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Sample records for classical density modification

  1. Introduction to Classical Density Functional Theory by a Computational Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levy, Nicolas; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We propose an in silico experiment to introduce the classical density functional theory (cDFT). Density functional theories, whether quantum or classical, rely on abstract concepts that are nonintuitive; however, they are at the heart of powerful tools and active fields of research in both physics and chemistry. They led to the 1998 Nobel Prize in…

  2. Evolution of classical projected phase space density in billiards

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debabrata Biswas

    2005-04-01

    The classical phase space density projected on to the configuration space offers a means of comparing classical and quantum evolution. In this alternate approach that we adopt here, we show that for billiards, the eigenfunctions of the coarse-grained projected classical evolution operator are identical to a first approximation to the quantum Neumann eigenfunctions. Moreover, there exists a correspondence between the respective eigenvalues although their time evolutions differ.

  3. Introduction to Classical Density Functional Theory by Computational Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We present here an introductory practical course to classical density functional theory (cDFT). Density functional theories, whether quantum or classical, rely largely on nonintuitive abstract concepts and applied mathematics. They are nevertheless a powerful tool and an active field of research in physics and chemistry that led to the 1998 Nobel prize in chemistry. We here illustrate the DFT in its most mathematically simple and yet physically relevant form: the classical density functional theory of an ideal fluid in an external field, as applied to the prediction of the structure of liquid neon at the molecular scale. This introductory course is built around the production of a cDFT code written by students using the Mathematica language. In this way, they are brought to deal with (i) the cDFT theory itself, (ii) some basic concepts around the statistical mechanics of simple fluids, (iii) the underlying mathematical and numerical problem of functional minimization, and (iv) a functional programming languag...

  4. Mercury Beating Heart: Modifications to the Classical Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najdoski, Metodija; Mirceski, Valentin; Petrusevski, Vladimir M.; Demiri, Sani

    2007-01-01

    The mercury beating heart (MBH) is a commonly performed experiment, which is based on varying oxidizing agents and substituting other metals for iron. Various modified versions of the classical demonstration of the experiment are presented.

  5. A numerical efficient way to minimize classical density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Markus; Roth, Roland

    2016-02-21

    The minimization of the functional of the grand potential within the framework of classical density functional theory in three spatial dimensions can be numerically very demanding. The Picard iteration, that is often employed, is very simple and robust but can be rather slow. While a number of different algorithms for optimization problems have been suggested, there is still great need for additional strategies. Here, we present an approach based on the limited memory Broyden algorithm that is efficient and relatively simple to implement. We demonstrate the performance of this algorithm with the minimization of an inhomogeneous bulk structure of a fluid with competing interactions. For the problems we studied, we find that the presented algorithm improves performance by roughly a factor of three.

  6. Universality principle and the development of classical density functional theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周世琦; 张晓琪

    2002-01-01

    The universality principle of the free energy density functional and the ‘test particle' trick by Percus are combined to construct the approximate free energy density functional or its functional derivative. Information about the bulk fluid ralial distribution function is integrated into the density functional approximation directly for the first time in the present methodology. The physical foundation of the present methodology also applies to the quantum density functional theory.

  7. Transport of particles by surface waves: a modification of the classical bouncer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragulskis, M [Department of Mathematical Research in Systems, Kaunas University of Technology, Studentu 50-222, 51638 Kaunas (Lithuania); Sanjuan, M A F [Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos Group, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: minvydas.ragulskis@ktu.lt, E-mail: miguel.sanjuan@urjc.es

    2008-08-15

    We consider a ball under the influence of gravity on a platform. A propagating surface wave travels on the surface of the platform, while the platform remains motionless. This is a modification of the classical bouncing ball problem and describes the transport of particles by surface waves. Phase and velocity maps cannot be expressed in an explicit form owing to implicit formulations, and no formal analytical analysis is possible. Numerical analysis shows that the transition to chaos is produced via a period doubling route, which is a common property for classical bouncers. The bouncing process can be sensitive to the initial conditions, which can build the ground for control techniques that can dramatically increase the effectiveness of particle transport in practical applications.

  8. Quasi-classical theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic molecular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J

    2012-11-26

    The standard Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (EFD). A previously proposed "coupled-channels" theory permits the extraction of the EFD from the BO wave function for one-electron diatomic systems, but attempts at generalization to many-electron polyatomic systems are frustrated by technical barriers. An alternative "quasi-classical" approach, which eliminates the explicit quantum dynamics of the electrons within a classical framework, yet retains the quantum character of the nuclear motion, appears capable of yielding EFDs for arbitrarily complex systems. Quasi-classical formulas for the EFD in simple systems agree with corresponding coupled-channels formulas. Results of the application of the new quasi-classical formula for the EFD to a model triatomic system indicate the potential of the quasi-classical scheme to elucidate the dynamical role of electrons in electronically adiabatic processes in more complex multiparticle systems.

  9. A comparison of wood density between classical Cremonese and modern violins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berend C Stoel

    Full Text Available Classical violins created by Cremonese masters, such as Antonio Stradivari and Giuseppe Guarneri Del Gesu, have become the benchmark to which the sound of all violins are compared in terms of their abilities of expressiveness and projection. By general consensus, no luthier since that time has been able to replicate the sound quality of these classical instruments. The vibration and sound radiation characteristics of a violin are determined by an instrument's geometry and the material properties of the wood. New test methods allow the non-destructive examination of one of the key material properties, the wood density, at the growth ring level of detail. The densities of five classical and eight modern violins were compared, using computed tomography and specially developed image-processing software. No significant differences were found between the median densities of the modern and the antique violins, however the density difference between wood grains of early and late growth was significantly smaller in the classical Cremonese violins compared with modern violins, in both the top (Spruce and back (Maple plates (p = 0.028 and 0.008, respectively. The mean density differential (SE of the top plates of the modern and classical violins was 274 (26.6 and 183 (11.7 gram/liter. For the back plates, the values were 128 (2.6 and 115 (2.0 gram/liter. These differences in density differentials may reflect similar changes in stiffness distributions, which could directly impact vibrational efficacy or indirectly modify sound radiation via altered damping characteristics. Either of these mechanisms may help explain the acoustical differences between the classical and modern violins.

  10. PREFACE: Classical density functional theory methods in soft and hard matter Classical density functional theory methods in soft and hard matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haataja, Mikko; Gránásy, László; Löwen, Hartmut

    2010-08-01

    evolving microstructures in spatially extended system with atomic scale spatial resolution over diffusive time scales, DFT provides both its theoretical underpinning and (hopefully) the means to construct microscopically more quantitative density functionals for use in engineering materials. Outstanding issues within the PFC and DFT approaches, discussed next, will provide further opportunities for interactions between the PFC and DFT communities. 3. Important open issues and exciting avenues for further research In the following we summarize some of the exciting topics for future research, which were discussed during the CECAM workshop. They concern both fundamental problems and applications, all within the framework of DFT and PFC. Addressing these issues will provide a framework for future work in these two overlapping fields. (a) How to construct a reliable density functional (DF) for soft repulsions? Most of the recent developments in classical density functional theory were focussed on hard-sphere-like interactions in the framework of fundamental-measure-theory (FMT) [30-33]. While this approach can be extended to additive and nonadditive mixtures [34, 35] and to non-spherical hard objects [36, 37], it is much more difficult to include soft-core interactions, such as inverse-power-law pair-potentials. There have been attempts to include those, mainly using the Ramakrishnan-Yussouff [38] or the weighted-density [39-41] approximation, or other modifications (see e.g., [42, 43]), but the accuracy of these functionals are inferior to that of FMT for hard spheres. Clearly the FMT of Rosenfeld needs an extension for the hard-core Coulomb system. A complementary approach is to start from a density functional for hard orientable objects [36] and to integrate out the orientational degrees of freedom. This would lead to a softened effective repulsion between spherical objects. We mention finally that in the extreme limit of ultrasoft pair potentials, which are penetrable, the

  11. Quantum and classical correlations for a two-qubit X structure density matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Bang-Fu; Wang Xiao-Yun; Zhao He-Ping

    2011-01-01

    We derive explicit expressions for quantum discord and classical correlation for an X structure density matrix.Based on the characteristics of the expressions,the quantum discord and the classical correlation are easily obtained and compared under different initial conditions using a novel analytical method.We explain the relationships among quantum discord,classical correlation,and entanglement,and further find that the quantum discord is not always larger than the entanglement measured by concurrence in a general two-qubit X state.The new method,which is different from previous approaches,has certain guiding significance for analysing quantum discord and classical correlation of a two-qubit X state,such as a mixed state.

  12. Effective model hierarchies for dynamic and static classical density functional theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majaniemi, S [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, PO Box 11100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Provatas, N [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, L8S-4L7 (Canada); Nonomura, M, E-mail: maj@fyslab.hut.f [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    The origin and methodology of deriving effective model hierarchies are presented with applications to solidification of crystalline solids. In particular, it is discussed how the form of the equations of motion and the effective parameters on larger scales can be obtained from the more microscopic models. It will be shown that tying together the dynamic structure of the projection operator formalism with static classical density functional theories can lead to incomplete (mass) transport properties even though the linearized hydrodynamics on large scales is correctly reproduced. To facilitate a more natural way of binding together the dynamics of the macrovariables and classical density functional theory, a dynamic generalization of density functional theory based on the nonequilibrium generating functional is suggested.

  13. Modeling lower critical solution temperature behavior of associating polymer brushes with classical density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Kai; Marshall, Bennett D; Chapman, Walter G

    2013-09-07

    We study the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) behavior of associating polymer brushes (i.e., poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) using classical density functional theory. Without using any empirical or temperature-dependent parameters, we find the phase transition of polymer brushes from extended to collapsed structure with increasing temperature, indicating the LCST behavior of polymer brushes. The LCST behavior of associating polymer brushes is attributed to the interplay of hydrogen bonding interactions and Lennard-Jones attractions in the system. The effect of grafting density and molecular weight on the phase behavior of associating polymer brushes has been also investigated. We find no LCST behavior at low grafting density or molecular weight. Moreover, increasing grafting density decreases the LCST and swelling ratio of polymer brushes. Similarly, increasing molecular weight decreases the LCST but increases the swelling ratio. At very high grafting density, a partial collapsed structure appears near the LCST. Qualitatively consistent with experiments, our results provide insight into the molecular mechanism of LCST behavior of associating polymer brushes.

