry use is inexpensive to purchase, readily transported and widely available. As a result, it is universally used. However, three factors are becoming increasingly significant as more environmental regulations are promulgated. First, the disposal of waste foundry sand has become an excessively burdensome cost. Second, the phase changes which occur in the silica structure on heating and cooling cause thermal breakdown of the sand into smaller unusable fractions. Third, silica is a relatively weak mineral. Alternatives to silica sand which can withstand the rigors of repetitive reuse must be seriously evaluated as a way to control production costs of the domestic metal casting industry. Chromite sands, olivine sands and carbon sands have each been successfully used to solve operating problems and thus have developed their specific niches in the foundry materials inventory. However, there are several other materials that are candidates for replacing silica sand, such as fused alumina, sintered bauxite and sintered oil well proppants. These media, and others that are generically similar, are manufactured for specific purposes. Compositions and shapes could be readily tailored for used in a metal casting environment of total recycling and materials conservation. This study examines materials that are readily available as alternatives to silica sand from a functionality perspective and a cost perspective. Some of the alternative materials are natural and others are synthetic and thus referring to them as ``sands`` has the potential to cause confusion; the generic term ``granular medium`` is used in this study to mean any material that could functionally substitute for silica sand in the foundry process.

  18. Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced Clean Coal Technology by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini; Wiles Elder

    1999-04-05

    This eleventh quarterly report describes work done during the eleventh three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ``Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

  19. Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced Clean Coal Technology by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-04-12

    This twelfth quarterly report describes work done during the twelfth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ``Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to a number of outside contacts.

  20. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-06-01

    This sixteenth quarterly report describes work done during the sixteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

  1. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-05-11

    This fifteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fifteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

  2. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-05-10

    This fourteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fourteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

  3. Thermal analysis on Al7075/Al2O3 metal matrix composites fabricated by stir casting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, S.; Shajin, S.; Gnanavel, C.

    2017-03-01

    Metal matrix Composites (MMC’s) have evoked a keen interest in recent times for various applications in aerospace, renewable energy and automotive industries due to their superior strength, low cost, easy availability and high temperature resistance [1]. The crack and propagation occurs in conventional materials without any appreciable indication in a short span. Hence composite materials are preferred nowadays to overcome this problem [2]. The process of metal matrix composites (MMC’s) is to unite the enviable attributes of metals and ceramics. The Stir casting method is used for producing aluminium metal matrix composites (AMC’s). A key challenge of the process is to spread the ceramic particles to achieve a defect free microstructure [2]. By carefully selecting stir casting processing specification, such as stirring time, temperature of the melt and blade angle, the desired microstructure can be obtained. The focus of this work is to develop a high strength particulate strengthen aluminium metal matrix composites, and Al7075 was selected which can offer high strength without much disturbing ductility of metal matrix [4]. The composites will be examined using standard metallurgical and mechanical tests. The cast composites are analysed to Laser flash analysis (LFA) to determine Thermal conductivity [5]. Also changes in microstructure are determined by using SEM analysis.

  4. Influence of compound deoxidation of steel with Al, Zr, rare earth metals, and Ti on properties of heavy castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Senberger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy steel castings deoxidized with aluminium are sometimes brittle intercrystalline failed during their service along primary grain boundaries what is initiated by aluminium nitrides and so called conchoidal fractures are formed. The tendency to forming the conchoidal fractures depends in particular on cooling rate (the casting modulus, aluminium and nitrogen contents in steel. During deoxidation, when manufacturing heavy castings, the elements with high affinity to nitrogen, zirconium or titanium, are added to steel that would decrease nitrogen activity by the bond on stable nitrides. The formation of stable nitrides should reduce the tendency of steel to the formation of conchoidal fractures. Deoxidation was thermodynamically analyzed at presence of the mentioned elements. For particular conditions a probable course of deoxidation was estimated at test castings. The deoxidation course was checked by microanalysis of deoxidation products (inclusions. For service and experimental castings the anticipated composition of inclusions was compared. It has been proved that in heavy castings with high aluminium contents in steel under studied conditions neither the addition of zirconium nor of titanium nor of rare earth metals will prevent the formation of conchoidal fractures.

  5. Thermo-Fluidic Comparison between Sandwich Panels with Tetrahedral Lattice Cores Fabricated by Casting and Metal Sheet Folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This numerical study compares single-phase forced convective heat transfer between two sandwich panels with tetrahedral metallic lattice cores separately fabricated by investment casting and the more cost-effective metal sheet folding method. The numerical model is validated against available experimental data. For a given Reynolds number and core porosity, the results reveal that the brazed sandwich outperforms the casted sandwich, exhibiting a 13% to 16% higher Nusselt number. Bigger vertexes and more evident blockage of mainstream by the ligaments are found to intensify the horseshoe vortex and the counter-rotating vortex pair upstream and downstream of each vertex. Relative to the casted sandwich panel, therefore, endwall heat transfer is enhanced by 22% to 27%, while similar heat transfer is achieved on the ligaments. It is also found that, for a given Reynolds number, the brazed sandwich induces a 1.6 to 1.7 times higher pressure drop relative to the casted sandwich due to more severe flow separation caused by the sharp edges of the rectangular ligaments. Finally, for a given pumping power, both sandwiches provide a similar heat transfer performance. Given that the brazed sandwich is more cost-effective and easier to fabricate than the casted one, the former may be superior from an engineering application point of view.

  6. Cleaning Effect of Interlayer Metal on the Joining Surface during Braze Pressure Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Yohei; Suzumura, Akio; Ikeshoji, Toshi-Taka; Yamazaki, Takahisa

    Braze Pressure Welding (BPW) with high frequency induction heating is a newly developed pressure welding technique using interlayer metals for welding the general steel pipes for pipe arrangement in buildings. BPW enables to make joints by solid-state welding in air with relatively small deformation. In this method, the interlayer metal is expected to play the primary role in making high performance joints. It removes contaminations from the joining surface of the base metal and forms fillets at the gaps around the joint. It had been revealed by some experiments and/or numerical analyses in previous research that the BPW joint had higher tensile strength than the brazed joint, and that the fillet can improve the joint strength. In this study, in order to investigate the cleaning effect of interlayer metal more closely, a low carbon steel plate specimen was brazed mainly by Ni-based brazing filler using a tungsten spacer. The microscopy and EPMA analysis on the joints made by various brazing temperatures and durations confirmed that the oxide films on the joining surfaces were removed and discharged from the joining region by the interlayer metal.

  7. Life Cycle Assessment of Biochar versus Metal Catalysts Used in Syngas Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Frazier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass gasification has the potential to produce renewable fuels, chemicals and power at large utility scale facilities. In these plants catalysts would likely be used to reform and clean the generated biomass syngas. Traditional catalysts are made from transition metals, while catalysts made from biochar are being studied. A life cycle assessment (LCA study was performed to analyze the sustainability, via impact assessments, of producing a metal catalyst versus a dedicated biochar catalyst. The LCA results indicate that biochar has a 93% reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and requires 95.7% less energy than the metal catalyst to produce. The study also estimated that biochar production would also have fewer impacts on human health (e.g., carcinogens and respiratory impacts than the production of a metal catalyst. The possible disadvantage of biochar production in the ecosystem quality is due mostly to its impacts on agricultural land occupation. Sensitivity analysis was carried out to assess environmental impacts of variability in the two production systems. In the metal catalyst manufacture, the extraction and production of nickel (Ni had significant negative effects on the environmental impacts. For biochar production, low moisture content (MC, 9% and high yield type (8 tons/acre switchgrass appeared more sustainable.

  8. Effect of the microhardness difference between base metal and bionic coupling unit on wear resistance of gray cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Chang, Fang; Zhang, Peng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Wang, Chuanwei; Ren, Luquan

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, the samples with different microhardness difference between bionic coupling units and base metal were manufactured by laser surface remelting. Wear behavior of gray cast iron with bionic coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using a homemade liner reciprocating wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that when the microhardness difference is 561 HV0.2, the wear resistance of sample is the best.

  9. Evaluation of marginal and internal gaps of metal ceramic crowns obtained from conventional impressions and casting techniques with those obtained from digital techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Rathika Rai; S Arun Kumar; R Prabhu; Ranjani Thillai Govindan; Faiz Mohamed Tanveer

    2017-01-01

    Background: Accuracy in fit of cast metal restoration has always remained as one of the primary factors in determining the success of the restoration. A well-fitting restoration needs to be accurate both along its margin and with regard to its internal surface. Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the marginal fit of metal ceramic crowns obtained by conventional inlay casting wax pattern using conventional impression with the metal ceramic crowns obtained by computer-aided design and comp...

  10. Microstructural evolution in WC-Co cermet reinforced - A17075 metal matrix composites by stir casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal Krishna, U. B.; Ranganatha, P.; Auradi, V.; Mahendra Kumar, S.; Vasudeva, B.

    2016-09-01

    Aluminium metal matrix composites (AMMCs) are preferred because of their enhanced properties like high strength to weight ratio, stiffness and wear resistance. In the present work, an attempt is made to develop cermet (WC-Co) reinforced with Al7075 metal matrix composite by stir casting technique. WC-Co cermet is reduced to an average size of 10μm through ball milling using Alumina as grinding media. Ball milled WC-Co Cermet in an amount of 6 wt. % is used as reinforcement in Al7075 matrix. Microstructural characterization of the prepared composites is carried out using SEM/EDX and XRD studies. X-ray diffraction studies have revealed the peaks corresponding to α-Al, WC, Co and minor Al5W phases. SEM/EDX characterization revealed the uniform distribution of cermet in Al matrix. Further studies also revealed that, addition of WC-Co cermet to Al7075 matrix has resulted in improvement in hardness and Densities of Al7075 matrix.

  11. An Investigation on Metallic Ion Release from Four Dental Casting Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nejatidanesh

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Element release from dental casting alloys into the oral environment is of clinical concern and is considered to be a potential health problem to all patients.Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the metallic ion release of four base metal alloys.Materials and Methods: Two Ni-Cr (Minalux and Supercast and two Co-Cr alloys (Minalia and Wironit were examined. Nine specimens of each type were prepared in 13×11×1.4 mm dimensions and each of the four alloys (3 specimens per group were conditioned in artificial saliva at 37 c for one, three and seven days.The conditioning media were analyzed for element-release using Inductive CoupledPlasma Atomic Emission Spectrophotometer (ICPAES. Collected data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Duncan multiple range test (P< 0.05.Results: The greatest amount of element release was seen after seven days (134.9 ppb Supercast, 159.2 ppb Minalux, 197.2 ppb Minalia, and 230.2 ppb Wironit. There was a significant difference between the released elements from the alloys after the three conditioning times (p<0.001.Conclusion: Element release from the studied alloys is proportional to the conditioning time. The Ni-Cr alloys tested in this investigation were more resistant to corrosion as compared to the Co-Cr alloys in artificial saliva. Supercast had the highest corrosion resistance.

  12. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.

    2003-09-12

    Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

  13. Effects of Casting Conditions on End Product Defects in Direct Chill Casted Hot Rolling Ingots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorulmaz, Arda; Yüksel, Çağlar; Erzi, Eraz; Dispinar, Derya

    Direct chill casting is a reliable casting process for almost any wrought aluminum alloy for subsequent deformation via hot rolling to supply vital industries such as aerospace, automotive, construction, packaging and maritime. While some defects occur during casting, like hot tearing, some others like surface defect causing blisters, appear after hot rolling process or annealing after final cold rolling steps. It was found that some of these defects are caused by melt impurities formed from entrained folded aluminum oxides or bifilms. A study in a hot rolling casting facility was carried out with different melt cleaning practices, launder and molten metal transferring designs. Bifilm index and reduced pressure test were used for determining melt cleanliness measurement. It was found that porous plug gas diffusons for degassing are more effective than lance type degassers and a design towards less turbulent molten metal flow from furnace to mould cavity are necessary for reducing defects caused by bifilms.

  14. Rapid tooling for functional prototyping of metal mold processes: Literature review on cast tooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hochanadel, P.W. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

    1995-11-01

    This report is a literature review on cast tooling with the general focus on AISI H13 tool steel. The review includes processing of both wrought and cast H13 steel along with the accompanying microstructures. Also included is the incorporation of new rapid prototyping technologies, such as Stereolithography and Selective Laser Sintering, into the investment casting of tool steel. The limiting property of using wrought or cast tool steel for die casting is heat checking. Heat checking is addressed in terms of testing procedures, theories regarding the mechanism, and microstructural aspects related to the cracking.

  15. Influence of wall thickness of spheroidal cast iron, manufactured in the foundry METAL-ODLEW Sp.J., on its graphite shape index and ultrasonic control index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Orłowicz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of ultrasonic evaluation of the microstructure of spheroidal cast iron manufactured under production condi-tions at the foundry of Metal Odlew Sp.J. Evaluation of ultrasonic control index sensitiveness to changes of graphite shape index Ss of spheroidal cast iron (type 500-7, utilized modelled stepped castings. The relationship was determined between the shape index of graphite precipitation Ss and the velocity of longitudinal ultrasonic wave cL.

  16. Study on interfacial heat transfer coefficient at metal/die interface during high pressure die casting process of AZ91D alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Zhi-peng

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The high pressure die casting (HPDC process is one of the fastest growing and most efficient methods for the production of complex shape castings of magnesium and aluminum alloys in today’s manufacturing industry.In this study, a high pressure die casting experiment using AZ91D magnesium alloy was conducted, and the temperature profiles inside the die were Measured. By using a computer program based on solving the inverse heat problem, the metal/die interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC was calculated and studied. The results show that the IHTC between the metal and die increases right after the liquid metal is brought into the cavity by the plunger,and decreases as the solidification process of the liquid metal proceeds until the liquid metal is completely solidified,when the IHTC tends to be stable. The interfacial heat transfer coefficient shows different characteristics under different casting wall thicknesses and varies with the change of solidification behavior.

  17. Investigation of Heat Transfer at the Mold/Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Light Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert D. Pehlke; John T. Berry

    2005-12-16

    Accurate modeling of the metal casting process prior to creating a mold design demands reliable knowledge of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient at the mold metal interface as a function of both time and location. The phenomena concerned with the gap forming between the mold and the solidifying metal are complex but need to be understood before any modeling is attempted. The presence of mold coatings further complicates the situation. A commercial casting was chosen and studied in a gravity permanent mold casting process. The metal/mold interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) was the focus of the research. A simple, direct method has been used to evaluate the IHTC. Both the simulation and experiments have shown that a reasonably good estimate of the heat transfer coefficient could be made in the case studied. It has been found that there is a good agreement between experiments and simulations in the temperature profiles during the solidification process, given that the primary mechanism of heat transfer across the gap in permanent mold casting of light alloys is by conduction across the gap. The procedure utilized to determine the interfacial heat transfer coefficient can be applied to other casting processes. A recently completed project involving The University of Michigan and Mississippi State University, together with several industrial partners, which was supported by the USDOE through the Cast Metals Coalition, examined a number of cases of thermal contact. In an investigation which gave special consideration to the techniques of measurement, several mold coatings were employed and results presented as a function of time. Realistic conditions of coating thickness and type together with an appropriate combination of mold preheat and metal pouring temperature were strictly maintained throughout the investigation. Temperature sensors, in particular thermocouples, play an important part in validating the predictions of solidification models. Cooling

  18. Atomic resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy of clean metal oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritsen, J V; Reichling, M

    2010-07-07

    In the last two decades the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become the premier tool for topographical analysis of surface structures at the nanometre scale. In its ultimately sensitive implementation, namely dynamic scanning force microscopy (SFM) operated in the so-called non-contact mode (NC-AFM), this technique yields genuine atomic resolution and offers a unique tool for real space atomic-scale studies of surfaces, nanoparticles as well as thin films, single atoms and molecules on surfaces irrespective of the substrate being electrically conducting or non-conducting. Recent advances in NC-AFM have paved the way for groundbreaking atomic level insight into insulator surfaces, specifically in the most important field of metal oxides. NC-AFM imaging now strongly contributes to our understanding of the surface structure, chemical composition, defects, polarity and reactivity of metal oxide surfaces and related physical and chemical surface processes. Here we review the latest advancements in the field of NC-AFM applied to the fundamental atomic resolution studies of clean single crystal metal oxide surfaces with special focus on the representative materials Al(2)O(3)(0001), TiO(2)(110), ZnO(1000) and CeO(2)(111). © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd

  19. Material Properties of Various Light Metals Produced by Heated Mold Continuous Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Miyamoto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an attempt was made to develop high quality cast aluminum alloys via a new casting technology, e.g., the heated mold continuous casting (HMC with ultrasonic vibration (UV process. With the UV process in the continuous casting process, fine and spherical grains were obtained, where the lattice structure is formed similarly before the UV process while dislocation density increases. The mechanical properties of the UV-HMC Al alloys are higher than those for the related cast Al alloys without UV although still high material ductility is obtained. The lattice and dislocation characteristics of the continuous cast samples made with and without the UV processes were analyzed systematically by the EBSD observations to interrupt clearly their mechanical properties.

  20. In situ sputter cleaning of thin film metal substrates for UHV-TEM corrosion studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.

    1973-01-01

    A prerequisite for conducting valid corrosion experiments by in situ electron microscopy techniques is not only the achievement of UHV background pressure conditions at the site of the specimen but also the ability to clean the surface of the thin metal substrate specimen before initiation of the corrosive interaction. A miniaturized simple ion gun has been constructed for this purpose. The gun is small enough to be incorporated into an UHV electron microscope specimen chamber with hot stage in such a way as to permit bombardment of the substrate specimen while observing it by transmission electron microscopy TEM. It is shown that the ion beam generated is confined well enough to cause a sputtering removal of substrate material at a rate of approximately 5-10 A/min and to prevent the sputter deposition of contaminating material from the specimen holder.

  1. Exploitation of rare earth metals in cast steel production for power engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kasińska

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of experiments carried out on industrial melts. There has been tested the REM influence on carbon properties (0.20%C as well as austenitic cast steel Cr-Ni 18/8+Ti type.It was found that REM cause an essential improvement of cast steels impact strength and in case of austenitic cast steel – also the corrosion resistance improvement in boiling 65%HNO3 (Huey test.

  2. Study of properties of manual metal arc electrodes for gray cast iron defects repair works

    OpenAIRE

    A. Klimpel; D. Janicki; A.St. Klimpel

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: of these researches was to determine influence of MMA technique and surfacing parameters of gray cast iron using CASTOLIN 27 coated electrodes on quality of deposits.Design/methodology/approach: single layer weave bead deposits and one layer overlapped multi weave bead deposits were MMA surfaced on gray cast iron type GG25. All deposits were surfaced on no preheated gray cast iron plate. To determine quality of deposits hardness HRC measurements on the cross section of deposits, macr...

  3. A prospective clinical trial comparing preformed metal crowns and cast restorations for defective first permanent molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagdwon, A M; Fayle, S A; Pollard, M A

    2003-09-01

    This study investigated two methods for the restoration of permanent molars affected by amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) or severe enamel defects. A prospective clinical trial was carried out on 17 subjects affected by AI or severe enamel defects of first permanent molars. A split mouth design was used so that each right or left permanent molar in both jaws was restored using either a preformed metal crown (SSC) or a cast adhesive coping (CAC). Subjects were followed for up to 24 months and assessed for longevity and quality of the restorations. Sequential analysis was used to compare longevity. Records for 42 restorations (19 SSC; 23 CAC) were kept. The split mouth design was possible on 24 occasions (right versus left=14; maxilla versus mandible=10). Three restorations, one SSC (at 6 months) and two CAC (at 2 and 19 months) failed and required replacement. There was no significant statistical difference between the two types of restorations. While there was no difference between the two restorations for quality and longevity, the SSC was considerably cheaper to use and needed only one visit, but more tooth tissue was lost in preparation and fitting. The CAC was significantly more expensive but left nearly all of the tooth crown intact. The choice of which restoration to use is indicated by the immediate and long-term needs of each individual patient.

  4. Modification of Cast Al-Mg2Si Metal Matrix Composite by Li

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadian, R.; Emamy, M.; Campbell, J.

    2009-12-01

    The effects of both Li modification and cooling rate on the microstructure and tensile properties of an in-situ prepared Al-15 pct Mg2Si composite were investigated. Adding 0.3 pct Li reduced the average size of Mg2Si primary particles from ~30 to ~6 μm. The effect of cooling rate was investigated by the use of a mold with different section thicknesses from 3 to 9 mm. The results show a refinement of primary particle size as a result of both Li additions and cooling rate increases, and their effects are additive. Similarly, both effects increased ultimate tensile stress (UTS) and elongation values. The thin sections show somewhat unexpectedly low and scattered tensile results attributed to the casting defects observed in fracture surfaces. The Li-modified alloy displays serrated yielding behavior that is not fully explained here. The refinement by Li and enhanced cooling rate is explained in terms of an analogy with the effect of Sr and cooling rate in Al-Si alloys, and is ultimately attributed to the effect of the alkali and alkaline earth metals deactivating oxide double films (bifilms) suspended in Al melts as favored substrates for intermetallics.

  5. AN ELECTROLYTIC CIP-CLEANING PROCESS FOR REMOVING IMPURITIES FROM THE INNER SURFACE OF A METALLIC CONTAINER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a novel electrolytic process for removing impurities from the inner surface of a metallic container. The process is particularly useful for cleaning process reactors used for culturing microorganisms, and storage tanks used for storing metabolites formed in the process...

  6. Detection of Non-metallic Inclusions in Centrifugal Continuous Casting Steel Billets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng; Seetharaman, Sridhar; Yang, Shufeng; Yang, Wen; Wang, Yi

    2016-06-01

    In the current study, automated particle analysis was employed to detect non-metallic inclusions in steel during a centrifugal continuous casting process of a high-strength low alloy steel. The morphology, composition, size, area fraction, amount, and spatial distribution of inclusions in steel were obtained. Etching experiment was performed to reveal the dendrite structure of the billet and to discuss the effect of centrifugal force on the distribution of oxide inclusions in the final solidified steel by comparing the solidification velocity with the critical velocity reported in literature. It was found that the amount of inclusions was highest in samples from the tundish (~250 per mm2), followed by samples from the mold (~200 per mm2), and lowest in billet samples (~86 per mm2). In all samples, over 90 pct of the inclusions were smaller than 2μm. In steel billets, the content of oxides, dual-phase oxide-sulfides, and sulfides in inclusions were found to be 10, 30, and 60 pct, respectively. The dual-phase inclusions were oxides with sulfides precipitated on the outer surface. Oxide inclusions consisted of high Al2O3 and high MnO which were solid at the molten steel temperature, implying that the calcium treatment was insufficient. Small oxide inclusions very uniformly distributed on the cross section of the billet, while there were more sulfide inclusions showing a banded structure at the outside 25 mm layer of the billet. The calculated solidification velocity was higher than the upper limit at which inclusions were entrapped by the solidifying front, revealing that for oxide inclusions smaller than 8μm in this study, the centrifugal force had little influence on its final distribution in billets. Instead, oxide inclusions were rapidly entrapped by solidifying front.

  7. An audit of the quality of base metal cast restorations provided within the restorative department of a UK dental institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddis, H P; Ridsdale, L; Chin, J S; Nixon, P J

    2014-09-01

    Gold alloy has long been used in dentistry for the fabrication of cast restorations due to its material and clinical properties and known excellent longevity over long-term follow-up. The cost of gold has increased dramatically in recent years (by 450% in the past ten years). The use of base metal alloys as an alternative would lead to a considerable cost saving: a cobalt chromium alloy is around 98% cheaper than gold alloy at the time of writing. NHS regulations state which alloys are permissible for use in cast restorations in dentistry, and certain 'non-precious gold' alloys should not be used. A prospective audit was carried out in our unit into the standard of cast restorations in cobalt-chromium alloy. The standard set before the audit was established by a prior audit of gold alloy restorations with measures of clinical and technical factors. Base-metal alloy restorations were considerably cheaper; but were of a poorer clinical standard than gold-alloy and required more frequent adjustment and remake (17% compared to 5%).

  8. A comparative evaluation of the effect of dentin desensitizers on the retention of complete cast metal crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saili M Chandavarkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Desensitizers are used to reduce dentin hypersensitivity. They affect the surface texture of prepared dentin and may alter the retention of fixed restorations. Aims: The aim was to evaluate the effect of dentin desensitizers on the retention of complete cast metal crowns luted with glass ionomer cement. Subjects and Methods: Fifty freshly extracted human premolars were subjected to standardized tooth preparation (20° total convergence, 4 mm axial height with a computer numerically controlled machine. Individual cast metal crowns were fabricated from a base metal alloy. Dentin desensitizers included none (control, a glutaraldehyde (GLU based primer (Gluma desensitizer, casein phosphopeptide (CPP-amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP (GC Mousse, erbium, chromium: YSGG laser (Waterlase MD Turbo, Biolase and Pro-Argin (Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief desensitizing polishing paste. After desensitization, crowns were luted with glass ionomer cement and kept for 48 h at 37°C in 100% relative humidity. The samples were tested using a universal testing machine by applying a load at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis included One-way ANOVA, followed by the Scheffe post-hoc test with P < 0.05. Results: All dentin desensitizers showed significantly different values: Pro-Argin (4.10 Megapascals [Mpa] < CPP-ACP (4.01 mpa < GLU based primer (3.87 Mpa < Virgin dentin (3.65 Mpa < LASER (3.37 Mpa. Conclusions : On comparing the effect of prepared virgin dentin, GLU based primer, CPP-ACP, LASER and Pro-Argin on the retention of complete cast metal crowns luted with glass ionomer cement on prepared teeth, it can be concluded that Pro-Argin and CPP-ACP showed the best retention in this in vitro study.

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Marginal Accuracy of a Cast Fixed Partial Denture Compared to Soldered Fixed Partial Denture Made of Two Different Base Metal Alloys and Casting Techniques: An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jei, J Brintha; Mohan, Jayashree

    2014-03-01

    The periodontal health of abutment teeth and the durability of fixed partial denture depends on the marginal adaptation of the prosthesis. Any discrepancy in the marginal area leads to dissolution of luting agent and plaque accumulation. This study was done with the aim of evaluating the accuracy of marginal fit of four unit crown and bridge made up of Ni-Cr and Cr-Co alloys under induction and centrifugal casting. They were compared to cast fixed partial denture (FPD) and soldered FPD. For the purpose of this study a metal model was fabricated. A total of 40 samples (4-unit crown and bridge) were prepared in which 20 Cr-Co samples and 20 Ni-Cr samples were fabricated. Within these 20 samples of each group 10 samples were prepared by induction casting technique and other 10 samples with centrifugal casting technique. The cast FPD samples obtained were seated on the model and the samples were then measured with travelling microscope having precision of 0.001 cm. Sectioning of samples was done between the two pontics and measurements were made, then the soldering was made with torch soldering unit. The marginal discrepancy of soldered samples was measured and all findings were statistically analysed. The results revealed minimal marginal discrepancy with Cr-Co samples when compared to Ni-Cr samples done under induction casting technique. When compared to cast FPD samples, the soldered group showed reduced marginal discrepancy.

  10. Derivative thermo analysis of the Al-Si cast alloy with addition of rare earths metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krupiński

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the dependence between chemical composition, structure and cooling rate of Al–Si aluminium cast alloy was investigated. For studying of the structure changes the thermo-analysis was carried out, using the UMSA (Universal Metallurgical Simulator and Analyzer device. For structure investigation optical and electron scanning microscopy was used, phase and chemical composition of the Al cast alloy also using qualitative point-wise EDS microanalysis.

  11. Influence of liquid surface segregation on the pitting corrosion behavior of semi-solid metal high pressure die cast alloy F357

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moller, H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Semi-solid metal processing results in liquid segregation at the surface of the components. The pitting behaviour of this surface layer of semi-solid metal processed alloy F357 was compared with the centre (or bulk) of cast plates in 3.5% Na...

  12. The effect of veneering on the marginal fit of CAD/CAM-generated, copy-milled, and cast metal copings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Sabit Melih; Yesil Duymus, Zeynep; Caglar, Ipek; Hologlu, Bilal

    2017-11-01

    This in vitro study investigated the marginal fit of metal and zirconia copings before and after veneering on dies with shoulder/chamfer (s/c) finish lines. Using CAD/CAM, ten (n = 10) each s/c zirconia (NZ) copings and ten (n = 10) each s/c metal (MM) copings were generated. As controls, ten (n = 10) each s/c zirconia copings were copy-milled (ZZ) and ten (n = 10) each s/c metal copings were cast (CC). The vertical marginal discrepancy of the copings was measured at 20 predefined spots of the circular shoulder and chamfer finish lines in microns (μm) before and after a first and a second veneering firing using a stereomicroscope at ×40 magnification. Data were statistically analyzed, and the comparisons of CAD/CAM-milled (NZ, MM), copy-milled (ZZ), and cast (CC) copings before and after veneering were made at a significance level of p veneering firing (40 ± 8/42 ± 7). MM copings showed gap values similar to NZ. Second firings did not significantly increase gaps in all groups except ZZ2 of chamfer finish line. Veneering increased the marginal gap width of copings. Within the limits of this in vitro study, aesthetic ceramic veneering of CAD/CAM-generated copings caused a statistically significant but tolerable loss of marginal fit precision.

  13. Wear and Friction Behavior of Stir Cast Al-TiB2 Metal Matrix Composites with Various Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Poria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Al- TiB2 metal matrix composites are fabricated using stir cast method and its tribological characterization is done using three different lubricants. Tribological studies are performed in a multi-tribotester using block-on-roller configuration under 25-75 N loads and 400-600 rpm rotational speeds. Four different weight percentages of TiB2 are considered in this study. Comparison between dry condition and lubricated conditions is gleaned to differentiate wear and friction characteristics and SEM images are taken to fortify them. Lubricated conditions yield large reduction in wear and friction compared to dry condition.

  14. Fracture strength of porcelain fused to metal crowns made of cast, milled or laser-sintered cobalt-chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Sozan Hama; Vult von Steyern, Per

    2013-09-01

    The aim was to compare the fracture strength of porcelain fused to metal crowns with copings fabricated in Co-Cr using different manufacturing techniques (casting, milling and laser-sintering) with crowns manufactured in a high-gold alloy. A total of 50 identical crowns were fabricated and sub-divided into five groups; cast Co-Cr, milled Co-Cr, two groups of laser-sintered Co-Cr and a control group cast in a high-gold alloy. After thermocycling (5000 cycles, 5-55°C) and pre-load (30-300 N, 10,000 cycles) the crowns were loaded until fracture. Load (N) and fracture mode were recorded. There was a significant difference (p alloy present numerically higher fracture strength than crowns made with copings fabricated in Co-Cr alloys. The difference is confirmed when analyzing the fracture surfaces, but the difference in fracture strength value is limited and is only significant with regard to one of the two laser-sintered groups.

  15. Heavy Metals in ToxCast: Relevance to Food Safety (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human exposure to heavy metals occurs through food contamination due to industrial processes, vehicle emissions and farming methods. Specific toxicity endpoints have been associated with metal exposures, e.g. lead and neurotoxicity; however, numerous varieties of heavy metals hav...

  16. Defining the relation between mechanical properties and ultrasonic wave velocity in spheroidal cast iron manufactured in the foundry Metal-Odlew s.c.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Orłowicz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents results of ultrasonic evaluation of mechanical properties of spheroidal cast iron manufactured under the productionconditions of Metal-Odlew s.c. Tests were conducted on wedge casts which were used as samples for tensile tests, a map of distribution of longitudinal ultrasound wave velocity was determined for the cast wedges. The tensile tests were conducted and values of longitudinalultrasound wave velocity were determined in the place where the sample was broken. Relations between the mechanical properties and the velocity of longitudinal ultrasonic wave cL were determined.

  17. Processing and Characterization of Functionally Graded Aluminum (A319)—SiCp Metallic Composites by Centrifugal Casting Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, E.; Jacob, Jibin C.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Joseph, M. A.; Pai, B. C.

    2016-08-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) are successfully adopted for the design and fabrication of engineering components with location-specific properties. The present study describes the processing and characterization of A319 Aluminum functionally graded metal matrix composites (FGMMC) with 10 and 15 wt pct SiCp reinforcements. The liquid stir casting method is used for composite melt preparation followed by FGMMC formation by vertical centrifugal casting method. The process parameters used are the mold preheating temperature of 523 K (250 °C), melt pouring temperature of 1013 K (740 °C), and mold rotation speed of 1300 rpm. The study analyzes the distribution and concentration of reinforcement particles in the radial direction of the FGMMC disk along with the effects of gradation on density, hardness, mechanical strength, the variation in coefficient of thermal expansion and the wear resistance properties at different zones. Microstructures of FGMMC reveal an outward radial gradient distribution of reinforcements forming different zones. Namely, matrix-rich inner, transition, particles-rich outer, and chill zone of a few millimeters thick at the outer most periphery of the casting are formed. From 10-FGM, a radial shift in the position of SiCp maxima is observed in 15-FGM casting. The mechanical characterization depicts enhanced properties for the particle-rich zone. The hardness shows a graded nature in correlation with particle concentration and a maximum of 94.4 HRB has been obtained at the particle-rich region of 15-FGM. In the particle-rich zone, the lowest CTE value of 20.1 µm/mK is also observed with a compressive strength of 650 MPa and an ultimate tensile strength of 279 MPa. The wear resistance is higher at the particle-rich zone of the FGMMC.

  18. Development of casting investment preventing blackening of noble metal alloys part 1. Application of developed investment for Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuta, Kiyoshi; Nakai, Akira; Goto, Shin-ichi; Wakamatsu, Yasushi; Yara, Atushi; Miyagawa, Yukio; Ogura, Hideo

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a casting investment that prevents the blackening of the cast surface of noble metal alloys. The experimental investments were prepared using a gypsum-bonded investment in which the metallic powders such as boron (B), silicon (Si), aluminum (Al) and titanium (Ti) were added as oxidizing agents. An Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy was cast into the mold made of the prepared investment. The effect of the addition of each metal powder was evaluated from the color difference between the as-cast surface and the polished surface of the cast specimen. The color of the as-cast surface approached that of the polished surface with increasing B and Al content. A lower mean value in the color difference was obtained at 0.25-1.00 mass% B content. B and Al are useful as an additive in a gypsum-bonded investment to prevent the blackening of an Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy. The effects of Si and Ti powder addition could not be found.

  19. Aluminum metal surface cleaning and activation by atmospheric-pressure remote plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, J., E-mail: jmespadero@uco.es; Bravo, J.A.; Calzada, M.D.

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Atmospheric-pressure postdischarges have been applied on aluminium surfaces. • The outer hydrocarbon layer is reduced by the action of the postdischarge. • The treatment promotes the appearance of hydrophilic OH radicals in the surface. • Effectivity for distances up to 5 cm allows for treating irregular surfaces. • Ageing in air due to the disappearance of OH radicals has been reported. - Abstract: The use of the remote plasma (postdischarge) of argon and argon-nitrogen microwave plasmas for cleaning and activating the surface of metallic commercial aluminum samples has been studied. The influence of the nitrogen content and the distance between the treated samples and the end of the discharge on the hydrophilicity and the surface energy has been analyzed by means of the sessile drop technique and the Owens-Wendt method. A significant increase in the hydrophilicity has been noted in the treated samples, together with an increase in the surface energy from values around 37 mJ/m{sup 2} to 77 mJ/m{sup 2}. Such increase weakly depends on the nitrogen content of the discharge, and the effectivity of the treatment extends to distances up to 5 cm from the end of the discharge, much longer than those reported in other plasma-based treatments. The analysis of the treated samples using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that such increase in the surface energy takes place due to a reduction of the carbon content and an increase in the amount of OH radicals in the surface. These radicals tend to disappear within 24–48 h after the treatment when the samples are stored in contact with ambient air, resulting in the ageing of the treated surface and a partial retrieval of the hydrophobicity of the surface.

  20. Rare earth metals influence on mechanical properties and crack resistance of GP240GH and G17CrMo5-5 cast steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gajewski

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of research on modification influence of REM on mechanical properties and crack resistance of GP240GH cast carbon steel and G17CrMo5-5 high-temperature cast steel. The tests have been performed on successive industrial melts. The rare earth metals were put into the ladle during tapping of heat melt from the furnace. Each time ca 2000 kg of liquid metals were modified. Because of this the amount of sulphur in the cast steel was decreased and the non-metallic inclusion morphology was significantly changed. There were tested mechanical properties (Re,Rm, plastic properties (A5,Z and impact strength (KV, and on the basis of the three-point bend test the KJC stress intensity factor was evaluated. It was noticed that the REM modification brings essential increase of impact strength as well as fracture toughness determined by KJC factor.

  1. Evaluation of marginal and internal gaps of metal ceramic crowns obtained from conventional impressions and casting techniques with those obtained from digital techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Rathika; Kumar, S Arun; Prabhu, R; Govindan, Ranjani Thillai; Tanveer, Faiz Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Accuracy in fit of cast metal restoration has always remained as one of the primary factors in determining the success of the restoration. A well-fitting restoration needs to be accurate both along its margin and with regard to its internal surface. The aim of the study is to evaluate the marginal fit of metal ceramic crowns obtained by conventional inlay casting wax pattern using conventional impression with the metal ceramic crowns obtained by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technique using direct and indirect optical scanning. This in vitro study on preformed custom-made stainless steel models with former assembly that resembles prepared tooth surfaces of standardized dimensions comprised three groups: the first group included ten samples of metal ceramic crowns fabricated with conventional technique, the second group included CAD/CAM-milled direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) crowns using indirect scanning, and the third group included DMLS crowns fabricated by direct scanning of the stainless steel model. The vertical marginal gap and the internal gap were evaluated with the stereomicroscope (Zoomstar 4); post hoc Turkey's test was used for statistical analysis. One-way analysis of variance method was used to compare the mean values. Metal ceramic crowns obtained from direct optical scanning showed the least marginal and internal gap when compared to the castings obtained from inlay casting wax and indirect optical scanning. Indirect and direct optical scanning had yielded results within clinically acceptable range.

  2. Arrays of hollow out-of-plane microneedles made by metal electrodeposition onto solvent cast conductive polymer structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, I.; Liu, Y.; Häfeli, U. O.; Stoeber, B.

    2013-08-01

    Transdermal drug delivery using microneedles is a technique to potentially replace hypodermic needles for injection of many vaccines and drugs. Fabrication of hollow metallic microneedles so far has been associated with time-consuming steps that restrict batch production of these devices. Here, we are presenting a novel method for making metallic microneedles with any desired height, spacing, and lumen size. In our process, we use solvent casting to coat a mold, which contains an array of pillars, with a conductive polymer composite layer. The conductive layer is then used as a seed layer in a metal electrodeposition process. To characterize the process, the conductivity of the polymer composite with respect to different filler concentrations was investigated. In addition, plasma etching of the polymer was characterized. The electroplating process was also studied further to control the thickness of the microneedle array plate. The strength of the microneedle devices was evaluated through a series of compression tests, while their performance for transdermal drug delivery was tested by injection of 2.28 µm fluorescent microspheres into animal skin. The fabricated metallic microneedles seem appropriate for subcutaneous delivery of drugs and microspheres.

