WorldWideScience

Sample records for clay mineral formation

  1. Impact-Induced Clay Mineral Formation and Distribution on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Craig, P. I.

    2015-01-01

    Clay minerals have been identified in the central peaks and ejecta blankets of impact craters on Mars. Several studies have suggested these clay minerals formed as a result of impact induced hydrothermalism either during Mars' Noachian era or more recently by the melting of subsurface ice. Examples of post-impact clay formation is found in several locations on Earth such as the Mjolnir and Woodleigh Impact Structures. Additionally, a recent study has suggested the clay minerals observed on Ceres are the result of impact-induced hydrothermal processes. Such processes may have occurred on Mars, possibly during the Noachian. Distinguishing between clay minerals formed preor post-impact can be accomplished by studying their IR spectra. In fact, showed that the IR spectra of clay minerals is greatly affected at longer wavelengths (i.e. mid-IR, 5-25 micron) by impact-induced shock deformation while the near-IR spectra (1.0-2.5 micron) remains relatively unchanged. This explains the discrepancy between NIR and MIR observations of clay minerals in martian impact craters noted. Thus, it allows us to determine whether a clay mineral formed from impact-induced hydrothermalism or were pre-existing and were altered by the impact. Here we study the role of impacts on the formation and distribution of clay minerals on Mars via a fully 3-D Monte Carlo cratering model, including impact- melt production using results from modern hydrocode simulations. We identify regions that are conducive to clay formation and the location of clay minerals post-bombardment.

  2. Clay mineral formation and transformation in rocks and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Three mechanisms for clay mineral formation (inheritance, neoformation, and transformation) operating in three geological environments (weathering, sedimentary, and diagenetic-hydrothermal) yield nine possibilities for the origin of clay minerals in nature. Several of these possibilities are discussed in terms of the rock cycle. The mineralogy of clays neoformed in the weathering environment is a function of solution chemistry, with the most dilute solutions favoring formation of the least soluble clays. After erosion and transportation, these clays may be deposited on the ocean floor in a lateral sequence that depends on floccule size. Clays undergo little reaction in the ocean, except for ion exchange and the neoformation of smectite; therefore, most clays found on the ocean floor are inherited from adjacent continents. Upon burial and heating, however, dioctahedral smectite reacts in the diagenetic environment to yield mixed-layer illite-smectite, and finally illite. With uplift and weathering, the cycle begins again. Refs.

  3. Towards an understanding of the role of clay minerals in crude oil formation, migration and accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin Mei; Zhou, Chun Hui; Keeling, John; Tong, Dong Shen; Yu, Wei Hua

    2012-12-01

    This article reviews progress in the understanding of the role of clay minerals in crude oil formation, migration and accumulation. Clay minerals are involved in the formation of kerogen, catalytic cracking of kerogen into petroleum hydrocarbon, the migration of crude oil, and the continued change to hydrocarbon composition in underground petroleum reservoirs. In kerogen formation, clay minerals act as catalysts and sorbents to immobilize organic matter through ligand exchange, hydrophobic interactions and cation bridges by the mechanisms of Maillard reactions, polyphenol theory, selective preservation and sorptive protection. Clay minerals also serve as catalysts in acid-catalyzed cracking of kerogen into petroleum hydrocarbon through Lewis and Brønsted acid sites on the clay surface. The amount and type of clay mineral affect the composition of the petroleum. Brønsted acidity of clay minerals is affected by the presence and state of interlayer water, and displacement of this water is a probable driver in crude oil migration from source rocks. During crude oil migration and accumulation in reservoirs, the composition of petroleum is continually modified by interaction with clay minerals. The clays continue to function as sorbents and catalysts even while they are being transformed by diagenetic processes. The detail of chemical interactions and reaction mechanisms between clay minerals and crude oil formation remains to be fully explained but promises to provide insights with broader application, including catalytic conversion of biomass as a source of sustainable energy into the future.

  4. Discussion on origin of clay minerals in outcropped sandstone from Lower Cretaceous Chengzihe Formation and Muling Formation in Jixi Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jianying; LIU Li; QU Xiyu

    2009-01-01

    Clay minerals in the outcropped sandstone from Lower Cretaceous Chengzihe Formation and Muling Formation in Jixi Basin were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The results show that the clay minerals mainly consist of illite, kaollinite and illite/smectite, which can be divided into two types: kaolinite- and illite/smectite types. The outcropped sandstone occurred in middle diagenetic stage-A on the basis of the clay mineral composition. The development factor of the formation of kaolinite type clay mineral is caused mainly by the organic acid from the coal-bearing formation and mudstone during the diagenesis process in Lower Cretaceous Chengzihe Formation and Muling Formation in the Jixi Basin. The weak hydrodynamic force of sedimentary facies made the sandstone leaching condition poor, which is the reason forming the aggregation of clay minerals of the illite/smectite-and illite types.

  5. The formation of goethite and hydrated clay minerals on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguenin, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Laboratory studies reported by Huguenin (1973) on the kinetics and mechanism of the photostimulated oxidation of magnetic and preliminary laboratory data on the weathering of silicates, reported herein, are applied to Mars. Basalts in the Martian dark areas are predicted to alter to hydrated Fe(2 plus or minus) depleted clay minerals, minor goethite, and minor to trace amounts of transition metal oxides such as TiO2, MnO2, and Cr2O3 at a rate of 10 to the minus 1.5 plus or minus 1.5 micron/yr. Some Ca-Mg carbonates are also expected to be formed. The clay minerals are predicted to be more silica-rich than the silicate source material, SiO2 contents of 60% or higher being expected, and strongly depleted in Fe(2+). The oxygen, OH, and H2O contents of the bulk weathering product are predicted to be significantly greater than those of the dark-area source materials, whereas the relative bulk metal abundances should be the same.

  6. CLAY MINERAL ASSEMBLAGES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS IN SHIHEZI FORMATION FROM THE HUAIBEI COAL-BEARING STRATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文辉; 许光泉; 刑军

    1998-01-01

    Clay mineral assemblages in Shihezi Formation of Huaibei coal-bearing strata are determined by X-ray diffraction and Differential Thermal Analyzer, that is restated to the sedimentfaces and climatic changes in the source area, and to a lesser extent, alterations during burial diagenesis. In the Upper Shihezi Formation, the clay fraction is dominated by kaolinite in norther npart of the coal field, which was formed in alluvial sediment environment. But in the South ofHuaibei coal field, the clay mineral assemblage consists of mainly illite that reflects the influenceof sea water. The predominately kaolinite and sederite composition of the clay fraction in the lower Shihezi Formation sediments documents less relief and gentle erosion of kaolinite rich soils developing under warm source area. In the lower part of Shihezi Formation, some chlorite is detected, which suggests transformation of illite or kaolinite to chlorite under conditions of burial diagenesis.

  7. Clay Minerals and Health

    OpenAIRE

    Abdurrahman Dalgıç; Orhan Kavak

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine clay minerals, which take very importantplace in relationships of minerals and human health. They have high areadensity, adsorption capacity, rheological properties, chemical inertia and verylow or nontoxic effects to human health. So, they are widely used in medicaltreatments. Commercially used clay minerals are; smectit, polygrstite, caoliniteand talc. The other clay minerals are under investigations for medicaltreatments.

  8. Authigenic clay minerals in the Rustler Formation, WIPP Site area, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transuranic waste is planned for disposal in the Late Permian evaporites of the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico, at the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) Site. The disposal horizon is located in the bedded halite of the Salado Formation, which is overlain by the impure halite-anhydrite (gypsum)-siltstone-mudstone of the Rustler Formation. The Rustler Formation also contains two dolomite members, the Magenta and Culebra, which transmit water. The Culebra Member is suspected to have actively interacted with waters at time(s) from the Late Permian to the present, and it is important to assess the reactivity of these waters in conjunction with WIPP stability. The authors have investigated the Rb-Sr systematics of clay minerals from the Culebra Member and elsewhere in the Rustler Formation. By separating the less than 0.125 μm size material the authors are able to deal with presumed true authigenic clay minerals. The authigenic fraction is especially sensitive to chemical and isotopic exchange with waters, and an episodic exposure to a large amount of water will re-set the clay minerals to such a time. Data yield 259 ± 22 Ma Rb-Sr isochron, which is consistent with the Late Permian age of the Rustler Formation. This age demonstrates that age-determining cations in these clay minerals have preserved their isotopic and chemical integrity since the Late Permian

  9. Investigating the behaviour of Mg isotopes during the formation of clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimpenny, Joshua; Colla, Christopher A.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Rustad, James R.; Casey, William H.

    2014-03-01

    We present elemental and isotopic data detailing how the Mg isotope system behaves in natural and experimentally synthesized clay minerals. We show that the bulk Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg) of a set of natural illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite spans a 2‰ range, and that their isotopic composition depends strongly on a balance between the relative proportions of structural and exchangeable Mg. After acid leaching, these natural clays become relatively enriched in isotopically heavy Mg by between 0.2‰ and 1.6‰. Results of exchange experiments indicate that the Mg that has adsorbed to interlayer spaces and surface charged sites is relatively enriched in isotopically light Mg compared to the residual clay. The isotopic composition of this exchangeable Mg (-1.49‰ to -2.03‰) is characteristic of the isotopic composition of Mg found in many natural waters. Further experiments with an isotopically characterized MgCl2 solution shows that the clay minerals adsorb this exchangeable Mg with little or no isotopic fractionation, although we cannot discount the possibility that the uptake of exchangeable Mg does so with a slight preference for 24Mg. To characterize the behaviour of Mg isotopes during clay mineral formation we synthesized brucite (Mg(OH)2), which we consider to be a good analogue for the incorporation of Mg into the octahedral sheet of Mg-rich clay minerals or into the brucitic layer of clays such as chlorite. In our experiment the brucite mineral becomes enriched in the heavy isotopes of Mg while the corresponding solution is always relatively enriched in isotopically light Mg. The system reaches a steady state after 10 days with a final fractionation factor (αsolid-solution) of 1.0005 at near-neutral pH. This result is consistent with the general consensus that secondary clay minerals preferentially take up isotopically heavy Mg during their formation. However our results also show that exchangeable Mg is an important component within bulk

  10. Characterization of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  11. Pedogenic formation of montmorillonite from a 2:1-2:2 intergrade clay mineral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, R.L.; Nettleton, W.D.; McCracken, R.J.

    1969-01-01

    Montmorillonite was found to be the dominant clay mineral in surface horizons of certain soils of the North Carolina Coastal Plain whereas a 2:1-2:2 intergrade clay mineral was dominant in subjacent horizons. In all soils where this clay mineral sequence was found, the surface horizon was low in pH (below 4??5) and high in organic matter content. In contrast, data from studies of other soils of this region (Weed and Nelson, 1962) show that: (1) montmorillonite occurs infrequently; (2) maximum accumulation of the 2:1-2:2 intergrade normally occurs in the surface horizon and decreases with depth in the profile; (3) organic matter contents are low; and (4) pH values are only moderately acid (pH 5-6). It is theorized that the montmorillonite in the surface horizon of the soils studied originated by pedogenic weathering of the 2:1-2:2 intergrade clay mineral. The combined effects of low pH (below 4??5) and high organic matter content in surface horizons are believed to be the agents responsible for this mineral transformation. The protonation and solubilization (reverse of hydrolysis) of Al-polymers in the interlayer of expansible clay minerals will occur at or below pH 4??5 depending on the charge and steric effects of the interlayer. A low pH alone may cause this solubilization and thus mineral transformation, but in the soils studied the organic matter is believed to facilitate and accelerage the transformation. The intermediates of organic matter decomposition provide an acid environment, a source of protons, and a source of watersoluble mobile organic substances (principally fulvic acids) which have the ability to complex the solubilized aluminum and move it down the profile. This continuous removal of solubilized aluminum would provide for a favorable gradient for aluminum solubilization. The drainage class or position in a catena is believed to be less important than the chemical factors in formation of montmorillonite from 2:1-2:2 intergrade, because

  12. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  13. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals.The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay.Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay

  14. Clay Minerals: Adsorbophysical Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and features of surfaces of clay minerals (kaolin, montmorillonite, etc) have an important scientific and practical value. On the surface the interrelation of processes at electronic, atomic and molecular levels is realized. Availability of mineral surface to external influences opens wide scientific and technical opportunities of use of the surface phenomena, so the research of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near-surface area of clay minerals is important. After long term researches of gas-clay mineral system in physical fields the author has obtained experimental and theoretical material contributing to the creation of the surface theory of clays. A part of the researches is dedicated to studying the mechanism of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near surface area of clay mineral systems, selectivity of the surface centers to interact with gas phase molecules and adsorbophysical properties. The study of physical and chemical properties of fine clay minerals and their modification has a decisive importance for development of theory and practice of nanotechnologies: they are sorbents, membranes, ceramics and other materials with required electronic features

  15. Ancient and recent clay formation on Mars as revealed from a global survey of hydrous minerals in crater central peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Vivian Z.; Milliken, Ralph E.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals on Mars have commonly been interpreted as the remnants of pervasive water-rock interaction during the Noachian period (>3.7 Ga). This history has been partly inferred by observations of clays in central peaks of impact craters, which often are presumed uplifted from depth. However, combined mineralogical and morphological analyses of individual craters have shown that some central peak clays may represent post-impact, possibly authigenic processes. Here we present a global survey of 633 central peaks to assess their hydrous minerals and the prevalence of uplifted, detrital, and authigenic clays. Central peak regions are examined using high-resolution Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment data to identify hydrous minerals and place their detections in a stratigraphic and geologic context. We find that many occurrences of Fe/Mg clays and hydrated silica are associated with potential impact melt deposits. Over 35% of central peak clays are not associated with uplifted rocks; thus, caution must be used when inferring deeper crustal compositions from surface mineralogy of central peaks. Uplifted clay-bearing rocks suggest the Martian crust hosts clays to depths of at least 7 km. We also observe evidence for increasing chloritization with depth, implying the presence of fluids in the upper portions of the crust. Our observations are consistent with widespread Noachian/Early Hesperian clay formation, but a number of central peak clays are also suggestive of clay formation during the Amazonian. These results broadly support current paradigms of Mars' aqueous history while adding insight to global crustal and diagenetic processes associated with clay mineral formation and stability.

  16. Lithologic Control on Secondary Clay Mineral Formation in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caylor, E.; Rasmussen, C.; Dhakal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the transformation of rock to soil is central to landscape evolution and ecosystem function. The objective of this study was to examine controls on secondary mineral formation in a forested catchment in the Catalina-Jemez CZO. We hypothesized landscape position controls the type of secondary minerals formed in that well-drained hillslopes favor Si-poor secondary phases such as kaolinite, whereas poorly drained portions of the landscape that collect solutes from surrounding areas favor formation of Si-rich secondary phases such as smectite. The study focused on a catchment in Valles Caldera in northern New Mexico where soils are derived from a mix of rhyolitic volcanic material, vegetation includes a mixed conifer forest, and climate is characterized by a mean annual precipitation of ~800 mm yr-1 and mean annual temperature of 4.5°C. Soils were collected at the soil-saprolite boundary from three landscape positions, classified as well drained hillslope, poorly drained convergent area, and poorly drained hill slope. Clay fractions were isolated and analyzed using a combination of quantitative and qualitative x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses and thermal analysis. Quantitative XRD of random powder mounts indicated the presence of both primary phases such as quartz, and alkali and plagioclase feldspars, and secondary phases that include illite, Fe-oxyhydroxides including both goethite and hematite, kaolinite, and smectite. The clay fractions were dominated by smectite ranging from 36-42%, illite ranging from 21-35%, and kaolinite ranging from 1-8%. Qualitative XRD of oriented mounts confirmed the presence of smectite in all samples, with varying degrees of interlayering and interstratification. In contrast to our hypothesis, results indicated that secondary mineral assemblage was not strongly controlled by landscape position, but rather varied with underlying variation in lithology. The catchment is underlain by a combination of porphorytic rhyolite and

  17. Formation of replicating saponite from a gel in the presence of oxalate: implications for the formation of clay minerals in carbonaceous chondrites and the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Dirk; Hartman, Hyman; Eberl, Dennis D.; Sears, S. Kelly; Hesse, Reinhard; Vali, Hojatollah

    2012-01-01

    The potential role of clay minerals in the abiotic origin of life has been the subject of ongoing debate for the past several decades. At issue are the clay minerals found in a class of meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites. These clay minerals are the product of aqueous alteration of anhydrous mineral phases, such as olivine and orthopyroxene, that are often present in the chondrules. Moreover, there is a strong correlation in the occurrence of clay minerals and the presence of polar organic molecules. It has been shown in laboratory experiments at low temperature and ambient pressure that polar organic molecules, such as the oxalate found in meteorites, can catalyze the crystallization of clay minerals. In this study, we show that oxalate is a robust catalyst in the crystallization of saponite, an Al- and Mg-rich, trioctahedral 2:1 layer silicate, from a silicate gel at 60°C and ambient pressure. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the saponite treated with octadecylammonium (n(C)=18) cations revealed the presence of 2:1 layer structures that have variable interlayer charge. The crystallization of these differently charged 2:1 layer silicates most likely occurred independently. The fact that 2:1 layer silicates with variable charge formed in the same gel has implications for our understanding of the origin of life, as these 2:1 clay minerals most likely replicate by a mechanism of template-catalyzed polymerization and transmit the charge distribution from layer to layer. If polar organic molecules like oxalate can catalyze the formation of clay-mineral crystals, which in turn promote clay microenvironments and provide abundant adsorption sites for other organic molecules present in solution, the interaction among these adsorbed molecules could lead to the polymerization of more complex organic molecules like RNA from nucleotides on early Earth.

  18. Clay Minerals Deposit of Halakabad (Sabzevar- Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Mohammad Hashemi

    2012-01-01

    Clay minerals are expanded in south of Sabzevar. They are identified with light color in the filed. The XRD and XRF chemical and mineralogical studies on the Clay minerals indicated that their main clay minerals are Kaolinite, Illite and Dickite. Pyrophyllite is minor clay mineral. Quartz and Sanidine non clay minerals are present with clay minerals .Ratio of Al2O3 is about 40 per cent, it is very good for industrial minerals .Volcanic rocks are origin clay minerals .Their composition are bas...

  19. Climatic control on clay mineral formation: Evidence from weathering profiles developed on either side of the Western Ghats

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Deepthy; S Balakrishnan

    2005-10-01

    Many physico-chemical variables like rock-type,climate,topography and exposure age affect weathering environments.In the present study,an attempt is made to understand how the nature of clay minerals formed due to weathering differs in tropical regions receiving high and low rainfall. Clay mineralogy of weathering pro files in west coast of India,which receives about 3 m rainfall through two monsoons and those from the inland rain-shadow zones (> 200 cm rainfall)are studied using X-ray diffraction technique.In the west coast,1:1 clays (kaolinite)and Fe –Al oxides (gibb-site/goethite)are dominant clay minerals in the weathering pro files while 2:1 clay minerals are absent or found only in trace amounts.Weathering pro files in the rain shadow region have more complex clay mineralogy and are dominated by 2:1 clays and kaolinite.Fe –Al oxides are either less or absent in clay fraction.The kaolinite –smectite interstrati fied mineral in Banasandra pro files are formed due to transformation of smectites to kaolinite,which is indicative of a humid paleo-climate. In tropical regions receiving high rainfall the clay mineral assemblage remains the same irrespective of the parent rock type.Rainfall and availability of water apart from temperature, are the most important factors that determine kinetics of chemical weathering.Mineral alteration reactions proceed through different pathways in water rich and water poor environments.

  20. Clay minerals and sedimentary basin history

    OpenAIRE

    Merriman, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Clay minerals in the mud and soil that coat the Earth's surface are part of a clay cycle that breaks down and creates rock in the crust. Clays generated by surface weathering and shallow diagenetic processes are transformed into mature clay mineral assemblages in the mudrocks found in sedimentary basins. During metamorphism, the release of alkali elements and boron from clay minerals generates magmas that are subsequently weathered and recycled, representing the magma-to-mud pathway of the cl...

  1. Barrier properties of natural clay minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Дудар, Т.В.; С.П. Бугера; В.М. Кадошніков; Б.П. Злобенко

    2009-01-01

     Clay minerals is a perfect material for geochemical barrier due to their high water resistivity, plasticity, high sorbing capacity, well developed surface and cheapness in extraction and processing. This work studies the peculiarities of uranium sorbtion on clay minerals on the example of bentonite and palygorskite clay from Cherkassy deposit, and clay usage as a barrier material.

  2. Barrier properties of natural clay minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т.В. Дудар

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available  Clay minerals is a perfect material for geochemical barrier due to their high water resistivity, plasticity, high sorbing capacity, well developed surface and cheapness in extraction and processing. This work studies the peculiarities of uranium sorbtion on clay minerals on the example of bentonite and palygorskite clay from Cherkassy deposit, and clay usage as a barrier material.

  3. Clay mineral variations near Pennsylvanian sandstone channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large linear sandstone bodies in the Illinois Basin have been interpreted as representing fresh water river channels that flowed through generally marine to brackish Pennsylvanian deltaic environments; fresh water from such channels could have affected deposition of adjacent coal-bearing rocks. Low-sulfur coals are commonly associated with the sandstone bodies, which may also host petroleum, uranium, fresh water, or other resources. Thus techniques to locate such channels would be economically useful. Previous studies have shown that clay mineral distributions and bulk chemistries of clay-rich sediments are affected when fresh waters mix with sea water. Such changes associated laterally with freshwater channels might have caused distinctive clay mineral or chemical patterns to develop around the channels. Mineralogies and chemical compositions of more than 500 mudrock samples taken immediately above the springfield Coal Member of the Petersburg Formation from 52 sections located from channel margins to 63 miles distant were determined to discern patterns that could aid in finding channels

  4. Cation exchange and adsorption on clays and clay minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Ammann, Lars

    2003-01-01

    The specific surface area of a clay mineral comprises the external and internal surface area and, finally, the surface area which is exposed to the solution (Chap. 6.1). The aim of this study was to correlate adsorption data of common clays with these specific surface areas.

  5. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  6. Mineral catalysis of the formation of the phosphodiester bond in aqueous solution - The possible role of montmorillonite clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, James P.; Ertem, Gozen; KAMALUDDIN; Agarwal, Vipin; Hua, Lu Lin

    1989-01-01

    The possible role of montmorillonite clays in the spontaneous formation on the primitive earth of the phosphodiester bond in the presence of water was investigated in experiments measuring the binding of various nucleosides and nucleotides with Na(+)-montmorillonite 22A and the reactions of these compounds with a water-soluble carbodiimide. It was found that, at neutral pH, adenine derivatives bind stronger than the corresponding uracil derivatives, consistent with the protonation of the adenine by the acidic clay surface and a cationic binding of the protonated ring to the anionic clay surface. The reaction of the 5-prime-AMP with carbodiimide resulted in the formation of 2-prime,5-prime-pApA (18.9 percent), 3-prime,5-prime-pApA (11 percent), and AppA (4.8 percent). The yields of these oligomers obtained when poly(U) was used in place of the clay were 15.5 percent, 3.7 percent, and 14.9 percent AppA, respectively.

  7. Surface geochemistry of the clay minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Sposito, Garrison; Skipper, Neal T.; Sutton, Rebecca; Park, Sung-Ho; Soper, Alan K.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    1999-01-01

    Clay minerals are layer type aluminosilicates that figure in terrestrial biogeochemical cycles, in the buffering capacity of the oceans, and in the containment of toxic waste materials. They are also used as lubricants in petroleum extraction and as industrial catalysts for the synthesis of many organic compounds. These applications derive fundamentally from the colloidal size and permanent structural charge of clay mineral particles, which endow them with significant ...

  8. Charge Properties and Clay Mineral Composition of Tianbao Mountains Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEJI-ZHENG; LIXUE-YUAN; 等

    1992-01-01

    The clay mineral association,oxides of clay fraction and surface charge properties of 7 soils,which are developed from granite,located at different altitudesof the Tianbao Mountains were studied.Results indicate that with the increase in altitude,1) the weathering process and desilicification of soil clay minerals became weaker,whereas the leaching depotassication and the formation process of hydroxy-aluminum interlayer got stronger;2)the contents of amorphous and complex aluminum and iron,and the activity of aluminum and iron oxides for soil clay fraction increased;and 3) the amount of variable negarive charge,anion exchange capacity and the values of PZC and PZNC also increased.The activity of aluminum and iron oxides,the accumulation of aluminum,and surface charge characteristics and their relation to clay oxides of the vertical zone soils were observed and recorded.

  9. Ostwald ripening of clays and metamorphic minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.; Srodon, J.; Kralik, M.; Taylor, B.E.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of particle size distributions indicate that clay minerals and other diagenetic and metamorphic minerals commonly undergo recrystallization by Ostwald ripening. The shapes of their particle size distributions can yield the rate law for this process. One consequence of Ostwald ripening is that a record of the recrystallization process is preserved in the various particle sizes. Therefore, one can determine the detailed geologic history of clays and other recrystallized minerals by separating, from a single sample, the various particle sizes for independent chemical, structural, and isotopic analyses.

  10. Ostwald ripening of clays and metamorphic minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D D; Sacuterodonacute, J; Kralik, M; Taylor, B E; Peterman, Z E

    1990-04-27

    Analyses of particle size distributions indicate that clay minerals and other diagenetic and metamorphic minerals commonly undergo recrystallization by Ostwald ripening. The shapes of their particle size distributions can yield the rate law for this process. One consequence of Ostwald ripening is that a record of the recrystallization process is preserved in the various particle sizes. Therefore, one can determine the detailed geologic history of clays and other recrystallized minerals by separating, from a single sample, the various particle sizes for independent chemical, structural, and isotopic analyses. PMID:17815598

  11. Clays and other minerals in prebiotic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1984-01-01

    Clays and other minerals have been investigated in context with prebiotic processes, mainly in polymerization of amino acids. It was found that peptides adsorbed on the clay, prior to polymerization, influence the reaction. The ratio between the amount of the peptides adsorbed and that of the clay is important for the yield as well as for the degrees of polymerization obtained. Adsorption prior to reaction produces a certain order in the aggregates of the clay particles which might induce better reaction results. Excess of added peptides disturbs this order and causes lesser degrees of polymerization. In addition to adsorption, clays are also able to occlude between their layers substances out of the environment, up to very high concentrations.

  12. Mineral acquisition from clay by budongo forest chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consum

  13. Radiolysis of carboxylic acids adsorbed in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research is aimed at studying the effect of ionizing radiation in an heterogeneous system formed by a carboxylic acid adsorbed in a clay mineral. The study is focussed to discriminate if the presence of a solid surface alters the formation and distribution of radiolytic products in relation to the radiolysis of the carboxylic acid without the surface (clay). The results showed that the radiolysis of the system clay-acid goes along a defined path rather than showing various pathways of decomposition as in the case of simple aqueous solutions. The main pathway was the decarboxylation of the target compound rather than condensation/dimerization reactions

  14. Structure and theoretical calculations of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural and spectroscopic methods are combined to determine the full structure, including hydrogen atom positions, of dickite, which is a member of the kaolin group. Using the structural information obtained, quantum chemical calculations are performed on these kaolin group minerals. Special emphasis is laid on the relationship between the experimentally derived structure and theory. Finally, the application of quantum chemical methods to study clay minerals at several levels of approximation is reviewed

  15. Adsorption of Nucleic Acid Bases, Ribose, and Phosphate by Some Clay Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Hashizume

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Besides having a large capacity for taking up organic molecules, clay minerals can catalyze a variety of organic reactions. Derived from rock weathering, clay minerals would have been abundant in the early Earth. As such, they might be expected to play a role in chemical evolution. The interactions of clay minerals with biopolymers, including RNA, have been the subject of many investigations. The behavior of RNA components at clay mineral surfaces needs to be assessed if we are to appreciate how clays might catalyze the formation of nucleosides, nucleotides and polynucleotides in the “RNA world”. The adsorption of purines, pyrimidines and nucleosides from aqueous solution to clay minerals is affected by suspension pH. With montmorillonite, adsorption is also influenced by the nature of the exchangeable cations. Here, we review the interactions of some clay minerals with RNA components.

  16. Uranyl adsorption at clay mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, N.

    2014-07-01

    This first exemplary survey of actinide adsorption at complex clay mineral surfaces, which provided new insights at the atomic level, will be extended to other pertinent adsorbates like neptunyl NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and more complex minerals like iron-substituted phyllosilicates. In this way we will check if the concepts developed so far can be applied more generally, to support the interpretation of upcoming experiments. An essential facet of these studies will be to account also for the dynamical nature of the mineral/water interface by means of exemplary dynamical simulations. (orig.)

  17. Thermal Behaviour of clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programme carried out by ENEA to model the thermal-hydraulic-mechanical behaviour of the clay formations and to measure, in situ and in laboratory, the thermal properties of these rocks, is presented. An in situ heating experiment has been carried out in an open clay quarry in the area of Monterotondo, near Rome. The main goal of the experiment was to know the temperature field and the thermal effects caused by the high level radioactive waste disposed of in a clayey geological formation. The conclusions are as follows: - the thermal conduction codes are sufficiently accurate to forecast the temperature increases caused in the clay by the dissipation of the heat generated by high level radioactive waste; - the thermal conductivity deduced by means of the ''curve fitting'' method ranges from 0.015 to 0.017 W.cm-1.0C-1 - the temperature variation associated with the transport of clay interstitial water caused by temperature gradient is negligible. A laboratory automated method has been designed to measure the thermal conductivity and diffusivity in clay samples. A review of experimental data concerning thermomechanical effects in rocks as well as results of thermal experiments performed at ISMES on clays are presented. Negative thermal dilation has been found both in the elastic and plastic range under constant stress. Thermoplastic deformation appears ten times greater than the thermoelastic one. A mathematical model is proposed in order to simulate the above and other effects that encompass thermal-elastic-plastic-pore water pressure response of clays at high temperature and effective pressure with undrained and transient drainage conditions. Implementation of the two versions into a finite element computer code is described

  18. Dilatometric study from Mato Grosso do Sul clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied dilatometric behavior on different clay minerals from the state of Mato Grosso do Sul. The kaolinite was show a larger contraction what is due the loss of structural water and metakaolinite formation. The increase of illite leads to a formation of approximately constant intervals on deformation before the metakaolinite recrystallization. The presence of quartz can be identified on reversible transition between α and β states from different symmetries. (author)

  19. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees

    OpenAIRE

    Vernon Reynolds; Andrew W Lloyd; English, Christopher J.; Peter Lyons; Howard Dodd; Catherine Hobaiter; Nicholas Newton-Fisher; Caroline Mullins; Noemie Lamon; Anne Marijke Schel; Brittany Fallon

    2015-01-01

    Date of Acceptance: 06/07/2015 Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay ea...

  20. Soil Clay Minerals in Namibia and their Significance for the Terrestrial and Marine Past Global Change Research

    OpenAIRE

    HEINE, Klaus; Völkel, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    We delineated seven soil clay mineral provinces in Namibia. Many individual clay mineral assemblages occur in fluvial, pan, cave and other environments. Previous researchers have used clay mineral compositions as evidence for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions, often without analyzing the formation, the transport and the deposition of these clay minerals. In Namibia, rates of erosion and denudation by water and wind have been very small since early Quaternary times. During the Quaternary, th...

  1. Sorption Energy Maps of Clay Mineral Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    1999-07-19

    A molecular-level understanding of mineral-water interactions is critical for the evaluation and prediction of the sorption properties of clay minerals that may be used in various chemical and radioactive waste disposal methods. Molecular models of metal sorption incorporate empirical energy force fields, based on molecular orbital calculations and spectroscopic data, that account for Coulombic, van der Waals attractive, and short-range repulsive energies. The summation of the non-bonded energy terms at equally-spaced grid points surrounding a mineral substrate provides a three dimensional potential energy grid. The energy map can be used to determine the optimal sorption sites of metal ions on the exposed surfaces of the mineral. By using this approach, we have evaluated the crystallographic and compositional control of metal sorption on the surfaces of kaolinite and illite. Estimates of the relative sorption energy and most stable sorption sites are derived based on a rigid ion approximation.

  2. Sorption Energy Maps of Clay Mineral Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A molecular-level understanding of mineral-water interactions is critical for the evaluation and prediction of the sorption properties of clay minerals that may be used in various chemical and radioactive waste disposal methods. Molecular models of metal sorption incorporate empirical energy force fields, based on molecular orbital calculations and spectroscopic data, that account for Coulombic, van der Waals attractive, and short-range repulsive energies. The summation of the non-bonded energy terms at equally-spaced grid points surrounding a mineral substrate provides a three dimensional potential energy grid. The energy map can be used to determine the optimal sorption sites of metal ions on the exposed surfaces of the mineral. By using this approach, we have evaluated the crystallographic and compositional control of metal sorption on the surfaces of kaolinite and illite. Estimates of the relative sorption energy and most stable sorption sites are derived based on a rigid ion approximation

  3. Feasibility of classification of clay minerals by using PAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Y.; Yoshida, Y.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2015-06-01

    After the nuclear power plant disaster, the evaluation of radioactive Cs kept in soil, especially in clay minerals and the elucidation of its movement are urgent subjects to promote decontamination. It is known that the extractable level of Cs depends on the sort of clay minerals. We tried to find the characteristics of clay minerals belonging to phillosilicate group using positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and the relationship between the results of PAS and the amounts of substantially extracted Cs from the clay minerals. The results showed that each clay mineral was found to be distinguishable from other clay minerals by PAS and the extraction rate of Cs was different among those clay minerals, however the direct correlation between the results of PAS and the extraction rates of Cs was not found.

  4. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific. PMID:24035982

  5. A STUDY OF MECHANISM OF GLAZE FORMATION IN THE PROCESS OF BURNING GLAZED BRICK ON THE BASIS OF BEIDELLITE CLAY AND MINERAL COTTON WASTE PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. V. Vdovina

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. It is essential to establish the values of temperature coefficient of linear expansionof glaze and ceramic material containing beidellite clay and waste products of mineral cotton,and to examine the mechanism of glaze formation in the course of burning by means of infraredspectroscopy and electronic microscopy.Results. The formation of glaze of type ЩЛСО involves glass phase separation which precedescrystallization process.Conclusions. The study of thermoprocessed monoliths shows that liquation structure considerablydecreases at temperatures of 700 оС and 950 оС. Temperature interval of liquation is a function ofglaze thermal treatment conditions. It is shown that crazing resistance of glazed products is determinedby correlation of average temperature coefficients of linear expansion of mass and glaze,therefore, to obtain heat-resistant glazed ceramic brick with temperature coefficient of linear expansion6.53 · 10-4 оС, it is necessary to use glaze of type ЩЛСО with temperature coefficient oflinear expansion 6.45 · 10-4 оС.

  6. Clay Minerals – Mineralogy and Phenomenon of Clay Swelling in Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Karpiński B.; Szkodo M.

    2015-01-01

    Among the minerals found in the earth's crust, clay minerals are of the widest interest. Due to the specific properties such as plasticity, absorbing and catalytic properties clay minerals are used in many industries (oil & gas, chemistry, pharmacy, refractory technology, ceramics etc.). In drilling, a phenomenon of swelling clays is frequently observed. It has an important impact on the cementing quality. During the last few decades clays have been the subject of research on a scale unpreced...

  7. Alteration of swelling clay minerals by acid activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steudel, A.; Batenburg, L.F.; Fischer, H.R.; Weidler, P.G.; Emmerich, K.

    2009-01-01

    The bulk material of six dioctahedral and two trioctahedral swellable clay minerals was leached in H2SO4 and HCl at concentrations of 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 M at 80 °C for several hours. Alteration of the clay mineral structures was dependent on the individual character of each mineral (chemical composit

  8. DFT theoretical and FT-IR spectroscopic investigations of the plasticity of clay minerals dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzhitskii, A.; Lazorenko, G.; Yavna, V.; Daniel, Ph.

    2016-04-01

    Plasticity is the most important property of dispersions of clay minerals that determine the character of participation of these systems in many natural and technological processes. We report on the results of studies of hydration mechanism in typical clay minerals making part of natural dispersions of sedimentation masses by means of IR spectroscopy and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) methods. X-ray diffraction analysis of clay minerals of Millerovo mineral deposit (Russian Federation) is carried out. Regularities and peculiarities of interaction of water molecules with kaolinite basal planes (001) and (00 1 bar) are analyzed. The role of water in the formation of plasticity of clay minerals dispersions is revealed. The modes of water molecules placement and their state and structure in the system "clay mineral-water" is defined. Phase transition processes of clay minerals dispersion into plastic and liquid state and their influence on spectral characteristics of the systems are investigated. The interpretation of clay minerals phase transitions into plastic and fluid state based on the results of DFT simulation is given. The relation is established between specific variation of spectral characteristics and phase transitions of clay minerals dispersions into plastic and liquid state.

  9. Clay minerals in the Meuse - Haute Marne underground laboratory (France): Possible influence of organic matter on clay mineral evolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Claret, Francis; Sakharov, Boris.A.; Drits, Victor.A.; Velde, Bruce; Meunier, Alain; Griffault, Lise; Lanson, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    A clay-rich Callovo-Oxfordian sedimentary formation was selected in the eastern Paris Basin (MHM site) to host an underground laboratory dedicated to the assessment of nuclear waste disposal feasibility in deep geological formations. As described initially, this formation shows a mineralogical transition from an illite-smectite (I-S) mixed-layered mineral (MLM), which is essentially smectitic and randomly interstratified (R=0) in the top part of the series to a more illitic, ordered (R≥1) I-S...

  10. Identification of clay minerals by infrared spectroscopy and discriminant analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ritz, Michal; Vaculíková, Lenka; Plevová, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Identification of clay minerals based on chemometric analysis of measured infrared (IR) spectra was suggested. IR spectra were collected using the diffuse reflection technique. Discriminant analysis and principal component analysis were used as chemometric methods. Four statistical models were created for separation and identification of clay minerals. More than 50 samples of various clay mineral standards from different localities were used for the creation of statistical models. The results...

  11. Identification of Clay Minerals by Infrared Spectroscopy and Discriminant Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ritz, Michal; Vaculíková, Lenka; Plevová, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Identification of clay minerals based on chemometric analysis of measured infrared (IR) spectra was suggested. IR spectra were collected using the diffuse reflection technique. Discriminant analysis and principal component analysis were used as chemometric methods. Four statistical models were created for separation and identification of clay minerals. More than 50 samples of various clay mineral standards from different localities were used for the creation of statistical models. The results...

  12. Radiation-induced defects in clay minerals : a review

    OpenAIRE

    Allard, T.; Balan, Etienne; Calas, G.; Fourdrin, C.; Morichon, E.; Sorieul, S.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive information has been collected on radiation effects on clay minerals over the last 35 years, providing a wealth of information on environmental and geological processes. The fields of applications include the reconstruction of past radioelement migrations, the dating of clay minerals or the evolution of the physico-chemical properties under irradiation. The investigation of several clay minerals, namely kaolinite, dickite, montmorillonite, illite and sudoite, by Electron Paramagneti...

  13. Optimization method for quantitative calculation of clay minerals in soil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Libo Hao; Qiaoqiao Wei; Yuyan Zhao; Zilong Lu; Xinyun Zhao

    2015-04-01

    Determination of types and amounts for clay minerals in soil are important in environmental, agricultural, and geological investigations. Many reliable methods have been established to identify clay mineral types. However, no reliable method for quantitative analysis of clay minerals has been established so far. In this study, an attempt was made to propose an optimization method for the quantitative determination of clay minerals in soil based on bulk chemical composition data. The fundamental principles and processes of the calculation are elucidated. Some samples were used for reliability verification of the method and the results prove the simplicity and efficacy of the approach.

  14. Clays, clay minerals and cordierite ceramics - a review

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Valaskova

    2015-01-01

    The conventional methods for the synthesis of cordierite ceramics include the solid-state sintering of individual oxides of magnesium, aluminium and silicon of the corresponding chemical composition of cordierite, or sintering of the natural raw materials. Clays are used in the ceramics industries largely because of their contribution to the molding and drying properties. The most effective use of clays meets with the problems of the improvement of the working properties of clays and...

  15. The use of Clay minerals in stratigraphic correlations of carboniferous coal deposits. Les mineraux argileux au service des correlations stratigraphiques des formations houilleres du Carbonifere; Rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzi, G.; Bossiroy, D.; Dreesen, R. (ISSeP, Liege (Belgium))

    1992-01-01

    The main objective of this research project has been achieved: the development of a new tool for the lithostratigraphical correlation of cored boreholes. The proposed technique is based on the processing and interpretation of the results of mineralogical analyses, carried out on the clay minerals from finegrained siliciclastic rocks, associated with coal seams. For this study, the stratigraphical interval below and above the Quaregnon Marine Band (limit between the Westphalian A and B), and more precisely the rock sequence between coal seams no KS 71 and 44 was selected: this interval has been recorded in several cored boreholes, north of the actual exploitation limits of the Beringen and Zolder-Houthalen collieries (Belgian Campine). Over 1000 samples (mainly from mudstones, some siltstones and sandstones) were taken out of the cores, at a regular spacing (about 2m), for further mineralogical analysis. Simultaneously, a sedimentological study was carried out on the the sampled sequences, as well as a petrographical analysis of the main rock types. This resulted in a reconstruction of the Westphalian depositional environments and in a better knowledge of the 'behaviour' (geological history) of the clay minerals. The mineralogical composition of the clay minerals was identified through X-ray diffraction and computer-aided graphical processing of the resulting data produced percentage or intensity ratio curves, which could then be used as a lithostratigraphical correlation tool. Correlations have been shown between relatively simple rock sequences (without split seams) in neighbouring boreholes (1 to 3 km apart) and positive correlations revealed between more complex sequences containing multiple coals seams. Some positive but less obvious correlations have also been discovered between sequences from widely spaced boreholes ({+-}10 km apart).

  16. The effect of clay minerals on diasterane/sterane ratios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kaam-Peters, H.M.E. van; Koster, J.; Gaast, S. J. van der; Dekker, M.H.A.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1998-01-01

    To examine the effect of clay minerals on diasterane/sterane ratios, the mineral compositions of three sample sets of sedimentary rocks displaying a wide range of diasterane/sterane ratios were analysed quantitatively. Diasterane/sterane ratios do not to correlate with clay content but depend on the

  17. Sm-Nd dating of Fig Tree clay minerals of the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulkeridis, T.; Goldstein, S. L.; Clauer, N.; Kroner, A.; Lowe, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Sm-Nd isotopic data from carbonate-derived clay minerals of the 3.22-3.25 Ga Fig Tree Group, Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa, form a linear array corresponding to an age of 3102 +/- 64 Ma, making these minerals the oldest dated clays on Earth. The obtained age is 120-160 m.y. younger than the depositional age determined by zircon geochronology. Nd model ages for the clays range from approximately 3.39 to 3.44 Ga and almost cover the age variation of the Barberton greenstone belt rocks, consistent with independent evidence that the clay minerals are derived from material of the belt. The combined isotopic and mineralogical data provide evidence for a cryptic thermal overprint in the sediments of the belt. However, the highest temperature reached by the samples since the time of clay-mineral formation was <300 degrees C, lower than virtually any known early Archean supracrustal sequence.

  18. Clay Minerals – Mineralogy and Phenomenon of Clay Swelling in Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpiński B.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the minerals found in the earth's crust, clay minerals are of the widest interest. Due to the specific properties such as plasticity, absorbing and catalytic properties clay minerals are used in many industries (oil & gas, chemistry, pharmacy, refractory technology, ceramics etc.. In drilling, a phenomenon of swelling clays is frequently observed. It has an important impact on the cementing quality. During the last few decades clays have been the subject of research on a scale unprecedented in the history of mineralogy. This paper presents review literature on mineralogy of clay minerals and phenomenon of swelling in oil and gas industry. Unique ion exchange properties and clay swelling mechanisms are also considered.

  19. Clay mineralogy of weathering rinds and possible implications concerning the sources of clay minerals in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Steven M.

    1982-01-01

    Weathering rinds on volcanic clasts in Quaternary deposits in the western US contain only very fine-grained and poorly crystalline clay minerals. Rinds were sampled from soils containing well-developed argillic B horizons in deposits approx 105 yr old or more. The clay-size fraction of the rinds is dominated by allophane and iron hydroxy-oxides, whereas the B horizons contain abundant well-crystallized clay minerals. The contrast between the clay mineralogy of the weathering rinds, in which weathering is isolated from other soil processes, and that of the associated soil matrices suggests a need to reassess assumptions concerning the rates at which clay minerals form and the sources of clay minerals in argillic B horizons. It seems that crystalline clay minerals form more slowly in weathering rinds than is generally assumed for soil environments and that the weathering of primary minerals may not be the dominant source of crystalline clay minerals in Middle to Late Pleistocene soil.-A.P.

  20. Clay minerals reactivity under thermal gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The argillaceous materials properties could be favourable to the radioelements confinement in high activity and thermogenic nuclear waste disposal. This study relates to the transformations induced on these materials under thermal stress and the impact on their properties. The samples were collected in the vicinity of a natural analogue: a basaltic intrusion in an argillaceous formation (argillites of Laumiere, Aveyron, France). This volcanic event has functioned for an unreachable time in a laboratory. The study of the mixed-layered illite-smectite minerals (I-S), major minerals of these argillites, shows an illitisation at the basaltic intrusion contact. The thin and disturbed variation of an index of crystallinity of the I-S corresponds to the influence of the geological context. Laumiere highlighted determining parameters (smectite formation during hydrothermal alteration) which has influenced the evolution of argillaceous materials in thermal context. (author)

  1. Neogene and Quaternary clay minerals in the southern North Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Adriaens, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    In this work it was demonstrated how the systematic quantitative analysis of clay minerals yields a better understanding of specific geologicaland stratigraphical issues. In the first part, a reliable and accurate method for the X-ray diffraction analysis of clay minerals, and glauconite minerals in particular, was established. Especially the decomposition and separate quantification of the 060-region in random oriented powder diffraction patterns was found a powerful tool for the characte...

  2. Performance Study of the Natural Rubber Composite with Clay Minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation, characterization and some applications of natural rubber clay composite have been studied. This study investigated the possibility of natural rubber latex to replace some part of natural clays. In formulation of rubber clay composite from natural rubber latex and various clay minerals, three main steps were involved (i) preparation of latex cream (ii) prevulcanization of latex cream (iii) mixing vulcanized latex compound, with other ingredients. In each step, several parameters have been carefully investigated to optimize the performance of natural rubber clay composite production. The composite products were of better quality and can be considered to be more cost effective.

  3. Dynamics of water confined in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy of the O-D stretching mode of dilute HOD in H2O probes the local environment and the hydrogen bond network of confined water. The dynamics of water molecules confined in the interlayer space of montmorillonites (Mt) and in interaction with two types of cations (Li+ and Ca2+) but also with the negatively charged siloxane surface are studied. The results evidence that the OD vibrational dynamics is significantly slowed down in confined media: it goes from 1.7 ps in neat water to 2.6 Ps in the case of Li+ cations with two water pseudo-layers (2.2-2.3 ps in the case of Ca2+ cations) and to 4.7 ps in the case of Li+ cations with one water pseudo-layer. No significant difference between the two cations is noticed. In this 2D confined geometry (the interlayer space being about 0.6 nm for two water pseudo-layers), the relaxation time constants obtained are comparable to the ones measured in analogous concentrated salt solutions. Nevertheless, and in strong opposition to the observations performed in the liquid phase, anisotropy experiments evidence the absence of rotational motions on a 5 ps time scale, proving that the hydrogen bond network in the interlayer space of the clay mineral is locked at this time scale. (authors)

  4. Characterization of clay minerals; Caracterizacion de minerales arcillosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz N, C.; Olguin, M.T.; Solache R, M.; Alarcon H, T.; Aguilar E, A. [Gerencia de Ciencias Basicas, Direccion de Investigacion Cientifica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  5. Polyaniline and mineral clay-based conductive composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Oliveira Vilela

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials have attracted the attention of numerous researchers due to the distinct properties shown by this class of materials and the mineral clay used in their synthesis. In this study, conductive composites were obtained by mixing polyaniline (PAni with clay (kaolinite and montmorillonite. The aniline was polymerized in a medium with clay and the powder was characterized by X ray diffraction, electrical conductivity and morphology. The results suggest PAni chain linearization in a kaolinite medium. The addition of montmorillonite resulted in PAni chain linearization and intercalation of mineral clay, although the montmorillonite was not pretreated. The PAni-clay composites showed an electrical conductivity of 0.01 S.cm-1, which appeared not to be influenced by the amount of clay used.

  6. Enhance decarboxylation reaction of carboxylic acids in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay minerals are important constituents of the Earth's crust. These minerals catalyze reactions in several ways: by energy transfer processes, redox reactions, stabilization of intermediates and by Broensted or Lewis acidity behavior. Important set of organic reactions can be improved in the precedence of clay minerals. Besides the properties of clays to catalyze chemical reactions, it is possible to enhance some of its reactions by using ionizing radiation. The phenomenon of radiation-induced catalysis may be connected with ionizing process in the solid and with the trapped non-equilibrium charge carriers. In this paper we are reporting the decarboxylation reaction of carboxylic acids catalyzed by clay and by irradiation of the system acid-clay. We studied the behaviour of several carboxylic acids and analyzed them by gas chromatography, X-ray and infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that decarboxylation of the target compound is the dominating pathway. The reaction is enhanced by gamma radiation in several orders of magnitude. (author)

  7. Polyaniline and mineral clay-based conductive composites

    OpenAIRE

    Samantha Oliveira Vilela; Mauro Alfredo Soto-Oviedo; Ana Paula Fonseca Albers; Roselena Faez

    2007-01-01

    Composite materials have attracted the attention of numerous researchers due to the distinct properties shown by this class of materials and the mineral clay used in their synthesis. In this study, conductive composites were obtained by mixing polyaniline (PAni) with clay (kaolinite and montmorillonite). The aniline was polymerized in a medium with clay and the powder was characterized by X ray diffraction, electrical conductivity and morphology. The results suggest PAni chain linearization i...

  8. Quantification of clay minerals by combined EWA/XRD method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jianhong; (徐建红); XU; Jianhong; (徐建红); T.; R.; Astin; PAN; Mao; (潘懋)

    2001-01-01

    Illite has been considered the main constraint on permeability in the Morecambe Gas Field, East Irish Sea, UK. Previous research has emphasized the morphology rather than the amount of clay minerals. By applying a new method of clay mineral quantification, EWA/XRD, and applying statistical analysis methods, we are able to establish a quantitative model of illite distribution in the field. The result also leads to a better understanding of permeability distribution in reservoir sandstones.

  9. Layer Charge of Clay Minerals; Selected papers from the Symposium on Current Knowledge on the Layer Charge of Clay Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Special issue contains papers based on the contributions presented during the workshop “Current Knowledge on the Layer Charge of Clay Minerals”, held on September 18 and 19, 2004, in the Smolenice Castle, Slovakia. Layer charge is one of the most important characteristics of clay minerals as it...

  10. Clays and clay minerals in Bikaner: Sources, environment pollution and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayatri, Sharma; Anu, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Environmental pollution can also be caused by minerals which include natural as well as human activities. Rapid urbanization, consumerist life style, anthropogenic deeds are increasing environmental pollution day by day. Fluctuation in our ecosystem or polluted environment leads to many diseases and shows adverse effects on living organisms. The main aim of this paper is to highlight the environmental pollution from clays and clay minerals and their mitigation..

  11. A new microenvironment for the formation of clay minerals: the example of authigenic halloysite-7Å and gibbsite in a stalactite from Agios Georgios Cave, Kilkis, north Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ifandi, University of Patras

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An unusual authigenic origin for halloysite and gibbsite is reported in a stalactite from Agios Georgios Cave, Kilkis. This speleothem includes mostly pure calcite whereas minor areas of Mg-rich calcite and scarce dolomite are present in four growth phases. Abundant pores are created due to imperfect coalescence of the calcite crystals. Several of them contain detrital muscovite, which was presumably transferred from the dripping water, during the formation of speleothem and has been variably altered to halloysite. Several pores in the stalactite contain different mineral assemblages that we interpret as in situ: halloysite-7Å, halloysite + silica, gibbsite + silica and gibbsite. The breakdown of the muscovite and the formation of halloysite require acidic conditions, which we suggest to have been established by potassium solubilising microorganisms. The silica minerals include spheroidal assemblages or needle-like and blade-like quartz and can be explained by further dissolution of halloysite, under the same acidic conditions in the presence of microorganisms. In our model, the precipitation of gibbsite is the result of direct formation from muscovite, promoted from abundant and undisturbed water percolation, at moderately low pH, also induced by the presence of bacteria. Given that microbial activities promote: (1 breakdown of muscovite and formation of halloysite, silica, and gibbsite, and (2 formation of Mg-calcite and dolomite after calcite, then it is likely that two or more different microbial communities may exist in the same speleothem. The first creates mild acidic conditions, aiming at the decomposition of muscovite in the microenvironment of the pores antagonising the second that produces alkaline microregimes and the local precipitation of Mg-rich carbonate minerals.

  12. Differentiation of pleistocene deposits in northeastern Kansas by clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, P.-L.

    1968-01-01

    Seventy-four samples from eight stratigraphic sections of lower Pleistocene glacial and glaciofluvial deposits in Doniphan County, extreme northeastern Kansas, were analyzed using X-ray diffraction techniques. Clay-mineral assemblages of the clay mineral associated with minor amounts of kaolinite and illite. An attempt was made to differentiate units of till and nontill deposits by using the relative intensities of 001 reflections of "mixed-layer mineral," kaolinite, and illite. At least two tills were recognizable. Associated nontill deposits, could not be differentiated from one another, although the nontills are easily distinguished from tills. ?? 1968.

  13. Clay minerals assemblage in the Neogene fluvial succession of the Pishin Belt, Pakistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasi, Aimal Khan; Kassi, Akhtar Muhammad; Friis, Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    indicate derivation of material from the Pre-Miocene sedimentary and meta-sedimentary terrains of the Pishin Belt. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses indicate that clay minerals in various mudstones and sandstone samples are identical and detrital in nature and include smectite, chlorite, illite, serpentine...... sedimentary and metasedimentary successions. The source of kaolinite seems to be pedogenic or lateritic. The clay minerals assemblage in mudstones and sandstones of the Dasht Murgha group, Malthanai formation and Bostan formation appears to have been derived from the nearby-exposed Pre-Miocence mafic...

  14. Fixation of Selenium by Clay Minerals and Iron Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdy, A. A.; Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1977-01-01

    In studying Se fixation, soil components capable of retaining Se were investigated. The importance of Fe hydrous oxides in the fixation of Se was established. The clay minerals common to soils, such as kaolinite, montmorillonite and vermiculite, all exhibited Se fixation, but greater fixation...... occurred with the 1:1 than the 2:1 clay type. Experiments with finely ground minerals showed that the pH of the systems greatly influenced the rate of fixation, reaching a maximum between pH 3 and 5 and decreasing rapidly as the pH increased. With the Fe2O3 system fixed Se was slightly reduced as the p......H was increased to over 8. The extractability of Se from the clay minerals indicated that 1:1 clay type minerals fix selenite more indissolubly than 2:1 clays and that selenite was adsorbed on the clays mainly by a surface exchange reaction. The major part of the selenite added to the Fe2O3 system was...

  15. Clay Mineral Assemblages as Proxies for Reconstructing Messinian Paleoenvironments in the Western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Ruiz, Francisca; Comas, Menchu; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2014-05-01

    Significant tectonic and climate changes at time of the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) led to a complex sedimentation involving marked changes in sediment composition, particularly in clay mineral assemblages. One of the noticeable mineralogical changes across this time interval is the strong smectite increase in Messinian deposits in comparison to the underlying Tortonian and overlaying Pliocene sediments. As no break in the clay mineralogy is recognized in the open ocean (Chamley et al., 1978), such changes are also distinctive of the Mediterranean basins. Since the early discoveries of the giant Messinian evaporite formation (DSDP Legs 13 and 42A), a vast literature contributed, during the last decades, to the continuous debate and re-examination of the actual Messinian paleoenvironment. Drilled records in the westernmost Mediterranean (Alboran Sea) have shown significant changes in the mineralogical assemblages associated to the Messinian events. This basin is depleted of significant salt deposits. Site 976 (ODP Leg 161) recovered a 670-m-thick, middle Miocene (Serravallian) to Pleistocene/Holocene sedimentary sequence, including a thin interval of Messinian sediment, lying directly upon the metamorphic basement. Analysis of clay mineral assemblages from the sedimentary cover of Hole 976B revealed an homogeneous clay association composed of illite, smectite, chlorite and kaolinite with no major changes in clay mineral abundances except for the sediment interval dated as Messinian, which is characterized by a sharp smectite increase (Martinez-Ruiz et al., 1999). Transmission Electron Microscope analyses of clay minerals revealed that smectite composition corresponds to Al-rich beidellites, which supports the existence of such smectites in peri-Mediterranean soils. Smectite formation was favored by the climate conditions at that time, comprising progressive aridification and the alternation of wet and dry climatic episodes. Diagenesis in these smectites is

  16. Study of radionuclide migration in clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the studies on the migration of Cs, Sr and I in clay formations, which are presently considered for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes. The distribution and diffusion coefficients were evaluated by means of experimental techniques and computer procedures, which are presented in this report. The natural clays tested in the laboratory experiments were sampled from the most representative italian basins and from the zone of Mol (Belgium). In addition tests were performed on monomineral clays artificially remade in edometer. The experimental results are in accordance with data found in the literature and show the existence of a good correlation between the observed migration properties and the granulometric and mineralogic characteristics of the natural clays

  17. Geochemistry of clay minerals for uranium exploration in the Grants mineral belt, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookins, D. G.

    1982-03-01

    Clay mineralogy studies of ore rocks versus barren rocks in the Grants mineral belt, New Mexico, show that some combination of chlorite (rosette form), illite, mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite, (±Mg-montmorillonite) are penecontemporaneous with uranium minerals in trend ore; these same clay minerals plus kaolinite are related to the roll-type ore near the main redox front of the Grants mineral belt. Clay minerals from barren rocks are characterized by a greater abundance of Na-montmorillonite, kaolinite, and face-to-edge form chlorite. Chlorites from ore zones contain much more vanadium than do chlorites from barren rocks. Trend orr probably formed from southeasterly flowing waters following paleochannels in the Late Jurassic. These deposits are found almost entirely in reduced rocks, and organic carbon may have been an important reductant to remove U-V-U-V-Se-Mo from solution as carbonate from ore zones contains some organic carbon based on stable isotope studies. Uplift, remobilization, and reprecipitation of some of the trend ore resulted in the formation of redistributed ore, some of which possesses a roll-type geometry. Mineralization for the roll-type ore was apparently controlled by sulfide-sulfate equilibria at or near the main redox front in the Grants mineral belt. Trend and roll-type ore possess different assemblages of clay minerals and different trace element abundances. Laramide-age faults cut both trend ore and some roll-type ores. Stack ore is found in Laramide-age fault zones. Limited oxygen isotopic data from clay minerals collected from two mines at Ambrosia Lake in reduced rocks indicate probable preservation of ancient, formational waters and show no evidence of infiltration by young meteoric waters. This information, plus the pre-Laramide-age faults, suggest, but do not unequivocally prove, that the main redox front has been relatively stable since its formation, probably some time in the Cretaceous. Younger encroachment of the redox front

  18. Black Carbon, The Pyrogenic Clay Mineral?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most soils contain significant amounts of black carbon, much of which is present as discrete particles admixed with the coarse clay fraction (0.2–2.0 µm e.s.d.) and can be physically separated from the more abundant diffuse biogenic humic materials. Recent evidence has shown that naturally occurring...

  19. Preparation of Synthetic Zeolites from Myanmar Clay Mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faujasite type zeolite X was successfully synthesized from Myanmar clay mineral kaolinite, by treating with sodium hydroxide at 820 C followed by dissolution in water and hydrothermal treatment. It was found that the solution of fused clay powder can be crystallized at 90C under ambient pressure to synthesize faujasite type zeolite X. The effects of aging time and the amount of water on the formation of the product phase and Si/ Al ratios of the resulting products were investigated. Most of the Si and Al components in kaolinite might be dissolved into an alkaline solution and reacted to form ring-like structures. Then it was effectively transformed into zeolite materials. The maximum relative crystallinity of faujasite zeolite obtained was found to be 100%. Zeolite P was found to be a competitive phase present in some resulting products during hydrothermal treatment. The cation exchange capacity of kaolinite is very low, but increased after a proper treatment. It was found that the prepared faujasite type zeolite X, zeolite P and hydrogen zeolite (HZ) can reduce the hardness, the alkalinity, the total dissolved solid and the dissolved iron of raw water in the batch wise operation of water treatment. Therefore, it can be used as the cation exchanged resin for water treatment

  20. Influence of Humic Acid on Interaction of Ammonium and Potassium Ions on Clay Minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Zhao; CHEN Xiao-Qin; ZHOU Jian-Min; LIU Dai-Huan; WANG Huo-Yan; DU Chang-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Interaction of ammonium (NH4+) and potassium (K+) is typical in field soils.However,the effects of organic matter on interaction of NH4+ and K+ have not been thoroughly investigated.In this study,we examined the changes in major physicochemical properties of three clay minerals (kaolinite,illite,and montmorillonite) after humic acid (HA) coating and evaluated the influences of these changes on the interaction of NH4+ and K+ on clay minerals using batch experiments.After HA coating,the cation exchange capacity (CEC) and specific surface area (SSA) of montmorillonite decreased significantly,while little decrease in CEC and SSA occurred in illite and only a slight increase in CEC was found in kaolinite.Humic acid coating significantly increased cation adsorption and preference for NH4+,and this effect was more obvious on clay minerals with a lower CEC.Results of Fourier transform infrared spectrometry analysis showed that HA coating promoted the formation of H-bonds between the adsorbed NH4+ and the organo-mineral complexes.HA coating increased cation fixation capacity on montmorillonite and kaolinite,but the opposite occurred on illite.In addition,HA coating increased the competitiveness of NH4+ on fixation sites.These results showed that HA coating affected both the nature of clay mineral surfaces and the reactions of NH4+ and K+ with clay minerals,which might influence the availability of nutrient cations to plants in field soils amended with organic matter.

  1. Clay Minerals as Solid Acids and Their Catalytic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses catalytic properties of clays, attributed to acidity of the clay surface. The formation of carbonium ions on montmorillonite is used as a demonstration of the presence of surface acidity, the enhanced dissociation of water molecules when polarized by cations, and the way the surface can interact with organic substances. (Author/JN)

  2. Fluoride content of clay minerals and argillaceous earth materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J., Jr.; Glass, H.D.; White, W.A.; Trandel, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A reliable method, utilizing a fluoride ion-selective electrode, is described for the determination of fluoride in clays and shales. Interference by aluminum and iron is minimal. The reproducibility of the method is about ??5% at different levels of fluoride concentration. Data are presented for various clay minerals and for the clays and shales. Fluoride values range from 44 ppm (0.0044%) for nontronite from Colfax, WA, to 51,800 ppm (5.18%) for hectorite from Hector, CA. In general, clays formed under hydrothermal conditions are relatively high in fluoride content, provided the hydrothermal waters are high in fluoride content. Besides hectorite, dickite from Ouray, CO, was found to contain more than 50 times as much fluoride (6700 ppm) as highly crystalline geode kaolinite (125 ppm). The clay stratum immediately overlying a fluorite mineralized zone in southern Illinois was found to have a higher fluoride content than the same stratum in a nonmineralized zone approximately 1 mile away. Nonmarine shales in contact with Australian coals were found to be lower in fluoride content than were marine shales in contact with Illinois coals. It is believed that, in certain instances, peak shifts on DTA curves of similar clay minerals are the result of significant differences in their fluoride content. ?? 1977.