  14. Surface modification for polystyrene colloidal particles with controlled charge densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongman; Kwon, Oh-Sun; Shin, Kwanwoo; Song, Ju-Myung; Kim, Joon-Seop; Seo, Young-Soo; Tael, Giyoong; Jon, Sangyong

    2007-11-01

    A significant amount of polystyrene sulfonated acid (PSSA) and poly(styrene-ran-acrylic acid) (PSAA) random copolymer can be adsorbed by dispersion of PS particles via a swelling-quenching process. A THF-water mixed solvent was used in the swelling process and a large amount of pure water was used, to give a low concentration of THF% in quenching process. Our results showed that functional PSSA groups were randomly and tightly adsorbed to the PS particles. When the mol.% of charged segments was increased, the progressive adsorption of PSSA chains to the PS particles leads to an increase in the electrophoretic mobility and zeta-potential of aqueous dispersions. Thus, we were able to obtain well-distributed surface charge density on the PS particles.

  15. Efficient classical density-functional theories of rigid-molecular fluids and a simplified free energy functional for liquid water

    CERN Document Server

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar

    2014-01-01

    Classical density-functional theory provides an efficient alternative to molecular dynamics simulations for understanding the equilibrium properties of inhomogeneous fluids. However, application of density-functional theory to multi-site molecular fluids has so far been limited by complications due to the implicit molecular geometry constraints on the site densities, whose resolution typically requires expensive Monte Carlo methods. Here, we present a general scheme of circumventing this so-called inversion problem: compressed representations of the orientation density. This approach allows us to combine the superior iterative convergence properties of multipole representations of the fluid configuration with the improved accuracy of site-density functionals. Next, from a computational perspective, we show how to extend the DFT++ algebraic formulation of electronic density-functional theory to the classical fluid case and present a basis-independent discretization of our formulation for molecular classical de...

  16. Modification of Classical SPM for Slightly Rough Surface Scattering with Low Grazing Angle Incidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the impedance/admittance rough boundaries, the reflection coefficients and the scattering cross section with low grazing angle incidence are obtained for both VV and HH polarizations. The error of the classical perturbation method at grazing angle is overcome for the vertical polarization at a rough Neumann boundary of infinite extent. The derivation of the formulae and the numerical results show that the backscattering cross section depends on the grazing angle to the fourth power for both Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions with low grazing angle incidence. Our results can reduce to that of the classical small perturbation method by neglecting the Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions.

  17. White matter microstructure pathology in classic galactosemia revealed by neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Inge; Zhang, Hui; Bastiani, Matteo; Jansma, Bernadette M; Roebroeck, Alard; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2015-03-01

    White matter abnormalities have been observed in patients with classic galactosemia, an inborn error of galactose metabolism. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data collected in the past were generally qualitative in nature. Our objective was to investigate white matter microstructure pathology and examine correlations with outcome and behaviour in this disease, by using multi-shell diffusion weighted imaging. In addition to standard diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) was used to estimate density and orientation dispersion of neurites in a group of eight patients (aged 16-21 years) and eight healthy controls (aged 15-20 years). Extensive white matter abnormalities were found: neurite density index (NDI) was lower in the patient group in bilateral anterior areas, and orientation dispersion index (ODI) was increased mainly in the left hemisphere. These specific regional profiles are in agreement with the cognitive profile observed in galactosemia, showing higher order cognitive impairments, and language and motor impairments, respectively. Less favourable white matter properties correlated positively with age and age at onset of diet, and negatively with behavioural outcome (e.g. visual working memory). To conclude, this study provides evidence of white matter pathology regarding density and dispersion of neurites in these patients. The results are discussed in light of suggested pathophysiological mechanisms.

  18. Polar-solvation classical density-functional theory for electrolyte aqueous solutions near a wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshavsky, Vadim; Marucho, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    A precise description of the structural and dielectric properties of liquid water is critical to understanding the physicochemical properties of solutes in electrolyte solutions. In this article, a mixture of ionic and dipolar hard spheres is considered to account for water crowding and polarization effects on ionic electrical double layers near a uniformly charged hard wall. As a unique feature, solvent hard spheres carrying a dipole at their centers were used to model water molecules at experimentally known concentration, molecule size, and dipolar moment. The equilibrium ionic and dipole density profiles of this electrolyte aqueous model were calculated using a polar-solvation classical density-functional theory (PSCDFT). These profiles were used to calculate the charge density distribution, water polarization, dielectric permittivity function, and mean electric potential profiles as well as differential capacitance, excess adsorptions, and wall-fluid surface tension. These results were compared with those corresponding to the pure dipolar model and unpolar primitive solvent model of electrolyte aqueous solutions to understand the role that water crowding and polarization effects play on the structural and thermodynamic properties of these systems. Overall, PSCDFT predictions are in agreement with available experimental data.

  19. Directional Local Density of States of Classical and Quantum Propagating Surface Plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthel, Martin; Jiang, Quanbo; Pham, Aline; Bellessa, Joel; Genet, Cyriaque; Huant, Serge; Drezet, Aurélien

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally introduce the concept of the local density of states (LDOS) associated with propagative surface plasmons (PSPs) launched along a structured thin gold film (a concept we call PSP LDOS). The alternative method couples a near-field optical microscope, in either the classical or the quantum regime of excitation, to a far-field leakage-radiation microscope. This method allows for selecting and collecting a very narrow portion of the directional SP wave vectors, thereby offering sufficient resolution to probe the collimation efficiency of a SP beam for a source near the focal point of a Bragg parabolic reflector. We are able to build and image the PSP LDOS in a fully integrated quantum SP launcher by depositing a diamond nanocrystal hosting nitrogen-vacancy centers at the focal point of the mirror. Our demonstration of the PSP LDOS with quantized SPs offers alternative prospects in the field of quantum plasmonics.

  20. Hydration of Clays at the Molecular Scale: The Promising Perspective of Classical Density Functional Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levesque, Maximilien; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Borgis, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We report here how the hydration of complex surfaces can be efficiently studied thanks to recent advances in classical molecular density functional theory. This is illustrated on the example of the pyrophylite clay. After presenting the most recent advances, we show that the strength of this implicit method is that (i) it is in quantitative or semi-quantitative agreement with reference all-atoms simulations (molecular dynamics here) for both the solvation structure and energetics, and that (ii) the computational cost is two to three orders of magnitude less than in explicit methods. The method remains imperfect, in that it locally overestimates the polarization of water close to hydrophylic sites of the clay. The high numerical efficiency of the method is illustrated and exploited to carry a systematic study of the electrostatic and van der Waals components of the surface-solvant interactions within the most popular force field for clays, CLAYFF. Hydration structure and energetics are found to weakly depend u...

  1. Classical probability density distributions with uncertainty relations for ground states of simple non-relativistic quantum-mechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radożycki, Tomasz

    2016-11-01

    The probability density distributions for the ground states of certain model systems in quantum mechanics and for their classical counterparts are considered. It is shown, that classical distributions are remarkably improved by incorporating into them the Heisenberg uncertainty relation between position and momentum. Even the crude form of this incorporation makes the agreement between classical and quantum distributions unexpectedly good, except for the small area, where classical momenta are large. It is demonstrated that the slight improvement of this form, makes the classical distribution very similar to the quantum one in the whole space. The obtained results are much better than those from the WKB method. The paper is devoted to ground states, but the method applies to excited states too.

  2. Orbital free DFT versus single density equation: a perspective through quantum domain behavior of a classically chaotic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debdutta; Kar, Susmita; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2015-12-21

    The orbital free density functional theory and the single density equation approach are formally equivalent. An orbital free density based quantum dynamical strategy is used to study the quantum-classical correspondence in both weakly and strongly coupled van der Pol and Duffing oscillators in the presence of an external electric field in one dimension. The resulting quantum hydrodynamic equations of motion are solved through an implicit Euler type real space method involving a moving weighted least square technique. The Lagrangian framework used here allows the numerical grid points to follow the wave packet trajectory. The associated classical equations of motion are solved using a sixth order Runge-Kutta method and the Ehrenfest dynamics is followed through the solution of the time dependent Schrodinger equation using a time dependent Fourier Grid Hamiltonian technique. Various diagnostics reveal a close parallelism between classical regular as well as chaotic dynamics and that obtained from the Bohmian mechanics.

  3. Oxidative modification of high density lipoprotein induced by cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江渝; 刘红; 彭家和; 叶治家; 何凤田; 董燕麟; 刘秉文

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the oxidative modification of high density lipoprotein (HDL) induced by cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Methods: HDL cocultured with SMCs at 37℃ in 48 h was subjected, and native HDL (N-HDL) served as control. Oxidative modification of HDL was identified by using agarose gel electrophoresis. Absorbances of conjugated diene (CD) and lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) were measured with ultraviolet spectrophotometry at 234 and 560 nm respectively, and fluorescence intensity of thiobarbuturic acid reaction substance (TBARS) with fluorescence spectrophotometry at 550 nm emission wavelength with excitation at 515 nm. Results: In comparison with N-HDL, the electrophoretic mobility of SMCs-cocultured HDL was increased, and the contents of CD, LOOH and TBARS HDL were very significantly higher than those of the control HDL (P<0.01). Conclusion: Oxidative modification of HDL can be induced by human arterial SMCs.

  4. Dynamic density functional theory for nucleation: Non-classical predictions of mesoscopic nucleation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Yatsyshin, Peter; Lutsko, James F.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) for fluids and its dynamic extension (DDFT) provide an appealing mean-field framework for describing equilibrium and dynamics of complex soft matter systems. For a long time, homogeneous nucleation was considered to be outside the limits of applicability of DDFT. However, our recently developed mesoscopic nucleation theory (MeNT) based on fluctuating hydrodynamics, reconciles the inherent randomness of the nucleation process with the deterministic nature of DDFT. It turns out that in the weak-noise limit, the most likely path (MLP) for nucleation to occur is determined by the DDFT equations. We present computations of MLPs for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in colloidal suspensions. For homogeneous nucleation, the MLP obtained is in excellent agreement with the reduced order-parameter description of MeNT, which predicts a multistage nucleation pathway. For heterogeneous nucleation, the presence of impurities in the fluid affects the MLP, but remarkably, the overall qualitative picture of homogeneous nucleation persists. Finally, we highlight the use of DDFT as a simulation tool, which is especially appealing as there are no known applications of MeNT to heterogeneous nucleation. We acknowledge financial support from the European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031 and from EPSRC via Grants No. EP/L020564 and EP/L025159.