  3. Non-Gold Base Dental Casting Alloys. Volume 2. Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    aluminum - bronze (80-85% copper, 8-10% aluminum, 1-3% nickel, plus iron); beta -brass ." (60% copper and 40% zinc), and other lesser known entities. The...gypsum investment, plaster is the binder and silica is the refractory. Beauty-Cast and Cristobalite are examples of such investments. In general, gypsum... Cristobalite ) on heating. LIQUIDUS - The temperature above which an alloy is entirely molten. 4. LIQUIDUS RANGE - The temperature range from the

  4. Fracture behavior of metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses with frameworks from cast or a newly developed sintered cobalt-chromium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Klaus-Peter; Knauber, Andreas W; Nothdurft, Frank P

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fracture behavior of metal-ceramic bridges with frameworks from cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo), which are manufactured using conventional casting or a new computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) milling and sintering technique. A total of 32 metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDPs), which are based on a nonprecious metal framework, was produced using a conventional casting process (n = 16) or a new CAD/CAM milling and sintering process (n = 16). Eight unveneered frameworks were manufactured using each of the techniques. After thermal and mechanical aging of half of the restorations, all samples were subjected to a static loading test in a universal testing machine, in which acoustic emission monitoring was performed. Three different critical forces were revealed: the fracture force (F max), the force at the first reduction in force (F decr1), and the force at the critical acoustic event (F acoust1). With the exception of the veneered restorations with cast or sintered metal frameworks without artificial aging, which presented a statistically significant but slightly different F max, no statistically significant differences between cast and CAD/CAM sintered and milled FDPs were detected. Thermal and mechanical loading did not significantly affect the resulting forces. Cast and CAD/CAM milled and sintered metal-ceramic bridges were determined to be comparable with respect to the fracture behavior. FDPs based on CAD/CAM milled and sintered frameworks may be an applicable and less technique-sensitive alternative to frameworks that are based on conventionally cast frameworks.

  5. Microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance and porcelain shear bond strength comparison between cast and hot pressed CoCrMo alloy for metal-ceramic dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, B; Soares, D; Silva, F S

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance and metal-porcelain bond strength of a CoCrMo dental alloy obtained by two routes, cast and hot pressing. CoCrMo alloy substrates were obtained by casting and hot pressing. Substrates' microstructure was examined by the means of Optical Microscopy (OM) and by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness tests were performed in a microhardness indenter. The electrochemical behavior of substrates was investigated through potentiodynamic tests in a saline solution (8g NaCl/L). Substrates were bonded to dental porcelain and metal-porcelain bond strength was assessed by the means of a shear test performed in a universal test machine (crosshead speed: 0.5 mm/min) until fracture. Fractured surfaces as well as undestroyed interface specimens were examined with Stereomicroscopy and SEM-EDS. Data was analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test to test the assumption of normality. The t-test (pbond strength results. Cast specimens exhibited dendritic microstructures whereas hot pressed specimens exhibited a typical globular microstructure with a second phase spread through the matrix. The hardness registered for hot pressed substrates was greater than that of cast specimens, 438±24HV/1 and 324±8HV/1, respectively. Hot pressed substrates showed better corrosion properties than cast ones, i.e. higher OCP; higher corrosion potential (E(corr)) and lower current densities (i(corr)). No significant difference was found (pbond strength between cast (116.5±6.9 MPa) and hot pressed (114.2±11.9 MPa) substrates. The failure type analysis revealed an adhesive failure for all specimens. Hot pressed products arise as an alternative to cast products in dental prosthetics, as they impart enhanced mechanical and electrochemical properties to prostheses without compromising the metal-ceramic bond strength. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The ancient Chinese casting techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Derui

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the course of Chinese civilization, which lasted more than 5,000 years, casting production has made a huge contribution. In this paper, some representative metal castings were presented. According to their forming techniques, they can be grouped into stone mould casting, clay mould casting, ablation casting, lost wax casting, stack casting, permanent mould casting, sand casting, etc. According to their materials, they can be categorized into tin bronze, bimetallic bronze, malleable cast iron, ductile cast iron, brass, cupronickel alloy (Packtong, etc. According to their surface decorative techniques they can be devided into gem inlay, gilding, gold and silver inlay, copper inlay, engraved decoration, surface tin-enrichment, mother-of-pearl inlay, burnished works with gold or silver inlay, surface coloring and cloisonné enamel, etc.

  7. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Development of an automated ultrasonic inspection cell for detecting subsurface discontinuities in cast gray iron. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burningham, J.S. [University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Technology

    1995-08-01

    This inspection cell consisted of an ultrasonic flaw detector, transducer, robot, immersion tank, computer, and software. Normal beam pulse-echo ultrasonic nondestructive testing, using the developed automated cell, was performed on 17 bosses on each rough casting. Ultrasonic transducer selection, initial inspection criteria, and ultrasonic flow detector (UFD) setup parameters were developed for the gray iron castings used in this study. The software were developed for control of the robot and UFD in real time. The software performed two main tasks: emulating the manual operation of the UFD, and evaluating the ultrasonic signatures for detecting subsurface discontinuities. A random lot of 105 castings were tested; the 100 castings that passed were returned to the manufacturer for machining into finished parts and then inspection. The other 5 castings had one boss each with ultrasonic signatures consistent with subsurface discontinuities. The cell was successful in quantifying the ultrasonic echo signatures for the existence of signature characteristics consistent with Go/NoGo criteria developed from simulated defects. Manual inspection showed that no defects in the areas inspected by the automated cell avoided detection in the 100 castings machined into finished parts. Of the 5 bosses found to have subsurface discontinuities, two were verified by manual inspection. The cell correctly classified 1782 of the 1785 bosses (99.832%) inspected.

  8. Internal fit of single crowns produced by CAD-CAM and lost-wax metal casting technique assessed by the triple-scan protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Bjørn Einar; Rønold, Hans Jacob; Dahl, Jon E

    2017-03-01

    Whether single crowns produced by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) have an internal fit comparable to crowns made by lost-wax metal casting technique is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the internal fit of single crowns produced with the lost-wax and metal casting technique with that of single crowns produced with the CAD-CAM technique. The internal fit of 5 groups of single crowns produced with the CAD-CAM technique was compared with that of single crowns produced in cobalt-chromium with the conventional lost-wax and metal casting technique. Comparison was performed using the triple-scan protocol; scans of the master model, the crown on the master model, and the intaglio of the crown were superimposed and analyzed with computer software. The 5 groups were milled presintered zirconia, milled hot isostatic pressed zirconia, milled lithium disilicate, milled cobalt-chromium, and laser-sintered cobalt-chromium. The cement space in both the mesiodistal and buccopalatal directions was statistically smaller (Pcasting technique compared with that of crowns produced by the CAD-CAM technique. Single crowns made using the conventional lost-wax and metal casting technique have better internal fit than crowns produced using the CAD-CAM technique. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Si-based multilayered print circuit board for MEMS packaging fabricated by Si deep etching, bonding, and vacuum metal casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoshi, Yoichi; Hanada, Kotaro; Li, Yaomin; Uchino, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Takaaki; Maeda, Ryutaro

    2001-11-01

    In our previous works, metal injection technique into small diameter (10 -100micrometers ) through holes was developed and applied for fabrication of Si based print circuit board. In the present work, we present the metal filling technology by vacuum casting into 3 dimensional through holes and trenches structure fabricated in stacked layered Si wafers prepared by fusion bonding of ICP etched Si wafers. Metal electrical feed through was successfully prepared by the method. Conventional print circuit boards have been fabricated with Epoxy resin based materials. In recent years Si is regarded as a candidate for next generation materials for print circuit board substrates, as the substrate whose thermal elongation same as the mounted chips is an ideal solution to residual stress problems in the elevated temperature application. In this report, we developed the double sided mountable stacked circuit board using Si deep etching technology and fusion bonding. This technology is expected to lead to the realization of the assembling of sensors, actuators and ICs, i.e. 3 dimensional MEMS packaging. In this report, we adopted micromachining technology to this application area and the special emphasis is placed on the low cost and reliable process development. The detailed items to be developed are shown as follows; 1) Development of Si wafer through holes penetration and trench formation by ICP etching. 2) Alignment and bonding of micromachined wafers. 3) Development of insulating layer with oxidation. 4) Development of formation of electrical feed through for stacked layers.

  10. Corrosion resistance of cast irons and titanium alloys as reference engineered metal barriers for use in basalt geologic storage: a literature assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlot, L.A.; Westerman, R.E.

    1981-07-01

    A survey and assessment of the literature on the corrosion resistance of cast irons and low-alloy titanium are presented. Selected engineering properties of cast iron and titanium are briefly described; however, the corrosion resistance of cast iron and titanium in aqueous solutions or in soils and their use in a basalt repository are emphasized. In evaluating the potential use of cast iron and titanium as structural barrier materials for long-lived nuclear waste packages, it is assumed that titanium has the general corrosion resistance to be used in relatively thin cross sections whereas the cost and availability of cast iron allows its use even in very thick cross sections. Based on this assumption, the survey showed that: The uniform corrosion of low-alloy titanium in a basalt environment is expected to be extremely low. A linear extrapolation of general corrosion rates with an added corrosion allowance suggests that a 3.2- to 6.4-mm-thick wall may have a life of 1000 yr. Pitting and crevice corrosion are not likely corrosion modes in basalt ground waters. It is also unlikely that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in the commercially pure (CP) titanium alloy or in palladiumor molybdenum-alloyed titanium materials. Low-alloy cast irons may be used as barrier metals if the environment surrounding the metal keeps the alloy in the passive range. The solubility of the corrosion product and the semipermeable nature of the oxide film allow significant uniform corrosion over long time periods. A linear extrapolation of high-temperature corrosion rates on carbon steels and corrosion rates of cast irons in soils gives an estimated metal penetration of 51 to 64 mm after 1000 yr. A corrosion allowance of 3 to 5 times that suggests that an acceptable cast iron wall may be from 178 to 305 mm thick. Although they cannot be fully assessed, pitting and crevice corrosion should not affect cast iron due to the ground-water chemistry of basalt.

  11. Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2005-11-01

    The study examines current and emerging melting technologies and discusses their technical barriers to scale-up issues and research needed to advance these technologies, improving melting efficiency, lowering metal transfer heat loss, and reducing scrap.

  12. MicroCast: Additive Manufacturing of Metal Plus Insulator Structures with Sub-mm Features Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel method for fabricating electronics containing both metals and polymers can be adapted to quickly and effectively produce micro-well sensors. The process...

  13. Bioaccumulation and depuration of metals in blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus Rathbun) from a contaminated and clean estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichmuth, Jessica M., E-mail: jreichmuth02@gmail.co [Department of Biological Sciences, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, 195 University Avenue, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Weis, Peddrick, E-mail: weis@umdnj.ed [Department of Radiology, UMDNJ-Medical School of New Jersey, Newark, NJ 07101 (United States); Weis, Judith S., E-mail: jweis@andromeda.rutgers.ed [Department of Biological Sciences, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, 195 University Avenue, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Blue crabs from a contaminated estuary (Hackensack Meadowlands-HM) and a cleaner reference site (Tuckerton-TK) were analyzed for Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn in muscle and hepatopancreas. Crabs from each site were taken into the laboratory and fed food from the other site, or in another experiment, transplanted to the other site for eight weeks. All crabs were analyzed for metals. Overall, tissue concentrations reflected environmental conditions. Tissue differences were found for Cu, Pb and Zn (all higher in hepatopancreas), and Hg (higher in muscle). HM muscle had more Hg than TK muscle, but did not decrease after transplanting or consuming clean food. HM crabs lost Cu, Pb and Zn in hepatopancreas after being fed clean food or transplanted. TK crabs increased Hg in muscle and Cr and Zn in hepatopancreas after transplantation or being fed contaminated (HM) food. Concentrations were variable, suggesting that blue crabs may not be fully reliable bioindicators of polluted systems. - The accumulation of metals within the muscle and hepatopancreas of blue crabs was highly variable, but often followed environmental concentrations.

  14. Comparison of Fracture Strength of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with Two Different Cast Metallic Post Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borhan Haghighi Z

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Endodontically treated teeth are more prone to fracture. The post and core are often used to provide the necessary retention for prosthetic rehabilitation. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to: 1 compare the fracture strength of endodontically treated teeth restored either with Nickel-Chromium (Ni- Cr post or Non- Precious Gold-color alloy (NPG post compared to the control group and 2 evaluate the fracture site in each group. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, endodontic treatment was carried out for 45 extracted maxillary premolars. The specimens were divided into 3 groups (n=15. Group1: restored with NPG post and core, group2: restored with Ni-Cr post and core, and group 3, no post and core were used after endodontic treatment and the access cavity was filled with amalgam. Failure force was recorded in Newton when root or remaining coronal structure fracture was occurred. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Student t-test and Tukey HSD test to compare the three groups. Results: There was a statistically significant difference among all groups (P<0.05. Fracture resistance of the teeth restored by NPG posts was significantly higher than those restored by Ni- Cr (P<0.001. Results showed that the fracture mainly occurred in the root of the teeth restored with Ni- Cr and NPG post while fractures occurred in the core portion of the teeth restored with amalgam. Conclusions: The findings of the present study indicated that the fracture strength of the teeth without using cast post and core was significantly lower than the teeth restored with cast post and core. Also the teeth restored by NPG post had a significantly higher fracture resistance than Ni-Cr posts.

  15. The Evolution and Fabrication of Implant-supported Full-arch Hybrid Prostheses. From Conventional Casted Metal to an All-Ceramic Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzer, Amanda

    2015-11-01

    Implant-supported, full-arch hybrid prostheses have developed from cast-metal frameworks with acrylic or porcelain to all-ceramic zirconia frameworks. CAD/CAM manufacturing removed the inaccuracies seen with casting and made use of zirconia possible. The materials and processes for prosthodontic fabrication are explained. Zirconia is highly opaque and versatile. However, porcelain-veneered zirconia frameworks have shown higher enamel wear, among other problems. Lithium disilicate has been shown to be more translucent than zirconia. Improved stained and more translucent zirconia frameworks have been produced as well. These promising new methods have gained popularity, but long-term studies are scarce and, thus, more research is required.

  16. A National Assistance Extension Program for Metal Casting: a foundation industry. Final report for the period February 16, 1994 through May 15, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The TRP award was proposed as an umbrella project to build infrastructure and extract lessons about providing extension-enabling services to the metal casting industry through the national network of Manufacturing Technology Center`s (MTC`s). It targeted four discrete task areas required for the MCC to service the contemplated needs of industry, and in which the MCC had secured substantial involvement of partner organizations. Task areas identified included Counter-Gravitational Casting, Synchronous Manufacturing, Technology Deployment, and Facility and Laboratory Improvements. Each of the task areas includes specific subtasks which are described.

  17. Marginal Adaptation of Metal Ceramic Crowns Cast from Four Different Base Metal Alloys before and after Porcelain Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hafezeqoran

    2015-04-01

    Material and Method: In this experimental study, a sound maxillary first premolar was prepared with chamfer and shoulder-bevel finish lines in palatal and buccal surfaces, respectively. Then the metal die was fabricated. Six points were marked 1 mm apical to the margin in the buccal and palatal surfaces. Forty impressions were taken from metal die by polyether impression material. Then, 10 frameworks were fabricated with each alloy type on stone dies. The vertical margin discrepancy between the frameworks and the marked points on metal dies were measured before and after porcelain firing. Paired sample t-test and One-way ANOVA, followed by multiple comparison tests (Tukey test were used to evaluate data. In this study, statistical significance was defined at p<0.05. Results: Before porcelain firing, T3 alloy showed the lowest marginal discrepancy on chamfer finish line (13.13 ± (1.26; but, the highest values were for Supermcast V copings and shoulder-bevel finish after porcelain application (30.83 ± (2.01. The mean marginal discrepancies of buccal and palatal surfaces before porcelain application were significantly lower for all alloy types (p<0.001. Conclusion:  The marginal adaptation of all four metal alloys was clinically acceptable and the thermal cycles of porcelain firing affected marginal adaptation.   Keywords: Crown; Marginal adaptation; Metal ceramic alloys

  18. Airborne benzene exposures from cleaning metal surfaces with small volumes of petroleum solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollins, Dana M; Kerger, Brent D; Unice, Kenneth M; Knutsen, Jeffrey S; Madl, Amy K; Sahmel, Jennifer E; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2013-06-01

    Airborne benzene concentrations were measured in a room with controlled air exchange during surface cleaning with two petroleum-based solvents (a paint thinner and an engine degreaser). The solvents were spiked with benzene to obtain target concentrations of 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1% by volume in the liquid. Personal samples on the worker and area samples up to 1.8m away were collected over 12 events (n=84 samples) designed to examine variation in exposure with solvent type, cleaning method (rag wipe or spatula scrape), surface area cleaned, air exchange rate, solvent volume applied, and distance from the cleaned surface. Average task breathing zone concentrations of benzene represented by 18-32 min time-weighted averages were 0.01 ppm, 0.05 ppm, and 0.27 ppm, when the solvents contained approximately 0.003, 0.008, and 0.07% benzene. Solvent benzene concentration, volume applied, and distance from the handling activities had the greatest effect on airborne concentrations. The studied solvent products containing 0.07% benzene (spiked) did not exceed the current OSHA permissible exposure limit of 1 ppm (averaged over 8h) or the ACGIH Threshold Limit Value of 0.5 ppm, in any of the tested short-term exposure scenarios. These data suggest that, under these solvent use scenarios, petroleum-based solvent products produced in the United States after 1978 likely did not produce airborne benzene concentrations above those measured if the concentration was less than 0.1% benzene. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Wear performance optimization of stir cast Al-TiB2 metal matrix composites using Taguchi design of experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poria, Suswagata; Sahoo, Prasanta; Sutradhar, Goutam

    2016-09-01

    The present study outlines the use of Taguchi parameter design to minimize the wear performance of Al-TiB2 metal matrix composites by optimizing tribological process parameters. Different weight percentages of micro-TiB2 powders with average sizes of 5-40 micron are incorporated into molten LM4 aluminium matrix by stir casting method. The wear performance of Al-TiB2 composites is evaluated in a block-on-roller type Multitribo tester at room temperature. Three parameters viz. weight percentage of TiB2, load and speed are considered with three levels each at the time of experiment. A L27 orthogonal array is used to carry out experiments accommodating all the factors and their levels including their interaction effects. Optimal combination of parameters for wear performance is obtained by Taguchi analysis. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is used to find out percentage contribution of each parameter and their interaction also on wear performance. Weight percentage of TiB2 is forced to be the most effective parameter in controlling wear behaviour of Al-TiB2 metal matrix composite.

  20. Transport and transformation of mercury during wet flue gas cleaning process of nonferrous metal smelting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhilou; Wang, Dongli; Peng, Bing; Chai, Liyuan; Liu, Hui; Yang, Shu; Yang, Bentao; Xiang, Kaisong; Liu, Cao

    2017-10-01

    Reducing mercury emission is hot topic for international society. The first step for controlling mercury in fuel gas is to investigate mercury distribution and during the flue gas treatment process. The mercury transport and transformation in wet flue gas cleaning process of nonferrous smelting industry was studied in the paper with critical important parameters, such as the solution temperature, Hg0 concentration, SO2 concentration, and Hg2+ concentration at the laboratory scale. The mass ratio of the mercury distribution in the solution, flue gas, sludge, and acid fog from the simulated flue gas containing Hg2+ and Hg0 was 49.12~65.54, 18.34~35.42, 11.89~14.47, and 1.74~3.54%, respectively. The primary mercury species in the flue gas and acid fog were gaseous Hg0 and dissolved Hg2+. The mercury species in the cleaning solution were dissolved Hg2+ and colloidal mercury, which accounted for 56.56 and 7.34% of the total mercury, respectively. Various mercury compounds, including Hg2Cl2, HgS, HgCl2, HgSO4, and HgO, existed in the sludge. These results for mercury distribution and speciation are highly useful in understanding mercury transport and transformation during the wet flue gas cleaning process. This research is conducive for controlling mercury emissions from nonferrous smelting flue gas and by-products.

  1. Evaluation of marginal and internal gaps of metal ceramic crowns obtained from conventional impressions and casting techniques with those obtained from digital techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathika Rai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accuracy in fit of cast metal restoration has always remained as one of the primary factors in determining the success of the restoration. A well-fitting restoration needs to be accurate both along its margin and with regard to its internal surface. Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the marginal fit of metal ceramic crowns obtained by conventional inlay casting wax pattern using conventional impression with the metal ceramic crowns obtained by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM technique using direct and indirect optical scanning. Materials and Methods: This in vitro study on preformed custom-made stainless steel models with former assembly that resembles prepared tooth surfaces of standardized dimensions comprised three groups: the first group included ten samples of metal ceramic crowns fabricated with conventional technique, the second group included CAD/CAM-milled direct metal laser sintering (DMLS crowns using indirect scanning, and the third group included DMLS crowns fabricated by direct scanning of the stainless steel model. The vertical marginal gap and the internal gap were evaluated with the stereomicroscope (Zoomstar 4; post hoc Turkey's test was used for statistical analysis. One-way analysis of variance method was used to compare the mean values. Results and Conclusion: Metal ceramic crowns obtained from direct optical scanning showed the least marginal and internal gap when compared to the castings obtained from inlay casting wax and indirect optical scanning. Indirect and direct optical scanning had yielded results within clinically acceptable range.

  2. Application of cylindrical covers from glass-metal composite made by spin casting method for strong cases of deep-sea submersibles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharuk, V. K.; Bocharova, A. A.; Ratnikov, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    In this work the manufacturing techniques of layered constructional material metal-glass-metal are considered by method of centrifugal casting; a similar approach to formation of a glass layer without superficial microcracks has no analogues in the world practice. The scheme of installation for production of cylindrical covers from a glass-metal composite is provided. The research of the main technological modes providing reliable connection of aluminium coverings with the glass which is in a plastic state is conducted. Optimum values of temperature parameters are defined. Methods of electronic microscopy have investigated the diffusive layer which is formed on the glass-aluminium border.

  3. Cleaning Effect of Interlayer Metal on the Joining Surface during Braze Pressure Welding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    INAGAKI, Yohei; SUZUMURA, Akio; IKESHOJI, Toshi-Taka; YAMAZAKI, Takahisa

    2005-01-01

    Braze Pressure Welding (BPW) with high frequency induction heating is a newly developed pressure welding technique using interlayer metals for welding the general steel pipes for pipe arrangement in buildings...

  4. Effect of superheat, mold, and casting materials on the metal/mold interfacial heat transfer during solidification in graphite-lined permanent molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, K. Narayan; Suresha, K. M.

    2004-10-01

    Heat transfer during the solidification of an Al-Cu-Si alloy (LM4) and commercial pure tin in single steel, graphite, and graphite-lined metallic (composite) molds was investigated. Experiments were carried out at three different superheats. In the case of composite molds, the effect of the thickness of the graphite lining and the outer wall on heat transfer was studied. Temperatures at known locations inside the mold and casting were used to solve the Fourier heat conduction equation inversely to yield the casting/mold interfacial heat flux transients. Increased melt superheats and higher thermal conductivity of the mold material led to an increase in the peak heat flux at the metal/mold interface. Factorial experiments indicated that the mold material had a significant effect on the peak heat flux at the 5% level of significance. The ratio of graphite lining to outer steel wall and superheat had a significant effect on the peak heat flux in significance range varying between 5 and 25%. A heat flux model was proposed to estimate the maximum heat flux transients at different superheat levels of 25 to 75 °C for any metal/mold combinations having a thermal diffusivity ratio (α R) varying between 0.25 and 6.96. The heat flow models could be used to estimate interfacial heat flux transients from the thermophysical properties of the mold and cast materials and the melt superheat. Metallographic analysis indicated finer microstructures for castings poured at increased melt superheats and cast in high-thermal diffusivity molds.

  5. A combined arc-melting and tilt-casting furnace for the manufacture of high-purity bulk metallic glass materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soinila, E.; Pihlajamäki, T.; Bossuyt, S.; Hänninen, H.

    2011-07-01

    An arc-melting furnace which includes a tilt-casting facility was designed and built, for the purpose of producing bulk metallic glass specimens. Tilt-casting was chosen because reportedly, in combination with high-purity processing, it produces the best fatigue endurance in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses. Incorporating the alloying and casting facilities in a single piece of equipment reduces the amount of laboratory space and capital investment needed. Eliminating the sample transfer step from the production process also saves time and reduces sample contamination. This is important because the glass forming ability in many alloy systems, such as Zr-based glass-forming alloys, deteriorates rapidly with increasing oxygen content of the specimen. The challenge was to create a versatile instrument, in which high purity conditions can be maintained throughout the process, even when melting alloys with high affinity for oxygen. Therefore, the design provides a high-vacuum chamber to be filled with a low-oxygen inert atmosphere, and takes special care to keep the system hermetically sealed throughout the process. In particular, movements of the arc-melting electrode and sample manipulator arm are accommodated by deformable metal bellows, rather than sliding O-ring seals, and the whole furnace is tilted for tilt-casting. This performance of the furnace is demonstrated by alloying and casting Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 directly into rods up to ø 10 mm which are verified to be amorphous by x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and to exhibit locally ductile fracture at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  6. Casting technology for ODS steels - dispersion of nanoparticles in liquid metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, M.; Grants, I.; Kaldre, I.; Bojarevics, A.; Gerbeth, G.

    2017-07-01

    Dispersion of particles to produce metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNC) can be achieved by means of ultrasonic vibration of the melt using ultrasound transducers. However, a direct transfer of this method to produce steel composites is not feasible because of the much higher working temperature. Therefore, an inductive technology for contactless treatment by acoustic cavitation was developed. This report describes the samples produced to assess the feasibility of the proposed method for nano-particle separation in steel. Stainless steel samples with inclusions of TiB2, TiO2, Y2O3, CeO2, Al2O3 and TiN have been created and analyzed. Additional experiments have been performed using light metals with an increased value of the steady magnetic field using a superconducting magnet with a field strength of up to 5 T.

  7. High integrity automotive castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, D. [Eck Industries Inc., St. Manitowoc, WI (United States)

    2007-07-01

    This paper described the High Integrity Magnesium Automotive Casting (HI-MAC) program, which was developed to ensure the widespread adoption of magnesium in structural castings. The program will encourage the use of low pressure permanent molds, squeeze casting, and electromagnetic pumping of magnesium into dies. The HI-MAC program is currently investigating new heat treatment methods, and is in the process of creating improved fluid flow and solidification modelling to produce high volume automotive components. In order to address key technology barriers, the program has been divided into 8 tasks: (1) squeeze casting process development; (2) low pressure casting technology; (3) thermal treatment; (4) microstructure control; (5) computer modelling and properties; (6) controlled molten metal transfer and filling; (7) emerging casting technologies; and (8) technology transfer throughout the automotive value chain. Technical challenges were outlined for each of the tasks. 1 ref., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  8. Production of Decorative Cast Metal Matrix Composites with a Complex Relief and Nonmetal Reinforcement Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Spasova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is relevant to the research of possibilities for the production of decorative complex relief metal matrix composites (MMCs of the “invitro” type, with unformed and unchanging reinforcement (strengthening phase in the process of creating a composite. The research on the methods of metal matrix composites development in this paper has been brought to the application of different space vacuum schemes for composite synthesisof vacuuming the space for composites synthesis by using the notion of the “capillary forming”. In this method the metal matrix (copper alloy melt was infiltrated in the space between the pellets of reinforcement phase (quartz particles – SiO2, whereas the classical method adopted for the obtaining MMCs “in vitro”, uses a mechanism of forced insertion of the reinforcement phase into the ready for use melt, followed by homogenization of the composite structure. In the particular case, because the obtained composite will have a complex relief three-dimensional surface, the conditions for compacting the building phases in the three directions x, y, z should be virtually equalized. In order to accomplish the task set, a laboratory system is developed. The experiments were conducted with laboratory equipment elaborated on the base of another equipment for "capillary forming" with extra vacuum. The structures of the obtained MMCs were tested by metallographic analysis.

  9. Analytical and electrochemical evaluation of the in vitro corrosion behavior of nickel-chrome and cobalt-chrome casting alloys for metal-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yfantis, Constaninos; Yfantis, Dimitrios; Anastassopoulou, Jane; Theophanides, Theophilos

    2007-03-01

    In this study we examined the hypothesis based on relevant literature survey that the in vitro corrosion behavior of a Cobalt-chrome dental casting alloy for metal-ceramic restorations is better than that of a Nickel-chrome dental casting alloy. The corrosion released metal ions were analysed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy. Moreover, the specimens were electrochemically tested by linear polarization. The statistical analysis of the results showed statistically significant differences in corrosion rates of Nickel-chrome alloy and Cobalt-chrome alloy calculated by analytical and electrochemical measurements. The hypothesis was confirmed and the results showed that the corrosion rates of the Cobalt-chrome alloy were lower than that of the Nickel-chrome alloy.

  10. Casting fine grained, fully dense, strong inorganic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.

    2015-11-24

    Methods and apparatuses for casting inorganic materials are provided. The inorganic materials include metals, metal alloys, metal hydrides and other materials. Thermal control zones may be established to control the propagation of a freeze front through the casting. Agitation from a mechanical blade or ultrasonic energy may be used to reduce porosity and shrinkage in the casting. After solidification of the casting, the casting apparatus may be used to anneal the cast part.

  11. Evaluating the Upset Protrusion Joining (UPJ) Method to Join Magnesium Castings to Dissimilar Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, Stephen [FCA US LLC, Auburn Hills, MI (United States)

    2016-02-24

    This presentation discusses advantages and best practices for incorporating magnesium in automotive component applications to achieve substantial mass reduction, as well as some of the key challenges with respect to joining, coating, and galvanic corrosion, before providing an introduction and status update of the U.S. Department of Energy and Department of Defense jointly sponsored Upset Protrusion Joining (UPJ) process development and evaluation project. This update includes sharing performance results of a benchmark evaluation of the self-pierce riveting (SPR) process for joining dissimilar magnesium (Mg) to aluminum (Al) materials in four unique coating configurations before introducing the UPJ concept and comparing performance results of the joints made with the UPJ process to those made with the SPR process. Key results presented include: The benchmark SPR process can produce good joints in the MgAM60B-Al 6013 joint configuration with minimal cracking in the Mg coupons if the rivet is inserted from the Mg side into the Al side; Numerous bare Mg to bare Al joints made with the SPR process separated after only 6-wks of accelerated corrosion testing due to fracture of the rivet as a result of hydrogen embrittlement; For the same joint configurations, UPJ demonstrated substantially higher pre-corrosion joint strengths and post-corrosion joint strengths, primarily because of the larger diameter protrusion compared to smaller SPR rivet diameter and reduced degradation due to accelerated corrosion exposure; As with the SPR process, numerous bare Mg to bare Al joints made with the UPJ process also separated after 6-wks of accelerated corrosion testing, but unlike the SPR experience, the UPJ joints experienced degradation of the boss and head because of galvanic corrosion of the Mg casting, not hydrogen embrittlement of the steel rivet; In the configuration where both the Mg and Al were pretreated with Alodine 5200 prior to joining and the complete assembly was powder

  12. Denture identification using individual national identification number of Saudi Arabia: An innovative inclusion method of casted metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Atul; Priya, M. S.; Kannan, S. Karthiga; Singh, Smita; Ahmed Shaikh, Saquib B.; Fadaleh, Mousa Abu

    2017-01-01

    Context: Forensic odontology is one of the branches of dentistry, which played a very important role in identification of individuals in accident, natural and mass disaster, and civil unrest and in genocide crimes. In the absence of natural teeth, marking or labeling of denture plays a vital role in the personal identification. Background: Various types of marking or labeling methods are reported. However, many are not according to the criteria put forth by American Dental Association or other professional association. Majority of these techniques may be time consuming and expansive, may not be standardized, long lasting and do not permit the incorporation of a large amount of information. Aim: The aim of this study is to find out a denture identification technique that should be easy, less expensive, long lasting, and standardized. Materials and Methods: This article illustrates an inclusion denture casted metal technique of the individual national identification number printed in the patient's residence number or iquama or national identity card issued by the ministry of interior, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is used as a denture marker in the lingual surface of mandibular denture. Results: The label in this method is durable and can withstand high temperature, less chances of deterioration, visible radiographically, and provide all important information about individual that is standardized, reliable, and also accessible from any remote location. Conclusion: Hence, the proposed technique is an easy, less expensive, long lasting, radiographically visible, and standardized method of identification. PMID:28584470

  13. Denture identification using individual national identification number of Saudi Arabia: An innovative inclusion method of casted metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Atul; Priya, M S; Kannan, S Karthiga; Singh, Smita; Ahmed Shaikh, Saquib B; Fadaleh, Mousa Abu

    2017-01-01

    Forensic odontology is one of the branches of dentistry, which played a very important role in identification of individuals in accident, natural and mass disaster, and civil unrest and in genocide crimes. In the absence of natural teeth, marking or labeling of denture plays a vital role in the personal identification. Various types of marking or labeling methods are reported. However, many are not according to the criteria put forth by American Dental Association or other professional association. Majority of these techniques may be time consuming and expansive, may not be standardized, long lasting and do not permit the incorporation of a large amount of information. The aim of this study is to find out a denture identification technique that should be easy, less expensive, long lasting, and standardized. This article illustrates an inclusion denture casted metal technique of the individual national identification number printed in the patient's residence number or iquama or national identity card issued by the ministry of interior, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is used as a denture marker in the lingual surface of mandibular denture. The label in this method is durable and can withstand high temperature, less chances of deterioration, visible radiographically, and provide all important information about individual that is standardized, reliable, and also accessible from any remote location. Hence, the proposed technique is an easy, less expensive, long lasting, radiographically visible, and standardized method of identification.

  14. Urinary casts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the urine; Fatty casts; Red blood cell casts; White blood cell casts Images ... Clinical Nephrology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 4. Gerber GS, Brendler CB. Evaluation ...

  15. Exposure vs toxicity levels of airborne quartz, metal and carbon particles in cast iron foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Beatrice; Viti, Cecilia; Cappelletti, David

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol dust samples and quartz raw materials from different working stations in foundry plants were characterized in order to assess the health risk in this working environment. Samples were analysed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy coupled with image analysis and microanalysis, and by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. In addition, the concentration and the solubility degree of Fe and other metals of potential health effect (Mn, Zn and Pb) in the bulk samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Overall, the results indicate substantial changes in quartz crystal structure and texture when passing from the raw material to the airborne dust, which include lattice defects, non-bridging oxygen hole centres and contamination of quartz grains by metal and/or graphite particles. All these aspects point towards the relevance of surface properties on reactivity. Exposure doses have been estimated based on surface area, and compared with threshold levels resulting from toxicology. The possible synergistic effects of concomitant exposure to inhalable magnetite, quartz and/or graphite particles in the same working environment have been properly remarked.

  16. NEW METHOD OF IMPROVING THE MACHINABILITY OF CAST STEEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The possibility of increasing cast steel machinability by introducing sodium sulfur compounds into the ladle containing melted steel immediately before casting the metal into an ingot is investigated.

  17. Correlation vs. Causation: The Effects of Ultrasonic Melt Treatment on Cast Metal Grain Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Ferguson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Interest in ultrasonic treatment of liquid metal has waxed and waned for nearly 80 years. A review of several experiments representative of ultrasonic cavitation treatment of Al and Mg alloys shows that the theoretical mechanisms thought to be responsible for grain refinement are (1 cavitation-induced increase in melting temperature predicted by the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and (2 cavitation-induced wetting of otherwise unwetted insoluble particles. Neither of these theoretical mechanisms can be directly confirmed by experiment, and though they remain speculative, the available literature generally assumes that one or the other or both mechanisms are active. However, grain size is known to depend on temperature of the liquid, temperature of the mold, and cooling rate of the entire system. From the reviewed experiments, it is difficult to isolate temperature and cooling rate effects on grain size from the theoretical effects. Ultrasonic treatments of Al-A356 were carried out to isolate such effects, and though it was found that ultrasound produced significant grain refinement, the treatments also significantly chilled the liquid and thereby reduced the pouring temperature. The grain sizes attained closely correlated with pouring temperature suggesting that ultrasonic grain refinement is predominantly a result of heat removal by the horn and ultrasonic stirring.

  18. [Clinical evaluation of residual crowns and roots restored by glass fiber post and core, cast metal post and core or directly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongxue; Shen, Lili; Liu, Kun; Su, Linwang

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the survival rate and complications of endodontically treated residual crowns and roots restored directly or by glass fiber post and core or cast metal post and core. In this study, 96 patients with a total of 142 teeth were selected. All the teeth were undergone root canal therapy. And then, according to different situations, some of them were restored with glass fiber post and core, another with cast metal post and core, the rest were restored directly in the strict controlled indications. The teeth (135) in 89 patients were divided into three groups. The first group contained 73 (54.1%) teeth restored with glass fiber post and composite resin core. The survival rate reached 97.3% in the average observation period of (5.7 +/- 1.9) years. The second group contained 40 teeth, restored with pure titanium casting post and core. The survival rate reached 87.5% in the average observation period of (6.2 +/- 2.2) years. The last group contained 22 teeth received no treatment. The survival rate reached 90.9% in the average observation period of (5.4 +/- 1.8) years. The success rate had no significant difference among the three groups. The most common complications after restored included root fracture (6.7%), retention loss (2.2%), secondary caries (1.5%) and periapical periodontitis (0.7%). Under the premise of high quality root canal treatment and standard restoration treatment, the abutment teeth, whether are restored by glass fiber post and core, cast metal post and core or without post, have a higher survival rate over 5 years of observation period and complications especially root fracture still should attract the necessary attention.

  19. Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Q.; Das, S.K. (Secat, Inc.)

    2008-02-15

    The project entitled 'Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Secat Inc. The three-year project was initially funded for the first year and was then canceled due to funding cuts at the DOE headquarters. The limited funds allowed the research team to visit industrial sites and investigate the status of using immersion heaters for aluminum melting applications. Primary concepts were proposed on the design of furnaces using immersion heaters for melting. The proposed project can continue if the funding agency resumes the funds to this research. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate integrated, retrofitable technologies for clean melting systems for aluminum in both the Metal Casting and integrated aluminum processing industries. The scope focused on immersion heating coupled with metal circulation systems that provide significant opportunity for energy savings as well as reduction of melt loss in the form of dross. The project aimed at the development and integration of technologies that would enable significant reduction in the energy consumption and environmental impacts of melting aluminum through substitution of immersion heating for the conventional radiant burner methods used in reverberatory furnaces. Specifically, the program would couple heater improvements with furnace modeling that would enable cost-effective retrofits to a range of existing furnace sizes, reducing the economic barrier to application.