  3. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  4. The influence of clay minerals on acoustic properties of sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Olav

    1997-12-31

    This thesis aims to provide better understanding of the relationship between the acoustic properties and the petrophysical/mineralogical properties in sand-prone rock. It emphasizes the influence of clay minerals. The author develops a method to deposit clay minerals/mineral aggregates in pore space of a rigid rock framework. Kaolinite aggregates were flushed into porous permeable Bentheimer sandstone to evaluate the effect of pore filling minerals on porosity, permeability and acoustic properties. The compressional velocity was hardly affected by the clay content and it was found that the effect of minor quantities of pore filling minerals may be acoustically modelled as an ideal suspension, where the pore fluid bulk modulus is modified by the bulk modulus of the clay minerals. The influence of clays on acoustic velocities in petroleum reservoir rocks was investigated through ultrasonic measurements of compressional- and shear-waves on core material from reservoir and non-reservoir units on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The measured velocities decrease as the porosity increases, but are not strongly dependent on the clay content. The measured velocities are less dependent on the petrophysical and lithological properties than indicated by previous authors and published mathematical models, and stiffness reduction factors are introduced in two of the models to better match the data. Velocities are estimated along the wellbores based on non-sonic well logs and reflect well the actual sonic log well measurements. In some wells the compressional velocity cannot be modelled correctly by the models suggested. Very high compressional wave anisotropy was measured in the dry samples at atmospheric conditions. As the samples were saturated, the anisotropy was reduced to a maximum of about 30% and decreases further upon pressurization. Reservoir rocks retrieved from 2500 m are more stress dependent than those retrieved from less than 200 m depth. 168 refs., 117 figs., 24

  5. Crystallite size distribution of clay minerals from selected Serbian clay deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The BWA (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach technique for the measurement of the mean crystallite thickness and thickness distributions of phyllosilicates was applied to a set of kaolin and bentonite minerals. Six samples of kaolinitic clays, one sample of halloysite, and five bentonite samples from selected Serbian deposits were analyzed. These clays are of sedimentary volcano-sedimentary (diagenetic, and hydrothermal origin. Two different types of shape of thickness distribution were found - lognormal, typical for bentonite and halloysite, and polymodal, typical for kaolinite. The mean crystallite thickness (T BWA seams to be influenced by the genetic type of the clay sample.

  6. Approach for decontamination from the viewpoint of clays and clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is essential to make the effective decontamination and to reduce the amount of the contaminated materials with radionuclides in the areas damaged from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. The Clay Science Society of Japan (CSSJ) has made the great efforts for so-called 'Fukushima Problems' as one of the scientific groups for clay and clay minerals. A review is given of the contributions against the problem from CSSJ itself and also the interested members in CSSJ joining the interested research projects. We would like to realize again the important role of CSSJ for the problems considering the results in these projects. (author)

  7. First Direct Detection of Clay Minerals on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, R. B.; Owensby, P. D.; Clark, R. N.

    1985-01-01

    Magnesian clays or clay-type minerals were conclusively detected in the martian regolith. Near-IR spectral observations of Mars using the Mauna Kea 2.2-m telescope show weak but definite absorption bands near microns. The absorption band positions and widths match those produced by combined OH stretch and Mg-OH lattice modes and are diagnostic of minerals with structural OH such as clays and amphiboles. Likely candidate minerals include serpentine, talc, hectorite, and sponite. There is no spectral evidence for aluminous hydroxylated minerals. No distinct band occurs at 2.55 microns, as would be expected if carbonates were responsible for the 2.35 micron absorption. High-albedo regions such as Elysium and Utopia have the strongest bands near 2.35 microns, as would be expected for heavily weathered soils. Low-albedo regions such as Iapygia show weaker but distinct bands, consistent with moderate coatings, streaks, and splotches of bright weathered material. In all areas observed, the 2.35-micron absorption is at least three times weaker than would be expected if well-crystallized clay minerals made up the bulk of bright soils on Mars.

  8. Force field development for molecular dynamics simulations of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Clay minerals and their interfaces with aqueous solutions play an important role in many subsurface processes, including the retention and transport of aqueous species. Molecular simulations provide atomistic details of structural and dynamic properties of these fine-grained minerals that are difficult to obtain experimentally. Our research focus has been classical simulations of bulk clay minerals and their basal surfaces and interfaces using the fully flexible Clayff energy force field. Clayff is compatible with other force fields based on electrostatic and van der Waals interactions, permitting the study of a wide range of inorganic and organic solute at clay interfaces. Trends in clay swelling and ion adsorption onto the basal surfaces of clays are accurately described using this force field approach. Adsorption at pH-dependent edge sites is beyond the original scope of Clayff but is critical to a complete understanding of radionuclide transport near radioactive waste repositories. The application of Clayff to such edge sites requires three-body angle bend terms, and our recent work has involved parameterizing the hydroxylated edge site species (Mg-O-H, Al-O-H, and Si-O-H) found in end member models. (authors)

  9. Clay mineral composition of river sediments in the Amazon Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Guyot, Jean-Loup; Jouanneau, J.M.; Soares, L; Boaventura, G.R.; Maillet, N; Lagane, Christelle

    2007-01-01

    Clay minerals are important in evaluating the maturity of suspended sediments, weathering intensity and source area. However, there are processes that can change the mineral assemblage such as river transportation, deposition, remobilization and tributary inputs. In terms of water discharge and sediment yield, the Amazon is one of the largest rivers in the world. Most of the suspended sediments come from the Andes, crossing the lowlands before reaching the ocean. This study measures the spati...

  10. Soil Microbes and soil microbial proteins: interactions with clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial enumeration in soil environments estimates that the population may reach approximately 1010 g-1 of soil and comprise up to 90% of the total soil microbial biomass. Bacteria are present in soils as single cells or multicell colonies and often strongly adsorb onto mineral surfaces such as sand and clay. The interactions of microbes and microbial biomolecules with these minerals have profound impacts on the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils. (Author)

  11. Simulation of the long term alteration of clay minerals in engineered bentonite barriers: nucleation and growth of secondary clay particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The long term stability of clay rich rocks used as barriers to the migration of radionuclides in the environment of nuclear wastes has been intensively studied, looking at the geochemical interactions between clay minerals and aqueous solutions. These studies combine experimental approaches for the short term and numerical modellings for the long term extrapolations, in the frame of the research supported by ANDRA in the French design for High Level Waste (HLW) repository. The main objective of the geochemical numerical tools devoted to clay-solutions interaction processes was to predict the feed-back effects of mineralogical and chemical transformations of clay mineral, in repository conditions as defined by Andra, on their physical and transport properties (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability). The 1D transport-reaction coupled simulation was done using the code KIRMAT, at 100 deg. C for 100000 years. The fluid considered is that of the Callovo-Oxfordian geological formation (COX) and assumed to diffuse into the clay barrier from one side. On the other side, ferrous iron, is provided by the steel overpack corrosion. Under these conditions, montmorillonite of the clay barrier is only partially transformed into illite, chlorite, and saponite. The simulation shows that only outer parts of the clay barrier is significantly modified, mainly at the interface with the geological environment. These modifications correspond to a closure of the porosity, followed by a decrease of mass transport by molecular diffusion. Near the COX, the swelling pressure of the clays from the barrier is predicted to decrease, but in its major part, the engineered barrier seems to keep its initial physical properties (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability, swelling pressure). In this modelling approach, the very important role of secondary clay minerals has to be taken into account with relevant kinetic rate laws; particularly

  12. Radiation-induced defects in clay minerals: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive information has been collected on radiation effects on clay minerals over the last 35 years, providing a wealth of information on environmental and geological processes. The fields of applications include the reconstruction of past radioelement migrations, the dating of clay minerals or the evolution of the physico-chemical properties under irradiation. The investigation of several clay minerals, namely kaolinite, dickite, montmorillonite, illite and sudoite, by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy has shown the presence of defects produced by natural or artificial radiations. These defects consist mostly of electron holes located on oxygen atoms of the structure. The various radiation-induced defects are differentiated through their nature and their thermal stability. Most of them are associated with a π orbital on a Si–O bond. The most abundant defect in clay minerals is oriented perpendicular to the silicate layer. Thermal annealing indicates this defect in kaolinite (A-center) to be stable over geological periods at ambient temperature. Besides, electron or heavy ion irradiation easily leads to an amorphization in smectites, depending on the type of interlayer cation. The amorphization dose exhibits a bell-shaped variation as a function of temperature, with a decreasing part that indicates the influence of thermal dehydroxylation. Two main applications of the knowledge of radiation-induced defects in clay minerals are derived: (i) The use of defects as tracers of past radioactivity. In geological systems where the age of the clay can be constrained, ancient migrations of radioelements can be reconstructed in natural analogues of high level nuclear waste repositories. When the dose rate may be assumed constant over time, the paleodose is used to date clay populations, an approach applied to fault gouges or laterites of the Amazon basin. (ii) The influence of irradiation over physico-chemical properties of clay minerals. An environmental

  13. Depth distribution of 137Cs adsorption property of clay minerals influenced by mineral weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocesium adsorption potential of mica clay mineral can increase as it is weathered, because K depletion in mica interlayer sites generates new Cs selective sites. However, in soils weathered under field conditions, the increase in 137Cs adsorption potential associated with mineral weathering has not been observed extensively. We investigated four soil profiles from Japan and Thailand with different soil pH ranges (3.3-4.0, 4.2-4.3, 5.0-5.7, and 5.5-7.3). The solid/liquid distribution coefficients of Cs (CsKd) in clay (137Cs adsorption potential of mica clay minerals. In three soil profiles, CsKd value in clay was the largest at a surface horizon and was decreased with depth, whereas in the most acidic of Podzolic soil profile, it was the largest at B horizon. The large CsKd value in surface clays relative to deeper horizons were well associated with that of 2.0-1.0 μm clay fraction. We assumed that the 137Cs adsorption potential increased at surface horizons mainly because coarser clay micas were weathered and generated Cs selective sites. The exceptional result obtained in Podzolic soil profile suggests that too intensive weathering destruct mica structure and may decrease in Cs adsorption potential of mica clay minerals. (author)

  14. Fixation of Selenium by Clay Minerals and Iron Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdy, A. A.; Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1977-01-01

    In studying Se fixation, soil components capable of retaining Se were investigated. The importance of Fe hydrous oxides in the fixation of Se was established. The clay minerals common to soils, such as kaolinite, montmorillonite and vermiculite, all exhibited Se fixation, but greater fixation...

  15. Geochemistry of clay minerals for uranium exploration in the Grants Mineral Belt, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay mineral chemistry can be used to address the problems of uranium transport and precipitation. This report examines some of the more conventional ideas and evaluates them in light of recent data and observations. 57 refs

  16. Main Clay Minerals in Soils of Fujian Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGGUO; ZHANGWEIMING; 等

    1996-01-01

    The clay minerals of more than 200 soil samples collected from various sites of Fujian Province were studied by the X-ray diffraction method and transmission electron microscopy to study their distribution and evolution.Montmorillonite was found in coastal solonchak,paddy soils derived from marine deposit,lacustrine deposit and river deposit,and some lateritic red soil,red soil and yellow soil with a low weathering degree.Chlorite existed mainly in coastal solonchak and paddy soil developed from marine deposit.1.4nm intergradient mineral appeared frequently in yellow soil,red soil and lateritic red soil.The content of 1.4nm intergradient mineral increased with the decrease of weathering degree from lateritic red soil to red soil to yellow soil.Hydrous micas were more in coastal solonchak,paddy soils derived from marine deposit,lacustrine deposit and river deposit.and puple soil from purple shale than in other soils.Kaolinte was the most important clay mineral in the soils iun this province.The higher the soil weathering degree,the more the kaolinite existed.From yellow soil to red soil to lateritic red soil,kaolinite increased gradually,Kaolinite was the predominant clay mineral accompanied by few other minerals in typical lateritic red soil. Tubular halloysite was a widespread clay mineral in soils of Fujian Province with varying quantities.The soil derived from the paent rocks rich in feldspar contained more tubular halloysite.Spheroidal halloysite was found in a red soil and a paddy soil developed from olivine basalt gibbsite in the soils in this district was largely“primary gibbsite” which formed in the early weathering stage.Gibbsite decreased with the increase of weathering degree from yellow soil to red soil to lateritic red soil.Goethite also decreased in the same sequence while hematite increased.

  17. Repository tunnel construction in deep clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the objects of the Hades project at Mol, Belgium has been to evaluate the feasibility of construction of a deep repository in the Boom clay formation at depth of approximately 225 metres. The main objective of the present project was to analyse and interpret the detailed geotechnical measurements made around the Hades trial shaft and tunnel excavations and evaluate the safety of radioactive waste disposal in a repository facility in deep clay formations. Plasticity calculations and finite element analyses were used which gave results consistent with the in-situ measurements. It was shown that effective stress analysis could successfully predict the observed field behaviour. Correct modelling of the small-strain stiffness of the Boom clay was essential if reasonable predictions of the pore pressure response due to construction are to be made. The calculations undertaken indicated that, even in the long term, the pressures on the test drift tunnel lining are likely to be significantly lower than the overburden pressure. Larger long-term tunnel lining pressures are predicted for impermeable linings. A series of laboratory stress path tests was undertaken to determine the strength and stiffness characteristics of the Boom clay. The tests were conducted at appropriate effective stress levels on high-quality samples retrieved during construction of the test drift. The apparatus developed for the testing is described and the results discussed. The development of a self boring retracting pressure-meter is described. This novel in-situ testing device was specifically designed to determine from direct measurements the convergence/confinement curve relevant to tunnelling in clay formations. 44 refs., 60 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Is the geological concept of clay minerals appropriate for soil science? A literature-based and philosophical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchman, G. Jock

    Data in the literature for soils that are dominated by each of the main types of clay minerals were examined and compared with those for reference clay minerals of the same types to determine the extent to which the nature and properties of clay-size minerals in soils could be explained by those of clay minerals with the same name from non-soil, ‘geological’ environments. Published information on soils from Australia, New Zealand and Iran was sourced for this study. The clay fractions of each of the soils are dominated by either one of the common phyllosilicates: kaolinite, halloysite, illite/mica, vermiculite, smectite, and palygorskite, or by the nanocrystalline mineral, allophane. Data for samples of kaolinite that had been extracted from soils from several countries (Australia, Thailand, Indonesia and Brazil) and purified before characterization have also been examined. In soils, each dominant clay mineral is generally associated with other materials, including iron oxides, other phyllosilicates and/or nanocrystalline minerals and organic matter. As the most studied example of an extracted phyllosilicate, kaolinite shows a wide range of properties in different soils, but a narrower range of properties within a particular locality. However, almost all of the soil kaolinites studied have larger specific surface areas and higher cation exchange capacities than reference kaolinites. The literature also reveals that, among phyllosilicates in soils, illites have a wide range of potassium contents, expandable minerals (vermiculites and smectites) may be interlayered by hydroxy-Al species particularly, and smectitic layers often occur interstratified with other layers, including those of illite, kaolinite and halloysite. The variability of soil phyllosilicates and their common association with other, often poorly crystallized but highly reactive minerals and compounds can be explained by their formation in the highly heterogeneous and dynamic soil environment

  19. Cesium sorption and desorption behavior of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesium sorption and desorption of clay minerals (montmorillonite, beidellite, nontronite, weathered biotite, rectorite and illite) were investigated by consecutive sorption-desorption (CSD) experiments. In batch sorption experiment, two solutions with different Cs concentration 10-3 and 10-7 mol/L) were used. In batch desorption experiments, Cs sorbed samples in sorption experiments were treated 5 times with 1 mol/L ammonium acetate solution. In the case of CSD experiments using 10-3 mol/L Cs solution, the exchangeable cations (Na, Ca, and K) in the clay samples affected to the sorption ratio of Cs, and this effect depended on the type of clay mineral. The desorption ratios of untreated, Na-exchanged and Ca-exchanged weathered biotite ranged from 23 to 33%, while that of other samples was over 80%. In the case of CSD experiments using 10-7 mol/L Cs solution, the sorption ratio of montmorillonite was smaller than that of the other clay samples. In desorption experiments, more than 10-9 mol sorbed Cs remained in 1.0 g of the sample after 5 extraction times. These results indicate that all examined clay samples are able to strongly adsorb Cs with a capacity of more than 10-9 mol/g. (author)

  20. Features of Clay Minerals in the YSDP102 Core on the Continental Shelf of the Southeast Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xuejun; QU Gaosheng; LI Shaoquan

    2004-01-01

    Ninety-eight clay mineral samples from the YSDP102 core were analyzed by x-ray diffractometer to study the four clay minerals: illite, chlorite, kaolinite and smectite. Twenty-eight samples had been analyzed on the laser particle-size analyzer to reveal the particle features of the sediments. Distribution of the clay minerals and the particle characteristics in the YSDP102 core show that the core experienced three different depositional periods and formed three different sedimentary intervals due to different sediment sources and different depositional environments. Features of the clay minerals and the heavy minerals in the YSDP102 core indicate that coarse-grained sediments and fine-grained sediments result from different sources. The Yellow Sea Warm Current has greatly influenced the sedimentary framework of this region since the current's formation.

  1. Clay Mineralogy of the Middle Miocene Paghumayan Formation, Vallehermoso, Negros Oriental, Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    ALETA, Dennis Gerald A.; TOMITA, Katsutoshi; MIEL, Julius Z.; LUPO, Elena S.; KAWANO, Motoharu; KITAMURA, Ryosuke

    2002-01-01

    Clay minerals of stratified tuff and mudrocks of the Middle Miocene Paghumayan Formation in Vallehermoso, Negros Oriental, Philippines were examined. The results showed homogeneity of clay mineralogy in the sedimentary sequence with single-phase smectite as the dominant phyllosilicate present and with little association of kaolinite. Feldspar, zeolite, cristobalite, quartz and calcite are typical non-sheeted accessories that yield to some mineral assemblages along with smectite. The signature...

  2. Adsorption of Nucleic Acid Bases, Ribose, and Phosphate by Some Clay Minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Hideo Hashizume

    2015-01-01

    Besides having a large capacity for taking up organic molecules, clay minerals can catalyze a variety of organic reactions. Derived from rock weathering, clay minerals would have been abundant in the early Earth. As such, they might be expected to play a role in chemical evolution. The interactions of clay minerals with biopolymers, including RNA, have been the subject of many investigations. The behavior of RNA components at clay mineral surfaces needs to be assessed if we are to appreciate ...

  3. Influence of non-clay minerals on the interaction between metallic iron and Callovo-Oxfordian clay fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, it is of prime importance to understand the interaction mechanisms between the geological matrix, Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock (COx) and metallic iron, from the package overpack. In order to evidence the individual role of each clay component entering in the mineralogy of the COx, interactions between metallic iron and pure clays (smectites, illite and kaolinite) were first conducted. To investigate the role of the other minerals, the reactivity of COx, COx clay fraction (COxCF) and mixtures between COxCF and quartz, calcite or pyrite, was studied. Clays and additional minerals were put in contact with powder metallic iron with a weight ratio iron:clay fixed at 1:3 and a clay:solution ratio of 1:20. Proportions of non-clay minerals were deduced from the average COx composition: 50% clays, 24.5% quartz, 24.5% calcite and 1% pyrite. Batch experiments were carried out in anoxic conditions at 90 deg. C in the presence of background electrolyte (NaCl 0.02 M.L-1, CaCl2 0.04 M.L-1) in Parr reactors for durations of one, three or nine months. After reaction, solid and liquid phases were separated by centrifugation and characterized by classical techniques combining chemical analyses (liquid analyses, transmission electron microscopy combined with Energy Dispersive of X-rays spectroscopy TEM-EDS), mineralogical (X-ray diffraction), spectroscopic (57Fe Moessbauer) and morphometric techniques (TEM, scanning electron microscopy and N2 adsorption). For COx, COxCF and all the pure clay phases, major evolutions were observed during the first month, which shows that the oxidation of metallic iron is rapid in our experimental conditions. Release of iron cations in solution, pH increase (8-10) and Eh decrease (reductive conditions) are responsible for the partial dissolution of initial clay phases. Released iron is involved in the crystallization of Fe

  4. Phase transformations of pyrophyllite clay mineral after heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The termal transformation of the Pyrophyllite clay mineral, given by the equations: AL sub(2) O sub(3).4SiO sub(2).H sub(2) O → Al sub(2) O sub(3).4SiO sub(2) + H sub(2) O Pyrophyllite Anhydride Water vapour. 3 (Al sub(2) O sub(3).4SiO sub(2)) → 3 Al sub(2) O sub(3). 2SiO sub(2) + 10 (SiO sub(2)) Pyrophyllite Anhydride Mullite Cristobalite, were studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) associated to Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAD), applied to a very pure sample, colected at Diamantina, M.G. Some other tgechniques were also used, as X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), applied to other different Pyrophyllite samples. A thermodynamical theoretical study was undertaken to estimate the values for the entropyu of formation, enthalpy and molar thermal capacity for the Pyrophyllite Anhydride. (author)

  5. Clay-mineral assemblages from some levels of K-118 drill core of Maha Sarakham evaporites, northeastern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanich, Parkorn

    Clay-mineral assemblages in Middle Clastic, Middle Salt, Lower Clastic, Potash Zone, and Lower Salt, totalling 13 samples from K-118 drill core, in the Maha Sarakham Formation, Khorat Basin, northeastern Thailand were studied. The clay-size particles were separated from the water-soluble salt by water leaching. Then the samples were leached again in the EDTA solution and separated into clay-size particles by using the timing sedimentation. The EDTA-clay residues were divided and analyzed by using the XRD and XRF method. The XRD peaks show that the major-clay minerals are chlorite, illite, and mixed-layer corrensite including traces of rectorite? and paragonite? The other clay-size particles are quartz and potassium feldspar. The XRF results indicate Mg-rich values and moderate MgAl atom ratio values in those clay minerals. The variable Fe, Na, and K contents in the clay-mineral assemblages can explain the environment of deposition compared to the positions of the samples from the core. Hypothetically, mineralogy and the chemistry of the residual assemblages strongly indicate that severe alteration and Mg-enrichment of normal clay detritus occurred in the evaporite environment through brine-sediment interaction. The various Mg-enrichment varies along the various members reflecting whether sedimentation is near or far from the hypersaline brine.

  6. Reduction and immobilization of hexavalent chromium by microbially reduced Fe-bearing clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10, 20, and 30 °C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10 °C, though at 30 °C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly

  7. Reduction And Immobilization Of Hexavalent Chromium By Microbially Reduced Fe-bearing Clay Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10°, 20°, and 30°C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10°C, though at 30°C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly

  8. METODOLOGY FOR LATERÍTICS CU-BEARING CLAY MINERALS CHARACTERIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Eliana Satiko Mano; Laurent Caner; Arthur Pinto Chaves

    2015-01-01

    Lateritic material lies over nearly 75% of the Brazilian surface area; but not more than 30% of this material is exploited. The expressive volume of clay minerals associated to the ores is the main reason of this low figure, especially because clay minerals are very complex, most of the time, impossible to concentrate. Under this circumstance, a proper mineral identification and the knowledge of the clay mineral structure are essential for the best mineral processing route choice. This stu...

  9. X-ray diffraction identification of clay minerals by microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The identification of clay minerals by X-ray powder diffraction are done by searching an unknown pattern with a file of standard X-ray diffraction patterns. For this searching done by hand is necessary a long time. This paper shows a program in ''Basic'' language to be utilized in microcomputers for the math of the unknown pattern, using the high velocity of comparison of the microcomputer. A few minutes are used for the match. (author)

  10. [The interaction of Bradyrhizobium japonicum with clay minerals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdish, I K; Drobit'ko, A V; Shevchenko, T V; Mar'iushkin, V F

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that such clay minerals as palygorskite and montmorillonite stimulate growth activity of Bradyrhizobium japonicum. The bacteria come into contact with the above minerals. Granulated preparations of rhizobia have been developed on the basis of the results obtained. These preparations are characterized by the high yield of viable cells and a possibility of long-term storage. The use of montmorillonite in production of granulated preparations provides the higher yield of viable bacteria in the preparations and stability of their composition under long-term storage. PMID:10872286

  11. Chemical processes in a final repository for high-level radioactive waste in clay and salt formations. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report on the chemical processes in a final repository for high-level radioactive waste in clay and salt formations covers the following issues: (i) chemical fundamentals; (ii) materials in a final repository: Sorel concrete, salt concrete, iron, glass, rock minerals (silicates, clays, pyrite, salt minerals); (iii) chemical interactions in the final repository: glass corrosion, cement corrosion, interactions with the host rock clay, sorption and diffusion of radionuclides, other interactions; (iiii) data base projects: NEA-TDB, THEREDA, evaluation.

  12. Studies of clays and clay minerals using x-ray powder diffraction and the Rietveld method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rietveld method was originally developed (Rietveld, 1967, 1969) to refine crystal structures using neutron powder diffraction data. Since then, the method has been increasingly used with X-ray powder diffraction data, and today it is safe to say that this is the most common application of the method. The method has been applied to numerous natural and synthetic materials, most of which do not usually form crystals large enough for study with single-crystal techniques. It is the ability to study the structures of materials for which sufficiently large single crystals do not exist that makes the method so powerful and popular. It would thus appear that the method is ideal for studying clays and clay minerals. In many cases this is true, but the assumptions implicit in the method and the disordered nature of many clay minerals can limit titsapplicability. This chapter will describe the Rietveld method, emphasizing the assumptions important for the study of disordered materials, and it will outline the potential applications of the method to these minerals. These applications include, in addition to the refinement of crystal structures, quantitative analysis of multicomponent mixtures, analysis of peak broadening, partial structure solution, and refinement of unit-cell parameters

  13. Studies of clays and clay minerals using x-ray powder diffraction and the Rietveld method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bish, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    The Rietveld method was originally developed (Rietveld, 1967, 1969) to refine crystal structures using neutron powder diffraction data. Since then, the method has been increasingly used with X-ray powder diffraction data, and today it is safe to say that this is the most common application of the method. The method has been applied to numerous natural and synthetic materials, most of which do not usually form crystals large enough for study with single-crystal techniques. It is the ability to study the structures of materials for which sufficiently large single crystals do not exist that makes the method so powerful and popular. It would thus appear that the method is ideal for studying clays and clay minerals. In many cases this is true, but the assumptions implicit in the method and the disordered nature of many clay minerals can limit titsapplicability. This chapter will describe the Rietveld method, emphasizing the assumptions important for the study of disordered materials, and it will outline the potential applications of the method to these minerals. These applications include, in addition to the refinement of crystal structures, quantitative analysis of multicomponent mixtures, analysis of peak broadening, partial structure solution, and refinement of unit-cell parameters.

  14. Spectral stratigraphy and clay minerals analysis in parts of Hellas Planitia, Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Das, I. C.; Joseph, J.; Subramanian, S K; V. K. Dadhwal

    2014-01-01

    Absorption features that occur in reflectance spectra are a sensitive indicator of mineralogy and chemical composition for a wide variety of materials. The investigation of the mineralogy and chemical composition of surfaces give information about the origin and evolution of planetary bodies. On Mars, the processes of formation of different types of clay minerals result from different types of wet conditions viz. hydrothermalism, subsurface/groundwater weathering, surface alteration ...

  15. Program and Abstracts for Clay Minerals Society 28th Annual Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that were accepted for presentation at the annual meeting. Some of the main topics covered include: (1) fundamental properties of minerals and methods of mineral analysis; (2) surface chemistry; (3) extraterrestrial clay minerals; (4) geothermometers and geochronometers; (5) smectite, vermiculite, illite, and related reactions; (6) soils and clays in environmental research; (7) kaolinite, halloysite, iron oxides, and mineral transformations; and (8) clays in lakes, basins, and reservoirs.

  16. Geochemical study of evaporite and clay mineral-oxyhydroxide samples from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of clay minerals, insoluble oxyhydroxides, and their host evaporites from the WIPP site have been studied for their major and minor elements abundances, x-ray diffraction characteristics, K-Ar ages, and Rb-Sr ages. This study was undertaken to determine their overall geochemical characteristics and to investigate possible interactions between evaporates and insoluble constituents. The evaporite host material is water-soluble, having Cl/Br ratios typical of marine evaporites, although the Br content is low. Insoluble material (usually a mixture of clay minerals and oxyhydroxide phases) yields very high Cl/Br ratios, possibly because of Cl from admixed halide minerals. This same material yields K/Rb and Th/U ratios in the normal range for shales; suggesting little, if any, effect of evaporite-induced remobilization of U, K, or Rb in the insoluble material. The rare-earth element (REE) data also show normal REE/chondrite (REE/CHON) distribution patterns, supporting the K/Rb and Th/U data. Clay minerals yield K-Ar dates in the range 365 to 390 Ma and a Rb-Sr isochron age of 428 ± 7 Ma. These ages are well in excess of the 220- to 230-Ma formational age of the evaporites, and confirm the detrital origin of the clays. The ages also show that any evaporite or clay mineral reactions that might have occurred at or near the time of sedimentation and diagenesis were not sufficient to reset the K-Ar and Rb-Sr systematics of the clay minerals. Further, x-ray data indicate a normal evaporitic assemblage of clay minerals and Fe-rich oxyhydroxide phases. The clay minerals and other insoluble material appear to be resistant to the destructive effects of their entrapment in the evaporites, which suggests that these insoluble materials would be good getters for any radionuclides (hypothetically) released from the storage of radioactive wastes in the area

  17. Aqueous dissolution, solubilities and thermodynamic stabilities of common aluminosilicate clay minerals: Kaolinite and smectites

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Howard M.; Klnniburgh, D.G.; Helmke, P.A.; Jackson, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Determinations of the aqueous solubilities of kaolinite at pH 4, and of five smectite minerals in suspensions set between pH 5 and 8, were undertaken with mineral suspensions adjusted to approach equilibrium from over- and undersaturation. After 1,237 days, Dry Branch, Georgia kaolinite suspensions attained equilibrium solubility with respect to the kaolinite, for which Keq = (2.72 ?? 0.35) ?? 107. The experimentally determined Gibbs free energy of formation (??Gf,2980) for the kaolinite is -3,789.51 ?? 6.60 kj mol-1. Equilibrium solubilities could not be determined for the smectites because the composition of the solution phase in the smectite suspensions appeared to be controlled by the formation of gibbsite or amorphous aluminum hydroxide and not by the smectites, preventing attempts to determine valid ??Gf0 values for these complex aluminosilicate clay minerals. Reported solubility-based ??Gf0 determinations for smectites and other variable composition aluminosilicate clay minerals are shown to be invalid because of experimental deficiencies and of conceptual flaws arising from the nature of the minerals themselves. Because of the variable composition of smectites and similar minerals, it is concluded that reliable equilibrium solubilities and solubility-derived ??Gf0 values can neither be rigorously determined by conventional experimental procedures, nor applied in equilibriabased models of smectite-water interactions. ?? 1986.

  18. Clays and Clay Minerals and their environmental application in Food Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Cuéllar Antequera, Jorge; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Cutillas Díez, Raul

    2013-04-01

    The clay materials have led to numerous applications in the field of public health (del Hoyo, 2007; Volzone, 2007) having been demonstrated its effectiveness as adsorbents of all contaminants. Some biodegradable materials are used for for adsorption of chemical contaminants: lignins (Valderrabano et al., 2008) and also clays and clay minerals, whose colloidal properties, ease of generating structural changes, abundance in nature, and low cost make them very suitable for this kind of applications. Among the strategies used at present to preserve the quality of the water and this way to diminish the environmental risk that supposes the chemical pollution, stands out the use of adsorbents of under cost, already they are natural or modified, to immobilize these compounds and to avoid the pollution of the water with the consequent reduction of environmental and economic costs Thanks to the development of the science and the technology of the nourishment in the last 50 years, there have revealed itself several new substances that can fulfill beneficial functions in the food, and these substances, named food additives, are today within reach of all. The food additives recover a very important role in the complex nourishing supply. The additives fulfill several useful functions in the food, which often we give for sat. Nevertheless the widespread use of food additives in the food production also influences the public health. The food industries, which are very important for the economy, spill residues proved from its activity that they have to be controlled to evaluate the environmental impact and to offer the necessary information about the quantitative evaluation of the chemical risk of the use of food additives for the public health. We have studied the adsorption of several contaminants by natural or modified clays, searching their interaction mechanisms and the possible recycling of these materials for environmental purposes and prevention of the health. References

  19. Interaction between clay minerals and hydrocarbon-utilizing indigenous microorganisms in high concentrations of heavy oil: implications for bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focused on whether the presence of clay minerals (montmorillonite and kaolinite) in marine or coastal environments contaminated with high concentrations of heavy-oil spills were able to support the growth of hydrocarbon degraders to enable bioremediation. The bacterial growth experiment utilizing ∼150 g/l of heavy oil (from the Nakhodka oil spill) was conducted with 1500 mg/l of montmorillonite or kaolinite. Bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa (isolated from Atake seashore, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan), capable of degrading heavy oil, was employed in combination with other hydrocarbon degraders inhabiting the heavy oil and seawater (collected from the Sea of Japan). The interactions among microbial cells, clay minerals and heavy oil were studied. Both clays were capable of promoting microbial growth and allowed microorganisms to proliferate (to a greater degree than in a control sample which contained no clay) in an extremely high concentration of heavy oil. Observation by transmission electron microscopy of the clay-oil-cell complexes showed that microbial cells tended to be bound primarily on the edges of the clays. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the clay-oil and clay-oil-cell complexes involved the adsorption of microbial cells and/or heavy oil on the external surfaces of the clays. How do the interactions among clay minerals, microbial cells and heavy oil contribute to environmental factors influencing the bioremediation process? To our knowledge, there are no previous reports on the use of clay minerals in the bioremediation of the Nakhodka oil spill in combination with biofilm formation. (author)

  20. Aqueous suspensions of natural swelling clay minerals. 2. Rheological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paineau, Erwan; Michot, Laurent J; Bihannic, Isabelle; Baravian, Christophe

    2011-06-21

    We report in this article a comprehensive investigation of the viscoelastic behavior of different natural colloidal clay minerals in aqueous solution. Rheological experiments were carried out under both dynamic and steady-state conditions, allowing us to derive the elasticity and yield stress. Both parameters can be renormalized for all sizes, ionic strength, and type of clay using in a first approach only the volume of the particles. However, applying such a treatment to various clays of similar shapes and sizes yields differences that can be linked to the repulsion strength and charge location in the swelling clays. The stronger the repulsive interactions, the better the orientation of clay particles in flows. In addition, a master linear relationship between the elasticity and yield stress whose value corresponds to a critical deformation of 0.1 was evidenced. Such a relationship may be general for any colloidal suspension of anisometric particles as revealed by the analysis of various experimental data obtained on either disk-shaped or lath- and rod-shaped particles. The particle size dependence of the sol-gel transition was also investigated in detail. To understand why suspensions of larger particles gel at a higher volume fraction, we propose a very simplified view based on the statistical hydrodynamic trapping of a particle by an another one in its neighborhood upon translation and during a short period of time. We show that the key parameter describing this hydrodynamic trapping varies as the cube of the average diameter and captures most features of the sol-gel transition. Finally, we pointed out that in the high shear limit the suspension viscosity is still closely related to electrostatic interactions and follows the same trends as the viscoelastic properties. PMID:21591697

  1. Geothermal alteration of clay minerals and shales: diagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to perform a critical review of the data on the mineral and chemical alterations that occur during diagenesis and low-grade metamorphism of shale and other clay-rich rocks - conditions similar to those expected from emplacement of heat-producing radioactive waste in a geologic repository. The conclusions drawn in this document are that the following type of alterations could occur: smectite alteration, ion mobilization, illitic shales, kaolinite reactions, chlorite reactions, organic reactions, paleotemperatures, low temperature shales, high temperature shales, and phase equilibrium changes

  2. Characterization of kaolinic clay minerals by emanation thermal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emanation Thermal Analysis ETA), which is based on the measurement of the rate of release of radon from solid samples previously labelled with trace concentrations of inert radioactive nuclides (228Th and 224Ra), can reveal the different physico-chemical and structural phenomena that occur during the heating of kaolinite from 20 to 1,300 deg. C. The results obtained depend on the crystallinity of the kaolinite sample and demonstrate the potential of ETA as a complementary method to conventional thermo-analysis and XRD in the field of clay minerals. (authors). 17 refs., 1 fig

  3. Clay mineral distribution in surface sediments of the South Atlantic: sources, transport, and relation to oceanography

    OpenAIRE

    Petschick, Rainer; Kuhn, Gerhard; Gingele, Franz

    1996-01-01

    Surface samples, mostly from abyssal sediments of the South Atlantic, from parts of the equatorial Atlantic, and of the Antarctic Ocean, were investigated for clay content and clay mineral composition. Maps of relative clay mineral content were compiled, which improve previous maps by showing more details, especially at high latitudes. Large-scale relations regarding the origin and transport paths of detrital clay are revealed. High smectite concentrations are observed in abyssal regions, pri...

  4. Separation of Clay Minerals from Host Sediments Using Cation Exchange Resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.S. Ismael; H.M. Baioumy

    2003-01-01

    Classic physical and chemical treatments applied to separating clay minerals from the host sediments are often difficult or aggressive for clay minerals. A technique using cation exchange resins (amberlite IRC-50H and amberlite IR-120) is used to separate clay minerals from the host sediments. The technique is based on the exchange of cations in the minerals that may be associated clay minerals in sediments,such as Ca and Mg from dolomite; Ca from calcite,gypsum and francolite with cations carried by resin radicals. The associated minerals such as gypsum,calcite,dolomite and francolite are removed in descending order. Separation of clay minerals using cation exchange resins is less aggressive than that by other classic treatments.The efficiency of amberlite IRC-50H in the removal of associated minerals is greater than that of amberlite IR-120.

  5. Analysis of mixed-layer clay mineral structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, W.F.

    1953-01-01

    Among the enormously abundant natural occurrences of clay minerals, many examples are encountered in which no single specific crystallization scheme extends through a single ultimate grain. The characterization of such assemblages becomes an analysis of the distribution of matter within such grains, rather than the simple identification of mineral species. It having become established that the particular coordination complex typified by mica is a common component of many natural subcrystalline assemblages, the opportunity is afforded to analyze scattering from random associations of these complexes with other structural units. Successful analyses have been made of mixed hydration states of montmorillonite, of montmorillonite with mica, of vermiculite with mica, and of montmorillonite with chlorite, all of which are variants of the mica complex, and of halloysite with hydrated halloysite.

  6. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically γ-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine

  7. Microbial metabolism mediates interactions between dissolved organic matter and clay minerals in streamwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, W R; Battin, T J

    2016-01-01

    Sorption of organic molecules to mineral surfaces is an important control upon the aquatic carbon (C) cycle. Organo-mineral interactions are known to regulate the transport and burial of C within inland waters, yet the mechanisms that underlie these processes are poorly constrained. Streamwater contains a complex and dynamic mix of dissolved organic compounds that coexists with a range of organic and inorganic particles and microorganisms. To test how microbial metabolism and organo-mineral complexation alter amino acid and organic carbon fluxes we experimented with (13)C-labelled amino acids and two common clay minerals (kaolinite and montmorillonite). The addition of (13)C-labelled amino acids stimulated increased microbial activity. Amino acids were preferentially mineralized by the microbial community, concomitant with the leaching of other (non-labelled) dissolved organic molecules that were removed from solution by clay-mediated processes. We propose that microbial processes mediate the formation of organo-mineral particles in streamwater, with potential implications for the biochemical composition of organic matter transported through and buried within fluvial environments. PMID:27481013

  8. Microbial metabolism mediates interactions between dissolved organic matter and clay minerals in streamwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, W. R.; Battin, T. J.

    2016-08-01

    Sorption of organic molecules to mineral surfaces is an important control upon the aquatic carbon (C) cycle. Organo-mineral interactions are known to regulate the transport and burial of C within inland waters, yet the mechanisms that underlie these processes are poorly constrained. Streamwater contains a complex and dynamic mix of dissolved organic compounds that coexists with a range of organic and inorganic particles and microorganisms. To test how microbial metabolism and organo-mineral complexation alter amino acid and organic carbon fluxes we experimented with 13C-labelled amino acids and two common clay minerals (kaolinite and montmorillonite). The addition of 13C-labelled amino acids stimulated increased microbial activity. Amino acids were preferentially mineralized by the microbial community, concomitant with the leaching of other (non-labelled) dissolved organic molecules that were removed from solution by clay-mediated processes. We propose that microbial processes mediate the formation of organo-mineral particles in streamwater, with potential implications for the biochemical composition of organic matter transported through and buried within fluvial environments.

  9. Paleoenvironmental Implications of Clay Minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Thomas F.; Blake, David F.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity spent approx 150 sols at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) studying a section of fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary rocks (with potential indications of volcanic influence), informally known as the Yellowknife Bay formation. YKB lies in a distal region of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan, which extends from the northern rim of Gale Crater toward the dune field at the base of Mt Sharp. Sedimentological and stratigraphic observations are consistent with the Yellowknife Bay formation being part of a distal fan deposit, which could be as young as middle Hesperian to even early Amazonian in age (approx. 3.5 to 2.5 Ga). The Yellowknife Bay formation hosts a unit of mudstone called the Sheepbed member. Curiosity obtained powdered rock samples from two drill holes in the Sheepbed Member, named John Klein and Cumberland, and delivered them to instruments in Curiosity. Data from CheMin, a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD)/X-ray fluorescence instrument (XRF), has allowed detailed mineralogical analysis of mudstone powders revealing a clay mineral component of approx. 20 wt.% in each sample. The clay minerals are important indicators of paleoenvironmental conditions and sensitive recorders of post-depositional alteration processes. The XRD pattern of John Klein reveals a 02l band consistent with a trioctahedral phyllosilicate. A broad peak at approx. 10A with a slight inflexion at approx. 12A indicates the presence of 2:1 type clay minerals in the John Klein sample. The trioctahedral nature of the clay minerals, breadth of the basal reflection, and presence of a minor component with larger basal spacing suggests that John Klein contains a trioctahedral smectite (probably saponite), whose interlayer is largely collapsed because of the low-humidity conditions. The XRD patterns show no evidence of corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite/smectite) or chlorite, which are typical diagenetic products of trioctahedral smectites when subjected to burial and

  10. The First X-ray Diffraction Patterns of Clay Minerals from Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Thomas; Blake, David; Bish, David L.; Vaniman, David; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Chipera, Steve; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Farmer, Jack, D.; Treiman, Allan H; Downs, Robert; Morrison, Shaunna; Achilles, Cherie; DesMarais, David J.; Crisp, Joy A.; Sarrazin, Philippe; Morookian, John Michael; Grotzinger. John P.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity spent approx 150 sols at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) studying a section of fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary rocks (with potential indications of volcanic influence), informally known as the Yellowknife Bay formation. YKB lies in a distal region of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan, which extends from the northern rim of Gale Crater toward the dune field at the base of Mt Sharp. Sedimentological and stratigraphic observations are consistent with the Yellowknife Bay formation being part of a distal fan deposit, which could be as young as middle Hesperian to even early Amazonian in age (approx 3.5 to 2.5 Ga). The Yellowknife Bay formation hosts a unit of mudstone called the Sheepbed member. Curiosity obtained powdered rock samples from two drill holes in the Sheepbed Member, named John Klein and Cumberland, and delivered them to instruments in Curiosity. Data from CheMin, a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD)/X-ray fluorescence instrument (XRF), has allowed detailed mineralogical analysis of mudstone powders revealing a clay mineral component of approx 20 wt.% in each sample. The clay minerals are important indicators of paleoenvironmental conditions and sensitive recorders of post-depositional alteration processes. The XRD pattern of John Klein reveals a 021 band consistent with a trioctahedral phyllosilicate. A broad peak at approx 10A with a slight inflexion at approx 12A indicates the presence of 2:1 type clay minerals in the John Klein sample. The trioctahedral nature of the clay minerals, breadth of the basal reflection, and presence of a minor component with larger basal spacing suggests that John Klein contains a trioctahedral smectite (probably saponite), whose interlayer is largely collapsed because of the low-humidity conditions. The XRD patterns show no evidence of corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite/smectite) or chlorite, which are typical diagenetic products of trioctahedral smectites when subjected to burial and heating

  11. The First X-ray Diffraction Patterns of Clay Minerals from Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, T.; Blake, D.; Bish, D. L.; Vaniman, D.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Chipera, S.; Rampe, E. B.; Farmer, J. D.; Treiman, A. H.; Downs, R.; Morrison, S.; Achilles, C.; Des Marais, D. J.; Crisp, J. A.; Sarrazin, P.; Morookian, J.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity spent ~150 sols at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) studying a section of fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary rocks (with potential indications of volcanic influence), informally known as the Yellowknife Bay formation. YKB lies in a distal region of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan, which extends from the northern rim of Gale Crater toward the dune field at the base of Mt Sharp. Sedimentological and stratigraphic observations are consistent with the Yellowknife Bay formation being part of a distal fan deposit, which could be as young as middle Hesperian to even early Amazonian in age (~3.5 to 2.5 Ga). The Yellowknife Bay formation hosts a unit of mudstone called the Sheepbed member. Curiosity obtained powdered rock samples from two drill holes in the Sheepbed Member, named John Klein and Cumberland, and delivered them to instruments in Curiosity. Data from CheMin, a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD)/X-ray fluorescence instrument (XRF), has allowed detailed mineralogical analysis of mudstone powders revealing a clay mineral component of ~20 wt.% in each sample. The clay minerals are important indicators of paleoenvironmental conditions and sensitive recorders of post-depositional alteration processes. The XRD pattern of John Klein reveals a 02l band consistent with a trioctahedral phyllosilicate. A broad peak at ~10A with a slight inflexion at ~12A indicates the presence of 2:1 type clay minerals in the John Klein sample. The trioctahedral nature of the clay minerals, breadth of the basal reflection, and presence of a minor component with larger basal spacing suggests that John Klein contains a trioctahedral smectite (probably saponite), whose interlayer is largely collapsed because of the low-humidity conditions. The XRD patterns show no evidence of corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite/smectite) or chlorite, which are typical diagenetic products of trioctahedral smectites when subjected to burial and heating >60°C in the presence of water

  12. Clay-mineral suites, sources, and inferred dispersal routes: Southern California continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J.R.; Dowling, J.S.; Schuetze, A.; Lee, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Clay mineralogy is useful in determining the distribution, sources, and dispersal routes of fine-grained sediments. In addition, clay minerals, especially smectite, may control the degree to which contaminants are adsorbed by the sediment. We analyzed 250 shelf sediment samples, 24 river-suspended-sediment samples, and 12 river-bed samples for clay-mineral contents in the Southern California Borderland from Point Conception to the Mexico border. In addition, six samples were analyzed from the Palos Verdes Headland in order to characterize the clay minerals contributed to the offshore from that point source. The clay-mineral suite for the entire shelf sediment data set (26% smectite, 50% illite, 24% kaolinite+chlorite) is closely comparable to that for the mean of all the rivers (31% smectite, 49% illite, 20% kaolinite+chlorite), indicating that the main source of shelf fine-grained sediments is the adjacent rivers. However, regional variations do exist and the shelf is divided into four provinces with characteristic clay-mineral suites. The means of the clay-mineral suites of the two southernmost provinces are within analytical error of the mineral suites of adjacent rivers. The next province to the north includes Santa Monica Bay and has a suite of clay minerals derived from mixing of fine-grained sediments from several sources, both from the north and south. The northernmost province clay-mineral suite matches moderately well that of the adjacent rivers, but does indicate some mixing from sources in adjacent provinces.

  13. A Preliminary Study on Identification of Clay Minerals in Soils with Reference to Reflectance Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUBIN-BIN; LIDE-CHENG; 等

    1995-01-01

    The characteristics of the reflectance spectra of clay minerals and their influences on the reflectance spectra of soils are dealt with in the paper.The results showed that dominant clay minerals in soils could be distinguished in light of the spectral -form parameters of the reflectance spectra of soils,thus making it possible to develop a quick method to determine clay minerals by means of reflectance spectra of soils in the lab.and providing a theoretic basis for remote sensing of clay minerals in soils with a high resolution imaging spectrometer.

  14. Nanokin: a geochemical computer model for dissolution, nucleation and growth of clay minerals in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent evolution of Water-Rock Interaction models including complex mineral phases like clay minerals: Clay minerals simulated as solid solution s The recent evolution of water-rock interaction models takes into account the ability of clay minerals to change their chemical composition along water-clay interaction processes, in relation with the possible variations of the aqueous chemical composition of natural fluids. The concept of solid solution has been used in our geochemical code KINDIS and coupled transport/ reaction model KIRMAT. Clay minerals are represented by generalized n-end-member solid solutions. The two codes are now producing mineral phases as solid solutions of n-end-members, at equilibrium with the aqueous reaction phase or under kinetic control if rate laws are available from experimental approach, or can be estimated. (authors)

  15. Clay surface catalysis of formation of humic substances: potential role of maillard reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mechanisms of the formation of humic substances are poorly understood, especially the condensation of amino acids and reducing sugars products (Maillard reaction) in soil environments. Clay minerals behave as Lewis and Brönsted acids and catalyze several reactions and likely to catalyze the Mai...

  16. Highly porous silicate ceramics prepared from saponite clay mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extremely porous silicate ceramics were fabricated by a freeze-drying process. This material was prepared from a water-based clay mineral. Porosity reached 99% for sintering bodies prepared from 2 mass% suspension. Porosity was controllable in the range of 95% 99% by modifying exchangeable cations. Card-house and card-pack structures were developed, which resembled dried agar. Heat treatments up to 1100 deg C had no effect on porosity for the sintered specimens. It was assumed that multiple condensation to be occurred on the basis of the N2 adsorption and desorption isotherm. Specific surface area of these porous materials was high. Copyright (2000) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  17. Content change of clay minerals in the subzone of interlayer oxidation zone in Mengqiguer deposit and its geological significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldspars and rock fragments could be alternated into clay minerals due to the rolling of interlayer oxidation zone. With SEM pictures, we find that the most part of clay minerals in Mengqiguer deposit are kaolinite, illite and I/S. The result of X-diffraction experiment is that the content change of each kind of clay mineral in this deposit is different. The content of illite hardly changed in different subzone which means the temperature and pressure didn't increased during the rolling of the interlayer oxidation zone. With the buried maximum depth of the strata, it could be concluded that the formation of illite ends up at Early Cretaceous. The content of kaolinite and I/S changed in the ore subzone which indicates that acid alkali liquids alternated in the transit zone, this alternation is related to the deposition and enrichment of uranium. (authors)

  18. Clay fractions from a soil chronosequence after glacier retreat reveal the initial evolution of organo-mineral associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dümig, Alexander; Häusler, Werner; Steffens, Markus; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2012-05-01

    Interactions between organic and mineral constituents prolong the residence time of organic matter in soils. However, the structural organization and mechanisms of organic coverage on mineral surfaces as well as their development with time are still unclear. We used clay fractions from a soil chronosequence (15, 75 and 120 years) in the foreland of the retreating Damma glacier (Switzerland) and from mature soils outside the proglacial area (>700 and mature soils. These findings from solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy are in line with the increasing amounts of microbial-derived carbohydrates with soil age. The large accumulation of proteins, which was comparable to those of carbohydrates, and the very low C/N ratios of H2O2-resistant OM indicated strong and preferential associations between proteinaceous compounds and mineral surfaces. In the acid soils, poorly crystalline Fe oxides were the main providers of mineral surface area and important for the stabilization of OM during aging of the clay fractions. This was indicated by (I) the strong correlations between oxalate soluble Fe and both, SSA of H2O2-treated clay fractions and OC content, and (II) the low formation of expandable clays due to small extents of mineral weathering. Our chronosequence approach provided new insights into the evolution of organo-mineral interactions in acid soils. The formation of organo-mineral associations started with the sorption of proteinaceous compounds and microbial-derived carbohydrates on mineral surfaces which were mainly provided by ferrihydrite. The sequential accumulation of different organic compounds and the large OC loadings point to multiple accretion of OM in distinct zones or layers during the initial evolution of clay fractions.

  19. Origin of clay-mineral variation in Wisconsinan age sediments from the Lake Michigan basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monaghan, G.W. (Geocomp Research, Eaton, NY (United States)); Larson, G.J. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-04-01

    Drift samples collected in Wisconsin and Michigan from exposures representative of the Wisconsinan stratigraphy of the Lake Michigan Lobe indicate that clay mineral and shale lithology systematically vary between successive till sheets as a result of differential erosion of two unique source beds: shale bedrock, rich in 10[angstrom] clay (illite) and pre-existing drift (particularly lacustrine clay), depleted in 10[angstrom] clay. A general increase in relative amounts of 10[angstrom] clay and shale clasts begins with early or middle Wisconsinan (Altonian) Glenn Shores till and continues through late Wisconsinan (Woodfordian) Ganges-New Berlin till and Saugatuck-Oak Creek till. Both 10[angstrom] clay and shale decrease in post Mackinaw (late Woodfordian) Interstade Ozaukee-Haven and Two Rivers tills. Clay minerals in till rich in 10[angstrom] clay (Saugatuck-Oak Creek) were derived mainly from extensive erosion and comminution of shale whereas those in tills depleted in 10[angstrom] clay (Ganges-New Berlin, Ozaukee-Haven, and Two Rivers) were eroded mainly from lacustrine clay. Because it is compositionally dissimilar to either the shale or lake clay source and relatively rich in kaolinite, clay minerals in early-middle Wisconsinan Glenn Shores till may have been derived from Sangamon saprolite eroded during an early post-Sangamon ice advance. Variations in source bed erosion and subsequent changes in till lithology result either from depletion of the source bed (Glenn Shores till) or from progressively eroding drift mantling shale outcrops (unroofing) during successive late Wisconsinan ice advances.

  20. Clay Minerals in Mawrth Vallis Region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This map showing the location of some clay minerals in of a portion of the Mawrth Vallis region of Mars covers an area about 10 kilometers (6.2 mile) wide. The map is draped over a topographical model that exaggerates the vertical dimension tenfold. The mineral mapping information comes from an image taken on Sept. 21, 2007, by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM). Iron-magnesium phyllosilicate is shown in red. Aluminum phyllosyllicate is shown in blue. Hydrated silica and a ferrous iron phase are shown in yellow/green. The topographical information comes from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter instrument on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter. Mawrth Vallis is an outflow channel centered near 24.7 degrees north latitude, 339.5 degrees east longitude, in northern highlands of Mars. CRISM is one of six science instruments on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Led by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md., the CRISM team includes expertise from universities, government agencies and small businesses in the United States and abroad. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the orbiter.

  1. Study of Adsorption of Phenanthrene on Different Types of Clay Minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fate and behaviour of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds in deep soil is mainly controlled by the mineral fraction present in the soil due to the very low organic carbon content of the deep soil. The mineral fraction that may greatly influence the fate and transport of these compounds due to its presence and properties are the clay minerals. Clay minerals also become increasingly important in low organic matter content soils. There tree, studies of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds adsorption on clay minerals without organic matter are necessary lo better understand the fate and transport of these compounds. In this work we used phenanthrene as model compound of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compound and four pure clay minerals: kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite including muscovite mica. These clays minerals are selected due to its abundance in represents ve Spanish soils and different properties as its structural layers and expanding capacity. Batch experiments were performed using phenanthrene aqueous solutions and the clays selected. Phenanthrene sorption isotherms for all clays, except muscovite mica, were best described by the Freundlich model. Physical sorption on the external surfaces is the most probable adsorption mechanisms. In this sense, the presence of non-polar nano-sites on clay surfaces could determine the adsorption of phenanthrene by hydrophobic interaction on these sites. (Author) 22 refs

  2. Distribution of grain size and clay minerals in sediments from the INDEX area, central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.; Ambre, N.V.

    ) and showed that smectite miner- als result from different sources and processes. For the northern Indian Ocean,the clay min-erals proved to come from a detrital origin.The CIB sediments have ben influenced by terrigenous material. Earlier,Nath et al. (1989...:175–185. Aoki,S.,and T. Sudo. 1973. Mineralogical study of the core samples from the Indian Ocean,with special reference to the vertical distribution of clay minerals. Journal of Oceano-graphical Society of Japan29:87–93. Grain Size and Clay Minerals in INDEX...

  3. Influence of the mineral composition of clay rocks on the stability of oil wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the oil companies, the operation of drilling well bore could be more expensive if the composition of the rocks is clay, the cost could increase between 10 and 15% from the starting budget. In order to decrease this problem, the oil industry has spent too much money for developing mechanisms that can provide better control and stability in clay formations during the drilling. The Society Petroleum Engineers (SPE) in some researches have published that the main chemical effects that are involved in the interaction of perforation fluids and the clay formation are: 1) chemical osmosis; and 2) hydration stresses, although, there are others like: Capillary effects, dehydration, differences in pressure and cationic exchange. These factors are not present generally in independent form. At Piedemonte Llanero the problem of the well bore stability represents a high spending of money for oil companies, caused in this region by chemical factors between fluid/rock and mechanical factors as resulted of the stresses in the area. Metil Blue Testing (MBT) and X-ray Diffraction (DR-X) were made in samples of clay; these were taken from cuts extracted of boreholes drilled in some places of the Colombian Llanos. It was found that these samples had a moderate content of reactive and low content of swell minerals.The samples main component was kaolinite, this mineral does not let the rock get swell, but it produces caving in the hole. However, it is necessary to do other tests to quantify the damages and evaluate the influence of there gime of the stress during the perforation of well bore.

  4. Biomineralization: mineral formation by organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve

    2014-09-01

    Organisms form many different types of minerals, with diverse shapes and sizes. These minerals fulfill a variety of functions. Inspired by the late H A Lowenstam, Steve Weiner and Lia Addadi have addressed many questions that relate to the mechanisms by which biological organisms produce these mineral phases and how their structures relate to their functions. Addadi and Weiner have explored the manner in which macromolecules extracted from mineralized tissues can interact with some crystal planes and not others, how these macromolecules can be occluded inside the forming crystals residing preferentially on specific crystal planes, and how they can induce one polymorph of calcium carbonate and not another to nucleate. Addadi and Weiner have also identified a novel strategy used by the sea urchin to form its smooth and convoluted mineralized skeletal elements. The strategy involves the initial production by cells of a highly disordered mineral precursor phase in vesicles, and then the export of this so-called amorphous phase to the site of skeletal formation, where it crystallizes. This strategy is now known to be used by many different invertebrate phyla, as well as by vertebrates to build bones and teeth. One of the major current research aims of the Weiner--Addadi group is to understand the biomineralization pathways whereby ions are extracted from the environment, are transported and deposited inside cells within vesicles, how these disordered phases are then transferred to the site of skeletal formation, and finally how the so-called amorphous phase crystallizes. Biology has clearly evolved unique strategies for forming crystalline minerals. Despite more than 300 years of research in this field, many challenging questions still remain unanswered.

  5. Some considerations on a borehole in a clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A borehole has been drilled in the clay formation underlying the Trisaia Nuclear Research Center (CNEN) in Southern Italy. The local stratigraphic series includes 850 m of marly clay of Pliocene-Calabrian age. The drilling operation has been interrupted at about -400 m, due to the occurrence of methane gas. The presence of gas, the reducing conditions of the clay and the lack of water in fracture zones testify the extremely low permeability of this clay formation. Reducing conditions may prevent the migration of many radionuclides. The occurrence of some sandy levels and lenses is due to the coastal character of the paleosedimentary environment. Previsions on the homogeneity of clay bodies may be indirectly inferred by examination of feeder paleobasins

  6. Radiation sensitivity of natural organic matter: Clay mineral association effects in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay-rich low-organic carbon formations (e.g., Callovo-Oxfordian argillite in France and Opalinus Clay in Switzerland) are considered as host rocks for radioactive waste disposal. The clay-organic carbon has a strong impact on the chemical stability of the clays. For this reason, the nature of the clay-organic carbon, the release of hydrophilic organic compounds, namely, humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) and the radiation sensitivity of the undisturbed host rock organics was investigated. The clay sample originates from Oxfordian argillite (447 m depth, borehole EST 104). HA and FA were extracted following the standard International Humic Substance Society (IHSS) isolation procedure. Synchrotron based (C-, K-, Ca-, O- and Fe-edge XANES) scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and FT-IR microspectroscopy was used to identify under high spatial resolution the distribution of clay-organic matter with different functionality using principal component and cluster analysis. The results show that in this old (Jurassic) geological formation, small parts of the organic inventory (1-5%) keeps the structure/functionality and can be mobilized as hydrophilic humic substance type material (HA and FA). Target spectra analysis shows best correlation for isolated humic acids with organics found in smectite-rich regions, whereas the extractable FA has better spectral similarities with the illite mixed layer minerals (MLM) regions. After radiation of 1.7 GGy under helium atmosphere the same rock sample area was investigated for radiation damage. Radiation damage in the smectite and illite-MLM associated organic matter is comparably low with 20-30% total oxygen mass loss and 13-18% total carbon mass loss. A critical dose dc of 2.5 GGy and a optical density after infinite radiation (OD∝) of 54% was calculated under room temperature conditions. C(1s) XANES show a clear increase in C=C bonds especially in the illite-MLM associated organics. This results suggests a combination of

  7. Clay mineral liner system for leachates containing organic contaminants

    OpenAIRE

    Sreedharan, Vandana; Sivapullaiah, PV

    2011-01-01

    A conventional liner with a good performance against inorganic contaminants with a minimal hydraulic conductivity does not usually perform well for retention/removal of leachates containing organic contaminants. Organic modification of clay can render the naturally organophobic clay tobe organophilic. Incorporation of modified organo clay along with unmodified inorganic clay in liner systems can overcome the inherent incompatibility of conventional liners to organic contaminants and can incre...

  8. Clay mineral distribution in surface sediments between Indonesia and NW Australia - source and transport by ocean currents

    OpenAIRE

    Gingele, F. X.; De Deckker, P.; Hillenbrand, C.-D.

    2001-01-01

    The clay mineral distribution in sediments between Indonesia and NW Australia has been assessed on the basis of 166 core-top samples. Clay mineral assemblages are closely related to the geology and weathering regime of the adjacent hinterland and allow the distinction of four clay mineral provinces. Three provinces, Western, Central and Eastern Province are situated along the Indonesian Islands Arc, from Sumatra in the west to Timor in the east. Illite is the major clay mineral of the Western...