  5. Bone tissue density modification in treatment of shin pseudoarthrosis by transosseous compressive osteosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tishkov N.V.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective is to detect bone mineral density along the shin according to «Esperanto» levels by Hounsfield's scale. Materials and methods. The analysis of density modification in 25 patients with pseudoarthrosis of tibia with predominant localization in a lower one-third of bone has been carried out. Results. By means of computed tomography it has been revealed that the bone tissue density of the tibia in the process of false joint union when using the compressive variant of combined transosseous osteosynthesis has changed according to the regularity reproducing phase character of the accumulation of mineral substances in the bone. Conclution. The growth of mineral density of the bone tissue during treatment spreads in the directions from proximal and distal metaepiphyses to the zone of pseudoarthrosis knitting

  6. Grey matter density decreases as well as increases in patients with classic galactosemia: A voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Inge; van der Korput, Lisanne D; Jansma, Bernadette M; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2016-10-01

    Brain impairments have been observed in patients with classic galactosemia, an inherited metabolic disorder resulting in a particular neuro-cognitive profile. Neuroimaging studies showed abnormalities such as diffuse white mater (WM) abnormalities and grey matter (GM) atrophy. Our current study analysed grey matter density using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and compared the brains of eight adolescent patients with classic galactosemia with eight healthy gender- and aged-matched controls. GM density differences were found in several regions. Decreased GM density was found in the patients in the bilateral putamen and bilateral occipital cortex. Increased GM density in the patients, on the other hand, was found in the bilateral inferior frontal and medial prefrontal cortex. The anatomical profile of the abnormalities is in line with the neuro-cognitive profile of patients with classic galactosemia, including motor dysfunction, speech and language difficulties and higher order cognitive problems. Less favourable GM densities in patients (either increased or decreased compared to controls) correlated with younger age, a worse visual working memory performance, and an older age at initiation of the galactose-restricted diet. To conclude, this explorative study is the first to analyse the GM using VBM in this population, and demonstrates a mixed profile of both increased and decreased GM density in these patients.

  7. Mixed time-dependent density-functional theory/classical trajectory surface hopping study of oxirane photochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tapavicza, Enrico; Tavernelli, Ivano; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Filippi, Claudia; Casida, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a mixed time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT)/classical trajectory surface hopping (SH) study of the photochemical ring opening in oxirane. Previous preparatory work limited to the symmetric CC ring-opening pathways of oxirane concluded that the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA)

  8. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzi, Luxherta, E-mail: l.buzi@fz-juelich.de [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Bvd. des Aiguillettes, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Temmerman, Greg De [FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Unterberg, Bernhard; Reinhart, Michael; Litnovsky, Andrey; Philipps, Volker [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Oost, Guido Van [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Möller, Sören [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER – relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER – like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux densities (high: 3.5–7 · 10{sup 23} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s and low: 9 · 10{sup 21} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s). Particle fluence and ion energy, respectively 10{sup 26} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} and ∼38 eV were kept constant in all cases. The experiments were performed at three different surface temperatures 530 K, 630 K and 870 K. Experimental results concerning the deuterium retention and surface modifications of low flux exposure confirmed previous investigations. At temperatures 530 K and 630 K, deuterium retention was higher at lower flux density due to the longer exposure time (steady state plasma operation) and a consequently deeper diffusion range. At 870 K, deuterium retention was found to be higher at high flux density according to the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements. While blisters were completely absent at low flux density, small blisters of about 40–50 nm were formed at high flux density exposure. At the given conditions, a relation between deuterium retention and blister formation has been found which has to be considered in addition to deuterium trapping in defects populated by diffusion.

  9. Iterative model-building, structure refinement, and density modification with the PHENIX AutoBuild Wizard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY, England; Terwilliger, Thomas; Terwilliger, T.C.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf Wilhelm; Afonine, P.V.; Moriarty, N.W.; Zwart, P.H.; Hung, L.-W.; Read, R.J.; Adams, P.D.

    2007-04-29

    The PHENIX AutoBuild Wizard is a highly automated tool for iterative model-building, structure refinement and density modification using RESOLVE or TEXTAL model-building, RESOLVE statistical density modification, and phenix.refine structure refinement. Recent advances in the AutoBuild Wizard and phenix.refine include automated detection and application of NCS from models as they are built, extensive model completion algorithms, and automated solvent molecule picking. Model completion algorithms in the AutoBuild Wizard include loop-building, crossovers between chains in different models of a structure, and side-chain optimization. The AutoBuild Wizard has been applied to a set of 48 structures at resolutions ranging from 1.1 {angstrom} to 3.2 {angstrom}, resulting in a mean R-factor of 0.24 and a mean free R factor of 0.29. The R-factor of the final model is dependent on the quality of the starting electron density, and relatively independent of resolution.

  10. Nuclear parton density modifications from low-mass lepton pair production at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, M.; Klasen, M.; König, F.

    2014-07-01

    In this article, we investigate the potential of low-mass lepton pair production in proton-ion collisions at the LHC to constrain nuclear modifications of parton densities. Similarly to prompt photon production, the transverse momentum spectrum is shown to be dominated by the QCD Compton process, but has virtually no fragmentation or isolation uncertainties. Depending on the orientation of the proton and ion beams and on the use of central or forward detector components, all interesting regions of nuclear effects (shadowing, antishadowing, isospin and EMC effects) can be probed. Ratios of cross sections allow to eliminate theoretical scale and bare-proton parton density errors as well as many experimental systematic uncertainties.

  11. Nuclear parton density modifications from low-mass lepton pair production at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, M., E-mail: matthiasbrandt@uni-muenster.de; Klasen, M., E-mail: michael.klasen@uni-muenster.de; König, F., E-mail: f.koenig@uni-muenster.de

    2014-07-15

    In this article, we investigate the potential of low-mass lepton pair production in proton–ion collisions at the LHC to constrain nuclear modifications of parton densities. Similarly to prompt photon production, the transverse momentum spectrum is shown to be dominated by the QCD Compton process, but has virtually no fragmentation or isolation uncertainties. Depending on the orientation of the proton and ion beams and on the use of central or forward detector components, all interesting regions of nuclear effects (shadowing, antishadowing, isospin and EMC effects) can be probed. Ratios of cross sections allow to eliminate theoretical scale and bare-proton parton density errors as well as many experimental systematic uncertainties.

  12. Nuclear parton density modifications from low-mass lepton pair production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, M; König, F

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the potential of low-mass lepton pair production in proton-ion collisions at the LHC to constrain nuclear modifications of parton densities. Similarly to prompt photon production, the transverse momentum spectrum is shown to be dominated by the QCD Compton process, but has virtually no fragmentation or isolation uncertainties. Depending on the orientation of the proton and ion beams and on the use of central or forward detector components, all interesting regions of nuclear effects (shadowing, antishadowing, isospin and EMC effects) can be probed. Ratios of cross sections allow to eliminate theoretical scale and bare-proton parton density errors as well as many experimental systematic uncertainties.

  13. High-resistance GaN epilayers with low dislocation density via growth mode modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z. Y.; Xu, F. J.; Wang, J. M.; Lu, L.; Yang, Z. J.; Wang, X. Q.; Shen, B.

    2016-09-01

    High-resistance GaN with low dislocation density adopting growth mode modification has been investigated by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The sheet resistance of the order of 1016 Ω/sq has been achieved at room temperature by diminishing the oxygen impurity level close to the substrate with an AlN blocking layer. Attributed to this method which offers more freedom to tailor the growth mode, a three-dimensional (3D) growth process is introduced by adjusting the growth pressure and temperature at the initial stage of the GaN epitaxy to improve the crystalline quality. The large 3D GaN grains formed during this period roughen the surface, and the following coalescence of the GaN grains causes threading dislocations bending, which finally remarkably reduces the dislocation density.

  14. Energy-level density of amorphous carbon and its modification by the annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov-Omskij, V I; Tagliaferro, A; Fanchini, G

    2002-01-01

    Annealing influence on the modification of electron density states of amorphous carbon a-C and amorphous hydrogenated carbon a-C:H has been studied. Optical transmission spectra were studied in 1.5-5.6 eV range and ellipsometric angles were measured for He-Ne laser wavelength. The model was suggested of the optical response of amorphous carbon. This model was based on the hypothesis of size fluctuations of sp sup 2 -components of amorphous carbon. The size of the optical gap E sub g for both types of materials was explained in terms of availability of fluctuations of their allotropic content having critical values. The dependence of the density of states of electrons both in fundamental and excited bands on the energy experimental data using model parameters

  15. Nucleosome Density ChIP-Seq Identifies Distinct Chromatin Modification Signatures Associated with MNase Accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorzadeh, Alireza; Bilenky, Misha; Hammond, Colin; Knapp, David J H F; Li, Luolan; Miller, Paul H; Carles, Annaick; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Gakkhar, Sitanshu; Moksa, Michelle; Eaves, Connie J; Hirst, Martin

    2016-11-15

    Nucleosome position, density, and post-translational modification are widely accepted components of mechanisms regulating DNA transcription but still incompletely understood. We present a modified native ChIP-seq method combined with an analytical framework that allows MNase accessibility to be integrated with histone modification profiles. Application of this methodology to the primitive (CD34+) subset of normal human cord blood cells enabled genomic regions enriched in one versus two nucleosomes marked by histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) and/or histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) to be associated with their transcriptional and DNA methylation states. From this analysis, we defined four classes of promoter-specific profiles and demonstrated that a majority of bivalent marked promoters are heterogeneously marked at a single-cell level in this primitive cell type. Interestingly, extension of this approach to human embryonic stem cells revealed an altered relationship between chromatin modification state and nucleosome content at promoters, suggesting developmental stage-specific organization of histone methylation states.

  16. Restoring the consistency with the contact density theorem of a classical density functional theory of ions at a planar electrical double layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) of fluids is a fast and efficient theory to compute the structure of the electrical double layer in the primitive model of ions where ions are modeled as charged, hard spheres in a background dielectric. While the hard-core repulsive component of this ion-ion interaction can be accurately computed using well-established DFTs, the electrostatic component is less accurate. Moreover, many electrostatic functionals fail to satisfy a basic theorem, the contact density theorem, that relates the bulk pressure, surface charge, and ion densities at their distances of closest approach for ions in equilibrium at a smooth, hard, planar wall. One popular electrostatic functional that fails to satisfy the contact density theorem is a perturbation approach developed by Kierlik and Rosinberg [Phys. Rev. A 44, 5025 (1991)PLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.44.5025] and Rosenfeld [J. Chem. Phys. 98, 8126 (1993)JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.464569], where the full free-energy functional is Taylor-expanded around a bulk (homogeneous) reference fluid. Here, it is shown that this functional fails to satisfy the contact density theorem because it also fails to satisfy the known low-density limit. When the functional is corrected to satisfy this limit, a corrected bulk pressure is derived and it is shown that with this pressure both the contact density theorem and the Gibbs adsorption theorem are satisfied.

  17. Anomalously strong plasmon resonances in aluminium bronze by modification of the electronic density-of-states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahcheraghi, N.; Keast, V. J.; Gentle, A. R.; Arnold, M. D.; Cortie, M. B.