  20. Laser cleaning in conservation of stone, metal, and painted artifacts: state of the art and new insights on the use of the Nd:YAG lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siano, S.; Agresti, J.; Cacciari, I.; Ciofini, D.; Mascalchi, M.; Osticioli, I.; Mencaglia, A. A.

    2012-02-01

    In the present work the application of laser cleaning in the conservation of cultural assets is reviewed and some further developments on the interpretation of the associated laser-material interaction regimes are reported. Both the state of the art and new insights mainly focus on systematic approaches addressed to the solution of representative cleaning problems, including stone and metal artifacts along with wall and easel paintings. The innovative part is entirely dedicated to the extension of the application perspective of the Nd:YAG lasers by exploiting the significant versatility provided by their different pulse durations. Besides extensively discussing the specific conservation and physical problems involved in stone and metal cleaning, a significant effort was also made to explore the application potential for wall and easel paintings. The study of the latter was confined to preliminary irradiation tests carried out on prepared samples. We characterized the ablation phenomenology, optical properties, and photomechanical generation associated with the irradiation of optically absorbing varnishes using pulse durations of 10 and 120 ns. Further results concern the nature of the well-known problem of the yellowish appearance in stone cleaning, removal of biological growths and graffiti from stones, cleaning of bronze and iron artifacts and related aspects of laser conversion of unstable minerals, removal of calcareous stratification from wall paintings, and other features.

  1. Pneumoconiosis and malignant mesothelioma in a family operated metal casting business that used industrial talc from New York state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Murray M

    2013-05-01

    The United States is second only to the People's Republic of China in annual talc production. U.S. talc is used in the production of ceramics, paint, paper, plastics, roofing, rubber, cosmetics, flooring, caulking, and agricultural applications. A number of U.S. talc deposits consistently contain talc intergrown with amphiboles such as tremolite and/or anthophyllite. It has long been recognized that miners and millers of talc deposits are at risk for pneumoconiosis and it has recently been reported that it is prudent, on the balance of probabilities, to conclude that dusts from New York State talc ores are capable of causing mesothelioma in exposed workers. This is a report of the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis and mesothelioma in a husband and wife who operated a small metal casting business that used industrial talc from New York as a parting agent. Case reports, including medical records and exposure histories, were provided by an attorney who had also commissioned laboratory investigation of the industrial talc product used in the factory. Mrs X was diagnosed with pneumoconiosis characterized by interstitial fibrosis and heavily calcified pleural plaques. Mr X had calcified pleural plaques and developed a fatal pleural mesothelioma. Samples of the industrial talc contained fibrous tremolite and anthophyllite. The author concludes that end users of industrial talc from New York State may be at risk of pneumoconiosis and malignant disease. End users of talcs from other regions of the United States, where talc formation arose from processes driven by regional metamorphism, might also be at risk. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Multi-layers castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented the possibility of making of multi-layers cast steel castings in result of connection of casting and welding coating technologies. First layer was composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy, which was put directly in founding process of cast carbon steel 200–450 with use of preparation of mould cavity method. Second layer were padding welds, which were put with use of TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas surfacing by welding technology with filler on Ni matrix, Ni and Co matrix with wolfram carbides WC and on the basis on Fe-Cr-C alloy, which has the same chemical composition with alloy, which was used for making of composite surface layer. Usability for industrial applications of surface layers of castings were estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Metal-ceramic Bond Strengths of Nickel Chromium and Cobalt Chromium Alloys on Repeated Castings: An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atluri, Kaleswara Rao; Vallabhaneni, Tapan Teja; Tadi, Durga Prasad; Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Tripuraneni, Sunil Chandra; Averneni, Premalatha

    2014-09-01

    Recasting the base metal alloys is done as a routine procedure in the dental laboratories whenever there is casting failure or to decrease the unit cost of a fixed partial denture. However, this procedure may affect the metal ceramic bond. Furthermore, it is unclear, as to which test closely predicts the bond strength of metal-ceramic interface. The aim was to compare the bond strength of nickel chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt chromium (Co-Cr) alloys with dental ceramic on repeated castings using shear bond test with a custom made apparatus. Sixty metal ceramic samples were prepared using Wiron 99 and Wirobond C, respectively. Three subgroups were prepared for each of the groups. The first subgroup was prepared by casting 100% fresh alloy. The second and third subgroups were prepared by adding 50% of fresh alloy and the remnants of the previous cast alloy. The bond load (N) between alloy and dental porcelain was evaluated using universal testing machine using a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min, which had a 2500-kgf load cell. Mean values were compared using oneway analysis of variance with post-hoc Tukey's test and Student's t-test. The mean shear bond load of A0 (842.10N) was significantly higher than the load of A1 (645.50N) and A2 (506.28N). The mean shear bond load of B0 (645.57N) was significantly higher than the load of B1 (457.35N) and B2 (389.30N). Significant reduction in the bond strength was observed with the addition of the first recast alloy (A1 and B1) compared with the addition of second recast alloy (A2 and B2). Ni-Cr alloys (664.63N) showed higher bond strengths compared to that of Co-Cr alloys (497.41N). The addition of previously used base metal dental alloy for fabricating metal ceramic restorations is not recommended.

  4. MOLDS FOR CASTING PLUTONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J.W.; Miley, F.; Pritchard, W.C.

    1962-02-27

    A coated mold for casting plutonium comprises a mold base portion of a material which remains solid and stable at temperatures as high as the pouring temperature of the metal to be cast and having a thin coating of the order of 0.005 inch thick on the interior thereof. The coating is composed of finely divided calcium fluoride having a particle size of about 149 microns. (AEC)

  5. Slip casting and extruding shapes of rhemium with metal oxide additives. Part 2: Development of grain stabilized rhenium parts for resistojets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Francis A.; Page, Russell J.

    1987-01-01

    The adaptation of the powdered particle process used for pure metal oxides to the coprocessing of rhenium oxides suitable to produce pure miniature resistojet hardware has been successful. Both slip casting and extrusion processes were used. The metal oxide ZrO2 was stabilized into the cubic phase with Y2O3, for use as a potentially grain stabilizing additive to rhenium. Straight meter long tubing in two sizes are reported. Tubing suitable for resistojet ohmic heater use of fully fired dimensions of nominally 3.8 mm o.d. x 2.2 mm i.d.. and 1.26 mm o.d. x .45 mm i.d. with 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0% zirconia additives were produced for further study. Photomicrographs of these are discussed. The addition of the metal oxide zirconia to rhenium resulted in more dense and less porous parts. The additions of phase stabilized zirconia most likely act as a sintering aid. Tubes of varying diameter were slip cast which were representative of miniature pressure cases.

  6. Elemental analyses of goundwater: demonstrated advantage of low-flow sampling and trace-metal clean techniques over standard techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasey, C. L.; Flegal, A. R.

    The combined use of both (1) low-flow purging and sampling and (2) trace-metal clean techniques provides more representative measurements of trace-element concentrations in groundwater than results derived with standard techniques. The use of low-flow purging and sampling provides relatively undisturbed groundwater samples that are more representative of in situ conditions, and the use of trace-element clean techniques limits the inadvertent introduction of contaminants during sampling, storage, and analysis. When these techniques are applied, resultant trace-element concentrations are likely to be markedly lower than results based on standard sampling techniques. In a comparison of data derived from contaminated and control groundwater wells at a site in California, USA, trace-element concentrations from this study were 2-1000 times lower than those determined by the conventional techniques used in sampling of the same wells prior to (5months) and subsequent to (1month) the collections for this study. Specifically, the cadmium and chromium concentrations derived using standard sampling techniques exceed the California Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL), whereas in this investigation concentrations of both of those elements are substantially below their MCLs. Consequently, the combined use of low-flow and trace-metal clean techniques may preclude erroneous reports of trace-element contamination in groundwater. Résumé L'utilisation simultanée de la purge et de l'échantillonnage à faible débit et des techniques sans traces de métaux permet d'obtenir des mesures de concentrations en éléments en traces dans les eaux souterraines plus représentatives que les résultats fournis par les techniques classiques. L'utilisation de la purge et de l'échantillonnage à faible débit donne des échantillons d'eau souterraine relativement peu perturbés qui sont plus représentatifs des conditions in situ, et le recours aux techniques sans éléments en traces limite l

  7. Fiber-Reinforced Slip Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blome, J. C.; Drennan, D. N.; Keeser, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    Addition of silica fibers greatly reduces shrinkage and cracking during casting of ceramics. Fiber-reinforced slip-cast silica ceramics are also tougher and have lower dielectric loss. Silica fibers are hyperpure material containing only 1 part per million total metal-ion impurities. Hyperpure fibers ensure high reflectance and allow casting to be fired at temperature greater than 2,200 degrees F without loss of strength from devitrification.

  8. Development and application of inverse heat transfer model between liquid metal and shot sleeve in high pressure die casting process under non-shooting condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-bo Yu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To predict the heat transfer behavior of A380 alloy in a shot sleeve, a numerical approach (inverse method is used and validated by high pressure die casting (HPDC experiment under non-shooting condition. The maximum difference between the measured and calculated temperature profiles is smaller than 3 ℃, which suggests that the inverse method can be used to predict the heat transfer behavior of alloys in a shot sleeve. Furthermore, the results indicate an increase in maximum interfacial heat flux density (qmax and heat transfer coefficient (hmax with an increase in sleeve filling ratio, especially at the pouring zone (S2 zone. In addition, the values of initial temperature (TIDS and maximum shot sleeve surface temperature (Tsimax at the two end zones (S2 and S10 are higher than those at the middle zone (S5. Moreover, in comparison with fluctuations in heat transfer coefficient (h with time at the two end zones (S2 and S10, 2.4-6.5 kW·m-2·K-1, 3.5-12.5 kW·m-2·K-1, respectively, more fluctuations are found at S5 zone, 2.1-14.7 kW·m-2·K-1. These differences could theoretically explain the formation of the three zones: smooth pouring zone, un-smooth middle zone and smooth zone, with different morphologies in the metal log under the non-shot casting condition. Finally, our calculations also reveal that the values of qmax and hmax cast at 680 ℃ are smaller than those cast at 660 ℃ and at 700 ℃.

  9. Reticular Chemistry and Metal-Organic Frameworks: Design and Synthesis of Functional Materials for Clean Energy Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal A.

    2017-06-01

    Gaining control over the assembly of crystalline solid-state materials has been significantly advanced through the field of reticular chemistry and metal organic frameworks (MOFs). MOFs have emerged as a unique modular class of porous materials amenable to a rational design with targeted properties for given applications. Several design approaches have been deployed to construct targeted functional MOFs, where desired structural and geometrical attributes are incorporated in preselected building units prior to the assembly process. This dissertation illustrates the merit of the molecular building block approach (MBB) for the rational construction and discovery of stable and highly porous MOFs, and their exploration as potential gas storage medium for sustainable and clean energy applications. Specifically, emphasis was placed on gaining insights into the structure-property relationships that impact the methane (CH4) storage in MOFs and its subsequent delivery. The foreseen gained understanding is essential for the design of new adsorbent materials or adjusting existing MOF platforms to encompass the desired features that subsequently afford meeting the challenging targets for methane storage in mobile and stationary applications.In this context, we report the successful use of the MBB approach for the design and deliberate construction of a series of novel isoreticular, highly porous and stable, aluminum based MOFs with the square-octahedral (soc) underlying net topology. From this platform, Al-soc-MOF-1, with more than 6000 m2/g apparent Langmuir specific surface area, exhibits outstanding gravimetric CH4 uptake (total and working capacities). It is shown experimentally, for the first time, that the Al-soc-MOF platform can address the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) challenging gravimetric and volumetric targets for the CH4 working capacity for on-board CH4 storage. Furthermore, Al-soc-MOF-1 exhibits the highest total gravimetric and volumetric uptake for carbon

  10. Status of metal contamination in surface waters of the coastal ocean off Los Angeles, California since the implementation of the Clean Water Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smail, Emily A; Webb, Eric A; Franks, Robert P; Bruland, Kenneth W; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A

    2012-04-17

    In order to establish the status of metal contamination in surface waters in the coastal ocean off Los Angeles, California, we determined their dissolved and particulate pools and compared them with levels reported in the 1970s prior the implementation of the Clean Water Act. These measurements revealed a significant reduction in particulate toxic metal concentrations in the last 33 years with decreases of ∼100-fold for Pb and ∼400-fold for Cu and Cd. Despite these reductions, the source of particulate metals appears to be primarily anthropogenic as enrichment factors were orders of magnitude above what is considered background crustal levels. Overall, dissolved trace metal concentrations in the Los Angeles coastal waters were remarkably low with values in the same range as those measured in a pristine coastal environment off Mexico's Baja California peninsula. In order to estimate the impact of metal contamination on regional phytoplankton, the internalization rate of trace metals in a locally isolated phytoplankton model organism (Synechococcus sp. CC9311) was also determined showing a rapid internalization (in the order of a few hours) for many trace metals (e.g., Ag, Cd, Cu, Pb) suggesting that those metals could potentially be incorporated into the local food webs.

  11. Design and Product Optimization for Cast Light Metals (USCAR/AMP): Final Report CRADA No. TC-1061-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Kenneth W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Osborne, Richard J. [General Motors Corporation, Warren, MI (United States); Cole, Gerald S. [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Cox, Bruce [Chrysler Corporation (DaimlerChrysler Corporation), Auburn Hills, MI (United States)

    2001-03-07

    The objective of the United States Automotive Partnership (USAMP) program was to develop information and technology for the U.S. automotive industry to optimize design and improve product capabilities for light weight, high strength, cast structural aluminum and magnesium components. Sandia National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory were also involved with this CRADA. This report covers only the work done by LLNL.

  12. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morakot Piemjai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred.

  13. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred.

  14. Plasma Cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center has developed two solvent-free precision cleaning techniques: plasma cleaning and supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2), that has equal performance, cost parity, and no environmental liability, as compared to existing solvent cleaning methods.

  15. Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley

    2004-03-15

    Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.

  16. Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Quarterly project status report, October 1--December 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

    1998-12-31

    The first series of experiments at the CMI-Tech Center was successfully conducted on October 14 and 15 with the participation of the University of Michigan team. The preliminary experimental results indicate that the die surface temperatures (or near the surface) have a close correlation with the metal pressure profiles. Considering the difference in timing of the peak die temperatures, the high melt temperature and hotter die temperature for Inter 54 might cause a longer solidification time, and the pressure would decrease more slowly than for Inter 12. The slopes of the metal pressure profiles at the low pressure setting are almost linear. This may mean that the low metal pressure couldn`t effectively keep a pressure channel opened. In other words, as temperature decreased, the solid fraction increased and the solidified shell strengthened, and the pressure, which couldn`t overcome the resistance, would drop linearly. However, at the high pressure, there are inflection points in the pressure profiles. The inflection points are at about 8,500 psi for both the low and the high melt temperature settings. This suggests that the metal pressure was sufficient enough to overcome the resistance of the solidified shell before the inflection point was reached. A preliminary microstructure analysis shows that the dendrite arms at the location near the gate are much coarser than that at the top of the casting. The influence of intensification pressure on microstructure needs further verification and study.

  17. Byproduct metal requirements for U.S. wind and solar photovoltaic electricity generation up to the year 2040 under various Clean Power Plan scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Nedal T.; Wilburn, David R.; Goonan, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    The United States has and will likely continue to obtain an increasing share of its electricity from solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind power, especially under the Clean Power Plan (CPP). The need for additional solar PV modules and wind turbines will, among other things, result in greater demand for a number of minor metals that are produced mainly or only as byproducts. In this analysis, the quantities of 11 byproduct metals (Ag, Cd, Te, In, Ga, Se, Ge, Nd, Pr, Dy, and Tb) required for wind turbines with rare-earth permanent magnets and four solar PV technologies are assessed through the year 2040. Three key uncertainties (electricity generation capacities, technology market shares, and material intensities) are varied to develop 42 scenarios for each byproduct metal. The results indicate that byproduct metal requirements vary significantly across technologies, scenarios, and over time. In certain scenarios, the requirements are projected to become a significant portion of current primary production. This is especially the case for Te, Ge, Dy, In, and Tb under the more aggressive scenarios of increasing market share and conservative material intensities. Te and Dy are, perhaps, of most concern given their substitution limitations. In certain years, the differences in byproduct metal requirements between the technology market share and material intensity scenarios are greater than those between the various CPP and No CPP scenarios. Cumulatively across years 2016–2040, the various CPP scenarios are estimated to require 15–43% more byproduct metals than the No CPP scenario depending on the specific byproduct metal and scenario. Increasing primary production via enhanced recovery rates of the byproduct metals during the beneficiation and enrichment operations, improving end-of-life recycling rates, and developing substitutes are important strategies that may help meet the increased demand for these byproduct metals.

  18. Developing technological process of obtaining giality casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Issagulov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the process of manufacturing castings using sand-resin forms and alloying furnace. Were the optimal technological parameters of manufacturing shell molds for the manufacture of castings of heating equipment. Using the same upon receipt of castings by casting in shell molds furnace alloying and deoxidation of the metal will provide consumers with quality products and have a positive impact on the economy in general engineering.

  19. Investigation of Elastic Deformation Mechanism in As-Cast and Annealed Eutectic and Hypoeutectic Zr–Cu–Al Metallic Glasses by Multiscale Strain Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Suzuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Elastic deformation behaviors of as-cast and annealed eutectic and hypoeutectic Zr–Cu–Al bulk metallic glasses (BMG were investigated on a basis of different strain-scales, determined by X-ray scattering and the strain gauge. The microscopic strains determined by Direct-space method and Reciprocal-space method were compared with the macroscopic strain measured by the strain gauge, and the difference in the deformation mechanism between eutectic and hypoeutectic Zr–Cu–Al BMGs was investigated by their correlation. The eutectic Zr50Cu40Al10 BMG obtains more homogeneous microstructure by free-volume annihilation after annealing, improving a resistance to deformation but degrading ductility because of a decrease in the volume fraction of weakly-bonded regions with relatively high mobility. On the other hand, the as-cast hypoeutectic Zr60Cu30Al10 BMG originally has homogeneous microstructure but loses its structural and elastic homogeneities because of nanocluster formation after annealing. Such structural changes by annealing might develop unique mechanical properties showing no degradations of ductility and toughness for the structural-relaxed hypoeutectic Zr60Cu30Al10 BMGs.

  20. Determination of vanadium in refractory metals, steel, cast iron, alloys and silicates by extraction of an NBPHA complex from a sulphuric-hydrofluoric acid medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, E M

    1970-07-01

    A method for determining up to 0.15% of vanadium in high-purity niobium and tantalum metals, cast iron, steel, non-ferrous alloys and silicates is described. The proposed method is based on the extraction of a red vanadium(V)-N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine complex into chloroform from a sulphuric-hydrofluoric acid medium containing excess of ammonium persulphate as oxidant. The molar absorptivity of the complex is 428 l.mole(-1).mm(-5) at 475 nm, the wavelength of maximum absorption. Interference from chromium(VI) and cerium(IV) is eliminated by reduction with iron(II). Common ions, including large amounts of titanium, zirconium, molybdenum and tungsten, do not interfere.

  1. Contact Pressure and Sliding Velocity Maps of the Friction, Wear and Emission from a Low-Metallic/Cast-Iron Disc Brake Contact Pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wahlström

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 µm (PM10 from car disc brakes contribute up to 50% of the total non-exhaust emissions from road transport in the EU. These emissions come from the wear of the pad and rotor contact surfaces. Yet few studies have reported contact pressures and offered sliding speed maps of the friction, wear, and particle emission performance of disc brake materials at a material level. Such maps are crucial to understanding material behaviour at different loads and can be used as input data to numerical simulations. A low-metallic pad and grey cast-iron rotor contact pair commonly used today in passenger car disc brakes was studied using a pin-on-disc tribometer at twelve contact pressure and sliding speed combinations. Maps of the coefficient of friction, specific wear rate, particle number, and mass rate are presented and discussed.

  2. Measurements of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in the lower reaches of major Eurasian arctic rivers using trace metal clean techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guay, Christopher K.H., E-mail: cguay@pmstllc.co [Pacific Marine Sciences and Technology, 3503 Lakeshore Avenue, Suite 5, Oakland, CA 94610 (United States); Zhulidov, Alexander V. [South Russian Regional Centre for Preparation and Implementation of International Projects (CPPI-S), 200/1 Stachki Av., No. 301, Rostov-on-Don 344090 (Russian Federation); Robarts, Richard D. [UNEP GEMS/Water Programme, c/o National Water Research Institute, National Hydrology Research Centre, 11 Innovation Blvd., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 3H5 (Canada); Zhulidov, Daniel A.; Gurtovaya, Tatiana Yu. [South Russian Regional Centre for Preparation and Implementation of International Projects (CPPI-S), 200/1 Stachki Av., No. 301, Rostov-on-Don 344090 (Russian Federation); Holmes, Robert M. [The Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, 7 MBL Street, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Headley, John V. [Aquatic Ecosystem Protection Research Branch, National Water Research Institute, National Hydrology Research Centre, 11 Innovation Blvd., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 3H5 (Canada)

    2010-02-15

    Concentrations of dissolved and particulate Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined in samples collected in summer 1998 from the lower reaches of six major Eurasian arctic rivers: the Onega, Severnaya Dvina, Mezen, Pechora, Ob and Yenisey. These data comprise some of the earliest measurements of trace metals in Eurasian arctic rivers above the estuaries using recognized clean techniques. Significant (alpha = 0.05) differences were observed among mean concentrations of particulate metals in the individual rivers (F <= 0.006), with highest levels overall observed in the Severnaya Dvina and Yenisey. No significant differences were observed among mean concentrations of dissolved metals in the individual rivers (F = 0.10-0.84). Contributions from anthropogenic sources are suggested by comparison of trace metal ratios in the samples to crustal abundances. These results establish a baseline for assessing future responses of Eurasian arctic river systems to climate-related environmental changes and shifting patterns of pollutant discharge. - We report some of the earliest reliable trace metal data for major Eurasian arctic rivers.

  3. IBA analysis of a laser cleaned archaeological metal object: The San Esteban de Gormaz cross (Soria-Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchiatti, A.; Gutiérrez Neira, P. C.; Climent-Font, A.; Escudero, C.; Barrera, M.

    2011-12-01

    The object under study, a 12th century gilded copper cross with a wooden core, now almost disappeared, shows the typical features produced by a long burial time: the entire surface of the copper alloys is covered by several layers of degradation products, which hinder the "legibility" of the cross in terms of the original materials and manufacturing techniques employed. In its cleaning several techniques have been applied and compared (dry and wet laser ablation, mechanical ablation, ultrasound brush). In the intermediate cleaning phase the cross has been extensively analysed with the external proton micro-beam of the Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales (CMAM) of the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. PIXE and RBS techniques have been used in parallel, to asses both the chemical composition and the layered structure of cleaned and original parts with the aim of verifying that none of the object structural features are being modified by the cleaning process leaving intact the possibility of artistic interpretation of the object (e.g. small series production of the cross elements). The recovery of this exceptional ornamental object is made possible by the coordinated work of several professionals coming from various disciplines and aimed at establishing the importance of this cross in terms of its physical appearance and in terms of the manufacturing techniques.

  4. IBA analysis of a laser cleaned archaeological metal object: The San Esteban de Gormaz cross (Soria-Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucchiatti, A., E-mail: alessandro.zucchiatti@uam.es [CMAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, c/Farady 3, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Gutierrez Neira, P.C., E-mail: carolina.gutierrez@uam.es [CMAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, c/Farady 3, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Climent-Font, A., E-mail: acf@uam.es [CMAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, c/Farady 3, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Escudero, C., E-mail: escremcr@jcyl.es [Centro de Conservacion y Restauracion de Bienes Culturales (CCRBC) de la Junta de Castilla y Leon, C/Carretera No. 2, 47130 Valladolid (Spain); Barrera, M., E-mail: barbarmr@jcyl.es [Centro de Conservacion y Restauracion de Bienes Culturales (CCRBC) de la Junta de Castilla y Leon, C/Carretera No. 2, 47130 Valladolid (Spain)

    2011-12-15

    The object under study, a 12th century gilded copper cross with a wooden core, now almost disappeared, shows the typical features produced by a long burial time: the entire surface of the copper alloys is covered by several layers of degradation products, which hinder the 'legibility' of the cross in terms of the original materials and manufacturing techniques employed. In its cleaning several techniques have been applied and compared (dry and wet laser ablation, mechanical ablation, ultrasound brush). In the intermediate cleaning phase the cross has been extensively analysed with the external proton micro-beam of the Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM) of the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid. PIXE and RBS techniques have been used in parallel, to asses both the chemical composition and the layered structure of cleaned and original parts with the aim of verifying that none of the object structural features are being modified by the cleaning process leaving intact the possibility of artistic interpretation of the object (e.g. small series production of the cross elements). The recovery of this exceptional ornamental object is made possible by the coordinated work of several professionals coming from various disciplines and aimed at establishing the importance of this cross in terms of its physical appearance and in terms of the manufacturing techniques.

  5. Experimental – Numerical Analysis of Stress State in Front of the Crack Tip of Modified and Unmodified G17CrMo5-5 Cast Steel by Rare Earth Metals in a Brittle-Ductile Transition Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzioba I.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper presented experimental data and numerical analysis of stress distribution in front of the crack of two melts of low-alloy G17CrMo5-5 cast steel-modified (M by rare earth metals and original, unmodified (UM in the temperature range, according to the brittle-ductile transition region. Experimental tests include determination of the tensile properties and fracture toughness characteristics for the UM and M cast steel. Numerical analysis includes determination of stress distribution in front of the crack at the initial moment of the crack extension. In the numerical computations, experimentally tested specimens SEN(B were modeled. The true stress-strain curves for the UM and M cast steel were used in the calculation. It was shown that the maximum of the opening stresses at the initial moment of the crack extension occurs in the axis of the specimens and reaches similar level of about 3.5σ0 for both UM and M cast steel. However, the length of the critical distance, measured for stress level equal 3σ0, is great for the M in comparison to the UM cast steel. Also was shown that the UM cast steel increased the level of the stress state triaxiality parameters that resulted in a decrease of fracture toughness.

  6. Development of a high-yield via-last through silicon via process using notchless silicon etching and wet cleaning of the first metal layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Naoya; Kikuchi, Hidekazu; Yanagisawa, Azusa; Shimamoto, Haruo; Kikuchi, Katsuya; Aoyagi, Masahiro; Nakamura, Akio

    2017-07-01

    A high-yield via-last through silicon via (TSV) process has been developed using notchless Si etching and wet cleaning of the first metal layer. In this process, the notching was suppressed by optimizing the deep Si etching conditions and wet cleaning was performed using an organic alkaline solution to remove reaction products generated by the etchback step on the first metal layer. By this process, a number of small TSVs (TSV diameter: 6 µm TSV depth: 22 µm number of TSVs: 20,000/chip) could be formed uniformly on an 8-in. wafer. The electrical characteristics of small TSVs formed by this via-last TSV process were investigated. The TSV resistance determined by four-terminal measurements was approximately 24 mΩ. The leakage current between the TSV and the Si substrate was 2.5 pA at 5 V. The TSV capacitance determined using an inductance-capacitance-resistance (LCR) meter was 54 fF, while the TSV yield determined from TSV chain measurements was high (83%) over an 8-in. wafer.

  7. Clean data

    CERN Document Server

    Squire, Megan

    2015-01-01

    If you are a data scientist of any level, beginners included, and interested in cleaning up your data, this is the book for you! Experience with Python or PHP is assumed, but no previous knowledge of data cleaning is needed.

  8. Biocompatibility effects of indirect exposure of base-metal dental casting alloys to a human-derived three-dimensional oral mucosal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Emma Louise; Moran, Gary P; Fleming, Garry J P

    2013-11-01

    The study employed a three-dimensional (3D) human-derived oral mucosal model to assess the biocompatibility of base-metal dental casting alloys ubiquitous in fixed prosthodontic and orthodontic dentistry. Oral mucosal models were generated using primary human oral keratinocyte and gingival fibroblast cells seeded onto human de-epidermidised dermal scaffolds. Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) base-metal alloy immersion solutions were exposed to oral mucosal models for increasing time periods (2-72h). Analysis methodologies (histology, viable cell counts, oxidative stress, cytokine expression and toxicity) were performed following exposure. Ni-based alloy immersion solutions elicited significantly decreased cell viability (P0.4755) or cellular toxicity (Pcasting alloys through discriminatory experimental parameters. Increasing incidences of Ni hypersensitivity in the general population warrants serious consideration from dental practitioners and patients alike where fixed prosthodontic/orthodontic dental treatments are the treatment modality involved. The novel and analytical oral mucosal model has the potential to significantly contribute to the advancement of reproducible dental medical device and dental material appraisals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Castings Airworthiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    coulec ci de meitre en cause i continuation de lutilisation d’un facteur de fonderie . a-i sssiiin fiiiale at Servi I e fiirum pour lcs tettants des...PAR LA REGLEMENTATION FRANCAISE POUR LES PIECES DE FONDERIE UTILISEES DANS LES AVIONS MILITAIRES par M.Robert 2 CASTING AIRWORTHINESS: JOINT EIROPEAN...FROM THEORY TO PRACTICAL APPLICATION by R.Genoux 5 EVALUATION OF TITANIUM CASTINGS FOR AEROSPACE COMPONENTS by G.Arsento 6 LE FACTEUR DE FONDERIE EN

  10. Hair casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweta S Parmar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hair casts or pseudonits are circumferential concretions,which cover the hair shaft in such a way that, it could be easily removed. They are thin, cylindrical, and elongated in length. We present an unusual case of an 8-year-old girl presenting with hair casts. Occurrence of these is unusual, and they may have varied associations. This patient was suffering from developmental delay. It is commonly misdiagnosed as and very important to differentiate from pediculosis capitis.

  11. Technological Aspects of Low-Alloyed Cast Steel Massive Casting Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szajnara J.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper authors have undertaken the attempt of explaining the causes of cracks net occurrence on a massive 3-ton cast steel casting with complex geometry. Material used for casting manufacturing was the low-alloyed cast steel with increased wear resistance modified with vanadium and titanium. The studies included the primary and secondary crystallization analysis with use of TDA and the qualitative and quantitative analysis of non-metallic inclusions.

  12. Sixty Years of Casting Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John

    2015-11-01

    The 60 years of solidification research since the publication of Chalmer's constitutional undercooling in 1953 has been a dramatic advance of understanding which has and continues to be an inspiration. In contrast, 60 years of casting research has seen mixed fortunes. One of its success stories relates to improvements in inoculation of gray irons, and another to the discovery of spheroidal graphite iron, although both of these can be classified as metallurgical rather than casting advances. It is suggested that true casting advances have dated from the author's lab in 1992 when a critical surface turbulence condition was defined for the first time. These last 20 years have seen the surface entrainment issues of castings developed to a sufficient sophistication to revolutionize the performance of light alloy and steel foundries. However, there is still a long way to go, with large sections of the steel and Ni-base casting industries still in denial that casting defects are important or even exist. The result has been that special ingots are still cast poorly, and shaped casting operations have suffered massive losses. For secondary melted and cast materials, electro-slag remelting has the potential to be much superior to expensive vacuum arc remelting, which has cost our aerospace and defense industries dearly over the years. This failure to address and upgrade our processing of liquid metals is a serious concern, since the principle entrainment defect, the bifilm, is seen as the principle initiator of cracks in metals; in general, bifilms are the Griffith cracks that initiate failures by cracking. A new generation of crack resistant metals and engineering structures can now be envisaged.

  13. Constant permeability of (Fe0.75B0.20Si0.05)96Nb4 bulk metallic glass prepared by B2O3 flux melting and Cu-mold casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitoh, T.; Shibata, D.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of B2O3 flux melting on the soft magnetic properties of (Fe0.75B0.20Si0.05)96Nb4 bulk metallic glass prepared by casting has been investigated. Ring-shaped bulk specimens that were prepared by B2O3 flux melting and Cu-mold casting (fluxed specimens) show a flat hysteresis curve, indicating a good linear relationship between the magnetic induction and the applied magnetic field. Although the permeability of the fluxed specimens is lower than that of the specimens prepared by conventional Cu-mold casting by one order of magnitude, their coercivities are almost same. These results show that it is possible to develop a new soft magnetic material that exhibits constant permeability with low core loss.

  14. Solidification and casting

    CERN Document Server

    Cantor, Brian

    2002-01-01

    INDUSTRIAL PERSPECTIVEDirect chillcasting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of steelsCastings in the automotive industryCast aluminium-silicon piston alloysMODELLING AND SIMULATIONModelling direct chill castingMold filling simulation of die castingThe ten casting rulesGrain selection in single crystal superalloy castingsDefects in aluminium shape castingPattern formation during solidificationPeritectic solidificationSTRUCTURE AND DEFECTSHetergeneous nucleation in aluminium alloysCo

  15. Research of linear contraction during continuous aluminum casting

    OpenAIRE

    Таран, Юрій Павлович

    2013-01-01

    Research works of plenty of scientists are dedicated to issues of continuous metals casting and rolling. Nevertheless there are no scientific papers, dealing with research of impact of continuous aluminum crystallization on the length of the casted billet and its velocity after casting.The speed process of continuous aluminum casting is characterized by an uneven heat exchange lengthwise the billet which is crystallized in the mould of the casting wheel in the temperatures range. It results i...

  16. Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Annual project status report for the period October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

    1998-09-30

    In the first year of this three-year project, substantial progress has been achieved. This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting is being conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigations of squeeze casting and semi-solid casting at CMI-Tech Center, and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive. U-M did an initial geometry which was defined for ProCAST to solve, and then a geometry half the size was defined and solved using the same boundary conditions. A conceptual mold geometry was examined and is represented as an axisymmetric element.Furthermore, the influences of the localized heat transfer coefficients on the casting process were carefully studied. The HTC Evaluator has been proposed and initially developed by the U-M team. The Reference and the Database Modules of the HTC Evaluator have been developed, and extensively tested. A series of technical barriers have been cited and potential solutions have been surveyed. At the CMI-Tech Center, the Kistler direct cavity pressure measurement system has been purchased and tested. The calibrations has been evaluated. The probe is capable of sensing a light finger pressure. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The first experiment is scheduled for October 14, 1998. The geometry of the experimental hockey-puck casting has been given to the U-M team for numerical analysis.

  17. Trichoderma harzianum Rifai 1295-22 mediates growth promotion of crack willow (Salix fragilis) saplings in both clean and metal-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P; De-Leij, F A A M; Lynch, J M

    2007-08-01

    We investigated if the plant growth promoting fungus Trichoderma harzianum Rifai 1295-22 (also known as "T22") could be used to enhance the establishment and growth of crack willow (Salix fragilis) in a soil containing no organic or metal pollutants and in a metal-contaminated soil by comparing this fungus with noninoculated controls and an ectomycorrhizal formulation commercially used to enhance the establishment of tree saplings. Crack willow saplings were grown in a temperature-controlled growth room over a period of 5 weeks' in a garden center topsoil and over 12 weeks in a soil which had been used for disposal of building materials and sewage sludge containing elevated levels of heavy metals including cadmium (30 mg kg(-1)), lead (350 mg kg(-1)), manganese (210 mg kg(-1)), nickel (210 mg kg(-1)), and zinc (1,100 mg kg(-1)). After 5 weeks' growth in clean soil, saplings grown with T. harzianum T22 produced shoots and roots that were 40% longer than those of the controls and shoots that were 20% longer than those of saplings grown with ectomycorrhiza (ECM). T. harzianum T22 saplings produced more than double the dry biomass of controls and more than 50% extra biomass than the ECM-treated saplings. After 12 weeks' growth, saplings grown with T. harzianum T22 in the metal-contaminated soil produced 39% more dry weight biomass and were 16% taller than the noninoculated controls. This is the first report of tree growth stimulation by application of Trichoderma to roots, and is especially important as willow is a major source of wood fuel in the quest for renewable energy. These results also suggest willow trees inoculated with T. harzianum T22 could be used to increase the rate of revegetation and phytostabilization of metal-contaminated sites, a property of the fungus never previously demonstrated.

  18. THE WEAR RESISTANCE INCREASE OF CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Ilyushenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the tests on the wear resistance of chromium cast irons of different compositions obtained in sand forms. It has been shown that increase of the wear resistance and mechanical properties of the cast iron is possible to obtain using the casting in metal molds. A further increase in wear resistance of parts produced in metal molds is possible by changing the technological parameters of casting and alloying by titanium.

  19. SCIP - Self-Cleaning Inert-Gas Brazing - a new process for brazing corrosion-resistant metals; SCIB - Self-Cleaning Inert-Gas Brazing - Ein neues Verfahren zum flussmittelfreien Hartloeten korrosionsbestaendiger Konstruktionswerkstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, F.W.; Moehwald, K. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde; Hollaender, U.; Roxlau, C. [Leipzig Univ. Hannover, Garbsen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    In flux-free inert gas furnace welding of corrosion-resistant metals, even very small water or oxygen impurities will dramatically reduce the quality of the brazed joint. A high-quality process atmosphere is ensured on the one hand by intelligent furnace design and on the other hand by the use of high-purity inert or reducing gases. The high quality demands on the process gases are an important cost factor especially in once-through furnaces. Further, gas purity with less than 1 ppm residual oxygen or water cannot be ensured so that inert gas welding of extremely oxidation-sensitive materials is not possible in principle. The contribution presents the new process of self-cleaning inert gas brazing (SCIB), in which conventional inert gases are doped with gaseous hydrides which cause direct and quantitative removal of all oxidizing impurities in the process gas already at room temperature. The concentration of residual oxygen and water in the inert gas is thus reduced to below the theoretical detection limit. The contribution describes the physical and chemical effective mechanism of the non-corrosive additives and presents experimental results with SCIB in flux-free brazing of sensitive construction materials in a conventional once-through inert gas furnace. (orig.)

  20. An Overview on Different Processing Parameters in Particulate Reinforced Metal Matrix Composite Fabricated by Stir Casting Process

    OpenAIRE

    Bagesh Bihari; Anil Kumar Singh

    2017-01-01

    In the past few years the global need for reduced weight, low cost, high wear resistance and good quality materials has caused a shift in research from monolithic to composite materials. Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have evoked a keen interest in recent times for potential applications in marine, aerospace and automotive industries owing to their superior strength to weight ratio and high temperature resistance. Driving force for the utilization of AMCs include performance, economic and env...