  9. Change effects in the land use about the mineral clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pampas land changes during the Quaternary, left their mark on the mineralogy of soil clays. This work is oriented to compare the mineralogical composition of the clays and the value of potassium in an eucalyptus forestation. These results show that the mineralogical illite alteration is the cause of its destruction. This clay is the main reservoir of potassium for the agricultural soils

  10. Distribution of Clay Minerals in Light Coal Fractions and the Thermal Reaction Products of These Clay Minerals during Combustion in a Drop Tube Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sida Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the contribution of clay minerals in light coal fractions to ash deposition in furnaces, we investigated their distribution and thermal reaction products. The light fractions of two Chinese coals were prepared using a 1.5 g·cm−3 ZnCl2 solution as a density separation medium and were burned in a drop-tube furnace (DTF. The mineral matter in each of the light coal fractions was compared to that of the relevant raw coal. The DTF ash from light coal fractions was analysed using hydrochloric acid separation. The acid-soluble aluminium fractions of DTF ash samples were used to determine changes in the amorphous aluminosilicate products with increasing combustion temperature. The results show that the clay mineral contents in the mineral matter of both light coal fractions were higher than those in the respective raw coals. For the coal with a high ash melting point, clay minerals in the light coal fraction thermally transformed more dehydroxylation products compared with those in the raw coal, possibly contributing to solid-state reactions of ash particles. For the coal with a low ash melting point, clay minerals in the light coal fraction produced more easily-slagging material compared with those in the raw coal, playing an important role in the occurrence of slagging. Additionally, ferrous oxide often produces low-melting substances in coal ash. Due to the similarities of zinc oxide and ferrous oxide in silicate reactions, we also investigated the interactions of clay minerals in light coal fractions with zinc oxide introduced by a zinc chloride solution. The extraneous zinc oxide could react, to a small extent, with clay minerals in the coal during DTF combustion.

  11. Clay Veins and Clay Minerals in the Granitic Rocks in Hiroshima and Shimane Prefectures, Southwest Japan : Effect of the hydrothermal activities on the decomposition of the granitic rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Kitagawa, Ryuji

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with the clay minerals found in the granitic rocks distributed in Hiroshima and Shimane Prefectures with special reference to the effects of hydrothermal activities on the decomposition process of the granitic rocks. Many clay veins and hydrothermal clay deposits are commonly developed in the granitic rocks and their mode of occurrences were investigated in detail. the preferred orientations of the clay veins and microcracks found in the constituent minerals of granitic rocks...

  12. MAX--An Interactive Computer Program for Teaching Identification of Clay Minerals by X-ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohut, Connie K.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses MAX, an interactive computer program for teaching identification of clay minerals based on standard x-ray diffraction characteristics. The program provides tutorial-type exercises for identification of 16 clay standards, self-evaluation exercises, diffractograms of 28 soil clay minerals, and identification of nonclay minerals. (MDH)

  13. Sorption and desorption hysteresis of radiocesium on clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The desorption of cesium on montmorillonite artificially loaded (3.36 mg/g) by humic acid and contaminated with cesium-137 solution 10-7 M CsCl[137Cs] was investigated. There was used repeated leaching technique (RLT) according to Kokotov and Popova. 6-8 leaching steps was accomplished to determine Kd and fraction of irreversibly sorbed (fixed) radiocesium Rfix values. A number of desorption solutions of various concentration and composition containing following competitive cations (K+, [Ag(tu)3]+, Na+, Ca2+, Fe3+, Fe2+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ba2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Cr3+, Tl+) were examined. Rate of immobilised cesium is specific for each competitive cation, not depended on its concentration and the ratio of solid and liquid phases. Kd value drops with increasing concentration of desorption solution. Sorption and desorption of cesium on various clay minerals (illite, illite/smectite, hectorite, chlorite, vermiculite, kaolinite, montmorillonite) were investigated. Cation exchange capacity and Kd values were obtained. Sorption properties of cesium can be successfully described by the Sips isotherm. Kd and Rfix values were also obtained by desorption experiment using RLT method. Differences between the Kd values calculated for sorption and desorption steps were caused not only by various composition of solutions, but also by contribution of unknown Rfix at sorption. (authors)

  14. Acyl silicates and acyl aluminates as activated intermediates in peptide formation on clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D. H.; Kennedy, R. M.; Macklin, J.

    1984-01-01

    Glycine reacts with heating on dried clays and other minerals to give peptides in much better yield than in the absence of mineral. This reaction was proposed to occur by way of an activated intermediate such as an acyl silicate or acyl aluminate analogous to acyl phosphates involved in several biochemical reactions including peptide bond synthesis. The proposed mechanism has been confirmed by trapping the intermediate, as well as by direct spectroscopic observation of a related intermediate. The reaction of amino acids on periodically dried mineral surfaces represents a widespead, geologically realistic setting for prebiotic peptide formation via in situ activation.

  15. [Species Determination and Spectral Characteristics of Swelling Clay Minerals in the Pliocene Sandstones in Xinghai, Qinghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-wen; Chen, Jiang-jun; Fang, Qian; Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-lie

    2015-10-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) were conducted to deepen our research on specific species and spectral characteristics of swelling clay minerals in the Pliocene sandstones in Xinghai, Qinghai province. XRD results show that swelling clay minerals are dominant clay minerals in the sandstones, which can be up to 97% in percentage. XRD patterns show 060 reflections of the samples occur both remarkably at 1.534 Å and 1.498 Å, indicating the samples contain physical mixtures of trioctahedral and dioctahedral swelling clay minerals, respectively. Further treatment of Li-300 degrees C heat and glycerol saturation shows the swelling clay minerals collapse to 9.3-9.9 Å with a partial expansion to -18 Å. This indicates the swelling clay minerals dominate montmorillonite and contain minor saponite. The montmorillonite shows no swelling after Li-300 degrees C heat and glycerol saturation because of Li+ inserting into the octahedral layers, which balances the layer charge caused by the substitution of Mg to Al. FTIR results show the samples are composed of a kind of phyllosilicate with absorbed and structural water, which is in agreement with the results of XRD. Absorbed peaks at 913, 842, 880 cm(-1), corresponding to OH associated with Al-Al, Al-Mg, and Al-Fe pairs, further indicates the minerals are dominant dioctahedron in structure. Meanwhile, absorbed peaks at 625 and 519 cm(-1), corresponding to coupled Si-O and Al-O-Si deformation, indicates parts of Si is replaced by Al in tetrahedron. The spectral characteristics of the samples are against the presence of beidellite and nontronite based on the results of XRD and FTIR, while demonstrating an,existence of montmorillonite. This study, to distinguish the specific species of swelling clay species in clay minerals, would be of great importance when using clay mineralogy to interpret provenance and climatic information. PMID:26904841

  16. Chemistry and mineralogy of clay minerals in Asian and Saharan dusts and the implications for iron supply to the oceans

    OpenAIRE

    G. Y. Jeong; E. P. Achterberg

    2014-01-01

    Mineral dust supplied to remote ocean regions stimulates phytoplankton growth through delivery of micronutrients, notably iron (Fe). Although attention is usually paid to Fe (hydr)oxides as major sources of available Fe, Fe-bearing clay minerals are typically the dominant phase in mineral dust. The mineralogy and chemistry of clay minerals in dust particles, however, are largely unknown. We conducted microscopic identification and chemical analysis of the clay minerals in As...

  17. Effects of magnesium minerals representative of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay-stone on borosilicate glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borosilicate glasses dissolution has been studied in presence of magnesium minerals. Those minerals (dolomite, illite, smectite...) belong to the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay-stone layer, studied in France as a potential site for nuclear waste disposal. Such minerals contain magnesium, an element able to sustain glass alteration when it is available in solution. In the confined media of the wastes disposal, the solids reactivity controls the solution composition and can be the driving force of nuclear glass alteration. Experiments show that magnesium carbonates (hydro-magnesite and dolomite) increase in the glass alteration: the precipitation of magnesium silicates consumes silicon which slows down the formation of the glass passivating layer. The lower the magnesium mineral solubility, the lower the glass alteration. The purified clay phases (illite, smectite...) from the COx layer increase the glass alteration. Half the magnesium was replaced by sodium during the purification process. In such conditions, the effect of clay phases on glass alteration is in part due to the acidic pH-buffering effect of the clay fraction. The GRAAL model implemented in the geochemical transport code HYTEC has confirmed and quantified the mechanisms put in evidence in the experiments. Cells diffusion experiments where the two solids were separated by an inert diffusion barrier allow to valid reactive transport modelling. Such experiments are more representative of the glass package which will be separated from the COx by corrosion products. They show that glass alteration rate is reduced when solids are not close. (author)

  18. Characteristics and genesis of clay minerals in the northern margin of the Qaidam Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Linlin; Jiang Bo; Peng Dehua; Yin Chengming; Zeng Chunlin

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop appropriate reservoir protection measures in the northern margin of the Qaidam Basin and improve its oil and gas recovery efficiency, characteristics of clay minerals from eleven clay rock samples from the northern margin of the Qaidam Basin were investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis, the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and energy spectrum analysis. Clay mineral composition and distribution characteristics of the main hydrocarbon reservoirs, I.e., from the Jurassic and Paleogene-Neogene, were explored. We analyzed the main factors which affected these attributes. The results show that the major clay minerals in the northern margin are chlorite, kaolinite, illite, smectite and illite/smectite inter-stratified minerals, Illite is the most widely spread clay mineral in this area.Chlorite is mainly found in the entire Neogene and in shallow horizons of the Paleogene. Smectite is enriched in the shallow Paleogene-Neogene. There are large amounts of kaolinite and illite/smectite inter-stratified minerals in the Jurassic. The major factors affecting the different development of clay minerals in the region are properties of parent rocks, paleoclimate and paleowater media conditions,diagenesis transformation, tectonic and terrain conditions.

  19. Clay mineral recrystalization in pottery and TL fine-grain dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prehistoric pottery samples from North Germany show considerable degrees of clay mineral recrystallization which increases with age. This phenomenon may affect the realiability of TL fine grain dating. Therefore, a joint test programme has been initiated which combines clay mineralogy and thermoluminescence studies on some Norht German pottery samples. First results are presented. (author)

  20. Clay Mineral Image Collection for Education in Geotechnical Engineering and the Earth Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Gordon; Dove, Joseph E.; Han, Nizhou; Dove, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    This file contains a collection of scanning electron microscope images of Kaolinite and Bentonite pure clay minerals, and the fine portion of a natural soil. National Science Foundation Grant No. 1301124

  1. Clay mineral distributions in the southern Yellow Sea and their significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    To better understand the characteristics of the clay minerals in the southern Yellow Sea, the X-ray quantitative determinations have been carried out for the surface samples obtained from the Yellow Sea. With newly compiled clay mineral synoptic maps, the depositional processes were described for four main clay minerals (illite, chlorite, kaolinite and smectite). The analysis shows that most clay minerals are of terrigenous source with the Huanghe River acting as the major sediment supplier. Besides, the source of muddy sediments in the Yellow Sea was also discussed. As for the central Yellow Sea mud (CYSM), the sediments in its northern part mainly come from the Huanghe River, and those in the rest are of multi-origin. Very similarly, a large amount of sediments in the northern part of the southeastern Yellow Sea Mud (SEYSM) derive from the Keum River and Yeongsan River, while those in the southern part are of multi-origin.

  2. Tritium capture by clay mineral structure during its propagation in aeration zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The underlay compositions in aeration zone have been contaminated near radioactive waste repositories as a result of radiation accident in which tritium leakage from repositories had been occurred. The tritium distribution in aeration zone and its moving into the first aquifer are investigated. Measurements of tritium activity in aeration zone have reviled, that tritium is captured by OH - groups of clay minerals. The measuring and modeling process of tritium capture by OH - groups of clay minerals let to estimate an amount of tritium, captured by OH - groups and typical times of capture and retention. It was shown that the tritium capture by OH - groups of clay minerals during its propagation into environment in some times improve the protective properties of the barrier consisting of clay minerals

  3. Clay mineral distribution in the continental shelf and slope off Saurashtra, West coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    with relatively low values on the outer shelf. Illite and chlorite contents are high on the outer shelf. These variations are attributed to the influence of depositional environment and individual property of the clay minerals. Distinct differences in the nature...

  4. Selenite reduction in Boom clay: Effect of FeS2, clay minerals and dissolved organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several experiments were set up to study Se speciation and solubility in the reducing Boom clay environment, starting from oxidized Se species which were added in oversaturation with respect to the thermodynamic solubility of reduced Se solid phases. Upon introduction of SeO32- to FeS2-containing samples, adsorption of SeO32- occurred at the FeS2 surface, and led to a reduction and precipitation of a Se0 solid phase with a solubility of 3x10-9 M (after 60 days). In the presence of humic substances, an association of Se with these humic substances was observed and the 3x10-9 M solubility limit was not reached in the same time delay. Upon introduction of SeO32- to Boom clay suspensions (equilibration up to 9 months), the initial adsorption of SeO32- on the solid phase was increased with respect to systems containing only FeS2, due to the presence of (illite) clay minerals. This competing adsorption process, and the presence of humic substances, again decreased the kinetics of reduction with respect to FeS2 samples. Also, an association of Se with Boom clay humic substances was observed, and amounted up to ∼10-7 M in some samples after 9 months equilibration. - Selenite reduction by FeS2 is kinetically controlled, with clay minerals and organic matter playing an important role

  5. Pyrite Formation in Organic-rich Clay, Calcitic and Coal-Forming Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gordana DEVI(C); Petar PFENDT; Branimir JOVAN(C)I(C)EVI(C); Zoran POPOVIC

    2006-01-01

    The early diagenetic characteristics of pyrite formation processes in a Miocene freshwater sequence of mixed sediments (coal fragments in clays, sandstones or shales) alternating with continuous brown coal layers was investigated. Based on abundant minerals, the following main sedimentary environments were distinguished: the illite-montmorillonitic (I-M), calcitic (Ct) and coal-forming environment (CL). For these hydrogeochemically differing environments the effects of limiting factors on the pyrite formation process (availability of sulphate and Fe, amount of organic matter and participation of organic sulphur) were assessed by correlation analysis. Significant differences in the effects of these limiting factors in the particular environments were observed. These differences were explained taking in account the different oxidative activity, Fe-complex and surface complex forming properties of hnmic substances in dependence of pH of environment and the abundance of sorptionally active clay minerals. In environments having a relatively low pH and containing clay minerals (I-Mand CL-environments) the oxidative activity of humic substances (Hs) on pyrite precursors was greatly prevented however pyrite formation depended on reactive Fe availability as the consequence of complex formation. On the contrary, in environments with a relatively high pH, as it was the calcitic,the oxidative activity of Hs was greatly enhanced, thus oxidizing the sulfur precursors of pyrite. The oxidation degree of organic matter was probably also a consequence of the differing activity of the humic electron-acceptors.

  6. Studies in Finishing Effects of Clay Mineral in Polymers and Synthetic Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Faheem Uddin

    2013-01-01

    The use of clay mineral in modifying the properties of polymeric material is improved in application. The current interest in modifying the polymeric materials, particularly polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, and nylon using clay mineral for improved flame retardancy, thermal stability, peak heat release rate, fracture, and strength properties generated significant research literature. This paper aims to review some of the important recent modification achieved in the performance of po...

  7. Distribution and origin of clay minerals during hydrothermal alteration of ore deposits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    René, Miloš

    Rijeka : Intech, 2012 - (Valášková, M.; Simha Martynková, G.), s. 81-100 ISBN 9789535107385 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME10083; GA ČR GA205/09/0540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : clay minerals, mineralogy * geochemistry * hydrothermal alteration Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.intechopen.com/articles/show/title/distribution-and-origin-of-clay-minerals-during- hydrothermal -alteration-of-ore-deposits

  8. Evaluation of the medicinal use of clay minerals as antibacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B; Haydel, Shelley E

    2010-07-01

    . Furthermore, aqueous leachates of the antibacterial clays effectively kill the bacteria. Progressively heating the clay leads first to dehydration (200 degrees C), then dehydroxylation (550 degrees C or more), and finally to destruction of the clay mineral structure by (~900 degrees C). By identifying the elements lost after each heating step, and testing the bactericidal effect of the heated product, we eliminated many toxins from consideration (e.g., microbes, organic compounds, volatile elements) and identified several redox-sensitive refractory metals that are common among antibacterial clays. We conclude that the pH and oxidation state buffered by the clay mineral surfaces is key to controlling the solution chemistry and redox related reactions occurring at the bacterial cell wall. PMID:20640226

  9. Terrestrial Analogs for Clay Minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Allan H; Morris, Richard V.; Bristow, Thomas; Ming, Douglas W.; Achillies, Cherie; Bish, David L.; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Chipera, Steve

    2013-01-01

    the last three varieties may be contemporaneous. One sample shows agate (alpha- quartz) that was precipitated between the episodes of deposition of the fine-grained and coarse-grained 'griffithite.' 'Griffithite' is not unique as a possible terrestrial analog - some clay minerals from the Doushantou formation, China, have similar 02L diffraction bands, and many basalts contain smectites in vesicles and as replacements after olivine. Similar trioctahedral smectites occur also in the nakhlite martian meteorites - as veinlets and replacements of olivine. By understanding the formation of these terrestrial clays, we hope to constrain the nature and mechanism of formation of the Sheepbed clay mineral.

  10. Effects of natural heating on a clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a contribution to the characterization of clay deposits as possible sites for nuclear waste disposal, the metamorphic effects induced on Pliocene argillaceous sediments by the small subvolcanic body of Orciatico (Tuscany, Italy) were investigated. In areas close to marginal facies of the magmatic body, where temperatures were presumably ranging from 100 to 5000C, the thermo-metamorphic aureole thickness doesn't exceed 2 meters. In this zone the clay fraction (45-69% of the bulk rock) changes from an illite+illite/smectite interstratified+vermiculite+chloritic intergrades assemblage to a paragenesis characterized only by illite+smectite, the later being the most stable phase among the clay minerals. Within such zone alkalis (Na,K, and Rb) and alkaline-earths (Ca and Sr) result to be the most highly mobilized elements

  11. Is the clogging process in Maqarin natural analogue controlled by accessory clay minerals? A reactive transport study with new data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, H.; Kosakowski, G.; Berner, U.; Kulik, D.; Mäder, U.; Kolditz, O.

    2012-04-01

    The safety of nuclear waste repositories is based on the functionality of multiple natural and engineered barriers for very long time. The barrier system typically combines geochemically different materials that might interact with each other. One example is the long term alteration of sedimentary host rocks by the interaction with high pH pore water from cement materials used for tunnel support, seals and as backfill material. Within this context the Maqarin site in Jordan was investigated since more than 20 years as a natural analogue for rock alterations and pore clogging due to ingress of high pH solutions. In this work we examine the geochemical evolution of Maqarin marl rock in contact with a fracture through which a hyper-alkaline groundwater is circulating. The new reactive transport calculations were performed with the code OpenGeoSys-GEMS and utilize a state-of-the-art geochemical model for cement-clay interactions. The simulations reveal that the precipitation of ettringite, and to a smaller extent the precipitation of calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH), is responsible for pore clogging in the rock matrix. Clogging of the pore space effectively seals the rock matrix on a centimeter scale after some hundreds of years and suppresses mass transfer of solutes from the fracture into the adjacent rock. In our Maqarin marl rock model typical clay minerals like kaolinite and illite are present in accessory mineral quantities only. A sensitivity analysis reveals that in this setup clay minerals are the main source for Al, necessary for the formation of ettringite-type solid solutions. It is thus the clay mineral content and the dissolution reactions that to a large degree control the spatial and temporal precipitation of ettringites and the associated pore clogging. Recently collected mineralogy and porosity data will be used to re-calibrate the model and to verify our improved findings that overall Maqarin system is controlled by accessory clay minerals.

  12. Spectral stratigraphy and clay minerals analysis in parts of Hellas Planitia, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, I. C.; Joseph, J.; Subramanian, S. K.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Absorption features that occur in reflectance spectra are a sensitive indicator of mineralogy and chemical composition for a wide variety of materials. The investigation of the mineralogy and chemical composition of surfaces give information about the origin and evolution of planetary bodies. On Mars, the processes of formation of different types of clay minerals result from different types of wet conditions viz. hydrothermalism, subsurface/groundwater weathering, surface alteration etc. The image analyzed in the present study was frt000947f- 164-trr3 (-27.87N-65.06E). Through the spectral stratigraphic characterization along a crater wall, eight (8) different layers were identified considering the spectral variability and their position. In Hellas Planitia, the alteration minerals identified by CRISM based on distinctive absorptions from 0.4 to3.9 μm include Al-rich smectite, montmorillonite, phyllosilicate mineral at 2.2 μm and 2.35 μm, including strong absorption feature noticed at 1.9 μm. We conclude that the layers exposed in the crater wall help characterize the compositional stratigraphy for confirming the presence of hydrated minerals in this region as an outcome of geohydrological weathering process.

  13. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For

  14. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For

  15. The emanation thermal analysis of kaolinite clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emanation thermal analysis (ETA) is based on the measurement of the rate of release of radon from solid samples previously labelled with trace concentrations of an inert radioactive nuclide (Thorium-228 or Ra-224). This method enables pointing out of the different steps that occur during the heating of kaolinite: pre-dehydroxylation, dehydroxylation, evolution of structural disorder in metakaolinite, segregation of amorphous silica and formation of precursors of high-temperature phases, crystallization and sintering of both mullite and cristobalite. The investigations of two kaolinite samples of quite different crystallinity demonstrates the role of the structural disorder of the mineral in the manifestation of these structural changes. The differences observed between the behaviour of the two samples are reflected by different diffusivities of radon which can be related to different morphology changes taking place in kaolinite during heating. The results obtained demonstrate the potential of ETA as a complementary method of conventional thermoanalysis and XRD methods

  16. Improved dewatering behavior of clay minerals dispersions via interfacial chemistry and particle interactions optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Angus; Bremmell, Kristen; Addai-Mensah, Jonas

    2006-01-01

    Orthokinetic flocculation of clay dispersions at pH 7.5 and 22 degrees C has been investigated to determine the influence of interfacial chemistry and shear on dewatering and particle interactions behavior. Modification of pulp chemistry and behavior was achieved by using kaolinite and Na-exchanged (swelling) smectite clay minerals, divalent metal ions (Ca(II), Mn(II)) as coagulants and anionic polyacrylamide copolymer (PAM A) and non-ionic polyacrylamide homopolymer (PAM N) as flocculants. The pivotal role of shear, provided by a two-blade paddle impeller, was probed as a function of agitation rate (100-500 rpm) and time (15/60 s). Particle zeta potential and adsorption isotherms were measured to quantify the interfacial chemistry, whilst rheology and cryogenic SEM were used to investigate particle interactions and floc structure and aggregate network, respectively. Osmotic swelling, accompanied by the formation of "honeycomb" particle network structure and high yield stress, was produced by the Na-exchanged smectite, but not kaolinite, dispersions. Dispersion of the clay particles in 0.05 M Ca(II) or Mn(II) solution led to a marked reduction in particle zeta potential, complete suppression of swelling, honeycomb network structure collapse and a concomitant reduction in shear yield stress of smectite pulps. Optimum conditions for improved, orthokinetic flocculation performance of negatively charged clay particles, reflecting faster settling flocs comprised (i) coagulation, (ii) moderate agitation rate, (iii) shorter agitation time, and (iv) anionic rather than non-ionic PAM. The optimum dewatering rates were significantly higher than those produced by standard, manual-mixing flocculation techniques (plunging and cylinder inversion) commonly used in industry for flocculant trials. The optimum flocculation conditions did not, however, have a significant impact on the final sediment solid content of 20-22 wt%. Further application of shear to pre-sedimented pulps

  17. Atomic force microscopy measurements of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation onto clay-sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiaoyun; Wu, Huayong; Cai, Peng; Fein, Jeremy B.; Chen, Wenli

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial adhesion onto mineral surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation play key roles in aggregate stability, mineral weathering, and the fate of contaminants in soils. However, the mechanisms of bacteria-mineral interactions are not fully understood. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the adhesion forces between bacteria and goethite in water and to gain insight into the nanoscale surface morphology of the bacteria-mineral aggregates and biofilms formed on clay-sized minerals. This study yields direct evidence of a range of different association mechanisms between bacteria and minerals. All strains studied adhered predominantly to the edge surfaces of kaolinite rather than to the basal surfaces. Bacteria rarely formed aggregates with montmorillonite, but were more tightly adsorbed onto goethite surfaces. This study reports the first measured interaction force between bacteria and a clay surface, and the approach curves exhibited jump-in events with attractive forces of 97 ± 34 pN between E. coli and goethite. Bond strengthening between them occurred within 4 s to the maximum adhesion forces and energies of -3.0 ± 0.4 nN and -330 ± 43 aJ (10-18 J), respectively. Under the conditions studied, bacteria tended to form more extensive biofilms on minerals under low rather than high nutrient conditions.

  18. Micro and nano-size pores of clay minerals in shale reservoirs: Implication for the accumulation of shale gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangbin; Han, Yufu; Fu, Changqin; Zhang, han; Zhu, Yanming; Zuo, Zhaoxi

    2016-08-01

    A pore is an essential component of shale gas reservoirs. Clay minerals are the adsorption carrier second only to organic matter. This paper uses the organic maturity test, Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to study the structure and effect of clay minerals on storing gas in shales. Results show the depositional environment and organic maturity influence the content and types of clay minerals as well as their structure in the three types of sedimentary facies in China. Clay minerals develop multi-size pores which shrink to micro- and nano-size by close compaction during diagenesis. Micro- and nano-pores can be divided into six types: 1) interlayer, 2) intergranular, 3) pore and fracture in contact with organic matter, 4) pore and fracture in contact with other types of minerals, 5) dissolved and, 6) micro-cracks. The contribution of clay minerals to the presence of pores in shale is evident and the clay plane porosity can even reach 16%, close to the contribution of organic matter. The amount of clay minerals and pores displays a positive correlation. Clay minerals possess a strong adsorption which is affected by moisture and reservoir maturity. Different pore levels of clay minerals are mutually arranged, thus essentially producing distinct reservoir adsorption effects. Understanding the structural characteristics of micro- and nano-pores in clay minerals can provide a tool for the exploration and development of shale gas reservoirs.

  19. Alteration of non-swelling clay minerals and magadiite by acid activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steudel, A.; Batenburg, L.F.; Fischer, H.R.; Weidler, P.G.; Emmerich, K.

    2009-01-01

    The bulk material of three kaolins, a sepiolite, an illite and one magadiite were treated with 1, 5 and 10 M H2SO4 at 80 °C for several hours. The alteration of the non-swelling clay mineral structures was controlled by the individual character of each mineral (chemical composition and initial parti

  20. Waste disposal concept in a tertiary clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations on the suitability of tertiary clay layer as host formation for disposal of conditioned high-level and alpha bearing radioactive waste were started in Belgium in the mid-seventies. On the basis of results obtained from preliminary field and laboratory research it was possible at the end of the seventies to elaborate a first rough outline of an underground facility for final emplacement of the waste concerned. Excellent retention capacity for most of the long-lived radionuclides and low hydraulic conductivity are found in the Boom clay formation in the investigated area. In the early stage of the program, however, uncertainties remained about the possibility of creating galleries at reasonable depth in clay at an acceptable cost price. Therefore, the decision was taken in 1978 to build an underground laboratory in order to investigate, among others, the geotechnical properties and the minability of the Boom clay. A satisfactory reproduction of three years of in-situ measurements was obtained by using an elasto-viscoplastic model with strain softening. The main conclusion of this R and D program, is that tunneling capabilities at reasonable cost prices in deep laying Boom clay have been demonstrated

  1. Use of thermogravimetry on rational analysis of clay minerals from state of Mato Grosso do Sul

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rational analysis on clay minerals, normally uses as structural water, the mass loss by firing. The presence of organic materials, sulphur or others minerals, can cause an error on quantification of structural water. With the use of thermal gravimetric analysis, we can calculate, in a more precise way, the quantity of mass loss by dehydroxylation, without take into account the loss of mass from others process. We compared the rational chemical analysis on some clay minerals from state of Mato Grosso do Sul using burning loss and thermal gravimetric analysis. (author)

  2. The Imprint of Atmospheric Evolution in the D/H of Hesperian Clay Minerals on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Webster, C. R.; Stern, J. C.; Brunner, A. E.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Domagal-Goldman, S.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Flesch, G. J.; Christensen, L. E.; Franz, H. B.; Glavin, D. P.; Jones, J. H.; McAdam, A. C.; Pavlov, A. A.; Trainer, M. G.; Williford, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    The deuterium-to-hydrogen (D/H) ratio in strongly bound water or hydroxyl groups in ancient Martian clays retains the imprint of the water of formation of these minerals. Curiosity's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment measured thermally evolved water and hydrogen gas released between 550 degrees Centigrade and 950 degrees Centigrade from samples of Hesperian-era Gale crater smectite to determine this isotope ratio. The D/H value is 3.0 (plus or minus 0.2) times the ratio in standard mean ocean water. The D/H ratio in this approximately 3-billion-year-old mudstone, which is half that of the present Martian atmosphere but substantially higher than that expected in very early Mars, indicates an extended history of hydrogen escape and desiccation of the planet.

  3. Stochastic Approach to Determine CO2 Hydrate Induction Time in Clay Mineral Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Lee, W.

    2008-12-01

    A large number of induction time data for carbon dioxide hydrate formation were obtained from a batch reactor consisting of four independent reaction cells. Using resistance temperature detector(RTD)s and a digital microscope, we successfully monitored the whole process of hydrate formation (i.e., nucleation and crystal growth) and detected the induction time. The experiments were carried out in kaolinite and montmorillonite suspensions at temperatures between 274 and 277 K and pressures ranging from 3.0 to 4.0 MPa. Each set of data was analyzed beforehand whether to be treated by stochastic manner or not. Geochemical factors potentially influencing the hydrate induction time under different experimental conditions were investigated by stochastic analyses. We observed that clay mineral type, pressure, and temperature significantly affect the stochastic behavior of the induction times for CO2 hydrate formation in this study. The hydrate formation kinetics along with stochastic analyses can provide basic understanding for CO2 hydrate storage in deep-sea sediment and geologic formation, securing its stability under the environments.

  4. Molecular Basis of Clay Mineral Structure and Dynamics in Subsurface Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygan, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals and their interfaces play an essential role in many geochemical, environmental, and subsurface engineering applications. Adsorption, dissolution, precipitation, nucleation, and growth mechanisms, in particular, are controlled by the interplay of structure, thermodynamics, kinetics, and transport at clay mineral-water interfaces. Molecular details of these processes are typically beyond the sensitivity of experimental and analytical methods, and therefore require accurate models and simulations. Also, basal surfaces and interlayers of clay minerals provide constrained interfacial environments to facilitate the evaluation of these complex processes. We have developed and used classical molecular and quantum methods to examine the complex behavior of clay mineral-water interfaces and dynamics of interlayer species. Bulk structures, swelling behavior, diffusion, and adsorption processes are evaluated and compared to experimental and spectroscopic findings. Analysis of adsorption mechanisms of radionuclides on clay minerals provides a scientific basis for predicting the suitability of engineered barriers associated with nuclear waste repositories and the fate of contaminants in the environment. Similarly, the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into geological reservoirs—to mitigate the impact of climate change—is evaluated by molecular models of multi-fluid interactions with clay minerals. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insights into the wettability of different fluids—water, electrolyte solutions, and supercritical carbon dioxide—on clay surfaces, and which ultimately affects capillary fluid flow and the integrity of shale caprocks. This work is supported as part of Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science and by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Geosciences Research Program

  5. Microorganism-induced weathering of clay minerals in a hydromorphic soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hanlie; Fang, Qian; Cheng, Liuling; Wang, Chaowen; Churchman, Gordon Jock

    2016-07-01

    In order to improve the understanding of factors influencing weathering in hydromorphic soils, the clay mineral and chemical compositions, iron (hydr)oxides, organic compounds, and Sr and Nd isotopic compositions, of hydromorphic soils on the banks of the Liangzi Lake, Hubei province, south China, were investigated. The B horizon in the lower profile exhibits a distinct net-like pattern, with abundant short white veins within the red-brown matrix. Their various 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotopic compositions showed only small variations of 0.7270-0.7235 and 0.51200-0.51204, respectively, consistent with the composition of Yangtze River sediments, indicating that the soils were all derived from alluvium from the catchment. The white veins contained notably more SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2, and mobile elements relative to the red-brown matrix, while they both showed similar values for the chemical index of alteration of 86.7 and 87.1, respectively, and displayed similar degrees of weathering. The clay minerals in A, AE, and E horizons of the soil profile were illite, kaolinite, and mixed-layer illite-smectite. These same three clay minerals comprised the white net-like veins in the soil B horizon, whereas only illite and kaolinite were observed in the red-brown matrix. Iron (hydr)oxides in A, AE, and E horizons of the soil profile were hematite and goethite, whereas in the red-brown matrix of the B horizon they were hematite, goethite, and ferrihydrite. Different organic compounds were observed for the white vein and the red-brown matrix in the soil B horizon: an 18:2 fatty acid biomarker for fungi in the net-like vein, but not in the red-brown matrix. Compared with the red-brown matrix, the white net-like vein also clearly contained more mono-unsaturated fatty acids, which are sometimes associated with bacteria that have the capacity to reduce Fe(III). Thus, migration of iron and the formation of the net-like veins involved the participation of biota during the hydromorphic

  6. Study of different disposal concepts in clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the scope of an R and D project which deals with the comparison of concepts in salt and clay formations the main work was to work out the major features of a final repository concept in clay for spent fuel and vitrified waste. The work focused on the topics safety, conceptual design, and economical aspects. The planning was carried out taking into account results of previous R+D projects and international experiences with repositories in clay (namely in France, Spain, Belgium and Switzerland). Open questions were to be identified for further research and development. The work was restricted to the final repository itself. Nevertheless, aspects of the siting procedure, of the final disposal casks, conditioning, long-term safety, and geochemical processes were also considered. The German Ministry of Economics and Labour represented by PtWT+E has funded the project. The project consisted of the following five work packages. Compilation of fundamentals and boundary conditions for the comparison: This included a compilation of the state of the art of national and international waste management concepts in clay. Furthermore, the amount of waste to be dealt with, cask materials, requirements for filling and closure material, and siting aspects were described. Disposal cask concepts: compilation of available information about waste conditioning processes and cask concepts including cost estimates.Conceptual design of a repository and repository techniques: the conceptual design of a repository in the host rock clay was performed considering the surface and subsurface installations and the required equipment including cost estimates. Repository safety in the operational phase: the radiation protection for the operational personnel, safeguards related questions, and criticality during the operational phase were analysed. Long-term safety of the repository: here special aspects of the geochemistry in clay were considered as well as basics for demonstrating the

  7. Effect of Clay Minerals on the Chemical Characteristics of Soil Humus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YEWEI; WENQIXIAO

    1996-01-01

    Chemical characteristics of humic substances in soils with different mineralogical characteristics and under different utilization paterns in Zhangpu,Fujian Province,together with two pairs of cultivated soils in North China Plain were studied by chemical analysis,visible and IR spectroscopy and 13C NMR spectrometry.For soils in Zhanpu the HA/FA ratio and both the aromaticity and the degree of humification of HA were higher in soils with montmorillonite as the predominant clay mineral than in those with kaolinite as the predominant clay mineral,provided these soils were under the same utilization pattern.While for each pair of soils with similar mineralogical characteristics the HA/FA ratio was higher and the C/H ratio and the contnet of carboxyl group of HA were lower in paddy soil than in upland soil.Among the upland soils(or paddy soils)studied the Ha/FA ratio of soil in Zhangpu with kaolinite as the predominant clay mineral was the lowest,and that of soil in Zhangpu with montmorillonite as the predominant clay mineral was the highest .the lowest.and that of soil in Zhangpu with montmorillonite as the predominant clay mineral was the highest It was concluded that the presence of montmorillonite favored the fromation and maturation of humic acid.

  8. Modeling of Cation Binding in Hydrated 2:1 Clay Minerals - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David E.

    2000-09-14

    Hydrated 2:1 clay minerals are high surface area, layered silicates that play a unique role in determining the fate of radionuclides in the environment. This project consisted of developing and implementing computer simulation methods for molecular characterization of the swelling and ion exchange properties of Hydrated 2:1 clay minerals, and the subsequent analysis and theoretical modeling with a view toward improving contaminant transport modeling as well as soil remediation and radionuclide containment strategies. Project results included the (a) development of simulation methods to treat clays under environmentally relevant conditions of variable water vapor pressure; (b) calculation of clay swelling thermodynamics as a function of interlayer ion size and charge (calculated quantities include immersion energies, free energies, and entropies of swelling); and (c) calculation of ion exchange free energies, including contributions from changing interlayer water contents and layer spacing.

  9. Characterization of Clay Minerals and Kerogen in Alberta Oil Sands Geological End Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Limin

    The high degree of variability of oil sands ores can be attributed to a mixture of different geological end members, i.e., estuarine sand, estuarine clay, marine sand and marine clay. This study focused on the mineralogy, especially of clay minerals, and toluene insoluble organic matter, referred to as kerogen, in different oil sands end members. Clays and kerogens will likely have a significant impact on solvent recovery from the gangue following non-aqueous bitumen extraction. The bitumen-free solids were subjected to mineralogical and geochemical analysis. Kerogens were isolated and analyzed by various characterization methods. The types of clays were identified in oriented samples by X-ray diffraction analysis. The nitrogen to carbon ratio in the isolated kerogens is found to be higher than in bitumen. There are more type III kerogens in estuarine samples and more type II kerogens in marine samples.

  10. Bioremediating Oil Spills in Nutrient Poor Ocean Waters Using Fertilized Clay Mineral Flakes: Some Experimental Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Warr, Laurence N.; André Friese; Florian Schwarz; Frieder Schauer; Portier, Ralph J.; Basirico, Laura M.; Gregory M. Olson

    2013-01-01

    Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contai...

  11. Mineral composition of the clay fraction in soils with a cambic horizon in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žigová, Anna; Šťastný, Martin; Krejčová, J.

    Szeged : University of Szeged, 2010 - (Zaharia, L.). Roč. 6, - (2010), s. 648-648 ISSN 0324-6523. [Mid-European Clay Conference (MECC 2010) /5./. 25.08.2010-29.08.2010, Budapest] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/08/0434 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : soil s * cambic horizon * parent material * clay minerals Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science

  12. Caracterização dos argilominerais usados em matéria-prima cerâmica, da formação Rio do Rasto, Bacia do Paraná, no município de Turvo, SC Characterization of clay minerals used in the ceramic industry, from Rio do Rasto formation, Paraná basin, exploitation in Turvo, SC, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Costa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available No sudeste de Santa Catarina existem inúmeras minas de exploração de argilas destinadas à indústria cerâmica da região. Para o conhecimento desta matéria prima foi realizada a caracterização em detalhe de uma frente de lavra em atividade. A exploração é realizada em terrenos sedimentares da Formação Rio do Rasto (Permiano Superior na Bacia do Paraná que afloram como morros testemunho. Foram coletadas quatorze amostras representativas dos níveis desta mina composta de argilitos com intercalação de siltitos de pequena espessura. As amostras foram analisadas por difratometria de raios X pelo método do pó na rocha total e na fração In the southeastern part of Santa Catarina state, Brazil, many mines of clays used as raw material for the ceramic industry are found. A detail study of this material was developed in a mine in activity. The exploitation of clays is held in sedimentary rocks of Rio do Rasto Formation (Upper Permian in the Paraná Basin. The outcrops are in hills testimonies. Fourteen samples were collected and represent the levels of this mine which consisted of argillites with intercalation of slim siltite layer. These samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction using the powder method and in the fraction < 4 µm. The chemical composition was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Petrographic observations in thin section were also performed. Scanning electron microscope images was obtained in samples fragments by secondary electron method. Electron microprobe microanalysis was performed in one thin section. The results showed large vertical variation in the mineralogy and it has been identified three different levels. Up to 2.00 m there is a predominance of smectite. Between 5.50 m 2.00 m the smectite is the main clay mineral, but with significant amounts of illite/mica and above 5.50 m occurs large increase in K-feldspar and detrital mica. Studies in detail by X-ray diffraction (determination of the b

  13. Paleoenvironmental significance of clay mineral assemblages in the southeastern Arabian Sea during last 30 kyr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siddhartha Sankar Das; Ajai K Rai; Vaseem Akaram; Dhananjai Verma; A C Pandey; Koushik Dutta; G V Ravi Prasad

    2013-02-01

    A gravity core SK-221 recovered from the southeastern Arabian Sea near Laccadive–Chagos Ridge was examined to identify the sources of detrital clay minerals and to decipher paleoenvironmental changes for the last 30 kyr. The clay mineral assemblages predominantly consist of illite, kaolinite and chlorite with small amounts of smectite. Quartz, feldspar and occasionally gibbsite are the clay-sized non-clay minerals present in the examined section. The detrital clay minerals primarily originated from the hinterland and were supplied to the present site by the numerous small rivers draining western India during preglacial and Holocene periods, and partly by the strong reworking of Indian continental shelf during glacial period. The low values of humidity proxies (kaolinite content, kaolinite to illite and smectite to illite ratios) and better illite crystallinity indicate relatively weak summer monsoon condition that resulted in reduced chemical weathering during glacial period, which was interrupted by a discrete event of winter monsoon intensification at ∼20–17 ka. The increased kaolinite content, higher values of humidity indices and poorer illite crystallinity reflect high humidity that resulted in strong hydrolysis activity during the preglacial and Holocene periods. The increased CaCO3 during above periods also indicates less terrigenous dilution and intensified southwest monsoon-led upwelling which result in higher surface biogenic productivity. The characteristic clay mineral associations broadly suggest dry to semi-drier conditions during Heinrich Events H1, H2, and H3 and also during Younger Dryas. The low values of biogenic carbonate and organic carbon also indicate low productivity associated with weak summer monsoons during Heinrich Events. Abrupt increased humidity was recorded at 15–12.7 ka (Bølling/Allerød Event) sandwiched between two lows of Heinrich Events. Cycles of millennial timescale variations 2300, 1800, 1300 and 1000 yr have been

  14. Bioremediation of PAHs and VOCs: Advances in clay mineral-microbial interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Rusmin, Ruhaida; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    Bioremediation is an effective strategy for cleaning up organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Advanced bioremediation implies that biotic agents are more efficient in degrading the contaminants completely. Bioremediation by microbial degradation is often employed and to make this process efficient, natural and cost-effective materials can serve as supportive matrices. Clay/modified clay minerals are effective adsorbents of PAHs/VOCs, and readily available substrate and habitat for microorganisms in the natural soil and sediment. However, the mechanism underpinning clay-mediated biodegradation of organic compounds is often unclear, and this requires critical investigation. This review describes the role of clay/modified clay minerals in hydrocarbon bioremediation through interaction with microbial agents in specific scenarios. The vision is on a faster, more efficient and cost-effective bioremediation technique using clay-based products. This review also proposes future research directions in the field of clay modulated microbial degradation of hydrocarbons. PMID:26408945

  15. Competitive adsorption of 90Sr on soil sediments, pure clay phases and feldspar minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of the adsorption of 90Sr by a soil sediment, mineralogically pure clay phases and feldspar minerals as a function of ionic composition of Ca, Mg and Na has been conducted. It is shown that a theoretical slope value of -1 for a pure ion-exchange mechanism of strontium adsorption onto Ca-saturated clay is predicted. Experimentally determined slopes represent an average of adsorption on several different mineral surfaces having different relative affinities for strontium, calcium and magnesium. Strontium was found to be adsorbed to ion-exchange sites and calcium and magnesium cations were observed to be effective competitors for these sites. Pure clay minerals yielded adsorption coefficients from equations with slopes of -10. (author)

  16. Removal of organic pollutants in model water and thermal wastewater using clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Emese; Vajda, Krisztina; Veréb, Gábor; Dombi, András; Mogyorósi, Károly; Ábrahám, Imre; Májer, Marcell

    2011-01-01

    Water treatment method was developed for the removal of different anionic dyes such as methyl orange and indigo carmine, and also for thymol applying sodium bentonite and cationic surfactant - hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB) - or polyelectrolytes (polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride, poly-DADMAC and poly-amines). The removal efficiency of these model substrates was examined in model water using UV-Vis spectrophotometry, HPLC and TOC analysis. The clay mineral and HTAB were added in one step to the polluted model water in Jar-test experiments. The influence of the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the applied clay mineral and the presence of polyaluminium chloride coagulant (BOPAC) were also tested for the water treatment process. The structures of the in situ produced and pre-prepared organoclay composites were compared by XRD analysis. The rapid formation of organoclay adsorbents provided very efficient removal of the dyes (65-90 % in 3-10 mg/L TOC(0) range) with 200 mg/L sodium bentonite dose, however thymol was less efficiently separated. Adsorption efficiencies of the composites were compared at different levels of ion exchange such as at 40, 60 and 100 %. In the case of thymol, the elimination of inorganic carbon from the model water before the TOC analysis resulted in some loss of the analysed volatile compound therefore the HPLC analysis was found to be the most suitable tool for the evaluation of the process. This one-step adsorption method using in situ formed organoclay was better performing than the conventional process in which the montmorillonite-surfactant composite is pre-preapared and subsequently added to the polluted water. The purification performance of this method was also evaluated on raw and artificially polluted thermal wastewater samples containing added thymol. PMID:21929471

  17. A database of dissolution and precipitation rates for clay-rocks minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The present work aims at proposing a compilation of kinetic parameters. • The selection of minerals is currently limited to clay rich rocks and cements. • Selected rate parameters have been used to simulate independent experiments. • Database is available in different formats (PhreeqC, CrunchFlow, ToughReact). - Abstract: Many geoscientific fields use reactive transport codes to set up and interpret experiments as well as to understand natural processes. Reactive transport codes are also useful to give insights in the long term evolution of systems such as radioactive waste repositories or CO2 storage sites, for which experiments cannot reach the targeted time scale nor the dimension of those systems. The consideration of kinetic reaction rates is often required to reproduce correctly the geochemical and transport processes of interest. However, kinetic data are scattered in the literature, making data and selection a tedious task. Kinetic parameters on a single system are also highly variable depending on data choice, interpretation and chosen kinetic modelling approaches, thus making inter-comparison of modelling studies difficult. The present work aims at proposing a compilation of kinetic parameters to overcome part of above cited problems. The proposed selection was done (i) to ensure consistency of data selection criteria and data treatment and (ii) to ease the use of common kinetic parameters that are independent of the chosen geochemical modelling code. For those two reasons, the kinetic formalism of the transition state theory (TST) was chosen. The selection of minerals is currently limited to those present in clay rich rocks and cements, reflecting the effort made at predicting the evolution of radioactive waste underground storage systems. Still, the proposed compilation should also be useful for other applications such as CO2 sequestration

  18. Interaction of surface-modified silica nanoparticles with clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omurlu, Cigdem; Pham, H.; Nguyen, Q. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the adsorption of 5-nm silica nanoparticles onto montmorillonite and illite is investigated. The effect of surface functionalization was evaluated for four different surfaces: unmodified, surface-modified with anionic (sulfonate), cationic (quaternary ammonium (quat)), and nonionic (polyethylene glycol (PEG)) surfactant. We employed ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy to determine the concentration of adsorbed nanoparticles in conditions that are likely to be found in subsurface reservoir environments. PEG-coated and quat/PEG-coated silica nanoparticles were found to significantly adsorb onto the clay surfaces, and the effects of electrolyte type (NaCl, KCl) and concentration, nanoparticle concentration, pH, temperature, and clay type on PEG-coated nanoparticle adsorption were studied. The type and concentration of electrolytes were found to influence the degree of adsorption, suggesting a relationship between the interlayer spacing of the clay and the adsorption ability of the nanoparticles. Under the experimental conditions reported in this paper, the isotherms for nanoparticle adsorption onto montmorillonite at 25 °C indicate that adsorption occurs less readily as the nanoparticle concentration increases.

  19. Mineral potential of clays that cover the gypsum deposits in Araripina-PE region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work the applicability of the clays that cover the deposits of Gypsum Plaster in the region of Araripina - PE for use as the ceramic pigments and for bricks production in the red ceramic industry was analyzed. The clay minerals contained the illite, kaolinite and smectite, with high proportion of the last one. The possibility of industrial application of this mineral clay is considerable; however, the mining industries that mine and process the gypsum in the region do not take the clays into account as the potential mineral. In general, industries use the clay minerals in manufacturing processes or as key raw materials, or as the alternatives for some kinds of the chemical processing industries. This paper aims to highlight the potential of materials that cover the deposits of gypsum in reference. The material sampled from different deposit layers was characterized and the physical treatment of ore was applied. The results showed that the material analyzed can be used in various kinds of industry, such as the production of natural ceramic pigments. (author)

  20. Clay mineralogy of the Boda Claystone Formation (Mecsek Mts., SW Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Németh Tibor

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Boda Claystone Formation (BCF is the host rock of the planned site for high level nuclear waste repository inHungary. Samples representing the dominant rock types of BCF were studied: albitic claystone, claystone with high illite content, and analcime bearing claystone. Clay minerals in these three rock types were characterized by Xray powder diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and thermal analysis (DTA-TG, and the results were discussed from the point of view of the radionuclide sorption properties being studied in the future. Mineral compositions of bulk BCF samples vary in wide ranges. In the albitic sample, besides the dominant illite, few percent of chlorite represents the layer silicates in the clay fraction. Illite is the dominating phase in the illitic sample, with a few percent of chlorite. HRTEM study revealed that the thickness of illite particles rarely reaches 10 layers, usually are of 5-6 TOT layer thick. Illite crystals are generally thicker in the albitic sample than in the illitic one. The significant difference between the clay mineral characterisitics of the analcimous and the other two samples is that the former contains regularly interstratified chlorite/smectite beside the dominant illite.

  1. Degradative crystal–chemical transformations of clay minerals under the influence of cyanobacterium-actinomycetal symbiotic associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Ivanova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria and actinomycetes are essential components of soil microbial community and play an active role in ash elements leaching from minerals of the parent rock. Content and composition of clay minerals in soil determine the sorption properties of the soil horizons, water-holding capacity of the soil, stickiness, plasticity, etc. The transformative effect of cyanobacterial–actinomycetes associations on the structure of clay minerals – kaolinite, vermiculite, montmorillonite, biotite and muscovite – was observed, with the greatest structural lattice transformation revealed under the influence of association in comparison with monocultures of cyanobacterium and actinomycete. The range of the transformative effect depended both on the type of biota (component composition of association and on the crystal–chemical parameters of the mineral itself (trioctahedral mica – biotite, was more prone to microbial degradation than the dioctahedral – muscovite. The formation of the swelling phase – the product of biotite transformation into the mica–vermicullite mixed-layered formation was revealed as a result of association cultivation. Crystal chemical transformation of vermiculite was accompanied by the removal of potassium (К, magnesium (Mg and aluminum (Al from the crystal lattice. The study of such prokaryotic communities existed even in the early stages of the Earth's history helps to understand the causes and nature of the transformations undergone by the atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere of the planet.contribution of treatments on structure induces and model parameters are discussed in the paper.

  2. Measurement of exchangeable aluminium in soils and clay minerals by isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopically exchangeable Al was determined in soils and clay minerals by equilibration with 28Al. Best results were obtained with a weak extractant and an equilibration time of eight min. The calculated amount of isotopically exchangeable Al was independent of the amount of carrier-Al added with the 28Al. In some soils isotopically exchangeable Al did not appear to be related to the amount of Al which could be extracted by various electrolyte solutions. This technique provides an improved means of studying the exchange reactions of Al in acid soils and clay minerals

  3. Comparative adsorption of sup 90 Sr on soil sediments, pure clay phases and feldspar minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to determine the adsorption of 90 Sr by a soil sediment, mineralogically pure clay phases (vermiculites, smectites and illites) and feldspar minerals (adesine, albite, microcline and oligoclase) as a function of ionic composition. The clay minerals were present at different proportion in the soil sediment. The important adsorbing phases and the adsorption mechanism(s) can be determined from the studies. Twenty two stock solutions were prepared with concentrations of the major cations Ca, Mg and Na and were varied from 0.0 to 0.00312 M, 0.0 to 0.00165 M, and 0.0 to 0.00312 M, respectively. The experiments yielded adsorption coefficient values K sub d that could be described by equations. Theoretical slope value -1 for pure ion-exchange mechanism of strontium adsorption onto Ca-saturated clay was described. The slopes obtained in the experiments represented an average of adsorption on several different mineral surfaces having different relative affinities for strontium, calcium and magnesium. Experiment results showed that strontium was adsorbed to ion-exchange sites and that calcium and magnesium cations were effective competitors for these sites. Pure clay minerals yielded adsorption coefficients that could be described by equations slopes -1.0 similar to the theoretical value. The feldspar minerals yielded slope ranges from -072 to -1.13, and the sediments slope value of -0.81. These suggest that ion-exchange was the dominant adsorption mechanism for strontium

  4. Rheological properties of different minerals and clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgor Khaydapova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rheological properties of kaolinite, montmorillonite, ferralitic soil of the humid subtropics (Norfolk island, southwest of Oceania, alluvial clay soil of arid subtropics (Konyaprovince, Turkey and carbonate loess loam of Russian forest-steppe zone were determined. A parallel plate rheometer MCR-302 (Anton Paar, Austria was used in order to conduct amplitude sweep test. Rheological properties allow to assess quantitatively structural bonds and estimate structural resistance to a mechanical impact. Measurements were carried out on samples previously pounded and capillary humidified during 24 hours. In the amplitude sweep method an analyzed sample was placed between two plates. The upper plate makes oscillating motions with gradually extending amplitude. Software of the device allows to receive several rheological parameters such as elastic modulus (G’, Pa, viscosity modulus (G", Pa, linear viscoelasticity range (G’>>G”, and point of destruction of structure at which the elastic modulus becomes equal to the viscosity modulus (G’=G”- crossover. It was found out that in the elastic behavior at G '>> G " strength of structural links of kaolinite, alluvial clay soil and loess loam constituted one order of 105 Pa. Montmorillonit had a minimum strength - 104 Pa and ferrallitic soil of Norfolk island [has] - a maximum one -106 Pa. At the same time montmorillonite and ferralitic soil were characterized by the greatest plasticity. Destruction of their structure (G '= G" took place only in the cases when strain was reaching 11-12%. Destraction of the kaolinite structure happened at 5% of deformation and of the alluvial clay soil and loess loam - at 4.5%.

  5. The effect of high pH alkaline solutions on the mineral stability of the Boom Clay - Batch experiments at 60 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boom Clay is currently viewed as a reference host formation for studies on deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in Belgium. The interactions between bulk rock Boom Clay and 0.1 M KOH, 0.1 M NaOH, 0.1 M Ca(OH)2, young cement water and evolved cement water solutions, ranging in pH from 12.5 to 13.2, were examined as static batch experiments at 60 deg. C to simulate alkaline plume perturbations, which are expected to occur in the repository due to the presence of concrete. Both liquids and solids were investigated at specific times between 90 and 510 days in order to control the elemental budget and to search for potential mineralogical alterations. Also, the clay fraction was separated from the whole-rock Boom Clay at the end of each run and characterized for its mineralogical composition. Thereby, the importance of the mineral matrix to buffer the alkaline attack and the role of organic matter to protect clay minerals were also addressed. The results indicate that the degree of geochemical perturbation in Boom Clay is dependent on the initial pH of the applied solution together with the nature of the major cation in the reactant fluids. The higher the initial pH of the media, the stronger its interaction with Boom Clay. No major non-clay mineralogical alteration of the Boom Clay was detected, but dissolution of kaolinite, smectite and illite occurred within the studied experimental conditions. The dissolution of clays is accompanied by the decrease in the layer charge, followed by a decrease in the cation-exchange capacity. The highest TOC values coincide with the highest total elemental concentrations in the leachates, and correspondingly, the highest dissolution degree. However, no quantitative link could be established between the degree of organic matter decomposition and clay dissolution.

  6. Chemistry and mineralogy of clay minerals in Asian and Saharan dusts and the implications for iron availability

    OpenAIRE

    G. Y. Jeong; E. P. Achterberg

    2014-01-01

    Mineral dust supplied to remote ocean regions stimulates phytoplankton growth through delivery of micronutrients, notably iron (Fe). Although attention is usually paid to Fe (hydr)oxides as major sources of available Fe, Fe-bearing clay minerals are typically the dominant phase in mineral dust. The mineralogy and chemistry of clay minerals in dust particles, however, are largely unknown. We conducted microscopic identification and chemical analysis of the c...

  7. Biogeochemical processes in a clay formation in situ experiment: Part E - Equilibrium controls on chemistry of pore water from the Opalinus Clay, Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory, Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -examination of the measured Ca/Mg activity ratios and consideration of the mineralogical composition of the Opalinus Clay suggested that Ca/Mg cation exchange rather than dolomite saturation may control the ratio of these ions in solution. This re-examination also suggests that the Ca/Mg ratio decreases with increasing pore-water salinity. Several possible reasons for this are proposed. Moreover, it is demonstrated that feldspar equilibria must not be included in Opalinus Clay modelling because feldspars are present only in very small quantities in the formation and because Na/K ratios measured in pore water samples are inconsistent with feldspar saturation. The principal need to improve future modelling is additional or better data on rock properties, in particular: (i) a more detailed identification of phases in the Opalinus Clay that include redox-sensitive elements together with evaluation of their thermodynamic properties; (ii) an improved understanding of the distribution of celestite throughout the Opalinus Clay for Sr/SO4 concentrations control; (iii) improvements in analytic and thermodynamic data for Ca-Mg rock cation exchange and mineral chemical properties and (iv) the measurement of composition and stability constants of clay minerals actually present in the formation.

  8. Biogeochemical processes in a clay formation in situ experiment: Part E - Equilibrium controls on chemistry of pore water from the Opalinus Clay, Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, F.J., E-mail: fjpearson@gmail.com [Ground-Water Geochemistry, 5108 Trent Woods Dr., New Bern, NC 28562 (United States); Tournassat, Christophe; Gaucher, Eric C. [BRGM, B.P. 36009, 45060 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2011-06-15

    -examination of the measured Ca/Mg activity ratios and consideration of the mineralogical composition of the Opalinus Clay suggested that Ca/Mg cation exchange rather than dolomite saturation may control the ratio of these ions in solution. This re-examination also suggests that the Ca/Mg ratio decreases with increasing pore-water salinity. Several possible reasons for this are proposed. Moreover, it is demonstrated that feldspar equilibria must not be included in Opalinus Clay modelling because feldspars are present only in very small quantities in the formation and because Na/K ratios measured in pore water samples are inconsistent with feldspar saturation. The principal need to improve future modelling is additional or better data on rock properties, in particular: (i) a more detailed identification of phases in the Opalinus Clay that include redox-sensitive elements together with evaluation of their thermodynamic properties; (ii) an improved understanding of the distribution of celestite throughout the Opalinus Clay for Sr/SO{sub 4} concentrations control; (iii) improvements in analytic and thermodynamic data for Ca-Mg rock cation exchange and mineral chemical properties and (iv) the measurement of composition and stability constants of clay minerals actually present in the formation.

  9. Bulk and clay mineral composition indicate origin of terra rossa soils in Western Herzegovina

    OpenAIRE

    Durn, Goran; Ćorić, Radica; Tadej, Neven; Barudžija, Uroš; Rubinić, Vedran; Husnjak, Stjepan

    2014-01-01

    The B horizons of terra rossa soils developed on three different carbonate lithologies having variable insoluble residue contents were studied in Western Herzegovina. Comparison of  their composition and properties illustrates to what extent mineral (especially clay mineral assemblage) and particle size composition of those horizons and the insoluble residue of the underlying carbonate rocks can be used as indicators of the polygenetic nature of terra rossa in this region. Terra rossa B horiz...

  10. Effect of purity on adsorption capacities of a Mars-like clay mineral at different pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Traci; Mcdoniel, Bridgett; Bustin, Roberta; Allton, Judith H.

    1992-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in adsorption of carbon dioxide on Marslike clay minerals. Some estimates of the carbon dioxide reservoir capacity of the martian regolith were calculated from the amount of carbon dioxide adsorbed on the ironrich smectite nontronite under martian conditions. The adsorption capacity of pure nontronite could place upper limits on the regolith carbon dioxide reservoir, both at present martian atmospheric pressure and at the postulated higher pressures required to permit liquid water on the surface. Adsorption of carbon dioxide on a Clay Mineral Society standard containing nontronite was studied over a wide range of pressures in the absence of water. Similar experiments were conducted on the pure nontronite extracted from the natural sample. Heating curves were obtained to help characterize and determine the purity of the clay sample.

  11. Modeling selenite adsorption envelopes on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenite adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum and iron oxides, clay minerals: kaolinite, montmorillonite, and illite, and 45 surface and subsurface soil samples from the Southwestern and Midwestern regions of the USA as a function of solution pH. Selenite adsorption decreased ...

  12. Clay Mineral Distribution Patterns of Tertiary Continental Oil-bearing Basins in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Xingyuan

    1996-01-01

    @@ Induction This paper studies the clay mineral distribution patterns of Tertiary continental oil-bearing basins in China. More than 9 000 shale samples from Paleogene (E) to Neogene (N) Series distributed in Bohai Gulf, Subei, Jianghan,Nanxiang, Zhoukou, Sanshui, Beibu Bay, East China Sea,Hetao, Juiquan, Qaidam and Tarim basins, and so on.

  13. Clay mineral stratigraphy of Miocene to recent marine sediments in the central Mediterranean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.P. de

    1992-01-01

    X-ray diffraction analyses were made of the smaller than 2 J..Lm fraction from about 1250 samples of the central Mediterranean Miocene to Recent and the southeastern North-Atlantic Miocene in order to reconstruct climatic changes. Relative quantities of the clay minerals chlorite, illite, pyrophylli

  14. Modeling selenate adsorption behavior on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenate adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum oxide, amorphous iron oxide, goethite, clay minerals: kaolinites, montmorillonites, illite, and 18 soil samples from Hawaii, and the Southwestern and the Midwestern regions of the US as a function of solution pH. Selenate adsorpti...

  15. Selenium containing clays minerals as additive for the discoloration of glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, K.; Limpt, J.A.C. van; Fischer, H.R.

    2010-01-01

    While selenium is applied as decolorizing agent for flint container glass or tableware glass, the retention of selenium in glass however is very low. Generally more than 75% of the total selenium input sublimes from the glass melt and leaves the clay minerals due to the high volatility of SeO2<

  16. Sedimentological and clay mineral studies in Kakinada Bay, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, N.P.C.; Rao, K.M.

    are of sandy sediments (2.9 to 3.05 phi). Interrelationships of size statistical parameters and the CM diagram of the bay sediments suggest a mechanism of slow deposition from quiet water. Montmorillonite is the predominant clay mineral followed by kaolinite...