    2016-10-01

    We use a combination of experimental measurements and density functional theory calculations to show that modification of the band structure of Cu by additions of Al causes an unexpected enhancement of the dielectric properties. The effect is optimized in alloys with Al contents between 10 and 15 at.% and would result in strong localized surface plasmon resonances at suitable wavelengths of light. This result is surprising as, in general, alloying of Cu increases its DC resistivity and would be expected to increase optical loss. The wavelengths for the plasmon resonances in the optimized alloy are significantly blue-shifted relative to those of pure Cu and provide a new material selection option for the range 2.2-2.8 eV.

  18. Ab initio molecular dynamics with nuclear quantum effects at classical cost: Ring polymer contraction for density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E

    2016-02-07

    Path integral molecular dynamics simulations, combined with an ab initio evaluation of interactions using electronic structure theory, incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the electrons and nuclei, which are essential to accurately describe systems containing light nuclei. However, path integral simulations have traditionally required a computational cost around two orders of magnitude greater than treating the nuclei classically, making them prohibitively costly for most applications. Here we show that the cost of path integral simulations can be dramatically reduced by extending our ring polymer contraction approach to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By using density functional tight binding as a reference system, we show that our ring polymer contraction scheme gives rapid and systematic convergence to the full path integral density functional theory result. We demonstrate the efficiency of this approach in ab initio simulations of liquid water and the reactive protonated and deprotonated water dimer systems. We find that the vast majority of the nuclear quantum effects are accurately captured using contraction to just the ring polymer centroid, which requires the same number of density functional theory calculations as a classical simulation. Combined with a multiple time step scheme using the same reference system, which allows the time step to be increased, this approach is as fast as a typical classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and 35× faster than a full path integral calculation, while still exactly including the quantum sampling of nuclei. This development thus offers a route to routinely include nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at negligible computational cost.

  19. On the Alternatives for Bath Correlators and Spectral Densities from Mixed Quantum-Classical Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We investigate on the procedure of extracting a "spectral density" from mixed QM/MM calculations and employing it in open quantum systems models. In particular, we study the connection between the energy gap correlation function extracted from ground state QM/MM and the bath spectral density used as input in open quantum system approaches. We introduce a simple model which can give intuition on when the ground state QM/MM propagation will give the correct energy gap. We also discuss the role ...

  20. Isolation of low density lipoprotein (LDL with its modification by Copper ion and Malondialdehyde (MDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doosty M

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of low density lipoproteins (LDLs is belived to be an important step in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. During oxidation, LDL particle undergoes a large number of structural changes that alters its biological properties, so it becomes atherogenic. To study atherogenic proteins, usually two forms of modified LDLs, including Cu2+-oxidized LDL (ox-LDL and malondialdehyde (MDA modified LDL (mal-LDL are used. In this study, LDL was isolated from 72 ml freshly prepared plasma by sequential Floatation Ultracentrifugation (SFU, which resulted in separation of 12.5 mg LDL protein. LDL oxidation was accomplished in Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS with 2µM cupric sulfate, and mal-LDL was prepared by incubating LDL in PBS with 0.5 M solution of freshly prepared MDA. These modifications were evaluated by measuring optical density at 234 nm, Thiobarbitoric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS, and electrophoretic mobility at pH 8.6. The increase of 234 nm absorption reflected initiation of LDL oxidation. TBARS of ox-LDL and mal-LDL was 80 Nm MAD/mg LDL protein and 400 nm MDA/mg LDL protein, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility of ox-LDL and mal-LDL, in respect to native LDL (n-LDL, were increased.

  1. Higher order classical density functional theory for branched chains and rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Bennett D; Chapman, Walter G

    2011-12-22

    We develop a general density functional theory for polyatomic molecules by taking the complete association limit of Wertheim's thermodynamic perturbation theory in a general way. By enforcing the complete association limit at an early point in the derivation and introducing the concept of molecular graphs, a general form for the free energy functional and segment densities are developed for both rigid and semiflexible molecules. The theory is applicable to branched chains, rings, or any other molecular structure. As an example the theory is applied as a second order perturbation theory to the case of molecules with a rigid three segment head and a fully flexible tail in a slit pore where bond angle of the rigid portion is an independent variable.

  2. Classical Electron Model with Negative Energy Density in Einstein-Cartan Theory of Gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, S; Ray, Saibal; Bhadra, Sumana

    2002-01-01

    Experimental result regarding the maximum limit of the radius of the electron \\sim 10^{-16} cm and a few of the theoretical works suggest that the gravitational mass which is a priori a positive quantity in Newtonian mechanics may become negative in general theory of relativity. It is argued that such a negative gravitational mass and hence negative energy density also can be obtained with a better physical interpretation in the framework of Einstein-Cartan theory.

  3. Rotochemical heating of millisecond and classical pulsars with anisotropic and density-dependent superfluid gap models

    CERN Document Server

    González-Jiménez, Nicolás; Reisenegger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    When a rotating neutron star loses angular momentum, the progressive reduction of the centrifugal force makes it contract. This perturbs each fluid element, raising the local pressure and originating deviations from beta equilibrium, inducing reactions that release heat (rotochemical heating). This effect has previously been studied by Fern\\'andez & Reisenegger (2005) for non-superfluid neutron stars and by Petrovich & Reisenegger (2010) for superfluid millisecond pulsars. Both studies found that pulsars reach a quasi-steady state in which the compression driving the matter out of beta equilibrium is balanced by the reactions trying to restore the equilibrium. We extend previous studies by considering the effect of density-dependence and anisotropy of the superfluid energy gaps, for the case in which the dominant reactions are the modified Urca processes, the protons are non-superconducting, and the neutron superfluidity is parametrized by models proposed in the literature. By comparing our prediction...

  4. New theorem of classical electromagnetism: equilibrium magnetic field and current density are zero inside ideal conductors

    CERN Document Server

    Fiolhais, Miguel C N; Providencia, C; Nordmark, Arne B

    2010-01-01

    We prove a theorem on the magnetic energy minimum in a system of perfect, or ideal, conductors. It is analogous to Thomson's theorem on the equilibrium electric field and charge distribution in a system of conductors. We first prove Thomson's theorem using a variational principle. Our new theorem is then derived by similar methods. We find that magnetic energy is minimized when the current distribution is a surface current density with zero interior magnetic field; perfect conductors are perfectly diamagnetic. The results agree with currents in superconductors being confined near the surface. The theorem implies a generalized force that expels current and magnetic field from the interior of a conductor that loses its resistivity. Examples of solutions that obey the theorem are presented.

  5. Classical density-functional theory of inhomogeneous water including explicit molecular structure and nonlinear dielectric response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischner, Johannes; Arias, T A

    2010-02-11

    We present an accurate free-energy functional for liquid water written in terms of a set of effective potential fields in which fictitious noninteracting water molecules move. The functional contains an exact expression of the entropy of noninteracting molecules and thus provides an ideal starting point for the inclusion of complex intermolecular interactions which depend on the orientation of the interacting molecules. We show how an excess free-energy functional can be constructed to reproduce the following properties of water: the dielectric response; the experimental site-site correlation functions; the surface tension; the bulk modulus of the liquid and the variation of this modulus with pressure; the density of the liquid and the vapor phase; and liquid-vapor coexistence. As a demonstration, we present results for the application of this theory to the behavior of liquid water in a parallel plate capacitor. In particular, we make predictions for the dielectric response of water in the nonlinear regime, finding excellent agreement with known data.

  6. Is Brenner's Modification to the Classical Navier-Stokes Equations Able to Describe Sound Propagation in Gases?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W. Marques Jr.

    2008-01-01

    @@ We analyse the problem concerning the propagation of sound waves in gases by using the modified hydrodynamic theory proposed recently by Brenner for single-component fluids. The modifications introduced by Brenner are based on his proposal that the translational momentum in fluid motion is not given by the mass flux. Comparison of the sound propagation results derived from Brenner's theory with available experimental data for monatomic gases shows that this modified continuum theory is unable to describe the acoustic measurements not even in the low-frequency limit, a result that from our point of view makes Brenner's proposal questionable.

  7. Dense ionic fluids confined in planar capacitors: in- and out-of-plane structure from classical density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtel, Andreas; Samin, Sela; van Roij, René

    2016-06-01

    The ongoing scientific interest in the properties and structure of electric double layers (EDLs) stems from their pivotal role in (super)capacitive energy storage, energy harvesting, and water treatment technologies. Classical density functional theory (DFT) is a promising framework for the study of the in- and out-of-plane structural properties of double layers. Supported by molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate the adequate performance of DFT for analyzing charge layering in the EDL perpendicular to the electrodes. We discuss charge storage and capacitance of the EDL and the impact of screening due to dielectric solvents. We further calculate, for the first time, the in-plane structure of the EDL within the framework of DFT. While our out-of-plane results already hint at structural in-plane transitions inside the EDL, which have been observed recently in simulations and experiments, our DFT approach performs poorly in predicting in-plane structure in comparison to simulations. However, our findings isolate fundamental issues in the theoretical description of the EDL within the primitive model and point towards limitations in the performance of DFT in describing the out-of-plane structure of the EDL at high concentrations and potentials.

  8. House design modifications reduce indoor resting malaria vector densities in rice irrigation scheme area in western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Githeko Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simple modifications of typical rural house design can be an effective and relatively inexpensive method of reducing indoor mosquito vector densities and consequently decreasing malaria transmission. Public health scientists have shown the potential for house design to protect people against malaria, yet this type of intervention remains virtually ignored. A randomized-controlled study was, therefore, undertaken to determine the effects of this method of vector control on the density of indoor resting malaria vectors in a rice irrigation scheme area in lowlands of western Kenya. Methods Ten treatment houses were modified with ceilings of papyrus mats and insecticide-treated netting (ITN and tested against ten control houses without papyrus ceilings. To determine densities of mosquitoes resting in homes, the pyrethrum spray method was used to simultaneously collect indoor resting malaria vectors in intervention and control houses. Each house was sampled a total of eight times over a period of four months, resulting in a total of 80 sampling efforts for each treatment. Community response to such intervention was investigated by discussions with residents. Results Papyrus mats ceiling modification reduced house entry by Anopheles gambiae s.l and Anopheles funestus densities by between 78–80% and 86% respectively compared to unmodified houses. Geometric mean density of Anopheles gambiae s.l. and Anopheles funestus in modified houses were significantly lower (t18 = 7.174, P 18 = 2.52, P = 0.02, respectively compared to controls. Unmodified houses were associated with relatively higher densities of malaria vectors. There was a 84% (OR 0.16, 95% CI 0.07–0.39, P Anopheles gambiae s.l. and Anopheles funestus presence in modified houses, respectively, compared with unmodified houses. Residents responded favourably to this mode of vector control. Conclusion House modifications involving insect screen ceilings made from locally

  9. Charge density modification of carboxylated cellulose nanocrystals for stable silver nanoparticles suspension preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeng, Fanny; Denneulin, Aurore [Université Grenoble Alpes, LGP2 (France); Neuman, Charles [Poly-Ink (France); Bras, Julien, E-mail: julien.bras@grenoble-inp.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, LGP2 (France)

    2015-06-15

    Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) has been found to be a great method for producing metallic particles in a sustainable way. In this work, we propose to evaluate the influence of the charge density of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO)-oxidized CNC on the morphology and the stability of synthetized silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles were obtained by sol–gel reaction using borohydride reduction, and charge density of TEMPO-oxidized CNC was tuned by an amine grafting. The grafting was performed at room temperature and neutral pH. Crystallinity and morphology were kept intact during the peptidic reaction on CNC allowing knowing the exact impact of the charge density. Charge density has been found to have a strong impact on shape, organization, and suspension stability of resulting silver particles. Results show an easy way to tune the charge density of CNC and propose a sustainable way to control the morphology and stability of silver nanoparticles in aqueous suspension.