  1. Evaluation of the marginal fit of metal copings fabricated on three different marginal designs using conventional and accelerated casting techniques: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Sharad; Parkash, Hari; Bhargava, Akshay; Gupta, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    Abundant resources and techniques have been used for complete coverage crown fabrication. Conventional investing and casting procedures for phosphate-bonded investments require a 2- to 4-h procedure before completion. Accelerated casting techniques have been used, but may not result in castings with matching marginal accuracy. The study measured the marginal gap and determined the clinical acceptability of single cast copings invested in a phosphate-bonded investment with the use of conventional and accelerated methods. One hundred and twenty cast coping samples were fabricated using conventional and accelerated methods, with three finish lines: Chamfer, shoulder and shoulder with bevel. Sixty copings were prepared with each technique. Each coping was examined with a stereomicroscope at four predetermined sites and measurements of marginal gaps were documented for each. A master chart was prepared for all the data and was analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version. Evidence of marginal gap was then evaluated by t-test. Analysis of variance and Post-hoc analysis were used to compare two groups as well as to make comparisons between three subgroups . Measurements recorded showed no statistically significant difference between conventional and accelerated groups. Among the three marginal designs studied, shoulder with bevel showed the best marginal fit with conventional as well as accelerated casting techniques. Accelerated casting technique could be a vital alternative to the time-consuming conventional casting technique. The marginal fit between the two casting techniques showed no statistical difference.

  2. Discrepancy measurements of copings prepared by three casting methods and two different alloys, on ITI implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siadat H.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: An important criterion for success assessment of implant-supported prostheses is marginal fit. Vertical and horizontal discrepancy can result in loosening of the prosthetic screw, crestal bone resorption, peri-implantitis and loss of osseointegration. Despite careful attention to waxing, investing, and casting, marginal discrepancies are inevitable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal gap and overhang in three casting methods with two different alloys in ITI implants.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study 48 analog abutments were randomly divided into six groups as follows: 1 burn out cap + BegoStar, 2 impression cap + BegoStar, 3 conventional wax up + BegoStar, 4 burn out cap + Verabond2, 5 impression cap + Verabond2, 6 conventional wax up + Verabond2. Waxing was done in 0.7 mm thickness verified by a digital gauge and a putty index was made for all groups. Reamer was used for correction of the finish line after casting in all groups. Castings were seated on analog abutments and embedded in acrylic resin. Specimens were sectioned by isomet instrument and polished and cleaned by ultrasonic cleaner for 10 min. The marginal gap and overextended margins of castings were examined under a  Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM (X200. The mean gap and margin overextension were calculated for each group. Data were analyzed by multivariate analysis and Bonferroni post-hoc test with p<0.05 as the level of significance.Results: No significant difference in gap size was observed among the three casting methods with two alloys (P=0.056. The marginal gap was not different in the studied casting methods (P=0.092. Gold alloy crowns showed lower marginal gaps compared to base metal alloy crowns (P<0.001. No significant difference in overhang size was observed among casting methods with two alloys (P=0.093. Base metal alloy crowns showed less overhang compared to gold alloy crowns (P<0.001. There was a

  3. CASTING FURNACES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, R.H.; Winters, C.E.

    1961-01-01

    A device is described for casting uranium which comprises a crucible, a rotatable table holding a plurality of molds, and a shell around both the crucible and the table. The bottom of the crucible has an eccentrically arranged pouring hole aligned with one of the molds at a time. The shell can be connected with a vacuum.

  4. Clean Grain Boundary Found in C14/Body-Center-Cubic Multi-Phase Metal Hydride Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Hao-Ting Shen; Kwo-Hsiung Young; Tiejun Meng; Bendersky, Leonid A

    2016-01-01

    The grain boundaries of three Laves phase-related body-center-cubic (bcc) solid-solution, metal hydride (MH) alloys with different phase abundances were closely examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and more importantly, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques. By using EBSD, we were able to identify the alignment of the crystallographic orientations of the three major phases in the alloys (C14, bcc, and B2 structures). This finding...

  5. Efficacy of Chicken Litter and Wood Biochars and Their Activated Counterparts in Heavy Metal Clean up from Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel M. Lima

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It is known that properties of activated biochars are tightly associated with those of the original feedstock as well as pyrolysis and activation conditions. This study examined two feedstock types, pine wood shavings and chicken litter, to produce biochars at two different pyrolysis temperatures and subsequently activated by steam, acid or base. In order to measure activation efficiency, all materials were characterized for their properties and ability to remediate two well-known heavy metals of concern: copper and arsenic. Base activated biochars were superior in arsenic adsorption, to acid or steam activated samples, but increase in adsorption was not significant to warrant use. For wood biochars, significant increases of surface functionality as related to oxygen bearing groups and surface charge were observed upon acid activation which led to increased copper ion adsorption. However, oxygen bearing functionalities were not sufficient to explain why chicken litter biochars and steam activated biochars appeared to be significantly superior to wood shavings in positively charged metal ion adsorption. For chicken litter, functionality of respective biochars could be related to phosphate containing groups inherited from feedstock composition, favorably positioning this feedstock in metal ion remediation applications.

  6. Infiltração marginal de agentes cimentantes em coroas metálicas fundidas Marginal microleakage of cast metal crowns luting agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomie Nakakuki de CAMPOS

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Um dos principais objetivos do cimento, que fixa a restauração protética ao dente, é o selamento da fenda existente entre os mesmos. Para avaliar a infiltração marginal, foram feitos preparos cavitários padronizados, em 20 dentes naturais extraídos. As coroas totais foram fundidas em NiCr, sendo 10 cimentadas com cimento de fosfato de zinco e 10 com cimento resinoso Panavia 21. As amostras foram submetidas à ciclagem térmica e em seguida foram colocadas em solução de azul de metileno a 0,5%. Após o seccionamento vestíbulo-lingual, os corpos-de-prova foram examinados com lupa de aumento. Houve diferença significante entre os dois cimentos testados, sendo que 100% das amostras cimentadas com cimento de fosfato de zinco apresentaram infiltração atingindo dentina e polpa e 100% das amostras cimentadas com Panavia 21 não sofreram qualquer tipo de infiltração. Conclui-se que: o cimento resinoso Panavia 21 apresentou melhores resultados, quanto ao grau de infiltração, quando comparado com o cimento de fosfato de zinco, na cimentação de coroas metálicas fundidas em NiCr.One of the main goals of the luting agent, which bonds the cast restoration to the prepared tooth, is to seal the gap between them. Standardized preparations were made on 20 extracted teeth in order to evaluate microleakage. The crowns were made in NiCr, and in one group of 10 crowns zinc phosphate was used as the luting agent; in the other 10, Panavia 21 was used. The samples were thermocycled and then put into methylene blue solution (0.5%. After buccolingual sectioning of the cemented crowns, the samples were examined with a magnifier. There was a significant difference between the two groups: 100% of the zinc phosphate cemented crowns presented microleakage reaching the dentin and the pulp and 100% of the samples with Panavia 21 did not suffer any microleakage. So, as to the marginal microleakage with cast metal crowns in NiCr, the Panavia 21 luting agent

  7. Technological parameters of die casting and quality of casting from EN AC46500 alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Š. Gašpár

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Die casting represents the highest technological level of metal mold casting. This technology enables production of almost all final products without necessity of further processing. The important aspect of efficiency and production is a proper casting parameters setting. In the submitted paper following die casting parameters are analyzed: plunger pressing speed and pressure. The studied parameters most significantly affect a qualitative of castings from EN AC46500 alloy and they influence the most a gained porosity level as well as basic mechanical properties represented by permanent deformations.

  8. Geometric aspects of the casting process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahn, H.-K.

    2001-01-01

    Manufacturing is the process of converting raw materials into useful products. Among the most important manufacturing processes, casting is a commonly used manufacturing process for plastic and metal objects. The industrial casting process consists of two stages. First, liquid is filled into a

  9. Base-metal dental casting alloy biocompatibility assessment using a human-derived three-dimensional oral mucosal model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, E L

    2012-01-01

    Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys used in fixed prosthodontics have been associated with type IV Ni-induced hypersensitivity. We hypothesised that the full-thickness human-derived oral mucosa model employed for biocompatibility testing of base-metal dental alloys would provide insights into the mechanisms of Ni-induced toxicity. Primary oral keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts were seeded onto Alloderm™ and maintained until full thickness was achieved prior to Ni-Cr and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy disc exposure (2-72 h). Biocompatibility assessment involved histological analyses with cell viability measurements, oxidative stress responses, inflammatory cytokine expression and cellular toxicity analyses. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis determined elemental ion release levels. We detected adverse morphology with significant reductions in cell viability, significant increases in oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokine expression and cellular toxicity for the Ni-Cr alloy-treated oral mucosal models compared with untreated oral mucosal models, and adverse effects were increased for the Ni-Cr alloy that leached the most Ni. Co-Cr demonstrated significantly enhanced biocompatibility compared with Ni-Cr alloy-treated oral mucosal models. The human-derived full-thickness oral mucosal model discriminated between dental alloys and provided insights into the mechanisms of Ni-induced toxicity, highlighting potential clinical relevance.

  10. Studies of Gas Atmosphere Near the Metal-mould Interface During Casting and Solidification of Ductile Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mocek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In sand moulds, at a distance of 3 mm from the metal- mould interface, the sensors of temperature, and of oxygen and hydrogen content were installed. Temperature and the evolution of partial gas pressure have been analysed in moulds bonded with bentonite with or without the addition of seacoal, water glass or furan resin. Moulds were poured with ductile iron. For comparison, also tests with the grey iron have been executed. It was found that the gas atmosphere near the interface depends mainly on the content of a carbonaceous substance in the mould. In the green sand moulds with 5% of seacoal or bonded with furan resin, after the mould filling, a sudden increase in the hydrogen content and the drop of oxygen is observed. This gas evolution results from the oxidation of carbon and reduction of water vapour in the mould material, and also from the reduction of water vapour and alloy reoxidation. In carbon-free sand, the evolution in the gas composition is slower because water vapour is reduced only at the interface. Changes of oxygen and hydrogen content in the controlled zone are determined by the transport phenomena.

  11. Clean Grain Boundary Found in C14/Body-Center-Cubic Multi-Phase Metal Hydride Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Ting Shen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The grain boundaries of three Laves phase-related body-center-cubic (bcc solid-solution, metal hydride (MH alloys with different phase abundances were closely examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and more importantly, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD techniques. By using EBSD, we were able to identify the alignment of the crystallographic orientations of the three major phases in the alloys (C14, bcc, and B2 structures. This finding confirms the presence of crystallographically sharp interfaces between neighboring phases, which is a basic assumption for synergetic effects in a multi-phase MH system.

  12. Engineering Design and Testing of a Novel High-Resolution Trace-Metal Clean Sampler for Profiling and Long-term Deployment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, A. V.; Crusius, J.; Carlson, K.; Chapin, T. P.

    2016-02-01

    Design, assembly, and testing of a novel in-situ sampler for automated high-frequency trace-metal clean sampling at ocean moorings was undertaken with the goal of improving marine data density for iron (and other metals) by up to a factor of ten relative to existing samplers. Target characteristics are: modular, flexible use (profiling, static moorings, AUV-deployed), high capacity (100-200 samples), low power, low cost ($3k per 100-samples), ability to collect filtered + unfiltered samples, and simple assembly. Smaller sample volumes (10mL) are enabled by recent innovations in analysis techniques, while use of off-the-shelf components enables lower cost and faster development time, although attention must be taken to verify trace-metal cleanliness of materials in commercial products. Standard polypropylene syringes (tips with lock fittings) are adapted as sample chambers through fabrication of a dual (viton) o-ring replacement plunger to prevent barrel contamination between acid washing and sample collection. Syringes are mounted along a (pumped) sampling channel machined into a modular custom-designed 7.5in. HDPE ring; successive rings stack, fitted around the central 3 in. PVC pressure housing containing the pump, batteries, and temperature and pressure sensors. Optional filtering (0.45um) is easily added at the inlet to the pumped sampling line. Syringes, pre-filled with acid for sample preservation, are held "closed" using plastic zipties connected to the plunger pull; individual syringes are selected for filling by breaking a 0.003in. wire (e.g., stainless steel, gold-plated tungsten/rhenium) with a pulse of current or by melting the ziptie loop using a nichrome wire. Multiplexed addressing minimizes required microcontroller output pins and wires between the free-flooded collection chamber and the pressure housing. A novel, custom rotating inlet mounting scheme ensures that the pump tubing inlet remains positioned approximately 1m upstream of the sampler.

  13. Casting methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  14. CASTING APPARATUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-09-23

    An apparatus is described for casting small quantities of uranlum. It consists of a crucible having a hole in the bottom with a mold positioned below. A vertical rcd passes through the hole in the crucible and has at its upper end a piercing head adapted to break the oxide skin encasing a molten uranium body. An air tight cylinder surrounds the crucible and mold, and is arranged to be evacuated.

  15. Clean Diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clean Diesel Program offers DERA funding in the form of grants and rebates as well as other support for projects that protect human health and improve air quality by reducing harmful emissions from diesel engines.

  16. Pressure rig for repetitive casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Peter; Hutto, William R.; Philips, Albert R.

    1989-09-01

    The invention is a pressure rig for repetitive casting of metal. The pressure rig performs like a piston for feeding molten metal into a mold. Pressure is applied to an expandable rubber diaphragm which expands like a balloon to force the metal into the mold. A ceramic cavity which holds molten metal is lined with blanket-type insulating material, necessitating only a relining for subsequent use and eliminating the lengthy cavity preparation inherent in previous rigs. In addition, the expandable rubber diaphragm is protected by the insulating material thereby decreasing its vulnerability to heat damage. As a result of the improved design the life expectancy of the pressure rig contemplated by the present invention is more than doubled. Moreover, the improved heat protection has allowed the casting of brass and other alloys with higher melting temperatures than possible in the conventional pressure rigs.

  17. Comparative study on the tensile bond strength and marginal fit of complete veneer cast metal crowns using various luting agents: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Devi Parameswari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several commercially available luting agents are used to cement the dental restorations such as intra-coronal, extra-coronal, and fixed partial dentures. Tensile bond strength (TBS and accurate marginal fit are the essential factors to determine the good clinical results in fixed prosthesis. The retentivity of the luting cements is assessed by their adhesive capacity over the tooth surface and metal surface. Generally, the adhesive ability has been evaluated with in vitro testing, with tensile bond tests. The failure of fixed prosthesis may be happened as a result of incomplete seating during cementation. Most research on cementation of crowns relates seating failure to the thickness of the cement film. Materials and Methods: The study is divided into four groups with 10 samples for each of the luting cement taken up for testing TBS and four groups with 5 samples for each luting agent chosen for assessing marginal fit. The results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: In this in vitro study, the TBS of luting cements, and marginal fit in relation to luting cements were tested by using appropriate testing devices. The TBS of cement is measured using universal testing machine, and the results are tabulated. The marginal gap that exists between the margin of the cast metal crown, and the finish line is measured using travelling microscope before and after cementation. The difference between these two values gives the discrepancy that is due to the film thickness of cement used for luting the restoration. Summary and Conclusion: The TBS value of zinc phosphate cement and glass ionomer cement were found to be almost same. The chemical adhesiveness of the glass ionomer with calcium ions of enamel and dentin may be the attributed reason (ionic bonding. In this study, the polycarboxylate is the one that showed low TBS, and it may be attributed to the weakness of the cement due to reduced film thickness, though this cement has

  18. A comparison of two methods of removing zinc oxide-eugenol provisional cement residue from the internal surface of cast restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosharraf, Ramin; Soleimani, Bahram; Sanaee-Nasab, Mehdi

    2009-05-01

    Remnants of provisional cement on the internal surface of cast restorations can have an adverse effect on the performance of the definitive luting agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of eugenol-containing temporary cement removal by an ultrasonic or an organic solvent on the retentive strength of metallic rings cemented to amalgam cores using zinc phosphate cement. A total of 36 cylindrical amalgam cores measuring 5.9 x 6 mm were made by condensing amalgam in brass molds for use in this in vitro study. Thirty-six cylindrical spaces measuring 6 x 6 mm were machined in the center of cast rods of Rexillium III alloy to create simulated retainers. The amalgam cores were divided into two groups and provisionally cemented in these cylindrical spaces (retainers) using zinc oxide-eugenol cement. After separation of the cores from the retainers, one group was cleaned with an ultrasonic cleaning device with water and the other group was cleaned with Solitine organic solvent. All specimens were then cemented with zinc phosphate cement and the samples were stored at 100% humidity in a 37 degrees C water bath after which they were tested with a DARTEK testing machine at a 0.02 cm/minute cross head speed. The data were analyzed using the Independent t-test. The statistical analysis revealed a significant difference between the two groups (pcleaning the internal surface of cast restorations, the ultrasonic cleaning method is more effective for removing zinc-oxide temporary cement.

  19. Casting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Anil R [Xenia, OH; Dzugan, Robert [Cincinnati, OH; Harrington, Richard M [Cincinnati, OH; Neece, Faurice D [Lyndurst, OH; Singh, Nipendra P [Pepper Pike, OH

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  20. RESOURCES-ECONOMY TECHNOLOGY OF CASTINGS PRODUCTION OF NICKEL-CONTAINING CAST-IRONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Komarov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The technological process of the cast-iron IChH28H2 alloying by means of insertion into burden composition of briquettes of dead nickel-chromic catalysts is developed. This technology allows to carry out recycling of expensive metals such as nickel, and in that way to decrease the cost price of castings

  1. Internal fit of three-unit fixed dental prostheses produced by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing and the lost-wax metal casting technique assessed using the triple-scan protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Bjørn E; Dahl, Jon E; Rønold, Hans J

    2017-11-24

    Suboptimal adaptation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) can lead to technical and biological complications. It is unclear if the computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technique improves adaptation of FDPs compared with FDPs made using the lost-wax and metal casting technique. Three-unit FDPs were manufactured by CAD/CAM based on digital impression of a typodont model. The FDPs were made from one of five materials: pre-sintered zirconium dioxide; hot isostatic pressed zirconium dioxide; lithium disilicate glass-ceramic; milled cobalt-chromium; and laser-sintered cobalt-chromium. The FDPs made using the lost-wax and metal casting technique were used as reference. The fit of the FDPs was analysed using the triple-scan method. The fit was evaluated for both single abutments and three-unit FDPs. The average cement space varied between 50 μm and 300 μm. Insignificant differences in internal fit were observed between the CAD/CAM-manufactured FDPs, and none of the FPDs had cement spaces that were statistically significantly different from those of the reference FDP. For all FDPs, the cement space at a marginal band 0.5-1.0 mm from the preparation margin was less than 100 μm. The milled cobalt-chromium FDP had the closest fit. The cement space of FDPs produced using the CAD/CAM technique was similar to that of FDPs produced using the conventional lost-wax and metal casting technique. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  2. Development of casting investment preventing blackening of noble metal alloys Part 2. Application of developed investment for type 4 gold alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Akira; Kakuta, Kiyoshi; Goto, Shin-ichi; Kato, Katuma; Yara, Atushi; Ogura, Hideo

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the developed investment for the prevention of blackening of a cast Type 4 gold and to analyze the oxides on its surface in relation to the blackening of the alloy. The experimental investments were prepared using a gypsum-bonded investment in which boron (B) or aluminum (Al) was added as a reducing agent. A Type 4 gold alloy was cast into the mold made of the prepared investment. The effect of the additives was evaluated from the color difference (deltaE*) between the as-cast surface and the polished surface of the cast specimen. B and Al were effective to prevent the blackening of a Type 4 gold alloy and the color of the as-cast surface approached that of the polished surface with increasing B and Al content. The prevention of the blackening of the gold alloy can be achieved by restraining the formation of CuO.

  3. 40 CFR 464.20 - Applicability; description of the copper casting subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... copper casting subcategory. 464.20 Section 464.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS METAL MOLDING AND CASTING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Copper Casting Subcategory § 464.20 Applicability; description of the copper casting subcategory. The...

  4. 40 CFR 464.30 - Applicability; description of the ferrous casting subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ferrous casting subcategory. 464.30 Section 464.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS METAL MOLDING AND CASTING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Ferrous Casting Subcategory § 464.30 Applicability; description of the ferrous casting subcategory. The...

  5. 40 CFR 464.10 - Applicability; description of the aluminum casting subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... aluminum casting subcategory. 464.10 Section 464.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS METAL MOLDING AND CASTING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Casting Subcategory § 464.10 Applicability; description of the aluminum casting subcategory. The...

  6. 40 CFR 464.40 - Applicability; description of the zinc casting subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... casting subcategory. 464.40 Section 464.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS METAL MOLDING AND CASTING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zinc Casting Subcategory § 464.40 Applicability; description of the zinc casting subcategory. The provisions of this...

  7. Engineering design of centrifugal casting machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusnowo, Roni; Gunara, Sophiadi

    2017-06-01

    Centrifugal casting is a metal casting process in which metal liquid is poured into a rotating mold at a specific temperature. Given round will generate a centrifugal force that will affect the outcome of the casting. Casting method is suitable in the manufacture of the casting cylinder to obtain better results. This research was performed to design a prototype machine by using the concept of centrifugal casting. The design method was a step-by-step systematic approach in the process of thinking to achieve the desired goal of realizing the idea and build bridges between idea and the product. Design process was commenced by the conceptual design phase and followed by the embodiment design stage and detailed design stage. With an engineering design process based on the method developed by G. E. Dieter, draft prototype of centrifugal casting machine with dimension of 550×450×400 mm, ¼ HP motor power, pulley and belt mechanism, diameter of 120-150mm, simultaneously with the characteristics of simple casting product, easy manufacture and maintenance, and relatively inexpensive, was generated.

  8. Measurement of the dimensions and abutment rotational freedom of gold-machined 3i UCLA-type abutments in the as-received condition, after casting with a noble metal alloy and porcelain firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigolo, P; Majzoub, Z; Cordioli, G

    2000-11-01

    Laboratory processing of implant-supported prostheses may alter the surface of the abutment in contact with the implant head and thus the interface fit. This study assessed changes at the implant interface of gold-machined UCLA abutments after casting and porcelain baking in the case of single-tooth restorations. The depth (d) and width (w) of the hexagonal portion of the abutment, the apical diameter (D) of the abutment, and the abutment rotational freedom (R) were assessed for 30 gold-machined UCLA abutments before casting procedures (time 0), after casting with a noble metal alloy (time 1), and after the addition of porcelain (time 2) to detect any eventual fitting change in the abutments on the top of the implant hexagon. No significant differences relative to all study parameters (d, w, D, and R) were observed between times 0, 1, and 2 (P=.576). The results of this investigation suggest that, if all laboratory steps are observed carefully, changes at the implant interface of gold-machined UCLA abutments do not occur.

  9. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  10. Investigate the Possibility of Tekcast Methods Used for Casting Polymeric Resin Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mäsiar H.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Contribution gives an overview of knowledge about the method of centrifugal casting with orientate on Tekcast system. Company Tekcast Industries has developed a device for centrifugal casting, extending the area of production of castings or prototyping of metal or plastic. Materials suitable for the centrifugal casting with flexible operating parameters may include non-ferrous metal alloy based on zinc or aluminum or non-metallic materials such as polyester resins, polyurethane resins, epoxy resins, waxes and the like. The casting process is particularly suitable for a wide range of commercial castings and decorative objects.

  11. Effect of blow-holes on reliability of cast component

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cast component; blow-holes; reliability; univariate response surface approximation; failure probability. 1. Introduction. Metal casting process begins by creating a mold, which is the 'reverse' shape of the part that is needed. The mold is made from a refractory material like sand. The metal is heated in an oven until it melts, ...

  12. Pressure generation beneath a new thermoplastic cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, L R; Pedowitz, R A; Byrne, T P; Gershuni, D H

    1996-01-01

    A new cast immobilizer that is heat-shrunk to conform to an injured extremity was examined. The purpose of these studies was to compare pressures beneath the thermoplastic cast with those beneath fiberglass casts on a laboratory model and on the forearms of human volunteers. Pressures measured beneath fiberglass casts on metal cylinders averaged 36 mm Hg. Thermoplastic casts on the smaller cylinder that allowed 42% shrinkage produced a mean pressure of 25 mm Hg; those placed on the larger cylinder that allowed 17% shrinkage produced a mean pressure of 39 mm Hg. Pressures measured on the forearms of healthy volunteers averaged 22 mm Hg beneath fiberglass casts and 31 mm Hg beneath the thermoplastic casts. These pressures were considerably less than pressures that have been shown to occlude the microcirculation of the skin. Acute compartment syndromes result from swelling within a limited space and remain a serious concern clinically when swelling is anticipated under any type of constraining cast. The results of these studies indicate that the new cast should not produce a greater risk of circulatory compromise to the limb than previously used fiberglass materials.

  13. Influence of dust addition from cast iron production on bentonite sand mixture properties

    OpenAIRE

    P. Gengeľ; A. Pribulová

    2010-01-01

    In cast iron foundry operations like melting, casting, feetling, casts cleaning and grinding of a high amount of dusts are produced. Threekinds of dusts from different parts of cast iron foundry were analysed; chemical analyses, granulometric analyses and microscopic analyseswere carried out. The bentonite sand mixtures with different portion of dusts were prepared. Technological properties of prepared sandmixtures (compression strength, shearing strength and permeability) were measured.

  14. Influence of dust addition from cast iron production on bentonite sand mixture properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gengeľ

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In cast iron foundry operations like melting, casting, feetling, casts cleaning and grinding of a high amount of dusts are produced. Threekinds of dusts from different parts of cast iron foundry were analysed; chemical analyses, granulometric analyses and microscopic analyseswere carried out. The bentonite sand mixtures with different portion of dusts were prepared. Technological properties of prepared sandmixtures (compression strength, shearing strength and permeability were measured.

  15. The Effect of Casting Ring Liner Length and Prewetting on the Marginal Adaptation and Dimensional Accuracy of Full Crown Castings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Hamdi, Osama A; Al-Shahrani, Abdulaziz A; Alhasaniah, Sultan

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of varying cellulose casting ring liner length and its prewetting on the marginal adaptation and dimensional accuracy of full veneer metal castings. The master die was milled in stainless steel to fabricate the wax pattern. Sixty wax patterns were fabricated with a uniform thickness of 1.5 mm at an occlusal surface and 1 mm axial surface, cervical width at 13.5 mm, and 10 mm cuspal height. The samples were divided into six groups (n = 10). Groups I and II samples had the full-length cellulose prewet and dry ring liner, respectively. The groups III and IV had 2 mm short prewet and dry cellulose ring liner, respectively, whereas groups V and VI were invested in 6 mm short ring liner. The wax patterns were immediately invested in phosphate bonded investment, and casting procedure was completed with nickel-chrome alloy. The castings were cleaned and mean score of measurements at four reference points for marginal adaption, casting height, and cervical width was calculated. The marginal adaption was calculated with Imaje J software, whereas the casting height and cervical width was determined using a digital scale. The data was subjected to one-way analysis of varaince and Tukey post hoc statistical analysis with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 software. The group II had the best marginal adaption with a gap of 63.786 μm followed by group I (65.185 μm), group IV (87.740 μm), and group III (101.455 μm). A large marginal gap was observed in group V at 188.871 μm. Cuspal height was more accurate with group V (10.428 mm), group VI (10.421 mm), and group II (10.488 mm). The cervical width was approximately similar in group I, group III, and group V. Statistically significant difference was observed in Tukey post hoc analysis between group V and group VI with all the other groups with regards to marginal adaptation. The dry cellulose ring liners provided better marginal adaptation in comparison to prewet cellulose ring liners

  16. Clean cars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piffaretti, M.

    2008-07-01

    This well-illustrated presentation made at the Swiss 2008 research conference on traffic by the Protoscar company takes a look at research, design, engineering and communication topics in the area of 'clean cars'. The present situation with electrically driven and hybrid-drive cars is reviewed and the chances and problems of the present-day vehicles are examined. New developments and a number of vehicles that should be on the market in the period from 2012 to 2015 are presented. Also, 'clean' specialist vehicles such as trucks and buses are reviewed. Battery systems and associated problems and new developments are looked at. The promotion scheme in Mendrisio, Switzerland is reviewed. Bottom-up and top-down approaches are discussed and future market developments are looked at, as are promotional activities in various countries.

  17. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  18. Development of vacuum continuous casting technology for uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.S.; Kim, C. K.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, D. B.; Kim, J. D.; Jang, S. J.; Ahn, H. S.; Shin, Y. J

    2001-02-01

    The spent fuel disposal process of new dry storage concept has been developed in KAERI, in which the uranium metal abstracted by Li-reduction of spent fuel will be formed to long rods and then the rods will be arranged uniformly in canister. The objective of this study is to review the feasibility of applying the continuous casting method to cast a long rod with modifying the vacuum high-frequency induction furnace to vacuum continuous casting system, which was normally used to cast the uranium. The results are as follows. With the nozzle size of 3mm and the withdrawal speed of 3.5 mm/sec, the length of 160mm, diameter of 30 mm continuous casting uranium bar was successfully cast. This result shows there might be a possibility of continuous casting of uranium and helps the design and fabrication of new continuous casting equipment.

  19. Electrostatic precipitator for air cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertsson, P.; Eriksson, R.; Vlastos, A.

    1981-03-31

    An electrostatic precipitator is disclosed for air cleaning wherein the air passes through in two steps: first passing through a charging portion and next through a separation portion. The charging portion includes wires positioned parallel to and between parallel metal sheets, the wires having an electric potential other than that of the metal sheets. The separation portion includes plural parallel metal sheets, each of which has an electric potential other than that of adjacent metal sheets. The charging portion includes two or more wires between each pair of metal sheets, and the metal sheets of the charging portion extend through and constitute some of the metal sheets of the separation portion, between which are disposed addition metal sheets of an odd number.

  20. Reinforcing cast iron with composite insert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulska A.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a proprietary method of making composite cast iron (eutectic locally reinforced with ceramics. The research included making casts with a ceramic layer, its percentage of the surface was 30%. The research included abrasive wear resistance according to ASTM G 65-00. As a result of the research it has been found that the infiltration of the molten metal into the ceramic preform mainly affects the correct production of the cast with local reinforcement. The research results also have proven that the application of a lattice ceramic insert placed in the mould is the most appropriate option, due to the even distribution of the particles in the cast and obtaining a sound cast.

  1. Method of reducing the green density of a slip cast article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangels, John A. (Inventor); Dickie, Ray A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The method disclosed in this specification is one of reducing the green density of an article cast in a slip casting operation. The article is cast from a casting slip containing silicon metal particles, yttrium containing particles, and a small amount of a fluoride salt which is effective to suppress flocculation of the silicon metal particles by y.sup.+3 ions derived from the yttrium containing particles. The method is characterized by the following step. A small amount of compound which produces a cation which will partly flocculate the particles of silicon metal is added to the casting slip. The small amount of this compound is added so that when the casting slip is slip cast into a casting mold, the partly flocculated particles of silicon will interrupt an otherwise orderly packing of the particles of silicon and particles of yttrium. In this manner, the green density of the slip cast article is reduced and the article may be more easily nitrided.

  2. Summary of thermal properties for casting alloys and mold materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlke, R. D.; Jeyarajan, A.; Wada, H.

    1982-12-01

    A review of thermal properties of casting alloys and mold materials was conducted for the purpose of stimulating activity in computer aided design for castings. A summary of thermal data; thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, and heats of fusion was prepared for metals and casting alloys, and for primary molding materials. This summary represents an initial step in the development of data bases for support of computer aided design systems for castings. Additional information is required, in particular for thermal properties of commercial casting alloy systems.

  3. Effect of Mould Wall Thickness on Rate of Solidification of Centrifugal Casting

    OpenAIRE

    Madhusudhan; Narendranaath S; S, Mohankumar G C; Mukunda P G

    2010-01-01

    In Centrifugal Casting process the centrifugal force presses the metal against the inner wall of the metal mould, resulting in rapid solidification of the molten metal. However the solidification structures like structural uniformity and structural character of the solidified metal of centrifugal casting is of great importance, regarding to its mechanical properties. The solidification time of the casting is dependent upon the various parameters like speed ofrotation of the mold, mould wall t...

  4. Model castings with composite surface layer - application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of cast carbon steel 200–450, by put directly in foundingprocess a composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase inhardness and aberasive wear resistance of cast steel castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generallyapplied welding technology (surfacing by welding and thermal spraying. In range of studies was made cast steel test castings withcomposite surface layer, which usability for industrial applications was estimated by criterion of hardness and aberasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral and quality of joint cast steel – (Fe-Cr-C. Based on conducted studies a thesis, that composite surface layer arise from liquid state, was formulated. Moreover, possible is control of composite layer thickness and its hardness by suitable selection of parameters i.e. thickness of insert, pouring temperature and solidification modulus of casting. Possibility of technology application of composite surface layer in manufacture of cast steel slide bush for combined cutter loader is presented.

  5. Hot mold casting process of ancient East India and Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnali Mandal

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Ancient casting process for production of brass or bronze utensils and icons were made in hot molds using clay molded investment casting or piece mold process, as presumed by archaeologists. Piece mold process is still traditionally practiced in many parts of Eastern India and Bangladesh along with investment casting process. Incidentally, Bengal artisans are more accustomed to piece mold process unlike tribal artisans who practiced investment casting process. This piece mold casting process has been reconstructed to get the idea of metal characteristics in order to investigate ancient casting process of Bengal and Bangladesh. The characterization of ancient archaeo-metal products come to a type of cast Cu-Sn-Zn-Pb type quaternary alloy produced by a slow freezing process. Though these alloys physically differ from the traditional cast alloy of binary Cu-Zn type brass, the physical characteristics are similar to the binary cast alloy character. This investigation throws light on the similarity of the production processes by which ancient artisans probably produced cast metal products.

  6. Effects of the Exposure to Corrosive Salts on the Frictional Behavior of Gray Cast Iron and a Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Truhan, Jr., John J [ORNL; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of increasingly aggressive road-deicing chemicals has created significant and costly corrosion problems for the trucking industry. From a tribological perspective, corrosion of the sliding surfaces of brakes after exposure to road salts can create oxide scales on the surfaces that affect friction. This paper describes experiments on the effects of exposure to sodium chloride and magnesium chloride sprays on the transient frictional behavior of cast iron and a titanium-based composite sliding against a commercial brake lining material. Corrosion scales on cast iron initially act as abrasive third-bodies, then they become crushed, spread out, and behave as a solid lubricant. The composition and subsurface microstructures of the corrosion products on the cast iron were analyzed. Owing to its greater corrosion resistance, the titanium composite remained scale-free and its frictional response was markedly different. No corrosion scales were formed on the titanium composite after aggressive exposure to salts; however, a reduction in friction was still observed. Unlike the crystalline sodium chloride deposits that tended to remain dry, hygroscopic magnesium chloride deposits absorbed ambient moisture from the air, liquefied, and retained a persistent lubricating effect on the titanium surfaces.

  7. Numerical Modelling of Metal/Flux Interface in a Continuous Casting Mould / Modelowanie Numeryczne Powierzchni Międzyfazowej Metal/Ciekły Żużel W Krystalizatorze Do Ciągłego Odlewania Stali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jowsa J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of liquid slag in the mould is one of the key research areas of the continuous steel casting process. Numerical simulations of steel casting in the mould equipped with submerged entry nozzle, intended for slab casting, have been carried out within the study. For modelling the behaviour of the interfaces of the liquid steel - liquid slag - air system, the VOF method was employed. In the conducted simulations, seven different procedures for the discretization of the interface of individual phases were tested. The computation results have revealed that the “entrapment” of fine slag portions into liquid steel occurs in the system under investigation; the cause of this phenomenon is explicated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz theory.

  8. Segregation in cast products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    equiaxed transition ..... solute in a cast product, important ones being: size of casting, rate of solidification, mode of heat extraction ..... the segregated region. A principal breakthrough in quantitative evaluation of segregation distribution has come.

  9. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  10. Assessment of the influence of magnesium content on the shape and amount of graphite precipitation in spheroidal cast iron manufactured by Metal-Odlew s.c.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Orłowicz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the influence of time on cast iron spheroidisation, modification of the magnesium content in the alloy, and the influence of the magnesium content on the shape and number of graphite precipitations. For one particular set of production conditions, it was observed that 17 minutes after completing the modification and spheroidisation procedure, the magnesium content had decreased from 0.070% to 0.040%. This resulted in a decrease in the graphite precipitation shape index Ss from 0.081 to 0.067, as well as a decrease in the average number of graphite precipitations NA from 568 mm-2 to 305 mm-2.

  11. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water.

  12. Determining the Temperature Variation of the on the Wall of the Casting Mould during the casting of the Hadfield Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Marta

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper approaches the analysis of the metal temperature variation during the filling and solidification of steel in the casting mould. Furthermore we made determinations upon the heat transfer through the wall of the casting mould. The casting temperature, the casting speed and the heat transfer through the walls of the mould have a remarkable impact upon the shrinkage process for the prevention of casting defects (heat cavities and cracks. These cavities are also development cores for the heat cracks and the concentration of strains, which reduce the chemical, physical and mechanical properties of the cast parts. The shrinkage cavities represent one of the main defects of the cast product, and their reduction should be made up to the limits of technical possibilities.

  13. Calculation of a vacuum system of the installation for cleaning the surface of metal rolling by a cathode spot of a vacuum arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, V. G.; Kurbanov, T. A.; Kostrin, D. K.

    2017-07-01

    In this work are presented the installations for cleaning the surface of rolled products (wire and ribbon) from scale and technological lubricant with gateway systems of open type. The calculation of gateway devices and the optimal selection of pumping systems are shown.

  14. Metal polish poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal polishes are used to clean metals, including brass, copper, or silver. This article discusses the harmful effects from swallowing metal polish. This article is for information only. DO NOT use ...

  15. Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Quarterly project status report, January 1, 1998--March 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, Shouwei; Cookson, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    There have been numerous developments in the current project over the last three months. The most appropriate geometries for performing the interfacial heat transfer studies have been discussed with both of our Industrial Partners. Both companies have molds which may be available for adaptation to record the thermal history during casting required for determining interfacial heat transfer coefficients. The details of what instrumentation would be the most appropriate remain to be worked out, but the instrumentation would likely include thermocoupling in the mold cavity as well as in the mold wall, as well as pressure sensors in the squeeze casting geometry molds and ultrasonic gap monitoring in the low pressure and gravity fed permanent mold geometry molds. The first advisory committee meeting was held on February 6th, and the steering committee was apprised of the objectives of the program. The capabilities of the Industrial Partners were reviewed, as well as the need for the project to make use of resources from other CMC projects. The second full Advisory Committee Meeting will be held in early May.