  17. Structural incorporation of trivalent f elements into the tri-octahedral clay mineral hectorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publications follows: Clay minerals may play an important role in a high-level nuclear waste repository system. Clay-based materials have a high affinity for trivalent actinides, and several distinct molecular level mechanisms of actinide retention can operate: outer- and inner-sphere complexation, cation-exchange (interlayer), and structural incorporation. Radionuclide immobilization by incorporation into the bulk structure of clay minerals may occur via coprecipitation. However, the size mismatch with the cations which typically occur in the octahedral sites of sheet silicates would result in large lattice strains [1]. Nevertheless, recent TRLFS data for Eu(III)/Cm(III) coprecipitated with hectorite at 90 C [2] suggest that such a substitution mechanism may operate [3,4]. Conventional EXAFS spectra collected on powders of Eu containing hectorite suggested that Eu(III) was hexa-coordinated with oxygens, as in a Mg structural site [5]. Neighbouring structural cations were not detected, maybe due to cancellation effects between EXAFS waves backscattered by (out-of-plane) Si and in-plane (Mg,Al) cations [6]. Polarized-EXAFS (P-EXAFS) experiments on self-supported films of these oriented clay minerals were thus carried out. Spectra were collected for varying europium contents to determine the influence of the degree of substitution on the local crystal structure. References: [1] N.L. Allan, J.D. Blundy et al., Solid-Solutions in Silicates and Oxides, EMU Notes in Mineralogy, 3, Eotvos University Press, Budapest. [2] K.A. Carrado, L. Xu et al. (2000), Chem. Mater. 12, 3052- 3059. [3] H. Brandt, D. Bosbach et al. (2007), Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71 (1), 145-154. [4] H. Pieper, D. Bosbach et al. (2006), Clays Clay Miner. 54, 47-55. [5] H. Pieper (2005), Wissenschaftliche Berichte FZKA 7188, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany. [6] M.L. Schlegel, A. Manceau et al. (1999), J. Colloid Interface Sci. 215, 140-158

  18. Clay minerals in primitive meteorites and interplanetary dust 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Keller, L. P.

    1991-01-01

    Many meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) with primitive compositions contain significant amounts of phyllosilicate minerals, which are generally interpreted as evidence of protoplanetary aqueous alteration at an early period of the solar system. These meteorites are chondrites (near solar composition) of the carbonaceous and ordinary varieties. The former are subdivided (according to bulk composition and petrology) into CI, CM, CV, CO, CR, and ungrouped classes. IDPs are extraterrestrial particulates, collected in stratosphere, which have chemical compositions indicative of a primitive origin; they are typically distinct from the primitive meteorites. Characterization of phyllosilicates in these materials is a high priority because of the important physico-chemical information they hold. The most common phyllosilicates present in chondritic extraterrestrial materials are serpentine-group minerals, smectites, and micas. We discuss these phyllosilicates and describe the interpretation of their occurrence in meteorites and IDPs and what this indicates about history of their parent bodies, which are probably the hydrous asteroids.

  19. Microwave processing of oil sands and contribution of clay minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, John P.; Binner, Eleanor; Saeid, Abdul; Al-Harahsheh, Mohammad; Kingman, S. W.

    2014-01-01

    This study establishes the feasibility of microwave heating for extracting oil from Oil Sands in ex-situ processes. Previous studies in this area have shown some potential, but have not characterised the dielectric properties of the Oil Sands used, nor related them to the mineral composition, both of which are vital if successful scale up is to be achieved. In this work the fundamental interactions of microwave energy with Oil Sands are investigated and understood for the first time, and the ...

  20. Clay minerals in basin of Mexico lacustrine sediments and their influence on ion mobility in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, C. J.; Rudolph, D. L.

    1997-09-01

    Semiconfined aquifers used as the principal water supply within the Basin of Mexico are overlain by lacustrine deposits that provide a degree of protection from contamination associated with metropolitan Mexico City. Solute transport behavior and the nature of chemical interactions with mineral components in these sediments is poorly understood. The objectives of this paper were to identify the clay mineral phases of the lacustrine sediments and to determine the significance of the exchange properties of the day minerals on contaminant transport processes. Samples obtained from two cores were separated into sand, silt, and clay-size fractions. The clay-size fraction was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and for specific surface area and pH-dependent cation and anion exchange capacity. The clay-sized fraction averaged 56% of the sediment. Analyses indicated that the clay was predominantly composed of a Si-rich allophane with approximately 30% montmorillonite. Halloysite was also present to a depth of about 1.5 m, but was absent deeper in the sediment. Kaolinite and illite, reported in previous studies, and imogolite were not found in the samples. Solute transport in the sediment was modeled to demonstrate the impact of exchange properties imparted by the allophane compared to other possible clay mineral assemblages. The predominance of allophane in the Basin of Mexico sediments is responsible for many of the fundamental characteristics of the material including: high porosity (0.8-0.9), high water content (200-400%), and an extremely high and pH-dependent cation exchange capacity. The pH of the pore water within the lacustrine sediments of the Basin of Mexico is typically between 6.5 and 12. Measured cation exchange values ranged from ≈ 450 meq kg -1 at pH 6.5 to ≈ 650 meq kg -1 at pH 12 which could produce variable cation mobility in the semiconfining aquitard. The simulations illustrated that allophane is very effective

  1. Determination of geochemical characters of insterstitial waters of pleistocene Italian clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geochemical characters of clay formations and of their pore water are fundamental with regards to the mobility of the radionuclides as well as to the corrosion processes on enginered barriers. Experimental researches have been carried out in different types of clay, which represent Italian formations, for the characterization of pore water. A squeezer system, which reaches 1500 Kg/cm2 in pressure, and an analytical micro-scale methodology, for the determination of dissolved constituents in pore water, were set up. The extracted pore water ranges from 60% to 85% in relation to consolidation state of clay. The chemical composition of the extracted fluid has been checked during the squeezing. During this step the observed variations were smaller than those between the different specimens of the same sample. The comparison between the results obtained by squeezing and by a multiple washing technique, using increasing water/sediment ratios, shows that the last one does not give reliable results on the chemical composition of pore water. This is due to the presence of easily weatherable minerals and to the exchange processes between the clayey minerals and the solution. Nevertheless both these techniques have supplied complementary information about geochemical processes in water-rock interaction. The salinity of pore water ranges from 0.45 g/l to 24.5 g/l and the chemism always shows a high content of calcium-magnesium sulfate, or sodium chloride or calcium-magnesium-sulfate with sodium chloride. The correlation between geochemical composition of pore water and mineralogical composition of clay is not significant

  2. Diffuse transport in clay media: μm to nm scale characterization of pore space and mineral spatial organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the framework of radioactive waste repository, clay-rock formations are foreseen as barrier materials due to their diffusion properties. In clay materials, the dominant transport mode is diffusive and depends mainly on various parameters such as the mobility of the species in water, the accessible porosity, the pore space geometry and the retardation as a result of reactions such as sorption or ion exchange. In this way, the European CATCLAY project (EURATOM FP7), in the context with research on transport in porous materials, was proposed to describe the cation migration processes in natural clay-rocks. The project is structured along 3 RTD work packages, combining modeling and experimental studies from a simpler, analogous system (monophasic compacted clay system) to clay-rocks (Callovo-Oxfordian argillites, Opalinus Clay and Boom Clay). Part of this experimental studies focuses on small scale structure (μm - nm) property of rocks in order to determine how the spatial distribution of mineral and pores at small scales can influence diffusion driven transport of sorbing cations. The present study focuses on compacted illite properties (simpler analogous system) in hopes to extent this study to the natural clay-rock formation. Illite was chosen by the way that is the main constituent of clay-rock. Compacted illite material represents thus an analogy with the clay matrix constituting clay-rocks. Our approach is mainly based on imaging the small scale structural organization of compacted illite material and analyzing the obtained images in order to extract information on pore space and mineral spatial distribution. Techniques for imaging the texture of illite material like water saturated, in compacted state, were first developed. The first step was to improve classic resin impregnation method in order to preserve the texture without losing the clay confinement and modifying the pore space geometry. This has been

  3. Cesium adsorption/desorption behavior of clay minerals considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Hiroki; Hirose, Atsushi; Motai, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Cesium adsorption/desorption experiments for various clay minerals, considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima, were conducted using the 137Cs radioisotope and an autoradiography using imaging plates (IPs). A 50 μl solution containing 0.185 ~ 1.85 Bq of 137Cs (10-11 ~ 10-9 molL-1 of 137Cs) was dropped onto a substrate where various mineral particles were arranged. It was found that partially-vermiculitized biotite, which is termed “weathered biotite” (WB) in this study, from Fukushima sorbed 137Cs far more than the other clay minerals (fresh biotite, illite, smectite, kaolinite, halloysite, allophane, imogolite) on the same substrate. When WB was absent on the substrate, the amount of 137Cs sorbed to the other clay minerals was considerably increased, implying that selective sorption to WB caused depletion of radiocesium in the solution and less sorption to the coexisting minerals. Cs-sorption to WB continued for about one day, whereas that to ferruginous smectite was completed within one hour. The sorbed 137Cs in WB was hardly leached with hydrochloric acid at pH 1, particularly in samples with a longer sorption time. The presence/absence of WB sorbing radiocesium is a key factor affecting the dynamics and fate of radiocesium in Fukushima.

  4. Clay minerals sorbing radiocesium in Fukushima. Investigation by IP autoradiography and electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although more than four years have passed after the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant, the state of radioactive cesium, which is the main source of the high radioactivity in the environment of Fukushima, is not well understood yet. To advance this situation, we tried to specify radioactive soil particles using IP autoradiography and electron microscopy. As a result, the radioactive soil particles were classified into three types from their morphologies and chemical compositions: (1) conglomerates of fine clay minerals, (2) organic matter containing clay mineral particles, and (3) weathered biotite with a platy shape originated from granite. The weathered biotite is actually a biotite-vermiculite mixed layer mineral, forming a porous structure with well-developed cleavage, and kaolinite filling the cleavage spaces. It was indicated that radioactive cesium is located uniformly in the weathered biotite, rather than concentrated around the edge of the platy shape. (author)

  5. Influence of Water Content on the Mechanical Behaviour of Limestone: Role of the Clay Minerals Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherblanc, F.; Berthonneau, J.; Bromblet, P.; Huon, V.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical characteristics of various sedimentary stones significantly depend on the water content, where 70 % loss of their mechanical strengths can be observed when saturated by water. Furthermore, the clay fraction has been shown to be a key factor of their hydro-mechanical behaviour since it governs for instance the hydric dilation. This work aims at investigating the correlations between the clay mineral content and the mechanical weakening experienced by limestones when interacting with water. The experimental characterization focuses on five different limestones that exhibit very different micro-structures. For each of them, we present the determination of clay mineral composition, the sorption isotherm curve and the dependences of tensile and compressive strengths on the water content. It emerges from these results that, first, the sorption behaviour is mainly governed by the amount of smectite layers which exhibit the larger specific area and, second, the rate of mechanical strength loss depends linearly on the sorption capacity. Indeed, the clay fraction plays the role of a retardation factor that delays the appearance of capillary bridges as well as the mechanical weakening of stones. However, no correlation was evidenced between the clay content and the amplitude of weakening. Since the mechanisms whereby the strength decreases with water content are not clearly established, these results would help to discriminate between various hypothesis proposed in the literature.

  6. Experimental investigation of magnetic mineral formation in hydrocarbon environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Rabiu; Muxworthy, Adrian; Sephton, Mark; Fraser, Alastair

    2013-04-01

    Experimental investigation of magnetic mineral formation in hydrocarbon environments Rabiu Abubakar, Adrian Muxworthy, Mark Septhon and Alastair Fraser Dept. of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London Magnetic anomalies have been observed over oil fields from aeromagnetic surveys. These anomalies have been linked with the presence of hydrocarbons and that has generated a lot of interest over possible application of magnetism in the exploration of oil and gas but there has also been debate over the origin of the magnetic minerals causing the magnetic anomaly. Our approach was to generate crude oil in the lab using three source rocks from the Wessex Basin, England, which is a hydrocarbon province. The source rocks were the Kimmeridge Clay, Oxford Clay and the Blue Lias. The source rocks were powered and pyrolysed in a high pressure vessel. The crude oil was then extracted and the magnetic signal of the remaining pyrolysate measured. We discovered a significant contrast in the magnetic hysteresis and thermomagnetic properties between the pyrolysate and the unpyrolysed (immature) source rocks. We will present the preliminary results, which indicate that magnetic minerals were generated as a result of heat and therefore related linked to maturation of the source rocks

  7. Bioreduction of Fe-bearing clay minerals and their reactivity toward pertechnetate (Tc-99)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Liu, Chongxuan; Edelmann, Richard E.

    2011-09-01

    99Technetium ( 99Tc) is a fission product of uranium-235 and plutonium-239 and poses a high environmental hazard due to its long half-life ( t1/2 = 2.13 × 10 5 y), abundance in nuclear wastes, and environmental mobility under oxidizing conditions [i.e., Tc(VII)]. Under reducing conditions, Tc(VII) can be reduced to insoluble Tc(IV). Ferrous iron, either in aqueous form (Fe 2+) or in mineral form [Fe(II)], has been used to reduce Tc(VII) to Tc(IV). However, the reactivity of Fe(II) from clay minerals, other than nontronite, toward immobilization of Tc(VII) and its role in retention of reduced Tc(IV) has not been investigated. In this study the reactivity of a suite of clay minerals toward Tc(VII) reduction and immobilization was evaluated. The clay minerals chosen for this study included five members in the smectite-illite (S-I) series, (montmorillonite, nontronite, rectorite, mixed layered I-S, and illite), chlorite, and palygorskite. Surface Fe-oxides were removed from these minerals with a modified dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) procedure. The total structural Fe content of these clay minerals, after surface Fe-oxide removal, ranged from 0.7% to 30.4% by weight, and the structural Fe(III)/Fe(total) ratio ranged from 45% to 98%. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy results showed that after Fe oxide removal the clay minerals were free of Fe-oxides. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that little dissolution occurred during the DCB treatment. Bioreduction experiments were performed in bicarbonate buffer (pH-7) with structural Fe(III) in the clay minerals as the sole electron acceptor, lactate as the sole electron donor, and Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 cells as a mediator. In select tubes, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) was added as electron shuttle to facilitate electron transfer. In the S-I series, smectite (montmorillonite) was the most reducible (18% and 41% without and with AQDS, respectively) and illite the least (1% for both

  8. Leaching of clay minerals in a limestone environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, D.; Starkey, H.C.

    1959-01-01

    Water saturated with CO2 at about 25??C was percolated through mixed beds of limestone or marble fragments and montmorillonite, "illite" and kaolinite in polyethylene tubes for six and fortyfive complete runs. The leachates were analysed for SiO2, A12O3 and Fe2O3, but only SiO2 was found. The minerals lost SiO2 in this order: montmorillonite > kaolinite > "illite". The differential removal of SiO2 during the short period of these experiments suggests a mechanism for the accumulation of bauxite deposits associated with limestones. ?? 1959.

  9. Clay mineralogy of the Boda Claystone Formation (Mecsek Mts., SW Hungary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Tibor; Máthé, Zoltán; Pekker, Péter; Dódony, István; Kovács-Kis, Viktória; Sipos, Péter; Cora, Ildikó; Kovács, Ivett

    2016-04-01

    Boda Claystone Formation (BCF) is the host rock of the planned site for high level nuclear waste repository inHungary. Samples representing the dominant rock types of BCF were studied: albitic claystone, claystone with high illite content, and analcime bearing claystone. Clay minerals in these three rock types were characterized by Xray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermal analysis (DTA-TG), and the results were discussed from the point of view of the radionuclide sorption properties being studied in the future. Mineral compositions of bulk BCF samples vary in wide ranges. In the albitic sample, besides the dominant illite, few percent of chlorite represents the layer silicates in the clay fraction. Illite is the dominating phase in the illitic sample, with a few percent of chlorite. HRTEM study revealed that the thickness of illite particles rarely reaches 10 layers, usually are of 5-6 TOT layer thick. Illite crystals are generally thicker in the albitic sample than in the illitic one. The significant difference between the clay mineral characterisitics of the analcimous and the other two samples is that the former contains regularly interstratified chlorite/smectite beside the dominant illite. Based on the structural and chemical data two illite type minerals are present in the BCF samples: 1M polytype containing octahedral Fe and Mg besides Al, 2M polytype illite generally is free of Fe andMg. Close association of very thin illite plates and nanosized hematite crystals is typical textural feature for BCF. The goal of this study is to provide solid mineralogical basis for further studies focusing on radionuclide sorption properties.

  10. Bioremediating Oil Spills in Nutrient Poor Ocean Waters Using Fertilized Clay Mineral Flakes: Some Experimental Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence N. Warr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98% of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity.

  11. Bioremediating oil spills in nutrient poor ocean waters using fertilized clay mineral flakes: some experimental constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Laurence N; Friese, André; Schwarz, Florian; Schauer, Frieder; Portier, Ralph J; Basirico, Laura M; Olson, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98%) of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity. PMID:23864952

  12. Water-mineral interaction in hygromechanics of clays exposed to environmental loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water-mineral interaction in narrow interstices (<3 nm) in dense, saturated clays is discussed in view of recent experimental findings and molecular dynamics simulations. Consequences to the macroscopic behavior are considered. A mixture theory for two interacting constituents is developed. Effects of temperature and chemicals are discussed. A postulate of mass transfer of absorbed water from solid to fluid fraction caused by thermal or chemical load is then discussed. Theory of plasticity of clays affected by heat or chemicals is developed to deal with the effects of thermal and chemical consolidation

  13. Iron-rich clay minerals on Mars - Potential sources or sinks for hydrogen and indicators of hydrogen loss over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Although direct evidence is lacking, indirect evidence suggests that iron-rich clay minerals or poorly-ordered chemical equivalents are widespread on the Martian surface. Such clays can act as sources or sinks for hydrogen ('hydrogen sponges'). Ferrous clays can lose hydrogen and ferric clays gain it by the coupled substitution Fe(3+)O(Fe(2+)OH)-1, equivalent to minus atomic H. This 'oxy-clay' substitution involves only proton and electron migration through the crystal structure, and therefore occurs nondestructively and reversibly, at relatively low temperatures. The reversible, low-temperature nature of this reaction contrasts with the irreversible nature of destructive dehydroxylation (H2O loss) suffered by clays heated to high temperatures. In theory, metastable ferric oxy-clays formed by dehydrogenation of ferrous clays over geologic time could, if exposed to water vapor, extract the hydrogen from it, releasing oxygen.

  14. Reactive Clay Minerals in a land use sequence of disturbed soils of the Belgian Loam Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barao, Lucia; Vandevenne, Floor; Ronchi, Benedicta; Meire, Patrick; Govers, Gerard; Struyf, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Clay minerals play a key role in soil biogeochemistry. They can stabilize organic matter, improve water storage, increase cation exchange capacity of the soil (CEC) and lower nutrient leaching. Phytoliths - the biogenic silica bodies (BSi) deposited in cell walls of plants - are important Si pools in soil horizons due to their higher solubility compared to minerals. They provide the source of Si for plant uptake in short time scales, as litter dissolves within soils. In a recent study, we analyzed the BSi pool differences across a set of different land uses (forests, pastures, croplands) in 6 long-term disturbed (multiple centuries) soil sites in the Belgium Loam Belt. Results from a simultaneous chemical extraction in 0.5M NaOH of Si and Al, showed that soils were depleted in the BSi pool while showing high levels of reactive secondary clay minerals, mainly in the deeper horizons and especially in the forests and the croplands. During the extraction, clays were similar in reactivity to the biogenic pool of phytoliths. In order to study the kinetics in a more natural environment, batch dissolution experiments were conducted. Samples from different soil depths for each land use site (0.5 g) were mixed with 0.5 L of demineralised water modified to pH 4, 7 and 10. Subsamples of 2 ml were taken during 3 months. In the end of the period, results for pH 7 showed that in the pastures, where reactive clays were almost absent, the ratio Si/RSi (defined as the Si concentration in the end of the batch experiment divided by the reactive silica extracted from the soil with the alkaline extraction) was lower than 0.005%. The same ratio was higher in the mineral horizons of forests (Si/RSi>0.01%) and croplands (0.005% < Si/RSi <0.01%) where clay minerals were the dominant fraction. These preliminary results highlight the clay minerals' strong potential for Si mobilization. More attention should be paid to this important fraction as it can contribute strongly to Si availability

  15. Expectations, open questions to be addressed in the workshop within the context of a deep geological repository in clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise knowledge of the clay properties in the various domains concerned by the construction feasibility, the exploitation phase of repository facilities, as well as the long term evolution of the waste and of its environment is of crucial importance in assessing the performance and the safety of the various radioactive waste disposal concepts. The knowledge to be acquired on clays as such goes well beyond solely the field of disposal of radioactive waste. For both, clay formations or bentonites in engineered barriers, the characterization in a continuous way from the nanometer to the micrometer, of their internal structure and the study of the associated physico-chemical phenomena is a fundamental issue. It aims for explaining: The 'Initial state' of the clays, in particular for the clay formations: the nature of the mechanical, hydraulic and geochemical processes, in a broad sense, and the way these processes were involved during the geological history of these formations, The fundamental processes involved by physico-chemical or hydraulic stresses, related to the evolution of the repository at the macroscopic scale. The choice of the characterization scale and relevant modeling is of first importance in the approaches leading to the establishment of the models of representation. Various research works pointed to experimental difficulties in quantifying the microstructure of the clay rocks at scales smaller than a micrometer, because of technical/instrumental limitations. This lack of knowledge at small scales does not allow to fully connect all the Thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) mechanisms and to integrate them into an up-scaling approach. There already exist conceptual models and experimental approaches to describe the microstructure of argillaceous formations in terms of porosity and texture. Examples on the undisturbed Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) argillite are given in this paper. Questions and objectives to be addressed during the

  16. Clay mineral facies and lateritization in basalts of the southeastern Parana Basin, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventeen samples from two lateritic profiles, each with five facies, were studied. These profiles occur on the old planation surface of the plateau basalts of the southern part of ParanáBasin, Brazil. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, Mössbauer spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra were used to obtain information about the nature and chemical composition of each weathering facies. In addition, scanning electron microscopy and analyses of clay minerals were performed to detect microcrystalline environmental changes. Both profiles have two major parts: a loose red-clay latosol separated from an underlying mottled clay and an alterite facies; a stone line may or may not be present between the latosol and the underlying units. In both profiles the latosol consists principally of kaolinite, hematite and goethite. Two alterite facies, shaped by differential weathering, are also present in the lower profile: a halloysite–nontronite clayey matrix with a well developed fissure system occurs in the argillaceous alterite and a network of Al–goethite aggregates is typical of the highly porous cortex of the boulder alterite that is found in the stone line and below it. Gibbsite has crystallized in the large pores of porphyritic boulder alterite but is absent in the small pores of the subaphyric boulder alterite. Clay minerals observed in fissures include halloysite associated with goethite and manganese oxides. The basalt has hydrothermal green-clays (mixed layers and trioctahedral smectites) that formed between primary plagioclase, pyroxene and Ti–magnetite crystals while fresh corestones of the boulder alterite have cryptocrystalline iron-rich material. The study of these profiles shows one principal evolutionary trend for clay minerals. This trend is from smectite and mixed layers that form green clays in altered bedrock at the base of the profile to an intermediate association of nontronite and halloysite in the argillaceous

  17. Effect of potassium on fixation of ammonium by clay minerals in different soil layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agelda Ajazi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In intensive agriculture systems, efficient nutrient use is necessary for high crop yields as well as for sustainable environment management. Fixation of NH4+ and K+ by soil clays affect N and K availability to plants. Latest studies indicates that non-exchangeable NH4+, may affect crop productivity and soil N dynamics more than previously thought. An incubation study with K2SO4 and NH4NO3 was conducted to evaluate NH4+ and K+ fixation in two southern Albanian soils. Soils contained significant amount of native-fixed NH4+ and showed relatively high NH4+ fixing capacity. Native fixed ammonium content varied for horizons Ap and BCg, from 97 to 133 mg/kg and accounted for between 5 to 19, 8 % of the total nitrogen, respectively . Ammonium fixation was increased with N rates and was reduced with increased K rates. When K was added to the soil prior to the NH4, the amount of ammonium fixed was reduced. By contrast, when K+ and NH4+ were added to the soils simultaneously (equivalent amount; 2mEq/100g, the ammonium fixation was increased somewhat in the BCg horizon , whereas no such preference for ammonium fixation was found in the Ap horizon. In case when NH4+ and K+ were added to the soil samples in form of solutions, containing equal amounts of NH4+ (corresponding to 2 mEq NH4+/100 g soil but varying amounts of K+, the capacity of the soil to fix ammonium was reduced in proportion to the amount of K+ added. The soil samples incubated anaerobically, were with high differences in clay minerals content. The dominate clay minerals for profile (I-Ap horizon are smectite > vermiculite > Ilite, while vermiculite plus ilite (as the most important clay fixed minerals, comprised 21% of clay fraction and 13 % of the soil. In the profile (II-BCg horizon, the dominant clay minerals ranged; vermiculite > Ilite > smectite, while (vermiculite + ilite, comprised 52% of the clay fraction and 23, 4 % of the soil. Studies on Ap and BCg horizons comparing the amount of

  18. Laboratory reflectance spectra of clay minerals mixed with Mars analog materials: Toward enabling quantitative clay abundances from Mars spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, Ted L.; Bishop, Janice L.; Brown, Adrian J.; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas F.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative estimates of clay minerals on the martian surface, via remote sensing observations, provide constraints on activity, timing, duration, and extent of aqueous processes and the geochemical environment in martian history. We describe an analytical study to begin enabling quantitative estimates of phyllosilicates when mixed with martian analog materials. We characterize the chemistry, mineralogy, particle size distribution, and reflectance spectra of the end-member materials: saponite, montmorillonite, pyroxene, and palagonitic soil. Reflectance spectra were obtained for physical mixtures of saponite and montmorillonite with pyroxene, and saponite with palagonitic soil. We analyzed the diagnostic phyllosilicate spectral signatures in the 2.2-2.4 μm wavelength region in detail for the mixtures. This involved fitting the observed ∼2.3 or ∼2.2 μm band depth, associated with the presence of saponite and montmorillonite, respectively, as a function of the abundance of these materials in the mixtures. Based upon the band depth of the spectral features we find that 3-5 wt.% of the clay minerals in the mixture with pyroxene can be recognized and at 25 wt.% their presence is indisputable in the mixtures. When the saponite is mixed with the lower albedo palagonitic soil, its presence is clearly distinguishable via the 1.4 and 2.3 μm features at 25 wt.% abundance. These relationships, between abundance and band depth, provide an ability to quantitatively address the amount of these materials in mixtures. The trends described here provide guidance for estimating the presence of phyllosilicates in matrices on the martian surface.

  19. Competitive sorption between glyphosphate and inorganic phosphate on clay minerals and low organic matter soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic phosphate may influence the adsorption of glyphosate to soil surface sites. It has been postulated that glyphosphate sorption is dominated by the phosphoric acid moiety, therefore, inorganic phosphate could compete with glyphosate for surface sorption sites. Sorption of glyphosate is examined in low organic carbon systems where clay minerals dominate the available adsorption sites using 32P-labeled phosphate and 14C-labeled glyphosate to track sorption. Glyphosate sorption was found to be strongly dependent on phosphate additions. Isotherms were generally of the L type, which is consistent with a limited number of surface sites. Most sorption on whole soils could be accounted for by sorption observed on model clays of the same mineral type as found in the soils. (author)

  20. Removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution by fibrous clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetics and equilibrium processes of the methylene blue (MB) retention from aqueous solution by a mixture of fibrous clay minerals, which was isolated from a naturally occurring clay, were investigated. For these purposes, the effects of contact time, initial adsorbate concentration, adsorbent content, pH and ionic strength were determined. The results show that the MB retention obeys a pseudo-first order equation and the process is a diffusion controlled solid-state reaction. Moreover, the isotherm data fitted the Langmuir equation and the MB binding process became more energetic with the increase of the adsorbent concentration. In addition, the augmentation of the clay content or the initial MB concentration reduced the adsorption capacity, presumably because of the clay particles microaggregation and/or the occurrence of MB deriving species. On the other hand, it is observed that the MB uptake limit is reduced in low acid pH, particularly below the PZC, as well as in ionic strengthen solutions. These facts are linked to the silanol group protonation and to the reduction of the electrostatic forces induced by the clay particles, respectively

  1. Effect of clay mineral addition on properties of bio-based polymer blends

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu, Ana S.; M. de OLIVEIRA; Machado, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of clay mineral addition to bio-based blends on morphology and physical properties of thermoplastic starch (TPS) and polypropylene grafted with maleic anhydride (PP-g-MA) was investigated. Blends and nanocomposites containing organoclay, Cloisite 30B, were prepared by melt mixing and characterized by several techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, STEM) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) demonstrate a very good dispers...

  2. Competitive adsorption of a pool of pharmaceuticals onto a raw clay mineral

    OpenAIRE

    Thiebault, Thomas; Boussafir, Mohammed; Le Forestier, Lydie; Le Milbeau, Claude; Monnin, Lucie; Guégan, Régis

    2016-01-01

    International audience The removal of a Pharmaceutically Active Compound (PhAC) pool using a well referenced clay mineral from Wyoming (SWy-2) as geosorbent was studied for a better understanding of their environmental fate. As expected, the selected material shows its particular adsorption properties to PhAC under different experimental conditions with two main features depending on the chemical nature of the emerging micro-pollutants. Cationic PhACs, for which the driving force for their...

  3. Application of short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectroscopy in quantitative estimation of clay mineral contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay minerals are significant constituents of soil which are necessary for life. This paper studied three types of clay minerals, kaolinite, illite, and montmorillonite, for they are not only the most common soil forming materials, but also important indicators of soil expansion and shrinkage potential. These clay minerals showed diagnostic absorption bands resulting from vibrations of hydroxyl groups and structural water molecules in the SWIR wavelength region. The short-wave infrared reflectance spectra of the soil was obtained from a Portable Near Infrared Spectrometer (PNIS, spectrum range: 1300∼2500 nm, interval: 2 nm). Due to the simplicity, quickness, and the non-destructiveness analysis, SWIR spectroscopy has been widely used in geological prospecting, chemical engineering and many other fields. The aim of this study was to use multiple linear regression (MLR) and partial least squares (PLS) regression to establish the optimizing quantitative estimation models of the kaolinite, illite and montmorillonite contents from soil reflectance spectra. Here, the soil reflectance spectra mainly refers to the spectral reflectivity of soil (SRS) corresponding to the absorption-band position (AP) of kaolinite, illite, and montmorillonite representative spectra from USGS spectral library, the SRS corresponding to the AP of soil spectral and soil overall spectrum reflectance values. The optimal estimation models of three kinds of clay mineral contents showed that the retrieval accuracy was satisfactory (Kaolinite content: a Root Mean Square Error of Calibration (RMSEC) of 1.671 with a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.791; Illite content: a RMSEC of 1.126 with a R2 of 0.616; Montmorillonite content: a RMSEC of 1.814 with a R2 of 0.707). Thus, the reflectance spectra of soil obtained form PNIS could be used for quantitative estimation of kaolinite, illite and montmorillonite contents in soil

  4. METODOLOGY FOR LATERÍTICS CU-BEARING CLAY MINERALS CHARACTERIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Satiko Mano

    2015-12-01

    This study describes an optimized methodology to characterize a Cu-lateritic ore, mainly composed of Cu-bearing clay minerals. Cations saturations and particle sizes separation, combined with X-ray diffraction, mid infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy allow concluding that this Cu-lateritic ore is mainly composed of smectites, micas and kaolinite; furthermore, the copper is especially associated to mica and secondarily to smectite.

  5. Different level of fluorescence at Raman spectroscopy of selected clay minerals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ritz, M.; Vaculíková, Lenka; Zdrálková, J.; Plevová, Eva; Bartoňová, L.

    Ostrava: VŠB TUO, 2015. s. 53-53. ISBN 978-80-248-3745-1. [Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Meeting, Nano Ostrava 2015 /4./. 18.05.2015-21.05.2015, Ostrava] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * fluorescence * clay minerals Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  6. Effect of clay minerals on the stabilization of black cotton and lateritic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem associated with black cotton and lateritic soils because of the swelling-shrinkage property of their constituent clay minerals were investigated. Samples of black cotton lateritic soils were collected from different parts of Kenya. The samples were analysed for their mineral compositions and later treated with hydrated lime in order to eliminate the swelling shrinkage behaviour. The samples were subsequently tested for their engineering properties in a soil mechanics laboratory using shear box and Casagrande apparatus. It was found that the chemical treatment of the soils with hydrated lime removes their plastic property and improves their shear strength. (author)

  7. Effect of heavy metal cations on the fate of extracellular DNA adsorbed and bound on clay minerals.

    OpenAIRE

    Ascher J.; Ceccherini M.T.; Arfaioli P.; Borgogni F.; Pietramellara G.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of high-valent metal cations on clay mineral surfaces is hypothesised to induce conformational changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of the DNA molecule adsorbed and bound onto clays, defined as M-conformation, and its condensation. The hypothesis that these reversible phenomena could enhance the resistance of DNA to enzymatic degradation strongly encourages the studies on the effects of heavy metal contamination in clay rich soils on the fate of extracellular soil DNA ...

  8. Investigating the Thermal Limit of Clay Minerals for Applications in Nuclear Waste Repository Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteo, E. N.; Miller, A. W.; Kruichak, J.; Mills, M.; Tellez, H.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Clay minerals are likely candidates to aid in nuclear waste isolation due to their low permeability, favorable swelling properties, and high cation sorption capacities. Establishing the thermal limit for clay minerals in a nuclear waste repository is a potentially important component of repository design, as flexibility of the heat load within the repository can have a major impact on the selection of repository design. For example, the thermal limit plays a critical role in the time that waste packages would need to cool before being transferred to the repository. Understanding the chemical and physical changes that occur in clay minerals at various temperatures above the current thermal limit (of 100 °C) can enable decision-makers with information critical to evaluating the potential trade-offs of increasing the thermal limit within the repository. Most critical is gaining understanding of how varying thermal conditions in the repository will impact radionuclide sorption and transport in clay materials either as engineered barriers or as disposal media. A variety of clays (illite, mixed layer illite/smectite, montmorillonite, and palygorskite) were heated for a range of temperatures between 100-500 °C. These samples were characterized by a variety of methods, including nitrogen adsorption, x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, barium chloride exchange for cation exchange capacity (CEC), and iodide sorption. The nitrogen porosimetry shows that for all the clays, thermally-induced changes in BET surface area are dominated by collapse/creation of the microporosity, i.e. pore diameters < 17 angstroms. Changes in micro porosity (relative to no heat treatment) are most significant for heat treatments 300 °C and above. Alterations are also seen in the chemical properties (CEC, XRD, iodide sorption) of clays, and like pore size distribution changes, are most significant above 300 °C. Overall, the results imply that changes seen in pores size distribution

  9. Relationship between heavy metal contents and clay mineral properties in surface sediments: Implications for metal pollution assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yueh-Min; Gao, Jin-bo; Yuan, Yong-Qiang; Ma, Jun; Yu, Shen

    2016-08-01

    Clay minerals in surface sediments can affect the adsorption of heavy metals. However, few historical studies have focused on the influence of fine clay mineral characteristics on metal sorption. Since the reactions between heavy metals and fine clay minerals in sediments remain obscure, this study investigates the influence of fine clay mineral characteristics on metal sorption in a typical urbanizing small watershed. Clay minerals, including nanoparticles with various size fractions ranging from 1000 to 2000 (clay), 450-1000 (fine clay), and 220-450 (very fine clay) nm were used to demonstrate their transformation from well crystalline to poorly crystalline. The nanoparticles were collected and evaluated by determination of their surface area, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical analyses. The relationship between metal content and properties of the surface sediments was also revealed by canonical correlation analysis. With smaller particle sizes, nanoparticles (very fine clay) were observed to be poorly crystalline, possibly indicating few repetitions of unit cells as a result of preferential structural disruption of other crystal planes caused by pressure-induced phase transition in the fine-size fractions. The first canonical matrix (M) variables of metal contents can be predicted by both surface area and pore volume, followed by kaolinite and illite contents. On the other hand, the category of metal, i.e., Cu, Cr, Zn, or Pb, was significantly correlated with the first 'M' canonical variables. The data obtained in the present study are of fundamental significance in advancing our understanding of the reactions between heavy metals and fine clay minerals in the terrestrial ecosystem.

  10. Significance of saturation index of certain clay minerals in shallow coastal groundwater, in and around Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chidambaram; U Karmegam; P Sasidhar; M V Prasanna; R Manivannan; S Arunachalam; S Manikandan; P Anandhan

    2011-10-01

    The saturation index of clay minerals like Gibbsite, Kaolinite, Illite, Montmorillonite and Chlorite in groundwater were studied in detail by collecting 29 groundwater samples from the shallow coastal aquifers in and around Kalpakkam. The samples collected were analysed for major cations, anions and trace elements by using standard procedures. The study reveals that pH has a significant role in the saturation index (SI) of minerals. It also shows that the relationship of electrical conductivity to the SI of these minerals is not significant than that of the ionic strength, log pCO2 values, and alumina silica ratio have significant relation to the SI of these clay minerals. The SI of these clay minerals was spatially distributed to identify the areas of higher SI. Silica has good correlation to SI of Kaolinite, Gibbsite and Montmorillonite and Al has good correlation to SI of all the minerals except to that of Chlorite.

  11. Provenance and distribution of clay minerals in the sediments of the western continental shelf and slope of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Rao, B.R.

    The distribution of clay minerals from 156 surficial sediments of the western continental margin of India, ranging from 17 to 2000 m water depth, indicate that there are three principal sources of sediments. The illite and chlorite-rich assemblage...

  12. Clay minerals as palaeomonsoon proxies: Evaluation and relevance to the late Quaternary records from SE Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thamban, M.; Rao, V.P.

    as palaeoclimatic proxies are evaluated and discussed. Systematic investigations using several sediment cores from the SE Arabian Sea reveal that despite the influence of several complicating factors, variations in clay mineral composition during the late Quaternary...

  13. Clay minerals as alteration products in acidic igneous rocks from Oued Belif structure (Nefza, North Tunisia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The Oued Belif structure is located in the north of Tunisia, seven kilometers north of Nefza city. It is part of the widespread Northern Tunisian 'Nappe Zone' composed of thrust sheets. This structure is delimited by a breccia rim, which encloses Triassic salt-related rocks and Serravallian to Tortonian (8.3 to 12.9 Ma) magmatic bodies (rhyodacite and granodiorite) associated with skarn deposits. Microscopic observation, chemical analyses, XRD, SEM and TEM investigations reveal that the mineral paragenesis of magmatic rocks consists mainly of clay minerals associated with other minerals such as quartz, biotite, feldspar and iron oxide. The outcropping magmatic rocks (granodiorite and rhyodacite) show an argillaceous paragenesis. The latter is made up of illite, kaolinite, smectite. The occurrence of these minerals is related to the meteoric weathering processes. Buried magmatic rocks, crossed by Oued Belif 45 borehole, show a considerable mobilization and removal of feldspar materiel and primary glass. This borehole crosses 370 m of the succession attributed to late Miocene. From bottom to top, we can identify (i) safe granodiorite; (ii) altered granodiorite; (iii) an alternation of altered rhyodacite and clayey unit rich in pyrite and (iiii) a very clayey rhyodacite unit. The clay fraction of the OB 45 borehole samples consists mainly of illite, kaolinite and smectite. These clay minerals were formed by the hydrothermal circulations through micro-fractures in magmatic rocks, which are forced by the high thermal gradient. The weathering of biotites, feldspars and primary glass contained both in buried and in outcropping magmatic rocks, produces illite, smectite and kaolinite. This is the result of the combined effect of subsurface oxidizing meteoric fluids and deep reducing hydrothermal fluids. (authors)

  14. R and D programme on radioactive waste disposal into geological formations (study of a clay formation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with the R and D activities performed by the Belgian Nuclear Research Establishment (SCK/CEN) and its subcontractors concerning the disposal of high-level and long-life conditioned wastes in a deep clay formation, the Boom clay. The studies reported concern equally experimental as theoretical work spread over the following research issues: geochemical characterization of the Boom clay, modelling of radionuclide migration in the clay environment, irradiation effects and corrosion behaviour of candidate canister materials in the Boom clay, geomechanical, construction, backfilling and sealing studies related to underground facilities, regional hydrological investigations of the Mol site and safety and risk analysis. The geomechanical and construction-related studies are to a large extent focused on in situ research, performed along the construction of the underground Hades laboratory. The corrosion studies are also dealing with the preparation of in situ experiments in the same underground laboratory. These various research issues are meant to contribute to the assessment of the technical feasibility and safety of the geological disposal in an argillaceous host formation

  15. Origin and evolution of Upper Triassic to Miocene clay-mineral associations from the eastern Algarve of Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Hendriks, Frits; Kellner, Thomas; Liebermann, Lutz

    2010-01-01

    XRD-analyses of pelitic deposits of Upper Jurassic to Miocene age occuring in the eastern Algarve (Portugal), give evidence of the occurrence of detrital clay minerals of continental origin as well as of conspicuous neoformations of marine provenance. The vertical succession of clay-mineral associations indicates the existence of three distinctive evolutionary cycles which are thought to reflect tectonically controlled transgressive-regressive events.

  16. Treatment and Conditioning of Radioactive Waste Solution by Natural Clay Minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical precipitation processes have been used for the treatment of radioactive elements from aqueous solution. The volume reduction is not very great and storage facilities are expensive. There are some radionuclides which are so difficult to be precipitated by this common method, so they may be precipitated by adding solid materials such as natural inorganic exchangers. In this woek, improvement the removal of caesium, cobalt and europium with zinc sulfate as coagulant and different clay minerals have been investigated. These include, Feldespare, Aswanly, Bentionite, Hematite, Mud, Calcite, Basalt, Magnetite, Kaoline, Sand stone, Limonite and Sand. The parameters affecting the precipitation process such as pH, particle size, temperature and weight of the clay have been studied. The results indicate that, the highest removal for Cs-137, Co-60 and Eu-152 and154 by Asswanly, Bentonite and Sand stone is more than the other clays. Removal of Cs-137 from low level waste solution with these three natural clays took the sequence, Aswanly (85.5%) > Bentonite (82.2%) > Sandstone (65.4%). Solidified cement products have been evaluated to determine mechanical strength and leaching rates of the waste products. The solidified waste forms were found more acceptable for handling ,storage and ultimate disposal

  17. Transmission X-ray Microscopy—A New Tool in Clay Mineral Floccules Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray L. Frost

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective flocculation and dewatering of mineral processing streams containing clays are microstructure dependent in clay-water systems. Initial clay flocculation is crucial in the design and for the development of a new methodology of gas exploitation. Microstructural engineering of clay aggregates using covalent cations and Keggin macromolecules have been monitored using the new state of the art Transmission X-ray Microscope (TXM with 60 nm tomography resolution installed in a Taiwanese synchrotron. The 3-D reconstructions from TXM images show complex aggregation structures in montmorillonite aqueous suspensions after treatment with Na+, Ca2+ and Al13 Keggin macromolecules. Na-montmorillonite displays elongated, parallel, well-orientated and closed-void cellular networks, 0.5–3 µm in diameter. After treatment by covalent cations, the coagulated structure displays much smaller, randomly orientated and openly connected cells, 300–600 nm in diameter. The average distances measured between montmorillonite sheets was around 450 nm, which is less than half of the cell dimension measured in Na-montmorillonite. The most dramatic structural changes were observed after treatment by Al13 Keggin; aggregates then became arranged in compacted domains of a 300 nm average diameter composed of thick face-to-face oriented sheets, which forms porous aggregates with larger intra-aggregate open and connected voids.

  18. Mineral Composition of Clay Fraction of the Chernozems Spread out in Ovče Pole in Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Mile Markoski; Tatjana Mitkova; Vedran Rubinić

    2011-01-01

    The results of mineral composition of the clay fraction of the chernozems spread out in Ovče Pole are presented. The mechanical composition of the soil samples show high domination of the physical clay and clay fractions in the soil separates, what is one of the reasons for strong influence on the physical and physical-mechanical properties of the soil. The clay content is dominant in the soil separates fraction and varies from 23.60% to 56.90%, or 36.23% average. The average content of physi...

  19. Refinements of water parameters for molecular dynamics: Simulations of adsorption at the clay mineral/aqueous solution interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, L.; Yu, C.; Teppen, B.J.;

    1999-01-01

    In the context of a long-term program involving molecular dynamics simulations of adsorption phenomena at the clay mineral/aqueous solution interface, we are testing the viability of combining a force field that we developed specificially for clays with other, independently derived potential...... parameters for molecular species which are important in clay adsorption. For the current study the importance of variations in the potential parameters of water were investigated and polarization effects on oxygen studied as a function of intermolecular interactions. For this purpose ab initio MP2/6-311GG...... hydrated clays is described....

  20. Fundamental study on the effect of clay mineral content and compacted direction on the orientation properties of clay particles and nuclide diffusive pathway in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning Electron microscopic (SEM) observations for micropore structure in compacted bentonite and through-diffusion experiments for non-sorptive tritiated water (HTO) were conducted in order to evaluate the effect of clay mineral content and the compacted direction of bentonite on the orientation of clay particles and nuclide diffusive pathway in compacted bentonite used as a buffer material in the geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. The SEM observations and through-diffusion experiments were conducted for axial and perpendicular directions to the compacted direction of bentonite as a function of bentonite's dry density. Two type of Na-bentonites, Kunigel-V1 and Kunipia-F with different smectite contents, which are major constituent clay mineral, were used in both experiments. No orientation of clay particles was found for Kunigel-V1 with 50wt% smectite content, while layers of clay particles orientated in the perpendicular direction to compacted direction were observed for Kunipia-F with approximately 100wt% smectite content. This trend is in good agreement with that for the effective diffusivities of HTO obtained from diffusion experiments. This indicates that smectite content in bentonite affects the orientation of clay particles and diffusive pathway. (author)

  1. Mineral Composition of Clay Fraction of the Chernozems Spread out in Ovče Pole in Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mile Markoski

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of mineral composition of the clay fraction of the chernozems spread out in Ovče Pole are presented. The mechanical composition of the soil samples show high domination of the physical clay and clay fractions in the soil separates, what is one of the reasons for strong influence on the physical and physical-mechanical properties of the soil. The clay content is dominant in the soil separates fraction and varies from 23.60% to 56.90%, or 36.23% average. The average content of physical sand and physical clay fractions is 42.20% and 57.80% respectively. Analysis of the mineral composition of clay in its entirety showed that no one of the minerals in the analyzed chernozem samples is not in absolute domination, but there is evident higher presence of clay minerals with 2:1 lattice type (vermiculite, illite and smectites in comparison with 1:1 lattice type (kaolinite. This shows that our variety of vertical chernozems has little deteriorated physical and physical-mechanical properties compared with typical chernozems.

  2. Bio-Mobilization of Potassium from Clay Minerals: I. By Ectomycorrhizas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A pot experiment was carried out to investigate effect of ectomycorrhizal fungi on eucalyptus growth and K bio-mobilization from soils and clay minerals. In the experiment, sands mixed with soil, KCl-saturated vermiculate and mica, respectively, were used to nurse eucalyptus seedlings which were nonectomycorrhized or ectomycorrhized by an ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius strain XC1 (Pt XC1) isolated from a forest soil from Xichang, Sichuan Province, China, and a worldwide well-known ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius strain 2 144 (Pt 2 144) obtained in Australia. More depletion of HCl-soluble K by mycorrhizas from the soil and minerals than nonmycorrhizas suggested that mycorrhizas had a great ability to mobilize K present in the interlayer and feldspar. Mycorrhizal seedlings depressed greatly K digested with HF-HClO4 from substrates after consecutive extractions of soils and minerals by water, ammonium acetate and boiling HCl, while nonmycorrhizal seedlings reduced it little if any, showing that the mycorrhizal seedlings could mobilize and then utilize the structural K in mineral lattice. Ectomycorrhizal fungi played a very important role not only in promoting the growth of eucalyptus seedlings but also in mobilizing K in soils and minerals. The infection of Pt XC1 led to a better growth of eucalyptus seedlings and more K accumulation in the seedlings than that of Pt 2 144. The large differences in K accumulation by the seedlings might be due to different abilities of the two ectomycorrhizal fungi to mobilize K in interlayer and lattice pools in the clay minerals.

  3. Removal of phosphate ions from aqueous solution using Tunisian clays minerals and synthetic zeolite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noureddine Hamdi; Ezzeddine Srasra

    2012-01-01

    Phosphate ions are usually considered to be responsible for the algal bloom in receiving water bodies and aesthetic problems in water.From the environmental point of view,the management of such contaminant and valuable resource is very important.The present work deals with the removal of phosphate ions from aqueous solutions using kaolinitic and smectic clay minerals and synthetic zeolite as adsorbent.The pH effect and adsorption kinetic were studied.It was found that phosphate could be efficiently removed at acidic pH (between 4 and 6) and the second order model of kinetics is more adopted for all samples.The isotherms of adsorption of phosphate ions by the two clays and the zeolite samples show that the zeolite has the highest rate of uptake (52.9 mg P/g).Equilibrium data were well fitted with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm.

  4. Removal of phosphate ions from aqueous solution using Tunisian clays minerals and synthetic zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2012-01-01

    Phosphate ions are usually considered to be responsible for the algal bloom in receiving water bodies and aesthetic problems in water. From the environmental point of view, the management of such contaminant and valuable resource is very important. The present work deals with the removal of phosphate ions from aqueous solutions using kaolinitic and smectic clay minerals and synthetic zeolite as adsorbent. The pH effect and adsorption kinetic were studied. It was found that phosphate could be efficiently removed at acidic pH (between 4 and 6) and the second order model of kinetics is more adopted for all samples. The isotherms of adsorption of phosphate ions by the two clays and the zeolite samples show that the zeolite has the highest rate of uptake (52.9 mg P/g). Equilibrium data were well fitted with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm. PMID:22894095

  5. Adsorption of Pentachlorophenol onto Oxide and Clay Minerals: Surface Reaction Model and Environmental Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Daqing; DIAO Guiyi; YUAN Peng; PENG Jinlian

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of pentachlorophenol (PCP) onto quartz, kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite and iron oxides has been investigated by batch equilibrium techniques. The pH-dependent isotherms are curves with peak values, the position of which is at about pH= 5-6 depending on the mineral species. Based on distribution of both speciation of surface hydroxyls on minerals and PCP in solution a surface reaction model involving surface complexation and surface electrostatic attraction is presented to fit the pH-dependent isotherms, and both reaction constants are calculated. The results show that on quartz and phyllosilicate minerals the predominant adsorption reaction is surface complexation,meanwhile both of surface electrostatic attraction and surface complexation are involved on the iron oxide minerals. The reaction constants of surface electrostatic adsorption are usually one to three orders in magnitude, larger than that of surface complexation. The concentration-dependent isotherms can be well fitted by Langmuir equation with the correlation coefficient R>0.93 for kaolinite and iron oxides. The maximum adsorption is found in the order: hematite > lepidocrocite > goethite > kaolinite >quartz > montmorillonite ≈ illite, which can be interpreted by consideration of both reaction mechanism and surface hydroxyl density. The significant adsorption of PCP onto mineral surfaces suggests that clay and iron oxide minerals will play an important role as HIOCs are adsorbed in laterite or latertoid soil, which is widespread in South China.

  6. Molecular simulation of carbon dioxide, brine, and clay mineral interactions and determination of contact angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Craig M; Cygan, Randall T

    2014-01-01

    Capture and subsequent geologic storage of CO2 in deep brine reservoirs plays a significant role in plans to reduce atmospheric carbon emission and resulting global climate change. The interaction of CO2 and brine species with mineral surfaces controls the ultimate fate of injected CO2 at the nanoscale via geochemistry, at the pore-scale via capillary trapping, and at the field-scale via relative permeability. We used large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to study the behavior of supercritical CO2 and aqueous fluids on both the hydrophilic and hydrophobic basal surfaces of kaolinite, a common clay mineral. In the presence of a bulk aqueous phase, supercritical CO2 forms a nonwetting droplet above the hydrophilic surface of kaolinite. This CO2 droplet is separated from the mineral surface by distinct layers of water, which prevent the CO2 droplet from interacting directly with the mineral surface. Conversely, both CO2 and H2O molecules interact directly with the hydrophobic surface of kaolinite. In the presence of bulk supercritical CO2, nonwetting aqueous droplets interact with the hydrophobic surface of kaolinite via a mixture of adsorbed CO2 and H2O molecules. Because nucleation and precipitation of minerals should depend strongly on the local distribution of CO2, H2O, and ion species, these nanoscale surface interactions are expected to influence long-term mineralization of injected carbon dioxide. PMID:24410258

  7. Uncertainty in the reactive transport model response to analkaline perturbation in a clay formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnol, A.; Blanc, P.; Xu, T.; Spycher, N.; Gaucher, E.C.

    2006-03-15

    The mineral alteration in the concrete barrier and in the clay formation around long-lived intermediate-level radioactive waste in the French deep geological disposal concept is evaluated using numerical modeling. There are concerns that the mineralogical composition of the surrounded clay will not be stable under the high alkaline pore fluid conditions caused by concrete (pH {approx} 12). Conversely, the infiltration of CO{sub 2}-rich groundwater from the clay formation into initially unsaturated concrete, at the high temperature (T {approx} 70 C) produced from the decay of radionuclides, could cause carbonation, thereby potentially affecting critical performance functions of this barrier. This could also lead to significant changes in porosity, which would affect aqueous diffusive transport of long-lived radionuclides. All these processes are therefore intimately coupled and advanced reactive transport models are required for long-term performance assessment. The uncertainty in predictions of these models is one major question that must be answered. A mass-transfer model response to an alkaline perturbation in clay with standard model values is first simulated using the two-phase non-isothermal reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. The selection of input parameters is thereafter designed to sample uncertainties in a wide range of physico-chemical processes without making a priori assumptions about the relative importance of different feedbacks. This 'base-case' simulation is perturbed by setting a parameter to a minimum, intermediate or maximum value or by switching on/off a process. This sensitivity analysis is conducted using grid computing facilities of BRGM (http://iggi.imag.fr). Our evaluation of the preliminary results suggests that the resaturation and the heating of the near-field will be of long enough duration to cause a limited carbonation through all the width of the concrete barrier. Another prediction is the possibility of self-sealing at

  8. Uncertainty in the reactive transport model response to an alkaline perturbation in a clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineral alteration in the concrete barrier and in the clay formation around long-lived intermediate-level radioactive waste in the French deep geological disposal concept is evaluated using numerical modeling. There are concerns that the mineralogical composition of the surrounded clay will not be stable under the high alkaline pore fluid conditions caused by concrete (pH ∼ 12). Conversely, the infiltration of CO2-rich groundwater from the clay formation into initially unsaturated concrete, at the high temperature (T ∼ 70 C) produced from the decay of radionuclides, could cause carbonation, thereby potentially affecting critical performance functions of this barrier. This could also lead to significant changes in porosity, which would affect aqueous diffusive transport of long-lived radionuclides. All these processes are therefore intimately coupled and advanced reactive transport models are required for long-term performance assessment. The uncertainty in predictions of these models is one major question that must be answered. A mass-transfer model response to an alkaline perturbation in clay with standard model values is first simulated using the two-phase non-isothermal reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. The selection of input parameters is thereafter designed to sample uncertainties in a wide range of physico-chemical processes without making a priori assumptions about the relative importance of different feedbacks. This 'base-case' simulation is perturbed by setting a parameter to a minimum, intermediate or maximum value or by switching on/off a process. This sensitivity analysis is conducted using grid computing facilities of BRGM (http://iggi.imag.fr). Our evaluation of the preliminary results suggests that the resaturation and the heating of the near-field will be of long enough duration to cause a limited carbonation through all the width of the concrete barrier. Another prediction is the possibility of self-sealing at the concrete/clay interface

  9. Adsorption ability of rare earth elements on clay minerals and its practical performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖燕飞; 龙志奇; 黄莉; 冯宗玉; 王良士

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of rare earth elements on clay minerals would have great influence on the mineralization process and the leaching process of the ion-adsorption type rare earths ore. In this work, the adsorption thermodynamics of REEs on kaolin were investigated thoroughly and systematically. The experimental results showed that the adsorption characteristics of La, Nd, Y on kaolin did fit well with the Langmuir isotherm model and their saturated adsorption capacities were 1.731, 1.587 and 0.971 mg/g, re-spectively. The free energy change (ΔG) values were –16.91 kJ/mol (La), –16.05 kJ/mol (Nd) and –15.58 kJ/mol (Y), respectively. The negative values ofΔG demonstrated that the adsorption of rare earth on kaolin was a spontaneously physisorption process. The deposit characteristic of the volcanic ion-adsorption type rare earths ore and the behavior of the rare earth in the column leaching process were also developed here. With the increase of the ore body depth, the distribution of the LREEs decreased and the HREEs increased. And the slight differences in the adsorption ability of REEs on clay minerals led to the fractionation effect in the column leaching process. These developed more evidences and better understanding of metallogenic regularity, and provided a theoretical ba-sis and scientific approach to separation of the HREEs and LREEs in the leaching process.

  10. Clay minerals on Mars: Riotinto mining district (Huelva, Spain) as Earth analogue for acidic alteration pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavris, C.; Cuadros, J.; Bishop, J. L.; Nieto, J. M.; Michalski, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Combined satellite and in-situ measurements of Mars surface have detected mineral assemblages indicating processes for which Earth analogues exist. Among them, aluminous clay-sulfate assemblages have been observed, which suggest alteration by acidic fluids. The Riotinto mining district (SW Spain) provides an Earth analogue site for such Martian processes. The parent rocks belong to an Upper Palaeozoic (Late Famennian-Tournaisian) volcano-sedimentary complex including siliciclastic sediments and mafic and felsic volcanics, all of which underwent hydrothermal alteration. The oxidation of an extensive pyrite-rich orebody provided mild to extreme acidic fluxes that leached the surrounding rocks for over 20 million years. The mineral assemblages are strongly dependent on their acidic alteration intensity. The observed mineralogical parageneses and leaching conditions for our sites at Riotinto are consistent with three alteration sequences: i) Mild: containing a range of clay minerals from vermiculite to kaolinite, with a wide variety of crystal order and mixed-layering; ii) Intermediate: containing smectite to kaolinite with jarosite-group phases; iii) Advanced: containing kaolinite, jarosite-group phases, and iron oxides. Our findings suggest that, even within this general scheme, the specific alteration pathways can be different.

  11. Development of the methodology of sample preparation to X-ray diffractometry of clay minerals at Petrobras Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various procedures can be used in the analysis of the clay mineral content of rocks by X-ray diffraction. This article describes the principal ones and discusses those adopted in the X-ray clay mineral laboratory of the PETROBRAS Research Center (CENPES) in Rio de Janeiro. This article presents the methodology used and provides users with information about its application and limitations. The methodology has been developed to study polymineral samples. The aim to identify clay mineral groups and to estimate their relative proportions. Of the four main steps of this analysis - separation and concentration of clay minerals, preparation of oriented specimens, X-ray irradiation under standard conditions and interpretation of X-ray diffraction patterns - only the first three are discussed here. Clay minerals occur mainly in the < 2 μ fraction. They are separated from the other minerals by disaggregation followed by size fractionation. The rocks are immersed in distilled water and disaggregated with an ultrasonic microprobe. The < 2 μ fraction is then separated by centrifugation. (author)

  12. Clay mineral content of continental shelf and river sediments, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James R.; Dowling, Jennifer S.

    2001-01-01

    This report contains data on the clay mineral content of 250 shelf surface-sediment samples from the California Continental Borderland (Tables 1, 2; Figures 1-7), 79 samples with depth in cores from Santa Monica Bay (Table 3; see Table 1 for surface sediment data for those same cores and for core locations), 24 suspended and 13 bottom sediment samples from rivers draining Southern California (Table 4), and six rock samples or composite rock samples from the Palos Verdes Headland (Table 4). This report is designed as the data repository and these data are discussed in a paper by Hein et al. (2001).

  13. The origin and implications of clay minerals from Yellowknife Bay, Gale crater, Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Bristow, Thomas F.; Grotzinger, John P.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity has documented a section of fluvio-lacustrine strata at Yellowknife Bay (YKB), an embayment on the floor of Gale crater, approximately 500 m east of the Bradbury landing site. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data and evolved gas analysis (EGA) data from the CheMin and SAM instruments show that two powdered mudstone samples (named John Klein and Cumberland) drilled from the Sheepbed member of this succession contain up to ~20 wt% clay minerals. A trioc...

  14. Mud peeling and horizontal crack formation in drying clays

    KAUST Repository

    Style, Robert W.

    2011-03-01

    Mud peeling is a common phenomenon whereby horizontal cracks propagate parallel to the surface of a drying clay. Differential stresses then cause the layer of clay above the crack to curl up to form a mud peel. By treating the clay as a poroelastic solid, we analyze the peeling phenomenon and show that it is caused by the gradient in tensile stress at the surface of the clay, analogously to the spalling of thermoelastic materials. For a constant water evaporation rate at the clay surface we derive equations for the depth of peeling and the time of peeling as functions of the evaporation rate. Our model predicts a simple relationship between the radius of curvature of a mud peel and the depth of peeling. The model predictions are in agreement with the available experimental data. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Sorption of radioiodine on organic rich soil, clay minerals and alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batch method was used to investigate the sorption behavior of radioiodine on organic rich soil, alumina, chlorite-illite clay mixture and bentonite. 131 I was used as tracer. The grain sizes of the samples used were all below 38μm. A rather slow kinetics was observed for the adsorption of radioiodine on organic rich soil. The distribution ratio increased with increasing solution/solid (V/m) ratio, and the contact time. The pH of the synthetic groundwater did not change the distribution ratio appreciably. The soil biomass however, showed a striking effect on the adsorption of radioiodine. Among the clay minerals, the highest distribution ratio value was found for chlorite-illite clay mixture. All the values were however well below those of the organic rich soil. The sorption data were fitted to Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich type isotherms. Mean energies of adsorption, as well as the affinity ratios of the sorption sites to iodine and chlorine were calculated. (author) 13 refs.; 6 figs.; 6 tabs

  16. Effects of clay minerals on radiocesium sorption behavior onto paddy field soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the viewpoint of radiological dose assessment, 137Cs is one of the most important radionuclides due to its long half life (30 y). In this work, sorption behavior of 137Cs in Japanese paddy field soils was investigated, taking into account effects of chemical properties. Soil-soil solution distribution coefficients (KdS) which are defined as the relation between an adsorbed radionuclide concentration and that present in the solution were measured for 30 daddy field soil samples collected throughout Japan. These measurements were carried out using the batch sorption test. Then, sequential extraction methods were carried out to determine the ratio of 137Cs fixed on soil. In addition, soil properties, such as pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC) and total carbon, total nitrogen and clay contents were measured as well. X-ray diffraction analysis was carried out to identify the clay minerals in soil samples. In particular, content of illite which can sorb Cs strongly was determined as a relative amount for all soil samples. Kd values ranged from 269-16 637 L/kg (geometric mean=2 286 L/kg). A correlation was observed between the Kd values and clay content with a Spearman rank correlation coefficient (Rc) of 0.55 (p 137Cs fixed in soil had good correlation with relative illite content (Rc=0.68, p137Cs fixed on soil. (author)

  17. The growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on natural clay minerals (kaolinite, nontronite and sepiolite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suitability of clay minerals - kaolinite, nontronite and sepiolite - is studied for synthesis of nanocomposites based on carbon nanotubes. Particles of iron were used as catalysts. Prior to synthesis, kaolinite and sepiolite were doped by the catalytically active metal, whereas in the case of nontronite the presence was used of this metal in the matrix of this mineral. Synthesis of CNTs was performed by hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. The produced nanocomposites were examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopies and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The experiment verified the potential of the three microcrystalline phyllosilicates for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Under the same technology conditions, the type of catalyst carrier affects the morphology and structure of the nanotube product markedly.