  10. Modifications of plasma density profile and thrust by neutral injection in a helicon plasma thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Takao, Yoshinori; Ando, Akira

    2016-11-01

    Argon propellant is introduced from the upstream and downstream sides of a high power helicon plasma thruster. The plasma density profile and the imparted thrust are measured for various upstream and downstream argon flow rates, where the total gas flow rate of 70 sccm and the resultant vacuum chamber pressure of 0.2 mTorr are maintained. It is observed that the imparted thrust increases with an increase in the downstream gas flow rate; simultaneously an upstream-peaking profile of the plasma density observed for the upstream gas injection becomes uniform for the downstream gas injection. The difference in the thrust between the upstream and downstream gas injections is enhanced by increasing the rf power. The observed density profiles are qualitatively consistent with theoretical predictions taking a neutral depletion effect into account.

  11. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buzi, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Unterberg, B.; M. Reinhart,; Litnovsky, A.; Philipps, V.; Van Oost, G.; Möller, S.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER - relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER - like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux

  12. Inactivation of the central nucleus of the amygdala blocks classical conditioning but not conditioning-specific reflex modification of rabbit heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhans, Lauren B; Schreurs, Bernard G

    2013-02-01

    Heart rate (HR) conditioning in rabbits is a widely used model of classical conditioning of autonomic responding that is noted for being similar to the development of conditioned heart rate slowing (bradycardia) in humans. We have shown previously that in addition to HR changes to a tone conditioned stimulus (CS), the HR reflex itself can undergo associative change called conditioning-specific reflex modification (CRM) that manifests when tested in the absence of the CS. Because CRM resembles the conditioned bradycardic response to the CS, we sought to determine if HR conditioning and CRM share a common neural substrate. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a critical part of the pathway through which conditioned bradycardia is established. To test whether the CeA is also involved in the acquisition and/or expression of CRM, we inactivated the CeA with muscimol during HR conditioning or CRM testing. CeA inactivation blocked HR conditioning without completely preventing CRM acquisition or expression. These results suggest that the CeA may therefore only play a modulatory role in CRM. Theories on the biological significance of conditioned bradycardia suggest that it may represent a state of hypervigilance that facilitates the detection of new and changing contingencies in the environment. We relate these ideas to our results and discuss how they may be relevant to the hypersensitivity observed in fear conditioning disorders like post-traumatic stress.

  13. Improved confinement in high-density H-modes via modification of the plasma boundary with lower hybrid wavesa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, J. L.; Reinke, M. L.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B.; Theiler, C.; Wallace, G. M.; Baek, S. G.; Brunner, D.; Churchill, R. M.; Edlund, E.; Ennever, P.; Faust, I.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Irby, J.; Lin, Y.; Parker, R. R.; Rice, J. E.; Shiraiwa, S.; Walk, J. R.; Wukitch, S. J.; Xu, P.

    2015-05-01

    Injecting Lower Hybrid Range of Frequency (LHRF) waves into Alcator C-Mod's high-density H-mode plasmas has led to enhanced global energy confinement by increasing pedestal temperature and pressure gradients, decreasing the separatrix density, modifying the pedestal radial electric field and rotation, and decreasing edge turbulence. These experiments indicate that edge LHRF can be used as an actuator to increase energy confinement via modification of boundary quantities. H98-factor increases of up to ˜35% (e.g., H98 from 0.75 to 1.0) are seen when moderate amounts of LH power (PLH/Ptot ˜ 0.15) are applied to H-modes of densities n ¯ e ˜ 3 × 1020 m-3, corresponding to values ˜0.5 of the Greenwald density. However, the magnitude of the improvement is reduced if the confinement quality of the target H-mode plasma is already good (i.e., H98target ˜ 1). Ray-tracing modeling and accessibility calculations for the LH waves indicate that they do not penetrate to the core. The LHRF power appears to be deposited in plasma boundary region, with a large fraction of the injected power increment appearing promptly on the outer divertor target. There is no evidence that the LH waves are driving current in these plasmas. The LHRF-actuated improvements are well correlated with suppressed pedestal density fluctuations in the 100-300 kHz range. There is also a correlation between the improved confinement and a drop in separatrix density, a correlation that is consistent with previous H-mode results with no LHRF.

  14. Wave induced density modification in RF sheaths and close to wave launchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eester, D.; Crombé, K.; Lu, Ling-Feng

    2015-12-01

    With the return to full metal walls - a necessary step towards viable fusion machines - and due to the high power densities of current-day ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) or RF (radio frequency) antennas, there is ample renewed interest in exploring the reasons for wave-induced sputtering and formation of hot spots. Moreover, there is experimental evidence on various machines that RF waves influence the density profile close to the wave launchers so that waves indirectly influence their own coupling efficiency. The present study presents a return to first principles and describes the wave-particle interaction using a 2-time scale model involving the equation of motion, the continuity equation and the wave equation on each of the time scales. Through the changing density pattern, the fast time scale dynamics is affected by the slow time scale events. In turn, the slow time scale density and flows are modified by the presence of the RF waves through quasilinear terms. Although finite zero order flows are identified, the usual cold plasma dielectric tensor - ignoring such flows - is adopted as a first approximation to describe the wave response to the RF driver. The resulting set of equations is composed of linear and nonlinear equations and is tackled in 1D in the present paper. Whereas the former can be solved using standard numerical techniques, the latter require special handling. At the price of multiple iterations, a simple 'derivative switch-on' procedure allows to reformulate the nonlinear problem as a sequence of linear problems. Analytical expressions allow a first crude assessment - revealing that the ponderomotive potential plays a role similar to that of the electrostatic potential arising from charge separation - but numerical implementation is required to get a feeling of the full dynamics. A few tentative examples are provided to illustrate the phenomena involved.

  15. Wave induced density modification in RF sheaths and close to wave launchers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Eester, D., E-mail: d.van.eester@fz-juelich.de [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, EUROfusion Consortium Member, Brussels (Belgium); Crombé, K. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, EUROfusion Consortium Member, Brussels (Belgium); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Lu, Ling-Feng [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2015-12-10

    With the return to full metal walls - a necessary step towards viable fusion machines - and due to the high power densities of current-day ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) or RF (radio frequency) antennas, there is ample renewed interest in exploring the reasons for wave-induced sputtering and formation of hot spots. Moreover, there is experimental evidence on various machines that RF waves influence the density profile close to the wave launchers so that waves indirectly influence their own coupling efficiency. The present study presents a return to first principles and describes the wave-particle interaction using a 2-time scale model involving the equation of motion, the continuity equation and the wave equation on each of the time scales. Through the changing density pattern, the fast time scale dynamics is affected by the slow time scale events. In turn, the slow time scale density and flows are modified by the presence of the RF waves through quasilinear terms. Although finite zero order flows are identified, the usual cold plasma dielectric tensor - ignoring such flows - is adopted as a first approximation to describe the wave response to the RF driver. The resulting set of equations is composed of linear and nonlinear equations and is tackled in 1D in the present paper. Whereas the former can be solved using standard numerical techniques, the latter require special handling. At the price of multiple iterations, a simple ’derivative switch-on’ procedure allows to reformulate the nonlinear problem as a sequence of linear problems. Analytical expressions allow a first crude assessment - revealing that the ponderomotive potential plays a role similar to that of the electrostatic potential arising from charge separation - but numerical implementation is required to get a feeling of the full dynamics. A few tentative examples are provided to illustrate the phenomena involved.

  16. Effects of CZSi furnace modification on density of grown-in defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN; Bingyan(任丙彦); ZHANG; Zhicheng(张志成); LIU; Caichi(刘彩池); HAO; Qiuyan(郝秋燕); WANG; Meng(王猛)

    2002-01-01

    During large diameter Czochralski silicon growth, heat zone and argon flow influence the formation of defects in silicon crystal by changing the distribution of temperature. Different silicon crys tals with various density of grown-in defects were grown by replacing the popular heater with the com posite heater and changing the popular argon flow into a controlled flow. The experimental results have been explained well by the numeric simulation of argon flow.

  17. Grey matter density decreases as well as increases in patients with classic galactosemia : a voxel-based morphometry study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, Inge; van der Korput, Lisanne D; Jansma, Bernadette M; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2016-01-01

    Brain impairments have been observed in patients with classic galactosemia, an inherited metabolic disorder resulting in a particular neuro-cognitive profile. Neuroimaging studies showed abnormalities such as diffuse white mater (WM) abnormalities and grey matter (GM) atrophy. Our current study anal

  18. Lower hybrid counter current drive for edge current density modification in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenstermacher, M.E.; Nevins, W.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US); Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (US). Plasma Fusion Center; Harvey, R.W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (US)

    1993-07-01

    Each of the Advanced Tokamak operating modes in DIII-D is thought to have a distinctive current density profile. So far these modes have only been achieved transiently through experiments which ramp the plasma current and shape. Extension of these modes to steady state requires non-inductive current profile control, e.g. with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD). Calculations of LHCD have been done for DIII-D using the ACCOME and CQL3D codes, showing that counter driven current at the plasma edge can cancel some of the undesirable edge bootstrap current and potentially extend the VH-mode. Results are presented for scenarios using 2.45 GHz LH waves launched from both the midplane and off-axis ports. The sensitivity of the results to injected power, n{sub e} and T{sub e}, and launched wave spectrum is also shown.