  16. Development of casting investment preventing blackening of noble metal alloys part 3. Effect of reducing agent addition on the strength and expansion of the investments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yukun; Nakai, Akira; Ogura, Hideo

    2004-06-01

    Different reducing agents (B, Al, Si and Ti) were individually added to two gypsum-bonded investments to prepare investments preventing surface blackening of some noble cast alloys. The effect of different additive contents on green-body and burnout compressive strength, setting and thermal expansion of the investments were evaluated. The strength and expansion of the investments were changed by the additives. The compressive strength of Al-, Si- and Ti-added investments decreased with the increase of additive contents. The burnout strength of B-added investments significantly increased while green-body strength remained unchanged. The setting expansion of the B-added investments increased while those of the Al-, Si- and Ti-added investments decreased with the increase of additive contents. The thermal expansion of the Si- and Ti-added investments decreased, and that of the Al- and B-added investments remained unchanged. Further study is necessary to evaluate the effects of these additives on the accuracy of dental castings.

  17. Modelling the Cast Component Weight in Hot Chamber Die Casting using Combined Taguchi and Buckingham's π Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rupinder

    2017-03-01

    Hot chamber (HC) die casting process is one of the most widely used commercial processes for the casting of low temperature metals and alloys. This process gives near-net shape product with high dimensional accuracy. However in actual field environment the best settings of input parameters is often conflicting as the shape and size of the casting changes and one have to trade off among various output parameters like hardness, dimensional accuracy, casting defects, microstructure etc. So for online inspection of the cast components properties (without affecting the production line) the weight measurement has been established as one of the cost effective method (as the difference in weight of sound and unsound casting reflects the possible casting defects) in field environment. In the present work at first stage the effect of three input process parameters (namely: pressure at 2nd phase in HC die casting; metal pouring temperature and die opening time) has been studied for optimizing the cast component weight `W' as output parameter in form of macro model based upon Taguchi L9 OA. After this Buckingham's π approach has been applied on Taguchi based macro model for the development of micro model. This study highlights the Taguchi-Buckingham based combined approach as a case study (for conversion of macro model into micro model) by identification of optimum levels of input parameters (based on Taguchi approach) and development of mathematical model (based on Buckingham's π approach). Finally developed mathematical model can be used for predicting W in HC die casting process with more flexibility. The results of study highlights second degree polynomial equation for predicting cast component weight in HC die casting and suggest that pressure at 2nd stage is one of the most contributing factors for controlling the casting defect/weight of casting.

  18. Modelling the Cast Component Weight in Hot Chamber Die Casting using Combined Taguchi and Buckingham's π Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rupinder

    2018-02-01

    Hot chamber (HC) die casting process is one of the most widely used commercial processes for the casting of low temperature metals and alloys. This process gives near-net shape product with high dimensional accuracy. However in actual field environment the best settings of input parameters is often conflicting as the shape and size of the casting changes and one have to trade off among various output parameters like hardness, dimensional accuracy, casting defects, microstructure etc. So for online inspection of the cast components properties (without affecting the production line) the weight measurement has been established as one of the cost effective method (as the difference in weight of sound and unsound casting reflects the possible casting defects) in field environment. In the present work at first stage the effect of three input process parameters (namely: pressure at 2nd phase in HC die casting; metal pouring temperature and die opening time) has been studied for optimizing the cast component weight `W' as output parameter in form of macro model based upon Taguchi L9 OA. After this Buckingham's π approach has been applied on Taguchi based macro model for the development of micro model. This study highlights the Taguchi-Buckingham based combined approach as a case study (for conversion of macro model into micro model) by identification of optimum levels of input parameters (based on Taguchi approach) and development of mathematical model (based on Buckingham's π approach). Finally developed mathematical model can be used for predicting W in HC die casting process with more flexibility. The results of study highlights second degree polynomial equation for predicting cast component weight in HC die casting and suggest that pressure at 2nd stage is one of the most contributing factors for controlling the casting defect/weight of casting.

  19. Fluidized-Bed Cleaning of Silicon Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, Naresh K.; Hsu, George C.

    1987-01-01

    Fluidized-bed chemical cleaning process developed to remove metallic impurities from small silicon particles. Particles (250 micrometer in size) utilized as seed material in silane pyrolysis process for production of 1-mm-size silicon. Product silicon (1 mm in size) used as raw material for fabrication of solar cells and other semiconductor devices. Principal cleaning step is wash in mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acids, leaching out metals and carrying them away as soluble chlorides. Particles fluidized by cleaning solution to assure good mixing and uniform wetting.

  20. Evaluation of solid–liquid interface profile during continuous casting ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 24; Issue 4. Evaluation of solid–liquid interface profile during continuous casting by a spline based formalism. S K Das. Metals and Alloys Volume ... Keywords. Continuous casting; solidification; solid–liquid interface; front tracking algorithm; phase change; heat transfer.

  1. The history and present of art casting in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derui Tan

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available History of art casting in China has been over 5000 years. In the past few thousand years, numerous forming and decorating skills of art castings has been created, and left behind precious treasures in the world metal arts and crafts. In individual historical period and at different terrain, a unique artistic style formed, which flashed brilliant light in world artistic treasury.

  2. Recycle of radioactive scrap metal from the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (K-25 Site)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meehan, R.W. [DOE-Oak Ridge Operations Office, TN (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The scale of the metal available for reuse at the plant includes 22 million pounds of Ni, 17 million pounds of Al, 47 million pounds of copper, and 835 million pounds of steels. In addition there is a wide range of industrial equipment and other items of value. The author describes small bench scale and pilot plant scale efforts made at treating metal for decontamination and fabrication into cast stock or specialized containers for reuse within the DOE complex or release. These projects show that much of the material can be cleaned or chemically decontaminated to a level where it can be free released to various markets. Of the remaining metals, much of it can be cast into products which can be absorbed within the DOE complex.

  3. Casting materials and their application in research and teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenssgen, Kati; Makanya, Andrew N; Djonov, Valentin

    2014-04-01

    From a biological point of view, casting refers to filling of anatomical and/or pathological spaces with extraneous material that reproduces a three-dimensional replica of the space. Casting may be accompanied by additional procedures such as corrosion, in which the soft tissue is digested out, leaving a clean cast, or the material may be mixed with radiopaque substances to allow x-ray photography or micro computed topography (µCT) scanning. Alternatively, clearing of the surrounding soft tissue increases transparency and allows visualization of the casted cavities. Combination of casting with tissue fixation allows anatomical dissection and didactic surgical procedures on the tissue. Casting materials fall into three categories namely, aqueous substances (India ink, Prussian blue ink), pliable materials (gelatins, latex, and silicone rubber), or hard materials (methyl methacrylates, polyurethanes, polyesters, and epoxy resins). Casting has proved invaluable in both teaching and research and many phenomenal biological processes have been discovered through casting. The choice of a particular material depends inter alia on the targeted use and the intended subsequent investigative procedures, such as dissection, microscopy, or µCT. The casting material needs to be pliable where anatomical and surgical manipulations are intended, and capillary-passable for ultrastructural investigations.

  4. Ultrasonic cleaning of depleted uranium material as an alternative to nitric acid cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frye, L.E.; Senviel, C.B.

    1991-05-28

    Nitric acid is used to clean depleted uranium in the form of cast billets, and cast and wrought parts in the processing cycle and is the largest contributor of waste to the West End Treatment Facility (WETF). An estimated 27,000 gallons of liquid and 75 to 95% of all uranium received was sent to the WETF for processing from this facility in our baseline year. Because wrought parts account for the largest throughput at the nitric acid facility, an alternative cleaning method for these parts was examined first. Test results on the first part type from the wrought family showed ultrasonic cleaning to be an effective cleaning method. Since the geometry for this part presented the most difficulty in terms of ultrasonic cleaning, the entire wrought family is expected to be moved from the nitric acid facility to the ultrasonic cleaning facility. As a result, there will be an 83% reduction part throughput at the nitric acid facility which corresponds to a significant decrease in wastes sent to the WETF and a reduction in the generation and associated costs of waste overall. This change also eliminated two building moves involving two RAD areas resulting in a part movement reduction of approximately 25% which is a significant cost savings.

  5. Rudimentary Cleaning Compared to Level 300A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpin, Christina Y. Pina; Stoltzfus, Joel

    2012-01-01

    A study was done to characterize the cleanliness level achievable when using a rudimentary cleaning process, and results were compared to JPR 5322.1G Level 300A. While it is not ideal to clean in a shop environment, some situations (e.g., field combat operations) require oxygen system hardware to be maintained and cleaned to prevent a fire hazard, even though it cannot be sent back to a precision cleaning facility. This study measured the effectiveness of basic shop cleaning. Initially, three items representing parts of an oxygen system were contaminated: a metal plate, valve body, and metal oxygen bottle. The contaminants chosen were those most likely to be introduced to the system during normal use: oil, lubricant, metal shavings/powder, sand, fingerprints, tape, lip balm, and hand lotion. The cleaning process used hot water, soap, various brushes, gaseous nitrogen, water nozzle, plastic trays, scouring pads, and a controlled shop environment. Test subjects were classified into three groups: technical professionals having an appreciation for oxygen hazards; professional precision cleaners; and a group with no previous professional knowledge of oxygen or precision cleaning. Three test subjects were in each group, and each was provided with standard cleaning equipment, a cleaning procedure, and one of each of the three test items to clean. The results indicated that the achievable cleanliness level was independent of the technical knowledge or proficiency of the personnel cleaning the items. Results also showed that achieving a Level 300 particle count was more difficult than achieving a Level A nonvolatile residue amount.

  6. Controlled Precipitation Gaseous Cavities in Aluminium Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roučka J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At thermal junctions of aluminium alloy castings and at points where risering proves to be difficult there appear internal or external shrinkages, which are both functionally and aesthetically inadmissible. Applying the Probat Fluss Mikro 100 agent, which is based on nano-oxides of aluminium, results in the appearance of a large amount of fine microscopic pores, which compensate for the shrinking of metal. Experimental tests with gravity die casting of AlSi8Cu3 and AlSi10Mg alloys have confirmed that the effect of the agent can be of advantage in foundry practice, leading to the production of castings without local concentrations of defects and without the appearance of shrinkages and macroscopic gas pores. Also, beneficial effect on the mechanical properties of the metal has been observed.

  7. Glovebox Advanced Casting System Casting Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Casting optimization in the GACS included three broad areas; casting of U-10Zr pins, incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier, and development of a permanent crucible coating. U-10Zr casting was improved over last year’s results by modifying the crucible design to minimize contact with the colder mold. Through these modifications casting of a three pin batch was successful. Incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier also was optimized through furnace chamber pressure changes during the casting cycle to reduce gas pressures in the mold cavities which led to three full length pins being cast which incorporated FCCI barriers of three different thicknesses. Permanent crucible coatings were tested against a base case; 1500°C for 10 minutes in a U-20Pu-10Zr molten alloy. None of the candidate coating materials showed evidence of failure upon initial visual examination. In all areas of work a large amount of characterization will be needed to fully determine the effects of the optimization activities. The characterization activities and future work will occur next year.

  8. Branchial cadmium and copper binding and intestinal cadmium uptake in wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from clean and metal-contaminated lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinck, J S; Green, W W; Mirza, R S; Nadella, S R; Chowdhury, M J; Wood, C M; Pyle, G G

    2007-08-30

    Branchial binding kinetics and gastro-intestinal uptake of copper and cadmium where examined in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from a metal-contaminated lake (Hannah Lake, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada) and an uncontaminated lake (James Lake, North Bay, Ontario, Canada). An in vivo approach was taken for gill binding comparisons while an in vitro gut binding assay was employed for gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) uptake analysis. By investigating metal uptake at the gill and the gut we cover the two main routes of metal entry into fish. Comparisons of water and sediment chemistries, metal burdens in benthic invertebrate, and metal burdens in the livers of perch from the two study lakes clearly show that yellow perch from Hannah L. are chronically exposed to a highly metal-contaminated environment compared to a reference lake. We found that metal-contaminated yellow perch showed no significant difference in gill Cd binding compared to reference fish, but they did show significant decreases in new Cd binding and absorption in their GITs. The results show that gill Cd binding may involve low-capacity, high-affinity binding sites, while gastro-intestinal Cd uptake involves binding sites that are high-capacity, low-affinity. From this we infer that Cd may be more critically controlled at the gut rather than gills. Significant differences in branchial Cu binding (increased binding) were observed in metal-contaminated yellow perch. We suggest that chronic waterborne exposure to Cu (and/or other metals) may be the dominant influence in gill Cu binding rather than chronic exposure to high Cu diets. We give supporting evidence that Cd is taken up in the GIT, at least in part, by a similar pathway as Ca(2+), principally that elevated dietary Ca(2+) reduces Cd binding and uptake. Overall our study reveals that metal pre-exposure via water and diet can alter uptake kinetics of Cu and Cd at the gill and/or the gut.

  9. Microstructure of high-pressure die-casting AM50 magnesium alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Dabrowski, R.; K.N. Braszczynska -Malik; Braszczynski, J.

    2009-01-01

    Microstructure analyses of high-pressure die-casting AM50 magnesium alloy are presented. Investigated pressure casting wasproduced on a cold chamber die-casting machine with locking force at 1100 tones in “FINNVEDEN Metal Structures”. Light microscopyand X-ray phase analysis techniques were used to characterize the obtained material. In microstructure, an

  10. Microstructure of high-pressure die-casting AM50 magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dabrowski

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure analyses of high-pressure die-casting AM50 magnesium alloy are presented. Investigated pressure casting wasproduced on a cold chamber die-casting machine with locking force at 1100 tones in “FINNVEDEN Metal Structures”. Light microscopyand X-ray phase analysis techniques were used to characterize the obtained material. In microstructure, an

  11. 46 CFR 56.60-10 - Cast iron and malleable iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cast iron and malleable iron. 56.60-10 Section 56.60-10... APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-10 Cast iron and malleable iron. (a) The low ductility of cast iron and malleable iron should be recognized and the use of these metals where shock loading may occur should be...

  12. Squeeze Casting of Steel Weapon Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-09-01

    is not washed into the casting when the molten metal is poured into the die or mold. As can be expected, the mold coatings have refractory ...melted in an alumina liner which is fixed inside the coil using refractory plaster. The alumina liner is a closed bottom tube approximately 9 in. long...of molten metal from the furnace to the die. In fact, if this transfer can be achieved without any manual handling by means of a transfer ladle

  13. SEGREGATION OF SOLUTE ELEMENTS IN CRUCIBLE DURING DIE CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keun Yong Sohn

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the segregation of solute elements in magnesium alloys AZ91D and AM60B in a crucible during hot-chamber die casting process has been investigated. The sampling of molten metal for chemical composition analysis was carried out at three positions within a crucible of 600 mm in depth. The picked molten metal was poured into a steel mold to cast into a rod 40mm diameter and 120mm length.

  14. Effect of Casting Material on the Cast Pressure After Sequential Cast Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Aaron; Shaw, K Aaron; Boomsma, Shawn E; Cameron, Craig D

    2017-01-01

    Circumferential casting is a vital component of nonoperative fracture management. These casts are commonly valved to release pressure and decrease the risk of complications from swelling. However, little information exists regarding the effect of different casting supplies on the pressure within the cast. Seventy-five long-arm casts were performed on human volunteers, divided between 5 experimental groups with 15 casts in each groups. Testing groups consisted of 2 groups with a plaster short-arm cast overwrapped with fiberglass to a long arm with either cotton or synthetic cast padding. The 3 remaining groups included fiberglass long-arm casts with cotton, synthetic, or waterproof cast padding. A pediatric blood pressure cuff bladder was placed within the cast and inflated to 100 mm Hg. After inflation, the cast was sequentially released with pressure reading preformed after each stage. Order of release consisted of cast bivalve, cast padding release, and cotton stockinet release. After release, the cast was overwrapped with a loose elastic bandage. Difference in pressure readings were compared based upon the cast material. Pressures within the cast were found to decrease with sequential release of cast. The cast type had no effect of change in pressure. Post hoc testing demonstrated that the type of cast padding significantly affected the cast pressures with waterproof padding demonstrating the highest pressure readings at all time-points in the study, followed by synthetic padding. Cotton padding had the lowest pressure readings at all time-points. Type of cast padding significantly influences the amount of pressure within a long-arm cast, even after bivalving the cast and cutting the cast padding. Cotton cast padding allows for the greatest change in pressure. Cotton padding demonstrates the greatest change in pressure within a long-arm cast after undergoing bivalve. Synthetic and waterproof cast padding should not be used in the setting of an acute fracture to

  15. Microdefects in cast multicrystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, E.; Klinger, D.; Bergmann, S. [Inst. of Crystal Growth Berlin (Germany)

    1995-08-01

    The microdefect etching behavior of cast multicrystalline BAYSIX and SILSO samples is mainly the same as that of EFG silicon, in spite of the very different growth parameters applied to these two techniques and the different carbon contents of the investigated materials. Intentional decorating of mc silicon with copper, iron and gold did not influence the results of etching and with help of infrared transmission microscopy no metal precipitates at the assumed microdefects could be established. There are many open questions concerning the origin of the assumed, not yet doubtless proved microdefects.

  16. SLIP CASTING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, A.G.

    1959-09-01

    S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

  17. Casting in Sport

    OpenAIRE

    DeCarlo, Mark; Malone, Kathy; Darmelio, John; Rettig, Arthur

    1994-01-01

    Attempts by sports medicine professionals to return high school athletes with hand and wrist injuries to competition quickly and safely have been the source of confusion and debate on many playing fields around the country. In addition to the differing views regarding the appropriateness of playing cast usage in high school football, a debate exists among sports medicine professionals as to which material is best suited for playing cast construction. Materials used in playing cast constructio...

  18. Cavitation effects in ultrasonic cleaning baths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasscock, Barbara H.

    1995-01-01

    In this project, the effect of cavitation from aqueous ultrasonic cleaning on the surfaces of metal and non-metal sample coupons was studied. After twenty cleaning cycles, the mass loss from the aluminum coupons averaged 0.22 mg/sq cm surface area and 0.014 mg/sq cm for both stainless steel and titanium. The aluminum coupons showed visual evidence of minor cavitation erosion in regions of previously existing surface irregularities. The non-metal samples showed some periods of mass gain. These effects are believed to have minor impact on hardware being cleaned, but should be evaluated in the context of specific hardware requirements. Also the ultrasonic activity in the large cleaning baths was found to be unevenly distributed as measured by damage to sheets of aluminum foil. It is therefore recommended that items being cleaned in an ultrasonic bath be moved or conveyed during the cleaning to more evenly distribute the cavitation action provide more uniform cleaning.

  19. Ultrasonic Inspection Techniques Possibilities for Centrifugal Cast Copper Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konar R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with ultrasonic testing possibilities of the copper alloy centrifugal casts. It focused on the problems that arise when testing of castings is made of non-ferrous materials. Most common types of casting defects is dedicated in theoretical introduction of article. Ultrasonic testing technique by conventional ultrasound system is described in the theoretical part too. Practical ultrasonic testing of centrifugal copper alloy cast - brass is in experimental part. The experimental sample was part of centrifugally cast brass ring with dimensions of Ø1200x34 mm. The influence of microstructure on ultrasonic attenuation and limitations in testing due to attenuation is describes in experimental part. Conventional direct single element contact ultrasound probe with frequencies of 5 MHz, 3.5 MHz and 2 MHz were used for all experimental measurements. The results of experimental part of article are recommendations for selecting equipment and accessories for casting testing made of non-ferrous metals.

  20. Battery Technology Stores Clean Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Headquartered in Fremont, California, Deeya Energy Inc. is now bringing its flow batteries to commercial customers around the world after working with former Marshall Space Flight Center scientist, Lawrence Thaller. Deeya's liquid-cell batteries have higher power capability than Thaller's original design, are less expensive than lead-acid batteries, are a clean energy alternative, and are 10 to 20 times less expensive than nickel-metal hydride batteries, lithium-ion batteries, and fuel cell options.

  1. A randomized controlled trial comparing interim acrylic prostheses with and without cast metal base for immediate loading of dental implants in the edentulous mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomé, Eloana; Lee, Hyung Joo; Sartori, Ivete Aparecida de Mattias; Trevisan, Roseli Latenek; Luiz, Jaques; Tiossi, Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    This randomized controlled trial used resonance frequency analysis (RFA) to assess the effects of the presence or absence of a cast rigid bar splinting multiple implants in the stability of immediately loaded implants. Twenty-nine edentulous patients were randomly divided into two groups: G1 with full-arch implant-fixed prostheses and G2 with multiple implant splinting via acrylic resin denture bases. All implants were immediately loaded. RFA measurements assessed implant stability at three different times (T0--at baseline, T1--4 months, and T2--8 months. Wilcoxon and Friedman tests and a multivariate model with repeated measures for longitudinal data were used for statistical comparison (α = 0.05). Twenty-nine patients were assessed (G1 = 15 and G2 = 14). Implant and prostheses survival rates were 100% for both groups after the 8-month observation period and no significant differences in the mean ISQ values were found at the different implant stability assessment times (P > 0.05). The different splinting protocols did not appear to affect implant stability during the 8-month observation period. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Numerical simulation of the interface molten metal air in the shot sleeve chambre and mold cavity of a die casting machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korti, Abdel Illah Nabil; Abboudi, Said

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study relates to the numerical simulation of the free surface during the two-dimensional flow and solidification of aluminum in the horizontal cylinder and mold cavity of the high pressure die casting HPDC machine with cold chamber. The flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations (the mass and the momentum conservations) and solved in the two phase's liquid aluminum and air. The tracking of the free surface is ensured by the VOF method. The equivalent specific heat method is used to solve the phase change heat transfer problem in the solidification process. Considering the displacement of the plunger, the geometry of the problem is variable and the numerical resolution uses a dynamic grid. The study examines the influence of the plunger speed on the evolution of the interface aluminum liquid-air profile, the mass of air imprisoned and the stream function contours versus time. Filling of a mold is an essential part of HPDC process and affects significantly the heat transfer and solidification of the melt. For this reason, accurate prediction of the temperature field in the system can be achieved only by including simulation of filling in the analysis.

  3. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 3: Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅰ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  4. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 3: Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅳ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  5. THEORETICAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL BASIS OF CASTING OF HOLLOW BILLETS BY THE METHOD OF DIRECTIONAL SOLIDIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The new method of continuously iterative casting of hollow cylindrical castings from cast iron without application of core, based on the principle of direction of metal solidification is presented in the work. the thermal condition of crystallizer at iterative temperature influences on its internal surface and solidification of casting in the conditions of intensive one-way heat sink and presence of constant overheat on front of solidification is examined.

  6. Evaluation of marginal gap of Ni-Cr copings made with conventional and accelerated casting techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Pavan Kumar Tannamala; Nagarasampatti Sivaprakasam Azhagarasan; K Chitra Shankar

    2013-01-01

    Context: Conventional casting techniques following the manufacturers′ recommendations are time consuming. Accelerated casting techniques have been reported, but their accuracy with base metal alloys has not been adequately studied. Aim: We measured the vertical marginal gap of nickel-chromium copings made by conventional and accelerated casting techniques and determined the clinical acceptability of the cast copings in this study. Settings and Design: Experimental design, in vitro stu...

  7. Self-cleaning Metal Organic Framework (MOF) based ultra filtration membranes - A solution to bio-fouling in membrane separation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, J. A.; Bhuvana, S.; Anbharasi, V.; Ayyanar, N.; Boodhoo, K. V. K.; Singh, G.

    2014-10-01

    Bio-fouling is a serious problem in many membrane-based separation processes for water and wastewater treatment. Current state of the art methods to overcome this are to modify the membranes with either hydrophilic additives or with an antibacterial compound. In this study, we propose and practise a novel concept to prevent bio-fouling by developing a killing and self-cleaning membrane surface incorporating antibacterial silver nanoparticles and highly hydrophilic negatively charged carboxylic and amine functional groups. The innovative surface chemistry helps to reduce the contact angle of the novel membrane by at least a 48% and increase the pure water flux by 39.4% compared to the control membrane. The flux drop for the novel membrane is also lower (16.3% of the initial flux) than the control membrane (55.3% of the initial flux) during the long term experiments with protein solution. Moreover, the novel membrane continues to exhibit inhibition to microbes even after 1320 min of protein filtration. Synthesis of self-cleaning ultrafiltration membrane with long lasting properties opens up a viable solution for bio-fouling in ultrafiltration application for wastewater purification.

  8. Self-cleaning Metal Organic Framework (MOF) based ultra filtration membranes--a solution to bio-fouling in membrane separation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, J A; Bhuvana, S; Anbharasi, V; Ayyanar, N; Boodhoo, K V K; Singh, G

    2014-10-09

    Bio-fouling is a serious problem in many membrane-based separation processes for water and wastewater treatment. Current state of the art methods to overcome this are to modify the membranes with either hydrophilic additives or with an antibacterial compound. In this study, we propose and practise a novel concept to prevent bio-fouling by developing a killing and self-cleaning membrane surface incorporating antibacterial silver nanoparticles and highly hydrophilic negatively charged carboxylic and amine functional groups. The innovative surface chemistry helps to reduce the contact angle of the novel membrane by at least a 48% and increase the pure water flux by 39.4% compared to the control membrane. The flux drop for the novel membrane is also lower (16.3% of the initial flux) than the control membrane (55.3% of the initial flux) during the long term experiments with protein solution. Moreover, the novel membrane continues to exhibit inhibition to microbes even after 1320 min of protein filtration. Synthesis of self-cleaning ultrafiltration membrane with long lasting properties opens up a viable solution for bio-fouling in ultrafiltration application for wastewater purification.

  9. [Study concerning the influence of the casting parameters of dental alloys on the cast prosthetic rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viţalariu, Anca Mihaela; Tatarciuc, Monica Silvia

    2008-01-01

    The integration of a cast rehabilitation into the oral environment and its clinical longevity are mainly determined by the accuracy reproduction of the technological parameters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the structural defects induced by the modification of the technological conditions of casting the conventional and titanium alloys. We used 35 cast prosthetic rehabilitation, divided into 7 groups. For each group we modified one parameter: the width of the wax pattern, the design and topography of the casting channels, the absence of the cleanliness of the wax pattern, the preparation of the investment material, the thermal system for the mold preparation and reduced quantity of metal used for casting. For the 7-th group, represented by titanium cast rehabilitation, we modified the design and dimensions of the casting channels. The changes in the technological conditions induced porosity, incomplete frameworks or plus on the prosthetic appliances. The fundamental theoretical knowledge of the clinician and dental technician and the strictly application of the technologies assure the premises of the satisfaction of the patient.

  10. Improvement of corrosion resistance in NaOH solution and glass forming ability of as-cast Mg-based bulk metallic glasses by microalloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Hao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The influences of the addition of Ag on the glass forming ability (GFA and corrosion behavior were investigated in the Mg-Ni-based alloy system by X-ray diffraction (XRD and electrochemical polarization in 0.1 mol/L NaOH solution. Results shows that the GFA of the Mg-Ni-based BMGs can be improved dramatically by the addition of an appropriate amount of Ag; and the addition element Ag can improve the corrosion resistance of Mg-Ni-based bulk metallic glass. The large difference in atomic size and large negative mixing enthalpy in alloy system can contribute to the high GFA. The addition element Ag improves the forming speed and the stability of the passive film, which is helpful to decrease the passivation current density and to improve the corrosion resistance of Mg-Ni-based bulk metallic glass.

  11. What is safe and clean water in rural Bolivian communities? A preliminary investigation of heavy metal contamination in rural community water systems in the Bolivian Altiplano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, M.; Guido, Z.; Borella, P.; Ketron, T.

    2009-12-01

    A proliferation of potable water systems utilizing groundwater is currently underway in the Lake Titicaca region of the Bolivian Altiplano. With the aid of national and international organizations, rural communities are developing groundwater sources because the region’s surface water is highly contaminated with waterborne pathogens—the primary factor contributing to high child mortality rates in developing nations. According to UNICEF, 86 percent of Bolivian families have access to “improved” water systems, which predominantly take the form of deep groundwater wells or contained natural springs. While the water systems have worked well to reduce pathogens in drinking water systems that cause illnesses such as dysentery, the water is rarely tested for heavy metal contamination, such as arsenic and lead. While bacteria analysis is essential, it is not the only component of healthy drinking water. Testing for heavy metals is especially important in the Bolivian Altiplano because abundant volcanic deposits and massive sulfide deposits suggest that in some areas it is likely that the water contains elevated concentrations of heavy metals. In this study, Terra Resource Development International, A California-based 502(c)3 nonprofit organization, partnered with Stanford University, the Technical University of Bolivia, and the Bolivian Geologic and Mining Survey to collect water samples in 36 rural community situated in four watersheds feeding into Lake Titicaca. Water was collected from shallow, hand dug wells, deep groundwater wells, springs, and small rivers in the Tiwanku, Laja, Batallas, Achacachi watersheds and were analyzed for inorganic contaminants. Samples were analyzed at Stanford’s Environmental Measurements Facility using the Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Spectrometer for major ions and heavy metals. Results will help determine which, if any, community water systems are at risk of heavy metal contamination, where more comprehensive sampling is

  12. Caste and power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Dayabati

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the institution of caste and its operation in a micro-level village setting of West Bengal, an Indian state, where state politics at grass roots level is vibrant with functioning local self-government and entrenched political parties. This ethnographic study reveals that caste...

  13. Inverse thermal analysis method to study solidification in cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dioszegi, Atilla; Hattel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Solidification modelling of cast metals is widely used to predict final properties in cast components. Accurate models necessitate good knowledge of the solidification behaviour. The present study includes a re-examination of the Fourier thermal analysis method. This involves an inverse numerical...... solution of a 1-dimensional heat transfer problem connected to solidification of cast alloys. In the analysis, the relation between the thermal state and the fraction solid of the metal is evaluated by a numerical method. This method contains an iteration algorithm controlled by an under relaxation term...... was developed in order to investigate the thermal behaviour of the solidifying metal. Three cylindrically shaped cast samples surrounded by different cooling materials were introduced in the same mould allowing a common metallurgical background for samples solidifying at different cooling rates. The proposed...

  14. Optimization of Process Parameters to enhance the Hardness on Squeeze Cast Aluminium Alloy AA6061

    OpenAIRE

    M. Thirumal Azhagan; B. Mohan; A. Rajadurai

    2014-01-01

    The automotive and aerospace industries have been the main driving force behind the search of new production processes which are capable of producing components with high integrity. Squeeze casting is one such novel metal processing technique which combines the advantages of both casting and forging in one operation. Squeeze casting process is suited for all melting ranges of metals varying from lead to iron. But nowadays, light weight materials like aluminium and magnesium are mostly used in...

  15. Comparative evaluation of retention of prefabricated and conventional cast post: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhary, Suchismita; Begum, Zubeda; Choudhary, Prashant; Tripathi, Siddhi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate the retention of various prefabricated posts and to compare them with that of the conventional cast post. Materials and Methods: A sample of 60 freshly extracted single-rooted human mandibular first premolars were sectioned horizontally, 1 mm coronal to the cemento-enamel junction and randomly divided into four groups consisting of carbon fiber posts, glass fiber posts, stainless steel posts and cast metal posts. Cast metal post ...

  16. Casting of microstructured shark skin surfaces and possible applications on aluminum casting parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor Ivanov

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the project Functional Surfaces via Micro- and Nanoscaled Structures?which is part of the Cluster of Excellence 揑ntegrative Production Technology?established and financed by the German Research Foundation (DFG, an investment casting process to produce 3-dimensional functional surfaces down to a structural size of 1 μm on near-net-shape-casting parts has been developed. The common way to realize functional microstructures on metallic surfaces is to use laser ablation, electro discharge machining or micro milling. The handicap of these processes is their limited productivity. The approach of this project to raise the efficiency is to use the investment casting process to replicate microstructured surfaces by moulding from a laser-microstructured grand master pattern. The main research objective deals with the investigation of the single process steps of the investment casting process with regard to the moulding accuracy. Actual results concerning making of the wax pattern, suitability of ceramic mould and core materials for casting of an AlSi7Mg0.3 alloy as well as the knock-out behavior of the shells are presented. By using of the example of an intake manifold of a gasoline race car engine, a technical shark skin surface has been realized to reduce the drag of the intake air. The intake manifold consists of an air-restrictor with a defined inner diameter which is microstructured with technical shark skin riblets. For this reason the inner diameter cannot be drilled after casting and demands a very high accuracy of the casting part. A technology for the fabrication and demoulding of accurate microstructured castings are shown. Shrinkage factors of different moulding steps of the macroscopic casting part as well as the microscopic riblet structure have been examined as well.

  17. Plasma cleaning of ITER first mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, L.; Marot, L.; Steiner, R.; Reichle, R.; Leipold, F.; Vorpahl, C.; Le Guern, F.; Walach, U.; Alberti, S.; Furno, I.; Yan, R.; Peng, J.; Ben Yaala, M.; Meyer, E.

    2017-12-01

    Nuclear fusion is an extremely attractive option for future generations to compete with the strong increase in energy consumption. Proper control of the fusion plasma is mandatory to reach the ambitious objectives set while preserving the machine’s integrity, which requests a large number of plasma diagnostic systems. Due to the large neutron flux expected in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), regular windows or fibre optics are unusable and were replaced by so-called metallic first mirrors (FMs) embedded in the neutron shielding, forming an optical labyrinth. Materials eroded from the first wall reactor through physical or chemical sputtering will migrate and will be deposited onto mirrors. Mirrors subject to net deposition will suffer from reflectivity losses due to the deposition of impurities. Cleaning systems of metallic FMs are required in more than 20 optical diagnostic systems in ITER. Plasma cleaning using radio frequency (RF) generated plasmas is currently being considered the most promising in situ cleaning technique. An update of recent results obtained with this technique will be presented. These include the demonstration of cleaning of several deposit types (beryllium, tungsten and beryllium proxy, i.e. aluminium) at 13.56 or 60 MHz as well as large scale cleaning (mirror size: 200 × 300 mm2). Tests under a strong magnetic field up to 3.5 T in laboratory and first experiments of RF plasma cleaning in EAST tokamak will also be discussed. A specific focus will be given on repetitive cleaning experiments performed on several FM material candidates.

  18. Spall behavior of cast iron with varying microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plume, Gifford; Rousseau, Carl-Ernst

    2014-07-01

    The spall strength of cast iron with varying microstructures has been investigated using plate impact at moderate speed. Stress history measurements were made with manganin stress gauges embedded between the back face of the specimen and a low impedance polycarbonate backing. Five separate cast irons were tested. Four of these consisted of gray cast iron with graphite in flake form, with three classified as Type VII A2 and the fourth containing a bimodal distribution of Types VII A4 and VII D8. The fifth casting consisted of ductile cast iron with graphite in nodular form, classified as Type I, size class 5. The spall strength for the Type VII A2 gray cast irons varied between 40 and 370 MPa, and that of the additional gray cast iron, between 410 and 490 MPa. The spall strength of the ductile cast iron fell within the range of 0.94-1.2 GPa. It is shown that the spall strength is linked to the damage level at the spall plane, where an increased level of tensile stress is required to generate higher levels of damage. Post mortem analysis was performed on the recovered samples, revealing the graphite phase to be the primary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons, where crack nucleation is directly correlated to the debonding of graphite from the metal matrix. The average length of graphite found within a casting is linked to the material's strength, where strength increases as a function of decreasing length. The morphology and mean free path of graphite precipitates further govern the subsequent coalescence of initiated cracks to form a complete fracture plane. In cases where graphite spacing is large, increased energy level is required to complete the fracture process. A secondary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons has also been linked to the microstructure of the metal matrix, with pearlite yielding higher spall strengths than free ferrite.

  19. The Abrasive Wear Resistance of Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopyciński D.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The resistance of cast iron to abrasive wear depends on the metal abrasive hardness ratio. For example, hardness of the structural constituents of the cast iron metal matrix is lower than the hardness of ordinary silica sand. Also cementite, the basic component of unalloyed white cast iron, has hardness lower than the hardness of silica. Some resistance to the abrasive effect of the aforementioned silica sand can provide the chromium white cast iron containing in its structure a large amount of (Cr, Fe7C3 carbides characterised by hardness higher than the hardness of the silica sand in question. In the present study, it has been anticipated that the white cast iron structure will be changed by changing the type of metal matrix and the type of carbides present in this matrix, which will greatly expand the application area of castings under the harsh operating conditions of abrasive wear. Moreover, the study compares the results of abrasive wear resistance tests performed on the examined types of cast iron. Tests of abrasive wear resistance were carried out on a Miller machine. Samples of standard dimensions were exposed to abrasion in a double to-and-fro movement, sliding against the bottom of a trough filled with an aqueous abrasive mixture containing SiC + distilled water. The obtained results of changes in the sample weight were approximated with a power curve and shown further in the study.

  20. On Degradation of Cast Iron Surface-Protective Paint Coat Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tupaj M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is a presentation of a study on issues concerning degradation of protective paint coat having an adverse impact on aesthetic qualities of thin-walled cast-iron castings fabricated in furan resin sand. Microscopic examination and microanalyses of chemistry indicated that under the coat of paint covering the surface of a thin-walled casting, layers of oxides could be found presence of which can be most probably attributed to careless cleaning of the casting surface before the paint application process, as well as corrosion pits evidencing existence of damp residues under the paint layers contributing to creation of corrosion micro-cells

  1. Cleaning supplies and equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000443.htm Cleaning supplies and equipment To use the sharing features on this page, ... to clean supplies and equipment. Disinfecting Supplies and Equipment Start by wearing the right personal protective equipment ( ...

  2. What Is Clean Cities?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-08-01

    This Clean Cities Program fact sheet describes the purpose and scope of this DOE program. Clean Cities facilitates the use of alternative and advanced fuels and vehicles to displace petroleum in the transportation sector.

  3. Casting in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decarlo, M; Malone, K; Darmelio, J; Rettig, A

    1994-03-01

    Attempts by sports medicine professionals to return high school athletes with hand and wrist injuries to competition quickly and safely have been the source of confusion and debate on many playing fields around the country. In addition to the differing views regarding the appropriateness of playing cast usage in high school football, a debate exists among sports medicine professionals as to which material is best suited for playing cast construction. Materials used in playing cast construction should be hard enough to provide sufficient stabilization to the injured area and include adequate padding to absorb blunt impact forces. The purpose of the biomechanical portion of this investigation was to attempt to determine the most appropriate materials for use in constructing playing casts for the hand and wrist by assessing different materials for: 1) hardness using a Shore durometer, and 2) ability to absorb impact using a force platform. Results revealed that RTV11 and Scotchcast were the "least hard" of the underlying casting materials and that Temper Stick foam greatly increased the ability of RTV11 to absorb impact. Assessment of the mechanical properties of playing cast materials and review of current developments in high school football rules are used to aid practitioners in choosing the most appropriate materials for playing cast construction.