  18. Clay minerals and geochemistry of the bottom sediments in the northwestern East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Clay minerals of 34 sediments collected from the northwestern continental shelf of the East China Sea have been determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The clay mineral distribution is mainly controlled by the sediment source and the dominant circulation pattern. The predominant clay mineral in our study area is illite comprising more than 67% of the whole clay fraction. The highest concentration of illite (>68%) is found in the southeastern offshore parts beyond the reach of terrigenous input from the Jeju Island. It means that these illites are largely transported by the Kuroshio Current from the South China Sea (SCS). Smectite is highly concentrated in the northwest middle part and in the outer-shelf mud patch. It seems to be due to the high supply of smectite transported from China where fine-grained sediments are discharged from modern and ancient Huanghe (Yellow) River. The relatively high abundant kaolinite is likely derived from the Changjiang (Yangtze) River via the Taiwan Warm Current. In contrast,large amounts of chlorite and high chlorite/kaolinite ratios occur in the northwestern area, reflecting the transportation by the Yellow Sea Coastal Current from the southern Yellow Sea. The discrimination diagrams clearly show that the sediments in the northwestern East China Sea are ultimately sourced from Chinese rivers, especially from the Huanghe River, whereas the sediment in the northeast part might come from the Jeju Island. The muddy sediments of the Changjiang River's submerged delta have much lower 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7162-0.7180) than those of the Shandong Peninsular mud wedge (0.7216-0.7249),which are supposed to be originated from the Huanghe River, suggesting the distribution pattern of 87Sr/86Sr ratios as a new tracer to discriminate the provenance of shelf sediments in the study area. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the outer-shelf muddy sediments ranged from 0.7169 to 0.7216 in a wide range and was between those of the Huanghe River and Changjiang

  19. Effect of clay minerals and nanoparticles on chromium fractionation in soil contaminated with leather factory waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, Marzieh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2015-10-30

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of time, clay minerals and nanoparticles (NPs) on chromium (Cr) fractionation in a soil contaminated with leather factory waste (LFW). Soil was mixed with LFW, then, the contaminated soils were treated with clay minerals (bentonite and zeolite) and nanoparticles (MgO, TiO2 and ZnO) at 5% and 1%, respectively. The samples were incubated for 15-180 days at 25 °C and constant moisture. After incubation, Cr in control and treated soils was fractionated by the sequential extraction procedure. The distribution of various Cr fractions in control soil indicated that the greatest amounts of Cr were found in the residual fraction (RES) followed by the carbonate (CAR), organic matter (OM) and exchangeable (EXC) fractions. The addition of LFW in soils increased Cr concentration in all fractions. The higher proportion of EXC fraction in the soil treated with LFW indicates its higher potential of leaching and runoff transport. In all treated soils, the RES fraction was increased, while EXC and OM fractions were decreased during incubation. The results indicated that NPs are effective adsorbent for the removal of Cr ions from LFW treated soil, and they could be useful in reducing their environment risk. PMID:25956643

  20. Determination of toxic metals in clay-minerals by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of toxic elements such as Mn, Cr, Co, Ni, As, Se, Cd and Pb have been awakening great interest, because they are frequently found in environmental materials like soils, sediments and waters. The emission of those metals can be, mainly, attributed to industries, thermoelectric plants and urban occupation sources. The study of the contamination of the soils and sediments for toxic metals is important for the preservation and conservation of those resources, once the soil is a component key of the ecosystem for the growth of the plants, degradation and recycling of the dead biomass. A method for determination of those elements in clay minerals was established. It was used x-ray fluorescence spectrometry and fundamental parameters method. This method allows to calculate the theoretical fluorescent intensities from the measured intensities of the elements present in sample, using instrumental sensitivity. The clay fraction was obtained through mineral desegregation, being deposited by gravity on a quartz substrate. This kind of sample preparation allows to obtain thin film samples, reducing drastically the matrix effects. The fundamental parameters method does not need the single element calibration curves, carrying a very fast analysis. The method presented an accuracy lower than 10%, a precision between 0.3 to 2.4% and a determination limit at the 1μg/g (author)

  1. Growth of Iron(III)-Reducing Bacteria on Clay Minerals as the Sole Electron Acceptor and Comparison of Growth Yields on a Variety of Oxidized Iron Forms†

    OpenAIRE

    Kostka, Joel E.; Dalton, Dava D.; Skelton, Hayley; Dollhopf, Sherry; Stucki, Joseph W.

    2002-01-01

    Smectite clay minerals are abundant in soils and sediments worldwide and are typically rich in Fe. While recent investigations have shown that the structural Fe(III) bound in clay minerals is reduced by microorganisms, previous studies have not tested growth with clay minerals as the sole electron acceptor. Here we have demonstrated that a pure culture of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 as well as enrichment cultures of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria from rice paddy soil and subsurface sediments...

  2. Method and apparatus for determining characteristics of clay-bearing formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to methods and apparatus for determining characteristics of clay-bearing geological formations by radioactivity well logging. In its broadest aspect, the invention comprises the steps of determining the volume of clay contained in the earth formations; determining a first property of the formations functionally related to the volume of clay; and determining a second property functionally related to the first property, the second property indicating potential clay swelling. In particular, the volume of clay is determined using electrical signals generated in response to the energy and frequency of detected radiations. The method is carried out with a well logging instrument that includes a high-resolution gamma ray spectrometer that traverses a borehole, whereby natural radiation strikes a scintillation crystal contained therein

  3. Assessment of Some Clay Deposits from Fatha Formation (M. Miocene for Brick Manufacturing in Koya Area, NE Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawzat R. Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the evaluation of physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of claystone sediments of Miocene age (Fatha Formation and their suitability to use them as raw materials in manufacturing of building clay brick in Kurdistan (Koya city. The study based on the field reconnaissance for three sites of claystones which were selected from three different locations within Fatha Formation in Koya city, includes Haibat-Sultan area, Koya-Sulaimania road and central of Koya city. The clay samples were subjected to particle size distribution, chemical composition, mineralogical analysis, plasticity index and XRD tests. Clay tiles were produced by using Semi-dry method under load 78 kN/mm² and fired at 950 C°. The produced clay tiles were subjected to water absorption, efflorescence, shrinkage and compressive strength tests. The research has shown that the plasticity index depends on the mineral composition of the raw materials. The grain size analysis of raw materials, physical properties and mechanical properties of the produced tiles has shown the suitability of the used raw materials in producing class bricks of class A (first class according to the requirements of specification of the Iraqi Standard (1993.

  4. The New Phenomenon of Lithium Electrochemical (De)Intercalation in Mineral Clay Materials and Their Potential Application in Rechargeable Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Shi-Jie Wen; Xiao-Tian Yin; L. Nazar

    1994-01-01

    A new phenomenon of Li electrochemical (de)intercalation on the pure mineral clay materials has been evidenced for the first time. These tests are initialized by the idea of putting an electronic conducting polymer or a multi-valent metal oxide in the layer of the clay to modify the electronic properties and also to modulate the charge and discharge potential of the clay during the Lithium electrochemical (de)intercalation processing. In this paper, as the beginning of our research, we will f...

  5. Technetium migration in Boom Clay - Assessing the role of colloid-facilitated transport in a deep clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The role of colloids - mainly dissolved natural organic matter (NOM, 50-150 mg/l) - in the transport of radionuclides in the Boom Clay formation (Mol, Belgium), has long since been a matter of (heavy) debate. For more than 20 years, batch experiments with Boom Clay suspensions showed a pronounced influence of the dissolved organic carbon concentration on the aqueous concentrations of different radionuclides like Tc, Np, Am and U. Moreover, small fractions of these radionuclides were also observed to elute almost un-retarded out of confined clay cores in percolation experiments. In the past years, a new conceptual model for the speciation of the long-lived fission product Technetium- 99 (99Tc) under Boom Clay conditions has been drafted. In brief, the stable oxidation state of 99Tc in these conditions is +IV, and, therefore, Tc solution concentrations are limited by the solubility of TcO2.nH2O(s). However, during reduction of TcVII (in the TcO4- form) to TcIV, precursor TcO2.nH2O colloids are formed, which are stabilised by the dissolved organic matter present in Boom Clay interstitial pore water, and in supernatants of Boom Clay batch suspensions. Moreover, this stabilisation process occurs in such a systematic way, that (conditional) interaction constants could be established, and the behaviour was described as a 'hydrophobic sorption', or, more accurately, a 'colloid-colloid' interaction. This conceptual model was implemented into PHREEQC geochemical and Hydrus transport code to come to a reactive transport model that was used to simulate both the outflow and the tracer profile in several long-term running percolation experiments (both in lab and under in situ conditions). To account for slow dissociation kinetics of Tc from the NOM colloid, a first-order kinetic rate equation was also added to the model. In order to describe the migration of colloidal particles (NOM), an independent study on

  6. Origin of opal-ct in lower eocene tallahatta formation, mississippi, usa and pleistocene barind clay formation in bangladesh: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opal-CT mineral in the lower Eocene Tallahatta formation in Mississippi. USA and the Pleistocene Barind clay formation in Bangladesh is of volcanogenic origin. X-ray diffraction patterns of claystones in the former indicated more ordered condition on the older sediments than those of the latter, which may be due to higher burial temperatures and longer time interval for transformation from volcanic ash to opal-CT of the former. Glass shards, present in the latter sediments, were not identified in the former, which may be due to transformation of glass shards of volcanic ash to opal-Cr over the time. (author)

  7. Reaction-path calculations of groundwater chemistry and mineral formation at Rainier Mesa, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction-patch calculations of groundwater chemistry and mineral formation at Rainier Mesa, Nevada, have been done using a model of volcanic-glass dissolution by water that is initially saturated with CO2. In the reaction-path calculation, rate processes control the availability of species through dissolution of volcanic glass, and equilibrium processes distribute the species between the aqueous phase and mineral phases in equilibrium at each step in the reaction path. The EQ3/6 chemical-equilibrium programs were used for the calculation. Formation constants were estimated for three zeolites (clinoptilolite, mordenite, and heulandite), so they could be considered as possible mineral precipitates. The first stage of mineral evolution, from volcanic glass to a cristobalite, smectite clay, and zeolite mixture, was modeled quite well. Predicted aqueous-phase compositions and precipitates agree with observations at Rainier Mesa and other Nevada Test Site areas. Further mineral evolution, to quartz, clay, analcime, and albite mixtures, was also modeled. Decreasing aqueous silica activity from the first stage, where cristobalite precipitates, to later stages, where quartz is present, was the controlling variable in the mineral evolution. 30 references, 20 figures, 4 tables

  8. Clay mineral distribution in surface sediments of the South China Sea and its significance for in sediment sources and transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建国; 陈木宏; 陈忠; 颜文

    2010-01-01

    Clay minerals of surface sediments in the South China Sea (SCS) are analyzed with X-ray diffraction, and their transport is explored with a grain size trend analysis (GSTA) model. Results show that clay mineral types in various sedimentary environments have different sediment sources and transport routes. Sediments in the northern SCS (north of 20°N) between the southwest of Taiwan Island and the outer mouth of the Pearl River have high contents of illite and chlorite, which are derived mainly from sediment...

  9. First-principles study of cesium adsorption to weathered micaceous clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Masahiko; Nakamura, Hiroki; Machida, Masahiko

    2014-05-01

    A large amount of radioactive nuclides was produced into environment due to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Residents near FDNPP were suffering from radioactive cesium and then evacuated, because which has long half-life and is retained by surface soil for long time. The Japanese government has been decontaminating the cesium by removing the surface soil in order to return them to their home. This decontamination method is very effective, but which produces huge amount of waste soil. This becomes another big problem in Fukushima, because it is not easy to find large storage sites. Then effective and economical methods to reduce the volume of the waste soil are needed. However, it has not been invented yet. One of the reasons is lack of knowledge about microscopic process of adsorption/desorption of cesium to/from soil. It is known that weathered micaceous clay minerals play crucial role on adsorption and retention of cesium. They are expected to have special sorption sites, called frayed edge sites (FESs), which adsorb cesium selectively and irreversibly. Properties of FES have been intensely investigated by experiments. But microscopic details of the adsorption process on FES are still unclear. Because direct observation of the process with current experimental techniques is quite difficult. We investigated the adsorption of cesium to FES in muscovite, which is a typical micaceous clay mineral, via first-principles calculations (density functional theory). We made a minimal model of FES and evaluate the energy difference before and after cesium adsorption to FES. This is the first numerical modeling of FES. It was shown that FES does adsorb cesium if the weathering of muscovite has been weathered. In addition, we revealed the mechanism of cesium adsorption to FES, which is competition between ion radius of cesium and the degree of weathering. I plan to discuss volume reduction of the waste soil based on our result. Reference M. Okumura

  10. Measuring the specific caesium sorption capacity of soils, sediments and clay minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Koning, A. [aEnergy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Westerduinweg 3, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG, Petten (Netherlands); Konoplev, A.V. [Institute of Experimental Meteorology, 82 Lenin Avenue, Obninsk, Kaluga Region, 249020 (Russian Federation); Comans, R.N.J. [Wageningen University, Department of Soil Quality, P.O. Box 8005, 6700 EC Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2007-01-15

    Two methods to quantify the specific Cs sorption capacity of soils and sediments, which is generally believed to be associated with the Frayed Edge Sites (FES) of illitic clay minerals, are described in detail and are critically reviewed. The first method is a direct measurement of the FES capacity, while the second quantifies the combined parameter K{sub D}{sup C}s x [K{sup +}] (=K{sub C}(K-->Cs) x [FES]) i.e. the product of the FES capacity and the affinity of these sites for Cs. Both methods use the bulky AgTU-complex to mask non-specific sorption sites for Cs and are applied to a number of different soils and pure minerals. Measurement of the FES capacity of pure illite is straightforward. It is shown that the measured capacity is independent of the saturating ion, but does depend on particle size. This method could not be successfully applied to a peat bog soil with 90% organic matter, because the necessary correction for non-specific Cs sorption by the large pool of organic exchange sites overpasses the capacity of the small FES fraction. Measurement of the combined parameter K{sub D}{sup C}s x [K{sup +}] is shown to be more appropriate in such cases. Application of the FES capacity method to the hydrous aluminosilicate mineral allophane, an important soil constituent of Andisols, shows that the AgTU-complex is unable to block all non-specific sorption sites for Cs on this mineral. The K{sub D}{sup C}s x [K{sup +}] measurements show evidence of a very small number of specific Cs sorption sites on allophane, much smaller than inferred from the FES capacity measurement. The FES capacity of the clay mineral vermiculite is difficult to quantify because the high Cs concentrations that are needed to measure the FES capacity probably cause a collapse of the vermiculite interlayers, thereby creating more high-affinity sites for Cs. The K{sub D}{sup C}s x [K{sup +}] method, in which only trace concentrations of Cs are used, is shown to be more appropriate for soils

  11. Influence of crop residues on trifluralin mineralization in a silty clay loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farenhorst, Annemieke

    2007-01-01

    Trifluralin is typically applied onto crop residues (trash, stubble) at the soil surface, or onto the bare soil surface after the incorporation of crop residues into the soil. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of the type and amount of crop residues in soil on trifluralin mineralization in a Wellwood silty clay loam soil. Leaves and stubble of Potato (Solanum tuberosum) (P); Canola (Brassica napus) (C), Wheat (Triticum aestivum) (W), Oats (Avena sativa), (O), and Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) (A) were added to soil microcosms at rates of 2%, 4%, 8% and 16% of the total soil weight (25 g). The type and amount of crop residues in soil had little influence on the trifluralin first-order mineralization rate constant, which ranged from 3.57E-03 day(-1) in soil with 16% A to 2.89E-02 day(-1) in soil with 8% W. The cumulative trifluralin mineralization at 113 days ranged from 1.15% in soil with 16% P to 3.21% in soil with 4% C, again demonstrating that the observed differences across the treatments are not of agronomic or environmental importance. PMID:17454379

  12. Interdisciplinary investigation of Boda clay-stone formation - preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The aim of GEOCHEM Ltd.'s, partly EU-funded project, which started in 2008, was the comparison of the results of laboratory and field investigations, the assessment of their differences and the determination of scale in case of Boda clay-stone Formation (BCF - Mecsek Mts.). The formation has been researched as the potential host rock for the deep geological disposal of high level radioactive waste since 1999. Although the rock has been analyzed from numerous various aspects, its reservoir characteristics are still less known. As the achievement of the project's research and development activity, the reliable and fast measurement of petrophysical features became possible, as well as the comparison of results with the results of geophysical and geochemical investigations and their complex assessment. Petrophysical investigations of BCF have also been performed by the SzKFI, Geopard Ltd. and by the Department of Reservoir Engineering of Research Institute of Applied Chemistry, University of Miskolc (ME AFKI) that showed 0.04 - 3 % porosity and between 10-15- 10-21 m2 water permeability values. Similar, 10-15 and 10-19 m2 permeability values were produced by the in-situ packer tests of Mecsekerc Plc. The results clearly show that this rock is extremely tight and its petrophysical characteristics are hard to measure. An even more serious problem is to determine how laboratory results can be extended to the rock body itself, that is, can the scale dependence of data be determined. The project tries to realize this goal in three steps, by well logs in the given borehole, by CT and core scanning on the whole core and by mineralogical, geophysical, pore structure and permeability measurements performed on plugs prepared for laboratory investigations. Individual sub-tasks are performed as subcontractors by the Eoetvoes Lorand Geophysical Institute, the Research Institute of Applied Earth Sciences of the University of Miskolc

  13. The mineralogy, geochemistry and surface area of mudrocks from the London Clay Formation of southern England

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, S.J.; Wagner, D.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the results of mineralogical and geochemical analysis of a suite of mudstones from the London Clay Formation of southern and south-eastern England. The work was carried out as part of the ongoing ‘Ground Movements: Shrink/Swell’ project under the Physical Hazards Programme. The first part of the report gives an introduction to the geology of the London Clay Formation and a summary of previous mineralogical studies of these rocks. A summary of analytical methods employ...

  14. Clay minerals in uraniferous deposit of Imouraren (Tim Mersoi basin, Niger): implications on genesis of deposit and on ore treatment process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigerian uraniferous deposits are located in carboniferous and Jurassic formations of Tim Mersoi basin. AREVA is shareholder of 3 mine sites in this area: SOMAIR and COMINAK, both in exploitation since 1960's and IMOURAREN, 80 km further South, whose exploitation is planned for 2015. Mineralization of Imouraren deposit is included in the fluvial formation of Tchirezrine 2 (Jurassic), composed of channels and flood plains. Facies of channel in-fillings range from coarse sandstones to siltstones, while overflow facies are composed of analcimolites. Secondary mineralogy was acquired during 2 stages: 1- diagenesis, with formation of clay minerals, analcime, secondary quartz and albites, and 2- stage of fluids circulations, which induced alteration of detrital and diagenetic minerals, formation of new phases and uranium deposition. A mineralogical zoning, at the scale of deposit resulted from this alteration. The heterogeneity of Tchirezrine 2, at the level of both facies and mineralogy, is also evidenced during ore treatment, as ore reacts differently depending on its source, with sometimes problems of U recovery. Ore treatment tests showed that analcimes and chlorites were both penalizing minerals, because of 1- the sequestration of U-bearing minerals into analcimes, 2- their dissolution which trends to move away from U solubilization conditions (pH and Eh) and to form numerous sulfates, and 3- problems of percolation. A detection method of analcime-rich ores, based on infrared spectroscopy, was developed in order to optimize ore blending and so to reduce negative effects during ore treatment process. (author)

  15. Interactions Between Chlorinated Waste Solvents and Clay Minerals in Low Permeability Subsurface Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayral, D.; Otero-Diaz, M.; Demond, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Waste organic contaminants stored in low permeability subsurface layers serve as long-term sources for dissolved phase contaminant plumes. These layers may have a different mineralogical make up than the surrounding geologic media; specifically, they may be characterized by a high clay content. Although these layers are often considered inert, interactions may occur between the clay minerals and the waste liquids that may influence transport. Measurements of the basal spacing of Na-montmorillonite in contact with pure chlorinated organic liquids such as trichloroethylene (TCE) showed that it is similar to that with water; however, its basal spacing in contact with waste chlorinated liquids was reduced, leading to cracking. In fact, the basal spacing in contact with the waste chlorinated liquids was closer to that in contact with air than in contact with water. The observation that contact with pure organic liquids did not cause cracking, but contact with chlorinated wastes obtained from the field did, suggests that other components of the waste are critical to the basal spacing reduction process. Screening experiments indicated that the presence of a binary mixture of surfactants, a nonionic and an anionic surfactant, in the chlorinated solvent were necessary to cause the cracking at the same rate and magnitude as the chlorinated wastes obtained from the field. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy measurements suggest that the mixture alters the adsorbed water OH-bending band, implying a displacement of adsorbed water. Coupling these results with sorption and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, a hypothesis of component conformation in the clay interlayer space that leads to cracking can be constructed.

  16. Effect of clay mineral on utilization of some mineral elements in ruminant feeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of tafla and bentofarm addition on feed intake, water intake, digestibility, nutritive values, some rumen parameters, nitrogen retention, some minerals retention and some blood parameters of rams, growth performance and some blood constituents of growing lambs. Twenty seven Rahmani mature rams, averaged 45 kg of live body weight were divided randomly to three main groups each main group subdivided into three treatments (three animals each). Main first group fed 100% bereseam and served as control (T1), the other two subgroups fed the T1diet plus 3% tafla (T2) or 3% bentofarm (T3).The second main group fed 50% bereseam and 50% concentrate feed mixture (T4), the other two subgroups fed the T4 diet plus 3% tafla (T5) or 3% bentofarm (T6).The third main group fed 100% concentrate feed mixture and rice straw (T7), the other subgroups fed (T7)diet plus 3% tafla (T8) or 3% bentofarm (T9).To carry out the growth trial, forty eight growing baladi male lambs about 2 months of age and average live body weight 17 kg were divided into six similar groups (eight lambs for each) according to their body weight. The experimental rations were: T4 -T9 in previous tasted rations. The results of digestibility of DM and CP significantly (P<0.05) decreased as a result of tafla and bentofarm addition than that of the control, while OM, CF, EE and NFE digestibilities were slightly improved with tafla or bentofarm compared with those of control, but the differences were not significant among treatments. However, the results of nutritive values as TDN, SV and DCP showed no significant differences among treatments. The results of ruminal parameters as TVFA's, ph and microbial protein significantly increased as a result of tafla and bentofarm addition than that of the control, but the values of ammonia-N concentrations significantly decreased by addition of tafla and bentofarm compared with the control treatments.

  17. Clay minerals in surface sediments of the Pearl River drainage basin and their contribution to the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZhiFei; Christophe COLIN; HUANG Wei; CHEN Zhong; Alain TRENTESAUX; CHEN JianFang

    2007-01-01

    Clay minerals have played a significant role in the study of the East Asian monsoon evolution in the South China Sea by being able to track oceanic current variations and to reveal contemporaneous paleoclimatic changes prevailing in continental source areas. As one of the most important rivers inputting terrigenous matters to the northern South China Sea, the Pearl River was not previously paid attention to from the viewpoint of clay mineralogy. This paper presents a detailed study on clay minerals in surface sediments collected from the Pearl River drainage basin (including all three main channels,various branches, and the Lingdingyang in the estuary) by using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method.The results indicate that the clay mineral assemblage consists dominantly of kaolinite (35%-65%),lesser abundance of chlorite (20%-35%) and illite (12%-42%), and very scare smectite occurrences (generally <5%). Their respective distribution does not present any obvious difference throughout the Pearl River drainage basin. However, downstream the Pearl River to the northern South China Sea, the clay mineral assemblage varies significantly: kaolinite decreases gradually, smectite and illite increase gradually. Additionally, illite chemistry index steps down and illite crystallinity steps up. These variations indicate the contribution of major kaolinite, lesser illite and chlorite, and very scarce smectite to the northern South China Sea from the Pearl River drainage basin. The maximum contribution of clay minerals from the Pearl River is 72% to the northern margin and only 15% to the northern slope of the South China Sea. In both glacials and interglacials, kaolinite indicates that the ability of mechanical erosion occurred in the Pearl River drainage basin.

  18. Characterization of interstitial waters and ionic exchange in the clay formations through monitoring of drilling fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay is a very complex material which has a great variability in its mineralogical composition and allows several kind of interactions with fluid environment. The investigations of clay formations are focussed on the reactivity of clay samples and the hydraulic properties of the formations. It is however difficult to describe the geochemical properties of the whole formation. This paper presents the experiments of chemical monitoring of drilling fluids which have been carried out in two wells in Ardeche (France) by the French BRGM (Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres) with the support of ANDRA. The basic principle of the method is the use of drilling fluids to obtain informations about the clay strata included in the Triassic formations of the Southeast basin of France. Drilling fluids constitute a loop from the surface down to the geological formation and back to the surface. The fluids interact with the formation which is crushed at the bottom of the hole and their chemical composition is modified. Since the well wall rapidly collapses, the rock-drilling fluids interaction is permanently renewed and real-time information is returned to the surface by the drilling fluids. In particular, it is possible to outline Ca-Mg exchange between the clay and the drilling fluid. This study shows that the interstitial waters of clay strata are mainly sea-water derived and have been modified by diagenesis reactions. (J.S.). 15 refs., 8 figs

  19. The differences in clay minerals between the northern and southern Chelungpu fault, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Y.

    2004-12-01

    In 1999, we obtained a detailed data about motion of fault from the Taiwan Chi-Chi earthquake. The motion represents the high frequency of acceleration and small slip distance in southern part, and low frequency of acceleration and large slip distance in the northern part. Those differences in the fault motion between the southern and northern parts are coincidence with occurrences of deformation textures of rocks which were sampled by drilling of shallow parts (a few hundreds meter) of the fault in 2000. In the southern core, a relatively strong deformation structure is preserved in total, and gouge containing fragments of pseudotachylytes and ultracataclasites is observed at the Chi-Chi- earthquake fault, which indicates that the main deformation mechanisms for the southern part of the fault was brittle. On the other hands, in the northern part, sand layer with much amount of water is found at the Chi-Chi- earthquake fault zone, and no breakage of sand grain is observed, which suggests that the deformation mechanism for northern part is independent particulate flow. The purpose of this study is to reveal the differences in clay minerals between the southern and northern part of the Chi-Chi earthquake fault. And then, we discuss about rock-fluid interaction and frictional heating characterized in seismogenic fault system. We analyzed clay minerals by X-ray diffract meter (XRD) after classification of rock types such as sandstone, alteration of sandstone and mudstone, breccia, and gouge. 1.33 micron meter of grains are obtained. Oriented sample was made. XRD analysis was conducted under following condition; 35kV, 15mA, 1 degree per minute of scan rate, and 0.02 degree of scan step. Range of 2 theta was from 2 degree to 35 degree. At first, air-dried condition of samples was measured. After that, ethylene glycol solvated samples were measured. The result represents that all samples contain smectite, illite, chlorite. No difference in components of clay mineral is

  20. Changes of Clay Minereal Association After High—Gradient Magenetic Separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUFAN; A.VIOLANTE; 等

    1998-01-01

    The changes of clay mineral association after high-gradient magnetic separation(HGMS) treatment,and the effects of chemical and physical technologies on concentrating Fe oxides for mian soils in central and southern China were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical analysis methods.Results indicated that the concentrating times of Fe oxides by HGMS treatment were the largest for 0.2-2μm size fraction in the examined soils .For the soils in which 2:1 phyllosilicates were dominant,concentrating times of iron oxides by HGMS treatment were larger than by 5 mol L-1 NaOH treatment .Phyllosili-cates were decreased after HGMS treatment ;however,the decrease was less than that of kaolinite,The goethite/(goethite+hematite) values in Fe oxides of the soils kept virtually constant after HGMS treatment.

  1. Moessbauer and X-ray investigation of clay minerals originated from Libya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    57Fe transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry were used to study clay mineral samples originated from two different regions (Um-arrazm and Alkawasim) of Libya in order to get information about their mineralogical composition to assess their potential for use in the Libyan oil industry. In the samples originated from Un-arrazm calcite, akaganeite and nontronite while in the samples originated from Alkawasim quartz, akaganeite, montmorillonite, kaolinite, illite, mica and hematite were identified with different ratios by using diffraction method. The differences in the phase composition of iron-containing phases of samples from different localities have reflected in the complex Moessbauer spectra at both 300 K and 80 K. For the samples originated from Um-arrazm the Moessbauer parameters of subspectra were identified as nontronite and akaganeite. (author)

  2. A comparison of heavy mineral assemblage between the loess and the Red Clay sequences on the Chinese Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wenbin; Wang, Zhao; Song, Yougui; Pfaff, Katharina; Luo, Zeng; Nie, Junsheng; Chen, Wenhan

    2016-06-01

    QEMSCAN-based (Quantitative Evaluation of Minerals by Scanning Electron Microscopy) heavy mineral analysis has recently been demonstrated an efficient way to allow a rapid extraction of provenance information from sediments. However, one key issue to correctly obtain a provenance signal using this technique is to clearly separate effects of diagenetic alteration on heavy minerals in sediments, especially in fine-grained loess. Here we compare heavy mineral assemblages of bottom Quaternary loess (L33) and upper Pliocene Red Clay of three sites on the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP). Two sites (Chaona and Luochuan) with similar modern climate conditions show similar heavy mineral assemblages but contain much less of the unstable heavy mineral amphibole than the drier Xifeng site. This result provides strong evidence supporting that climate-caused diagenesis is an important factor controlling heavy mineral assemblages of fine-grained loess. However, heavy mineral assemblages are similar for loess and paleosol layers deposited after 0.5 Ma on the Chinese Loess Plateau regardless of climate differences, suggesting that time is also a factor controlling heavy mineral assemblages of loess and Red Clay. Our high resolution sampling of the upper Miocene-Pliocene Chaona Red Clay sequence reveals similar heavy mineral compositions with a minor amphibole content, different from the drier Xifeng site results of the same age. This result indicates that the monsoonal climate pattern might have been maintained since the late Miocene. Furthermore, it indicates that the heavy mineral method is promising in tracing provenance for sites northwest of the Xifeng site on the Loess Plateau.

  3. Distinct actions of strontium on mineral formation in matrix vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matrix vesicles (MVs) are involved in the initial step of mineralization in skeletal tissues and provide an easily model to analyze the hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. Sr stimulates bone formation and its effect was tested on MVs. Sr2+ (15-50 μM) in the mineralization medium containing MVs, 2 mM Ca2+ and 3.42 mM Pi, retarded HA formation. Sr2+ (1-5 mM) in the same medium-induced other types of mineral than HA and cancelled the ATP-, ADP- or PPi-induced retardation in the mineral formation. Our findings suggest that the beneficial effect of Sr2+ at a low dose (15-50 μM) is rather an inhibitor of bone resorption than an activator of mineral formation, while at high Sr2+ concentration (1-5 mM), mineral formation, especially other types of mineral than HA, is favored

  4. Study of delayed behaviour of clays in deep geologic formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is a cost-sharing contract with the European Atomic Energy Community within the framework of Research and Development Program on Management, Storage and Radioactive Waste Disposal. The aim of the work presented in this report is to study the time-dependent behaviour of deep clays in Laboratory or in situ, by means of tests of similar geometry, in order to get easy comparisons and to study scale effect. The cylindrical geometry has been chosen as it resembles in situ works (tunnels, galleries) more closely. The first part of the study concerns a new test on hollow-cylinder. The experimental system, set up specially for this study, has allowed to conduct experiments in which 3 loading parameters may be controlled independently. Different types of experiments can therefore be conducted to study various aspects of mechanical behavior of rocks. A comprehensive experimental program was conducted in the particular case of Boom clay. In the second part of the report devoted to in situ creep or relaxation dilatometer tests, by using new techniques or loading paths, it was shown that time-dependent convergence of boreholes can reach significant values, and is dependent on the direction of the borehole. The anisotropy of the initial state of stress was also put in evidence. The proposed constitutive model (part III) appears to be very suitable to explain the behavior of the Boom clay, in view of the experimental results. In particular, the scale effect is low for Boom clay. 15 refs., 58 figs., 10 tabs

  5. Selection of a site adapted to the realization of an underground laboratory in clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research carried out in Italy by ENEA for site selection of an underground laboratory in a clay formation are presented. Mine roadways, abandoned tunnels, natural or artificial escarpments are prospected. The Pasquasia potash mine in Sicily was selected. The decline reach the lower pliocen starta from -110m to -200m below surface through a clay formation. The site selected for the laboratory is 160 m deep. A 50 meter-long horizontal tunnel will be dug. Experiments planned include thermal, hydrological, mechanical and thermomechanical behavior of clays. Data on temperature variations, interstitial fluid pressure, total pressure, deformations produced by a heater placed in clay will be obtained. Data related to mechanical behavior of formation will be recorded before, during and after the construction of the gallerie. Convergence of borehole will be also studied

  6. Stable Isotope Systematics of Abiotic Nitrite Reduction Coupled with Anaerobic Iron Oxidation: The Role of Reduced Clays and Fe-bearing Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabb, K. C.; Buchwald, C.; Hansel, C. M.; Wankel, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, it is widely assumed that nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) reduction is primarily the result of microbial respiration. However, it has also been shown that abiotic reduction of nitrate and nitrite by reduced iron (Fe(II)), whether mineral-bound or surface-associated, may also occur under certain environmentally relevant conditions. With a range of experimental conditions, we investigated the nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope systematics of abiotic nitrite reduction by Fe(II) in an effort to characterize biotic and abiotic processes in the environment. While homogenous reactions between NO2- and Fe(II) in artificial seawater showed little reduction, heterogeneous reactions involving Fe-containing minerals showed considerable nitrite loss. Specifically, rapid nitrite reduction was observed in experiments that included reduced clays (illite, Na-montmorillonite, and nontronite) and those that exhibited iron oxide formation (ferrihydrite, magnetite and/or green rust). While these iron oxides and clay minerals offer both a source of reduced iron in the mineral matrix as well as a surface for Fe(II) activation, control experiments with corundum as a non-Fe containing mineral surface showed little NO2- loss, implicating a more dominant role of structural Fe in the clays during nitrite reduction. The isotope effects for 15N and 18O (15ɛ and 18ɛ) ranged from 5 to 14‰ for 15ɛ and 5 to 17‰ for 18ɛ and were typically coupled such that 15ɛ ~ 18ɛ. Reactions below pH 7 were slower and the 18ɛ was affected by oxygen atom exchange with water. Although little data exist for comparison with the dual isotopes of microbial NO2- reduction, these data serve as a benchmark for evaluating the role of abiotic processes in N reduction, particularly in sediment systems low in organic carbon and high in iron.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotubes on clay minerals and its application to a hydrogen peroxide biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, H.-L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Jehng, J.-M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jmjehng@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on clay minerals, and the development of biosensors based on Nafion-CNT/Clay-Au and Nafion-CNT/Clay-Au-Glucose oxidase (GOD) composite films for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and glucose, respectively. The CNTs are synthesized on nickel cation exchanged clay mineral platelets. From field-emission scanning electron microscope images, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transfer infrared and thermogravimetric analysis results, the clay layers are exfoliated and delaminated after the growth of CNTs on them. The mixed hybrid film of Nafion, CNT/Clay, Au particles and GOD is coated on the glassy carbon (GC) electrode to detect H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or glucose. This film exhibits a detection limit of 5.0 x 10{sup -5} M for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with a sensitivity of 280 nA mM{sup -1}. In addition, the amperometric response for glucose containing 2.0 mg mL{sup -1} GOD in the Nafion-CNT/Clay-Au-GOD modified GC electrode exhibits a sensitivity of 620 nA mM{sup -1} with a linear range up to 1850 {mu}M. A higher sensitivity and shorter response time are observed with increasing GOD content in the composite matrix film. Besides, the highest sensitivity of 2032 nA mM{sup -1} is obtained with the addition of the 10.0 mg mL{sup -1} GOD in the composite film. Consequently, the CNT/Clay/Nafion medium can probably be a useful electrode for the development of sensors due to its high sensitivity and applicability.

  8. Selenite reduction in boom clay: effect of FeS2, clay minerals and dissolved organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Belgium, the Boom clay layer is considered as the candidate host rock for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW). For this disposal, Selenium 79 is considered to be a critical radionuclide and responsible for the highest dose to man over a period of tens of thousands of years. The behaviour and reactivity of Se thereby depend on its speciation and on its complex biogeochemical transformations. 79Se is thought to occur in, and be released from the solid waste matrix in a variety of redox states, including Se oxyanions such as SeO32- or SeO42-. The composition of the solid and liquid phases of Boom clay was published before. In this paper, the reduction of Se oxyanions was investigated by adding appropriate amounts of SeO32- in over-saturation with respect to the proclaimed thermodynamical solubility of reduced Se solid phases (SeO, FeSe, FeSe2), to a number of systems which represent Boom clay geochemical conditions. The range of systems is chosen in order to incorporate in an increasing way the different Se competing organic and inorganic phases present in the Boom clay matrix. (authors)

  9. Process of phase formation in calcareous hydromica-containing clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illite type hydromica-containing clays as raw materials of highly heat-insulating materials are investigated. Secondary crystalline phases of anorthite, gehlenite, hematite, mullite and diopside are formed in the process of high-temperature firing. In the clays with high content of dolomite akermanite, monticellite and calcium ferrite are formed in the thermal process. 1000-1-2- deg C is an optimal firing temperature for these heat-insulating materials. Finally we have obtained the following characteristics for the calcareous hydromica-containing firing ceramic body: density 1.30-1.20 g/cm3, bending strength 120-180 MPa, coefficient of thermal conductivity λ 0.19 W/m.K. (author)

  10. Universal scaling of the formation factor in clays: Example from the Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Hugh; Ghanbarian, Behzad; Henry, Pierre; Conin, Marianne

    2015-11-01

    Electrical conductivity is a fundamental characteristic describing how strongly a network opposes flow of electrical current. In fully water-saturated porous media the conductivity, represented by the formation factor, is mainly controlled by porosity, connectivity of the conducting phases, and the tortuosity of electrical current paths. Previous work has shown that universal scaling derived from percolation and effective medium theories accurately describes the relationship between formation factor and porosity when the percolation threshold is taken account, as well as the porosity value at which the scaling switches from percolation theory to effective medium theory. We determined the formation factor in clay-rich sediments based on cation exchange capacity measurements on samples from five scientific ocean drilling sites in the Nankai Trough. We then compared the results to predictions from universal scaling after determining the volume of clay-bound water and the percolation threshold. We found that the previously reported universal scaling relations hold in these clay-rich sediments once the corrections are made for the clay-bound water and that percolation scaling appears to be valid over the entire range of observed porosities, probably due to relatively broad pore size distributions or low pore system connectivity. Our results show that universal scaling can be applied to describe the porosity dependence of the formation factor in clay-rich sediments when appropriate corrections are made for the presence of clay-bound water.

  11. Effect of organic matter properties, clay mineral type and thermal maturity on gas adsorption in organic-rich shale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongwei; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ruppel, Stephen C.; Milliken, Kitty; Lewan, Mike; Sun, Xun

    2013-01-01

    A series of CH4 adsorption experiments on natural organic-rich shales, isolated kerogen, clay-rich rocks, and artificially matured Woodford Shale samples were conducted under dry conditions. Our results indicate that physisorption is a dominant process for CH4 sorption, both on organic-rich shales and clay minerals. The Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of the investigated samples is linearly correlated with the CH4 sorption capacity in both organic-rich shales and clay-rich rocks. The presence of organic matter is a primary control on gas adsorption in shale-gas systems, and the gas-sorption capacity is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) content, organic-matter type, and thermal maturity. A large number of nanopores, in the 2–50 nm size range, were created during organic-matter thermal decomposition, and they significantly contributed to the surface area. Consequently, methane-sorption capacity increases with increasing thermal maturity due to the presence of nanopores produced during organic-matter decomposition. Furthermore, CH4 sorption on clay minerals is mainly controlled by the type of clay mineral present. In terms of relative CH4 sorption capacity: montmorillonite ≫ illite – smectite mixed layer > kaolinite > chlorite > illite. The effect of rock properties (organic matter content, type, maturity, and clay minerals) on CH4 adsorption can be quantified with the heat of adsorption and the standard entropy, which are determined from adsorption isotherms at different temperatures. For clay-mineral rich rocks, the heat of adsorption (q) ranges from 9.4 to 16.6 kJ/mol. These values are considerably smaller than those for CH4 adsorption on kerogen (21.9–28 kJ/mol) and organic-rich shales (15.1–18.4 kJ/mol). The standard entropy (Δs°) ranges from -64.8 to -79.5 J/mol/K for clay minerals, -68.1 to -111.3 J/mol/K for kerogen, and -76.0 to -84.6 J/mol/K for organic-rich shales. The affinity of CH4 molecules for sorption on organic matter

  12. The role of clay minerals on the hardsetting properties of soils in the Carnarvon horticultural district of Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We investigated the role of clay minerals on the hardsetting properties of soils used for intensive irrigated horticulture in the Carnarvon horticultural district of Western Australia. Hardsetting soils break down when wetted due to a combination of slaking and dispersion processes, resulting in a structureless mass of soil when dry. Soil samples were studied from several horizons from six profiles with hardsetting problems. On bulk samples, we measured the cation exchange capacity (CEC) and following treatment with sodium (Na), measured the tensile strength of (Na saturated) remoulded cores. On clay separates we measured the clay mineralogy using X-ray . diffraction (XRD) analysis and CEC by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis after barium (Ba) saturation. Samples were also investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The tensile strength of the Na saturated remoulded cores was highly correlated (p ≤ 0.001) to both clay % and CEC of the soil. Lugo (1975) working with dried briquettes of soil materials produced similar results, and demonstrated that the increase in tensile strength adversely affected the stand of plants. When the tensile strength of the remoulded cores was compared to the CEC of the clay fractions, the soil clays with higher CEC had greater tensile strength than soils lower in CEC (p=0.09). Initial qualitative XRD results using the SIROQUANT method indicated that the soil clays mainly consisted of kaolinite with some illite, but very little smectite content. However the measured CEC's (by Ba saturation) were higher than expected and could not be explained on the basis of the illite and kaolinite contents. It was therefore inferred that interstratified smectite was also present. Using the proprietary software 'Traces', and a Pseudo-Voigt peak-shape algorithm, each XRD pattern was fitted with calculated peaks for the clay minerals present. Comparison with calculated patterns for interstratified illite/smectite (I/S) using

  13. Study of adsorption of Phenanthrene on Different Types of Clay Minerals; Estudio de Adsorcion de Fenentreno en Diferentes Tipos de Arcillas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, M. L.; Escolano, O.; Rodriguez, V.; Diaz, F. J.; Perez, R.; Garcia, S.; Garcia Frutos, F. J.

    2003-07-01

    The fate and behaviour of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds in deep soil is mainly controlled by the mineral fraction present in the soil due to the very low organic carbon content of the deep soil. The mineral fraction that may greatly influence the fate and transport of these compounds due to its presence and properties are the clay minerals. Clay mineral also become increasingly important in low organic matter content soils. There tree, studies of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds adsorption on clay minerals without organic matter are necessary lo better understand the fate and transport of these compounds. In this work we used phenanthrene as model compound of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compound and four pure clay minerals: kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite including muscovite mica. These clays minerals are selected due to its abundance in represent ve Spanish soils and different properties as its structural layers and expanding capacity. Batch experiments were performed using phenanthrene aqueous solutions and the clays selected. Phenanthrene sorption isotherms for all clays, except muscovite mica, were best described by the Freundlich model. Physical sorption on the external surfaces is the most probable adsorption mechanisms. In this sense, the presence of non-polar nano-sites on clay surfaces could determine the adsorption of phenanthrene by hydrophobic interaction on these sites. (Author) 22 refs.

  14. Bio-Mobilization of Potassium from Clay Minerals: II. By Ectomycorrhizal Fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi, including Cenococcum geophilurn SIV (Cg SIV), and Pisolithus tinctorius 2144(Pt 2144), 441 (Pt 441) and XC1 (Pt XC1), were cultured in Pachlewski liquid medium with H2KPO4, KClsaturated vermiculite and mica as K sources, respectively, to investigate the mechanism of K absorption and mobilization by the fungi. Fungal growth rate, K absorption and mobilization varied significantly among the fungal species. Faster growth and greater K accumulation in Pt XC1 than Pt 2 144, Pt 441 and Cg siv were observed. Ectomycorrhizal fungi depressed HCl-soluble K in minerals after successive extractions by water and NH4OAc. Ratio of the total amount of K, including water-, NH4OAc- and HCl-soluble K, lost from substrates to the K accumulated in fungal colonies was less than 60%. These reveal that the ectomycorrhizal fungi could utilize K in interlayer and structural pools, which are usually unavailable for plants in short period. Large differences in the depletion of K in interlayer and structural pools by fungi were observed at fungal harvest. Taking into account the nutrient absorption by ectomycorrhizal fungi in symbionts and the direct contact between hyphae and soils, the fungi species colonized on the root surfaces seemed to be related to the effectiveness of mycorrhizas to utilize K in soils. Ectomycorrhizal fungi differed in the efflux of protons and oxalate. Pt XC1 was observed to have greatest ability to effuse protons and oxalate among the fungi adopted in the experiment. Furthermore, the higher the concentrations of protons and oxalate in the liquid culture solutions, the larger the depletion of K in interlayer and structural pools in minerals by fungi. Protons could replace interlayer K and chelation of oxalate with Fe and A1 in crystal lattice could cause weathering of clay minerals. So, protons and oxalate produced by ectomycorrhizal fungi might play an important role in K mobilization in these two pools.

  15. Experiments on the reduction of radiocesium in pigs by adding clay minerals to the contaminated feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For some time now clay minerals are used as feed additives in animal production but are even discussed lately as a possibility of decontamination of radiocesium in the living animal because of their ion exchange property. The nuclear accident of Chernobyl in April 1986 induced the Austrian government to set radioactivity limits for contamination with Cs-137 and 134. For pork the total of 5nCi Cs-137 and 134/kg was set which proved to be a problem for pig fattening when fed on whey and concentrate. The aim of this study was to see if the addition of clays to the animal feed can reduce the cesium content in the meat. After 3 short-term-trials with the total amount of 21 animals one long-term pig-fattening experiment with 40 animals was conducted. For 70 days their feed contained fallout Cs in form of dried whey. The control group was fed the normal ration, for test group 1 bentonite and for test group 2 bolus alba were mixed into the concentrate in amounts corresponding to 5%. After administering fallout-Cs for 70 days 5 animals of each group were slaughtered and the Cs-activity specified in leg, butt, neck, liver, kidney and blood. With exception of the liver the mean values of the control group reached higher levels than 5nCi Cs-137 and 134, test group 2 showed the same tendency in the leg. Test group 1 proved satisfactorily with all mean values well beyond the limit with highly significant response. Feeding the remaining animals with uncontaminated rations of feed it could be demonstrated that bentonite decreases the biological half-life of cesium. 52 refs., 10 figs., 26 tabs

  16. Clay mineral records of East Asian monsoon evolution during late Quaternary in the southern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhifei; C. Colin; A. Trentesaux; D. Blamart

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution clay mineral records combined with oxygen isotopic stratigraphy over the past 190 ka during late Quaternary from core MD01-2393 off the Mekong River in the southern South China Sea are reported to reconstruct a history of East Asian monsoon evolution.The dominating clay mineral components indicate a strong glacial-interglacial cyclicity, with high glacial illite, chlorite, and kaolinite contents and high interglacial smectites content. The provenance analysis indicates the direct input of clay minerals via the Mekong River drainage basin.Illite and chlorite derived mainly from the upper reach of the Mekong River, where physical erosion of meta-sedimentary rocks is dominant. Kaolinite derived mainly from active erosion of inhered clays from reworked sediments in the middle reaches. Smectites originated mainly through bisiallitic soils in the middle to lower reaches of the Mekong River. The smectites/(illite+chlorite)and smectites/kaolinite ratios are determined as mineralogical indicators of East Asian monsoon variations. Relatively high ratios occur during interglacials and indicate strengthened summer-monsoon rainfall and weakened winter-monsoon winds; relatively lower ratios happened in glacials, indicating intensified winter monsoon and weakened summer monsoon. The evolution of the summer and winter monsoons provides an almost linear response to the summer insolation of the Northern Hemisphere, implying an astronomical forcing of the East Asian monsoon evolution.

  17. Study on rich alumina alkali-activated slag clay minerals cementitious materials for immobilization of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The composition and some properties of its pastes of rich alumina alkali-activated slag clay minerals (RAAASCM) cementitious materials for immobilization of radioactive waste are studied. Experimental results show that heat activated kaolinite, Xingjiang zeolite, modified attapulgite clay are better constituents of RAAASCM. RAAASCM cementitious materials pastes exhibit high strength, low porosity, fewer harmful pore, and high resistance to sulphate corrosion as well as gamma irradiation. The Sr2+, Cs+ leaching portion of the simulated radioactive waste forms based on RAAASCM, is low

  18. Luminescent Oxygen Gas Sensors Based on Nanometer-Thick Hybrid Films of Iridium Complexes and Clay Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisako Sato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Ir(III complexes in photo-responsive molecular devices for oxygen gas sensing is reviewed. Attention is focused on the immobilization of Ir(III complexes in organic or inorganic host materials such as polymers, silica and clays in order to enhance robustness and reliability. Our recent works on constructing nanometer-thick films comprised of cyclometalated cationic Ir(III complexes and clay minerals are described. The achievement of multi-emitting properties in response to oxygen pressure is demonstrated.

  19. Clays as prebiotic photocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lawless, J.; Lahav, N.; Sutton, S.; Sweeney, M.

    1981-01-01

    Clay minerals catalyze peptide bond formation in fluctuating environments. A number of plausible mechanisms have been proposed and tested. The possibility that clays may actually be energizing the reaction by means of electronic excitation, creating mobile or trapped holes and electrons in the lattice, is explored. It has been discovered that clays emit light upon dehydration. The correlation between dehydration-induced, or thermoluminescent, processes and the yield of glycine oligomers after treatments known to affect the luminescent yields is being tested, in an effort to understand the catalytic mechanism

  20. The Kimmeridge Clay Formation (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) of the Norwegian continental shelf and Dorset, UK: a chemostratigraphical correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Holly; Gale, Andy; Gradstein, Felix

    2016-04-01

    The type section of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation (KCF) at Dorset, (UK) stands at the forefront in multidisciplinary research on climatic cyclicity, orbital forcing, sea level change and the productivity vs. preservation controversy. In economic terms, it is a prime source rock of the North Sea hydrocarbon province containing up to 35% total organic carbon. Lateral equivalents of the KCF occur widely in the North, Norwegian and Barents Sea regions of north-western Europe under other names: the Draupne, Mandal, Spekk, Hekkingen and Agardhfjellet (Svalbard) formations. Carbon isotopes and clay mineralogy have been extensively studied from the KCF type section at Dorset. However, between the North Sea and Western Barents Sea, little is known of these records. Correlation using both clay mineral and δ13Corg profiles across these areas would provide insights for our understanding of Late Jurassic climatic developments in north-western Europe. New chemostratigraphical records through the KCF of five Norwegian exploration wells of Lundin Petroleum and one of Statoil, are compared with the Kimmeridgian of Sub-Boreal Dorset, along with a correlation between Svalbard records with the Tithonian cores sampled in this project. Dinoflagellate biostratigraphy accompanies isotope stratigraphy in the placement of each core in time. Initial results show a strong overall correlation. On a smaller timescale, several events are described from Dorset, including a distinct mid-Eudoxus positive isotope peak reflecting a sea level rise, and the Hudlestoni aridity peak as recorded by low kaolinite/illite ratios. Off the Norwegian Continental Shelf, how are these events recorded, if recorded at all, in a δ13Corg and clay mineralogical profile? Such events are useful tools in correlation, and their identification regionally reduces the likelihood of local influence on oceanographical conditions, such as palaeoproductivity response to nutrient influxes, and instead reflects changes in the

  1. Preparation and characterization of bentonite clay for formation of nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study we used the linear medium density polyethylene (PELMD) as polymer matrix and introduced, as reinforcement to increase the mechanical and thermal properties, the green bentonite deposit of Boa Vista/PB, rich montmorillonite (MMT), previously characterized by XRD, that passed by three stages of purification. The first stage was to clean by washing and filtering for removal of coarse material (sand and organic matter), followed by an acid attack. In the second, we used the quaternary ammonium surfactant, in order to increase the distance between the layers of MMT, and the third was removed from the wastewater, using absolute ethanol, finishing the purification of process. Then, the clay was introduced into the polymer matrix by polymerization in solution by intercalation and characterized by XRD. The results showed a partial exfoliation, satisfying the increasing properties. (author)

  2. Basic investigation of the distribution coefficients of radioactive nuclides to clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption of radioactive cations to clay minerals, which governs the movement of radioactive cations through the saturated zone, has been investigated. The influence of coexisting Ca2+ and Mg2+ on the adsorption of radioactive cations was discussed in this report. Theoretical studies were developed on the basis of the experimental results which were obtained in the previous experiments. The approximate equation, which shows that the influence of coexisting Ca2+ and Mg2+ can be substituted for that Ca2+ alone by using the equilibrium constant K sub(Ca-Mg) was derived from the above results. The distribution coefficients of radioactive cations (60Co and 85Sr) to the ion exchangers (Amberlite IR-120B, Green sand and KUR sand) were obtained experimentally for the several concentrations of coexisting Ca2+ and Mg2+. These results could be explained well by the above approximate equation. It is concluded that the influence of coexisting Ca2+ and Mg2+ on the distribution coefficients of radioactive cations can be easily substituted for that of Ca2+ only. (auth.)

  3. Aspects of the X-ray identification of swelling clay minerals in soils and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the interest in and necessity for identifying swelling clay minerals of the smectite group because of their economic importance, routine investigation by conventional X-ray diffraction methods seldom includes any attempt to identify the sub-group or species of smectite. The more important techniques for achieving such identification are examined with special reference to the Greene-Kelly test and intercalation with alkylammonium chlorides. The Greene-Kelly test can only be used for dioctahedral species and stevensite and fails to distinguish between montmorillonite and beidellite in a manner consistent with the internationally recognised definitions for these species based on layer charge. A better differentiation of species is achieved by the alkylammonium chloride method, but the effort involved makes routine application unattractive unless an abbreviated version is applied, in which case, however, the presence of chlorite may produce an ambiguos result. There are, nevertheless, distinct advantages to the use of this method, both in obtaining an identification of smectite species which is most consistent with definition, and in being able to predict the usefulness of a particular smectite for certain types of industrial application

  4. Vanadium recovery from clay vanadium mineral using an acid leaching method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Haoran; FENG Yali; LIANG Jianglong; LUO Xiaobing; DU Zhuwei

    2008-01-01

    A technique including direct acid leaching,vanadium precipitation with alkaline,sodium hydroxide releaching,impurity removing by adjusting pH value,precipitation vanadium with ammonium chloride,and vanadium pentoxide by roasting steps was proposed according to the characteristic of Xichuan clay vanadium mineral.The factors influencing leaching vanadium such as temperature and the concentration of sulfuric acid were investigated and optimized.The experimental results indicate that the extract ratios of V2O5 can reach 94% and 92% at a sodium chlorate ratio of 3% and a manganese dioxide ratio of 3%,respectively.A completely chemical precipitation method was adopted to decontaminate and enrich the vanadium in the acid leaching solution.The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern and the purity analysis of vanadium pentoxide indicate that the purity of final vanadium pentoxide can reach 99% and meet the standard specifications.The total recovery can reach about 75%.The technique has the characteristics of simplicity,less investlnent,and more environment safety as compared with the traditional salt roasting method.

  5. Tectonic?palaeoenvironmental forcing of clay-mineral assemblages in nonmarine settings: the Oligocene?Miocene As Pontes Basin (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, A.; Inglès, M.; Cabrera, L.; de las Heras, A.

    2003-07-01

    Two small, alluvial-lacustrine subbasins developed during the early restraining overstep stages of the Oligocene-Miocene As Pontes strike-slip Basin (NW Spain). Later, the basin evolved into a restraining bend stage and an alluvial-swamp-dominated depositional framework developed. The palaeobiological record demonstrates that the Oligocene-Miocene palaeoclimate in NW Spain was subtropical, warm and humid to subhumid. The metamorphic and igneous basin catchment yielded clay assemblages made up by kaolinite, illite and Al-smectite. Illite occurred as an original mineral in the source rock area, whereas kaolinite and Al-smectite resulted mainly from weathering of feldspar and clinochlore, respectively. This detrital primary clay assemblage remained preserved in the colluvial, alluvial fan and shallow lacustrine facies, whose early diagenesis was influenced by diluted, poorly evolved pore waters with neutral to slightly alkaline pH. The original clay assemblage was mildly to strongly transformed under early diagenetic conditions in the lacustrine and swampy environments where significant hydrochemical and Eh-pH changes took place. A fibrous magnesium-rich clay mineral-dominated assemblage (palygorskite and sepiolite) formed in shallow, saline lakes and palustrine zones under the influence of magnesium-rich, alkaline waters. Moreover, kaolinite-enriched assemblages formed in deep lacustrine, swamp and swamp-related alluvial zones under the influence of slightly to highly acidic pore waters. Pore water acidic conditions, characterising environments with organic matter accumulation, led to early diagenetic transformation of Al-smectite into kaolinite. This process was relatively limited in some environments such as organic matter-rich bottoms in meromictic lacustrine zones, whereas it was pervasive in peat-forming swamp zones. The stratigraphic relationships between the diverse clay mineral assemblages in the As Pontes Basin fill demonstrate the coeval development of

  6. CLAY MINERALOGY OF INSOLUBLE RESIDUES IN MARINE EVAPORITES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodine, Marc W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Insoluble residues from three sequences of Paleozoic marine evaporites (Retsof salt bed in western New York, Salado Formation in south-eastern New Mexico, and Paradox Member of the Hermosa Formation in southeastern Utah) are rich in trioctahedral clays. Chlorite (clinochlore), corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite-trioctahedral smectite), talc, and illite (the only dioctahedral clay) are the dominant clay minerals; serpentine, discrete trioctahedral smectite (saponite), and interstratified talc-trioctahedral smectite are sporadically abundant. These clay-mineral assemblages differ chemically and mineralogically from those observed in most continental and normal marine rocks, which commonly contain kaolinite, dioctahedral smectite (beidellite-montmorillonite), illite, mixed-layer illite-dioctahedral smectite, and, in most cases, no more than minor quantities of trioctahedral clay minerals. The distinctive clay mineralogy in these evaporite sequences suggests a largely authigenic origin. These clay minerals are thought to have formed during deposition and early diagenesis through interaction between argillaceous detritus and Mg-rich marine evaporite brines.

  7. Formation of hydrocarbons from acid-Clay suspensions by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Castaneda, J.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM. Cd. Universitaria, A. P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-07-03

    The adsorption of certain organic compounds by clays gives rise to the transformation of the adsorbate through the action of the clays. This phenomenon can be enhanced using ionizing radiation. In this context, these kinds of reactions play an important role in many natural and industrial processes. For example, in oil and gas exploration, the source and trap of petroleum hydrocarbons is frequently clay-rich rocks. Clay-water-based muds are also seen as environmentally friendly alternatives to toxic oil-based fluids. The principal processes that occur in sediments are usually held to be of bacterial action and thermal transformation, which may include thermally induced catalytic alteration of the organic debris. On the other hand, radioactive materials are widely distributed throughout Earth. They were more abundant in the past, but are present in petroleum reservoirs. Their presence induced radioactive bombardment, which may have altered these sediments. This important subject has not been extensively studied. The aim of this work is to study the behavior of fatty acids-like behenic acid-and dicarboxylic acids-like fumaric acid-as model compounds, which are adsorbed in a clay mineral (Na-montmorillonite) and exposed to gamma radiation. The results show that the radiation-induced decomposition of the clay-acid system goes along a definitive path (oxidation), rather than following several modes of simultaneous decomposition, as happens in radiolysis without clay or by heating the system. The main radiolytic products for fatty acids are their corresponding hydrocarbons, with one C-atom less than the original acid.

  8. Formation and Stabilization of Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals Induced by the Interaction of Anthracene with Fe(III)-Modified Clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hanzhong; Nulaji, Gulimire; Gao, Hongwei; Wang, Fu; Zhu, Yunqing; Wang, Chuanyi

    2016-06-21

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are occasionally detected in Superfund sites but the formation of EPFRs induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is not well understood. In the present work, the formation of EPFRs on anthracene-contaminated clay minerals was quantitatively monitored via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and surface/interface-related environmental influential factors were systematically explored. The obtained results suggest that EPFRs are more readily formed on anthracene-contaminated Fe(III)-montmorillonite than in other tested systems. Depending on the reaction condition, more than one type of organic radicals including anthracene-based radical cations with g-factors of 2.0028-2.0030 and oxygenic carbon-centered radicals featured by g-factors of 2.0032-2.0038 were identified. The formed EPFRs are stabilized by their interaction with interlayer surfaces, and such surface-bound EPFRs exhibit slow decay with 1/e-lifetime of 38.46 days. Transformation pathway and possible mechanism are proposed on the basis of experimental results and quantum mechanical simulations. Overall, the formation of EPFRs involves single-electron-transfer from anthracene to Fe(III) initially, followed by H2O addition on formed aromatic radical cation. Because of their potential exposure in soil and atmosphere, such clay surface-associated EPFRs might induce more serious toxicity than PAHs and exerts significant impacts on human health. PMID:27224055

  9. X-ray-phase and IR-spectral study of clay rocks mineral content of the Caspian Sea Gulf depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of clays selected from different oil fields (Sazankurak, Kemerkol, Kozha and others) and deposition depths are examined on both the X-ray diffractometers (Dron-2 and Dron-4) and the infrared-spectrometers (IR-20). In this diagnostic the American file with different minerals X-ray systematized data is used. The X-ray reflections, which are in compliance with suitable inter-plane distances and clay impurities reflex intensities are determined. With confirmation purpose for mineral content correctness obtained according X-ray-phase analysis the infrared-spectrometric method is used, in which principal attention was paid to absorption field (3,400-3,700 cm-1) of H2O and OH valency frequency vibrations

  10. Geochemical studies of clay minerals III. The determination of free silica and free alumina in montmorillonites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, M.D.