  19. Lower hybrid current drive for edge current density modification in DIII-D: Final status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenstermacher, M.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Porkolab, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center

    1993-08-04

    Application of Lower Hybrid (LH) Current Drive (CD) in the DIII-D tokamak has been studied at LLNL, off and on, for several years. The latest effort began in February 1992 in response to a letter from ASDEX indicating that the 2.45 GHz, 3 MW system there was available to be used on another device. An initial assessment of the possible uses for such a system on DIII-D was made and documented in September 1992. Multiple meetings with GA personnel and members of the LH community nationwide have occurred since that time. The work continued through the submission of the 1995 Field Work Proposals in March 1993 and was then put on hold due to budget limitations. The purpose of this document is to record the status of the work in such a way that it could fairly easily be restarted at a future date. This document will take the form of a collection of Appendices giving both background and the latest results from the FY 1993 work, connected by brief descriptive text. Section 2 will describe the final workshop on LHCD in DIII-D held at GA in February 1993. This was an open meeting with attendees from GA, LLNL, MIT and PPPL. Summary documents from the meeting and subsequent papers describing the results will be included in Appendices. Section 3 will describe the status of work on the use of low frequency (2.45 GHZ) LH power and Parametric Decay Instabilities (PDI) for the special case of high dielectric in the edge regions of the DIII-D plasma. This was one of the critical issues identified at the workshop. Other potential issues for LHCD in the DIII-D scenarios are: (1) damping of the waves on fast ions from neutral beam injection, (2) runaway electrons in the low density edge plasma, (3) the validity of the WKB approximation used in the ray-tracing models in the steep edge density gradients.

  20. Fourier space approach to the classical density functional theory for multi-Yukawa and square-well fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlushak, Stepan P; McCabe, Clare; Cummings, Peter T

    2012-09-14

    We present a Fourier space density functional approach for hard particles with attractive interactions, which is based on a previously developed two-dimensional approach [S. Hlushak, W. Rżysko, and S. Sokołowski, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 094904 (2009)] for hard-sphere chains. The interactions are incorporated by means of a three-dimensional Fourier image of the direct correlation function that is obtained from the first-order mean-spherical approximation. In order to improve the computational efficiency, we make extensive use of fast Fourier transforms for calculating density convolution integrals. A two-dimensional implementation of the new density functional approach, based on the expansion of the functional around the bulk fluid density, is used to study structure and adsorption of two model fluids in narrow cylindrical pores. We also investigate two methods that improve the accuracy of the theory as compared to the conventional DFT approach, which expands the free energy functional around the bulk fluid density: One a variant of the reference fluid density functional theory used by Gillespie et al. [Phys. Rev. E 68, 031503 (2003)], and the second a weighted density approach with energy route thermodynamics. Results from these two methods are compared to the conventional approach and also to the results of Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the method of Gillespie et al. and the weighted density approach with energy route thermodynamics yield significant improvement over the conventional approach.

  1. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Final Cover Soil: Measurements and Model Modification by Dry Bulk Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Kawamoto, K.; Hamamoto, S.; Nagamori, M.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Until recently, landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest sources of anthropogenic CH4 emission, the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the greenhouse gases migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill while securing the hydraulic performance. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil, few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils have been done. However, recent soil-gas studies implied that the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size are key parameters to understand landfill gaseous performance. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport. In this study, the effects of compaction level and particle size fraction effects on ka and Dp for landfill final cover soil was investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final cover in Japan. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm, 2120 cm3) at two different compaction levels [(MP):2700 kN/m2 and (SP):600 kN/m2]. After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential of 0.98, 2.94, 9.81, 1235 kPa and with air-dried and oven-dried conditions. Results showed that measured Dp and ka values for the coarser (content. Further, compaction effort was much significant

  2. A Density Functional Study on the Hydrolysis Process of Non-classical Transplatin(Ⅱ) with Two Same Planar Heterocycle Amines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Qing-Hui; ZHOU Li-Xin

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, the hydrolysis process of non-classical transplatin(Ⅱ) with two same planar heterocycle amines has been studied using hybrid density functional theory (B3LYP) and IEF-PCM solvation models. Optimizations were performed at the B3LYP level using a combined basis set of (LanL2DZ+6-31+G(d,p)) with single-point energy evaluations using the B3LYP/6-31++G(3df,2pd) approach in vacuo and in aqueous solution. For the obtained structures of reactants, intermediates, transition states, and products, both thermodynamic (reaction energies and Gibbs energies) and kinetic (reaction barriers) characteristics were estimated. In comparison with cisplatin, decreased activation energies were obtained. The result implies that the non-classical transplatin with two same planar heterocycle amines increases the equatorial steric effect and lowers reaction barriers, which may assist in designing novel Pt-based anticancer drugs.

  3. Anomalous enhancement of the sheet carrier density beyond the classic limit on a SrTiO3 surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Kitoh, Ai; Inoue, Isao H.

    2016-05-01

    Electrostatic carrier accumulation on an insulating (100) surface of SrTiO3 by fabricating a field effect transistor with Parylene-C (6 nm)/HfO2 (20 nm) bilayer gate insulator has revealed a mystifying phenomenon: sheet carrier density is about 10 times as large as ( is the sheet capacitance of the gate insulator, VG is the gate voltage, and e is the elementary charge). The channel is so clean to exhibit small subthreshod swing of 170 mV/decade and large mobility of 11 cm2/Vs for of 1 × 1014 cm‑2 at room temperature. Since does not depend on either VG nor time duration, beyond is solely ascribed to negative charge compressibility of the carriers, which was in general considered as due to exchange interactions among electrons in the small limit. However, the observed is too large to be naively understood by the framework. Alternative ideas are proposed in this work.

  4. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum classical molecular dynamics - embedded cluster density functional theory: single-excitation configuration interaction study

    CERN Document Server

    Shkrob, I A; Larsen, R E; Schwartz, B J; Glover, William J.; Larsen, Ross E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.; Shkrob, Ilya A.

    2006-01-01

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron (e-) in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the e- were extracted from these simulations and embedded in a matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory and single-excitation configuration interaction methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid calculations is significant transfer (ca. 0.18) of the excess electron's charge density into the O 2p orbitals in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfc) tensors, and the IR and Raman spectra of the e-. The calculated hfc tensors were used to compute the EPR and ESEEM spectra for the ...

  5. Density-Functional Theory with Dispersion-Correcting Potentials for Methane: Bridging the Efficiency and Accuracy Gap between High-Level Wave Function and Classical Molecular Mechanics Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Edmanuel; DiLabio, Gino A

    2013-08-13

    Large clusters of noncovalently bonded molecules can only be efficiently modeled by classical mechanics simulations. One prominent challenge associated with this approach is obtaining force-field parameters that accurately describe noncovalent interactions. High-level correlated wave function methods, such as CCSD(T), are capable of correctly predicting noncovalent interactions, and are widely used to produce reference data. However, high-level correlated methods are generally too computationally costly to generate the critical reference data required for good force-field parameter development. In this work we present an approach to generate Lennard-Jones force-field parameters to accurately account for noncovalent interactions. We propose the use of a computational step that is intermediate to CCSD(T) and classical molecular mechanics, that can bridge the accuracy and computational efficiency gap between them, and demonstrate the efficacy of our approach with methane clusters. On the basis of CCSD(T)-level binding energy data for a small set of methane clusters, we develop methane-specific, atom-centered, dispersion-correcting potentials (DCPs) for use with the PBE0 density-functional and 6-31+G(d,p) basis sets. We then use the PBE0-DCP approach to compute a detailed map of the interaction forces associated with the removal of a single methane molecule from a cluster of eight methane molecules and use this map to optimize the Lennard-Jones parameters for methane. The quality of the binding energies obtained by the Lennard-Jones parameters we obtained is assessed on a set of methane clusters containing from 2 to 40 molecules. Our Lennard-Jones parameters, used in combination with the intramolecular parameters of the CHARMM force field, are found to closely reproduce the results of our dispersion-corrected density-functional calculations. The approach outlined can be used to develop Lennard-Jones parameters for any kind of molecular system.

  6. Phasing of lysozyme using one-wavelength anomalous scattering of sulphur atoms through the combination of direct methods and density modification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江凡; 古元新; 郑朝德; 范海福

    2003-01-01

    A new method of combining one-wavelength anomalous scattering (OAS) phasing and density modification has been described, in which the improved phases from density modification are re-introduced into OAS phasing. In this way, the phases could be improved iteratively until convergence. The OAS phasing method is based on the previously established sign-probability formula, which breaks the phase ambiguity in the OAS phasing. The implementation of this method has been awilable in CCP4 as OASIS. This method, although based on direct-methods, could also incorporate known phases and figures of merit into its sign-probability formula. In the implementation of OASIS, the known phases are from the positions of the anomalous scatters. In the current method, the known phases are from the density modification. The current method was tested on phasing a lysozyme crystal using anomalous scattering of sulphur atoms with diffraction data collected on an in-house x-ray source. The resulting map was well connected for the backbone atoms and clearly traceable, with an average map correlation coefficient of 0.6622 for the backbone atoms.

  7. Effects of fiber density and plasma modification of nanofibrous membranes on the adhesion and growth of HaCaT keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacakova, Marketa; Lopot, Frantisek; Hadraba, Daniel; Varga, Marian; Zaloudkova, Margit; Stranska, Denisa; Suchy, Tomas; Bacakova, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    It may be possible to regulate the cell colonization of biodegradable polymer nanofibrous membranes by plasma treatment and by the density of the fibers. To test this hypothesis, nanofibrous membranes of different fiber densities were treated by oxygen plasma with a range of plasma power and exposure times. Scanning electron microscopy and mechanical tests showed significant modification of nanofibers after plasma treatment. The intensity of the fiber modification increased with plasma power and exposure time. The exposure time seemed to have a stronger effect on modifying the fiber. The mechanical behavior of the membranes was influenced by the plasma treatment, the fiber density, and their dry or wet state. Plasma treatment increased the membrane stiffness; however, the membranes became more brittle. Wet membranes displayed significantly lower stiffness than dry membranes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed a slight increase in oxygen-containing groups on the membrane surface after plasma treatment. Plasma treatment enhanced the adhesion and growth of HaCaT keratinocytes on nanofibrous membranes. The cells adhered and grew preferentially on membranes of lower fiber densities, probably due to the larger area of void spaces between the fibers.