  4. The Effect of a Thin-Wall Casting Mould Cavity Filling Conditions on the Casting Surface Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trytek A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of metallographic examination of faults occurring in the course of founding thin-walled cast-iron castings in furan resin sand molds. A non-conformance of the scab type was Observed on surface of the casting as well as sand buckles and cold shots. Studied the chemical composition by means of a scanning electron microscope in a region of casting defects: microanalysis point and microanalysis surface. Around the observed defects discloses high concentration of oxides of iron, manganese and silicon. A computer simulation of the casting process has been carried out with the objective to establish the cause of occurrence of cold shots on casting surface. The simulation was carried out with the use of NovaFlow & Solid program. We analyzed the flowing metal in the mold cavity. The main reason for the occurrence of casting defects on the surface of the casting was gating system, which caused turbulent flow of metal with a distinctive splash stream of liquid alloy.

  5. Numerical study of porosity in titanium dental castings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M; Sahm, P R; Augthun, M; Spiekermann, H; Schädlich-Stubenrauch, J

    1999-09-01

    A commercial software package, MAGMASOFT (MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH, Aachen, Germany), was used to study shrinkage and gas porosity in titanium dental castings. A geometrical model for two simplified tooth crowns connected by a connector bar was created. Both mold filling and solidification of this casting model were numerically simulated. Shrinkage porosity was quantitatively predicted by means of a built-in feeding criterion. The risk of gas pore formation was investigated using the numerical filling and solidification results. The results of the numerical simulations were compared with experiments, which were carried out on a centrifugal casting machine with an investment block mold. The block mold was made of SiO2 based slurry with a 1 mm thick Zr2 face coat to reduce metal-mold reactions. Both melting and casting were carried out under protective argon (40 kPa). The finished castings were sectioned and the shrinkage porosity determined. The experimentally determined shrinkage porosity coincided with the predicted numerical simulation results. No apparent gas porosity was found in these model castings. Several running and gating systems for the above model casting were numerically simulated. An optimized running and gating system design was then experimentally cast, which resulted in porosity-free castings. Copyright 1999 Kluwer Academic Publishers

  6. Laser cleaning on Roman coins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakaki, E.; Karydas, A. G.; Klinkenberg, B.; Kokkoris, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Stavrou, E.; Vlastou, R.; Zarkadas, C.

    Ancient metal objects react with moisture and environmental chemicals to form various corrosion products. Because of the unique character and high value of such objects, any cleaning procedure should guarantee minimum destructiveness. The most common treatment used is mechanical stripping, in which it is difficult to avoid surface damage when employed. Lasers are currently being tested for a wide range of conservation applications. Since they are highly controllable and can be selectively applied, lasers can be used to achieve more effective and safer cleaning of archaeological artifacts and protect their surface details. The basic criterion that motivated us to use lasers to clean Roman coins was the requirement of pulsed emission, in order to minimize heat-induced damages. In fact, the laser interaction with the coins has to be short enough, to produce a fast removal of the encrustation, avoiding heat conduction into the substrate. The cleaning effects of three lasers operating at different wavelengths, namely a TEA CO2 laser emitting at 10.6 μm, an Er:YAG laser at 2.94 μm, and a 2ω-Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm have been compared on corroded Romans coins and various atomic and nuclear techniques have also been applied to evaluate the efficiency of the applied procedure.

  7. TCV mirrors cleaned by plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Marot

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallic mirrors exposed in TCV tokamak were cleaned by plasma in laboratory. A gold (Au mirror was deposited with 185–285nm of amorphous carbon (aC:D film coming from the carbon tiles of TCV. Another molybdenum (Mo mirror had a thicker deposit due to a different location within the tokamak. The thickness measurements were carried out using ellipsometry and the reflectivity measurements performed by spectrophotometry revealed a decrease of the specular reflectivity in the entire range (250–2500nm for the Mo mirror and specifically in the visible spectrum for the Au. Comparison of the simulated reflectivity using a refractive index of 1.5 and a Cauchy model for the aC:D gives good confidence on the estimated film thickness. Plasma cleaning using radio frequency directly applied to a metallic plate where the mirrors were fixed demonstrated the ability to remove the carbon deposits. A mixture of 50% hydrogen and 50% helium was used with a −200V self-bias. Due to the low sputtering yield of He and the low chemical erosion of hydrogen leading to volatile molecules, 20h of cleaning were needed for Au mirror and more than 60h for Mo mirror. Recovery of the reflectivity was not complete for the Au mirror most likely due to damage of the surface during tokamak exposure (breakdown phenomena.

  8. Investigating of the Knocking Out Properties of Moulding Sands with New Inorganic Binders Used for Castings of Non-ferrous Metal Alloys in Comparison with the Previously Used

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Izdebska-Szanda

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of investigations, which make a fragment of the broad-scale studies carried out as a part of the projectPOIG.01.01.02-00-015/09 “Advanced materials and technologies”.One of the objectives of the introduction of new inorganic binders is to provide a good knocking out properties of moulding sands, whilemaintaining an appropriate level of strength properties.Therefore, a logical continuation of the previous studies were carried out the tests knocking out properties of moulding sands with newinorganic binders, including making moulds, pouring them by the chosen of non-ferrous metal alloys, knoking-out, and determining theknocking out work.The results of the study were related to the research results obtained by applying the moulding sand performed by existing technology.

  9. Symptomatic stent cast.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keohane, John

    2012-02-03

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  10. Analysis of four dental alloys following torch/centrifugal and induction/ vacuum-pressure casting procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Geoffrey A; Luo, Qing; Hefti, Arthur

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown casting methodology to influence the as-cast properties of dental casting alloys. It is important to consider clinically important mechanical properties so that the influence of casting can be clarified. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how torch/centrifugal and inductively cast and vacuum-pressure casting machines may affect the castability, microhardness, chemical composition, and microstructure of 2 high noble, 1 noble, and 1 base metal dental casting alloys. Two commonly used methods for casting were selected for comparison: torch/centrifugal casting and inductively heated/ vacuum-pressure casting. One hundred and twenty castability patterns were fabricated and divided into 8 groups. Four groups were torch/centrifugally cast in Olympia (O), Jelenko O (JO), Genesis II (G), and Liberty (L) alloys. Similarly, 4 groups were cast in O, JO, G, and L by an inductively induction/vacuum-pressure casting machine. Each specimen was evaluated for casting completeness to determine a castability value, while porosity was determined by standard x-ray techniques. Each group was metallographically prepared for further evaluation that included chemical composition, Vickers microhardness, and grain analysis of microstructure. Two-way ANOVA was used to determine significant differences among the main effects. Statistically significant effects were examined further with the Tukey HSD procedure for multiple comparisons. Data obtained from the castability experiments were non-normal and the variances were unequal. They were analyzed statistically with the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Significant results were further investigated statistically with the Steel-Dwass method for multiple comparisons (α=.05). The alloy type had a significant effect on surface microhardness (Pcasting did not affect the microhardness of the test specimen (P=.465). Similarly, the interaction between the alloy and casting technique was not significant (P=.119). A high

  11. Effect of Process Parameters, Casting Thickness, and Alloys on the Interfacial Heat-Transfer Coefficient in the High-Pressure Die-Casting Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi-Peng; Xiong, Shou-Mei; Liu, Bai-Cheng; Li, Mei; Allison, John

    2008-12-01

    The heat transfer at the metal-die interface is believed to have great influence on the solidification process and cast structure of the high-pressure die-casting (HPDC) process. The present article focused on the effects of process parameters, casting thickness, and alloys on the metal-die interfacial heat-transfer coefficient (IHTC) in the HPDC process. Experiment was carried out on a cold-chamber die-casting machine with two casting alloys AM50 and ADC12. A special casting, namely, “step-shape” casting, was used and cast against a H13 steel die. The IHTC was determined using an inverse approach based on the temperature measurements inside the die. Results show that the IHTC is different at different steps and changes as the solidification of the casting proceeds. Process parameters only influence the IHTC in its peak value, and for both AM50 and ADC12 alloys, a greater fast shot velocity leads to a greater IHTC peak value at steps 1 and 2. The initial die surface temperature has a more prominent influence on the IHTC peak values at the thicker steps, especially step 5. Results also show that a closer contact between the casting and die could be achieved when the casting alloy is ADC12 instead of AM50, which consequently leads to a higher IHTC.

  12. Optimization of Squeeze Casting for Aluminum Alloy Parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Qingming Chang; Yulong Zhu

    2002-07-30

    This study was initiated with the installation of a new production size UBE 350 Ton VSC Squeeze Casting system in the Metal Casting Laboratory at Case Western University. A Lindberg 75k W electrical melting furnace was installed alongside. The challenge of installation and operation of such industrial-size equipment in an academic environment was met successfully. Subsequently, a Sterling oil die heater and a Visi-Track shot monitoring system were added. A significant number of inserts were designed and fabricated over the span of the project, primarily for squeeze casting different configurations of test bars and plates. A spiral ''ribbon insert'' for evaluation of molten metal fluidity was also fabricated. These inserts were used to generate a broad range of processing conditions and determine their effect on the quality of the squeeze cast parts. This investigation has studied the influence of the various casting variables on the quality of indirect squeeze castings primarily of aluminum alloys. The variables studied include gating design, fill time and fill patter, metal pressure and die temperature variations. The quality of the die casting was assessed by an analysis of both their surface condition and internal soundness. The primary metal tested was an aluminum 356 alloy. In addition to determining the effect of these casting variables on casting quality as measured by a flat plate die of various thickness, a number of test bar inserts with different gating designs have been inserted in the squeeze casting machine. The mechanical properties of these test bars produced under different squeeze casting conditions were measured and reported. The investigation of the resulting properties also included an analysis of the microstructure of the squeeze castings and the effect of the various structural constituents on the resulting properties. The main conclusions from this investigation are as follows: The ingate size and shape are very important

  13. Effect of Selected Parameters of Pressure Die Casting on Quality of AlSi9Cu3 Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pałyga Ł.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results on the effects of die-casting process on the strength parameters of castings of the aluminium AlSi9Cu3 alloy belonging to the group of EN AB-46000, made on renovated high pressure die-casting machine. Specimens for quality testing were taken from the places of the casting most loaded during the service. The aim of a research was to prove how the new die-casting process control capabilities influence on the tensile strength of the cast material defined as a value of the breaking force of the specimens. It has been found that it is possible to specify a set of recommended settings valves of second (II and third (III phase, which are responsible for filling the metal mould on die-casting pressure machine. From the point of view of the finished cast element, it was noticed that exceeding the prescribed values of valve settings does not bring further benefits and even causes unnecessary overload and reduce the durability of the mold. Moreover, it was noticed that reduction of the predetermined setting of the second phase (II valve leads to the formation of casting defects again.

  14. Bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In these paper the possibility of upper and lower bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings are presented. Conditions, when in cast iron with carbides castings during continuous free air cooling austenite transformation to upper bainite or its mixture with lower bainte proceeds, have been given. A mechanism of this transformation has been given, Si, Ni, Mn and Mo distribution in the eutectic cell has been tested and hardness of tested castings has been determined.

  15. Adhesion Casting In Low Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond J.

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion casting in low gravity proposed as technique for making new and improved materials. Advantages of low-gravity adhesion casting, in comparison with adhesion casting in normal Earth gravity, comes from better control over, and greater uniformity of, thicknesses of liquid films that form on and adhere to solid surfaces during casting.

  16. HFIR Fuel Casting Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhoff, Seth D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gibbs, Paul Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Solis, Eunice Martinez [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Process exploration for fuel production for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using cast LEU-10wt.%Mo as an initial processing step has just begun. This project represents the first trials concerned with casting design and quality. The studies carried out over the course of this year and information contained in this report address the initial mold development to be used as a starting point for future operations. In broad terms, the final billet design is that of a solid rolling blank with an irregular octagonal cross section. The work covered here is a comprehensive view of the initial attempts to produce a sound casting. This report covers the efforts to simulate, predict, cast, inspect, and revise the initial mold design.

  17. Cool Cast Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you can get a special waterproof sleeve to cover it. Depending on where your cast or splint is on your body, you may find it easier to take a sponge bath. This means that instead of getting all ...

  18. Aluminium Foam and Magnesium Compound Casting Produced by High-Pressure Die Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iban Vicario

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions are two of the main focal points in vehicle design, promoting the reduction in the weight of vehicles by using lighter materials. The aim of the work is to evaluate the influence of different aluminium foams and injection parameters in order to obtain compound castings with a compromise between the obtained properties and weight by high-pressure die cast (HPDC using aluminium foams as cores into a magnesium cast part. To evaluate the influence of the different aluminium foams and injection parameters on the final casting products quality, the type and density of the aluminium foam, metal temperature, plunger speed, and multiplication pressure have been varied within a range of suitable values. The obtained compound HPDC castings have been studied by performing visual and RX inspections, obtaining sound composite castings with aluminium foam cores. The presence of an external continuous layer on the foam surface and the correct placement of the foam to support injection conditions permit obtaining good quality parts. A HPDC processed magnesium-aluminium foam composite has been developed for a bicycle application obtaining a suitable combination of mechanical properties and, especially, a reduced weight in the demonstration part.

  19. Characterization of Bimetallic Castings with an Austenitic Working Surface Layer and an Unalloyed Cast Steel Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents the technology of bimetallic castings based on the founding method of layer coating directly in the cast process of the so-called method of mold cavity preparation. The prepared castings consist of two fundamental parts, i.e., the base and the working surface layer. The base part of the bimetallic casting is typical foundry material, i.e., unalloyed cast steel, whereas the working layer is a plate of austenitic alloy steel sort X2CrNi 18-9. The quality of the joint between the base part and the working layer was evaluated on the basis of ultrasonic non-destructive testing and structure examinations containing metallographic macro- and microscopic studies with the use of a light microscope (LOM) with microhardness measurements and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with microanalysis of the chemical composition (energy dispersive spectroscopy—EDS). On the basis of the obtained results it was confirmed that the decisive phenomena needed to create a permanent joint between the two components of the bimetallic casting are carbon and heat transport in the direction from the high-carbon and hot base material which was poured into the mold in the form of liquid metal to the low-carbon and cold material of the working layer which was placed in the mold cavity in the form of a monolithic insert.

  20. Analysis of the quality renovated continuous steel casting roller

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Renovation of continuous steel casting rollers, made of X12Cr13 EN 10088-1-97, was realised using submerged arc surfacing technology. ... were made in the influence of surfacing parameters on cladding metal mixing (mixed) with base metal and also influence of heat introduced by welding using metallographic analysis.

  1. Casting of Hearth Plates from High-chromium Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drotlew A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studies on the development of manufacturing technologies to cast hearth plates operating in chamber furnaces for heat treatment. Castings made from the heat-resistant G-X40CrNiSi27-4 steel were poured in hand-made green sand molds. The following operations were performed: computer simulation to predict the distribution of internal defects in castings produced by the above mentioned technology with risers bare and coated with exothermic and insulating sleeves, analysis of each variant of the technology, and manufacture of experimental castings. As a result of the conducted studies and analysis it was found that the use of risers with exothermic sleeves does not affect to a significant degree the quality of the produced castings of hearth plates, but it significantly improves the metal yield.

  2. An ultra-clean technique for accurately analysing Pb isotopes and heavy metals at high spatial resolution in ice cores with sub-pg g(-1) Pb concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, Laurie J; Rosman, Kevin J R; Candelone, Jean-Pierre; Vallelonga, Paul; Burton, Graeme R; Smith, Andrew M; Morgan, Vin I; Barbante, Carlo; Hong, Sungmin; Boutron, Claude F

    2009-02-23

    Measurements of Pb isotope ratios in ice containing sub-pg g(-1) concentrations are easily compromised by contamination, particularly where limited sample is available. Improved techniques are essential if Antarctic ice cores are to be analysed with sufficient spatial resolution to reveal seasonal variations due to climate. This was achieved here by using stainless steel chisels and saws and strict protocols in an ultra-clean cold room to decontaminate and section ice cores. Artificial ice cores, prepared from high purity water were used to develop and refine the procedures and quantify blanks. Ba and In, two other important elements present at pg g(-1) and fg g(-1) concentrations in Polar ice, were also measured. The final blank amounted to 0.2+/-0.2 pg of Pb with (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(207)Pb ratios of 1.16+/-0.12 and 2.35+/-0.16, respectively, 1.5+/-0.4 pg of Ba and 0.6+/-2.0 fg of In, most of which probably originates from abrasion of the steel saws by the ice. The procedure was demonstrated on a Holocene Antarctic ice core section and was shown to contribute blanks of only approximately 5%, approximately 14% and approximately 0.8% to monthly resolved samples with respective Pb, Ba and In concentrations of 0.12 pg g(-1), 0.3 pg g(-1) and 2.3 fg g(-1). Uncertainties in the Pb isotopic ratio measurements were degraded by only approximately 0.2%.

  3. Method of casting aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poco, John F.

    1993-01-01

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

  4. Graphitized Cast Irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silman, G. I.; Makarenko, K. V.

    2014-05-01

    An analytical review of data on general-purpose grayed cast iron with different forms of graphite (lamellar, vermicular, globular, flaked) is presented. Grades of cast iron, their compositions, special features of structure of the graphite, and properties of gray, high-strength and malleable irons are described. The data on the kinds of iron considered are compared with those stipulated in international and some national standards.

  5. Airing 'clean air' in Clean India Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, T; Kumar, M; Mall, R K; Singh, R S

    2017-03-01

    The submission explores the possibility of a policy revision for considering clean air quality in recently launched nationwide campaign, Clean India Mission (CIM). Despite of several efforts for improving availability of clean household energy and sanitation facilities, situation remain still depressing as almost half of global population lacks access to clean energy and proper sanitation. Globally, at least 2.5 billion people do not have access to basic sanitation facilities. There are also evidences of 7 million premature deaths by air pollution in year 2012. The situation is even more disastrous for India especially in rural areas. Although, India has reasonably progressed in developing sanitary facilities and disseminating clean fuel to its urban households, the situation in rural areas is still miserable and needs to be reviewed. Several policy interventions and campaigns were made to improve the scenario but outcomes were remarkably poor. Indian census revealed a mere 31% sanitation coverage (in 2011) compared to 22% in 2001 while 60% of population (700 million) still use solid biofuels and traditional cook stoves for household cooking. Further, last decade (2001-2011) witnessed the progress decelerating down with rural households without sanitation facilities increased by 8.3 million while minimum progress has been made in conversion of conventional to modern fuels. To revamp the sanitation coverage, an overambitious nationwide campaign CIM was initiated in 2014 and present submission explores the possibility of including 'clean air' considerations within it. The article draws evidence from literatures on scenarios of rural sanitation, energy practises, pollution induced mortality and climatic impacts of air pollution. This subsequently hypothesised with possible modification in available technologies, dissemination modes, financing and implementation for integration of CIM with 'clean air' so that access to both sanitation and clean household energy may be

  6. Evaluating the use of laser radiation in cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological Egyptian textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Kareem, Omar [Conservation Department, Faculty of Archaeology, Cairo University, El-Gamaa Street, El-Giza (Egypt)], E-mail: Omaa67@yahoo.com; Harith, M.A. [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Science, Cairo University (Egypt)], E-mail: mharithm@niles.edu.eg

    2008-07-15

    Cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological textiles is still a complicated conservation process, as most textile conservators believe that the advantages of using traditional cleaning techniques are less than their disadvantages. In this study, the uses of laser cleaning method and two modified recipes of wet cleaning methods were evaluated for cleaning of the corroded archaeological Egyptian copper embroidery threads on an archaeological Egyptian textile fabric. Some corroded copper thread samples were cleaned using modified recipes of wet cleaning method; other corroded copper thread samples were cleaned with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser radiation of wavelength 532 nm. All tested metal thread samples before and after cleaning were investigated using a light microscope and a scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis unit. Also the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique was used for the elemental analysis of laser-cleaned samples to follow up the laser cleaning procedure. The results show that laser cleaning is the most effective method among all tested methods in the cleaning of corroded copper threads. It can be used safely in removing the corrosion products without any damage to both metal strips and fibrous core. The tested laser cleaning technique has solved the problems caused by other traditional cleaning techniques that are commonly used in the cleaning of metal threads on museum textiles.

  7. Casting Simulation of an Austrian Bronze Age Sword Hilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pola, Annalisa; Mödlinger, Marianne; Piccardo, Paolo; Montesano, Lorenzo

    2015-07-01

    Bronze Age swords with a metal hilt can be considered the peak of Bronze Age casting technologies. To reconstruct the casting techniques used more than 3000 years ago, a metal hilted sword of the Schalenknauf type from Lower Austria was studied with the aid of macroscopic analyses and simulation of mold filling and casting solidification. A three-dimensional model of the hilt was created based on optical scanner measurements performed on a hilt recently discovered during archaeological excavations. Three different configurations of the gating system were considered, two on the pommel disk and one on the knob, and the effect of its location on the formation of casting defects was investigated. Three-dimensional computed tomography was used to detect internal defects, such as gas and shrinkage porosity, which were then compared with those calculated by simulation. The best match between actual and predicted hilt quality demonstrated the location of the gating system, which turned out to be on the pommel disk.

  8. Development of low-temperature high-strength integral steel castings for offshore construction by casting process engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Sang-Sub

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In casting steels for offshore construction, manufacturing integral casted structures to prevent fatigue cracks in the stress raisers is superior to using welded structures. Here, mold design and casting analysis were conducted for integral casting steel. The laminar flow of molten metal was analyzed and distributions of hot spots and porosities were studied. A prototype was subsequently produced, and air vents were designed to improve the surface defects caused by the release of gas. A radiographic test revealed no internal defects inside the casted steel. Evaluating the chemical and mechanical properties of specimens sampled from the product revealed that target values were quantitatively satisfied. To assess weldability in consideration of repair welding, the product was machined with grooves and welded, after which the mechanical properties of hardness as well as tensile, impact, and bending strengths were evaluated. No substantive differences were found in the mechanical properties before and after welding.

  9. Preperation for a Clean Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurimas Ralys

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews techniques for preparing clean surfaces used in the manufacturing process, considers the types of clean surfaces and their role in modern production and provides the classification methods of arranging such surfaces. The paper also discusses the principles of methods for solvent cleaning, aqueous cleaning, ultrasonic cleaning, precision cleaning and mechanical cleaning. The study focuses on the possibility of adjusting a clean surface using a water flow, including cavitation.Article in Lithuanian

  10. Effect of heat treatment on the properties of laser-beam welded rheo-cast F357 aluminum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Semi-solid metal rheo-cast F357 aluminum plates were joined by autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding and were welded in either the as-cast (F) condition, T4 temper or T6 temper condition. The weldability of this age-hardenable Al–7%Si–0.6%Mg casting alloy...

  11. Radiographic analysis of 1000 cast posts in Sergipe state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Garcez MENDONÇA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Endodontically treated teeth with extensive coronary destruction require posts and cores to enable prosthetic restoration. Despite the increasing use of prefabricated posts, cast metal posts and cores are still widely used. The quality of the latter is important for the longevity of restorative treatment, and failure can occur if the fundamental principles are not followed. Objective To radiographically evaluate the prosthetic principles of 1000 cast metal post-and-core restorations performed in single-rooted teeth and their coherence with the principles used for their confection. Material and method Digital periapical radiographs of 1000 endodontically treated, single-rooted teeth with cast metal posts and cores were selected from the collection of a radiology clinic (Centro de Imagem, Aracaju/SE, Brazil. The images were analyzed using a measurement software (ImageJ, USA in accordance with the fundamental prosthetic principles: length and diameter of the post, ratio between post and bone crest, contiguity of post to the root canal, gap between post and the remaining root canal filling, amount of remaining root canal filling, and absence of periapical lesion. The data were qualitatively analyzed, classified into ideal and not ideal, and submitted to the chi-square test (α=0.05. Result Only 6.7% of the cast metal posts analyzed were satisfactorily fabricated. Conclusion Many prosthetic criteria are neglected during the manufacturing of cast metal post and cores, resulting in inadequate work that may compromise the longevity of restorative treatments.

  12. Investigation of Shrinkage Defect in Castings by Quantitative Ishikawa Diagram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chokkalingam B.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Metal casting process involves processes such as pattern making, moulding and melting etc. Casting defects occur due to combination of various processes even though efforts are taken to control them. The first step in the defect analysis is to identify the major casting defect among the many casting defects. Then the analysis is to be made to find the root cause of the particular defect. Moreover, it is especially difficult to identify the root causes of the defect. Therefore, a systematic method is required to identify the root cause of the defect among possible causes, consequently specific remedial measures have to be implemented to control them. This paper presents a systematic procedure to identify the root cause of shrinkage defect in an automobile body casting (SG 500/7 and control it by the application of Pareto chart and Ishikawa diagram. with quantitative Weightage. It was found that the root causes were larger volume section in the cope, insufficient feeding of riser and insufficient poured metal in the riser. The necessary remedial measures were taken and castings were reproduced. The shrinkage defect in the castings was completely eliminated.

  13. Continuous Modification of Cast Iron By the FLORET Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanus A.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demands on the utility properties of materials used for castings have led to the production of cast iron with a modified shape of graphite, where the required properties are achieved by a change in graphite shape, its size and layout, and a change in the basic structure of the metal. This paper is focused on the continuous method of producing spheroidal graphite FLOTRET.

  14. Processing Design of Miniature Casting Incorporating Stereolithography Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Pei-Hsing Huang; Wei-Ju Huang

    2017-01-01

    Investment casting is commonly used in the production of metallic components with complex shapes, due to its high dimensional precision, good surface finish, and low cost. However, the process is cumbersome, and the period between trial casting and final production can be very long, thereby limiting business opportunities and competitiveness. In this study, we replaced conventional wax injection with stereolithography (SLA) 3D printing to speed up the trial process and reduce costs. We also u...

  15. Structure and properties of gray iron casted in the electromagnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the national [1] and foreign [2] literature the methods of improving the homogeneity of the structure of castings using forced convection of the solidifying metal in the casting mould or the crystallizer are presented. This article presents the influence of chosen parameters of the rotating electromagnetic filed that is forcing the movement of melted metal in the mould on the morphology of graphite and the abrasive wear of the grey cast iron. The effect of this examination is the obtained modification of the flake graphite divisions morphology and a alteration of the abrasive wear resistance of the castings manufactured this way.

  16. Rapid Tooling via Investment Casting and Rapid Prototype Patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, Michael D.

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this work to develop the materials processing and design technologies required to reduce the die development time for metal mold processes from 12 months to 3 months, using die casting of Al and Mg as the example process. Sandia demonstrated that investment casting, using rapid prototype patterns produced from Stereo lithography or Selective laser Sintering, was a viable alternative/supplement to the current technology of machining form wrought stock. A demonstration die insert (ejector halt) was investment cast and subsequently tested in the die casting environment. The stationary half of the die insert was machined from wrought material to benchmark the cast half. The two inserts were run in a die casting machine for 3,100 shots of aluminum and at the end of the run no visible difference could be detected between the cast and machined inserts. Inspection concluded that the cast insert performed identically to the machined insert. Both inserts had no indications of heat checking or degradation.

  17. New Approaches to Cleaning Liquid Radioactive Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabulonov, Yu.L.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The industrial cleaning methods of liquid radioactive waste and technologically contaminated solutions, which contain heavy metals and radionuclides, are considered. It is shown that in the case when heavy metal ions exclusively exist in ionic form, the cleaning method with highest efficiency is electrodialysis. In the case when components, which must be removed, are in ionic and colloidal forms at the same time, the previous destruction of colloidal and organic matter (method of hydrodynamic cavitation, lowtemperature plasma etc is necessary. The developed «PTANK» method enables an effective purification of multicomponent metalcontaining man-made solutions, which contain additionally organic substances and complexes. Development of advanced membrane technologies, creation of complex recycling schemes and their synergistic combination will provide an opportunity to achieve deep cleaning of technologically contaminated solutions and minimize the amount of secondary wastes.

  18. Quality improvement of steel cast-welded constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аркадій Васильович Лоза

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the various types of metallurgical equipment there are structures which are welded compounds of a cast base and additional elements produced by casting or any other means. Such structures are called cast-welded constructions. Besides new working properties such constructions appear to be more efficient and provide better durability as compared to the similar structures produced by other industrial means. Meanwhile the advantages of the technology are not used in full. One reason is low quality of the compound products caused by lack of proper preparation of the elements to be welded and poor quality of the welds themselves. In the article the methods of quality production and the maintenance of steel cast-welded constructions have been considered. A ladle of a blast-furnace slag car is used as the subject of investigation and further testing of the mentioned above technologies. The ladle is a cast product. Under operating conditions, the ladle undergoes mechanical and thermal load, which results in deformation of its sides that deflect inside. To prevent the deflection stiffening ribs are welded onto the outer surface of the ladle. However, there may be casting defects in the base metal that could reduce the durability of the welds. It has been proved that welds on the unprepared cast base of the steel product cannot guarantee the combination’s durability and reliability. To prevent the influence of the casting defects it has been recommended to cover the base metal with one more metal layer before welding the elements on. Two-layer surfacing provides best result as the first layer serves for the weld penetration of the casting defects since this layer has a significant share of base metal therefore it is less malleable; the second layer is necessary for making the layer viscous enough. The viscous layer ensures the absence of sharp transition from the deposited metal to the base metal and increases the crack resistance of the weld. In

  19. Clean Energy Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    For the past several years, the IEA and others have been calling for a clean energy revolution to achieve global energy security, economic growth and climate change goals. This report analyses for the first time progress in global clean energy technology deployment against the pathways that are needed to achieve these goals. It provides an overview of technology deployment status, key policy developments and public spending on RDD&D of clean energy technologies.

  20. THE MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CASTED INGOTS FROM THE STEEL OF TYPE 5XHM , RECEIVED BY CAST MOULDING INTO INGOT MOLD AFTER INDUCTION REMELT OF STEEL WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Fedulov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There is offered the technology of the cast instrument production by means of induction smelting using different metal discards as a base mixture. The given results of investigations prove the possibility of the cast instrument production and its application.

  1. Cleaning Products Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    This 1997 case study documents a three-year effort to identify and compare environmentally preferable commercial cleaning products and to implement the Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program (EPP).

  2. Metallic Recovery and Ferrous Melting Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luis Trueba

    2004-05-30

    The effects of melting atmosphere and charge material type on the metallic and alloy recovery of ferrous charge materials were investigated in two sets of experiments (Tasks 1 and 2). In addition, thermodynamic studies were performed (Task 3) to determine the suitability of ladle treatment for the production of ductile iron using scrap charge materials high in manganese and sulfur. Task 1--In the first set of experiments, the charge materials investigated were thin steel scrap, thick steel scrap, cast iron scrap, and pig iron in the rusty and clean states. Melting atmospheres in this set of experiments were varied by melting with and without a furnace cover. In this study, it was found that neither covered melting nor melting clean (non-rusty) ferrous charge materials improved the metallic recovery over the recovery experienced with uncovered melting or rusty charge materials. However, the silicon and manganese recoveries were greater with covered melting and clean materials. Silicon and manganese in the molten iron react with oxygen dissolved in the iron from uncovered melting and oxidized iron (surface rust). Silica and manganese silicates are formed which float to the slag decreasing recoveries of silicon and manganese. Cast iron and pig iron had higher metallic recoveries than steel scrap. Carbon recovery was affected by the carbon content of the charge materials, and not by the melting conditions. Irons with higher silicon contents had higher silicon recovery than irons with lower silicon contents. Task 2--In the second set of experiments, briquetted turnings and borings were used to evaluate the effects of briquette cleanliness, carbon additions, and melting atmosphere on metallic and alloy recovery. The melting atmosphere in this set of experiments was varied by melting in air and with an argon atmosphere using the SPAL process. In this set of experiments, carbon additions to the briquettes were found to have the greatest effect on metallic and alloy

  3. The Effect of Ductile Cast Iron Matrix on Zinc Coating During Hot Dip Galvanising of Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth kinetics of the zinc coating formed on the surface of casting made from ductile iron grade EN-GJS-500-3 was investigated. To produce homogenous metal matrix in test samples, the normalising and ferritising annealing was carried out. Studies showeda heterogeneous structure of cast iron with varying content of the phases formed. This was followed by hot dip galvanising treatment at450°C to capture the growth kinetics of the zinc coating (the time of the treatment ranged from 60 to 600 seconds. Nonlinear estimation of the determined growth kinetics of the alloyed layer of a zinc coating was made and an equation of the zinc coating growth was derived.Based on the results of the investigations it was concluded that thickness of the zinc coating formed on the surface of casting with a 100% pearlitic matrix makes 55% of the thickness of coating formed on the surface in 100% ferritic.

  4. The Effect of Ductile Cast Iron Matrix on Zinc Coating During Hot Dip Galvanising of Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopyciński D.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth kinetics of the zinc coating formed on the surface of casting made from ductile iron grade EN-GJS-500-3 was investigated. To produce homogenous metal matrix in test samples, the normalising and ferritising annealing was carried out. Studies showed a heterogeneous structure of cast iron with varying content of the phases formed. This was followed by hot dip galvanising treatment at 450°C to capture the growth kinetics of the zinc coating (the time of the treatment ranged from 60 to 600 seconds. Nonlinear estimation of the determined growth kinetics of the alloyed layer of a zinc coating was made and an equation of the zinc coating growth was derived. Based on the results of the investigations it was concluded that thickness of the zinc coating formed on the surface of casting with a 100% pearlitic matrix makes 55% of the thickness of coating formed on the surface in 100% ferritic.

  5. Clean Fossil Energy Conversion Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, L.-S.

    2007-03-01

    Absolute and per-capita energy consumption is bound to increase globally, leading to a projected increase in energy requirements of 50% by 2020. The primary source for providing a majority of the energy will continue to be fossil fuels. However, an array of enabling technologies needs to be proven for the realization of a zero emission power, fuel or chemical plants in the near future. Opportunities to develop new processes, driven by the regulatory requirements for the reduction or elimination of gaseous and particulate pollutant abound. This presentation describes the chemistry, reaction mechanisms, reactor design, system engineering, economics, and regulations that surround the utilization of clean coal energy. The presentation will cover the salient features of the fundamental and process aspects of the clean coal technologies in practice as well as in development. These technologies include those for the cleaning of SO2, H2S, NOx, and heavy metals, and separation of CO2 from the flue gas or the syngas. Further, new combustion and gasification processes based on the chemical looping concepts will be illustrated in the context of the looping particle design, process heat integration, energy conversion efficiency, and economics.

  6. Comparison of marginal accuracy of castings fabricated by conventional casting technique and accelerated casting technique: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S Srikanth; Revathi, Kakkirala; Reddy, S Kranthikumar

    2013-01-01

    Conventional casting technique is time consuming when compared to accelerated casting technique. In this study, marginal accuracy of castings fabricated using accelerated and conventional casting technique was compared. 20 wax patterns were fabricated and the marginal discrepancy between the die and patterns were measured using Optical stereomicroscope. Ten wax patterns were used for Conventional casting and the rest for Accelerated casting. A Nickel-Chromium alloy was used for the casting. The castings were measured for marginal discrepancies and compared. Castings fabricated using Conventional casting technique showed less vertical marginal discrepancy than the castings fabricated by Accelerated casting technique. The values were statistically highly significant. Conventional casting technique produced better marginal accuracy when compared to Accelerated casting. The vertical marginal discrepancy produced by the Accelerated casting technique was well within the maximum clinical tolerance limits. Accelerated casting technique can be used to save lab time to fabricate clinical crowns with acceptable vertical marginal discrepancy.

  7. Substitution of Organic Solvents in Selected Industrial Cleaning Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Thomas; Rasmussen, Pia Brunn

    1997-01-01

    can be replaced with monoesters of fatty acids from vegetable oils (VOFA). The paper describes the selection of other industrial cleaning or degreasing processes where VOC could be replaced by VOFA. Manual degreasing and cleaning processes in metal industry, maintenance and repair of vehicles...

  8. Melt Cast High Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Cudziło

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Abstract[/b]. This paper reviews the current state and future developments of melt-cast high explosives. First the compositions, properties and methods of preparation of trinitrotoluene based (TNT conventional mixtures with aluminum, hexogen (RDX or octogen (HMX are described. In the newer, less sensitive explosive formulations, TNT is replaced with dinitroanisole (DNANDNANDNAN and nitrotriazolone (NTONTONTO, nitroguanidine (NG or ammonium perchlorate (AP are the replacement for RDRDX and HMX. Plasticized wax or polymer-based binder systems for melt castable explosives are also included. Hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HPTB is the binder of choice, but polyethylene glycol, and polycaprolactone with energetic plasticizers are also used. The most advanced melt-cast explosives are compositions containing energetic thermoplastic elastomers and novel highly energetic compounds (including nitrogen rich molecules in whose particles are nanosized and practically defect-less.[b]Keywords[/b]: melt-cast explosives, detonation parameters

  9. Synthesis and performance of antifouling and self-cleaning polyethersulfone/graphene oxide composite membrane functionalized with photoactive semiconductor catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizge, Nadir; Gonuldas, Hakan; Ozay, Yasin; Ates, Hasan; Ocakoglu, Kasim; Harputlu, Ersan; Yildirimcan, Saadet; Unyayar, Ali

    2017-02-01

    This study was performed to synthesize membranes of polyethersulfone (PES) blended with graphene oxide (GO) and PES blended with GO functionalized with photoactive semiconductor catalyst (TiO 2 and ZnO). The antifouling and self-cleaning properties of composite membranes were also investigated. The GO was prepared from natural graphite powder by oxidation method at low temperature. TiO 2 and ZnO nanopowders were synthesized by anhydrous sol-gel method. The surface of TiO 2 and ZnO nanopowders was modified by a surfactant (myristic acid) to obtain a homogeneously dispersed mixture in a solvent, and then GO was functionalized by loading with these metal oxide nanopowders. The PES membranes blended with GO and functionalized GO into the casting solution were prepared via phase inversion method and tested for their antifouling as well as self-cleaning properties. The composite membranes were synthesized as 14%wt. of PES polymer with three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0%wt.) of GO, GO-TiO 2 , and GO-ZnO. The functionalization of membranes improved hydrophilicity property of membranes as compared to neat PES membrane. However, the lowest flux was obtained by functionalized membranes with GO-TiO 2 . The results showed that functionalized membranes demonstrated better self-cleaning property than neat PES membrane. Moreover, the flux recovery rate of functionalized membranes over five cycles was higher than that of neat membrane.