    1953-01-01

    Determination of free silica by the method proposed made possible the derivation of logical formulas for several specimens of montmorillonites for which the formulas could not be derived from the analyses alone. Other montmorillonites, for which logical formulas could be derived from their analyses, were found to contain small amounts of free silica or free alumina. Others were found to contain neither free silica nor free alumina. The method consists of the following steps: (1) digestion of 1 g of the specimen with 0.5 N NaOH solution in a covered platinum crucible or dish on a steam bath for 4 hrs, stirring the mixture at 30-min intervals, (2) filtration of the undissolved material, followed by washing several times with 1% NaOH solution, (3) neutralization of the filtrate with HCl, addition of 5 ml HCl in excess and determination of SiO and Al2O3 in the usual way and (4) calculation of the amount of free SiO2 or free Al2O3 if any and the amount of attack of the clay structure by the treatment from the ratio of SiO2 to Al2O3 dissolved and the ratio of SiO2 to Al2O3 obtained on analysis. Tests with 5% Na2CO3 solution, the reagent formerly used for the solution of free SiO2 in rocks and minerals, showed that solution of opal by this reagent is always fractional, never complete, no matter how small the amount present or how long the period of treatment. Re-treatment of the sample results in 90-95% solution if 10 mg or less of opal is present, but for larger amounts of opal the percentage dissolved decreases as the amount present increases. On the other hand, 75 ml of 0.5 N NaOH completely dissolves as much as 400 mg of opal in 4 hrs digestion in a covered platinum crucible or dish, on a steam bath. However, a weaker solution or a shorter period of digestion does not effect complete solution. The same amount (75 ml) of 0.5 N NaOH also dissolves 90 mg of cristobalite and 57 mg of quartz having a grain size of less than 2 microns. Use of NaOH also permits determination

  11. Role of Clay Minerals in Long-Distance Transport of Landslides in Valles Marineris, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, J.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Yin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Long-runout (> 50 km) subaerial landslides are rare on Earth, but are common features episodically shaping Mars' Valles Marineris (VM) trough system over the past 3.5 billion years. They display two end-member morphologies: a thick-skinned inner zone, characterized by fault-bounded, rotated blocks near their source region, and a thin-skinned, exceptionally long-runout outer zone, characterized by thin sheets spreading over 10s of km across the trough floor. Four decades of studies on the latter have resulted in two main competing hypotheses to explain their long-distance transport: (1) movement of landslides over layers of trapped air or soft materials containing ice or snow, enabling basal lubrication, and (2) fluidization of landslide materials with or without the presence of water and volatiles. To address this issue, we examine the mineralogic composition of landslides across VM using Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) near-infrared spectral data analysis coupled with detailed geologic mapping and morphometric analysis of satellite images. Our survey reveals a general correlation between transport distance, significant lateral spreading, and the presence of hydrated silicates among VM landslides. Given that smectite clay absorbs water into its layered crystal structure and can reduce the friction coefficient by a factor of three v. that of dry rocks, these results suggest that hydrated silicates played a decisive role in facilitating long-runout landslide transport in VM. We propose that, concurrent with downslope failure and sliding of broken trough-wall rock, frontal landslide masses overrode and entrained hydrated-silicate-bearing trough-floor deposits, lubricating the basal sliding zones and permitting the landslide outer zones to spread laterally while moving forward over the low-friction surface. The key participation of hydrated silicates in episodic, sustained landslide activity throughout the canyon implies that clay minerals

  12. Provenance changes between recent and glacial-time sediments in the Amundsen Sea embayment, West Antarctica: clay mineral assemblage evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrmann, Werner; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Smith, James A.; Graham, Alastair G.C.; Kuhn, Gerhard; Larter, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    The Amundsen Sea embayment is a probable site for the initiation of a future collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. This paper contributes to a better understanding of the transport pathways of subglacial sediments into this embayment at present and during the last glacial period. It discusses the clay mineral composition of sediment samples taken from the seafloor surface and marine cores in order to decipher spatial and temporal changes in the sediment provenance. The most striking featu...

  13. Adsorption of reovirus to clay minerals: effects of cation-exchange capacity, cation saturation, and surface area.

    OpenAIRE

    Lipson, S M; Stotzky, G

    1983-01-01

    The adsorption of reovirus to clay minerals has been reported by several investigators, but the mechanisms defining this association have been studied only minimally. The purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the mechanisms involved with this interaction. More reovirus type 3 was adsorbed, in both distilled and synthetic estuarine water, by low concentrations of montmorillonite than by comparable concentrations of kaolinite containing a mixed complement of cations on the exchange com...

  14. Surficial clay mineral distribution on the southwestern continental margin of India: Evidence of input from the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chauhan, O.S.; Gujar, A.R.

    are also present in significant quantities on the slope with traces of gibbsite and palygorskite in some samples. The high contents of illite and chlorite (clay minerals which are not abundant in the soils and estuarine sediments of this region...) in the southern region of the study area are evidence for sediment contribution from the Bay of Bengal waters (BBW), which enter this region after the SW monsoon. Distribution trends of kaolinite, smectite, gibbsite, and laterite granules on the slope...

  15. Adsorption Mechanisms of Emerging Micro-pollutants with a clay Mineral: Case of Tramadol and Doxepine Pharmaceutical Products

    OpenAIRE

    Thiebault, Thomas; Guégan, Régis; Boussafir, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    International audience A sodium exchanged smectite clay mineral (Mt) was used as geo-sorbent for the adsorption of tramadol and doxepin: two pharmaceutical products (PPs) defined as emerging pollutants due to their presence at significant concentration in numerous water compartments. The adsorption isotherms for both the temperatures of 20 and 40 °C and the derived data determined through the fitting procedure by using Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin–Radushkevich equation models explicitl...

  16. Disposal of conditioned HLW matrices and interaction with a deep clay layer as host formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About two decades ago the Belgian Nuclear Research Center, SCK CEN, started the construction of an underground laboratory at a depth of 250 m in the Boom Clay formation extending from 180 to 280 m depth. The shaft was dug under freezing conditions because large aquifers surmount the clay layer. The underground galleries were constructed with conventional semi-automatic tunneling machines. An extensive R and D program has been undertaken within the framework of the European Community's Research and Development Programme on the management and storage of radioactive waste. The main scientific fields of investigation are: local and regional hydrogeologic characterisation, migration of radionuclides in clay, interaction of waste forms with clay, gas migration in compact clay, corrosion of canister materials, thermal load and heat dissipation in clay, study and performance analysis of backfill materials, and safety analysis of an underground repository. The underground laboratory at Mol has been used by many partners within the European Union to carry out in situ experiments in fully representative conditions. 14 refs

  17. Evaluation of the medicinal use of clay minerals as antibacterial agents

    OpenAIRE

    WILLIAMS, LYNDA B.; Haydel, Shelley E.

    2010-01-01

    Natural clays have been used to heal skin infections since the earliest recorded history. Recently our attention was drawn to a clinical use of French green clay (rich in Fe-smectite) for healing Buruli ulcer, a necrotizing fasciitis (‘flesh-eating’ infection) caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. These clays and others like them are interesting as they may reveal an antibacterial mechanism that could provide an inexpensive treatment for this and other skin infections, especially in global areas ...

  18. Characterisation of gas transport properties of the Opalinus Clay, a potential host rock formation for radioactive waste disposal

    OpenAIRE

    Marschall, P; Horseman, S.; Gimmi, T.

    2005-01-01

    The Opalinus Clay in Northern Switzerland has been identified as a potential host rock formation for the disposal of radioactive waste. Comprehensive understanding of gas transport processes through this low-permeability formation forms a key issue in the assessment of repository performance. Field investigations and laboratory experiments suggest an intrinsic permeability of the Opalinus Clay in the order of 10-20 to 10-21 m2 and a moderate anisotropy ratio < 10. Porosity depends on clay con...

  19. Method for determination of clay and mica consentrations in underground sandstone formations by radioactivity logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An underground formation is logged for the registration of natural gamma radiation from trace amounts of thorium, uranium and potassium. Both the clay and mica content for an interesting interval is determined from natural gamma activities in the interval of interest, in a pure sandstone interval and in a shale interval free from mica

  20. Physicochemical Study of Photocatalytic Activity of TiO2 Supported Palygorskite Clay Mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahcen Bouna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the influence of physicochemical parameters, namely, the photocatalyst loading, dye concentration, and pH of polluted solutions, on the degradation efficiency of Orange G (OG solutions containing TiO2 nanoparticles supported on palygorskite clay mineral (TiO2-Pal. The TiO2 photocatalyst attached to natural palygorskite fibers was elaborated by colloidal sol-gel route. It exhibits the anatase structure that is the most photoactive crystallographic form. The highest performances of supported photocatalyst on OG degradation were found using an optimum amount of TiO2-Pal around 0.8 g·L−1, which corresponds properly to ca. 0.4 g·L−1 of TiO2. This amount is interestingly lower than the 2.5 g·L−1 generally reported when using pure unsupported TiO2 powder. The photodegradation rate increases by decreasing OG initial concentration, and it was found significantly higher when the OG solution is either acidic (pH<4 or basic (pH≈11. For OG concentrations in the range 5×10-6– 5×10-4 M, the kinetic law of the OG degradation in presence of TiO2-Pal is similar to that reported for unsupported TiO2 nanopowder. It follows a Langmuir-Hinshelwood model with a first-order reaction and an apparent rate constant of about 2.9×10-2 min−1.

  1. Se behaviour in the Boom Clay system: spectroscopic evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Breynaert, Eric; Scheinost, Andreas C.; Dom, Dirk; Vancluysen, Jacqueline; Maes, André

    2009-01-01

    In Belgium, the Boom Clay formation is studied as a reference host formation for the geological disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive waste for more than 30 years. This formation mainly consists of mixed clay minerals (illite, interstratified illite-smectite), pyrite and immobile and dissolved natural organic matter. Since it provides good sorption capacities, very low permeability, and chemically reducing conditions due to the presence of pyrite (FeS2), the Boom clay formation it...

  2. Heterogeneous uptake of the C1 to C4 organic acids on a swelling clay mineral

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Tolbert; Gough, R. V.; C. D. Hatch

    2007-01-01

    International audience Mineral aerosol is of interest due to its physiochemical impacts on the Earth's atmosphere. However, adsorbed organics could influence the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric mineral particles and alter their impact on the biosphere and climate. In this work, the heterogeneous uptake of a series of small organic acids on the swelling clay, Na-montmorillonite, was studied at 212 K as a function of relative humidity (RH), organic acid pressure and clay mass...

  3. Distribution of clay minerals in drift sediments on the continental rise west of the Antarctic Peninsula, ODP Leg 178, Sites 1095 and 1096

    OpenAIRE

    Hillenbrand, C.-D.; W. Ehrmann

    2001-01-01

    The clay mineral compositions of upper Miocene to Quaternary sediments recovered at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 178, Sites 1095 and 1096, from the continental rise west of the Antarctic Peninsula were analyzed in order to reconstruct the Neogene and Quaternary Antarctic paleoclimate and ice dynamics. The clay mineral assemblages are dominated by smectite, illite, and chlorite. Kaolinite occurs only in trace amounts. Analysis of a surface-sample data set facilitates the assignment of thes...

  4. Application of molecular orbital calculation for evaluating binding force of water molecules sorbed on surface of 2:1 type clay mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluate the bonding force subjecting on the water molecule sorbed on the surface of 2:1 type clay mineral by using semi-empirical molecular orbital calculation, and compare it with the binding forces of solid and liquid phases of water. We can consider that molecular orbital calculation is a useful and helpful tool for characterizing the properties of water molecules present in the clay minerals. (author)

  5. Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in the Presence of Silica Sand and Bentonite Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Saw V.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation and dissociation of methane hydrates in a porous media containing silica sand of different sizes and bentonite clay were studied in the presence of synthetic seawater with 3.55 wt% salinity. The phase equilibrium of methane hydrate under different experimental conditions was investigated. The effects of the particle size of silica sand as well as a mixture of bentonite clay and silica sand on methane hydrate formation and its dissociation were studied. The kinetics of hydrate formation was studied under different subcooling conditions to observe its effects on the induction time of hydrate formation. The amount of methane gas encapsulated in hydrate was computed using a real gas equation. The Clausius-Clapeyron equation is used to estimate the enthalpy of hydrate dissociation with measured phase equilibrium data.

  6. Possibility of disposing of conditioned nuclear waste in deep-lying clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the host rock types suitable for final disposal of nuclear waste, argillaceous formations display distinct advantages and disadvantages. In the present paper some of them will be examined. In order to render conceivable the possibilities for disposing of radwastes into a plastic clay formation, some main items of the Belgian R and D-programme in that matter will be discussed (site and rock investigation, conceptual design and feasibility, and risk analysis). (Auth.)

  7. Coupled transport phenomena in a clay from a Callovo-Oxfordian formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low permeability materials containing clay play an important role in practical life and natural environment. Indeed, the ability of clay soils to act as semi permeable membranes, that inhibit the passage of electrolytes, is of great interest. The major objective of this thesis is to evaluate the transport properties of natural clays and in particular coupled transports when a pressure gradient, an electrical field, a concentration gradient and a temperature gradient interact. The material is a compact argillite extracted in East France from a Callovo-Oxfordian formation which was supplied to us by ANDRA. NaCl was used as the main solute. Two series of experiments were performed to measure permeability, diffusion, conductivity, the electro-osmotic coefficient and the Soret coefficient. (author)

  8. A recommended procedure for the preparation of oriented clay-mineral specimens for X-ray diffraction analysis; modifications to Drever's filter-membrane peel technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollastro, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely well-oriented clay mineral mounts for X-ray diffraction analysis can be prepared quickly and without introducing segregation using the filter-membrane peel technique. Mounting problems encountered with smectite-rich samples can be resolved by using minimal sample and partial air-drying of the clay film before transfer to a glass slide. Samples containing small quantities of clay can produce useful oriented specimens if Teflon masks having more restrictive areas are inserted above the membrane filter during clay deposition. War]page and thermal shock of glass slides can be controlled by using a flat, porous, ceramic plate as a holding surface during heat treatments.

  9. R and D programme on radioactive waste disposal into a clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report presents the main results obtained during the period 1980-82 in the Belgian R and D work on geological disposal of conditioned radioactive waste in the boom clay beneath the Mol site. Multiple research projects have been continued: both experimental research in the field and in the laboratory and theoretical studies. A regional hydrological observation network has been set up which permitted an assessment of the hydrogeological system over- and underlying the Boom clay as well as the modelling of groundwater flow in the area. Clay samples collected during the drilling campaigns were submitted to a number of analyses with a view to chemical characterization and determination of geotechnical properties. Various studies were performed concerning the migration of radionuclides through the clay and an analytical computer model was developed. The corrosion behaviour of various candidate materials for HLW containers and repository linings were tested under different conditions possibly encountered in the clay formation. Furthermore, various backfill and sealing materials and mixtures have been selected and are being tested. Finally, the activities deployed for the safety analysis were continued, mainly concentrated upon two approaches: the probabilistic risk assessment and the performance assessment of a mined repository under normal evolution conditions

  10. Non-selective oxidation of humic acid in heterogeneous aqueous systems: a comparative investigation on the effect of clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavurmaci, Sibel Sen; Bekbolet, Miray

    2014-01-01

    Application of photocatalysis for degradation of natural organic matter (NOM) has received wide interest during the last decades. Besides NOM, model compounds more specifically humic acids (HAs) were also studied. As a continuation of the previous research, TiO2 photocatalytic degradation of HA was investigated in the presence of clay minerals, i.e., montmorillonite (Mt) and kaolinite (Kt). Degradation of HA was expressed by the pseudo-first-order kinetic modelling of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and UV-VIS parameters (Colour436 and UV254). A slight rate enhancement was attained for Colour436 and UV254 in the presence of either Mt or Kt. The presence of clay particles did not significantly change the DOC degradation rate of HA. The effect of ionic strength (Ca2+ loading from 5 x 10(-4) M to 5 x 1(-3) M) was also assessed for the photocatalytic degradation of sole HA and HA in the presence of either Mt or Kt. Following photocatalytic treatment, molecular size distribution profiles of HA were presented. Besides the effective removal of higher molecular size fractions (100 and 30 kDa fractions), transformation to lower molecular size fractions (TiO2 and Mt or Kt both prior to and following photocatalysis. This study demonstrated that photocatalysis could be applicable for DOC degradation in the presence of clay minerals in natural waters. PMID:25145193

  11. Spatial distribution and longitudinal variation of clay minerals in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.

    1). Further, the average clay content gradually increases from 60 to 70 % particularly along either side of the 76.5 o fracture zone (fz; Table 1). Similar small increase in clay is also observed along the 73 o fz, but along 74.5 o E the clay... fz in the western CIB, smectite and illite decrease slightly (16 to 15 %, and 50 to 49 % respectively), and kaolinite and chlorite increase (17 to 18 %, and 16 to 19 % respectively, Table 2). Similarly, along 74.5 o E, smectite and kaolinite...

  12. Burial diagenetic processes of clay mineral and non-clay mineral, quartz cementation and dissolution in sandstones and mudstones of the Siri Canyon, Danish North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazerouni, Afsoon Moatari; Friis, Henrik; Svendsen, Johan Byskov

    reprecipitate as opal, quartz or other mineral phases inside the shale itself. The deep marine sandstones in the Siri Canyon, Danish North Sea, have been reported to import significant amounts of dissolve silica from adjacent Paleocene shales during early diagenesis, and the authigenesis of silica developed...

  13. Alteration of glass as a possible source of clay minerals on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, J. L.; Keil, K.

    1978-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations show that, under present Martian surface conditions, favorable gas-solid weathering products of feldspar glasses should include beidellites (clays of the montmorillonite series) + carbonates + quartz. The gas-solid weathering of mafic silicate glass ( of volcanic or impact origin) may similarly favor the production of metastable Fe-rich montmorillonite clays. Simple mass-balance calculations suggest that gas-solid weathering of Martian proto-regolith containing 10% glass could conceivably produce a global blanket of clays at a rate of at least 0.4 cm/b.y. The production rate should be expected to increase significantly with the glass content and rate of reworking of the proto-regolith and with the availability of water. Complete extraction of altered glass from a lunar-like proto-regolith might yield a global Martian clay blanket about 10-100 cm in thickness.

  14. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. - Highlights: • Iodide sorption experiments were completed with a diverse array of clay minerals. • Iodide uptake trended with CEC and swamping electrolyte identity and concentration. • Results can be explained by considering the formation of ion pairs in clay interlayers

  15. Protection of Nitrosomonas europaea colonizing clay minerals from inhibition by nitrapyrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, S J; Prosser, J I

    1991-08-01

    Nitrate production by Nitrosomonas europaea in inorganic liquid medium containing ammonium was limited by reduction in pH. In the presence of montmorillonite and vermiculite, expanding clays with high cation-exchange-capacity (CEC), nitrite yield was increased, ammonia oxidation continued at pH values below those which inhibited growth in the absence of clays and growth was biphasic. The first phase was similar to that in the absence of clays, while the second was characterized by a lower rate of nitrite production. Illite, a non-expanding clay with low CEC, had no significant effect on ammonia oxidation, while oxidation of ammonia-treated vermiculite (ATV) occurred with no significant change in the pH of the medium. ATV, montmorillonite and vermiculite, but not illite, protected cells from inhibition by nitrapyrin at concentrations inhibitory to cells growing in suspended culture. This protection was maintained in ATV homo-ionic to Al3+, but montmorillonite made homo-ionic to Al3+ did not provide protection from inhibition. Attachment of cells to clays with high CEC is therefore advantageous in providing exchange at the clay surface of NH+4 and H+ produced by ammonia oxidation, in reducing pH toxicity, and in protecting cells from inhibition. PMID:1955871

  16. CHARACTERISTICS OF FLUORIDE EMISSION FROM FIVE CLAY MINERALS AS AFFECTED BY TEMPERATURE,HEATING TIME AND ADDITION OF CALCIUM COMPOUNDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Characteristics of fluoride emission from five clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite, vermiculite, geothite, and allophane) as affected by temperature, heating time and addition of calcium compounds were studied. Marked increase of the fluoride emission rate was noticed with increase of temperature. The fluoride release, began at 500 ℃-600 ℃, and the main bulk of the fluoride emission occurred at the temperature of about 800 ℃. The loss of crystalline water was primarily responsible for the increase of fluoride emission. When minerals were heated at 800 ℃, The fluoride emission rate from the clay minerals reached the highest after heating for 1 hour. The samples treated by CaO, CaCO3, Ca(OH)2, Ca3(PO4)2, and CaSO4 had 55.45%, 59.58%, 46.45%, 54.31%, 31.25% reduction in the fluoride emission from montmorillonite at the temperature of 800 ℃, respectively. CaCO3 had the highest fluoride fixing capacity compared to other calcium compounds.

  17. Focusing on clay formation as host media of HLW geological disposal in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Host medium is vitally important for safety for HLW geological disposal. Chinese HLW disposal effort in the past decades were mainly focused on granite formation. However, the granite formation has fatal disadvantage for HLW geological disposal. This paper reviews experiences gained and lessons learned in the international community and analyzes key factors affecting the site selection. It is recommended that clay formation should be taken into consideration and additional effort should be made before decision making of host media of HLW disposal in China. (authors)

  18. Characterization of groundwater flow in the environment of the Boom Clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1975, the possibility to dispose of high-level radioactive waste in the Boom Clay formation has been investigated in Belgium at the test site in Mol. This research involves detailed studies of the hydrogeological system at various scales, observations of groundwater levels in the regional and local piezometric networks, several site investigations including geophysics and core-drilled boreholes. The knowledge gained during the long-term hydrogeological research is integrated in groundwater models. Major differences in the groundwater regimes above and below the Boom Clay gave rise to two models simulating these two sub-systems separately. The Neogene aquifer model is used to simulate the groundwater flow above the Boom Clay and the Deep aquifer pumping model to simulate the groundwater flow below the Boom Clay. The regional groundwater research improved the understanding of the regional flow system, since it has enabled to explain the behaviour of the aquifer system using a combination of a steady-state model for the Neogene aquifers and a transient model for the deep aquifers. This combination of modelling tools can offer a representative set of boundary conditions for the consecutive models that will depend on the scenarios required for the performance assessment of the integrated repository system. (authors)

  19. Hydrothermal formation of Clay-Carbonate alteration assemblages in the Nili Fossae region of Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J; Baldridge, Alice M; Crowley, James K; Bridges, Nathan T; Thomson, Bradley J; Marion, Giles M; Filho, Carlos R de Souza; Bishop, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) has returned observations of the Nili Fossae region indicating the presence of Mg- carbonate in small (<10km sq2), relatively bright rock units that are commonly fractured (Ehlmann et al., 2008b). We have analyzed spectra from CRISM images and used co-located HiRISE images in order to further characterize these carbonate-bearing units. We applied absorption band mapping techniques to investigate a range of possible phyllosilicate and carbonate minerals that could be present in the Nili Fossae region. We also describe a clay-carbonate hydrothermal alteration mineral assemblage in the Archean Warrawoona Group of Western Australia that is a potential Earth analog to the Nili Fossae carbonate-bearing rock units. We discuss the geological and biological implications for hydrothermal processes on Noachian Mars.

  20. Geochemistry of rare earths in main media of clay formation and sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims i) at a better knowledge of rare earth behavior in surface conditions and ii) possible use of rare earth as a marker for argilaceous mineral genesis. Chemical properties of rare earths and geochemistry of these elements in main rocks are recalled. Rare earth behaviour during continental alteration process, experimental hydrolysis of various magmatic materials and rare earth geochemistry in argilaceous minerals in continental shelf are examined. Then some aspects of rare earth behaviour in oceans are studied: alteration of sea bed and hydrothermalism rare earth distribution in pelagic sediments red clays of deep seas and manganese nodules. In conclusion rare earth behaviour in sedimentary processes of the exogenous cycle is summarized

  1. Study of Pu(IV) and Am(III) sorption to clay minerals. Laboratory experiments and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorption of Pu(IV) and Am(III) to natural clay from a mixture of synthetic rainwater - cement water was studied by batch and sequential extraction experiments as a function of pH and ionic strength These experiments were intended to simulate the effect of cement dissolution, causing the release of K+, Ca2+ and other cations from solidified radioactive waste into the aqueous phases. The results indicated a complex sorption behavior of the elements studied. It was found that iron oxides play an important role in the uptake of Pu(IV), whereas ion exchange and CaCO3 are mainly responsible for the binding of Am(III) on the clay. Simplified sorption experiments were conducted with clay minerals and iron oxides, using 0.01 and 0.1 mol/L NaNO3 as background electrolyte under an Ar atmosphere, for a better understanding of the sorption mechanisms. The experimental data were interpreted using the combination of surface complexation and ion-exchange models. (orig.)

  2. The influence of mineral detritus on rock varnish formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Ronald I.; Krinsley, David H.; Langworthy, Kurt A.; Ditto, Jeffrey; Thompson, Tyler J.

    2013-09-01

    A mix of high resolution electron microscope methods imaged the textures and chemistry of rock varnish samples from 19 field sites on five continents. The vast majority of aeolian mineral is not incorporated into manganiferous rock varnish. Of those dust particles that are enveloped, submicron sized oval-shaped quartz minerals are the most common type of detritus seen, as they rest conformably between laminated layers. The dominance of quartz as the most common detrital mineral, combined with the relative rarity of feldspars - is consistent with the hypothesis that feldspars experience in situ decay into clay minerals. After the detritus is buried in varnish, mineral boundaries often develop enhanced porosity. Some porous zones around dust particles develop submicron skins of redeposited Mn-Fe. In other cases, the porous zones aid in the transport of capillary water that mobilizes and redeposits Mn-Fe as stringers in fissures. Larger dust particles ˜10 μm in diameter are deposited in microtopographic depressions, such as tubes created by acid-producing lithobionts. Varnishes growing in particularly dusty regions form alternating dust-rich and varnish-rich layers that potentially correlate to alternating dusty and less dusty periods. The very foundation of varnish, the underlying rock, is often less stable in the surficial environment than varnish - leading to enhanced porosity and mineral decay in the substrate. Sometimes, physical collapse of varnish into the underlying void space mixes varnish and rock; more commonly, however, remobilization of varnish constituents into these pore spaces creates case hardening of the weathering rind in the underlying rock.

  3. Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Youjun [Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Center for Multiphase Environmental Research, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6420 (United States); Harsh, James B. [Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Center for Multiphase Environmental Research, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6420 (United States)]. E-mail: harsh@wsu.edu; Flury, Markus [Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Center for Multiphase Environmental Research, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6420 (United States); Young, James S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Boyle, Jeffrey S. [Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Center for Multiphase Environmental Research, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6420 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Highly-alkaline waste solutions have leaked from underground tanks at the US DOE Hanford Site, Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. The main mineral precipitation and transformation pathways were studied in solutions mimicking tank leak conditions at the US DOE Hanford Site. In batch experiments, Si-rich solutions, representing dissolved silicate minerals, were mixed with caustic tank simulants. The tank wastes encompass a large range of chemical compositions. The effect of the following factors on mineral transformations were investigated: temperature (22, 50 and 80deg. C), concentration of NaOH (from 0 to 16M), 6 types of common inorganic anions in the tank supernatant, concentration of NaNO{sub 3} (the most abundant electrolyte in the tanks), and the Si/Al ratio in the starting solutions. Precipitates were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. A general mineral transformation pathway was observed: poorly crystalline aluminosilicate->Linde Type A (LTA) zeolite->cancrinite/sodalite. Cancrinite and sodalite were the two stable mineral phases. The concentration of NaOH and the type of anion played the determinative roles in mineral formation and transformation. Increasing NaOH concentration and temperature favored the formation of cancrinite and sodalite. Cancrinite formed in the presence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} or SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}; sodalite formed in the presence of Cl{sup -} or NO{sub 2}{sup -}. The experiments indicate that (1) NaOH is a mineralization agent in the mineral transformation and the anions served as templates in the formation of cancrinite and sodalite by forming ion-pairs with Na{sup +} and (2) cancrinite and sodalite with various morphologies and crystallinity should form in the contaminated sediments.

  4. Distribution of clay minerals in marine sediments off Chennai, Bay of Bengal, India:Indicators of sediment sources and transport processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subramanian VEERASINGAM; Ramdoss VENKATACHALAPATHY; Thirunavukkarasu RAMKUMAR

    2014-01-01

    Clay mineralogy, texture size and statistical analyses were carried out on surface sediments from the continental shelf of Chennai, Bay of Bengal, India. The purpose of this study is to characterize the clay mineral distribution and its relation to the hydrodynamics off Chennai to identify the sources and transport pathways of the marine sediments. Characterization of clay minerals in coastal sediments by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has provided the association of quartz, feldspar, kaolinite, chlorite, illite and iron oxides (magnetite and hematite) derived from river catchments and coastal erosion. Kaolinite, chlorite, illite, iron oxides, and organic matter are the dominant minerals in Cooum, and Adayar region. High quartz and feldspar zones were identified in Marina, which are being confined the sand zone and paralleling the coast. The strong relationships among the wave energy density, sand, quartz and carbonate revealed that wave induced littoral drift system play a dominant role in transportation and deposition of sediments in the Chennai coast. The sediment texture and minerals data are in agreement well with the previous results of hydrodynamics and littoral drift models in this region. Multivariate statistical analyses (correlation, cluster and factor analyses) were carried out and obtained results suggested that clay minerals and organic matter are trapped in silt and clay particles, whereas quartz, feldspar and carbonate are associated with sand particles. Results of sediment sources and transport processes from this study will be useful to predict the fate of the pollutants released from land or the potential change in sediment delivery to coastal areas.

  5. Structural Investigation of Alkali Activated Clay Minerals for Application in Water Treatment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.; Dembovska, L.

    2015-11-01

    Alkali activation technology can be applied for a wide range of alumo-silicates to produce innovative materials with various areas of application. Most researches focuse on the application of alumo-silicate materials in building industry as cement binder replacement to produce mortar and concrete [1]. However, alkali activation technology offers high potential also in biotechnologies [2]. In the processes where certain pH level, especially alkaline environment, must be ensured, alkali activated materials can be applied. One of such fields is water treatment systems where high level pH (up to pH 10.5) ensures efficient removal of water pollutants such as manganese [3]. Previous investigations had shown that alkali activation technology can be applied to calcined clay powder and aluminium scrap recycling waste as a foam forming agent to create porous alkali activated materials. This investigation focuses on the structural investigation of calcined kaolin and illite clay alkali activation processes. Chemical and mineralogical composition of both clays were determined and structural investigation of alkali activated materials was made by using XRD, DTA, FTIR analysis; the microstructure of hardened specimens was observed by SEM. Physical properties of the obtained material were determined. Investigation indicates the essential role of chemical composition of the clay used in the alkali activation process, and potential use of the obtained material in water treatment systems.

  6. Lability of soil organic carbon in tropical soils with different clay minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Thilde Bech; Elberling, Bo; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup

    2010-01-01

    of SOC in tropical soils with contrasting clay mineralogy (kaolinite, smectite, allophane and Al-rich chlorite). Soil was sampled from A horizons at six sites in humid tropical areas of Ghana, Malaysian Borneo and the Solomon Islands and separated into fractions above and below 250 µm by wet sieving...

  7. Suitability of the methylene blue test for determination of cation exchange capacity of clay minerals related to ammonium acetate method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milošević, Maja; Logar, Mihovil; Dojčinović, Biljana; Erić, Suzana

    2015-04-01

    Cation exchange capacity (CEC) represents one of the most important parameters of clay minerals which reflects their ability to exchange cations with liquid phases in near contact. Measurement of CEC is used for characterizing sample plasticity, adsorbing and swelling properties which later define their usage in industrial purposes. Several methods have been developed over the years for determination of layer charge, charge density, charge distribution, etc. and have been published in numerous papers (Czimerova et al., 2006; Yukselen and Kaya, 2008). The main goal of present study is comparison of suitability of more recent method - methylene blue test in regard to older method - ammonium acetate for determination of CEC. For this study, we selected one montmorillonite clay (Bogovina, Serbia) and two mainly kaolinite clays (Miličinica, Serbia). Chemicals used for CEC determinations were solution of methylene blue (MB)(14*10-6M/ml) and ammonium acetate (AA) solution (1M). The obtained results are showing generally lower values in case of MB method. The main difference is due to molecular aggregation of MB on the clay surface. AA method is highly sensitive to the presence of CaO. Release of Ca ion from the sample into the solution can limit the saturation of exchange sites by the ammonium ion. This is clearly visible in case of montmorillonite clay. Fe2+ and Mg ions are difficult to move by the ammonium ion because of their ion radius, but in case of MB molecule there is no such restriction in removing them from the exchange sites. MB solution, even in a low concentration (2*10-6M/ml), is showing preferable results in moving the ions from their positions which is already visible after adding a small quantity of solution (25cm3). Both MB-titration and MB-spot test yield similar results and are much simpler methods than AA and they also give other information such as specific surface area (external and internal) whereas AA method only provides information about

  8. Remediation of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution using clay mineral Fe(II)-montmorillonite: Encompassing anion exclusion impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuth, Mirle; Bhojya Naik, Halehatty Seethya; Manjanna, Jayappa

    2015-12-01

    We have explored the highly efficient and environmentally benign clay mineral, Fe(II)-montmorillonite, for the reduction of Cr(VI) in aqueous solution. Fe(II)-Mt was treated with K2Cr2O7 solution at different pH, temperature and solid-to-liquid ratio. The [Cr2O7]2- was estimated by UV-vis spectra with a correction for anion exclusion impact. In general, the Cr(VI) reduction was rapid at acidic pH and increased with temperature up to 50 °C. A complete reduction occurred in about 5 min at pH 3-5. The time taken for complete reduction at 0 °C, RT (30 °C) and 40 °C are 12 min, 8 min and 5 min, respectively. The reduction followed by immobilization of Cr(III) on the spent clay mineral was well characterized by EDX and chemical extraction analysis. This remediation process could be easily scaled-up for real system applications.

  9. The ARCHIMEDE-ARGILE project: acquisition and regulation of the water chemistry in a clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first aim of the CEC/ANDRA project known as ARCHIMEDE-ARGILE is to gain an understanding on the mechanisms of acquisition and regulation of the water chemistry in a clay environment. This step is essential for predicting both the behaviour and the migration in solution of artificial elements which are initially absent in clay formation. The second aim is to assess sampling methodology and data collection techniques for key physico-chemical parameters (pH, Eh, pCO2, CEC, alkalinity...) which are the basis of the geochemical modelling of the behaviour of natural and artificial radioelements. Six drill holes have been performed in 1992 in the sliding ribs gallery in the Underground Research Facility (URF) at Mol. The study has demonstrated the importance of in situ measurements for key parameters that cannot be rigorously evaluated otherwise: redox, pH, pCO2. Fluid geochemistry can realistically be modelled using equilibrium models, in which cation exchange must be taken into account. Bacterial studies have revealed the importance of human activity on the microbial equilibrium of the formation. This paper presents the main results obtained during the first two years of the project with emphasis on determination of the hydrochemical characteristics of the Boom clay. (author). 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Hydrogen peroxide formation and decay in γ-irradiated clay water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of the radiolytic formation and disappearance of hydrogen peroxide in aerated clay water was studied. The yield of H2O2 formation in clay water in an air atmosphere is equal to 0.25 μmol J-1. When initially present in the solution, hydrogen peroxide disappears with a yield dependent upon the concentration and the dose rate. In both cases a steady state is reached dependent on the dose rate. In order to define more precisely the role of OH free radicals in this process, the reaction of these free radicals in clay water was studied by pulse radiolysis. As expected, OH is scavenged by different solutes, therefore, it cannot react with hydrogen peroxide. A kinetic scheme based upon these results is proposed. Using a minimal equation set (nine equations), it is possible to simulate the [H2O2] evolution with a very good accuracy, for doses going up to 20,000 Gy. It is also demonstrated that the reaction of H2 with OH does not occur in such conditions, which is consistent with the accumulation of dihydrogen during the radiolysis of ground water. (author)

  11. Formation of calcium containing minerals in the low temperature dolomite ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to elaborate low temperature dolomite ceramics, potentially suitable for the production of building materials, local low carbonate clay and dolomite siftings were used as a raw materials. Relationship between mechanical properties, mineral composition and firing temperature kept in the range of 600-800° C were established. According to the obtained data it was detected that the optimal burning temperature, giving the highest crushing strength (40 MPa) was around 700-750° C, optimal proportion of dolomite and clay expressed as ratio between CaO and Al2O3 - 2.5 wt%. Gradual formation of C3A occurs during firing, yielding C4AHX, i.e. mainly C4AH13 after hydratation of obtained composite material. The work was carried out in the frame of project, Innovative low temperature composite materials from local mineral deposits (N°2010/024/2DP/2.1.1.1.0/10/APIA/VIAA/152) financed by the European Regional Development Foundation (Activity 2.1.1.1.).

  12. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of the toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki by clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins in soil is further enhanced through association with soil particles. Such persistence may improve the effectiveness of controlling target pests, but impose a hazard to non-target organisms in soil ecosystems. In this study, the equilibrium adsorption of the Bt toxin by four clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite, goethite, and silicon dioxide) was investigated, and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The results showed that Bt toxin could be adsorbed easily by minerals, and the adsorption was much easier at low temperature than at high temperature at the initial concentration varying from 0 to 1000 mg L-1. The adsorption fitted well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, but the Freundlich equation was more suitable. The pseudo-second-order (PSO) was the best application model to describe the adsorption kinetic. The adsorption process appeared to be controlled by chemical process, and the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. The negative standard free energy (ΔrGmθ) values of the adsorption indicated that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by the minerals was spontaneous, and the changes of the standard enthalpy (ΔrHmθ) showed that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by montmorillonite was endothermic while the adsorption by the other three minerals was exothermic.

  13. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of the toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki by clay minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Qingling; Deng Yali; Li Huishu; Liu Jie [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resource and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Hu Hongqing, E-mail: hqhu@mail.hzau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resource and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Chen Shouwen [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resource and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Sa Tongmin [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, College of Agriculture, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-01

    The persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins in soil is further enhanced through association with soil particles. Such persistence may improve the effectiveness of controlling target pests, but impose a hazard to non-target organisms in soil ecosystems. In this study, the equilibrium adsorption of the Bt toxin by four clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite, goethite, and silicon dioxide) was investigated, and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The results showed that Bt toxin could be adsorbed easily by minerals, and the adsorption was much easier at low temperature than at high temperature at the initial concentration varying from 0 to 1000 mg L{sup -1}. The adsorption fitted well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, but the Freundlich equation was more suitable. The pseudo-second-order (PSO) was the best application model to describe the adsorption kinetic. The adsorption process appeared to be controlled by chemical process, and the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. The negative standard free energy ({Delta}{sub r}G{sub m}{sup {theta}}) values of the adsorption indicated that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by the minerals was spontaneous, and the changes of the standard enthalpy ({Delta}{sub r}H{sub m}{sup {theta}}) showed that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by montmorillonite was endothermic while the adsorption by the other three minerals was exothermic.

  14. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of the toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki by clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qingling; Deng, Yali; Li, Huishu; Liu, Jie; Hu, Hongqing; Chen, Shouwen; Sa, Tongmin

    2009-02-01

    The persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) toxins in soil is further enhanced through association with soil particles. Such persistence may improve the effectiveness of controlling target pests, but impose a hazard to non-target organisms in soil ecosystems. In this study, the equilibrium adsorption of the Bt toxin by four clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite, goethite, and silicon dioxide) was investigated, and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The results showed that Bt toxin could be adsorbed easily by minerals, and the adsorption was much easier at low temperature than at high temperature at the initial concentration varying from 0 to 1000 mg L -1. The adsorption fitted well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, but the Freundlich equation was more suitable. The pseudo-second-order (PSO) was the best application model to describe the adsorption kinetic. The adsorption process appeared to be controlled by chemical process, and the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. The negative standard free energy ( ΔGmθr) values of the adsorption indicated that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by the minerals was spontaneous, and the changes of the standard enthalpy ( ΔHmθr) showed that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by montmorillonite was endothermic while the adsorption by the other three minerals was exothermic.

  15. Relationship between the isotopic composition of strontium in newly formed continental clay minerals and their source material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of recent montmorillonites and kaolinites newly formed in weathering profiles of western and central Africa and of Nosy Be and La Reunion islands near Madagascar are directly related to the composition and age of the parent rocks or minerals. They may, therefore, be used as a genetic tracer. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios are about 0.704 when these clays crystallise from recent basalts and they are higher than 0.715 when the parent rocks are of sialic composition and old in age. Kaolinites newly formed in situ from feldspars contain small amounts of Sr with abnormally high 87Sr/86Sr ratios: in this study they are higher than 1.094. When these minerals crystallize from biotites, their 87Sr/86Sr ratios are much lower and can be close to the value of the primary Sr trapped in the biotites during their crystallization. On the other hand, the 87Sr/86Sr of continental montmorillonites are less scattered: they range, in this study, between 0.704 and 0.722. These low values, as well as the high adsorption capacities of these minerals in the sedimentary environment, allow the assumption that they frequently have 87Sr/86Sr ratios close to that of marine Sr during sedimentation. Therefore, montmorillonites are able to form homogeneous authigenic minerals by synsedimentary alterations. (Auth.)

  16. Fracture-fluid relationships: implications for the sealing capacity of clay layers - Insights from field study of the Blue Clay formation, Maltese islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sealing capacity of clay layers is a key parameter in many fields of geoscience, such as CO2 storage, hydrocarbons trapping, and waste disposal. In the context of deep geological disposal of radioactive waste, clayey formations are studied as potential host rocks. This work deals with tectonic fracturing, fluid flow, and the sealing capacity of clay layers in an outcropping formation sharing similarities to these potential host rocks. The Blue Clay formation (Maltese islands) outcrops between two limestones affected by slight extensional tectonics. Zones of oxidation around fractures are interpreted as evidence of palaeo-fluid circulation, and are used to assess the role of joints and faults in controlling the hydrological communication between adjacent layers. Joints and small faults (displacement 50 m) display clay smear structures, and the lack of oxidized zones around them suggests they served as barriers to fluid flow. Intermediate-sized faults die out up-section into complex deformation zones comprised of irregular joints that are filled with gypsum and surrounded by oxidation zones. These observations indicate that these intermediate-sized faults, usually considered as sealed by classical predictive methods such as 'Shale Smear Factor', may have played a significant role in the local palaeo-hydrology. (authors)

  17. Travel time simulation of radionuclides in a 200 m deep heterogeneous clay formation locally disturbed by excavation

    OpenAIRE

    Huysmans, Marijke; Berckmans, Arne; Dassargues, Alain

    2005-01-01

    In the North of Belgium the Boom Clay Formation, at a depth of 200m below surface, is being evaluated as a potential host formation for the disposal of vitrified nuclear waste. The aim of this study is to model the transport of radionuclides through the clay, taking into account the geological heterogeneity and the excavation induced fractures around the galleries in which the waste will be stored. This is achieved by combining a transport model with geostatistical techniques used to simulate...

  18. Early-middle Eocene birds from the Lillebaelt Clay Formation of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Bent Erik Kramer

    2009-01-01

    The marine Lillebaelt Clay Formation of central Denmark is of early-middle Eocene age (late Ypresian - middle Lutetian; microfossil zones NP 13-NP 15). Over 20 bird fossils collected by amateur palaeontologists have been acquired through the Danish national ‘Danekrae' fossil treasure trove...... legislation. The fossils are preserved in clay ironstone concretions and almost two-thirds are isolated skulls preserved three-dimensionally. Bird fossils of this age and degree of preservation are rare in an international context. The fossils indicate a very diverse assemblage consisting of both marine...... and terrestrial forms. These include at least one pelagornithid or 'pseudo-toothed bird'; two or three taxa with charadriiform affinities (shorebirds and allies); a massive, narrow-beaked psittaciform (parrots and allies); a large rallid (rail) and one lithornithid (extinct, volant palaeognaths). The Lillebaelt...

  19. Synthesis and structural characterization of ferrous trioctahedral smectites: Implications for clay mineral genesis and detectability on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemtob, Steven M.; Nickerson, Ryan D.; Morris, Richard V.; Agresti, David G.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2015-06-01

    Widespread detections of phyllosilicates in Noachian terrains on Mars imply a history of near-surface fluid-rock interaction. Ferrous trioctahedral smectites are thermodynamically predicted products of basalt weathering on early Mars, but to date only Fe3+-bearing dioctahedral smectites have been identified from orbital observations. In general, the physicochemical properties of ferrous smectites are poorly studied because they are susceptible to air oxidation. In this study, eight Fe2+-bearing smectites were synthesized from Fe2+-Mg-Al silicate gels at 200°C under anoxic conditions. Samples were characterized by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, powder X-ray diffraction, Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Mössbauer spectroscopy, and visible/near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectroscopy. The range of redox states was Fe3+/ΣFe = 0 to 0.06 ± 0.01 as determined by both XAS and, for short integration times, Mössbauer. The smectites have 060 distances (d(060)) between 1.53 and 1.56 Å, indicating a trioctahedral structure. d(060) and XAS-derived interatomic Fe-(Fe,Mg,Al) distance scaled with Fe content. Smectite VNIR spectra feature OH/H2O absorption bands at 1.4 and 1.9 µm, (Fe2+,Mg,Al)3-OH stretching bands near 1.4 µm, and Fe2+Fe2+Fe2+-OH, MgMgMg-OH, AlAl(Mg,Fe2+)-OH, and AlAl-OH combination bands at 2.36 µm, 2.32 µm 2.25 µm, and 2.20 µm, respectively. The spectra for ferrous saponites are distinct from those for dioctahedral ferric smectites, permitting their differentiation from orbital observations. X-ray diffraction patterns for synthetic high-Mg ferrosaponite and high-Mg ferrian saponite are both consistent with the Sheepbed saponite detected by the chemistry and mineralogy (CheMin) instrument at Gale Crater, Mars, suggesting that anoxic basalt alteration was a viable pathway for clay mineral formation on early Mars.

  20. A comparative study on the illite crystallinity and the clay mineral reflectance spectral index for subdividing the very low-grade metamorphic belt along the Lizhou-Hekou geological section in the Youjiang sedimentary basin, Guangxi,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Shouxun

    2004-01-01

    To examine the application potential of hyperspectral remote sensing techniques in classifying very low-grade metamorphic belts, the composition of clay minerals and the cyrstallinity of illite from mudstones were measured using XRD and VIS-SWIR (400-2500 nm) reflectance spectroscopy. Based on the illite cyrstallinity, Kubler Index (KI), the Early Triassic LuoLou Group and the Middle Triassic lower Baifeng Formation were classified as the lower Epizone with KI△2θ° ranging from 0.22 to 0.25, the upper Baifeng Formation as upper anchizone with KI△2θ°ranging from 0.26 to 0.33, and the Hekou Formation as lower anchizone with KI△2θ° ranging from 0.38 to 0.40. According to a KI△2θ° value of 0.43, it is possible that there may exist a local diagenetic zone in the upper strata. The illite cyrstallinity Kubler index and the metamorphic grade increase from the bottom to the top of the stratigraphic sequence. The metamorphic grade boundaries nearly match the stratigraphic boundaries, indicating a burial metamorphism nature for the stratigraphic sequence. From the bottom to the top of the sequence, the spectral absorption band center of clay minerals from fresh rocks is around 2200 nm. The absorption band centers change towards shorter wavelengths: the Luolou Group being at 2220 nm, the Baifeng Formation at 2217-2213 nm, the lower member of the Hekou Formation at 2214-2206 nm, and the upper member of the Hekou Formation at 2205-2197 nm. The spectral absorption band center of illite shows the same change pattern. These results indicate that very low-grade metamorphic belts can be subdivided using spectral indices of clay minerals, which are measured by using field portable spectroradiometers. However, it may not work well with satellite and airborne sensors.

  1. The 1.7- to 4.2-micron spectrum of asteroid 1 Ceres - Evidence for structural water in clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Feierberg, M. A.; Larson, H. P.; Johnson, J. R.; Tokunaga, A. T.

    1981-01-01

    A high-resolution Fourier spectrum (1.7-3.5 microns) and medium-resolution spectrophotometry (2.7-4.2 microns) were obtained for Asteroid 1 Ceres. The presence of the 3-micron absorption feature due to water of hydration was confirmed. The 3-micron feature is compared with the 3-micron bands due to water of hydration in clays and salts. It is concluded that the spectrum of Ceres shows a strong absorption at 2.7-2.8 microns due to structural OH groups in clay minerals. The dominant minerals on the surface of Ceres are therefore hydrated clay minerals structurally similar to terrestrial montmorillonites. There is also a narrow absorption feature at 3.1 microns which is attributable to a very small amount of water ice on Ceres. This is the first evidence for ice on the surface of an asteroid.

  2. Effect of pH on the heavy metal-clay mineral interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altyn, O.; Oezbelge, H.O.; Dogu, T.; Oezbelge, T.A. [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey)

    1997-12-31

    Adsorption and ion exchange of Pb and Cd on the surface of kaolinite and montmorillonite were studied with a strong emphasis on the pH values of solutions containing heavy metal ions. The pH range studied was 2.5 - 9. For kaolinite at a clay/solution ratio of 1/10 (w/w), Pb removal changes from 20 to 30% for an initial Pb concentration of 1640 ppm, and Cd removal changes from 10 to 20% for an initial Cd concentration of 1809 ppm. Due to its high exchange capacity, montmorillonite can remove more heavy metal than kaolinite. Removal rates for montmorillonite can reach up to 90% for both Pb and Cd. In the pH range of 3-6, there is a plateau for the removal rates. At pH values higher than 6, removal seems to increase artificially due to the precipitation of heavy metals. Under similar conditions for both clays, the rate of removal of Pb is always higher than that of Cd. As the pH value decreases for montmorillonite, there is a strong tendency for decreased surface area and swelling, as indicated by BET surface area measurements, adsorbed layer thickness and pore size distribution data. In the range of pH values studied, X-ray diffraction analysis showed the appearance of a characteristic (001) peak for montmorillonite, indicating that the crystalline structure of the clay was intact during the experiments.

  3. Effect of pH on the heavy metal-clay mineral interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsorption and ion exchange of Pb and Cd on the surface of kaolinite and montmorillonite were studied with a strong emphasis on the pH values of solutions containing heavy metal ions. The pH range studied was 2.5 - 9. For kaolinite at a clay/solution ratio of 1/10 (w/w), Pb removal changes from 20 to 30% for an initial Pb concentration of 1640 ppm, and Cd removal changes from 10 to 20% for an initial Cd concentration of 1809 ppm. Due to its high exchange capacity, montmorillonite can remove more heavy metal than kaolinite. Removal rates for montmorillonite can reach up to 90% for both Pb and Cd. In the pH range of 3-6, there is a plateau for the removal rates. At pH values higher than 6, removal seems to increase artificially due to the precipitation of heavy metals. Under similar conditions for both clays, the rate of removal of Pb is always higher than that of Cd. As the pH value decreases for montmorillonite, there is a strong tendency for decreased surface area and swelling, as indicated by BET surface area measurements, adsorbed layer thickness and pore size distribution data. In the range of pH values studied, X-ray diffraction analysis showed the appearance of a characteristic (001) peak for montmorillonite, indicating that the crystalline structure of the clay was intact during the experiments

  4. Measurement techniques for in situ stresses around underground constructions in a deep clay formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li X.L.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Disposal in deep underground geological formations is internationally recognized as the most viable option for the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste. In Belgium, the Boom clay formation is extensively studied in this context, in particular at the 225 m deep HADES Underground Research Facility in Mol. A cost-effective design of deep underground structures requires an accurate assessment of the in situ stresses; a good estimation of these stresses is also essential when interpreting in situ experiments regarding the hydro-mechanical behaviour of the host formation. Different measurement techniques are available to provide data on the stress evolution and other mechanical properties of the geological formation. The measurement can be direct (measurement of total pressure, or it can be an indirect technique, deriving the stress from related quantities such as strain (changes in structural members. Most total stress measurements are performed through permanently installed sensors; also once-only measurements are performed through specific methods (e.g. pressuremeter. Direct measurement of the stress state is challenging due to the complex mechanical behaviour of the clay, and the fact that the sensor installation inevitably disturbs the original stress field. This paper describes ways to deal with these problems and presents the results obtained using different techniques at HADES.

  5. Formation of magnetic minerals at hydrocarbon-generation conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Abubakar, R.; Muxworthy, A. R.; Sephton, M.A.; Southern, P.; Watson, J. S.; Fraser, A.J.; Almeida, T.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the pyrolysis and formation of magnetic minerals in three source rock samples from the Wessex Basin in Dorset, southern England. The experimental conditions in the laboratory recreated the catagenesis environment of oil source rocks. Magnetic analysis of both the heated and the unheated samples at room temperature and at very low-temperatures (5 K), coupled with transmission electron-microscopy imaging and X-ray analysis, revealed the formation of nanometre-sized (...

  6. Effect of chlorine in clay-mineral specimens prepared on silver metal-membrane mounts for X-ray powder diffraction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, L.J.; Commeau, J.A.; Pense, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    Silver metal-membrane filters are commonly used as substrates in the preparation of oriented clay-mineral specimens for X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The silver metal-membrane filters, however, present some problems after heat treatment if either the filters or the samples contain significant amounts of chlorine. At elevated temperature, the chloride ions react with the silver substrate to form crystalline compounds. These compounds change the mass-absorption coefficient of the sample, reducing peak intensities and areas and, therefore, complicating the semiquantitative estimation of clay minerals. A simple procedure that eliminates most of the chloride from a sample and the silver metal-membrane substrate is presented here.

  7. Influence of organic matter and clay minerals in migration of derivative compounds of hydrocarbons; Influencia da materia organica e argilominerais na migracao de compostos derivados de hidrocarbonetos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Denize Gloria Barcellos; Mendonca Filho, Joao Graciano de; Polivanov, Helena [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Geologia]. E-mail: denize@geologia.ufrj.br; graciano@geologia.ufrj.br; helena@acd.ufrj.br

    2003-07-01

    Soil samples from the Guanabara Bay in Duque de Caxias city (RJ) were submitted to mineralogical and organic geochemistry analyses. This proceeding was used mainly to determine a possible interaction of hydrocarbons contaminants with the organic matter and the clay minerals presents in this mangrove. The sampling was carried out using Direct Push techniques. Thus, the mainly clay minerals characterizes were: gibbsite, illite, caulinite and smectite. The compositional analysis of organic constituents showed a predominance of amorphous material (degraded cuticles), followed of wood material and sporomorphs constituents, suggesting that the biological degradation occurred in situ. (author)

  8. The HADES demonstration and pilot project on radioactive waste disposal in a clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of the HADES programme is the evaluation of the technical feasibility and safety of the disposal of radwaste in a deep clay formation. The pilot phase is aimed at demonstrating the system behaviour for those components of the system and those operations and issues which can be demonstrated directly. The time period considered covers a first phase of the development programme of the pilot project which includes: -The construction of a concrete lined tests drift of about 30 m length with a useful inner diameter of 3.5 m. In the lining, a number of openings or ports are foreseen for emplacing the various tests and sensors for the general auscultation in the host rock; - Mine-by test for the investigation of the response of the surrounding clay on the excavating; - CERBERUS test, a combined heating-irradiation test aiming at evaluating by simulation (electrical heaters and Co-60 radiation source) the impact of a HLW canister on its immediate near field; - Design of a gallery heating test for the demonstration by simulation of the behaviour of a concrete lined gallery structure and of the surrounding clay mass in a temperature field (TEMPPRES code for temperature and pressure evolution simulation). 21 refs

  9. Clay formation and metal fixation during weathering of coal fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enormous and worldwide production of coal fly ash cannot be durably isolated from the weathering cycle, and the weathering characteristics of fly ash must be known to understand the long-term environmental impact. The authors studied the weathering of two coal fly ashes and compared them with published data from weathered volcanic ash, it's closest natural analogue. Both types of ash contain abundant aluminosilicate glass, which alters to noncrystalline clay. However, this study reveals that the kinetics of coal fly ash weathering are more rapid than those of volcanic ash because the higher pH of fresh coal fly ash promotes rapid dissolution of the glass. After about 10 years of weathering, the noncrystalline clay content of coal fly ash is higher than that of 250-year-old volcanic ash. The observed rapid clay formation together with heavy metal fixation imply that the long-term environmental impact of coal fly ash disposal may be less severe and the benefits more pronounced than predicted from previous studies on unweathered ash. Their findings suggest that isolating coal fly ash from the weathering cycle may be counterproductive because, in the long-term under conditions of free drainage, fly ash is converted into fertile soil capable of supporting agriculture

  10. Interaction of selenite with iron sulphide minerals: implications for the geochemical fate of Se in Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The geochemistry of selenium, exhibiting valence states from +VI to -II, is of key importance due to its role as a highly toxic essential micro-nutrient and as a significant component of high level radioactive waste (HLRW). XAS studies conducted at circum-neutral pH have shown that pyrite (FeS2), the most relevant redox-active mineral in Boom clay, reduces selenite to a solid-state Se(0) phase. This observation raises several questions. First, why does an Fe-free Se(0) phase in form presence of pyrite, while selenite is reduced to FeSex by troilite and mackinawite (FeS)? What is the exact identity of this elemental Se phase, which has been observed by several authors? Why is a dissolved, low oxidation-state selenium species encountered in association with the Se(0) phase; and what is its identity? Correlating selenium redox chemistry with sulphide mineral oxidation pathways allowed to link these observations to the different oxidation behaviour of acid-soluble and acid-insoluble metal sulphides. The end products of Se(IV) reduction by acid-soluble iron sulphur minerals are fairly well known, but the solid and liquid phase species present during interaction of SeO32- with pyrite are poorly characterized. The solid phase reaction product could not yet be assigned as a specific phase, but clearly identified as a Se0 compound. Trigonal (grey) selenium could be excluded as a candidate. Acid insoluble metal sulphides such as pyrite, molybdenite or tungstenite exhibit oxidative dissolution only. Upon six consequent one-electron oxidation steps, a thiosulphate anion is liberated (thiosulphate pathway). In contrast, acid soluble metal sulphides (troilite, mackinawite, sphalerite, etc.) exhibit also non-oxidative dissolution thereby liberating sulphide species (H2S, HS-,S2-). Under oxidative dissolution in presence of Fe-III, they release sulphide cations (e.g. H2S+). The latter can spontaneously dimerize into disulphide

  11. Numerical investigation of the seismic detectability of carbonate thin beds in the Boom Clay formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcione, José M.; Gei, Davide

    2016-04-01

    The present study evaluates the capacity of the Boom Clay as a host rock for disposal purposes, more precisely its seismic characterization, which may assess its long-term performance to store radioactive wastes. Although the formation is relatively uniform and homogeneous, there are embedded thin layers of septaria (carbonates) that may affect the integrity of the Boom Clay. Therefore, it is essential to locate these geobodies. The seismic data to characterise the Boom Clay has been acquired at the Kruibeke test site. The inversion, which allowed us to obtain the anisotropy parameters and seismic velocities of the clay, is complemented with further information such as log and laboratory data. The attenuation properties have been estimated from equivalent formations (having similar composition and seismic velocities). The inversion yields quite consistent results although the symmetry of the medium is unusual but physically possible, since the anisotropy parameter ɛ is negative. According to a time-domain calculation of the energy velocity at four frequency bands up to 900 Hz, velocity increases with frequency, a behaviour described by the Zener model. Then, we use this model to describe anisotropy and anelasticity that are implemented into the equation of motion to compute synthetic seismograms in the space-time domain. The technique is based on memory variables and the Fourier pseudospectral method. We have computed reflection coefficients of the septaria thin layer. At normal incidence, the P-wave coefficient vanishes at specific thicknesses of the layer and there is no conversion to the S wave. For example, calculations at 600 Hz show that for thicknesses of 1 m the septarium can be detected more easily since the amplitudes are higher (nearly 0.8). Converted PS waves have a high amplitude at large offsets (between 30 and 80 degrees) and can be useful to identify the target on this basis. Moreover, we have investigated the effect of septaria embedded in the

  12. The Boom Clay geochemistry: Natural evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Belgium, the Boom Clay is studied as the reference formation for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel. As the Boom Clay is considered as the main barrier for radionuclide migration/retention, a thorough characterisation of the clay and its pore water was done. This facilitates better understanding of the long-term geological processes and the distribution of the trace elements and radionuclides. From a mineralogical/geochemical point of view, the Boom Clay is considered as a rather homogeneous sediment, vertically as well as laterally. It is composed of detrital minerals, organic matter and fossils. Minerals are mainly clay minerals, quartz and feldspars. Minor amounts of pyrite and carbonates are also present. Small variations in mineralogical/geochemical composition are related to granulometrical variations. The radiochemical study indicates that the Boom Clay is in a state of secular radioactive equilibrium, meaning that the Boom Clay has not been disturbed for a very long time. Pore water sampling is done in situ from various piezometers, or by the squeezing or leaching of clay cores in the laboratory. These three pore water sampling techniques have been compared and evaluated. Boom Clay pore water is a NaHCO3 solution of 15 mM, containing 115 mg·l-1 of dissolved natural organic carbon. Some slight variations in pore water composition have been observed and can be explained by principles of chemical equilibrium. (author)

  13. Monitoring Nitrogen Leaching for the Evaluation of the Dutch Minerals Policy for Agriculture in Clay Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Dico Fraters; Boumans, Leo J.M.; van Leeuwen, Ton C.; de Hoop, Wim D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the Dutch monitoring program for agriculture in the clay regions for the period 1996–2000 and evaluates the monitoring strategy. A wide range of farms (25 to 85%) had a NO3–-N concentration in tile drainwater higher than the EU standard of 11.3 mg/l. The low figure is related to wet winters; the high, to dry winters. Arable farms are more prone to NO3– leaching than dairy farms. On arable farms, about 25% of the N surplus leached to groundwater and tile drai...

  14. Effect of potassium on fixation of ammonium by clay minerals in different soil layers

    OpenAIRE

    , Agelda Ajazi; Liri Miho; Aida Bani; , Ardian Maçi

    2013-01-01

    In intensive agriculture systems, efficient nutrient use is necessary for high crop yields as well as for sustainable environment management. Fixation of NH4+ and K+ by soil clays affect N and K availability to plants. Latest studies indicates that non-exchangeable NH4+, may affect crop productivity and soil N dynamics more than previously thought. An incubation study with K2SO4 and NH4NO3 was conducted to evaluate NH4+ and K+ fixation in two southern Albanian soils. Soils contained significa...

  15. 3D imaging of clay minerals inside sandstone: pushing the spatial resolution limits using ptychographic tomography

    OpenAIRE

    De Boever, Wesley; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Stappen, Jeroen; Dewanckele, Jan; Bultreys, Tom; Boone, Matthieu; De Schryver, Thomas; De Kock, Tim; Skjonsfjell, ETB; Diaz, Ana; Holler, Mirko; Cnudde, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of microporous, clay-sized particles in natural stone is essential for the understanding of their dynamics. These processes are importand in the fields of oil and gas, groundwater, building stone weathering and soil science. Methods such as X-ray micro-computed tomography is an excellent tool to study features larger than or just under 1 μm, but below the 400 nm limit, the technique falls short. Although destructive methods exists (e.g. FIB/SEM), non-destructive imaging at th...

  16. Seismic stratigraphy and clay mineral distribution in shallow-marine siliciclastic deposits, central Mississippi sound, North-central Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, G.G.; Manley, F.H.; Staheli, A.C.