  8. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics embedded cluster density functional theory: single-excitation configuration interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Glover, William J; Larsen, Ross E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2007-06-21

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the hydrated electron were extracted from the MQC MD simulations and embedded in a roughly 18 Ax18 Ax18 A matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory (DFT) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid DFT(CIS)/MQC MD calculations is significant transfer (approximately 18%) of the excess electron's charge density into the 2p orbitals of oxygen atoms in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the singly occupied and the lower unoccupied molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfcc) tensors, and the infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of these embedded water cluster anions. The calculated hfcc tensors were used to compute electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra for the hydrated electron that compared favorably to the experimental spectra of trapped electrons in alkaline ice. The calculated vibrational spectra of the hydrated electron are consistent with the red-shifted bending and stretching frequencies observed in resonance Raman experiments. In addition to reproducing the visible/near IR absorption spectrum, the hybrid DFT model also accounts for the hydrated electron's 190-nm absorption band in the ultraviolet. Thus, our study suggests that to explain several important experimentally observed properties of the hydrated electron, many-electron effects must be accounted for: one-electron models that do not allow for mixing of the excess

  9. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics embedded cluster density functional theory : single-excitation configuration interaction study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkrob, I. A.; Glover, W. J.; Larsen, R. E.; Schwartz, B. J.; Chemistry; Univ. of California at Los Angeles

    2007-06-21

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the hydrated electron were extracted from the MQC MD simulations and embedded in a roughly 18 Angstrom x 18 Angstrom x 18 Angstrom matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory (DFT) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid DFT(CIS)/MQC MD calculations is significant transfer ({approx}18%) of the excess electron's charge density into the 2p orbitals of oxygen atoms in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the singly occupied and the lower unoccupied molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfcc) tensors, and the infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of these embedded water cluster anions. The calculated hfcc tensors were used to compute electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra for the hydrated electron that compared favorably to the experimental spectra of trapped electrons in alkaline ice. The calculated vibrational spectra of the hydrated electron are consistent with the red-shifted bending and stretching frequencies observed in resonance Raman experiments. In addition to reproducing the visible/near IR absorption spectrum, the hybrid DFT model also accounts for the hydrated electron's 190-nm absorption band in the ultraviolet. Thus, our study suggests that to explain several important experimentally observed properties of the hydrated electron, many-electron effects must be accounted for: one-electron models that do not

  10. Mean-field density functional theory of a nanoconfined classical, three-dimensional Heisenberg fluid. I. The role of molecular anchoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattes, Stefanie M; Gubbins, Keith E; Schoen, Martin

    2016-05-21

    In this work, we employ classical density functional theory (DFT) to investigate for the first time equilibrium properties of a Heisenberg fluid confined to nanoscopic slit pores of variable width. Within DFT pair correlations are treated at modified mean-field level. We consider three types of walls: hard ones, where the fluid-wall potential becomes infinite upon molecular contact but vanishes otherwise, and hard walls with superimposed short-range attraction with and without explicit orientation dependence. To model the distance dependence of the attractions, we employ a Yukawa potential. The orientation dependence is realized through anchoring of molecules at the substrates, i.e., an energetic discrimination of specific molecular orientations. If the walls are hard or attractive without specific anchoring, the results are "quasi-bulk"-like in that they can be linked to a confinement-induced reduction of the bulk mean field. In these cases, the precise nature of the walls is completely irrelevant at coexistence. Only for specific anchoring nontrivial features arise, because then the fluid-wall interaction potential affects the orientation distribution function in a nontrivial way and thus appears explicitly in the Euler-Lagrange equations to be solved for minima of the grand potential of coexisting phases.

  11. Mean-field density functional theory of a nanoconfined classical, three-dimensional Heisenberg fluid. I. The role of molecular anchoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattes, Stefanie M.; Gubbins, Keith E.; Schoen, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we employ classical density functional theory (DFT) to investigate for the first time equilibrium properties of a Heisenberg fluid confined to nanoscopic slit pores of variable width. Within DFT pair correlations are treated at modified mean-field level. We consider three types of walls: hard ones, where the fluid-wall potential becomes infinite upon molecular contact but vanishes otherwise, and hard walls with superimposed short-range attraction with and without explicit orientation dependence. To model the distance dependence of the attractions, we employ a Yukawa potential. The orientation dependence is realized through anchoring of molecules at the substrates, i.e., an energetic discrimination of specific molecular orientations. If the walls are hard or attractive without specific anchoring, the results are "quasi-bulk"-like in that they can be linked to a confinement-induced reduction of the bulk mean field. In these cases, the precise nature of the walls is completely irrelevant at coexistence. Only for specific anchoring nontrivial features arise, because then the fluid-wall interaction potential affects the orientation distribution function in a nontrivial way and thus appears explicitly in the Euler-Lagrange equations to be solved for minima of the grand potential of coexisting phases.

  12. Extended symmetrical classical electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, A V; Kalashnikov, E G

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss a modification of classical electrodynamics in which "ordinary" point charges are absent. The modified equations contain additional terms describing the induced charges and currents. The densities of the induced charges and currents depend on the vector k and the vectors of the electromagnetic field, E and B . It is shown that the vectors E and B can be defined in terms of two four-potentials and the components of k are the components of a four-tensor of the third rank. The Lagrangian of the modified electrodynamics is defined. The conditions are derived at which only one four-potential determines the behavior of the electromagnetic field. It is also shown that static modified electrodynamics can describe the electromagnetic field in the inner region of an electric monopole. In the outer region of the electric monopole the electric field is governed by the Maxwell equations. It follows from boundary conditions at the interface between the inner and outer regions of the monopole that the vector k has a discrete spectrum. The electric and magnetic fields, energy, and angular momentum of the monopole are found for different eigenvalues of k .

  13. Classical antiparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costella, J.P.; McKellar, B.H.J.; Rawlinson, A.A.

    1997-03-01

    We review how antiparticles may be introduced in classical relativistic mechanics, and emphasize that many of their paradoxical properties can be more transparently understood in the classical than in the quantum domain. (authors). 13 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Classical antiparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Costella, J P; Rawlinson, A A; Costella, John P.; Kellar, Bruce H. J. Mc; Rawlinson, Andrew A.

    1997-01-01

    We review how antiparticles may be introduced in classical relativistic mechanics, and emphasize that many of their paradoxical properties can be more transparently understood in the classical than in the quantum domain.

  15. The Biharmonic Oscillator and Asymmetric Linear Potentials: From Classical Trajectories to Momentum-Space Probability Densities in the Extreme Quantum Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckle, L. J.; Belloni, M.; Robinett, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    The biharmonic oscillator and the asymmetric linear well are two confining power-law-type potentials for which complete bound-state solutions are possible in both classical and quantum mechanics. We examine these problems in detail, beginning with studies of their trajectories in position and momentum space, evaluation of the classical probability…

  16. Towards an automated tool to evaluate the impact of the nuclear modification of the gluon density on quarkonium, D and B meson production in proton-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansberg, Jean-Philippe; Shao, Hua-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    We propose a simple and model-independent procedure to account for the impact of the nuclear modification of the gluon density as encoded in nuclear collinear PDF sets on two-to-two partonic hard processes in proton-nucleus collisions. This applies to a good approximation to quarkonium, D and B meson production, generically referred to H. Our procedure consists in parametrising the square of the parton scattering amplitude, A_{gg → HX} and constraining it from the proton-proton data. Doing so, we have been able to compute the corresponding nuclear modification factors for J/ψ , Υ and D^0 as a function of y and P_T at √{s_NN}=5 and 8 TeV in the kinematics of the various LHC experiments in a model independent way. It is of course justified since the most important ingredient in such evaluations is the probability of each kinematical configuration. Our computations for D mesons can also be extended to B meson production. To further illustrate the potentiality of the tool, we provide - for the first time - predictions for the nuclear modification factor for η _c production in pPb collisions at the LHC.

  17. Sequential tentacle grafting and charge modification for enhancing charge density of mono-sized beads for facilitated protein refolding and purification from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Ran; Yang, Chun-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2014-06-20

    We have previously found that addition of like-charged media in a refolding solution can greatly enhance the refolding of pure proteins by suppressing protein aggregation. Herein, negatively charged mono-sized microspheres with sulfonic groups were fabricated to explore the facilitating effect of like-charged media on the refolding of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs). A sequential polymer-tentacle grafting and sulfonate modification strategy was developed to increase the charge density of mono-sized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (pGMA) beads (2.4μm). Namely, GMA was first grafted onto the beads by grafting polymerization to form poly(GMA) tentacles on the pGMA beads, and then the epoxy groups on the tentacles were converted into sulfonic groups by modification with sodium sulfite. By this fabrication strategy, the charge density of the beads reached 793μmol/g, about 2.8 times higher than that modified without prior grafting of the pGMA beads (285μmol/g). The negatively charged beads of different charge densities were used for facilitating the refolding of like-charged EGFP from IBs. The refolding yield as well as refolding rate increased with increasing charge density. The anti-aggregation effects of urea and like-charged microspheres were synergetic. In addition, partial purification of EGFP was achieved because the ion-exchange adsorption led to 52% removal of positively charged contaminant proteins in the refolded solution. Finally, reusability of the tentacle beads was demonstrated by repetitive EGFP refolding and recovery cycles.

  18. Acoustic study of a linear low-density polyethylene film after modification of the crystalline structure by heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Sakamoto, Yuhei

    2014-02-01

    We report on a hybrid microscopy technique that enables us to measure the acoustic properties of a thin polymer film together with an optical microscope image of the corresponding area. Linear low-density polyethylene films are heated to various temperatures and examined by the technique. Density of the film is increased by heating and its sound velocity is decreased compared with a film without heating. Also, spherulites can clearly be seen in the optical microscope image, supporting the thermal shrinkage of the film which can be detected by the present technique.

  19. Dietary modifications of low-density lipoprotein fatty acids in humans: their effect on low-density lipoprotein-fibroblast interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudet, M F; Esteva, O; Lasserre, M; Jacotot, B

    1986-01-01

    The chemical composition and metabolism of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) in a population of Benedictine nuns were studied after 5-month periods during which the predominant dietary fats were sunflower oil, fluid of palm, peanut oil, milk fats, low erucic acid rapeseed (LEAR) oil, corn oil, olive oil, soybean oil. The population was divided into three groups. The control group (C) included 12 subjects selected at random by taking 2 subjects per age pool among those with plasma cholesterol less than 230 mg/dl. Groups H1 and H2 were selected in the same way among those with plasma cholesterol less than 230 mg/dl. Groups H1 and H2 comprised 6 subjects and differed from each other in the amount of plasma cholesteryl esters, i.e., below and above the mean value of group C. Changes in LDL composition, according to the dietary fat, were associated with changes in LDL catabolism studied in fibroblast cultures, but no significant differences were found between the three groups.

  20. Classics Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayman, Dee L.

    1995-01-01

    Appraises several databases devoted to classical literature. Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG) contains the entire extant corpus of ancient Greek literature, including works on lexicography and historiography, extending into the 15th century. Other works awaiting completion are the Database of Classical Bibliography and a CD-ROM pictorial dictionary…

  1. Classical integrability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the sections consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schrödinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel’fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  2. Modification of free-energy density functional theory approach for prediction of high-pressure mixture adsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ShuYan; YANG XiaoNing; YANG Zhen

    2008-01-01

    A modified non-local free energy density functional theory (NDFT) model, with the consideration of the nonadditivity term of solid-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions and finite pore wall thickness (≈2 layers), was developed to model the confined fluid mixtures in slit pore. This improved NDFT approach, com-bining with the pore size distribution (PSD) analysis of adsorbent material can be applied to predicting the adsorption equilibria of high-pressure gas mixtures on activated carbon. Compared with the con-ventional NDFT method, this new approach partly improves the correlation performance of adsorption equilibrium for pure species and increases the reliability of the PSD analysis. For the mixtures, CH4/N2 and CO2/N2, a relatively improved performance has been observed for the adsorption equilibrium pre-diction of the mixtures under high-pressure conditions, especially for the weakly adsorbed species.