  10. Enhancements in Magnesium Die Casting Impact Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Srinath Viswanathan; Shafik Iskander

    2000-06-30

    % in AM50 to over 9% in AZ91, more of the intermetallic Mg17Al12 is formed in the microstructure. For instance, for 15 increase in the aluminum content from AM50 to AM60, the volume fraction of eutectic present in the microstructure increases by 35%! Eventually, the brittle Mg17Al12 compound forms an interconnected network that reduces ductility and impact resistance. The lower aluminum in AM50 and AM60 are therefore a desirable feature in applications that call for higher impact resistance. Further improvement in impact resistance depends on the processing condition of the casting. Sound castings without porosity and impurities will have better mechanical properties. Since magnesium oxidizes readily, good melting and metal transfer practices are essential. The liquid metal has to be protected from oxidation at all times and entrainment of oxide films in the casting needs to be prevented. In this regard, there is evidence that us of vacuum to evacuate air from the die casting cavity can improve the quality of the castings. Fast cooling rates, leading to smaller grain size are beneficial and promote superior mechanical properties. Micro-segregation and banding are two additional defect types often encountered in magnesium alloys, in particular in AZ91D. While difficult to eliminate, segregation can be minimized by careful thermal management of the dies and the shot sleeve. A major source of segregation is the premature solidification in the shot sleeve. The primary solid dendrites are carried into the casting and form a heterogeneous structure. Furthermore, during the shot, segregation banding can occur. The remedies for this kind of defects include a hotter shot sleeve, use of insulating coatings on the shot sleeve and a short lag time between pouring into the shot sleeve and the shot.

  11. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  12. The method for research of solidification process of continuous casting blanks in the mold of CCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергій Леонідович Макуров

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The modern methods of investigation of the crystallization process in the continuous casting crystallizer are observed in the article. In the context of continuous casting the method of the horizontal probing involving the use of the probe, fastened on a turning mechanism, and recording data using a protractor arouse interest. The main disadvantage of this method is the use of a rotary mechanism, which results in design complication and reduces the accuracy of experimental results. In order to eliminate this drawback, a new non-destructive method of oblique probing of continuous casting is proposed in the article. The method involves the application of a steel rod, which is introduced at a certain angle into the melt until it stops in the formed crust of metal. Then, the crust thickness can be determined by using the difference of length of the section of the rod introduced into the melt before casting mold and after finding the metal crust. The study takes place at several levels of the mold, which makes it possible to investigate the formation of cortical areas blank in the mold during the casting process more accurately. The research of crust at several horizons is due to the metal shrinkage during casting, as well as the probability of forming gaps between the wall of the mold and metal crust. The method makes it possible to research the crust growth just during casting, and thereby to adjust the process parameters for producing casting with high quality of metal surface

  13. Repair welding of cast iron coated electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żuk, M.; Górka, J.; Dojka, R.; Czupryński, A.

    2017-08-01

    Welding cast iron is a complex production procedure. Repair welding was used to repair damaged or poorly made castings. This is due to a tendency to cracking of the material during welding as well as after it. Welding cast iron can be carried out on hot or on cold. Hot welding requires high heat material and the use of welding material in the form of cast iron. In the case of cold welding, it is possible to use different materials. Mostly used filler metals are nickel and copper based. The work shows the course of research concerning repairmen of ductile iron with arc welding method. For the reparation process four types of ESAB company coated electrodes dedicated for cast iron were used with diameter 3.2 and 4 mm: ES 18-8-6B (4mm), EB 150 (4mm), OK NiCl, EŻM. In the cast iron examined during the testing grooves were made using plasma methods, in order to simulate the removed casting flaws. Then the welding process with coated electrodes was executed. The process utilized low welding current row of 100A, so there would only be a small amount of heat delivered to the heat affected zone (HAZ). Short stitches were made, after welding it was hammered, in order to remove stresses. After the repair welding the part of studies commenced which purpose was finding surface defects using visual testing (VT) and penetration testing (PT). In the second part, a series of macro and microscopic studies were executed witch the purpose of disclosuring the structure. Then the hardness tests for welds cross sections were performed. An important aspect of welding cast iron is the colour of the padding weld after welding, more precisely the difference between the base material and padding weld, the use of different materials extra gives the extra ability to select the best variant. The research of four types of coated electrode was executed, based on the demands the best option in terms of aesthetic, strength and hardness.

  14. Twin Roll Casting of Aluminium: The Occurrence of Structure Inhomogeneities and Defects in as Cast Strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westengen, H.; Nes, K.

    Continuous strip casting provides an attractive shortcut from the liquid metal to final gauge sheet. Twin roll casters are by far the most widespread machines in commercial operation, mainly due to their flexibility and relatively low investment costs. Strip produced by these casters is presently appreciated as a well suited alternative to conventional material for a number of applications, and in some instances improved properties are obtained (1). Twin roll casters have been in commercial operation for nearly three decades, however, the literature on the subject is rather incomplete. Most of the available information has been published by the machine producers, hence attention is mainly paid to the positive aspects of the methods. However, some interesting papers have recently been published. A general description of casting and annealing structures is given by Nes and Slevolden (2), while Jin et. al. (3) consider the formation of centreline segregates during casting. Althoff (1) summarizes some aspects of mechanical properties, and a couple of papers desribe new alloys which are especially suitable for strip casting (4,5). A contribution to the understanding of the influence of casting parameters on the solidification zone is presented by Iricibar and Jin (6).

  15. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... AllYouWantTV 616,527 views 1:19 WHO: SAVE LIVES - Clean Your Hands - No action today; no cure ... 10,684 views 1:53 Clean hands save lives - Duration: 0:59. NIHClinicalCenter 2,298 views 0: ...

  16. DIRTY AND CLEAN TECHNOLOGIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DAS GUPTA, SUPRATIM

    2015-01-01

    ... out of these essential resources. In a model of total energy production from a dirty resource and a perfect substitute clean technology (backstop), we show the optimal solution implies using either one energy source at first before finally converging to a steady state of using both the dirty and clean technologies in fixed proportions. The di...

  17. Evaluation of Cracking Causes of AlSi5Cu3 Alloy Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eperješi Š.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the castings made from aluminum-silicon alloys by pressure die casting are increasingly used in the automotive industry. In practice, on these castings are high demands, mainly demands on quality of their structure, operating life and safety ensuring of their utilization. The AlSi5Cu3 alloy castings are widely used for production of car components. After the prescribed tests, the cracks and low mechanical properties have been identified for several castings of this alloy, which were produced by low pressure casting into a metal mould and subsequent they were heat treated. Therefore, analyses of the castings were realized to determine the causes of these defects. Evaluation of structure of the AlSi5Cu3 alloy and causes of failure were the subjects of investigation presented in this article.

  18. Manufacturing Methods for Process Effects on Aluminum Casting Allowables

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    at room temperature using a steel ladle coated with refractory Insulkotz R-20. (4) Clean Up After the casting was shaken out of the mold, the gates...wax assembly was then coated with two coats of refractory L * slurry with a colloidal silica binder, followed by five coats of slurry with an ethyl...coatings of refractory material were applied to the wax pattern assembly to form the mold (Item 4 of Figure 10). Between each coating, the assembly was

  19. Preliminary Results on the Surface of a New Fe-Based Metallic Material after “In Vivo” Maintaining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Săndulache, F.; Stanciu, S.; Cimpoeşu, N.; Stanciu, T.; Cimpoeșu, R.; Enache, A.; Baciu, R.

    2017-06-01

    Abstract A new Fe-based alloy was obtained using UltraCast melting equipment. The alloy, after mechanical processing, was implanted in five rabbit specimens (with respect for the “in-bone” procedure). After 30 days of implantation the samples were recovered and analyzed by weight and surface state meanings. Scanning electron microscopy technique was used to determine the new compounds morphology from the metallic surface and X-ray dispersive energy spectroscopy for chemical analyze results. A bond between the metallic material and biological material of the bone was observed through increasing of sample weight and by SEM images. After the first set of tests, as the samples were extracted and biologically cleaned, the samples were ultrasonically cleaned and re-analyzed in order to establish the stability of the chemical compounds.

  20. Characterization of the interface between cast-to Co-Cr implant cylinders and cast Co-Cr alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkomur, Ahmet; Ucar, Yurdanur; Ekren, Orhun; Arai Shinkai, Rosemary Sadami; Teixeira, Eduardo Rolim

    2016-05-01

    The affordable Co-Cr cast alloy should provide an ideal interface with prefabricated cast-to cylinders from the same alloy family. The alloy microstructures should be maintained up to the interface, and porosities and reaction regions should be absent, and sufficient bond strength between alloys should be provided. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the metallurgical interfacial compatibility between Co-Cr dental casting alloys and a prefabricated Co-Cr dental implant cast-to-cylinder. A Co-Cr alloy was cast to Co-Cr implant cylinders. Specimens were cross-sectioned longitudinally and divided into as-cast and heat-treated groups. The microstructures of specimens were evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The elemental composition of as-received prefabricated implant cylinders and diffusion characteristics of cast interfacial regions were determined by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Vickers hardness values were defined across the interface on cast specimens and for the as-received implant cylinders. ANOVA and Tukey honest significant differences tests were used for the statistical evaluation of hardness values. No significant reaction regions or porosity were present in the interface. Microstructural aspect and interdiffusion indicated a metal-metal bond between the Co-Cr implant cylinder and cast alloy. Mean hardness values demonstrated a significant rise across the interface (373.5 ±12.8; 363.8 ±12.6, respectively) from the wrought cylinder (338.6 ±10.5; 329 ±9.7, respectively) to the cast alloy (399.8 ±7.4; 392.3 ±10.3, respectively) for the as-cast and heat-treated conditions, respectively. Co-Cr casting alloy cast on to prefabricated Co-Cr implant cylinders provided interfaces which appear to fulfill the requirements of the established criteria. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the Inertness of Investment Casting Molds Using Both Sessile Drop and Centrifugal Casting Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xu; Yuan, Chen; Green, Nick; Withey, Paul

    2013-02-01

    The investment casting process is an economic production method for engineering components in TiAl-based alloys and offers the benefits of a near net-shaped component with a good surface finish. An investigation was undertaken to develop three new face coat systems based on yttria, but with better sintering properties. These face coat systems were mainly based on an yttria-alumina-zirconia system (Y2O3-0.5 wt pct Al2O3-0.5 wt pct ZrO2), an yttria-fluoride system (Y2O3-0.15 wt pct YF3), and an yttria-boride system (Y2O3-0.15 wt pct B2O3). After sintering, the chemical inertness of the face coat was first tested and analyzed using a sessile drop test through the metal wetting behavioral change for each face coat surface. Then, the interactions between the shell and metal were studied by centrifugal investment casting TiAl bars. Although the sintering aids in yttria can decrease the chemical inertness of the face coat, the thickness of the interaction layer in the casting was less than 10 μm; therefore, these face coats still can be possible face coat materials for investment casting TiAl alloys.

  2. Correlating Cleaning Thoroughness with Effectiveness and Briefly Intervening to Affect Cleaning Outcomes: How Clean Is Cleaned?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Clifford

    Full Text Available The most efficient approach to monitoring and improving cleaning outcomes remains unresolved. We sought to extend the findings of a previous study by determining whether cleaning thoroughness (dye removal correlates with cleaning efficacy (absence of molecular or cultivable biomaterial and whether one brief educational intervention improves cleaning outcomes.Before-after trial.Newly built community hospital.90 minute training refresher with surface-specific performance results.Dye removal, measured by fluorescence, and biomaterial removal and acquisition, measured with culture and culture-independent PCR-based assays, were clandestinely assessed for eight consecutive months. At this midpoint, results were presented to the cleaning staff (intervention and assessments continued for another eight consecutive months.1273 surfaces were sampled before and after terminal room cleaning. In the short-term, dye removal increased from 40.3% to 50.0% (not significant. For the entire study period, dye removal also improved but not significantly. After the intervention, the number of rooms testing positive for specific pathogenic species by culturing decreased from 55.6% to 36.6% (not significant, and those testing positive by PCR fell from 80.6% to 53.7% (P = 0.016. For nonspecific biomaterial on surfaces: a removal of cultivable Gram-negatives (GN trended toward improvement (P = 0.056; b removal of any cultivable growth was unchanged but acquisition (detection of biomaterial on post-cleaned surfaces that were contaminant-free before cleaning worsened (P = 0.017; c removal of PCR-based detection of bacterial DNA improved (P = 0.046, but acquisition worsened (P = 0.003; d cleaning thoroughness and efficacy were not correlated.At this facility, a minor intervention or minimally more aggressive cleaning may reduce pathogen-specific contamination, but not without unintended consequences.

  3. Graphite nodules in fatigue-tested cast iron characterized in 2D and 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukherjee, Krishnendu; Fæster, Søren; Hansen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Thick-walled ductile iron casts have been studied by applying (i) cooling rate calculations by FVM, (ii) microstructural characterization by 2D SEM and 3D X-ray tomography techniques and (iii) fatigue testing of samples drawn from components cast in sand molds and metal molds. An analysis has shown...... correlations between cooling rate, structure and fatigue strengths demonstrating the benefit of 3D structural characterization to identify possible causes of premature fatigue failure of ductile cast iron....

  4. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 1: Introduction (Ⅰ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  5. "Souvenir" casting silicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carel, R S; Salman, H; Bar-Ziv, J

    1994-10-01

    A case of silicosis in a 47-year-old worker who was employed for many years in a small souvenir casting shop is described. This work site demonstrates many unfavorable characteristics of small industries, such as lack of awareness of the need for safety measures, exposure control, protection of workers, and lack of compliance with environmental and medical-legal standards.

  6. Casting and Splinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-21

    70° ~ Does injured extremity maintain good color , temp, and cap refill ~ Were thermal injuries avoided by ensuring water was not hot and cast was...immediate assistance if: )- Numbness (pins and needles) of fingers > Excessive swelling of fmgers > Blueness or whiteness of fingers > Severe pain

  7. INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE REGIME OF MELTING ON CHARACTERISTICS OF CAST ALIMINIUM ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Rafalski

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature dependence of the melts properties of the system Al-Si with content of silicon up to 16% (masses and influence of the temperature regime of the alloys melting in liquid phase on the structure and properties of cast metal is studied. The temperature regimes of preparation of cast aluminium alloys in liquid phase providing dispersible phases at crystallizing and increase of mechanical properties of cast metal are established. Modification of form, sizes and character of distribution of primary and eutectic phases is the result of the regime of the temperature processing of alloy in liquid state. The formalized model of evolutions of the metal system condition is offered.

  8. Effect of pressure applied during casting on temperatures beneath casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deignan, Brian J; Iaquinto, Joseph M; Eskildsen, Scott M; Woodcock, Cassandra A; Owen, John R; Wayne, Jennifer S; Kuester, Victoria G

    2011-01-01

    Burns and pressure sores are common injuries during cast application. Various factors such as water temperature, padding, and cast material layers may play a role in these injuries; however, the effect of cast molding on temperatures and pressures has not been investigated. This raises the following questions, does the application of molding during cast application: (1) alter skin level temperatures in a variety of cast materials? and (2) risk inducing either thermal injury or pressure necrosis? An upper extremity model was created to measure pressure and temperature underneath casting materials. Cast padding, water bath temperature, and cast thickness were standardized. A 3-point mold was simulated using 3 casting materials-Fiberglass only, Plaster Only splint, and Plaster splint overwrapped with Fiberglass-while pressure and temperature were recorded. : Pressure application led to a statistically significant (PFiberglass combination reached an average peak temperature of 47.9°C, which was maintained for up to 6 minutes. Neither Fiberglass nor Plaster Only reached peak temperatures of this magnitude (average of 42.7 and 43.6°C, respectively). Peak (369 mm Hg) and highest residual (21 mm Hg) pressures were below harmful levels. Pressure application during casting is a risk factor for burn injuries. Care should be taken when molding a plaster splint overwrapped in fiberglass by waiting until the plaster has fully cooled. Combined with other known risk factors, the pressure from molding a cast could increase the likelihood of causing cutaneous burns.

  9. Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Ultrasonic Assisted Cast Magnesium 1wt% Silicon Carbide Nano-Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erman, Ari

    The goal of this dissertation is to establish an understanding of processing -- microstructure -- mechanical behavior relationship in Mg-1wt% SiC metal matrix nano-composites fabricated via an ultrasonic assisted casting process, with the emphasis on the effect of the distribution of nanoparticles on this relationship. Ultrasonic assisted casting has been proved as an effective technique to distribute nanoparticles in Mg metal matrix nano-composites (MMNCs). Mg MMNCs reinforced with 1 wt% SiC nanoparticles, were cast by ultrasonic cavitation-based dispersion methods. Microstructural analyses of as cast specimens were conducted to characterize the grain size, shape and distribution, SiC nanoparticle size and distribution, and nanoparticle-matrix interface. Average grain size for the ultrasonic assisted cast composite specimens was 72 mum compared to 181 mum for pure Mg samples prepared by the same method. The average measured SiC nanoparticle size was 66 nm. TEM studies showed good local dispersion of SiC nanoparticles, with only a few small, widely spaced clusters. HRTEM showed a clean interface between SiC nanoparticles and the Mg matrix, with no evidence of secondary phases. The yield strength of Mg-1 wt% SiC nanocomposites was 67 MPa, which showed improvement from 47 MPa for the pure Mg samples. This extra strengthening is due to Orowan and Hall-Petch effects. Fatigue experiments were conducted to characterize the cyclic stress-strain response of pure Mg and Mg-1wt% SiC samples at 0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6% plastic strain amplitudes. The analyses of the cyclic stress response curves and hysteresis loops, combined with post failure TEM analyses provided an understanding of the role of twinning, and twin-particle interactions on the cyclic deformation behavior of Mg MMNCs. Tensile twinning and basal slip are the main forms of deformation mechanisms under compression, followed by detwinning and basal slip in subsequent tension. Fatigue lives of Mg MMNCs are comparable to

  10. Simulation of mould filling process for composite skeleton castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dziuba

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work authors showed selected results of simulation and experimental studies on temperature distribution during solidification of skeleton casting and mould filling process. The aim of conducted simulations was the choice of thermal and geometrical parameters for the needs of designed calculations of the skeleton castings and the estimation of the guidelines for the technology of manufacturing. The subject of numerical simulation was the analysis of ability of filling the channels of core by liquid metal at estability technological parameters.. Below the assumptions and results of the initial simulated calculations are presented. The total number of the nodes in the casting was 1920 and of the connectors was 5280 what gave filling of 100% for the nodes and 99,56% for the connectors in the results of the simulation. Together it resulted as 99,78 % of filling the volume of the casting. The nodes and connectors were filled up to the 30 level of the casting in the simulation. The all connectors were filled up to the 25 level of the casting in the simulation. Starting from the 25 level individual connectors at the side surface of the casting weren’t filled up. The connectors weren’t supplied by multi-level getting system. The differences of filling the levels are little (maximally 5 per cent.

  11. Supercritical fluids cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butner, S.; Hjeresen, D.; Silva, L.; Spall, D.; Stephenson, R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed multi-party research and development program which seeks to develop supercritical fluid cleaning technology as an alternative to existing solvent cleaning applications. While SCF extraction technology has been in commercial use for several years, the use of these fluids as cleaning agents poses several new technical challenges. Problems inherent in the commercialization of SCF technology include: the cleaning efficacy and compatibility of supercritical working fluids with the parts to be cleaned must be assessed for a variety of materials and components; process parameters and equipment design Have been optimized for extractive applications and must be reconsidered for application to cleaning; and co-solvents and entrainers must be identified to facilitate the removal of polar inorganic and organic contaminants, which are often not well solvated in supercritical systems. The proposed research and development program would address these issues and lead to the development and commercialization of viable SCF-based technology for precision cleaning applications. This paper provides the technical background, program scope, and delineates the responsibilities of each principal participant in the program.

  12. The casting of western sculpture during the XIXth century: sand casting versus lost wax casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, T.P.C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper will discuss research into bronze casting techniques as practiced during the XIXth and early XXth century. Both natural sand casting (fonte au sable naturel) and lost wax casting (fonte à la cire perdue) were employed during this period and sometimes rivalled for commissions. Before the

  13. Development Program for Natural Aging Aluminum Casting Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Geoffrey K. Sigworth

    2004-05-14

    A number of 7xx aluminum casting alloys are based on the ternary Al-Zn-Mg system. These alloys age naturally to high strength at room temperature. A high temperature solution and aging treatment is not required. Consequently, these alloys have the potential to deliver properties nearly equivalent to conventional A356-T6 (Al-Si-Mg) castings, with a significant cost saving. An energy savings is also possible. In spite of these advantages, the 7xx casting alloys are seldom used, primarily because of their reputation for poor castibility. This paper describes the results obtained in a DOE-funded research study of these alloys, which is part of the DOE-OIT ''Cast Metals Industries of the Future'' Program. Suggestions for possible commercial use are also given.

  14. Friction Stir Welding of Magnesium Die Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skar, Jan Ivar; Gjestland, Haavard; Oosterkamp, Ljiljana Djapic; Albright, Darryl L.

    Friction stir welding (FSW), being a solid-state process, is an attractive method for joining magnesium die castings. In this study, FSW of AZ91D and AM50A plates was performed both on the individual alloys and to join them together. The welds were sound and free from defects, except for small surface cracks in AM50A; a fine microstructure characterized the weld zones. The tensile properties of specimens transverse to the weld zone were measured, as were the corrosion properties. The tensile properties were somewhat lower than the base metal, with the largest percentage decrease found in the elongation of AM50A, perhaps due to the surface cracking. The corrosion resistance of the weld zone was relatively poor, most likely due to iron contamination from wearing of the tool. Further optimization of the FSW tool design and process parameters must take place to improve the reliability of FSW for magnesium die castings.

  15. Deriving site-specific clean-up criteria to protect ecological receptors (plants and soil invertebrates) exposed to metal or metalloid soil contaminants via the direct contact exposure pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checkai, Ron; Van Genderen, Eric; Sousa, José Paulo; Stephenson, Gladys; Smolders, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Soil contaminant concentration limits for the protection of terrestrial plants and soil invertebrates are commonly based on thresholds derived using data from laboratory ecotoxicity tests. A comprehensive assessment has been made for the derivation of ecological soil screening levels (Eco-SSL) in the United States; however, these limits are conservative because of their focus on high bioavailability scenarios. Here, we explain and evaluate approaches to soil limit derivation taken by 4 jurisdictions, 2 of which allow for correction of data for factors affecting bioavailability among soils, and between spiked and field-contaminated soils (Registration Evaluation Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals [REACH] Regulation, European Union [EU], and the National Environment Protection Council [NEPC], Australia). Scientifically advanced features from these methods have been integrated into a newly developed method for deriving soil clean-up values (SCVs) within the context of site-specific baseline ecological risk assessment. Resulting site-specific SCVs that account for bioavailability may permit a greater residual concentration in soil when compared to generic screening limit concentrations (e.g., Eco-SSL), while still affording acceptable protection. Two choices for selecting the level of protection are compared (i.e., allowing higher effect levels per species, or allowing a higher percentile of species that are potentially unprotected). Implementation of this new method is presented for the jurisdiction of the United States, with a focus on metal and metalloid contaminants; however, the new method can be used in any jurisdiction. A case study for molybdate shows the large effect of bioavailability corrections and smaller effects of protection level choices when deriving SCVs. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:346–357. PMID:24470189

  16. Making Artificial Heart Components – Selected Aspects Of Casting Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobczak J.J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study shown possibilities of Rapid Prototyping techniques (RP and metal casting simulation software (MCSS, including non inertial reference systems. RP and MCSS have been used in order to design and produce essential elements for artificial heart. Additionally it has been shown possibilities of Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM technique and DodJet technology using prototyped elements of rotodynamic pump. MAGMASOFT® software allowed to verify the cast kit heart valves model. Optical scanner Atos III enabled size verification of experimental elements supplied by rapid prototyping together with metal casting elements. Due to the selection of ceramic materials and assessment of molten metal – ceramic reactivity at high temperatures together with pattern materials selection model it was possible to design, manufacture a ceramic mould for titanium based alloys. The casting structure modification has been carried out by means of high isostatic pressure technique (HIP. The quality assessment of the casting materials has been performed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF, ARL 4460 Optical Emission Spectrometer, metallographic techniques and X-ray computed tomography.

  17. Cast iron - a predictable material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg C. Sturm

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available High strength compacted graphite iron (CGI or alloyed cast iron components are substituting previously used non-ferrous castings in automotive power train applications. The mechanical engineering industry has recognized the value in substituting forged or welded structures with stiff and light-weight cast iron castings. New products such as wind turbines have opened new markets for an entire suite of highly reliable ductile iron cast components. During the last 20 years, casting process simulation has developed from predicting hot spots and solidification to an integral assessment tool for foundries for the entire manufacturing route of castings. The support of the feeding related layout of the casting is still one of the most important duties for casting process simulation. Depending on the alloy poured, different feeding behaviors and self-feeding capabilities need to be considered to provide a defect free casting. Therefore, it is not enough to base the prediction of shrinkage defects solely on hot spots derived from temperature fields. To be able to quantitatively predict these defects, solidification simulation had to be combined with density and mass transport calculations, in order to evaluate the impact of the solidification morphology on the feeding behavior as well as to consider alloy dependent feeding ranges. For cast iron foundries, the use of casting process simulation has become an important instrument to predict the robustness and reliability of their processes, especially since the influence of alloying elements, melting practice and metallurgy need to be considered to quantify the special shrinkage and solidification behavior of cast iron. This allows the prediction of local structures, phases and ultimately the local mechanical properties of cast irons, to asses casting quality in the foundry but also to make use of this quantitative information during design of the casting. Casting quality issues related to thermally driven

  18. Die Casting Part Distortion: Prediction and Attenuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr, R. Allen Miller

    2002-02-12

    The goal of this research was to predict the part deformation and residual stresses after ejection from the die and cooling to room temperature. A finite element model was built to achieve this goal and several modeling techniques were investigated throughout this research. Die-casting is a very complex process and the researchers are faced with a large number of hard to solve physical problems when modeling the process. Several assumptions are made in our simulation model. The first significant assumption is the instantaneous cavity filling. This means that the cavity filling stage is not considered in our model. Considering the cavity filling stage increases the modeling complexity as a result of different flow patterns. expected in the shot sleeve, gate, runner and different cavity features. The flow of gas from the cavity through the vents is another problem that is ignored in our model as a result of this assumption. Our second assumption is that the cast metal has uniform temperature distribution inside the cavity, at the starting point of simulation. This temperature is assumed to be over liquidus limit, i.e. the solid fraction is 0.0% of the cast metal. The third assumption is due to ABAQUS (commercial software used in this research) limitations. ABAQUS cannot deal with multi-phase models; therefore we use solid elements to define the casting instead of multi-phase (liquid/solid) elements. Liquid elements can carry the hydrostatic pressure from the shot sleeve and apply it on the cavity surfaces, while the solid elements do not have this capability. To compensate for this assumption we add the cavity pressure as a boundary condition and apply it on the cavity surface separately from the part. Another issue with this assumption is that, liquid casting can follow the cavity shape when it distorts. With the use of solid elements to represent the casting during its liquid state, it loses this capability to follow the cavity. Several techniques were tested to

  19. Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilkening, D. [Columbia Falls Aluminum Co., Columbia Falls, MT (United States); Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B. [AFFCO, L.L.C., Anaconda, MT (United States)

    1998-11-01

    The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast.

  20. Comprehensive Report to Congress Clean Coal Technology Program: Clean power from integrated coal/ore reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report describes a clean coal program in which an iron making technology is paired with combined cycle power generation to produce 3300 tons per day of hot metal and 195 MWe of electricity. The COREX technology consists of a metal-pyrolyzer connected to a reduction shaft, in which the reducing gas comes directly from coal pyrolysis. The offgas is utilized to fuel a combined cycle power plant.

  1. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... reminding healthcare providers to clean their hands. See: https://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/campa... . Comments on this ... are allowed in accordance with our comment policy: http://www.cdc.gov/SocialMedia/Tools/... This video can ...

  2. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hand hygiene and empower patients to play a role in their care by asking or reminding healthcare providers to clean their hands. See: ... Hand Washing For Nurses - Duration: 2:57. Kevin Gorin 213,219 views ...

  3. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out why Close Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe ...

  4. Clean Water Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Clean Water Act (CWA) establishes the basic structure for regulating discharges of pollutants into U.S. waters and regulating quality standards for surface...

  5. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ... intended to promote or encourage adherence to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the ...

  6. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 59K ...

  7. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... intended to promote or encourage adherence to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean ... also aims to address myths and misperceptions about hand hygiene and empower patients to play a role in ...

  8. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... empower patients to play a role in their care by asking or reminding healthcare providers to clean ... 290 views 1:27 Hand Hygiene for Health Care Workers - Germ Smart - Duration: 5:45. Former Saskatoon ...

  10. Clean Energy Finance Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    This tool is for state and local governments interested in developing a financing program to support energy efficiency and clean energy improvements for large numbers of buildings within their jurisdiction.

  11. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean Hands Count campaign, which also ... views 3:56 Loading more suggestions... Show more Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History ...

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  13. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... LIVES - Clean Your Hands - No action today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 59, ... 328 views 1:53 Good Sam Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 2:28. Good Samaritan Medical Center ...

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    Full Text Available ... to a playlist. Sign in Share More Report Need to report the video? Sign in to report ... WHO: SAVE LIVES - Clean Your Hands - No action today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health ...

  15. Clean Diesel Tribal Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DERA Tribal Program awards clean diesel grants specifically for tribal nations. The Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) appropriates funds for these projects. Publication Numbers: EPA-420-B-13-025 and EPA-420-P-11-001.

  16. Clean Diesel National Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Funding Assistance Program administers competitive grants for clean diesel projects. The Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) appropriates funds for these projects. Publication numbers: EPA-420-B-13-025 and EPA-420-P-11-001.

  17. Clean Water Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent geographic terms used within the Clean Water Act (CWA). The CWA establishes the basic structure for regulating the addition of pollutants...

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    Full Text Available ... Published on May 5, 2017 This video for healthcare providers is intended to promote or encourage adherence ... role in their care by asking or reminding healthcare providers to clean their hands. See: https://www. ...

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  2. A Process for Manufacturing Metal-Ceramic Cellular Materials with Designed Mesostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelling, Dean Andrew, Jr.

    The goal of this work is to develop and characterize a manufacturing process that is able to create metal matrix composites with complex cellular geometries. The novel manufacturing method uses two distinct additive manufacturing processes: i) fabrication of patternless molds for cellular metal castings and ii) printing an advanced cellular ceramic for embedding in a metal matrix. However, while the use of AM greatly improves the freedom in the design of MMCs, it is important to identify the constraints imposed by the process and its process relationships. First, the author investigates potential differences in material properties (microstructure, porosity, mechanical strength) of A356 - T6 castings resulting from two different commercially available Binder Jetting media and traditional "no-bake" silica sand. It was determined that they yielded statistically equivalent results in four of the seven tests performed: dendrite arm spacing, porosity, surface roughness, and tensile strength. They differed in sand tensile strength, hardness, and density. Additionally, two critical sources of process constraints on part geometry are examined: (i) depowdering unbound material from intricate casting channels and (ii) metal flow and solidification distances through complex mold geometries. A Taguchi Design of Experiments is used to determine the relationships of important independent variables of each constraint. For depowdering, a minimum cleaning diameter of 3 mm was determined along with an equation relating cleaning distance as a function of channel diameter. Furthermore, for metal flow, choke diameter was found to be significantly significant variable. Finally, the author presents methods to process complex ceramic structure from precursor powders via Binder Jetting AM technology to incorporate into a bonded sand mold and the subsequently casted metal matrix. Through sintering experiments, a sintering temperature of 1375°C was established for the ceramic insert (78

  3. Triple Plate Mold Final Report: Optimization of the Mold Design and Casting Parameters for a Thin U-10mo Fuel Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aikin, Jr., Robert M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-04

    This work describes the experiments and modeling that have been performed to improve and try to optimize the simultaneous casting of three plates of U-10wt%Mo in a single coil vacuum induction melting (VIM) furnace. The plates of interest are 280 mm wide by 203 mm tall by 5 mm thick (11" x 8" x 0.2"). The initial mold design and processing parameters were supplied by Y-12. The mold and casting cavity were instrumented with a number of thermocouples, and the casting performed to determine the thermal history of the mold and casting. The resulting cast plates were radiographed and numerous defects identified. Metallography was performed to help identify the nature of the radiographically observed defects. This information was then used to validate a mold filling and solidification model of that casting. Based on the initial casting, good casting design practice, and process simulation of several design alternatives, a revised design was developed with the goal of minimizing casting defects such as porosity. The redesigned mold had a larger hot-top and had its long axis along the horizontal direction. These changes were to try to develop a strong thermal gradient conducive to good feeding and minimization of micro- and macroporosity in the cast plates. An instrumented casting was then performed with the revised mold design and a linear distributor. This design yielded cast plates with significantly less radiographically identified defects. Unfortunately, there was significant variation in plate weight and metal content in their hot-tops. Fluid flow simulations were then performed on this mold/distributor design. This helped identify the issue with this linear distributor design. Additional simulations were then performed on candidate distributor redesigns and a preferred distributor annular design was identified. This improved annular design was used to produce a third instrumented casting with favorable results. These refined designs and their radiographic

  4. Casting larger polycrystalline silicon ingots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Tomlinson, T.; Cliber, J.; Shea, S.; Narayanan, M.

    1995-08-01

    Solarex has developed and patented a directional solidification casting process specifically designed for photovoltaics. In this process, silicon feedstock is melted in a ceramic crucible and solidified into a large grained semicrystalline silicon ingot. In-house manufacture of low cost, high purity ceramics is a key to the low cost fabrication of Solarex polycrystalline wafers. The casting process is performed in Solarex designed casting stations. The casting operation is computer controlled. There are no moving parts (except for the loading and unloading) so the growth process proceeds with virtually no operator intervention Today Solarex casting stations are used to produce ingots from which 4 bricks, each 11.4 cm by 11.4 cm in cross section, are cut. The stations themselves are physically capable of holding larger ingots, that would yield either: 4 bricks, 15 cm by 15 an; or 9 bricks, 11.4 cm by 11.4 an in cross-section. One of the tasks in the Solarex Cast Polycrystalline Silicon PVMaT Program is to design and modify one of the castings stations to cast these larger ingots. If successful, this effort will increase the production capacity of Solarex`s casting stations by 73% and reduce the labor content for casting by an equivalent percentage.

  5. Rapid precision casting for complex thin-walled aluminum alloy parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanpu DONG

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on Vacuum Differential Pressure Casting (VDPC precision forming technology and the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS Rapid Prototyping (RP technology, a rapid manufacturing method called Rapid Precision Casting (RPC process from computer three-dimensional solid models to metallic parts was investigated. The experimental results showed that the main advantage of RPC was not only its ability to cast higher internal quality and more accurate complex thin-walled aluminum alloy parts, but also the greatly-reduced lead time cycle from Selective Laser Sintering(SLS plastic prototyping to metallic parts. The key forming technology of RPC for complex thin-walled metallic parts has been developed for new casting production and Rapid Tooling (RT, and it is possible to rapidly manufacture high-quality and accurate metallic parts by means of RP in foundry industry.

  6. Analysis of reasons causing riser feeding failure in nodular iron castings production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Gen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to mold rigidity and metallurgical quality of iron melting, the main reasons causing riser feeding failure in nodular iron castings production are: (a open and cold metal flowing-over risers were adopted; (b riser location was not proper; (c riser was too small or/and not enough high; (d ingates did not freeze up instantly as soon as pouring finished;(e there're isolated hot spots in the casting which are not connected with feeding channel of the riser; (f the feeding channel of castings with small size and thin sections is too narrow for feeding liquid to enter casting; and so on.

  7. Analysis of Defects in Castings Cast by Rheocasting Method SEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryksi Stunova B.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses specific defects of castings produced by semi-solid casting process, especially rheocasting method SEED, which uses mechanical swirling for reaching proper structure in semisolid state with high content of solid fraction. Heat treated alloy AlSi7Mg0.3 was applied for producing an Engine Bracket casting part. For observing structure, metallographic observation by light and SEM microscopy was used. To analyse the process, software ProCAST was used to simulate the movements in shot chamber and filling of the mold.

  8. Electromagnetically Clean Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem, Theodore G.; Kenniston, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    The term 'electromagnetically clean solar array' ('EMCSA') refers to a panel that contains a planar array of solar photovoltaic cells and that, in comparison with a functionally equivalent solar-array panel of a type heretofore used on spacecraft, (1) exhibits less electromagnetic interferences to and from other nearby electrical and electronic equipment and (2) can be manufactured at lower cost. The reduction of electromagnetic interferences is effected through a combination of (1) electrically conductive, electrically grounded shielding and (2) reduction of areas of current loops (in order to reduce magnetic moments). The reduction of cost is effected by designing the array to be fabricated as a more nearly unitary structure, using fewer components and fewer process steps. Although EMCSAs were conceived primarily for use on spacecraft they are also potentially advantageous for terrestrial applications in which there are requirements to limit electromagnetic interference. In a conventional solar panel of the type meant to be supplanted by an EMCSA panel, the wiring is normally located on the back side, separated from the cells, thereby giving rise to current loops having significant areas and, consequently, significant magnetic moments. Current-loop geometries are chosen in an effort to balance opposing magnetic moments to limit far-0field magnetic interactions, but the relatively large distances separating current loops makes full cancellation of magnetic fields problematic. The panel is assembled from bare photovoltaic cells by means of multiple sensitive process steps that contribute significantly to cost, especially if electomagnetic cleanliness is desired. The steps include applying a cover glass and electrical-interconnect-cell (CIC) sub-assemble, connecting the CIC subassemblies into strings of series-connected cells, laying down and adhesively bonding the strings onto a panel structure that has been made in a separate multi-step process, and mounting the

  9. Clean elements in abelian rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Let be a ring with identity. An element in is said to be clean if it is the sum of a unit and an idempotent. is said to be clean if all of its elements are clean. If every idempotent in is central, then is said to be abelian. In this paper we obtain some conditions equivalent to being clean in an abelian ring.

  10. Fracture Mechanisms in Steel Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski Z.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigations were inspired with the problem of cracking of steel castings during the production process. A single mechanism of decohesion - the intergranular one - occurs in the case of hot cracking, while a variety of structural factors is decisive for hot cracking initiation, depending on chemical composition of the cast steel. The low-carbon and low-alloyed steel castings crack due to the presence of the type II sulphides, the cause of cracking of the high-carbon tool cast steels is the net of secondary cementite and/or ledeburite precipitated along the boundaries of solidified grains. Also the brittle phosphor and carbide eutectics precipitated in the final stage solidification are responsible for cracking of castings made of Hadfield steel. The examination of mechanical properties at 1050°C revealed low or very low strength of high-carbon cast steels.