    1983-03-01

    Three north-south high-resolution (7 kHz) seismic profiles and 16 20-foot cores taken at shot-point locations in central Mississippi Sound were utilized to determine: (1) any meaningful seismic reflector configurations in the subsurface; (2) the clay species dispersal pattern and its relation to transport systems that move sediment into the depositional basin; (3) any change in clay mineral species that has occurred through time with respect to deposition of 5 to 6 m (16 to 20 ft) of sediment. Interpretation of shallow seismic events (20 m (66 ft)) and clay mineral analysis indicates that extrinsic factors largely determined the clay mineral species and geologic history of Pleistocene and Holocene sedimentation in central Mississippi Sound. Trend surface maps, residual maps, profiles of the smectite (montmorillonite) to kaolinite ratios, and seismic profiles illustrate that: (1) Mississippi Sound has been influenced by transgressions and regressions associated with proglacial and interglacial stages; (2) a toplap seismic reflection configuration forms the probable Pleistocene-Holocene boundary; (3) at least one ancient barrier island is located inside the Holocene barrier system; (4) there is a late date for sea level reaching its present location (2500 years B.P.); (5) the influence of the Mississippi River system on sedimentation is soon after inundation of Mississippi Sound; (6) the longshore currents and flood tides supplied sediment rich in kaolinite to the study area; (7) the drainage systems emptying into the study area have local influence on clay mineral distribution; and (8) the dredging of ship channels affects the clay-mineral distribution within the sediments immediately below the sediment-water interface in central Mississippi Sound.

  17. Removal of uranium and thorium from artificially and routinely contaminated surfaces using attapulgus clay suspensions with and without mineral acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reported for experiments in which standard samples, artificially contaminated with uranium and thorium salts, were decontaminated using a semi-solid material whose basic constituent was attapulgite (a hydrated magnesium silicate). The application of attapulgus clay suspensions with additions of mineral acids resulted in the almost complete removal of these actinides from various surfaces. Since the results obtained on a laboratory scale were quite satisfactory, the method was applied to real materials, namely a glove box utilized for some years in various and repeated manipulations of natural uranium. This method of decontamination caused no damage to the surface subjected to the treatment, was simple to perform and required no special equipment. No liquid radioactive waste was generated and we were able to recover the glove box for further use. (orig.)

  18. Characterization of clay minerals and organic matter in shales: Application to high-level nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the Sedimentary Rock Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is to conduct investigations to assess the potential for shale to serve as a host medium for the isolation of high-level nuclear wastes. The emphasis on shale is a result of screening major sedimentary rock types (shale, sandstone, carbonate , anhydrite, and chalk) for a variety of attributes that affect the performance of repositories. The retardation of radionuclides was recognized as one of the potentially favorable features of shale. Because shale contains both clay minerals and organic matter, phases that may provide significant sorption of radioelement, the characterization of these phases is essential. In addition, the organic matter in shale has been identified as a critical area for study because of its potential to play either a favorable (reductant) or deleterious (organic ligands) role in the performance of a repository sited in shale. 36 refs., 36 figs., 10 tabs

  19. In vivo ectopic bone formation by devitalized mineralized stem cell carriers produced under mineralizing culture condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yoke Chin; Geris, Liesbet; Bolander, Johanna; Pyka, Grzegorz; Van Bael, Simon; Luyten, Frank P; Schrooten, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Functionalization of tissue engineering scaffolds with in vitro-generated bone-like extracellular matrix (ECM) represents an effective biomimetic approach to promote osteogenic differentiation of stem cells in vitro. However, the bone-forming capacity of these constructs (seeded with or without cells) is so far not apparent. In this study, we aimed at developing a mineralizing culture condition to biofunctionalize three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds with highly mineralized ECM in order to produce devitalized, osteoinductive mineralized carriers for human periosteal-derived progenitors (hPDCs). For this, three medium formulations [i.e., growth medium only (BM1), with ascorbic acid (BM2), and with ascorbic acid and dexamethasone (BM3)] supplemented with calcium (Ca(2+)) and phosphate (PO4 (3-)) ions simultaneously as mineralizing source were investigated. The results showed that, besides the significant impacts on enhancing cell proliferation (the highest in BM3 condition), the formulated mineralizing media differentially regulated the osteochondro-related gene markers in a medium-dependent manner (e.g., significant upregulation of BMP2, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and Wnt5a in BM2 condition). This has resulted in distinguished cell populations that were identifiable by specific gene signatures as demonstrated by the principle component analysis. Through devitalization, mineralized carriers with apatite crystal structures unique to each medium condition (by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis) were obtained. Quantitatively, BM3 condition produced carriers with the highest mineral and collagen contents as well as human-specific VEGF proteins, followed by BM2 and BM1 conditions. Encouragingly, all mineralized carriers (after reseeded with hPDCs) induced bone formation after 8 weeks of subcutaneous implantation in nude mice models, with BM2-carriers inducing the highest bone volume, and the lowest in the BM3 condition (as quantitated by nano-computed tomography

  20. Monitoring nitrogen leaching for the evaluation of the Dutch minerals policy for agriculture in clay regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraters, D; Boumans, L J; van Leeuwen, T C; de Hoop, W D

    2001-11-01

    This paper presents the results of the Dutch monitoring program for agriculture in the clay regions for the period 1996-2000 and evaluates the monitoring strategy. A wide range of farms (25 to 85%) had a NO3--N concentration in tile drainwater higher than the EU standard of 11.3 mg/l. The low figure is related to wet winters; the high, to dry winters. Arable farms are more prone to NO3- leaching than dairy farms. On arable farms, about 25% of the N surplus leached to groundwater and tile drainwater, on dairy farms this was about 15%. N in tile drainwater has shown to be the best indicator for monitoring the effects of farming practice changes in the clay regions. The average NO3--N concentration in tile drainwater was 18.8 and 3.2 mg/l in borehole water on farms where both were monitored. It is known that N use has a relationship with NO3- in tile drainwater and not with NH4+ and organic N. The presented results indicate that crop rotation and precipitation strongly influence NO3- concentration in tile drainwater. PMID:12805827

  1. Reduction and long-term immobilization of technetium by Fe(II) associated with clay mineral nontronite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99Tc is formed mostly during nuclear reactions and is released into the environment during weapons testing and inadvertent waste disposal. The long half-life, high environmental mobility (as Tc(VII)O4-) and its possible uptake into the food chain cause 99Tc to be a significant environmental contaminant. In this study, we evaluated the role of Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay mineral, nontronite (NAu-2), in reducing Tc(VII)O4- to poorly soluble Tc(IV) species as a function of pH and Fe(II) concentration. The rate of Tc(VII) reduction by Fe(II) in NAu-2 was higher at neutral pH (pH 7.0) than at acidic and basic pHs when Fe(II) concentration was low (+-birnessite, it reoxidized previously reduced Tc(IV). Nitrate neither enhanced reduction of Tc(VII) nor promoted reoxidation of Tc(IV). Approximately 11% of Tc(IV) was oxidized by oxygen. The rate and extent of Tc(IV) reoxidation was found to strongly depend on the nature of the oxidants and concentration of Fe(II). When the same oxidants were added to aged Tc reduction products (mainly NAu-2 and TcO2 · nH2O), the extent of Tc(IV) reoxidation decreased significantly relative to fresh Tc(IV) products. Increasing NAu-2 concentration also resulted in the decreased extent of Tc(IV) reoxidation. The results were attributed to the effect of NAu-2 aggregation that effectively retained Tc(IV) in the solid and decreased its vulnerability to reoxidation. Overall, our results implied that bioreduced clay minerals could play an important role in reducing Tc(VII) and in maintaining the long-term stability of reduced Tc(IV).

  2. Colloids formation versus complexation in radionuclides natural organic matter interaction studies: the case of Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Complexation of radionuclides (RN) by Natural Organic Matter (NOM) present in the host rock may pose a negative impact on the safety of a radioactive waste repository. This is because the formed complexes may increase the solubility, decrease the sorption, and thus enhance the mobility of RN. For Boom Clay, the reference host formation in Belgium for methodological research, and the one with probably the most abundant NOM content among the studied sites in the world, such a negative impact has not been demonstrated. This paper illustrates that Boom Clay NOM plays only a negligible role in RN complexation, based on data produced by the EC project TRANCOM-II. Classic approaches use a conditional stability constant (CSC) to measure the extent of interaction between RN and NOM. Such approaches borrow the theories from aquatic chemistry and model NOM as a complexing ligand. At neutral to alkaline pH, the condition relevant for most of disposal sites, side reactions such as hydrolysis and carbonate complexation interfere with the formation of RN-NOM complexes so that a CSC is highly conditional. Most of the published CSC values are very large implying high stabilities of formed RN-NOM complexes. A large value of a CSC predicts an increase in solubility and, if the formed RN-NOM complex is not sorbed, a decrease in sorption. Such predictions should be tested, before applied in safety assessments, by solubility and sorption experiments under relevant disposal conditions. Solubilities of laboratory prepared, amorphous tetravalent uranium and thorium phases were determined under geochemical conditions of Boom Clay with varying concentrations of NOM, mainly humic acid. Experimental results showed that Boom Clay NOM did not have an observable impact on the solubility of U(IV) and Th. For both actinides, however, NOM facilitated the formation of U/Th bearing colloids resulting in an apparent increase of U(IV) and Th concentration 3 orders of

  3. Experimental Study of the Selective Adsorption of Heavy Metals onto Clay Minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何宏平; 郭九皋; 等

    2000-01-01

    The interaction between minerals and heavy metals has been a hot object of study in environmental science,mineralogy and soil science,Through the selective adsorption experiment of Ca-montomorillonite,illite and kaolinite to Cu2+,Pb2+,Zn2+,Cd2+,and Cr3+ ions at certain conditions,it could be concluded that Cr3+ is most effectively sorbed by all the three minerals.Also,it can be found that Pb2+ shows a strong affinity for illite and kaolinite while cu2+ for montmorillonite .Based on the adsorption experiment at varying pH of solution,it can be found that the amount of heavy etals sorbed by minerals increases with increasing pH of the solution.

  4. Clay minerals as an alteration product of nuclear waste and natural glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification is one of the most advanced immobilization options for radioactive and toxic waste that provide long-term, safe isolation of radionuclide and toxic species from the environment. Present work was carried out to understand alteration mechanism, rate of alteration and mineral paragenesis in the nuclear waste and natural glasses under induced, near hydrothermal conditions where alteration parameters were controlled in the laboratory framework. Solution chemistry of leachates and chemico-mineralogical attributes of the glass surfaces and neo-formed minerals produced by alteration were studied with special reference to their retention property of various elements, representing specific radionuclide. The ionic release is in the order Na> Si > K > Ca > Al = Mg > Fe > Mn > Ti. To establish alteration mechanism and mineral paragenesis. The chemico-mineralogical attributes of the surface layers and alteration products. Obsidian that occurs in Osham hill, Gujarat, India is considered as potential natural analogue for nuclear waste glass. Experimentally derived secondary phases reorganized from the glass matrix

  5. Hydro-mechanical behaviour of two reference Belgian clay formations under non-isothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Two deep clay formations are being investigated in Belgium in connection with the design of a repository for 'High-Level Radioactive Waste': Boom clay BC at Mol (located between 160 and 270 m depths), considered the reference host formation, and Ypresian clay YC at Kallo (located between 300 and 450 m depths) as an alternative one. A comprehensive experimental programme has been carried out on these materials to explore water permeability at different temperatures and sample orientations, as well as to analyse volume change behaviour on loading/unloading at different temperatures and sample orientations (including pre and post-yield compressibility, yield properties and volume changes on drained thermal loading). Table 1 summarises some properties of BC and YC. Figure 1 presents the pore size distribution PSD curves of both clays obtained by mercury intrusion porosimetry. They display contrasting features (bi-modal pore network in YP with larger dominant pore sizes). Larger water permeability values are expected on YC as indicated in Table 1 and Figure 2, not only as a consequence of its higher void ratio but also due to these double porosity features. Water retention properties, of particular concern on sample retrieval from large depths, are also affected due to desaturation processes that are associated with the double porosity network of YP and its effects on air-entry value (a lower initial suction is measured on YP, despite being retrieved from larger depths). Figure 2 shows vertical and horizontal water permeability results under constant volume conditions and different temperatures. BC and YC display small anisotropy at sample scale - permeability is slightly larger on horizontal direction-. With regard to temperature effects, the figure shows that water permeability dependency on temperature in YC is slightly higher than the water viscosity prediction for both orientations. Instead BC displayed a thermal

  6. Action of a clay suspension on an Fe(0) surface under anoxic conditions: Characterization of neoformed minerals at the Fe(0)/solution and Fe(0)/atmosphere interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Immersion of an Fe(0) foil in a clay suspension at 90 °C and in anoxic conditions. • Magnetite was observed on the atmospheric part. • Iron-rich 7 Å serpentines were observed on the clay suspension part. • A gradient in serpentine cristallochemistry was observed. • A pure Fe–Si phyllosilicate was identified at the Fe(0)/clay suspension contact. - Abstract: To better understand the reaction mechanisms involved at the Fe(0)/clay minerals interface, we investigate in the present study the reaction between an Fe(0) surface and a clay suspension extracted from the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone (COx). Batch experiments were carried out under anoxic conditions in sealed autoclave, at 90 °C to mimic predicted radioactive waste disposal conditions. An Fe(0) foil was introduced into the autoclave so that the lower part of the foil was immersed in the clay suspension while the upper part was contacted with the atmosphere of the experimental setup. After two months, the mineralogical deposits that precipitated at the surface of the Fe(0) foil were analyzed using multiple techniques, namely X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning/transmission electron microscopy associated to microanalysis (SEM/TEM–EDXS), and micro-spectroscopic measurements (μ-FTIR and μ-Raman). Both parts of the Fe(0) foil were then shown to react: magnetite was the main resulting mineral formed at the Fe(0) surface in the atmospheric conditions whereas serpentine 1:1 phyllosilicates were the main end-products in the clay suspension. The analyses performed on the immersed part of the foil revealed a spatial heterogeneity in both serpentine cristallochemistry and morphology, with a gradient from the Fe(0) contact point toward the clay suspension. A pure Fe–Si phyllosilicate ring was observed at the direct contact point with the Fe(0) foil and a progressive incorporation of Al instead of Fe into the clay phases was identified as deposit thickness increased from the Fe(0) surface to

  7. Clay minerals in primitive meteorites and interplanetary dust 2. Smectites and micas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Zolensky, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    The classification is briefly summarized of stony meteorites and cosmic dust, and the mineralogy and chemistry is described of serpentine group minerals. The occurrence of smectites and micas in extraterrestrial materials is examined. The characterization of fine grained minerals in meteorites and IDPs relies heavily on electron beam instruments, especially the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Typically, phyllosilicates are identified by a combination of high resolution imaging of basal spacings, electron diffraction, and chemical analysis. Smectites can be difficult to differentiate from micas because the smectites lose their interlayer water and the interlayer partly collapse in the high vacuum of the TEM.

  8. Clay mineral continental amplifier for marine carbon sequestration in a greenhouse ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Martin J.; Wagner, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The majority of carbon sequestration at the Earth’s surface occurs in marine continental margin settings within fine-grained sediments whose mineral properties are a function of continental climatic conditions. We report very high mineral surface area (MSA) values of 300 and 570 m2 g in Late Cretaceous black shales from Ocean Drilling Program site 959 of the Deep Ivorian Basin that vary on subcentennial time scales corresponding with abrupt increases from approximately 3 to approximately 18% ...

  9. Disposal in argillaceous formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general description is made of clay as a geochemical medium, including a rapid review of the principal mineralogic data characterizing typical clay minerals, whereafter a description follows of the formation of geologic clay deposits. Two examples are used as illustration: the Boom clay formation at the Nuclear Center of Mol in Belgium and the marly clay layer at the Trisaia Nuclear Research Center in Italy. The principal physico-chemical and hydrogeologic properties of clays e.g. permeability and pore water composition are discussed in some detail due to their importance in assessing clay layers as host rock. Ion exchange of clays is reviewed with particular emphasis on the distribution coefficients, the diffusion coefficient and the migration parameters of radionuclides. Specific data relating to the Boom clay are commented in connection to the required conditioning techniques. The influence of heat on clay is shortly addressed and data are given of the heat transfer coefficients found in Belgium and Italy

  10. Geochemical simulation of the evolution of granitic rocks and clay minerals submitted to a temperature increase in the vicinity of a repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alteration of a granitic rock around a repository for spent nuclear fuel has been simulated considering the effect of an increase of temperature due to this kind of induced geothermal system. The results of the simulation have been interpreted in terms of mass transfer and volumic consequences. The alteration proceeds by dissolution of minerals (with an increase of the volumes of fissures and cracks) and precipitation of secondary miminerals as calcite and clay minerals particularly (with a decrease of the porosity). The increase of the temperature from 10 degrees C to about 100 degrees C will favour the alteration of the granitic rock around the repository by the solution filling the porosity. The rock is characterized by a very low fissure porosity and a consequent very low water velocity. This too, favours intense water rock interactions and production of secondary clays and the total possible mass transfer will decrease the porosity. A combination of these thermodynamic mass balance calculations with a kinetic approach of mineral dissolutions gives a first attempt to calibrate the modelling in the time scale: the decrease of porosity can be roughly estimated between 2 and 20% for 100,000 years. The particular problem of Na-bentonites behaviour in the proximate vicinity of the repository has been studied too. One must distinguish between two types of clay-water interactions: -within the rock around the repository, Na-bentonites should evolute with illitization in slighltly open system with low clay/water ratios, -within the repository itself, the clay reacts in a closed system for a long time with high clay/water ratios and a self-buffering effect should maintain the bentonite type. This chemical buffering effect is a positive point for the use of this clay as chemical barrier. (Author)

  11. Studies of fertilizer nitrogen transformation in soil with special regard to ammonium fixation in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transformation of 15N is investigated by means of nitrogen analyses of the soil and analyses for nitrogen uptake by plants after 15(NH4)2SO4 or K15NO3 fertilization. Under conditions of nitrogen deficiency, winter wheat utilizes 50-60% of the fertilizer nitrogen. Nitrogen uptake is higher with K15NO3 fertilization. This is due to higher immobilization and additional fixation after fertilization with ammonium. Nitrogen fixation under plant cover amounts to 12 kg N·ha-1 in loess soil and 4.5 kg N·ha-1 in heavily loamed clay soil. Remobilization and plant availability of these reserves cannot be discerned within one growing season. (author)

  12. Evidence of contrasting low-grade metamorphic conditons from clay mineral assablages in Triassic Alpujárride-Maláguide transtional units in the Betic Cordilleras, Spain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ruiz Cruz, M. D.; Franco, F.; Sanz de Galdeano, C.; Novák, Jiří Karel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 41, 2 (2006), s. 621-638. ISSN 0009-8558 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : low-grade metamorphism * clay minerals * Betic Cordilleras Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.974, year: 2006

  13. Study of dolomite dissolution at various temperatures - Evidence for the formation of nanocrystalline secondary phases at dolomite surface and influence on dolomite interactions with other minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debure, M.; Andreazza, P.; Grangeon, S.; Lerouge, C.; Montes-Hernandez, G.; MADE, B.; Tournassat, C.

    2015-12-01

    In most clay-rock geological formation studied for the storage of nuclear waste, pore water compositions are expected to be at equilibrium with carbonate minerals, which are always included in predictive models for pore water composition calculations [1]. Among the carbonates known to be present, dolomite may be problematic in the pore water composition calculation because its solubility spans a large range of values as a function of its crystallinity in thermodynamic databases. In addition, the composition of dolomite minerals observed in clay-rock formations such as Callovian-Oxfordian or Opalinus clay formation differs from this of a pure dolomite: the Ca/Mg stoichiometry is not ideal, and the minerals contain minor amounts of Fe and traces of many other elements [2]. To understand the influence of secondary phases precipitation during dolomite dissolution on pore water chemistry, the dissolution of monocrystals of dolomite were investigated at 25 °C and at 80 °C in a pH range 3 to 8 for various time periods (30 minutes to 21 days) in sealed PTFE reactors. Solution analyses evidenced a stoichiometric release of Ca and Mg in solution during dolomite dissolution. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Raman and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analyses did not evidence secondary Mg-bearing minerals precipitation, but revealed the formation of Fe-bearing particles on the dolomite surface. Morphological characterizations performed with Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) evidenced that the precipitation occurs along a specific crystallographic plane of the dolomite monocrystal. Thus, the precipitated nanoparticles clustered on specific surface sites, and are made of Fe-rich phases poorly crystallized (carbonates, oxides and hydroxides). [1] Tournassat et al. 2015. Ch. 3: Chemical Conditions in Clay-Rocks. Natural and Engineered Clay Barriers, Elsevier. [2] Lerouge et al. 2011. Geochim. et Cosmoch. Acta, 2011, 75, 2633-2663.

  14. REE Provenance and U-Th Distribution on Poly-Mineralized Lithofacies, Um Bogma Formation, Allouga environs, West Central Sinai, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Allouga environs, West Central Sinai, are bounded by lat. 28 degree 58/ - 29 degree 03/ N and long. 33 degree 21/ and 33 degree 26/ E, covering about 100 km2. The environs are covered by late Proterozoic basement rocks overlain non conformably by Paleozoic rock succession. The Paleozoic succession attains about 450 m, comprising seven stratigraphic formations. The Um Bogma Formation, Also referred to as the middle carbonate series, attains 61 m thickness and hosts most of the polymetallic mineralization associated with Paleozoic rocks. It was deposited in shallow, warm, well agitated and oxidized transgressed marine environment. Owing to its importance, it is classified into three members: a) lower members comprising siltstone, clay stone and sandy dolomite; b) middle member comprising marly dolostone and c) upper member comprising sandy dolostone, clay stone and siltstone. The REE and trace elements investigations of the shale/siltstone/clay stone lithofacies (Um Bogma Formation), indicate that it mainly comprises graywacke provenance with small amount of litharenites. Also, the data indicates the derivation of the terrigenous material from granite-gneiss and siliceous sources characteristics of sedimentary basins developed near or around active continental margin. The Cu- mineralization occurs in all members of Umm Bog ma Formation as disseminations and encrustation of green and blue colored Cu-minerals dominated by highly oxidized minerals such as silicates, carbonates, phosphates, sulphates and chlorides. This mineral assemblage reflects the wide range of ph conditions of the mineralizing fluids. The U-Th distribution in the shale/siltstone/clay stone lithofaciesis as follows: The marly shales have U content average (261 ppm) and Th content average (7.7 ppm), black and variegated shales have U content average (56.2 ppm) and Th content average (20 ppm), The ferrgenous siltstone have U content average (38 ppm) and Th content average (17.8 ppm), the black

  15. Oligomerization reactions of deoxyribonucleotides on montmorillonite clay - The effect of mononucleotide structure on phosphodiester bond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, James P.; KAMALUDDIN

    1989-01-01

    The formation of oligomers from deoxynucleotides, catalyzed by Na(+)-montmorillonite, was investigated with special attention given to the effect of the monomer structure on the phosphodiester bond formation. It was found that adenine deoxynucleotides bind more strongly to montmorillonite than do the corresponding ribonucleotides and thymidine nucleotides. Tetramers of 2-prime-dpA were detected in the reaction of 2-prime-d-5-prime-AMP with a water-soluble carbodiimide EDAC in the presence of Na(+)-montmorillonite, illustrating the possible role of minerals in the formation of biopolymers on the primitive earth.

  16. Mineral formation on metallic copper in a `Future repository site environment`: Textural considerations based on natural analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amcoff, Oe. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Inst. of Earth Sciences

    1998-01-01

    Copper mineral formation in the Swedish `repository site environment` is discussed. Special attention is given to ore mineral textures (=the spatial relation among minerals), with examples given from nature. It is concluded: By analogy with observations from natural occurrences, an initial coating of Cu-oxide on the canister surface (because of entrapped air during construction) will probably not hinder a later sulphidation process. Early formation of Cu-sulphides on the canister surface may be accompanied by formation of CuFe-sulphides. The latter phase(s) may form through replacement of the Cu-sulphides or, alternatively, by means of reaction between dissolved copper and fine-grained iron sulphide (pyrite) in the surrounding bentonite. Should for some reason the bentonite barrier fail and the conditions become strongly oxidizing, we can expect crustifications and rhythmic growths of Cu(II)-phases, like malachite (Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}). A presence of Fe{sup 2} in the clay minerals making up the bentonite might prove to have an adverse effect on the canister stability, since, in this case, the bentonite might be expected to act as a sink for dissolved copper. The mode of mineral growth along the copper - bentonite interface remains an open question.

  17. Mineral formation on metallic copper in a 'Future repository site environment': Textural considerations based on natural analogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper mineral formation in the Swedish 'repository site environment' is discussed. Special attention is given to ore mineral textures (=the spatial relation among minerals), with examples given from nature. It is concluded: By analogy with observations from natural occurrences, an initial coating of Cu-oxide on the canister surface (because of entrapped air during construction) will probably not hinder a later sulphidation process. Early formation of Cu-sulphides on the canister surface may be accompanied by formation of CuFe-sulphides. The latter phase(s) may form through replacement of the Cu-sulphides or, alternatively, by means of reaction between dissolved copper and fine-grained iron sulphide (pyrite) in the surrounding bentonite. Should for some reason the bentonite barrier fail and the conditions become strongly oxidizing, we can expect crustifications and rhythmic growths of Cu(II)-phases, like malachite (Cu2(OH)2CO3). A presence of Fe2 in the clay minerals making up the bentonite might prove to have an adverse effect on the canister stability, since, in this case, the bentonite might be expected to act as a sink for dissolved copper. The mode of mineral growth along the copper - bentonite interface remains an open question

  18. TEM/AEM characterization of fine-grained clay minerals in very-low-grade rocks: Evaluation of contamination by EMPA involving celadonite family minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gejing; Peacor, D.R. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Coombs, D.S.; Kawachi, Y. [Univ. of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand)

    1996-12-31

    Recent advances in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) have led to many new insights into the structural and chemical characteristics of very fine-grained, optically homogeneous mineral aggregates in sedimentary and very low-grade metamorphic rocks. Chemical compositions obtained by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) on such materials have been shown by TEM/AEM to result from beam overlap on contaminant phases on a scale below resolution of EMPA, which in turn can lead to errors in interpretation and determination of formation conditions. Here we present an in-depth analysis of the relation between AEM and EMPA data, which leads also to the definition of new mineral phases, and demonstrate the resolution power of AEM relative to EMPA in investigations of very fine-grained mineral aggregates in sedimentary and very low-grade metamorphic rocks.

  19. Effects of natural increase in temperature on clay formations and determination of the course and the effects of geothermal fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of clay cover towards the geothermal fluids rising up to the surface may represent an excellent natural analogue of the potential migration processes from deep waste repositories in clay formations. The ENEA is conducting research in an appropriate area near M. Amiata in southern Tuscany in order to contribute to solving the problem of the expected impermeability of clay formations. Geothermal fields may namely give an opportunity of studying a case of clay behaviour at a scale corresponding to size and time considered in waste disposal. In the considered area a relevant geothermal field is still active. A clay complex represents the impermeable cover of the local geothermal field. Several endogenous phenomena indicate the preferential ways of migrations of fluids from the basement throughout the cover. The data obtained by the present research prove that the upward flow of fluids, is possible only in the points of reduced thickness of the cover where very important faulting or granulometric discontinuity occur. This situation typically occurs at the border and not in the central part of the clay basins

  20. Radiation-induced defects in clay minerals, markers of the mobility of the uranium in solution in the unconformity-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents the works driven on three groups of clay minerals (kaolins, illite, sudoite (di-tri-octahedral chlorites)) characteristics of the alteration halos surrounding unconformity-type uranium deposits, in order to reveal uranium paleo-circulations in the intra-cratonic meso-Proterozoic basins (1,2 - 1,6 Ga). Thanks to Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (EPR), we were able to highlight the persistence of structural defects in kaolin-group minerals contemporaneous of the basin diagenesis, and demonstrate the existence of relatively stable defects in illites and sudoites contemporaneous of the uranium deposits setting. Thus, the main defect in illite (Ai centre) and the main defect in sudoite (As centre) are characterized by their g components such as, respectively, gt = 2,003 et g// = 2,051 for illite and gt = 2,008 et g// = 2,051 for sudoite. As the main defect in kaolins (kaolinite/dickite), the main defects in illite and sudoite are perpendicularly oriented according to the (ab) plane, on the tetrahedral Si-O bound. However, their thermal stabilities seem different. The observation of samples from different zones (background, anomal or mineralized) of the Athabasca basin (Canada) allowed to identify a parallel evolution between actual defects concentration measured in the different clay minerals and the proximity of the mineralisation zones. Consequently, clays minerals can be considered as potential plotters of zones where uranium-rich solutions have circulated. (author)

  1. Growth of iron(III)-reducing bacteria on clay minerals as the sole electron acceptor and comparison of growth yields on a variety of oxidized iron forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka, Joel E; Dalton, Dava D; Skelton, Hayley; Dollhopf, Sherry; Stucki, Joseph W

    2002-12-01

    Smectite clay minerals are abundant in soils and sediments worldwide and are typically rich in Fe. While recent investigations have shown that the structural Fe(III) bound in clay minerals is reduced by microorganisms, previous studies have not tested growth with clay minerals as the sole electron acceptor. Here we have demonstrated that a pure culture of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 as well as enrichment cultures of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria from rice paddy soil and subsurface sediments are capable of conserving energy for growth with the structural Fe(III) bound in smectite clay as the sole electron acceptor. Pure cultures of S. oneidensis were used for more detailed growth rate and yield experiments on various solid- and soluble-phase electron acceptors [smectite, Fe(III) oxyhydroxide FeOOH, Fe(III) citrate, and oxygen] in the same minimal medium. Growth was assessed as direct cell counts or as an increase in cell carbon (measured as particulate organic carbon). Cell counts showed that similar growth of S. oneidensis (10(8) cells ml(-1)) occurred with smectitic Fe(III) and on other Fe forms [amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide, and Fe citrate] or oxygen as the electron acceptor. In contrast, cell yields of S. oneidensis measured as the increase in cell carbon were similar on all Fe forms tested while yields on oxygen were five times higher, in agreement with thermodynamic predictions. Over a range of particle loadings (0.5 to 4 g liter(-1)), the increase in cell number was highly correlated to the amount of structural Fe in smectite reduced. From phylogenetic analysis of the complete 16S rRNA gene sequences, a predominance of clones retrieved from the clay mineral-reducing enrichment cultures were most closely related to the low-G+C gram-positive members of the Bacteria (Clostridium and Desulfitobacterium) and the delta-Proteobacteria (members of the Geobacteraceae). Results indicate that growth with smectitic Fe(III) is similar in magnitude to that with Fe

  2. Antibiotic eluting clay mineral (Laponite®) for wound healing application: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiri, M; Chrzanowski, W; Rohanizadeh, R

    2014-11-01

    Different materials in form of sponge, hydrogel and film have been developed and formulated for treating and dressing burn wounds. In this study, the potential of Laponite, a gel forming clay, in combination with an antimicrobial agent (mafenide), as a wound dressing material was tested in vitro. Laponite/mafenide (Lap/Maf) hydrogel was formulated in three different ratios of Lap/Maf 1:1, 1:2, 1:3. Laponite/mafenide/alginate (Lap/Maf/Alg) film was also formulated by combining Lap/Maf gel (1:1) with alginate. Intercalation rate of mafenide into the layers of Laponite nanoparticles and physico-chemical properties, including wound dressing characteristics of materials were studied using various analytical methods. Furthermore, the degradation of materials and the release profile of mafenide were investigated in simulated wound exudates fluid and antibacterial effectiveness of the eluted mafenide was tested on a range of bacterial species. The cytotoxicity of materials was also evaluated in skin fibroblast culture. The results showed that mafenide molecules were intercalated between the nano-sized layers of Laponite. The eluted mafenide showed active antibacterial effects against all three tested bacteria. All intercalated mafenide released from Lap/Maf 1:1 and 1:2 gel formulations and nearly 80% release from 1:3 formulation during test period. No significant difference was observed in release profile of mafenide between Lap/Maf/Alg film and Lap/Maf formulations. Wound dressing tests on Lap/Maf/Alg film showed it is a breathable dressing and has capacity to absorb wound exudates. The study showed that prepared Lap/Maf composite has the potential to be used as an antibiotic eluting gel or film for wound healing application. Additionally, Laponite has shown benefits in wound healing processes by releasing Mg(2+) ions and thereby reducing the cytotoxic effect of mafenide on fibroblast cells. PMID:25027303

  3. Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes Induce Calcium Mineral Formation and Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubo Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium crystals are present in the synovial fluid of 65%–100% patients with osteoarthritis (OA and 20%–39% patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. This study sought to investigate the role of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs in calcium mineral formation. We found that numerous genes classified in the biomineral formation process, including bone gamma-carboxyglutamate (gla protein/osteocalcin, runt-related transcription factor 2, ankylosis progressive homolog, and parathyroid hormone-like hormone, were differentially expressed in the OA and RA FLSs. Calcium deposits were detected in FLSs cultured in regular medium in the presence of ATP and FLSs cultured in chondrogenesis medium in the absence of ATP. More calcium minerals were deposited in the cultures of OA FLSs than in the cultures of RA FLSs. Examination of the micromass stained with nonaqueous alcoholic eosin indicated the presence of birefringent crystals. Phosphocitrate inhibited the OA FLSs-mediated calcium mineral deposition. These findings together suggest that OA FLSs are not passive bystanders but are active players in the pathological calcification process occurring in OA and that potential calcification stimuli for OA FLSs-mediated calcium deposition include ATP and certain unidentified differentiation-inducing factor(s. The OA FLSs-mediated pathological calcification process is a valid target for the development of disease-modifying drug for OA therapy.

  4. Evaluation of radiological safety assessment of a repository in a clay rock formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a comprehensive description of the post-closure radiological safety assessment of a repository for the spent fuel arisings resulting from the Spanish nuclear program excavated in a clay host rock formation. In this report three scenarios have been analysed in detail. The first scenario represents the normal in detail. The first scenario represents the normal evolution of the repository (Reference Scenario); and includes a set of variants to investigate the relative importance of the various repository components and examine the sensitivity of the performance to parameters variations. Two altered scenarios have also been considered: deep well construction and poor sealing of the repository. This document contains a detailed description of the repository system, the methodology adopted for the scenarios generation, the process modelling approach and the results of the consequences analysis. (Author)

  5. Impact of advanced fuel cycles on radioactive waste disposal in a clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last 15 years the EC (European Commission) has initiated several research projects on the possibilities of introducing partitioning and transmutation techniques in nuclear fuel cycles in order to reduce the amount of long-lived isotopes present in the radioactive waste. One of these projects, Red-Impact (impact of partitioning, transmutation and waste reduction technologies on the final nuclear waste disposal) started in 2004; its main objective was to assess the impact of partitioning and transmutation on radioactive waste management and geological disposal. The main objective of SCK-CEN's contribution to the Red-Impact project is to evaluate the impact of some representative advanced fuel cycles, making use of partitioning and transmutation techniques, on radioactive waste disposal in a clay formation

  6. Reduction and long-term immobilization of technetium by Fe(II) associated with clay mineral nontronite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99Tc is formed mostly during nuclear reactions and is released into the environment during weapons testing and inadvertent waste disposal. The long half-life, high environmental mobility (as Tc(VII)O4-) and its possible uptake into the food chain cause 99Tc to be a significant environmental contaminant. In this study, we evaluated the role of Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay mineral, nontronite (NAu-2), in reducing Tc(VII)O4- to poorly soluble Tc(IV) species as a function of pH and Fe(II) concentration. The rate of Tc(VII) reduction by Fe(II) in NAu-2 was higher at neutral pH (pH 7.0) than at acidic and basic pHs when Fe(II) concentration was low (< 1 mmol/g). The effect of pH, however, was insignificant at higher Fe(II) concentrations. The reduction of Tc(VII) by Fe(II) associated with NAu-2 was also studied in the presence of common subsurface oxidants including iron and manganese oxides, nitrate, and oxygen, to evaluate the effect of the oxidants on the enhancement and inhibition of Tc(VII) reduction, and reoxidation of Tc(IV). Addition of iron oxides (goethite and hematite) to the Tc(VII)-NAu-2 system, where Tc(VII) reduction was ongoing, enhanced reduction of Tc(VII), apparently as a result of re-distribution of reactive Fe(II) from NAu-2 to more reactive goethite/hematite surfaces. Addition of manganese oxides stopped further Tc(VII) reduction, and in case of K+-birnessite, it reoxidized previously reduced Tc(IV). Nitrate neither enhanced reduction of Tc(VII) nor promoted reoxidation of Tc(IV). Approximately 11% of Tc(IV) was oxidized by oxygen. The rate and extent of Tc(IV) reoxidation was found to strongly depend on the nature of the oxidants and concentration of Fe(II). When the same oxidants were added to aged Tc reduction products (mainly NAu-2 and TcO2nH2O), the extent of Tc(IV) reoxidation decreased significantly relative to fresh Tc(IV) products. Increasing NAu-2 concentration also resulted in the decreased extent of Tc(IV) reoxidation. The results

  7. Mineralogy and chemistry of altered Icelandic basalts: Application to clay mineral detection and understanding aqueous environments on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlmann, B. L.; Bish, D. L.; Ruff, S. W.; Mustard, J. F.

    2012-10-01

    We used a suite of techniques, including those emulating compositional data sets obtained from Mars orbit and obtainable at the Mars surface, to examine aqueous alteration of basaltic rocks from Iceland as a mineralogic and geochemical analog for Noachian environments on Mars. A sample suite was collected for laboratory measurement of (1) whole-rock visible/near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance and thermal infrared (TIR) emission spectra; (2) VNIR and TIR reflectance spectra of particle-size separates derived from the bulk rock and from materials extracted from fractures/vesicles; (3) X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns for determination of quantitative modal mineralogy; (4) major element chemistry using flux fusion of whole-rock powders; and (5) electron microprobe analyses of minerals in thin sections. Conclusions about aqueous alteration can be influenced by technique. For these basalts, whole-rock chemical data showed scant evidence for chemical fractionation, but TIR, VNIR, and XRD measurements identified distinctive assemblages of hydrous silicate minerals, differing by sample. XRD provided the most complete and accurate quantitative determination of sample mineralogy. However, VNIR spectroscopy was the technique most useful for determining composition of low-abundance smectite clays, and TIR spectroscopy was the most useful for recognizing hydrated silicates in thin surface coatings. High spatial resolution mineralogical and chemical data sets were useful for understanding the texture and distribution of alteration products and variations in fluid chemistry. No single approach provides a complete assessment of the environment of alteration, demonstrating the importance of employing multiple, synergistic mineralogical and geochemical techniques and instruments in exploration of rock strata from aqueous paleoenvironments on Mars.

  8. Feasibility of immobilizing simulated radioactive slurry based on alkali-activated slag-clay minerals composite cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of immobilizing simulated radioactive slurry (SRS) by alkali-activated slag-clay minerals composite cement (AASCM) was studied under the experimental conditions. The results show that the flowability of the mixture of AASCM and SRS is highly dependent on the dosage of SRS and water cement ratio and the setting time is more dependent on temperature but less dependent on sorts of anions in the experiment. The application of AASCM in solidification engineering is suitable below 20 degree C. When cement-sand ratio is 1:1 and water-cement ratio is 0.45, the flowability of the mixture meets the case of solidification engineering and the compressive strength of the waste forms containing 20% SRS meets the needs of GB 14569.1-93. The leaching rate of AASCM based waste forms is lower than that of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based waste forms. Silicon fume can improve the workability of the mixture of AASCM and SRS and decrease the leaching rate of waste forms based on AASCM as well. (authors)

  9. Evolution of multi-mineral formation evaluation using LWD data in complex carbonates offshore Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraris, Paolo; Borovskaya, Irina [Schlumberger, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Petrophysical Formation Evaluation using Logging While Drilling (LWD) measurements is a new requisite when drilling in carbonates reservoirs offshore Brazil. These reservoirs are difficult to characterize due to an unusual mixture of the minerals constituting the matrix and affecting rock texture. As wells are getting deeper and more expensive, an early identification of the drilled targets potential is necessary for valuable decisions. Brazil operators have been especially demanding towards service providers, pushing for development of suitable services able to positively identify and quantify not only the presence of hydrocarbons but also their flowing capability. In addition to the standard gamma ray / resistivity / porosity and density measurements, three new measurements have proven to be critical to evaluate complex carbonate formations: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Spectroscopy and Capture Cross-Section (sigma). Under appropriate logging conditions, NMR data provides lithology independent porosity, bound and free fluids fractions, reservoir texture and permeability. Capture Spectroscopy allows assessment of mineral composition in terms of calcite, dolomite, quartz and clay fractions, and in addition highlights presence of other heavier minerals. Finally, sigma allows performing a volumetric formation evaluation without requiring custom optimization of the classical exponents used in all forms of resistivity saturation equations. All these new measurements are inherently statistical and if provided by wireline after drilling the well they may result in significant usage of rig time. When acquired simultaneously while drilling they have three very clear advantages: 1) no extra rig time, 2) improved statistics due to long formation exposure (drilling these carbonates is a slow process and rate of penetration (ROP) rarely exceeds 10 m/hr), 3) less invasion effect and better hole condition. This paper describes the development of two LWD tools performing the

  10. Biogeochemical processes in a clay formation in situ experiment: Part A - Overview, experimental design and water data of an experiment in the Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, P., E-mail: paul.wersin@gruner.ch [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland)] [Gruner Ltd., Gellertstrasse 55, 4020 Basel (Switzerland); Leupin, O.X. [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland); Mettler, S. [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland)] [Solexperts Ltd., Mettlenbachstrasse 25, 8617 Moenchaltorf (Switzerland); Gaucher, E.C. [BRGM, 3 avenue Claude Guillemin, B.P. 36009, 45060 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Maeder, U. [University of Bern, Institute of Geological Sciences, Baltzerstrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); De Canniere, P. [SCK.CEN, Waste and Disposal Project, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Vinsot, A. [ANDRA, Laboratoire de Recherche Souterrain de Meuse/Haute-Marne, RD960 BP9, 55290 Bure (France); Gaebler, H.E. [BGR, Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover (Germany); Kunimaro, T. [JAEA, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kiho, K. [CRIEPI, 1646 Abiko, Abiko-city Chiba 270-1194 (Japan); Eichinger, L. [Hydroisotop, 85301 Schweitenkirchen (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > The composition was affected by the complex interplay of diffusion, mineral and surface reactions. > The {sup 13}C signals for carbon species showed significant variations which could only be partly explained. > The main cations remained remarkably constant during the experiment. > This underlines the strong buffering via cation exchange and carbonate dissolution/precipitation. - Abstract: An in situ test in the Opalinus Clay formation, termed porewater chemistry (PC) experiment, was carried out for a period of 5 years. It was based on the concept of diffusive equilibration whereby a traced water with a composition close to that expected in the formation was continuously circulated and monitored in a packed-off borehole. The main original focus was to obtain reliable data on the pH/pCO{sub 2} conditions of the porewater, but because of unexpected microbiologically-induced redox reactions, the objective was extended to elucidate the biogeochemical processes occurring in the borehole and to understand their impact on pH/pCO{sub 2} and porewater chemistry in the low permeability clay formation. The behaviour of the conservative tracers {sup 2}H and Br{sup -} could be explained by diffusive dilution in the clay and moreover the results showed that diffusive equilibration between the borehole water and the formation occurred within about 3 year's time. However, the composition and pH/pCO{sub 2} conditions differed considerably from those of the in situ porewater. Thus, pH was lower and pCO{sub 2} was higher than indicated by complementary laboratory investigations. The noted differences are explained by microbiologically-induced redox reactions occurring in the borehole and in the interfacial wall area which were caused by an organic source released from the equipment material. The degradation of this source was accompanied by sulfate reduction and - to a lesser extent - by methane generation, which induced a high rate of acetogenic reactions

  11. A new avian fauna from the early-middle Eocene Lillebælt Clay Formation of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Bent Erik Kramer

    A number of hitherto undescribed fossil bird remains have been recovered from the Lillebælt Clay Formation of central Denmark, which is early-middle Eocene in age (~50 to 43 mya). The core of the material consists of fossils acquired through the Danish ‘Danekræ' fossil treasure trove legislation...

  12. Comparative 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar dating of illite-type clay minerals: A tentative explanation for age identities and differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauer, Norbert; Zwingmann, Horst; Liewig, Nicole; Wendling, Raymond

    2012-10-01

    The 40K/40Ar (K-Ar) and 40Ar/39Ar dating methods are applied here to the same, very small, micrometric illite-type particles that crystallized under low-temperature (samples with a total of fifteen size fractions from advantages, such as the plateaus obtained by incremental step heating of the various size fractions, even if not translatable straight as ages of the illite populations; they allow identification of two generations of authigenic illite that formed at about 200 and 175 Ma, and one detrital generation. However, 40Ar/39Ar dating of clay minerals remains challenging as technical factors, such as the non-standardized encapsulation, may have potential unexpected effects. Both dating methods have their limitations: (1) K-Ar dating requires relatively large samples (ca. 10-20 mg) incurring potential sample homogeneity problems, with two aliquots required for K and Ar analysis for an age determination, also inducing a higher analytical uncertainty; (2) an identified drawback of 40Ar/39Ar dating is Ar recoil and therefore potential loss that occurs during neutronic creation of 39Ar from 39K, mostly in the finer mineral particles. If all the recoiled 39Ar is redistributed into adjacent grains/minerals, the final 40Ar/39Ar age of the analyzed size fraction remains theoretically identical, but it is not systematic in clay-type material. The finest grain sizes (e.g., convenient and straightforward use supported by a standardized and well-controlled technical approach. The present comparison of the two Ar-dating methods as applied to clay material shows that neither method is presently outdated, and that they are even of reciprocal use. Both methods have distinct application fields in clay geochronology and complementary application fields in clay crystallography.

  13. Mineral matter crystallization and crack formation in tuyere coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislav Gornostayev; Jouko Haerkki [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland). Laboratory of Process Metallurgy

    2006-05-15

    Polished and dry-cut sections of samples of tuyere coke were studied by scanning electron microscopy to reveal the mechanism of appearance, distribution and effects of aluminosilicate spherules and irregular segregations of slag and spinel crystals formed in the coke matrix. It was found that the formation of spherules and slag is not destructive with respect to the host coke matrix. On the contrary, the octahedral spinel crystals, which grow from the aluminosilicate spherules gradually expose {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} faces and edges and change the shape and possibly volume of the parental mineral matter. The sharp and straight edges probably cause cracks to appear in the coke matrix, leading to a weakening of its strength upon crystal growth. The proposed model for this crack formation probably reflects the negative role of some Al- and especially Mg-bearing minerals in the coal blends used for the production of coke, and partly reveals mineralogical insights into the negative influence of high ash basicity on coke strength. 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Formation of secondary minerals in a lysimeter approach - A mineral-microbe interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäffner, F.; Merten, D.; De Giudici, G.; Beyer, A.; Akob, D. M.; Ricci, P. C.; Küsel, K.; Büchel, G.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy metal contamination of large areas due to uranium mining operations poses a serious long-term environmental problem. In the Ronneburg district (eastern Thuringia, Germany), leaching of low grade uranium bearing ores (uranium content agar plates. Furthermore, it was possible to show the importance of iron on this process, as some MOB isolates were able to oxidize manganese independently from the iron content, whereas some are not. The latter isolates are only able to oxidize manganese if iron is present in the media. In the lysimeter, SEM-EDX data showed microorganisms in organic rich phases together with the occurrence of manganese, oxygen, and nickel, indicating manganese oxides enriched in nickel. Although this new mineral phases could not yet be identified microprobe EDX results from polished thin sections showed needle-like mineral structures that are similar to the birnessite and todorokite samples observed from field samples. Hence, the lysimeter experiment revealed that the formation of iron and manganese minerals that are involved in heavy metal natural attenuation is result of both abiotic and biotic processes.

  15. Detection and identification of autochthonous microorganisms in deep clay rock formations under evaluation for disposal of high activity nuclear wastes: example of opalinus clay (Mont Terri, Switzerland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feasibility of deep geological storage of high activity nuclear wastes mainly relies on physico-chemical properties of the targeted host rock, in particular its ability to limit radionuclide transfer through the geological barrier formation and within the biosphere for hundreds of thousands years. Several phenomena such as chemical form of radionuclides may be influenced or catalyzed by microorganisms living in the host rock, or brought by excavation and human activity. This work deals with detection of microbial DNA and identification of autochthonous microorganisms in the undisturbed potential host clay formation from Mont Terri URL (Switzerland). Our approach is based on molecular biology in order to obtain a broad view of diversity in this extreme environment. DNA extraction, 16s-rDNA PCR amplification with universal primers for Bacteria and Archaea, and sequencing methods were thus chosen for detection and identification of endogenous microbes. (authors)

  16. CLAYFORM: a FORTRAN 77 computer program apportioning the constituents in the chemical analysis of a clay or other silicate mineral into a structural formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodine, M.W., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The FORTRAN 77 computer program CLAYFORM apportions the constituents of a conventional chemical analysis of a silicate mineral into a user-selected structure formula. If requested, such as for a clay mineral or other phyllosilicate, the program distributes the structural formula components into appropriate default or user-specified structural sites (tetrahedral, octahedral, interlayer, hydroxyl, and molecular water sites), and for phyllosilicates calculates the layer (tetrahedral, octahedral, and interlayer) charge distribution. The program also creates data files of entered analyses for subsequent reuse. ?? 1987.

  17. Synergy between polyaniline and OMt clay mineral in Langmuir-Blodgett films for the simultaneous detection of traces of metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Anerise; Ferreira, Mariselma; Constantino, Carlos José Leopoldo; Bortoleto, José Roberto Ribeiro; Ferreira, Marystela

    2015-04-01

    We report on Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films made with emeraldine salt polyaniline (PAni-ES) and organophilic montmorillonite clay mineral (OMt), where synergy between the components was reached to yield an enhanced performance in detecting trace levels of cadmium (Cd(2+)), lead (Pb(2+)) and copper (Cu(2+)). Detection was carried out using square wave anodic stripping (SWAS) voltammetry with indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes modified with LB films of PAni-ES/OMt nanocomposite, whose data were compared to those obtained with electrodes coated with neat PAni-ES and neat OMt LB films. The enhanced performance in the nanocomposite may be attributed to the stabilizing and ordering effect promoted by OMt in PAni-ES Langmuir films, which then led to more homogeneous LB films. According to X-ray diffraction data, the stacking of OMt layers was preserved in the LB films and therefore the PAni-ES chains did not cause clay mineral exfoliation. Instead, OMt affected the polaronic state of PAni-ES as indicated in UV-vis, Raman and FTIR spectra, also consistent with the changes observed for the Langmuir films. Taken together these results do indicate that semiconducting polymers and clay minerals may be combined for enhancing the electrical properties of nanostructures for sensing and related applications. PMID:25761908

  18. Pre-treatment of Used-Cooking Oil as Feed Stocks of Biodiesel Production by Using Activated Carbon and Clay Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Syah Putra

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many low-cost feedstock i.e. used-cooking oil (UCO for the production of biodiesel fuel (BDF has contained a large amount of water and high proportion of free fatty acids (FFAs. Therefore, a pre-treatment process to reduce the water content (<0.1 wt.% and FFAs (<2.0 wt.% were necessary in order to avoid an undesirable side reactions, such as saponification, which could lead to serious problem of product separation and low fatty acid methyl ester (FAME yield. . In this study, a pre-treatment process of used cooking oil as a feedstock for the production of BDF by using various adsorbents such as Activated Carbon (AC and various clay minerals, for example Smectite (S, Bentonite (B, Kaolinite (K, and Powdered Earthenware (PE were evaluated. The oil obtained from pre-treatment was compared with oil without pre-treatment process. In this study, we reported a basic difference in material ability to the oil, depending on the adsorption condition with respect to the physico-chemical parameters, e.g. refractive index (R, density (ρ, FFAs, and water content (W. The results showed that the water content and FFAs in the oil has decreased when using AC as an adsorbent compared with clay minerals. However, the refractive index of oil has similar with the oil without pre-treatment process as well; meanwhile, the density of oil has increased after the pre-treatment process by using clay minerals.

  19. Zinc-rich clays in supergene non-sulfide zinc deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choulet, F.; Buatier, M.; Barbanson, L.; Guégan, R.; Ennaciri, A.

    2016-04-01

    The nature and the origin of zinc clays are poorly understood. With the example of the Bou Arhous Zn-Pb ore deposit in the Moroccan High Atlas, this study presents new data for the mineralogical and chemical characterization of barren and zinc clays associated with non-sulfide zinc ores. In the field, white to ocher granular clays are associated with willemite (Zn2SiO4), while red clays fill karst-related cavities cutting across the non-sulfide ore bodies. Red clays (kaolinite, chlorite, illite, and smectite) present evidence of stratification that reflects internal sedimentation processes during the karst evolution. White clays contain 7-Å clay mineral/smectite irregular interstratified minerals with less than 20 % of smectite layers. Willemite is partially dissolved and is surrounded by authigenic zinc clay minerals. Together with XRD results, WDS analyses on newly formed clay aggregates suggest that this interstratified mineral is composed of fraipontite and sauconite. CEC measurements support that zinc is only located within the octahedral sheets. These new results support the following process: (i) dissolution of willemite, leading to release of Si and Zn, (ii) interaction between Zn-Si-rich solutions and residual-detrital clays, and (iii) dissolution of kaolinite and formation of interstratified zinc clay minerals that grew over detrital micas.

  20. Temperature effect on sorption of cations onto clay minerals: complexation modeling and experimental measurements up to 150 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tertre, E. [LMTG, UMR UPS-CNRS-IRD 5563, 14 av. E. Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France)]|[ANDRA, Parc de la Croix Blanche - 1/7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry (France)]|[EDF R and D, 77818 Moret sur Loing (France); Berger, G.; Castet, S.; Loubet, M. [LMTG, UMR UPS-CNRS-IRD 5563, 14 av. E. Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Giffaut, E. [ANDRA, Parc de la Croix Blanche - 1/7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry (France); Simoni, E. [Universite Paris XI, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Groupe de Radiochimie, Bat. 100, 91406 Orsay (France); Catalette, H. [EDF R and D, 77818 Moret sur Loing (France)

    2005-07-01

    clay minerals is not temperature dependant whereas the surface charges increase weakly when temperature rises from 25 to 60 deg. C [2]. A surface complexation model (DLM) integrating the temperature parameter was performed to explain our sorption data. This model takes into account the site densities and their associated pK{sub a} obtained by our surface acid/base model [2]. [1] Experimental sorption of Ni{sup 2+}, Cs{sup +} and Ln{sup 3+} onto a montmorillonite up to 150 deg. C. E. Tertre, G. Berger, S. Castet, M. Loubet and E. Giffaut (submitted). [2] Acid/base surface chemistry of kaolinite and montmorillonite at 25 and 60 deg. C. Experimental measurements and modeling by CHESS{sup R}. E. Tertre, S. Castet, G. Berger, M. Loubet and E. Giffaut (in preparation). (authors)

  1. Cloud condensation nucleus activity comparison of dry- and wet-generated mineral dust aerosol: the significance of soluble material

    OpenAIRE

    Garimella, Sarvesh; Huang, Y.-W.; Seewald, J. S.; Cziczo, Daniel James

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the interaction of clay mineral particles and water vapor for determining the conditions required for cloud droplet formation. Droplet formation conditions are investigated for two common clay minerals, illite and sodium-rich montmorillonite, and an industrially derived sample, Arizona Test Dust. Using wet and dry particle generation coupled to a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and cloud condensation nuclei counter, the critical activation of the clay mineral particle...

  2. Soft Matter Physics of Clays and Clay suspensions: structural arrest, ordering, and host-guest interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeth Lindbo, Hansen

    2013-01-01

    This thesis contains fundamental experimental studies in soft matter physics, focusing on plate-shaped hectorite and uorohectorite clays as nanomaterials with applications in the formation of glasses, gels and liquid crystals, as naturally occurring minerals, as drug carrier systems, and as hosts for CO2 storage.The first part presents fundamental studies on the physics of dispersions of clays in aqueous solvents. We find that gravity induces phase separation in aqueous suspensions of the syn...

  3. Geological isolation of radioactive waste in clay formations: fractures and faults as possible pathways for radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term isolation of radioactive waste can be provided by a combination of natural and man-made barriers. Geological formations of different types have been proposed as suitable natural barriers for radioactive waste isolation. Argillaceous formations can have very favourable characteristics such as: low permeability, high sorption capacity, high plasticity. The retention properties and the low intrinsic permeability can guarantee waste isolation as long as the rock is homogeneous and integer. The presence of undetected fractures, or fractures formed after waste emplacement, can seriously compromise the efficiency of the barrier. In general terms clay formations are expected to respond in a plastic way to external stresses, thus fault and fracture formation should be a rare phenomenon in such media. This plastic behaviour seems supported by mathematical models applied to both conceptual and specific cases. Nevertheless, faults and fractures have been observed in clay outcrops, in quarries and in relatively deep tunnels. In some quarries, fissures surrounded by oxidation zones 1 or 2 cm thick have been seen. The mechanisms of fault and fracture formation in clays must be investigated and the possibility that they can act as pathways of enhanced water and radionuclide migration must be evaluated. (Auth.)

  4. Clay minerals of Pliocene deposits and their potential use for the purification of polluted wastewater in the Sohag area, Egypt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Refaey; B. Jansen; A.H. El-Shater; A.A. El-Haddad; K. Kalbitz

    2015-01-01

    In our study we investigated the clay fraction composition of Pliocene clay deposits in the Sohag area, Egypt. Our goal was to obtain insights into the origin of the deposits, and to assess their potential for use in inexpensive wastewater purification. The rationale for the latter was that in Egypt

  5. Platform-induced clay-mineral fractionation along a northern Tethyan basin-platform transect: implications for the interpretation of Early Cretaceous climate change (Late Hauterivian-Early Aptian)

    OpenAIRE

    Godet, Alexis; Bodin, Stéphane; Adatte, Thierry; Föllmi, Karl B.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution clay-mineral analyses were performed on upper Hauterivian to lower Aptian sediments along a platform-to-basin transect through the northern Tethyan margin from the Neuchâtel area (Switzerland), to the Vocontian Trough (France) in order to investigate links between climate change, carbonate platform evolution, and fractionation patterns in clay minerals during their transport. During the Hauterivian, the northern Tethyan carbonate platform developed in a heterozoan mode, and t...

  6. Formation of environmentally persistent free radical (EPFR) in iron(III) cation-exchanged smectite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Ugwumsinachi G; Roy, Amitava; dela Cruz, Albert Leo N; Dellinger, Barry; Cook, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) have been found at a number of Superfund sites, with EPFRs being formed via a proposed redox process at ambient environmental conditions. The possibility of such a redox process taking place at ambient environmental conditions is studied utilizing a surrogate soil system of phenol and iron(III)-exchanged calcium montmorillonite clay, Fe(III)CaM. Sorption of phenol by the Fe(III)CaM is demonstrated by Fourier-transformed infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, as evidenced by the peaks between 1345 cm(-1) and 1595 cm(-1), and at lower frequencies between 694 cm(-1) and 806 cm(-1), as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, as shown by an increase in interlayer spacing within Fe(III)CaM. The formation and characterization of the EPFRs is determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, showing phenoxyl-type radical with a g-factor of 2.0034 and ΔHP-P of 6.1 G at an average concentration of 7.5 × 10(17) spins per g. EPFRs lifetime data are indicative of oxygen and water molecules being responsible for EPFR decay. The change in the oxidation state of the iron redox center is studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, showing that 23% of the Fe(III) is reduced to Fe(II). X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) results confirm the XANES results. These findings, when combined with the EPFR concentration data, demonstrate that the stoichiometry of the EPFR formation under the conditions of this study is 1.5 × 10(-2) spins per Fe(II) atom. PMID:26647158

  7. Impact of Long-Term Alfalfa Cropping on Soil Potassium Content and Clay Minerals in a Semi-Arid Loess Soil in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI De-Cheng; B. VELDE; LI Feng-Min; ZHANG Gan-Lin; ZHAO Ming-Song; HUANG Lai-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Alfalfa cropping has been considered an efficient method of increasing soil fertility.Usually nitrogen increase in root nodules is considered to be the major beneficial effect.A 21-year time series (five sampling periods) of alfalfa cultivation plots on a loess soil,initially containing illite and chlorite,in Lanzhou of northwestern China was selected to investigate the relationships among alfalfa cropping,soil potassium (K) content and soil clay minerals.The results indicated that soil K significantly accumulated after cropping,with a peak value at about 15 years,and decreased afterwards.The accumulated K was associated with the K increase in the well-crystallized illite,which was not extracted by the traditional laboratory K extraction methods in assessing bioavailability.The steep decline in soil K content after 15-year cropping was in accord with the observed fertility loss in the alfalfa soil.Plant biomass productivity peaked at near 9 years of culture,whereas soil K and clay minerals continued to increase until cropping for 15 years.This suggested that K increased in the topsoil came from the deep root zone.Thus alfalfa continued to store K in clays even after peak production occurred.Nitrogen did not follow these trends,showing a general decline compared with the native prairie soils that had not been cropped.Therefore,the traditional alfalfa cropping can increase K content in the topsoil.

  8. An EXAFS study on the effects of natural organic matter and the expandability of clay minerals on cesium adsorption and mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Q. H.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, K.; Sakaguchi, A.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-06-01

    The relationship between cesium (Cs) adsorption on clay minerals with various expandabilities and Cs mobility in environment was investigated using sequential extraction, batch adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), generalized adsorption model (GAM), and Cs LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analyses with molecular simulations using the density functional theory (DFT). In particular, the difference between the affinities of illite (non-expansion) and vermiculite (intermediate expansion) for Cs and the effect of humic acid (HA) addition on the Cs/clay mineral system were highlighted in this study. These two factors affect Cs mobility and bioavailability in surface soil and sediments. The batch adsorption results showed that Cs adsorption was inhibited to some extent in the ternary clay + HA + Cs system because of (i) the blocked access of Cs to the frayed edge site (FES) and type II site [inner-sphere (IS) complex in GAM] by HA, and (ii) the reduced availability of the interlayer site in vermiculite. EXAFS analysis further confirmed that the adsorbed Cs in clay minerals was drastically changed by the sequential addition of HA. In addition, the dominant IS complex in the illite + Cs and illite + Cs + HA systems (in which HA was added after Cs adsorption on illite) can be converted to the outer-sphere (OS) complex largely in the illite + HA + Cs system (in which HA was added prior to Cs adsorption). These results are consistent with the sequential extraction and GAM results. The IS complex of dehydrated Cs+ mainly formed at the FES and interlayer site on illite (non-expansion) without resulting in any illite structural changes. However, on vermiculite (intermediate expansion), the dehydrated Cs+ can be adsorbed as an IS complex associated with the siloxane group of the di-trigonal cavity in the tetrahedral SiO4 sheet. This adsorption is accompanied by collapse of the layer, which can be easily coated by HA molecules to prevent Cs fixation

  9. Mineral dust aerosols promote the formation of toxic nitropolycyclic aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Takayuki; Azumi, Eri; Fukushima, Aki; Tang, Ning; Matsuki, Atsushi; Kamiya, Yuta; Toriba, Akira; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs), which have been shown to have adverse health effects such as carcinogenicity, are formed in part through nitration reactions of their parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the atmosphere. However, little is known about heterogeneous nitration rates of PAHs by gaseous NO2 on natural mineral substrates, such as desert dust aerosols. Herein by employing kinetic experiments using a flow reactor and surface analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with pyridine adsorption, we demonstrate that the reaction is accelerated on acidic surfaces of mineral dust, particularly on those of clay minerals. In support of this finding, we show that levels of ambient particle-associated NPAHs in Beijing, China, significantly increased during heavy dust storms. These results suggest that mineral dust surface reactions are an unrecognized source of toxic organic chemicals in the atmosphere and that they enhance the toxicity of mineral dust aerosols in urban environments. PMID:27075250

  10. Mineral dust aerosols promote the formation of toxic nitropolycyclic aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Takayuki; Azumi, Eri; Fukushima, Aki; Tang, Ning; Matsuki, Atsushi; Kamiya, Yuta; Toriba, Akira; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs), which have been shown to have adverse health effects such as carcinogenicity, are formed in part through nitration reactions of their parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the atmosphere. However, little is known about heterogeneous nitration rates of PAHs by gaseous NO2 on natural mineral substrates, such as desert dust aerosols. Herein by employing kinetic experiments using a flow reactor and surface analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with pyridine adsorption, we demonstrate that the reaction is accelerated on acidic surfaces of mineral dust, particularly on those of clay minerals. In support of this finding, we show that levels of ambient particle-associated NPAHs in Beijing, China, significantly increased during heavy dust storms. These results suggest that mineral dust surface reactions are an unrecognized source of toxic organic chemicals in the atmosphere and that they enhance the toxicity of mineral dust aerosols in urban environments. PMID:27075250

  11. Colorimetric Humidity and Solvent Recognition Based on a Cation-Exchange Clay Mineral Incorporating Nickel(II)-Chelate Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Hitoshi; Mochida, Tomoyuki

    2015-12-01

    Solvatochromic nickel(II) complexes with diketonato and diamine ligands were incorporated into a saponite clay by ion exchange, and their colorimetric humidity- and solvent-recognition properties were investigated. These powders exhibit color change from red to blue-green depending on humidity, and the detection range can be controlled by modifying the metal complex. The humidity response takes advantage of the humidity-dependent water content in clay and the coordination of water molecules to the metal complex in equilibrium. The addition of organic solvents to the powders causes a color change to occur, varying from red to blue-green depending on the donor number of the solvent, thereby enabling solvent recognition. In the clay, the affinity of less sterically hindered complexes to water or solvent molecules is decreased compared with that in solution because the cationic complexes interact with the anionic layers in the clay. Incorporating diethylene glycol into the materials produced thermochromic powders. PMID:26542108

  12. Application of clay minerals from Cayo Guan, Cuba, as sorbents of heavy metals and ceramic raw materials; Aplicaciones de los minerales arcillosos de Cayo Guan, Cuba, como adsorbentes de metales pesados y materia prima ceramica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, D.; Barba, F.; Callejas, P.; Recio, P.

    2012-11-01

    It has been studied by Analysis Heating Microscope Optical the behaviour of some kaolinitic clays from a reservoir of Cayo Guan rich in iron oxides and low silica content proving to be a refractory materials whose softening appears after 1500 degree centigrade. It has obtained the workability diagram of the different clay minerals calculating the plasticity by the method of Casagrande spoon; only one of the samples is in the area suitable for extrusion. Vitrification diagrams report that the capacity of water absorption is <0.6 % when the temperature of 1400 degree centigrade is achieved. We have designed a program to calculate compositions of porcelain stoneware prepared from these modified clays adding low-cost raw materials that facilitate the formation of glassy phase ((potassium feldspar and glass cullet) and/or increase the silica (sand and diatomaceous earth used as filters in the brewing industry). With one of these compositions, prepared in the laboratory (60 % of clay, 30 % feldspar and 10 % of diatomaceous earth), calcined at 1250 degree centigrade with a heating rate of 15 degree centigrade/min, the results were: water absorption 0.8 %, and linear shrinkage 21 % without any deformation observed. These clays have been treated with acid to eliminate its high iron content and study its application as an sorbent of heavy metals as Cd{sup 2}+, Cr{sup 3}+. The results of the immobilization of these elements have been compared with those obtained with thermally activated vermiculite at 800 degree centigrade, showing that the treated samples show sorption of both cadmium and chromium below the vermiculite, but the non-treated ones are suitable to remove chromium; this is because these clays do not contain in its composition exchangeable ions (Ca{sup {sub 2}} +, Mg{sup 2} +, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}), and even if they are chemically activated only the presence of Fe ions is which produces form bindings (Cr{sub x}.Fe{sub 1}-x) (OH){sub 3} which favor Cr sorption

  13. Carbonate leaching processes in the Red Clay Formation, Chinese Loess Plateau: Fingerprinting East Asian summer monsoon variability during the late Miocene and Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tong; Chen, Yang; Balsam, William; Qiang, Xiaoke; Liu, Lianwen; Chen, Jun; Ji, Junfeng

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution variations in carbonate minerals from the Jiaxian Red Clay section, located at the northern limit of the present East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) on Chinese Loess Plateau were quantified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. We analyzed a large quantity of sediments dated from the late Miocene to Pliocene (8.2-2.6 Ma). The carbonates in this interval show high-frequency variations alternating between leached and calcareous horizons. The low carbonate contents and high values of magnetic susceptibility and high Rb/Sr ratios were found in the leached zones, a pattern that is consistent with that observed in the overlying Quaternary loess-paleosol sequences. This pattern suggests that East Asian Monsoon (EAM) rainwater enhanced leaching and accumulation processes of carbonate minerals in the Red Clay Formation in a way similar to the loess-paleosol sequence. Seven alternating leached and calcareous zones are identified, suggesting oscillations of the EASM and East Asian winter monsoon intervals. The calcareous zones were also found to have high Zr/Rb ratio. These indications of shifts from a strong EASM to East Asian winter monsoon dominance correlate well with the cooling transition indicated by deep sea δ18O isotopes. This evidence suggests that the EAM was active during the late Miocene and Pliocene and was similar to the Quaternary monsoon. The presence of a strong EAM during the Pliocene Warm Period also raises questions about the hypothesis that past and future warm climate conditions could produce a permanent El Niño-like state.

  14. Characteristics of Clay Minerals in the Northern South China Sea and Its Implications for Evolution of East Asian Monsoon since Miocene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Shiming; Li Anchun; Xu Kehui; Yin Xueming

    2008-01-01

    Clay mineral assemblages, crystallinity, chemistry, and micromorphology of clay particles in sediments from ODP Site 1146 in the northern South China Sea (SCS) were analyzed, and used to trace sediment sources and obtain proxy records of the past changes in the East Asian monsoon climate since the Miocene, based on a multi-approach, including X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS). Clay minerals consist mainly of illite and smectite, with associated chlorite and kaolinite. The illite at ODP Site 1146 has very well-to-well crystallinity, and smectite has moderate-to-poor crystallinity. In SEM the smectite particles at ODP Site 1146 often appear cauliflower-like, a typical micromorphology of volcanic smecites. The smectite at ODP Site 1146 is relatively rich in Si element, but poor in Fe, very similar to the smectite from the West Philippine Sea. In contrast, the chemical composition of illite at ODP Site 1146 has no obvious differences from those of the Loess plateau, Yellow River, Yangtze River, and Pearl River. A further study on sediment source indicates that smectite originates mainly from Luzon, kaolinite from the Pearl River, and illite and chlorite from the Pearl River, Taiwan and/or the Yangtze River. The clay mineral assemblages at ODP Site 1146 were not only controlled by continental eathering regimes surrounding the SCS, but also by the changing strength of the transport processes. The ratios of (illite+chlorite)/smectite at ODP Site 1146 were adopted as proxies for the East Asian monsoon evolution. Relatively higher ratios reflect strongly intensified winter monsoon relative to summer monsoon, in contrast, lower ratios indicate a strengthened summer monsoon relative to winter monsoon. The consistent variation of this clay proxy from those of Loess plateau, eolian deposition in the North Pacific, planktonic, benthic foraminifera, and black carbon in the SCS since 20 Ma shows

  15. System for detecting interfaces between mineral seams and the surrounding earth formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention contemplates a system for detecting an interface between a mineral seam and the surrounding earth formation utilizing a radiation source and a radiation receiver mounted on a miner having a positionable cutter assembly. As the miner is moved into the coal seam, a first distance is continuously sensed between one surface formed in the mineral seam by the miner cutter assembly and the surrounding earth formation and the miner cutter assembly is positioned in response to the sensed first distance. As the miner is withdrawn from the coal seam, a second distance is continuously sensed between one surface formed in the mineral seam by the miner cutter assembly and the surrounding earth formation and the miner cutter assembly is positioned in response to the sensed second distance. A substantial portion of the space between the wall formed in the mineral seam by the miner cutter assembly and the radiation source and radiation receiver is substantially filled with a material having a density greater than the density of air to direct a substantial portion of the radiation through the mineral seam

  16. Stepwise effects of the BCR sequential chemical extraction procedure on dissolution and metal release from common ferromagnesian clay minerals: A combined solution chemistry and X-ray powder diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, P.C. [Geology Department, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States)], E-mail: pryan@middlebury.edu; Hillier, S. [Macaulay Institute, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH UK (United Kingdom); Wall, A.J. [Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, 16802 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Sequential extraction procedures (SEPs) are commonly used to determine speciation of trace metals in soils and sediments. However, the non-selectivity of reagents for targeted phases has remained a lingering concern. Furthermore, potentially reactive phases such as phyllosilicate clay minerals often contain trace metals in structural sites, and their reactivity has not been quantified. Accordingly, the objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of trace metal-bearing clay minerals exposed to the revised BCR 3-step plus aqua regia SEP. Mineral quantification based on stoichiometric analysis and quantitative powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) documents progressive dissolution of chlorite (CCa-2 ripidolite) and two varieties of smectite (SapCa-2 saponite and SWa-1 nontronite) during steps 1-3 of the BCR procedure. In total, 8 ({+-} 1) % of ripidolite, 19 ({+-} 1) % of saponite, and 19 ({+-} 3) % of nontronite (% mineral mass) dissolved during extractions assumed by many researchers to release trace metals from exchange sites, carbonates, hydroxides, sulfides and organic matter. For all three reference clays, release of Ni into solution is correlated with clay dissolution. Hydrolysis of relatively weak Mg-O bonds (362 kJ/mol) during all stages, reduction of Fe(III) during hydroxylamine hydrochloride extraction and oxidation of Fe(II) during hydrogen peroxide extraction are the main reasons for clay mineral dissolution. These findings underscore the need for precise mineral quantification when using SEPs to understand the origin/partitioning of trace metals with solid phases.

  17. Stepwise effects of the BCR sequential chemical extraction procedure on dissolution and metal release from common ferromagnesian clay minerals: A combined solution chemistry and X-ray powder diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequential extraction procedures (SEPs) are commonly used to determine speciation of trace metals in soils and sediments. However, the non-selectivity of reagents for targeted phases has remained a lingering concern. Furthermore, potentially reactive phases such as phyllosilicate clay minerals often contain trace metals in structural sites, and their reactivity has not been quantified. Accordingly, the objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of trace metal-bearing clay minerals exposed to the revised BCR 3-step plus aqua regia SEP. Mineral quantification based on stoichiometric analysis and quantitative powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) documents progressive dissolution of chlorite (CCa-2 ripidolite) and two varieties of smectite (SapCa-2 saponite and SWa-1 nontronite) during steps 1-3 of the BCR procedure. In total, 8 (± 1) % of ripidolite, 19 (± 1) % of saponite, and 19 (± 3) % of nontronite (% mineral mass) dissolved during extractions assumed by many researchers to release trace metals from exchange sites, carbonates, hydroxides, sulfides and organic matter. For all three reference clays, release of Ni into solution is correlated with clay dissolution. Hydrolysis of relatively weak Mg-O bonds (362 kJ/mol) during all stages, reduction of Fe(III) during hydroxylamine hydrochloride extraction and oxidation of Fe(II) during hydrogen peroxide extraction are the main reasons for clay mineral dissolution. These findings underscore the need for precise mineral quantification when using SEPs to understand the origin/partitioning of trace metals with solid phases

  18. Evaluation of first-row transition metal oxides supported on clay minerals for catalytic growth of carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work we employed various transition metals (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) loaded on different smectite clays (laponite and montmorillonite) as catalysts in synthesis of carbon nanostructures (mainly nanotubes) and we report the effect of the nature of the catalytic centers and type of aluminosilicate layers in the morphology, quality and structure on the final products. Owing to their unique swelling, ion-exchange and intercalation properties smectite clays were easily, uniformly and reproducibly loaded with metal cations. Different homoionic forms of montmorillonite and laponite were prepared containing first-row transition metals and the synthesis of carbon nanostructures was carried out at 700 deg. C using an acetylene/nitrogen mixture. A variety of analytical techniques (XRD, Raman, SEM, TEM and thermal analysis) were used to fully characterize the final materials. Iron-, cobalt-, nickel- and manganese-exchanged clays showed to be effective catalysts for the production of carbon nanotubes, while acetylene decomposition over copper-exchanged clays resulted to the creation of carbon spheres. The resulting hybrid systems are particularly attractive for polymer reinforcing applications since the combined action of clay-carbon nanotubes in polymer matrixes can provide outstanding properties to the resulting composite materials

  19. Clay minerals in aqueous alteration of meteorites as analogue materials for the long term disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Introduction: The long term disposal of nuclear waste provides a big challenge for material science. The material waste has to be stored safely for at least 105 years. The nuclides are embedded as particles in silica glass, which is conditioned in steel containers, which again are emplaced in a clay-rich environment. Since it is difficult to estimate the long-term stability of materials in such a time frame, certain types of meteorites are used as an analogue material. Precursor materials of meteorites formed 4.56 Gy ago in the protoplanetary disk, a disk of gas and dust particles around the young sun. One of the first components to be formed was the chondrules. These spherical, silicate-rich objects formed by the quenching of silicate droplets in the protoplanetary disk. Chondrules mainly consist of silicates like olivine and pyroxene, metal and sulfide grains. These phases are often embedded in a silicate-rich glass, the mesostasis. Chondrules and other components accreted together with finer particles to form larger parent bodies, planetesimals. On some of these bodies, accreted ices melted as result of the heat created by the decay of short-lived nuclides. In the following aqueous alteration phase circulating fluids altered the materials on these bodies to varying degrees. This probably lasted more than 1 my, so meteoritic materials allow to study alteration and corrosion in a much longer time frame than possible in laboratory. Abundant larger metal grains (up to several 100 μm in size) can help to estimate corrosion processes of the steel containment. These components are embedded in a phyllosilicate-rich matrix, similar to the clay material in which the waste packages are emplaced. CR chondrites are a group of meteorites that show alteration over the whole range from type 3 (pristine, unaltered material) to 1 (completely hydrated), thus allowing the investigation of all steps in corrosion of the materials

  20. Warmed up for ten-year test in the Boom Clay formation PRACLAY Heater Experiment is launched

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article discusses latest developments concerning the PRACLAY Heater Experiment. The PRACLAY experiment investigates the impact of heat on the properties of clay adjacent to a repository for the geological disposal of radioactive waste. Results from the PRACLAY experiment will provide significant input for the NIRAS research programme on the disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive waste in clay formations.The heating phase of the PRACLAY underground experiment was launched in 2014. The latest preparations comprised the improvement and installation of a back-up heating system. In the future, the control, monitoring, and analysis and interpretation of the measured data will receive the greatest attention in the PRACLAY Heater Experiment.

  1. Studies on Tagged Clay Migration Due to Water Movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    55Fe-tagged clay minerals, produced by hydrothermal synthesis, serve to clarify the question whether clay migration or clay formation in situ is the predominating mechanism in the Bt-development of Parabraunerde (sol brun lessive, grey brown podsolic, hapludalf, dernopodsol). They further indicate the possibilities of clay transportation caused by water percolation. Suitable experimental approaches, such as thin-layer chromatography and autoradiography, translocation tests in columns filled with monotypical textural fractions or with undisturbed soil profiles, and synchronous hydrothermal treatment of 55Fe-con raining material from different horizons of Parabraunerde, to reveal the specific readiness of the different profile zones for 55Fe-clay production, are described. The possibilities of clay percolation are discussed. (author)

  2. The sorption behavior of Cs+ ion on clay minerals and zeolite in radioactive waste management: sorption kinetics and thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, Cs+ ion sorption on some clays and zeolite were investigated. 137Cs was used as a tracer. Activities were measured with a NaI crystal gamma counter. The particle size distribution was determined by a laser sizer. Surface area of the particles were determined by BET (Brunauer, Emmett and Teller method). Structure analysis was made by using X-ray diffraction. The chemical compositions of the solid samples were determined using a ICAP-OE spectrometer. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were determined. Due to very high uptake results; clay and zeolite can be proposed as a good sorbents in waste management considerations. (author)

  3. Modeling diffusion of an alkaline plume in a clay barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Gaucher, Eric C.; Blanc, Philippe; Matray, Jean-Michel; Michau, Nicolas

    2004-01-01

    The design of clay plugs used for sealing access galleries to a radioactive waste repository built with concrete structures in a deep clayey formation must take into consideration their chemical evolution over time. Diffusion of an alkaline plume from concrete into bentonite was therefore modeled over a 100 ka period with the PHREEQC geochemical code in order to determine, as a function of time, modifications to mineral surfaces, dissolution of existing minerals and precipitation of new miner...

  4. Geochemical and technological characterization of clays of Corumbataí Formation, Paraná Basin, in the state of São Paulo, Brazil for the application in the ceramic industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofoletti, Sergio Ricardo; Torres Moreno, Maria Margarita; Batezelli, Alessandro; Zanardo, Antenor

    2014-05-01

    The Corumbataí Formation is a geological unit of the Paraná Basin comprises a range of predominantly argillaceous facies. These clays are important from an economic point of view, because they represent important mineral deposits suppliers of raw materials for the ceramic industry in the production of ceramic tiles.The study presents preliminary results of a research that aims to study the clays municipalities Tambaú, Ferreira and Santa Rosa of Viterbo in the State of São Paulo for their application and diversification of ceramic products. The methodology used was based on a detailed description of facies using the methodology in principles of analysis of Basin Miall (1984), followed by mineralogical identification by X-ray Diffraction, chemical analysis of major elements by X-ray Fluorescence and technological tests ceramic. According to the geological surveys of mines studied through columnar sections were identified the following lithofacies from base to top: Massive, Laminated, Intercalated and Altered. The mineralogy present on these lithofacies is composed by minerals: quartz, microclineo, albite, calcite, dolomite and hematite and by clay minerals illite, kaolinite and montmorillonite. The quartz represents the mineral more present in diffraction and occurs with d001 of 3.33Å in all lithofacies studied. The illite clay mineral represents the most frequent in studied samples presenting d 001 10Å in three conditions (natural, heated and treated with ethylene glycol) in which the blade was subjected to the analysis of X-ray diffraction, the presence of kaolinite or montmorillonite occurs or not in samples. It was observed a increased frequency of some minerals in the lithofacies studied, carbonates (calcite and dolomite), hematite and feldspar occurring in the intermediate portions of the profile with a predominance in lithofacies Intercalated. The illita clay mineral occurs throughout the profile, but with greater frequency in the lithofacies Massive and

  5. Stress state variations among the clay and limestone formations of the molasse basin of Northern Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The design of geological repositories for radioactive waste responds to the requirements of technical feasibility and long-term safety in the context of a specific geological setting. An important aspect of the geological setting is the primary stress field. To a large extent the stress state controls repository induced effects such as the excavation damage zone and the associated potential changes in the waste isolation properties of the host rock. Therefore the measurement of the stress state receives some attention where the site selection for geological repositories focuses onto relatively weak host rocks such as clay-stones and marly shales that tend to develop a significant excavation damage zone. Measurements of the minimum stress magnitudes in a recently drilled geothermal well in the Molasse Basin of northern Switzerland have yielded a stress profile reaching from 592 m to 1455 m depth. It straddles several rock units and includes the top of the crystalline basement. The sedimentary sequence consists of Marine limestones, shales and marls unconformably covered by Tertiary rocks of the Molasse. In other parts of the basin the evaporitic rocks of the Triassic Muschelkalk formation at the base of the sedimentary layer served as a regional detachment and enabled thin skinned thrusting and the formation of the Jura Fold and Thrust Belt in the Late Miocene. The stress measurements have been performed in the open hole by Mini-frac tests. The method uses a double packer system to isolate a one meter long interval of the borehole that is then pressurized at high injection rates up to the breakdown of the formation. Repeated pressurization of the interval allows to determine the stress that acts on the newly created fracture. The total injected volume during such a test is in the range of a few litres and the size of the fracture that extends from the borehole normal to the minimum

  6. Stratigraphy and formation of clays, sulfates, and hydrated silica within a depression in Coprates Catena, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Catherine M.; Bishop, Janice L.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the morphology, mineralogy, and stratigraphy of light-toned layered deposits within a trough of Coprates Catena, centered at -15°N, 300°E. One of the deposits in the eastern portion of the trough contains numerous hydrated minerals, including Al-phyllosilicates, Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates, hydrated silica, hydrated sulfates, jarosite and acid alteration products characterized by a spectral doublet between 2.2 and 2.3 µm, and weakly hydrated materials. The Al-phyllosilicates are observed both stratigraphically above and below the Fe/Mg-phyllosilicate unit, which is a rare and perhaps unique association on Mars. Most of the western light-toned layered deposit underlies a terraced fan. This deposit contains hydrated materials, including Al-phyllosilicates and Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates. Dip measurements indicate that both the eastern and western deposits dip toward the center of the trough, indicating that they postdate formation of the trough and are consequently Late Hesperian or younger in age. Volcanic ash, most likely erupted during formation of the pit crater in the eastern portion of the trough, seems to best explain our observations for several of the units. Valleys sourced from water along the plateau may have flowed into the trough and altered the sediments, with changing aqueous chemistries over time resulting in the diverse range of mineralogies now observed in the eastern light-toned deposit. Our results reveal a complex sedimentary and aqueous history within the Coprates Catena trough, indicating that localized habitable conditions were possible relatively late in Martian history at a time when colder, drier conditions likely dominated the majority of the planet.

  7. Clay mineral distribution in the continental shelf sediments from Krishna to Ganges river mouth, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    Ninety six sediment samples (less than 2 mu m fractions) of the eastern continental shelf of India between Ganges in the north and Krishna in the south have been studiEd. by X-ray diffraction. On the basis of nature and abundance of different clay...

  8. Late-Quaternary variations in clay minerals along the SW continental margin of India: Evidence of climatic variations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chauhan, O.S.; Sukhija, B.S.; Gujar, A.R.; Nagabhushanam, P.; Paropkari, A.L.

    Down-core variations in illite, chlorite, smectite and kaolinite (the major clays) in two sup(14)C-dated cores collected along the SW continental margin of India show that illite and chlorite have enhanced abundance during 20-17, 12.5, 11-9.5, and 5-4...

  9. What do we really know about the role of microorganisms in iron sulfide mineral formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Aude; Gartman, Amy; Girguis, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Iron sulfide mineralization in low-temperature systems is a result of biotic and abiotic processes, though the delineation between these two modes of formation is not always straightforward. Here we review the role of microorganisms in the precipitation of extracellular iron sulfide minerals. We summarize the evidence that links sulfur-metabolizing microorganisms and sulfide minerals in nature and we present a critical overview of laboratory-based studies of the nucleation and growth of iron sulfide minerals in microbial cultures. We discuss whether biologically derived minerals are distinguishable from abiotic minerals, possessing attributes that are uniquely diagnostic of biomineralization. These inquiries have revealed the need for additional thorough, mechanistic and high-resolution studies to understand microbially mediated formation of a variety of sulfide minerals across a range of natural environments.

  10. Fe(0)-clays interactions at 90°C under anoxic conditions: a comparative study between clay fraction of Callovo-Oxfordian and other purified clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste it is of prime importance to understand the interactions between the saturated clay formation and steel containers. This can be achieved through an in-depth analysis of iron-clay interactions. Previous studies on the subject investigated the influence of solid/liquid ratio, iron/clay ratio, temperature and reaction time. The aim of the present study is to explain Callovo-Oxfordian-Fe(0) interactions by determining the role of each mineral phases present in the Callovo-Oxfordian (clay minerals, quartz, carbonates and pyrite) on the mechanisms of interaction between metal iron and clay particles. In that context, it is especially important to understand in detail the influence of clay nature and to obtain some insight about the relationships between interaction mechanisms at the molecular scale and crystallographic properties (particle size, TO or TOT layers, amount of edge faces...). The influence of the combination of different clays and the addition of other minerals must also be studied. In a first step, the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from the Andra's underground research laboratory was purified to extract the clay fraction (illite, illite-smectite, kaolinite and chlorite). Batch experiments were carried out in anoxic conditions at 90 deg. C in the presence of background electrolyte (NaCl 0.02 M.L-1, CaCl2 0.04 M.L-1) for durations of one, three or nine months in the presence of metallic iron powder. Experiments without iron were used as control. The iron/clay ratio was fixed at 1/3 with a solid/liquid ratio of 1/20. The above mentioned experiments were also carried out in parallel on other purified clays: two smectites (Georgia bentonite and SWy2 from the Clay Minerals Society), one illite (illite du Puy) and one kaolinite (KGa2, from the Clay Minerals society). At the end of the experiments, solid and liquid phases were separated by

  11. In situ clay formation : evaluation of a proposed new technology for stable containment barriers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Kathryn L. (University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL); DiGiovanni, Anthony Albert; Fredrich, Joanne T.

    2004-03-01

    Containment of chemical wastes in near-surface and repository environments is accomplished by designing engineered barriers to fluid flow. Containment barrier technologies such as clay liners, soil/bentonite slurry walls, soil/plastic walls, artificially grouted sediments and soils, and colloidal gelling materials are intended to stop fluid transport and prevent plume migration. However, despite their effectiveness in the short-term, all of these barriers exhibit geochemical or geomechanical instability over the long-term resulting in degradation of the barrier and its ability to contain waste. No technologically practical or economically affordable technologies or methods exist at present for accomplishing total remediation, contaminant removal, or destruction-degradation in situ. A new type of containment barrier with a potentially broad range of environmental stability and longevity could result in significant cost-savings. This report documents a research program designed to establish the viability of a proposed new type of containment barrier derived from in situ precipitation of clays in the pore space of contaminated soils or sediments. The concept builds upon technologies that exist for colloidal or gel stabilization. Clays have the advantages of being geologically compatible with the near-surface environment and naturally sorptive for a range of contaminants, and further, the precipitation of clays could result in reduced permeability and hydraulic conductivity, and increased mechanical stability through cementation of soil particles. While limited success was achieved under certain controlled laboratory conditions, the results did not warrant continuation to the field stage for multiple reasons, and the research program was thus concluded with Phase 2.

  12. Comment on "Evaluation of X-ray diffraction methods for determining the crystal growth mechanisms of clay minerals in mudstones, shales and slates," by L. N. Warr and D. R. Peacor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.; Srodon, J.; Drits, V.A.

    2003-01-01

    A recent paper by Warr and Peacor (2002) suggested that our use of the Bertaut-Warren-Averbach technique (MudMaster computer program) for studying changes in crystallite thickness distributions (CTDs) of clay minerals during diagenesis and very low-grade metamorphism is not reliable because it is dependent on many variables which can not be fully controlled. Furthermore, the authors implied that the measured shapes of CTDs cannot be used with confidence to deduce crystal growth mechanisms and histories for clays, based on our CTD simulation approach (using the Galoper computer program). We disagree with both points, and show that the techniques are powerful, reliable and useful for studying clay mineral alteration in rocks. ?? 2003 Schweiz. Mineral. Petrogr. Ges.

  13. The role of paramagnetic minerals in clay sediments magnetic anisotropy: correlation between magnetic fabric and chlorite preferred orientation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cifelli, F.; Mattei, M.; Chadima, Martin; Hirt, A. M.; Lenser, S.

    Geofyzikální ústav AV ČR, v. v. i.. Roč. 38, - (2006), s. 24-24 ISSN 0231-5548. [Castle Meeting New Trends in Geomagnetism, Paleo, Rock and Environmental Magnetism /10./. 03.09.2006-08.09.2006, Valtice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : magnetic anisotropy * neutron diffraction analysis * clay sediments Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  14. Hematite-enriched sandstones and chromium-rich clays - Clues to the origin of vanadium-uranium deposits in the Morrison Formation, southwestern Colorado and southeastern Utah, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluvial sandstones of the Salt Wash Member, Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, southwestern Colorado and southeastern Utah, host tabular, epigenetic vanadium-uranium (V-U) deposits. Laterally within a few tens of meters of some of the V-U deposits are two distinct accumulations -one enriched in iron (hematite), and the other chromium (Cr-rich mixed-layer clays). The iron-enriched sandstones commonly occur at the contact between red and gray (buff in outcrop) sandstones, are dark red and generally color banded. Between the iron and V-U deposits, chromium accumulated in gray argillaceous sandstones that contain small coalified plant fragments. Variations in Eh, oriented parallel to facies changes but perpendicular to regional ground-water flow, controlled the spatial distribution of iron, chromium, and V-U deposits. Depositional facies within the Salt Wash Member are characterized by fluvial axes containing thick sandstones, and by well-drained floodplains marginal to the fluvial axes. Laterally continuous sandstones contained an organic acid bearing solution that mobilized iron as Fe(II). This reducing solution mixed with alkaline U-, Cr-, and V-bearing, oxygenated pore waters from floodplain sediments. Due to mixing, dissolved iron in the reducing solution was oxidized and precipitated as ferric hydroxide. Chromium, as chromate (CrO42-), was chemically reduced by organic compounds in the vicinity of minor accumulations of detrital plant fragments and was incorporated into authigenic clay minerals. Dissolved U and V were not reduced by the organic compounds; instead, reduction and precipitation occurred by reaction with localized strongly reducing (sulfidic) pore waters. The tabular geometry of V-U deposits was a product of the hydrologic characteristics of the host rock or a brine-freshwater interface. Similar redox processes may explain the association of Cr, V, and U in the Mecsek deposits, Hungary, and deposits hosted by the Jurassic Entrada Sandstone

  15. CO2 + N2O mixture gas hydrate formation kinetics and effect of soil minerals on mixture-gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkh-Amgalan, T.; Kyung, D.; Lee, W.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 mitigation is one of the most pressing global scientific topics in last 30 years. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of the main greenhouse gases (GHGs) defined by the Kyoto Protocol and its global warming potential (GWP) of one metric ton is equivalent to 310 metric tons of CO2. They have similar physical and chemical properties and therefore, mixture-gas (50% CO2 + 50% N2O) hydrate formation process was studied experimentally and computationally. There were no significant research to reduce N20 gas and we tried to make hydrate to mitigate N20 and CO2 in same time. Mixture gas hydrate formation periods were approximately two times faster than pure N2O hydrate formation kinetic in general. The fastest induction time of mixture-gas hydrate formation observed in Illite and Quartz among various soil mineral suspensions. It was also observed that hydrate formation kinetic was faster with clay mineral suspensions such as Nontronite, Sphalerite and Montmorillonite. Temperature and pressure change were not significant on hydrate formation kinetic; however, induction time can be significantly affected by various chemical species forming under the different suspension pHs. The distribution of chemical species in each mineral suspension was estimated by a chemical equilibrium model, PHREEQC, and used for the identification of hydrate formation characteristics in the suspensions. With the experimental limitations, a study on the molecular scale modeling has a great importance for the prediction of phase behavior of the gas hydrates. We have also performed molecular dynamics computer simulations on N2O and CO2 hydrate structures to estimate the residual free energy of two-phase (hydrate cage and guest molecule) at three different temperature ranges of 260K, 273K, and 280K. The calculation result implies that N2O hydrates are thermodynamically stable at real-world gas hydrate existing condition within given temperature and pressure. This phenomenon proves that mixture-gas could be

  16. In Vivo Ectopic Bone Formation by Devitalized Mineralized Stem Cell Carriers Produced Under Mineralizing Culture Condition

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Yoke Chin; Geris, Liesbet; Bolander, Johanna; Pyka, Gregory; Van Bael, Simon; Luyten, Frank; Schrooten, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Functionalization of tissue engineering scaffolds with in vitro–generated bone-like extracellular matrix (ECM) represents an effective biomimetic approach to promote osteogenic differentiation of stem cells in vitro. However, the bone-forming capacity of these constructs (seeded with or without cells) is so far not apparent. In this study, we aimed at developing a mineralizing culture condition to biofunctionalize three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds with highly mineralized ECM in...

  17. Electron Microscopic Observation of Clays of Calcareous and Noncalcareous Soils in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    ALAM, Md. Lutfe; KAKOI, Teruzane; MIYAUCHI, Nobufumi; SHINAGAWA, Akio; カコイ, テルザネ; ミヤウチ, ノブフミ; シナガワ, アキオ

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscopic observation of calcareous and noncalcareous floodplain soils of Bangladesh were carried out by TEM and SEM. Morphological changes in relation to clay formation and weathering process were investigated. Unweathered, partially weathered and weathered micaceous minerals accompanying with poorly crystallized kaolinite and halloysite and other primary minerals were observed in silt and coarse clay of both calcareous and noncalcareous soil. Smectite and vermiculite which are...

  18. Role of clay as catalyst in Friedel–Craft alkylation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tanushree Choudhury; Nirendra M Misra

    2011-10-01

    Solid acids have become increasingly important for many liquid-phase industrial reactions these days. Montmorillonite clays (2:1 clay mineral) have been used as efficient solid acid catalysts for a number of organic and liquid phase reactions and offer several advantages over classic acids. Tailor made catalysts can be prepared from clays by suitably adjusting their acidity and surface area by acid activation. In the present work, preparation, characterization and performance of Pt (II) clays, Cu (II) clays, acid clay, and sol–gel hybrids of Cu (II) clays as solid catalysts in a test Friedel–Craft alkylation reaction of benzyl chloride with toluene using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) are reported. Product formation has been analysed by FTIR spectroscopy. The main objective of this work is to show how clay as a solid catalyst affects reaction rates and activation energies. Acidity and dispersion of solid catalysts are twomain factors which govern a catalysis reaction. Kinetic parameter analysis and XRD studies confirm that acid Pt (II) clay and Pt (II) clay dispersed by natural dispersants aremore effective catalysts. In contrast to the reactions using AlCl3, the experimental conditions are non-polluting and the final work up does not require any aqueous treatment.

  19. Uranium mineralization in the Mesoproterozoic Banganapalle formation near Nagayapalle, Cuddapah Basin, Andhra Pradesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuddapah Basin is the hub of uranium exploration for years together in India. Initial efforts were for quartz-pebble-conglomerate type mineralization. However, the emphasis later shifted towards dolostone-hosted mineralization and finally to unconformity-associated uranium mineralization. The recent finding of uranium mineralization associated with the Banganapalle Formation near Nagayapalle is the outcome of continuous exploration input in the Cuddapah Basin over years. Uranium mineralization (up to 0.278% U3O8) associated with the Mesoproterozoic Banganapalle Formation near Nagayapalle is represented by pitchblende and autunite. Pitchblende occurs as tiny grains in the intergranular spaces and along grain boundaries; and also at places replaces pyrite and covellite grains. The geological set-up indicates that the geodomain is favourable for uranium mineralization. (author)

  20. A site-specific probabilistic risk evaluation exercise for radioactive waste disposal in a continental clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clay formation of Boom (Belgium) could be suitable for the creation of a radioactive waste repository, because of its homogeneity, stability and size. It offers a good test case for the validation of the Joint Research Centre risk assessment methodology. This latter consists in the identification of possible release scenarios, assessment of the corresponding occurrence probabilities and release consequences, and calculation of the corresponding risk. Probability evaluation is performed by utilizing the logical schemes of fault tree analysis: the consequences are estimated on the basis of the available knowledge of the behaviour of the different barriers operating in the given scenario. On the basis of the current state of knowledge a probability distribution is defined for each uncertain input parameter, to cover the range over which it may vary. By a Monte Carlo method, a probability distribution is then obtained for the quantity assessed. Aquifer contamination followed by radionuclide migration through the subsoil is the most likely scenario for environmental contamination. It may result from radionuclide migration through the clay formation up to the adjacent aquifers (normal scenario) as well as from clay breaching events, which could lead to waste exposure to flowing groundwater (probabilistic scenarios). An example of the results obtained is given, for a faulting scenario; the distribution of the maximum individual dose rate due to ingestion of long-lived nuclides is shown: it lies in the range 10-5 to 10-2 rem/a. Multiplication by the scenario probability results in the distribution of the corresponding risk, and could allow the comparison with future risk upper-bound limits. The conclusion is drawn that uncertainties in the analysis should become ''as low as reasonably achievable'' through a better knowledge of data and processes; the remaining unavoidable degree of uncertainty will not seriously harm the validity of the analysis, provided that

  1. Characterisation of gas transport properties of the Opalinus clay, a potential host rock formation for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Opalinus Clay in Northern Switzerland has been identified as a potential host rock formation for the disposal of radioactive waste. Comprehensive understanding of gas transport processes through this low-permeability formation forms a key issue in the assessment of repository performance. Field investigations and laboratory experiments suggest an intrinsic permeability of the Opalinus Clay in the order of 10-20 to 10-21 m2 and a moderate anisotropy ratio ≤ 10. Porosity depends on clay content and burial depth; values of ∼ 0.12 are reported for the region of interest. Porosimetry indicates that about 10-30% of voids can be classed as macro-pores, corresponding to an equivalent pore radius > 25 nm. The determined entry pressures are in the range of 0.4-10 MPa and exhibit a marked dependence on intrinsic permeability. Both in situ gas tests and gas permeameter tests on drill-cores demonstrate that gas transport through the rock is accompanied by pore water displacement, suggesting that classical flow concepts of immiscible displacement in porous media can be applied when the gas entry pressure (i.e. capillary threshold pressure) is less than the minimum principal stress acting within the rock. Essentially, the pore space accessible to gas flow is restricted to the network of connected macro-pores, which implies a very low degree of desaturation of the rock during the gas imbibition process. At elevated gas pressures (i.e. when gas pressure approaches the level of total stress that acts on the rock body), evidence was seen for dilatancy controlled gas transport mechanisms. Further field experiments were aimed at creating extended tensile fractures with high fracture transmissivity (hydro- or gas-fractures). The test results lead to the conclusion that gas fracturing can be largely ruled out as a risk for post-closure repository performance. (authors)

  2. Detection of Soluble and Fixed NH4+ in Clay Minerals by DTA and IR Reflectance Spectroscopy : A Potential Tool for Planetary Surface Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice, Bishop; Banin, A.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Klovstad, M. R.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential element for life. It is the only element among the six major biogenic elements, C, O, S, O, P, H, whose presence in the Martian soil has not been positively and directly established. We describe here a study assessing the ability to detect NH4 in soils by two methods: differential thermal analysis (DTA) and infrared (IR) reflectance spectroscopy. Four standard clay minerals (kaolinite, montmorillonite, illite and attapulgite) and an altered tephra sample from Mauna Kea were treated with NH4 in this study. Samples of the NH4-treated and leached clays were analyzed by DTA and infrared (IR) reflectance spectroscopy to quantify the delectability of soluble and sorbed/fixed NH4. An exotherm at 270-280 C was clearly detected in the DTA curves of NH4-treated (non-leached) samples. This feature is assigned to the thermal decomposition reaction of NH4. Spectral bands observed at 1.56, 2.05, 2.12, 3.06, 3.3, 3.5, 5.7 and 7.0 microns in the reflectance spectra of NH4-treated and leached samples are assigned to the sorbed/fixed ammonium in the clays. The montmorillonite has shown the most intense absorbance due to fixed ammonium among the leached samples in this study, as a result of its high cation sorption capacity. It is concluded that the presence of sorbed or fixed NH4 in clays may be detected by infrared (IR) reflectance or emission spectroscopy. Distinction between soluble and sorbed NH4 may be achieved through the presence or absence of several spectral features assigned to the sorbed NH4 moietyi and, specifically, by use of the 4.2 micrometer feature assigned to solution NH4. Thermal analyses furnish supporting evidence of ammonia in our study through detection of N released at temperatures of 270-330 C. Based on these results it is estimated that IR spectra measured from a rover should be able to detect ammonia if present above 20 mg NH4/g sample in the surface layers. Orbital IR spectra and thermal analyses measured on a rover may be able to

  3. Formation of calcium phosphate mineral materialcontrolled by microemulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to prepare calcium phosphate-based material with nano-structure and bioactivity, natural lecithin and n-tetradecane were used as the amphipile and the oil phase respectively, along with the water phase, to form a microemulsion template. Phosphate mineralization was induced and controlled by the microemulsion. The products, characterized by scanning electronic microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis, are composed of lecithin and hydroxyapatite, and possess the nano-structure of sticks, balls and three-dimensional nets connected by tubes. These results show that the microemulsion can be used to control calcium phosphate mineralization for the preparation of biomimetic mineral materials with various nano-structures.

  4. Hydraulic characterization of the boom clay formation from the HADES underground laboratory in Mol: evolution and assessment of the piezometric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The network of piezometers installed in the Boom clay formation from the HADES Underground laboratory (-223 m) at Mol is an invaluable tool for the measurement and physical understanding of the groundwater flow towards a non closes deep repository system in an argillaceous formation. The hydraulic testing, test interpretation and groundwater sampling methodologies in a plastic clay (19 - 26 % H2O) at medium depth are presented. The results obtained from in situ tests (metric to local scale, 1 to 30 m) and from laboratory experiments on vertical and horizontal clay plugs (centimetric scale, 3 - 7 cm) have put into evidence the anisotropy of the Boom clay. The horizontal hydraulic conductivity is approximately 2.4 times higher than the vertical one. Laboratory and in situ results are discussed. Their comparison gives coherent hydraulic and transport parameters supporting the model used to describe quantitatively the migration of radionuclides through the clay. Meanwhile, concerning the hydraulic conductivity, a large discrepancy still subsists with the regional model (kilometric scale, 40 km x 80 km) which is presently being revisited (i.a. boundary conditions and refinement of the mesh, from 5 to 0.5 km) and with the regional observations often too scarce (water level measurements in the sandy aquifers surrounding the Boom clay formation). (authors). 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. Performance assessment of geological isolation systems for radioactive waste. Disposal in clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the PAGIS project of the CEC Research Programme on radioactive waste, performance assessment studies have been undertaken on the geological disposal of vitrified high-level waste in clay layers at a reference site at Mol (B) and a variant site at Harwell (UK). The calculations performed for the reference site shown that most radionuclides decay to negligible levels within the first meters of the clay barrier. The maximum dose rates arising from the geological disposal of HLW, as evaluated by the deterministic approach are about 10-11 Sv/y for river pathways. If the sinking of a water well into the 150 m deep aquifer layer in the vicinity of the repository is considered together with a climatic change, the maximum calculated dose rate rises to a value of 3.10-7 Sv/y. The calculated maxima arise between 1 million and 15 million years after disposal. The maximum dose rates evaluated by stochastic calculations are about one order of magnitude higher due to the considerable uncertainties in the model parameters. In the case of the Boom clay the estimated consequences of a fault scenario are of the same order of magnitude as the results obtained for the normal evolution scenario. The maximum risk is estimated from stochastic calculations to be about 4.10-8 per year. For the variant site the case of the normal evolution scenario has been evaluated. The maximum dose rates calculated deterministically are about 1.10-6 Sv/y for river pathways and 6.10-5 Sv/y for a water well pathways; these doses would occur after about 1 million years. This document is one of a set of 5 reports covering a relevant project of the European Community on a nuclear safety subject having very wide interest. The five volumes are: the summary (EUR 11775-EN), the clay (EUR 11776-EN), the granite (EUR 11777-FR), the salt (EUR 11778-EN) and the sub-seabed (EUR 11779-EN)

  6. Clay catalysis of oligonucleotide formation: kinetics of the reaction of the 5'-phosphorimidazolides of nucleotides with the non-basic heterocycles uracil and hypoxanthine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, K.; Ferris, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The montmorillonite clay catalyzed condensation of activated monocleotides to oligomers of RNA is a possible first step in the formation of the proposed RNA world. The rate constants for the condensation of the phosphorimidazolide of adenosine were measured previously and these studies have been extended to the phosphorimidazolides of inosine and uridine in the present work to determine of substitution of neutral heterocycles for the basic adenine ring changes the reaction rate or regioselectivity. The oligomerization reactions of the 5'-phosphoromidazolides of uridine (ImpU) and inosine (ImpI) on montmorillonite yield oligo(U)s and oligo(I)s as long as heptamers. The rate constants for oligonucleotide formation were determined by measuring the rates of formation of the oligomers by HPLC. Both the apparent rate constants in the reaction mixture and the rate constants on the clay surface were calculated using the partition coefficients of the oligomers between the aqueous and clay phases. The rate constants for trimer formation are much greater than those dimer synthesis but there was little difference in the rate constants for the formation of trimers and higher oligomers. The overall rates of oligomerization of the phosphorimidazolides of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides in the presence of montmorillonite clay are the same suggesting that RNA formed on the primitive Earth could have contained a variety of heterocyclic bases. The rate constants for oligomerization of pyrimidine nucleotides on the clay surface are significantly higher than those of purine nucleotides since the pyrimidine nucleotides bind less strongly to the clay than do the purine nucleotides. The differences in the binding is probably due to Van der Waals interactions between the purine bases and the clay surface. Differences in the basicity of the heterocyclic ring in the nucleotide have little effect on the oligomerization process.

  7. Distribution And Mineralogy Of The Clay Deposits In Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Al Mohandis, Ahmed A. [احمد عبد القادر المهندس

    1993-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to characterize the mineral clay deposits in Saudi Arabia; especially their mineral composition, deposit size, geological setting and possible uses. Different published reports and papers on clay deposits of Saudi Arabia have been reviewed. Three major clay deposits have been studied by XRD, DTA and chemical analyses. Saudi clay deposits consist generally of kaolinite as a major mineral, and small amounts other clay minerals, such as montmorillonite and illite. ...

  8. Mycotoxins modify the barrier function of Caco-2 cells through differential gene expression of specific claudin isoforms: Protective effect of illite mineral clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Alejandro; Ares, Irma; Ramos, Eva; Castellano, Víctor; Martínez, Marta; Martínez-Larrañaga, María-Rosa; Anadón, Arturo; Martínez, María-Aránzazu

    2016-04-15

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), fumonisin B1 (FB1), ochratoxin A (OTA) and T-2 toxin (T2) are mycotoxins that commonly contaminate the food chain and cause various toxicological effects. Their global occurrence is regarded as an important risk factor for human and animal health. In this study, the results demonstrate that, in human Caco-2 cells, AFB1, FB1, OTA and T2 origin cytotoxic effects, determining cell viability through MTT assay and LDH leakage, and decrease trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER). The decrease in barrier properties is concomitant with a reduction in the expression levels of the tight junction constituents claudin-3, claudin-4 and occludin. The protective effect of mineral clays (diosmectite, montmorillonite and illite) on alterations in cell viability and epithelial barrier function induced by the mycotoxins was also evaluated. Illite was the best clay to prevent the mycotoxin effects. Illite plus mycotoxin co-treatment completely abolished AFB1 and FB1-induced cytotoxicity. Also, the decreases in the gene expression of claudins and the reduction of TEER induced by mycotoxins were reversed by the illite plus mycotoxin co-treatment. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that mycotoxins AFB1, FB1, T2 and OTA disrupt the intestinal barrier permeability by a mechanism involving reduction of claudin isoform expressions, and illite counteracts this disruption. PMID:27153755

  9. Clays in prebiological chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M.; Oro, J.; Odom, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    The ways in which clays have been utilized in studies of prebiological chemistry are reviewed, and an assessment is given of the possible role of clays in prebiological systems. The adsorption of organic molecules on clays has been demonstrated, as has the synthesis of bioorganic monomers in the presence of clays. For instance, amino acids, purines and pyrimidines have been obtained from carbon monoxide and nitric acid in the presence of clays at relatively high temperatures (250-325 C). The oligomerization of biochemical monomers, mediated by clays, has also been shown to result in the formation of polymer molecules basic to life. Clays have also been found to affect the condensation of mononucleotides to oligonucleotides.

  10. Formation of brucite and cronstedtite-bearing mineral assemblages on Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Dwarf planet Ceres is the largest body in the main asteroid belt with a rocky surface and uncertain internal structure. Spectra of Ceres in near- and mid-infrared wavelengths are consistent with the occurrence of brucite, Mg-bearing carbonates, and an Fe-rich phyllosilicate cronstedtite. Spectra of 10 Hygiea and 324 Bamberga imply similar compositions. Here, we considered stabilities of these minerals to constrain their origin. Cronstedtite is most stable at the temperature of ˜0 °C at moderately oxidizing aqueous conditions and at high water/rock ratios. Although cronstedtite could form on planetesimals, the apparent lack of serpentine may indicate its formation by Ceres' temporary surface solutions. Brucite forms at a low activity of dissolved SiO2, at a low fugacity of CO2, and at highly alkaline pH. Brucite and cronstedtite do not form together and may not form deep in the Ceres' interior. The absence of Mg serpentine from Ceres' surface materials and the unlikely occurrence of very olivine-rich rocks do not indicate a formation of brucite through serpentinization of such rocks. Brucite could form by transient near-surface fluids which do not equilibrate with silicates. Temporary fluids could deposit Mg carbonates before, after, or together with brucite at near-surface conditions that favor CO2 degassing. Regardless of Ceres' internal structure, internal thermal and aqueous processes may not affect cold near-surface layers. Percolation of interior fluids is not consistent with the lack of detection of low-solubility salts. However, impacts of ice-rich targets during the Late Heavy Bombardment could account for transient aqueous environments and unusual surface mineralogies of Ceres, Hygiea, and Bamberga. Brucite and Mg carbonates could have formed through hydration and carbonation of MgO evaporated from silicates. Apparently abundant carbonates may indicate an ample impact oxidation of organic matter, and the occurrence of brucite with cronstedtite may

  11. Underground openings in clay formations - Technical requirements on drifting technology and support systems for underground openings and their impact on retreat systems for the installation of engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Several countries are currently investigating the possibility of long-term storage of nuclear waste in clay formations, with a special focus on mud-stone formations. During the last decades extensive research has been conducted on the suitability of mud-stone as repository and the related special requirements of the clay matrix - with significant success. The knowledge base on the behaviour of the host formations during the mining phase of the excavations on the other hand is relatively limited compared to that of other investigated host rock formations, e.g. salt. With the low value of mud-stone and its relatively limited industrial application range, there have not been any large scale commercial underground mining activities in recent years to provide a significant and independent database on the behaviour of the selected mud-stone formations or their geological analogue during mining activities. Most information currently used for the assessment of this type of sediment and the planning of the mining activities has been gathered either during the execution of logistics and tunneling projects or during the excavation of today's underground laboratories. There is, however, a database on a vast variety of clay deposit types and morphologies available from commercial underground clay mining activities worldwide. The data available on commercial clay mining shows significant differences for each and every technological stage of clay mining as compared to the stages of any other mining operation. This is, amongst other things, due to the high and partly extreme ductility and creeping properties of typical clay formations, especially when considering their sensitiveness to a changing water content. In general the technical and technological differences include the applicable mining technology for the excavation of underground openings, the need for an advancement of any available technology to waterless variants as

  12. Mechanisms of erosion in miocene clays from the Tudela formation (Bardenas Reales, Navarra, Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Bardenas Reales area (located in the central-western part of the Ebro Depression) several erosion rates have been measured along the last years. The mean annual erosion rates are of 32 Tm/Ha/yr. Due to semiarid conditions, precipitation is irregularly distributed along the year with maximums on spring and autumn when the great erosion is produced. There are intensity and quality thresholds below which erosion does not take place. In Bardenas Reales some erosion processes act (mud slides and armoured mud balls among others). Mud slides are mobilised on spring when the sediment have reached its plastic limit and could slide due to heavy rains. Armored mud balls are produced by the enhancement of popcorn cracks that individualize clays cores which are rounded by water. The same kind of strong precipitation that mobilised mud slides is the responsible of armoured mud balls destruction because the conditions to its maintenance are very limited. (Author) 9 refs.

  13. Catalysis of peptide bond formation by histidyl-histidine in a fluctuating clay environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D. H.; Erickson, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The condensation of glycine to form oligoglycines during wet-dry fluctuations on clay surfaces was enhanced up to threefold or greater by small amounts of histidyl-histidine. In addition, higher relative yields of the longer oligomers were produced. Other specific dipeptides tested gave no enhancement, and imidazole, histidine, and N-acetylhistidine gave only slight enhancements. Histidyl-histidine apparently acts as a true catalyst (in the sense of repeatedly catalyzing the reaction), since up to 52 nmol of additional glycine were incorporated into oligoglycine for each nmol of catalyst added. This is the first known instance of a peptide or similar molecule demonstrating a catalytic turnover number greater than unity in a prebiotic oligomer synthesis reaction, and suggests that histidyl-histidine is a model for a primitive prebiotic proto-enzyme. Catalysis of peptide bond synthesis by a molecule which is itself a peptide implies that related systems may be capable of exhibiting autocatalytic growth.

  14. Clay mineral analysis of the Hirabayashi NIED drill core on the Nojima fault that ruptured in the 1995 Kobe Earthquake, southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, T.; Omura, K.; Ikeda, R.; Awaji, D.

    2002-12-01

    A 1800-m-deep borehole was drilled at Nojima Hirabayashi and penetrated the Nojima fault that was activated at the time of the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu Earthquake (Kobe Earthquake) in Japan. Three possible fracture zones were detected at depths of about 1140 m, 1300 m, and 1800 m. At first, we analyzed the mode of distribution of rocks, minerals and chemical elements in them. There is a foliated blue-gray gouge at a depth of 1140 m. So we infer that this is the central fault plane, and began our fracture zone analysis there, as follows. The degree of fracturing is evidently greater in the hanging wall than in the footwall. We estimated the relative amounts of minerals qualitatively, and we detected not only quartz, orthoclase, plagioclase, biotite and hornblende in the parent rock (granodiorite), but also kaolinite, smectite, laumontite, stilbite, calcite, ankerite and siderite, which are related to hydrothermal alteration. Biotite notably disappears in both the hanging wall and footwall across the central fault plane, although it disappears over a significantly greater distance in the hanging wall than in the footwall. Equally, we estimated the amounts of major chemical elements quantitatively. Al2O3, Fe2O3, MnO, TiO2, and P2O5 all decrease throughout this interval, except at a few points. H2O_{ and CO2 increase throughout the interval. Na2O increases in the region adjacent to the central fault plane, while MgO and CaO increase in the hanging wall and decrease in the footwall. SiO2 and K2O decrease in the hanging wall and increase in the footwall. Next, we particularly investigated about the clay minerals such as smectite. From the drill core, we separated the clay-size fraction and analyzed it by X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD). Incidentally, particle-size separations are based on Stokes_fs law. We prepared oriented samples for XRD and to make it, we used the glass slide method. We measured it both in the air-dried and ethylene glycol-solvated conditions. We analyzed the

  15. Formation of Layered Single- and Double-Metal Hydroxide Precipitates at the Mineral/Water Interface: A Multiple-Scattering XAFS Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinost; Sparks

    2000-03-15

    Spectroscopic and microscopic studies have shown that Ni and Co sorption by clay minerals may proceed via formation of surface precipitates. Several studies employing X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy suggested the formation of turbostratic, alpha-type metal hydroxides, of layered double hydroxides (LDH) with Al-for-metal substitution, and of 1:1 or 2:1 phyllosilicates. Distinction of these phases is difficult because they have low crystallinity and/or a small mass compared to the sorbents, and because they have similar metal-metal distances in their hydroxide layers/sheets. Distinction of these phases is crucial, however, because they have substantially differing solubilities. In this paper we show that an XAFS beat pattern at about 8 Å(-1) can be used as a fingerprint to unequivocally distinguish LDH from the alpha-type hydroxides and phyllosilicates. Full multiple-scattering simulations and experimental spectra of model compounds indicate that the beat pattern is due to focused multiple scattering at Me/Al ratios between 1 and 4 (Me=Ni, Co). By applying the fingerprint method to new and to already published XAFS data on Ni and Co surface precipitates, we found that LDH preferentially forms in the presence of the Al-containing sorbents pyrophyllite, illite, kaolinite, gibbsite, and alumina above pH 7.0. However, alpha-type metal hydroxides form in the presence of the Al-free sorbents talc, silica, and rutile, and in the presence of the Al-containing clay minerals montmorillonite and vermiculite. We believe that the high permanent charge of these latter minerals prevents or retards the release of Al. When Al is available, the formation of LDH seems to be thermodynamically and/or kinetically favored over the formation of alpha-type hydroxides. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10700399

  16. Clay-based Nanocomposites Possibilities and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulis, Dimitris

    2011-09-01

    In the last decades, clay mineral based nanocomposites and polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNC) have been proposed as very useful materials for many uses including photocatalysis, medicinal uses as tissue engineering or modified drug delivery systems. Clay minerals and especially montmorillonite, kaolinite, halloysite palygorskite and sepiolite are the most used clay minerals because of their high surface areas, colloidal dimensions of their particles and other properties. This lecture aims at reporting on very recent developments in the use of clay minerals and PCNC as materials with photocatalytic and medical interest.

  17. Infrared spectroscopic studies of the effect of elevated temperature on the association of pyroglutamic acid with clay and other minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macklin, J. W.; White, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier transform i.r. measurements of L-pyroglutamic acid dispersed in a matrix of a clay, silica or alumina have been obtained at various temperatures between 25 and 220 degrees C. The i.r. spectrum of L-pyroglutamic acid varies in a manner dependent upon the matrix material and shows considerable change as the temperature of the mixtures is increased. The differences in the spectrum at elevated temperatures are explained in terms of a chemical reaction between hydroxyl groups in the matrix and the carboxylic acid. The i.r. spectra of trimethylsilyl derivatives of L-pyroglutamic acid and aluminum pyroglutamate were also measured to assist the understanding of spectra and interpretation of the spectral changes dependent upon increasing temperature.

  18. Local structure of Th complexes on montmorillonite clay mineral determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research at the Waste Management Laboratory, PSI, concentrates on the understanding of safety relevant mechanisms and processes that govern the release of radionuclides from waste matrices, and their transport through engineered barrier systems and the surrounding geosphere. For this reason, detailed sorption studies of radionuclides in clay and cement systems are conducted. The studies are combined with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy measurements in order to understand the sorption mechanisms at an atomic level. In this manuscript, a case study of Th(IV) uptake on montmorillonite is presented. EXAFS samples were prepared by incubating a montmorillonite suspension with Th for seven days at pH = 5 (Thinitial: 4.3 x 10-5 to 4 x 10-4 M). The resulting Th loadings on the clay varied between 14 and 166 μmol/g. LIII-Th EXAFS spectra of Th-treated montmorillonite were measured at the Rossendorf Beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Data analysis revealed the presence of two O shells at 2.27 angstrom and 2.45 angstrom in all samples. The spectra at low Th uptake suggest the presence of Si/A1 and Th backscattering atoms at distances of 3.85 angstrom and 3.77 angstrom respectively. The presence of a Th-Si/A1 backscattering pair suggests that Th is bound to Si tetrahedra by a double corner-sharing manner. At higher Th uptake, however, the spectrum shows a strong similarity with the spectrum of amorphous Th(OH)4 and suggests that Th is predominately present as a newly formed Th(OH)4-like phase. (authors)

  19. Modelling of the physico-chemical behaviour of clay minerals with a thermo-kinetic model taking into account particles morphology in compacted material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sali, D.; Fritz, B.; Clément, C.; Michau, N.

    2003-04-01

    Modelling of fluid-mineral interactions is largely used in Earth Sciences studies to better understand the involved physicochemical processes and their long-term effect on the materials behaviour. Numerical models simplify the processes but try to preserve their main characteristics. Therefore the modelling results strongly depend on the data quality describing initial physicochemical conditions for rock materials, fluids and gases, and on the realistic way of processes representations. The current geo-chemical models do not well take into account rock porosity and permeability and the particle morphology of clay minerals. In compacted materials like those considered as barriers in waste repositories, low permeability rocks like mudstones or compacted powders will be used : they contain mainly fine particles and the geochemical models used for predicting their interactions with fluids tend to misjudge their surface areas, which are fundamental parameters in kinetic modelling. The purpose of this study was to improve how to take into account the particles morphology in the thermo-kinetic code KINDIS and the reactive transport code KIRMAT. A new function was integrated in these codes, considering the reaction surface area as a volume depending parameter and the calculated evolution of the mass balance in the system was coupled with the evolution of reactive surface areas. We made application exercises for numerical validation of these new versions of the codes and the results were compared with those of the pre-existing thermo-kinetic code KINDIS. Several points are highlighted. Taking into account reactive surface area evolution during simulation modifies the predicted mass transfers related to fluid-minerals interactions. Different secondary mineral phases are also observed during modelling. The evolution of the reactive surface parameter helps to solve the competition effects between different phases present in the system which are all able to fix the chemical

  20. Macro-and Micro- Properties of Two Natural Marine Clays in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ming-jing; PENG Li-cai; ZHU He-hua; LIN Yi-xi; HUANG Liang-ji

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,macro- and micro- properties of natural marine clay in two different and representative regions of China are investigated in detail.In addition to in-situ tests,soil samples are collected by use of Shelby tubes for laboratory examination in Shanghai and Zhuhai respectively,two coastal cities in China.In the laboratory tests,macro-properties such as consolidation characteristics and undrained shear strength are measured.Moreover,X-ray diffraction test,scanning electron microscope test,and mercury intrusion test are carried out for the investigation of their micro-properties including clay minerals and microstructure.The study shows that:(1) both clays are Holocene series formations,classified as either normal or underconsolidated soils.The initial gradient of the stress-strain curves shows their increase with increasing consolidation pressure;however,the Shanghai and the Zhuhai clays are both structural soils with the latter shown to be more structured than the former.As a result,the Zhuhai clay shows strain softening behavior at low confining pressures,but strain hardening at high pressures.In contrast,the Shanghai clay mainly manifests strain-hardening.(2) An activity ranges from 0.75 to 1.30 for the Shanghai marine clay and from 0.5 to 0.85 for the Zhuhai marine clay.The main clay mineral is illite in the Shanghai clay and kaolinite in the Zhuhai clay.The Zhuhai clay is mainly characterized by a flocculated structure,while the typical Shanghai clay shows a dispersed structure.The porous structure of the Shanghai clay is characterized mainly by large and medium-sized pores,while the Zhuhai clay porous structure is mainly featreed by small and medium-sized pores.The differences in their macro- and micro- properties can he attributed to different sedimentation environments.