  11. Geometrical modulus of a casting and its influence on solidification process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Havlicek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Object: The work analyses the importance of the known criterion for evaluating the controlled solidification of castings, so called geometrical modulus defined by N. Chvorinov as the first one. Geometrical modulus influences the solidification process. The modulus has such specificity that during the process of casting formation it is not a constant but its initial value decreases with the solidification progress because the remaining melt volume can decrease faster than its cooling surface.Methodology: The modulus is determined by a simple calculation from the ratio of the casting volume after pouring the metal in the mould to the cooled mould surface. The solidified metal volume and the cooled surface too are changed during solidification. That calculation is much more complicated. Results were checked up experimentally by measuring the temperatures in the cross-section of heavy steel castings during cooling them.Results: The given experimental results have completed the original theoretical calculations by Chvorinov and recent researches done with use of numerical calculations. The contribution explains how the geometrical modulus together with the thermal process in the casting causes the higher solidification rate in the axial part of the casting cross-section and shortening of solidification time. Practical implications: Change of the geometrical modulus negatively affects the casting internal quality. Melt feeding by capillary filtration in the dendritic network in the casting central part decreases and in such a way the shrinkage porosity volume increases. State of stress character in the casting is changed too and it increases.

  12. Materials on dies for pressure die casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ragan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the contribution the stress of die materials of thermal fatigue is defi ned and material life is derived theoretically and compared with the measured values. The important properties of the die materials as thermal conductivity, coeffi cient of thermal expansivity, modulus of elasticity and mechanical properties are described. Binding to it single die materials as carbon steels and chrome-tungsten steels are analyzed. As the perspective die material for pressure die casting of ferrous metals appears molybdenum with regard to advantageous properties.

  13. Clean technologies: methods for minimizing the releases and choice of the effluents valorization processes. Application to metal workshops; Technologies propres: methodes de minimisation des rejets et de choix des procedes de valorisation des effluents. Application aux ateliers de traitement de surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laforest, V.

    1999-12-10

    Currently, the essential part of the money invested by the industrialist is for the water treatment. In France, most of the 20 billions francs per year devoted to the water treatment is used for the industrial activity. The global management of effluents favour the integration of clean technologies (optimization, change and modification of the production process) in order to reduce the pollution problem at its source. Our study aims at the introduction of clean technologies in the metal workshops (consumer and generator of water and chemicals) by the development of two data management methods, which lead to two decision support systems. The aim of the first one is to minimize both the water consumption and the wastewater disposal by optimizing the production process (optimum yield and efficiency of the rinsing baths). The second one concerns the choice of valorization techniques considering the valorization objectives, the effluents characteristics and the parameters limiting the use of the techniques. Our approach fits into a global management method for the metal finishing industry wastewater. Its aim is to limit the quantity of wastewater generated, to valorize effluents and by this way to develop the clean technologies.

  14. Influence of time of placement of investments for burnout and the type of rings being used on the casting accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shabir A; Naqash, Talib Amin; Padmanabhan, T V; Subramanium; Lambodaran; Nazir, Shazana

    2014-03-01

    The sole objective of casting procedure is to provide a metallic duplication of missing tooth structure, with as great accuracy as possible. The ability to produce well fitting castings require strict adherence to certain fundamentals. A study was undertaken to comparatively evaluate the effect on casting accuracy by subjecting the invested wax patterns to burnout after different time intervals. The effect on casting accuracy using metal ring into a pre heated burnout furnace and using split ring was also carried. The readings obtained were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis.

  15. Marginal Gap of Milled versus Cast Gold Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Russell; Verrett, Ronald; Haney, Stephan; Mansueto, Michael; Challa, Suman

    2017-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated and compared the vertical marginal gap of cast and milled full coverage gold copings using two margin designs (chamfer and chamfer bevel) before and after fitting adjustments. Ten impressions were made of two metal master dies (one chamfer margin, one chamfer-bevel margin) and poured twice in Type IV stone. The 20 subsequent casts with 40 dies were split into four groups (n = 10); cast gold bevel, cast gold chamfer, milled gold bevel, and milled gold chamfer groups. The cast specimens received approximately 40 μm die relief no closer than 1 mm from the finish line. Cast copings were hand waxed, cast in a high noble gold alloy, chemically divested, and the sprues were removed. For milled gold copings, casts were scanned and copings designed using 3shape D900 scanner and software. Parameters were set to approximate analog fabrication (cement gap = 0.01 mm; extra cement gap = 0.04 mm, drill radius = 0.65 mm). Copings were milled from the same high noble alloy. All copings were seated on their respective master die in a custom scanning jig and measured using a measuring microscope at 90× (60 measurements per specimen, 15 per surface). Following initial measurements, all copings were adjusted on stone dies. The number of adjustment cycles was recorded and post-adjustment measurements were made using the same method. Data were analyzed using independent and paired t-tests. Milled gold copings with a beveled margin (11.7 ± 20.4 μm) had a significantly (p cast gold copings with a beveled margin (43.6 ± 46.8 μm) after adjustment. Cast gold copings with a chamfer margin (22.7 ± 24.7 μm) had a significantly (p gold copings with a chamfer margin (27.9 ± 31.6 μm) following adjustments. Adjustments significantly decreased marginal gap for both cast groups (p gold restorations milled with the tested parameters provide a vertical marginal gap that is an acceptable alternative to traditional gold crown casting techniques. © 2016 by the

  16. Understanding the Relationship Between Filling Pattern and Part Quality in Die Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerald Brevick; R. Allen Miller

    2004-03-15

    The overall objective of this research project was to investigate phenomena involved in the filling of die cavities with molten alloy in the cold chamber die-casting process. It has long been recognized that the filling pattern of molten metal entering a die cavity influences the quality of die-cast parts. Filling pattern may be described as the progression of molten metal filling the die cavity geometry as a function of time. The location, size and geometric configuration of points of metal entry (gates), as well as the geometry of the casting cavity itself, have great influence on filling patterns. Knowledge of the anticipated filling patterns in die-castings is important for designers. Locating gates to avoid undesirable flow patterns that may entrap air in the casting is critical to casting quality - as locating vents to allow air to escape from the cavity (last places to fill). Casting quality attributes that are commonly flow related are non-fills, poor surface finish, internal porosity due to trapped air, cold shuts, cold laps, flow lines, casting skin delamination (flaking), and blistering during thermal treatment.

  17. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, David M [Livermore, CA; Sampayan, Stephen [Manteca, CA; Slenes, Kirk [Albuquerque, NM; Stoller, H M [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  18. Improved Casting Furnace Conceptual Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tolman, David Donald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-02-01

    In an attempt to ensure more consistent casting results and remove some schedule variance associated with casting, an improved casting furnace concept has been developed. The improved furnace uses the existing arc melter hardware and glovebox utilities. The furnace concept was designed around physical and operational requirements such as; a charge sized of less than 30 grams, high heating rates and minimal additional footprint. The conceptual model is shown in the report as well as a summary of how the requirements were met.

  19. Cause and Prevention of Explosions Involving DC Casting of Aluminum Sheet Ingot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Ray T.; Ekenes, J. Martin

    The casting of aluminum alloy sheet ingot and T-bar presents the potential for some of the most volatile situations that can occur in DC (direct chill) and EMC (Electromagnetic) casting processes. Aluminum Association explosion incident data from over 300 explosions spanning a twenty-year period were reviewed and analyzed looking for common factors and repetitive reasons for explosions. Analysis of explosions occurring during the three stages of sheet ingot casting, `start of cast', `steady state' and `end of cast', were examined and prioritized. Case studies illustrate the need for understanding both technical and non-technical factors contributing to explosions involving molten metal. This paper identifies the major causes of explosions involving DC casting of aluminum alloy sheet ingot and makes recommendations for how to prevent the recurrence of such events and minimize the risk of injury.

  20. EBR-II fuel slug casting experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, C. W.; Batte`, G. L.; Tracy, D. B.; Griffiths, V.

    1987-07-01

    The following paper presents a chronology of EBR-II fuel slug casting experience. Starting with the early vendor campaigns, the paper explains how production of EBR-II fuel, as well as fuel for off-site reactors, has evolved. The production facilities (i.e., EFL, Room 20, FMF, etc.) and casting techniques are discussed in detail. The paper also presents how the original casting operations have improved and the problems encountered as the techniques were developed. Extensive descriptions and data are given on the major experimental programs currently ongoing at EBR-II. Major programs include the IFR lead subassemblies, large diameter slugs, IFR metal fuel RBCB, and the FFTF subassembly program. Concluding the paper is a brief description of future development projects being considered and a summation of how EBR-II Fuels and Materials has been able to overcome various administration obstacles (i.e., improved security and safeguards measures) to continue to meet the increasing demands of fuel production while maintaining an aggressive and active research and development program in fuel slug production.

  1. Effect of nozzle outlet angle on flow and temperature field in a slab continuous casting mould

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sowa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical and numerical simulation model of the growth of the solid metal phase within a continuous cast slab is presented in thispaper. The problem was treated as a complex one. The velocity fields are obtained by solving the momentum equations and the continuityequation, whereas the thermal fields are calculated by solving the conduction equation with the convection term. One takes intoconsideration in the mathematical model the changes of thermophysical parameters depending on the temperature and the solid phasevolume fractions in the mushy zone. The problem was solved by the finite element method. A numerical simulation of the cast slabsolidification process was made for different cases of continuous casting mould pouring by molten metal. The effect of nozzle outlet angle on the velocity fields in liquid phase and the solid phase growth kinetics of the cast slab were investigated, because these magnitudes have essential an influence on high-quality of a continuous steel cast slab.

  2. Review on Vertical Twin-Roll Strip Casting: A Key Technology for Quality Strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshadev Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays near-net-shape casting technology is an important area of research in the iron and steel industry. Among different kinds of near-net-shape casting process, twin-roll casting process has received much attention among researchers. Twin-roll casting (TRC has been the subject of extensive research, not only to develop the technology but also to achieve an understanding of microstructural evolution and to produce quality strips. The main issues concerning the design and operation of twin-roll casters are metal-mold heat transfer, metal delivery system, and their possible effects on the solid shell formation and characteristics of the strips. The present review gives an idea about the process aspect, modeling, and quality issues in vertical twin-roll strip casting process and helps to improve the design of twin-roll strip caster.

  3. Continuous Casting of Single Crystal Ingots by the O.C.C. Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, A.

    1986-01-01

    To prevent the nucleation of crystals on the mold wall in the continuous casting of metals, a heated mold that maintained that temperature above the solidification temperature of the cast metal was used instead of the conventional cold mold. The cooling of the ingot was conducted outside of the mold. Heat was conducted axially along the ingot from the mold zone to the cooling zone. The principle of the O.C.C. (Ohno Continuous Casting) Process® was applied to the horizontal casting and vertical (upward) casting of wire and platelike ingots of Sn and Al. The ingots consisted of a completely unidirectionally solidified structure. It was possible to obtain a long single crystal ingot as a result of the growth competition of crystals.

  4. Computer modeling of adsorption and decomposition pathways of boundary-layer lubricants on clean aluminum(111) surface, and adhesive metal transfer at the aluminum/steel interface: The ab-initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jun

    Density functional theory (DFT) is employed to study lubricant adsorption and decomposition pathways, and adhesive metal transfer on clean aluminum surfaces. In this dissertation, density functional theory (DFT-GGA) is used to investigate the optimal adsorption geometries and binding energies of vinyl-phosphonic and ethanoic acids on an A1(111) surface. Tri-bridged, bi-bridged and uni-dentate coordinations for adsorbates are examined to determine the optimal binding sites on the surface. An analysis of the charge density of states (DOS) of oxygen involved in reacting with aluminum ions reveals changes in the atomic bonding configuration. For these acid molecules, the favorable decomposition pathways lead to fragments of vinyl- and alkylchains bonding to the Al(111) surface with phosphorous and carbon ions. Final optimal decomposition geometries and binding energies for various decomposition stages are also discussed. In addition, ab-initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) is carried out to explore collisions of aliphatic lubricants like butanol-alcohol and butanoic-acid with the Al(111) surface. Simulation results indicate that functional oxygen groups on these molecules could react with the "islands of nascent aluminum" and oxidize the surface. Favorable decomposition pieces on the surface, which were corroborated with experiment and DFT calculations, are found to contribute to the effectiveness of a particular molecule for boundary thinfilm lubrication to reduce the wear of aluminum. Finally, ab-initio molecular dynamics is also applied to investigations of the interaction between aluminum and hematite surfaces with and without a vinyl-phosphonic acid (VPA) lubricant. Without the lubricant, hematite is found to react with Al strongly (thermit reaction). This removes relatively large fragments from the surface of the aluminum substrate when this substrate is rubbed with a harder steel-roller under an external shock contact-load exceeding the ability of the substrate to

  5. Influence of electromagnetic field parameters on the morphology of graphite in grey cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One way to improve the unification of the casting structure may be the application of forced convection of liquid metal during thecrystallization in the form or continuous casting mould. This paper presents the results describing the influence of selected parameters of rotating electromagnetic field enforcing the movement of liquid metal in the form on the morphology of graphite in grey cast iron. The results were fragmented graphite flakes in conditions of regulating the rate of cooling in the range of temperature TZAL

  6. Accuracy of ringless casting and accelerated wax-elimination technique: a comparative in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rahul; Al-Keraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Kathuria, Nidhi; Gandhi, P V; Bhide, S V

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the ringless casting and accelerated wax-elimination techniques can be combined to offer a cost-effective, clinically acceptable, and time-saving alternative for fabricating single unit castings in fixed prosthodontics. Sixty standardized wax copings were fabricated on a type IV stone replica of a stainless steel die. The wax patterns were divided into four groups. The first group was cast using the ringless investment technique and conventional wax-elimination method; the second group was cast using the ringless investment technique and accelerated wax-elimination method; the third group was cast using the conventional metal ring investment technique and conventional wax-elimination method; the fourth group was cast using the metal ring investment technique and accelerated wax-elimination method. The vertical marginal gap was measured at four sites per specimen, using a digital optical microscope at 100× magnification. The results were analyzed using two-way ANOVA to determine statistical significance. The vertical marginal gaps of castings fabricated using the ringless technique (76.98 ± 7.59 μm) were significantly less (p castings fabricated using the conventional metal ring technique (138.44 ± 28.59 μm); however, the vertical marginal gaps of the conventional (102.63 ± 36.12 μm) and accelerated wax-elimination (112.79 ± 38.34 μm) castings were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The ringless investment technique can produce castings with higher accuracy and can be favorably combined with the accelerated wax-elimination method as a vital alternative to the time-consuming conventional technique of casting restorations in fixed prosthodontics. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  7. Design optimization of gating and feeding system through simulation technique for sand casting of wear plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin L. Nimbulkar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Casting is a manufacturing process to make complex shapes of metal materials; during mass production, we may experience many defects, such as gas porosity, pin holes, blow holes, shrinkages and incomplete filling that may occur in sand casting. Porosity is one of the defects most frequently encountered in ductile iron casting. Porosity impacts cost by scrap loss and limits the use of cast parts in critical high strength applications. The amount of porosity is closely related to the parameter of sand casting process. The gating/riser system design plays a very important role for improving casting quality. Many researchers reported that 90% of the defects in casting are obtained only because of improper design of gating and feeding system. The main objectives were to study the existing design of gating and feeding system, to optimize the gating and feeding system using Auto-CAST X1 casting simulation software, to prepare the sand mold and cast the part, to compare the simulated result and experimental results, to reduce rejection rate and to enable the company to again start the production.

  8. Gating system optimization of low pressure casting A356 aluminum alloy intake manifold based on numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Wenming

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To eliminate the shrinkage porosity in low pressure casting of an A356 aluminum alloy intake manifold casting, numerical simulation on filling and solidification processes of the casting was carried out using the ProCAST software. The gating system of the casting is optimized according to the simulation results. Results show that when the gating system consists of only one sprue, the filling of the molten metal is not stable; and the casting does not follow the sequence solidification, and many shrinkage porosities are observed through the casting. After the gating system is improved by adding one runner and two in-gates, the filling time is prolonged from 4.0 s to 4.5 s, the filling of molten metal becomes stable, but this casting does not follow the sequence solidification either. Some shrinkage porosity is also observed in the hot spots of the casting. When the gating system was further improved by adding risers and chill to the hot spots of the casting, the shrinkage porosity defects were eliminated completely. Finally, by using the optimized gating system the A356 aluminum alloy intake manifold casting with integrated shape and smooth surface as well as dense microstructure was successfully produced.

  9. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Rudolph G.; Martinez, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  10. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  11. The influence of the parameters of lost foam process on the quality of aluminum alloys castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aćimović-Pavlović Zagorka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research results of application of Lost foam process for aluminum alloys castings of a simple geometry. The process characteristic is that patterns and gating of moulds, made of polymers, stay in the mould till the liquid metal inflow. In contact with the liquid metal, pattern intensely and in relatively short time decomposes and evaporates, which is accompanied by casting crystallization. As a consequence of polymer pattern decomposition and evaporation a great quantity of liquid and gaseous products are produced, which is often the cause of different types of casting errors. This paper presents the results of a research with a special consideration given to detecting and analyzing the errors of castings. In most cases the cause of these errors are defects of polymer materials used for evaporable patterns production, as well as defects of materials for refractory coatings production for polymer patterns. The researches have shown that different types of coatings determine properties of the obtained castings. Also, the critical processing parameters (polymer pattern density, casting temperature, permeability of refractory coating and sand, construction of patterns and gating of moulds significantly affect on castings quality. During the research a special consideration was given to control and optimization of these parameters with the goal of achieving applicable castings properties. The study of surface and internal error of castings was performed systematically in order to carry out preventive measures to avoid errors and minimize production costs. In order to achieve qualitative and profitable castings production by the method of Lost foam it is necessary to reach the balance in the system: evaporable polymer pattern - liquid metal - refractory coating - sandy cast in the phase of metal inflow, decomposition and evaporation of polymer pattern, formation and solidification of castings. By optimizing the processing

  12. Implant cast accuracy as a function of impression techniques and impression material viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mary P; Ries, Dave; Borello, Blake

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare implant cast accuracy as a function of impression technique, closed tray impressions using indirect, metal impression copings at the implant level or direct, plastic impression caps at the abutment level, and impression material viscosity combinations. A stainless steel master model with three implant replicas was utilized to produce Type IV stone casts. Master model impressions were made using closed trays at the implant level with screw-on metal impression copings (indirect/implant level) or at the abutment level with snap-on plastic impression caps (direct/abutment level). With both techniques, either medium-body or heavy-body polyether impression material was syringed around the implant impression coping or abutment impression cap with medium body material in a custom tray. Twenty casts were produced with 5 casts in each test group. A measuring microscope (0.001 mm accuracy) was used to measure cast inter-implant or inter-abutment distances. Cast accuracy was calculated based on the percent difference of the measurements as compared to the master model. A repeated measures 2-factor ANOVA (alpha = .05) indicated no significant difference in cast accuracy as a function of impression viscosity. However, cast accuracy was significantly different between casts made with indirect/implant level versus direct/abutment level impressions. With the plastic impression caps, the cast inter-abutment distances were larger than the master model, with mean percent differences of 0.19% to 0.24% across the 3 measurement sites. In contrast, with the metal impression coping impressions, the cast inter-implant distances were almost equal to or slightly smaller than the master model, with mean percent differences -0.06% to 0.02%. Impression material viscosity does not appear to be a critical factor for implant cast accuracy. However, casts made with indirect, metal impression copings might be more accurate than casts made with direct, plastic

  13. Effects of Cr - Ni 18/9 Austenitic Cast Steel Modification by Mischmetal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gajewski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of Cr - Ni 18/9 austenitic cast steel modifications by mischmetal. The study was conducted on industrial melts. Cast steel was melted in an electric induction furnace with a capacity of 2000 kg and a basic lining crucible. .The mischmetal was introduced into the ladle during tapping of the cast steel from the furnace. The effectiveness of modification was examined with the carbon content of 0.1% and the presence of δ ferrite in the structure of cast steel stabilized with titanium. The changes in the structure of cast steel and their effect on mechanical properties and intergranular corrosion were studied. It was found that rare earth metals decrease the sulfurcontent in cast steel and above all, they cause a distinct change in morphology of the δ ferrite and non-metallic inclusions. These changes have improved mechanical properties. R02, Rm, and A5 and toughness increased significantly. There was a great increase of the resistance to intergranular corrosion in the Huey test. The study confirmed the high efficiency of cast steel modification by mischmetal in industrial environments. The final effect of modification depends on the form and manner of placing mischmetal into the liquid metal and the melting technology, ie the degree of deoxidation and desulfurization of the metal in the furnace.

  14. Environmental cleaning and disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverse, Michelle; Aceto, Helen

    2015-03-01

    The guidelines in this article provide veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and veterinary health care workers with an overview of evidence-based recommendations for the best practices associated with environmental cleaning and disinfection of a veterinary clinic that deals with small animals. Hospital-associated infections and the control and prevention programs necessary to alleviate them are addressed from an environmental perspective. Measures of hospital cleaning and disinfection include understanding mechanisms and types of contamination in veterinary settings, recognizing areas of potential concern, addressing appropriate decontamination techniques and selection of disinfectants, the management of potentially contaminated equipment, laundry, and waste management, and environmental surveillance strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Freeze Casting for Assembling Bioinspired Structural Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qunfeng; Huang, Chuanjin; Tomsia, Antoni P

    2017-12-01

    Nature is very successful in designing strong and tough, lightweight materials. Examples include seashells, bone, teeth, fish scales, wood, bamboo, silk, and many others. A distinctive feature of all these materials is that their properties are far superior to those of their constituent phases. Many of these natural materials are lamellar or layered in nature. With its "brick and mortar" structure, nacre is an example of a layered material that exhibits extraordinary physical properties. Finding inspiration in living organisms to create bioinspired materials is the subject of intensive research. Several processing techniques have been proposed to design materials mimicking natural materials, such as layer-by-layer deposition, self-assembly, electrophoretic deposition, hydrogel casting, doctor blading, and many others. Freeze casting, also known as ice-templating, is a technique that has received considerable attention in recent years to produce bioinspired bulk materials. Here, recent advances in the freeze-casting technique are reviewed for fabricating lamellar scaffolds by assembling different dimensional building blocks, including nanoparticles, polymer chains, nanofibers, and nanosheets. These lamellar scaffolds are often infiltrated by a second phase, typically a soft polymer matrix, a hard ceramic matrix, or a metal matrix. The unique architecture of the resultant bioinspired structural materials displays excellent mechanical properties. The challenges of the current research in using the freeze-casting technique to create materials large enough to be useful are also discussed, and the technique's promise for fabricating high-performance nacre-inspired structural materials in the future is reviewed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Getter Incorporation into Cast Stone and Solid State Characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmussen, Robert M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawter, Amanda R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephenson, John R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bowden, Mark E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Washton, Nancy M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Neeway, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Du, Yingge [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pearce, Carolyn I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Clayton, Ray E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saslow, Sarah A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buck, Edgar C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cordova, Elsa [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-28

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is collecting relevant available data on waste forms for use as a supplemental immobilization technology, to provide the additional capacity needed to treat low-activity waste (LAW) in Hanford Site tanks and complete the tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost-effective manner. One candidate supplemental waste form, fabricated using a low-temperature process, is a cementitious grout called Cast Stone. Cast Stone has been under investigation for this application at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) since initial screening tests in FY13. This report is the culmination of work to lower the diffusivities of Tc and I from Cast Stone using getters. Getters are compounds added to a system designed to selectively sequester a species of interest to provide increased stability to the species. The work contained within this report is related to waste form development and testing, and does not directly support the 2017 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment. However, this work contains valuable information which may be used in performance assessment maintenance past FY17, and in future waste form development. This report on performance characterization of Tc and I getters in Cast Stone fabricated with simulated LAW covers several areas of interest and major findings to WRPS: investigating performance of potassium metal sulfide (KMS-2-SS) and tin (II) apatite (Sn-A) as Tc getters when incorporated into Cast Stone; investigating performance of silver exchanged zeolite (Ag-Z) and argentite (Arg) as I getters when incorporated into Cast Stone; utilizing sequential addition of Tc and I getters to overcome any deleterious interactions between the getters in solution; determining, for the first time, Tc distribution within the cured Cast Stone and its evolution during leaching; and performing solid state characterization of getters and Cast Stone samples to support leach test findings and develop a

  17. Metal Compression Forming of aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, S.; Ren, W.; Porter, W.D.; Brinkman, C.R.; Sabau, A.S.; Purgert, R.M.

    2000-02-01

    Metal Compression Forming (MCF) is a variant of the squeeze casting process, in which molten metal is allowed to solidify under pressure in order to close porosity and form a sound part. However, the MCF process applies pressure on the entire mold face, thereby directing pressure on all regions of the casting and producing a uniformly sound part. The process is capable of producing parts with properties close to those of forgings, while retaining the near net shape, complexity in geometry, and relatively low cost of the casting process.

  18. Benchmark testing the flow and solidification modeling of AI castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirrell, B.; Holliday, M.; Campbell, J.

    1996-03-01

    Although the heat flow aspects of the simulation of castings now appears to be tolerably well advanced, a recent exercise has revealed that computed predictions can, in fact, be widely different from experimentally observed values. The modeling of flow, where turbulence is properly taken into account, appears to be good in its macroscopic ability. However, better resolution and the possible general incorporation of surface tension will be required to simulate the damaging effect of air entrainment common in most metal castings. It is envisaged that the results of this excercise will constitute a useful benchmark test for computer models of flow and solidification for the foreseeable future.

  19. Development of metallic fuel fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Ho; Lee, Chong Yak; Lee, Myung Ho and others

    1999-03-01

    With the vacuum melting and casting of the U-10wt%Zr alloy which is metallic fuel for liquid metal fast breeder reactor, we studied the microstructure of the alloy and the parameters of the melting and casting for the fuel rods. Internal defects of the U-10wt%Zr fuel by gravity casting, were inspected by non-destructive test. U-10wt%Zr alloy has been prepared for the thermal stability test in order to estimate the decomposition of the lamellar structure with relation to swelling under irradiation condition. (author)

  20. Heat-Transfer Coefficient and In-Cavity Pressure at the Casting-Die Interface during High-Pressure Die Casting of the Magnesium Alloy AZ91D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasaiid, A.; Dour, G.; Dargusch, M. S.; Loulou, T.; Davidson, C.; Savage, G.

    2008-04-01

    The present article deals with the application of a new measurement method to determine the heat-transfer coefficient (HTC) and the heat flux density at the casting-die interface during high-pressure die casting (HPDC) and solidification of the magnesium AZ91D alloy. The main measurements during the trial included velocity and the position of the piston that delivers the metal into the die, the pressure in the die cavity and at the tip of the piston, the alloy surface temperature, and the die temperature at different depths from the surface of the die. The temperature data were analyzed using an inverse method to determine the HTC at the casting-die interface during solidification. This article examines in detail the influence of the piston velocity and in-cavity pressure on heat transfer at the casting-die interface during casting and solidification of the magnesium AZ91D alloy.

  1. theory of batchwise centrifugal casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Biesheuvel, Pieter Maarten; Nijmeijer, Arian; Verweij, H.

    1998-01-01

    In batchwise centrifugal casting a cylindrical mold is filled with suspension and rotated rapidly around its axis. This results in the movement of the particulate phase toward the cylinder wall and the formation of a tubular cast. Theory is presented for particle transport in the suspension phase

  2. Cleanly: trashducation urban system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reif, Inbal; Alt, Florian; Ramos, Juan David Hincapie

    are exacerbated by a poor personal trash management culture. In this paper we present Cleanly, an urban trashducation system aimed at creating awareness of garbage production and management, which may serve as an educational plat-form in the urban environment. We report on data collected from an online survey...

  3. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is a component of the Clean Hands Count campaign, which also aims to address myths and misperceptions ... views 3:56 Creative Communication - LifeBouy Hand Washing Campaign - Duration: 2:08. LIQVD ASIA 15,338 views ...

  4. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 56,897 views 3:10 Handwashing Gangnam ... Moments of Hand Hygiene - Duration: 1:53. Salem Health 10,662 views 1:53 Clean hands save ...

  5. NSW clean coal summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    The presentations (overheads/viewgraphs) include: Otway CO{sub 2} storage project (P. Cook); alternative pathways to low emission electricity (L. Wibberley); Delta Electricity pilot capture project (G. Everett); international developments for CO{sub 2} capture and storage and clean coal (K. Thambimutu); NSW storage opportunities (B. Mullard); NSW opportunities (M. O'Neil); and the Climate Institute (J. Connor).

  6. Road-Cleaning Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    Roadways are literally soaked with petrochemical byproducts, oils, gasoline, and other volatile substances that eventually run off into sewers and end up in rivers, waterways, and other undesirable places. Can the roads be cleaned of these wastes, with their proper disposal? Can vehicles, robots, or other devices be designed that could be driven…

  7. WINDOW-CLEANING

    CERN Multimedia

    Environmental Section / ST-TFM

    2001-01-01

    The two-month window-cleaning session on the Meyrin, Prévessin and LEP sites will soon begin. The cleaning contractors will work from Monday to Saturday, every week from 4.00 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. The work will be organised so as to disturb users as little as possible. In any event, a work notice will be left in each office 24 hours beforehand. To prevent any damage to documents or items which could occur despite the precautions taken, please clear completely the window-sills and the area immediately around them. If, however, for valid reasons, the work cannot be done on the scheduled day, please inform the Environmental Section by telephoning: 73753 / 74233 / 72242 If you are going to be absent during this two-month period, we should be grateful if you would clear the above mentioned areas before your departure. REMINDER To allow more thorough cleaning of the entrance doors to buildings and also facilitate the weekly work of the cleaning contractors, we ask you to make use of the notice boards at the...

  8. Clean energy microgrids

    CERN Document Server

    Obara, Shin'ya

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the latest technology in microgrids and economic, environmental and policy aspects of their implementation, including microgrids for cold regions, and future trends. The aim of this work is to give this complete overview of the latest technology around the world, and the interrelation with clean energy systems.

  9. Clean Cities Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-12-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities offers a large collection of Web-based tools on the Alternative Fuels Data Center. These calculators, interactive maps, and data searches can assist fleets, fuels providers, and other transportation decision makers in their efforts to reduce petroleum use.

  10. EFFECT OF CAST RECTIFIERS ON THE MARGINAL FIT OF UCLA ABUTMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, Ana Paula Gumieiro; de Vasconcellos, Diego Klee; Mesquita, Alfredo Mikail Melo; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: This study assessed the effect of cast rectifiers on the marginal misfit of cast UCLA abutments compared to premachined UCLA abutments. The influence of casting and porcelain baking on the marginal misfit of these components was also investigated. Methods: Two groups were analyzed: test group – 10 cast UCLA abutments, finished with cast rectifier and submitted to ceramic application; control group – 10 premachined UCLA abutments, cast with noble metal alloy and submitted to ceramic application. Vertical misfit measurements were performed under light microscopy. In the test group, measurements were performed before and after the use of cast rectifiers, and after ceramic application. In the control group, measurements were performed before and after casting, and after ceramic application. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α= 5%). Results: The use of cast rectifiers significantly reduced the marginal misfit of cast UCLA abutments (from 25.68μm to 14.83μm; p<0.05). After ceramic application, the rectified cylinders presented misfit values (16.18μm) similar to those of premachined components (14.3 μm). Casting of the premachined UCLA abutments altered the marginal misfit of these components (from 9.63 μm to 14.6 μm; p<0.05). There were no significant changes after porcelain baking, in both groups. Conclusion: The use of cast rectifiers reduced the vertical misfit of cast UCLA abutments. Even with carefully performed laboratory steps, changes at the implant interface of premachined UCLA abutments occurred. Ceramic application did not alter the marginal misfit values of UCLA abutments. PMID:19089125

  11. Effect of cast rectifiers on the marginal fit of UCLA abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Gumieiro Jaime

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the effect of cast rectifiers on the marginal misfit of cast UCLA abutments compared to premachined UCLA abutments. The influence of casting and porcelain baking on the marginal misfit of these components was also investigated. METHODS: Two groups were analyzed: test group - 10 cast UCLA abutments, finished with cast rectifier and submitted to ceramic application; control group - 10 premachined UCLA abutments, cast with noble metal alloy and submitted to ceramic application. Vertical misfit measurements were performed under light microscopy. In the test group, measurements were performed before and after the use of cast rectifiers, and after ceramic application. In the control group, measurements were performed before and after casting, and after ceramic application. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by ANOVA and Tukey's test (a= 5%. RESULTS: The use of cast rectifiers significantly reduced the marginal misfit of cast UCLA abutments (from 25.68mm to 14.83mm; p<0.05. After ceramic application, the rectified cylinders presented misfit values (16.18mm similar to those of premachined components (14.3 mm. Casting of the premachined UCLA abutments altered the marginal misfit of these components (from 9.63 mm to 14.6 mm; p<0.05. There were no significant changes after porcelain baking, in both groups. CONCLUSION: The use of cast rectifiers reduced the vertical misfit of cast UCLA abutments. Even with carefully performed laboratory steps, changes at the implant interface of premachined UCLA abutments occurred. Ceramic application did not alter the marginal misfit values of UCLA abutments.

  12. Facile preparation of hierarchically porous carbons from metal-organic gels and their application in energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei; Qiu, Bin; Xia, Dingguo; Zou, Ruqiang

    2013-06-01

    Porous carbon materials have numerous applications due to their thermal and chemical stability, high surface area and low densities. However, conventional preparing porous carbon through zeolite or silica templates casting has been criticized by the costly and/or toxic procedure. Creating three-dimensional (3D) carbon products is another challenge. Here, we report a facile way to prepare porous carbons from metal-organic gel (MOG) template, an extended metal-organic framework (MOF) structure. We surprisingly found that the carbon products inherit the highly porous nature of MOF and combine with gel's integrated character, which results in hierarchical porous architectures with ultrahigh surface areas and quite large pore volumes. They exhibit considerable hydrogen uptake and excellent electrochemical performance as cathode material for lithium-sulfur battery. This work provides a general method to fast and clean synthesis of porous carbon materials and opens new avenues for the application of metal-organic gel in energy storage.

  13. Cast and splint immobilization: complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halanski, Matthew; Noonan, Kenneth J

    2008-01-01

    During the past three decades, internal fixation has become increasingly popular for fracture management and limb reconstruction. As a result, during their training, orthopaedic surgeons receive less formal instruction in the art of extremity immobilization and cast application and removal. Casting is not without risks and complications (eg, stiffness, pressure sores, compartment syndrome); the risk of morbidity is higher when casts are applied by less experienced practitioners. Certain materials and methods of ideal cast and splint application are recommended to prevent morbidity in the patient who is at high risk for complications with casting and splinting. Those at high risk include the obtunded or comatose multitrauma patient, the patient under anesthesia, the very young patient, the developmentally delayed patient, and the patient with spasticity.

  14. Internal adaptation of cast titanium crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sicknan Soares da Rocha

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available As the adaptation of titanium crowns obtained by Rematitan Plus investment, specific for titanium, is not recognized to be suitable, this study evaluated the effect of the concentration of the specific liquid and the temperature of the mold of investments on the internal misfit of crowns cast on commercially pure titanium. Individual dies of epoxy resin were obtained, representing teeth prepared for full-crown restoration with a 6-degree axial surface convergence angle and shoulder (1.0 mm. For the waxing of each crown, a ring-shaped stainless steel matrix (8.0mm internal diameter; 7.5 mm height was adapted above the individual dies of epoxy resin. The Rematian Plus investment was mixed according to the manufacturer's instructions using two different concentrations of the specific liquid: 100%, 75%. Casting was performed in a Discovery Plasma Ar-arc vacuum-pressure casting machine with molds at temperatures of 430ºC, 515ºC and 600ºC. The crowns were cleaned individually in a solution (1% HF + 13% HNO3 for 10 min using a ultrasonic cleaner, with no internal adaptations, and luted with zinc phosphate cement under a 5 kg static load. The crown and die assemblies were embedded in resin and sectioned longitudinally. The area occupied by cement was observed using stereoscopic lens (10X and measured by the Leica Qwin image analysis system (mm². The data for each experimental condition (n=8 were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test (á=0.05. The results showed that liquid dilution and the increase in mold temperature did not significantly influence the levels of internal fit of the cast titanium crowns. The lowest means (±SD of internal misfit were obtained for the 430ºC/100%: (7.25 mm² ±1.59 and 600ºC/100% (8.8 mm² ±2.25 groups, which presented statistically similar levels of internal misfit.

  15. An energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and SEM study of debris remaining on endodontic instruments after ultrasonic cleaning and autoclave sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parirokh, Masoud; Asgary, Saeed; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar

    2005-08-01

    This study was carried out to investigate metallic and non-metallic debris remaining on endodontic files after ultrasonic cleaning and autoclave processing. Forty-eight unused rotary and hand endodontic files, including eight different brands, were tested. Instruments were cleaned with ultrasound, autoclaved and before and after each step were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Adherent debris was analysed by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA). All of the instruments before ultrasound cleaning were contaminated with metallic and non-metallic debris. Although most non-metallic debris was removed by ultrasonic cleaning, most of the metallic debris remained even after the final step of sterilization.

  16. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  17. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  18. Gating of Permanent Molds for Aluminum Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-011D13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was to determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings. Equipment and procedure for real time X-Ray radiography of molten aluminum flow into permanent molds have been developed. Other studies have been conducted using water flow and behavior of liquid aluminum in sand mold using real time photography. This investigation utilizes graphite molds transparent to X-Rays making it possible to observe the flow pattern through a number of vertically oriented grating systems. These have included systems that are choked at the base of a rounded vertical sprue and vertical gating systems with a variety of different ingates into the bottom of a mold cavity. These systems have also been changed to include gating systems with vertical and horizontal gate configurations. Several conclusions can be derived from this study. A sprue-well, as designed in these experiments, does not eliminate the vena contracta. Because of the swirling at the sprue-base, the circulating metal begins to push the entering metal stream toward the open runner mitigating the intended effect of the sprue-well. Improved designs of

  19. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-01

    The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  20. The Rationale for Continuous Casting of Finished Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollard, Francois R.

    1982-03-01

    An analysis is presented of the considerable effort that has been devoted to the development of methods for manufacturing small section finished products directly from molten metal. The most significant processes available for such small section continuous casting are examined to determine how well they fulfill the promises on which their development was initially justified. These processes include upward casting, the Taylor process, melt drag, melt extraction, melt spinning, and roll quenching. It is shown that the major advantages of these processes are attributable to the corresponding high cooling rate, low capital cost, and flexibility of product form. Drawbacks of the processes include low productivity compared to conventional casting-working route with relatively poor control of product geometry. It is concluded that each process, without being universally applicable, can, however, be economically used for specific end products that cannot be obtained by conventional means.