  3. Ordinary mode reflectometry. Modification of the scattering and cut-off responses due to the shape of localized density fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanack, C.; Boucher, I.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 54 - Nancy (France). Lab. de Physique du Solide; Clairet, F.; Zou, X.L. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    1996-01-01

    Ordinary wave reflectometry in a plasma containing a localized density perturbation is studied with a 1-D model. The phase response is studied as a function of the wavenumber and position of the perturbation. It is shown that it strongly depends upon the perturbation shape and size. For a small perturbation wavenumber, the response is due to the oscillation of the cut-off layer. For larger wavenumbers, two regimes are found: for a broad perturbation, the phase response is an image of the perturbation itself; for a narrow perturbation, it is rather an image of the Fourier transform. For tokamak plasmas it turns out that, for the fluctuation spectra usually observed, the phase response comes primarily from those fluctuations that are localized at the cut-off. Results of a 2-D numerical model show that geometry effects are negligible for the scattering by radial fluctuations. (author). 18 refs.

  4. Electron Density Modification of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT by Liquid-Phase Molecular Adsorption of Hexaiodobenzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Kanoh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Electron density of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT is effectively modified by hexaiodobenzene (HIB molecules using liquid-phase adsorption. UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectra of the HIB-adsorbed SWCNT, especially in the NIR region, showed a disappearance of S11 transitions between the V1 valance band and the C1 conduction band of van Hove singularities which can be attributed to the effective charge transfer between HIB and the SWCNT. The adsorption of HIB also caused significant peak-shifts (lower frequency shift around 170 cm−1 and higher shift around 186 cm‑1 and an intensity change (around 100–150 cm−1 and 270–290 cm−1 in the radial breathing mode of Raman spectra. The charge transfer from SWCNT to HIB was further confirmed by the change in the C1s peak of X-ray photoelectron spectrum, revealing the oxidation of carbon in SWCNT upon HIB adsorption.

  5. Towards an automated tool to evaluate the impact of the nuclear modification of the gluon density on quarkonium, D and B meson production in proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lansberg, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple and model-independent procedure to account for the impact of the nuclear modification of the gluon density as encoded in nuclear collinear PDF sets on two-to-two partonic hard processes in proton-nucleus collisions. This applies to a good approximation to quarkonium, D and B meson production, generically referred to H. Our procedure consists in parametrising the square of the parton scattering amplitude, A_{gg -> H X} and constraining it from the proton-proton data. Doing so, we have been able to compute the corresponding nuclear modification factors for J/psi, Upsilon and D^0 as a function of y and P_T at sqrt(s_NN)=5 and 8 TeV in the kinematics of the various LHC experiments in a model independent way. It is of course justified since the most important ingredient in such evaluations is the probability of each kinematical configuration. Our computations for D mesons can also be extended to B meson production. To further illustrate the potentiality of the tool, we provide --for the first t...

  6. Towards an automated tool to evaluate the impact of the nuclear modification of the gluon density on quarkonium, D and B meson production in proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lansberg, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    We propose a simple and model-independent procedure to account for the impact of the nuclear modification of the gluon density as encoded in nuclear collinear PDF sets on two-to-two partonic hard processes in proton-nucleus collisions. This applies to a good approximation to quarkonium, D and B meson production, generically referred to H. Our procedure consists in parametrising the square of the parton scattering amplitude, A_{gg -> H X} and constraining it from the proton-proton data. Doing so, we have been able to compute the corresponding nuclear modification factors for J/psi, Upsilon and D^0 as a function of y and P_T at sqrt(s_NN)=5 and 8 TeV in the kinematics of the various LHC experiments in a model independent way. It is of course justified since the most important ingredient in such evaluations is the probability of each kinematical configuration. Our computations for D mesons can also be extended to B meson production. To further illustrate the potentiality of the tool, we provide --for the first t...

  7. Early changes of parotid density and volume predict modifications at the end of therapy and intensity of acute xerostomia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, Maria Luisa; Broggi, Sara [Ospedale San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Medical Physics, Milano (Italy); Scalco, Elisa; Rizzo, Giovanna [CNR, Istituto di Bioimmagini e Fisiologia Molecolare, Milano (Italy); Sanguineti, Giuseppe [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rome (Italy); Fiorino, Claudio; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro [Ospedale San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Medical Physics, Milano (Italy); CNR, Istituto di Bioimmagini e Fisiologia Molecolare, Milano (Italy); Dinapoli, Nicola; Valentini, Vincenzo [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Radiotherapy, Rome (Italy); Ricchetti, Francesco [Ospedale Sacro Cuore, Radiotherapy, Negrar (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    To quantitatively assess the predictive power of early variations of parotid gland volume and density on final changes at the end of therapy and, possibly, on acute xerostomia during IMRT for head-neck cancer. Data of 92 parotids (46 patients) were available. Kinetics of the changes during treatment were described by the daily rate of density (rΔρ) and volume (rΔvol) variation based on weekly diagnostic kVCT images. Correlation between early and final changes was investigated as well as the correlation with prospective toxicity data (CTCAEv3.0) collected weekly during treatment for 24/46 patients. A higher rΔρ was observed during the first compared to last week of treatment (-0,50 vs -0,05HU, p-value = 0.0001). Based on early variations, a good estimation of the final changes may be obtained (Δρ: AUC = 0.82, p = 0.0001; Δvol: AUC = 0.77, p = 0.0001). Both early rΔρ and rΔvol predict a higher ''mean'' acute xerostomia score (≥ median value, 1.57; p-value = 0.01). Median early density rate changes for patients with mean xerostomia score ≥ / < 1.57 were -0.98 vs -0.22 HU/day respectively (p = 0.05). Early density and volume variations accurately predict final changes of parotid glands. A higher longitudinally assessed score of acute xerostomia is well predicted by higher rΔρ and rΔvol in the first two weeks of treatment: best cut-off values were -0.50 HU/day and -380 mm{sup 3}/day for rΔρ and rΔvol respectively. Further studies are necessary to definitively assess the potential of early density/volume changes in identifying more sensitive patients at higher risk of experiencing xerostomia. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie ist die Untersuchung der praediktiven Aussagekraft von fruehen Veraenderungen in Volumen und Dichte der Ohrspeicheldruese in Bezug auf die finale Verformung zum Ende der Therapie sowie das Risiko von Xerostomie waehrend der intesitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (IMRT) bei Kopf und Hals Tumoren. Die Studie

  8. Modification of a new potential model used for calculation of the second virial coefficient and zero density transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsafar, G. A.; Shokouhi, M.

    properties of the fluids at the zero density limit, including viscosity, thermal conductivity, and self-diffusion coefficients, are calculated using the same values of the potential parameters. Maximum percentage deviation of transport properties at the zero density limit is about 3% for viscosity (except for Ar, with 5%), about 2.5% for thermal conductivity (except for N2 and Ar, at 8 and 5%, respectively), and about 8% for the self-diffusion coefficient. In comparison with experimental data, the modified potential model gives more accurate results than those obtained from the hard-core and modified hard-core potential models, especially at high temperatures.

  9. Localized Scrape-Off Layer density modifications by Ion Cyclotron near fields in JET and ASDEX-Upgrade L-mode plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colas, L., E-mail: laurent.colas@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Jacquet, Ph. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Van Eester, D. [LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Bobkov, V. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Brix, M.; Meneses, L. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Marsen, S. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Silva, C. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal); Carralero, D.; Kočan, M.; Müller, H.-W. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Crombé, K.; Křivska, A. [LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Goniche, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lerche, E. [LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Rimini, F.G. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    Combining Lithium beam emission spectroscopy and edge reflectometry, localized Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) density modifications by Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) near fields were characterized in JET L-mode plasmas. When using the ICRF wave launchers connected magnetically to the Li-beam chord, the density decreased more steeply 2–3 cm outside the last closed flux surface (mapped onto the outer mid-plane) and its value at the outer limiter radial position was half the ohmic value. The depletion depends on the ICRF power and on the phasing between adjacent radiating straps. Convection due to ponderomotive effects and/or E × B{sub 0} drifts is suspected: during ICRF-heated H-mode discharges in 2013, DC potentials up to 70 V were measured locally in the outer SOL by a floating reciprocating probe, located toroidally several metres from the active antennas. These observations are compared with probe measurements on ASDEX-Upgrade. Their implications for wave coupling, heat loads and impurity production are discussed.

  10. Improved confinement in ELM-suppressed high-density H-modes at the ITER field via modification of the plasma boundary with Lower Hybrid RF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, J. L.

    2014-10-01

    Injecting Lower Hybrid (LH) power into Alcator C-Mod's high-density H-mode plasmas has enhanced global confinement by increasing pedestal temperature gradients, modifying edge rotation, and decreasing edge and SOL turbulence. These new experiments indicate that edge LHRF can be used as a tool to increase confinement via direct modification of boundary quantities. Ray-tracing modeling and accessibility calculations for the LH waves indicate that the LH waves do not penetrate to regions inside the top of the pedestal and are not driving current in these plasmas; instead the LH power modifies the boundary conditions. When moderate amounts of LH power (PLH/Ptot = 20%) are applied to high-density EDA H-modes (neo = 3.5×1020 m-3) , we observe the following effects: edge/SOL fluctuation power decreases by roughly an order of magnitude; pedestal temperature gradients are increased; global energy confinement time and H-factor increase by 30-40% (H98 from 0.7 to 1.0); co-current core and pedestal rotation velocities increase; power to the (outer) divertor target increases promptly with an increment that is roughly 1/2 of the injected LH power, qualitatively consistent with the inaccessibility of the LH waves; and the central frequency of the edge-localized Quasi-Coherent Mode down-shifts and becomes much more coherent. These H-mode confinement improvements brought about by the edge LHRF are the result of changes in the pedestal (e.g. changes in rotation/shear and increased pedestal temperature gradients), with no substantial change in peaking of core density or temperature profiles. There is not perfect correlation with edge turbulence suppression, indicating that the turbulence decrease may be a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for the pedestal and confinement improvements. Supported by US DoE Awards DE-FC02-99ER54512 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  11. Classical Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Gallavotti, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    This is the English version of a friendly graduate course on Classical Mechanics, containing about 80% of the material I covered during the January-June 1999 semester at IFUG in the Mexican city of Leon. For the Spanish version, see physics/9906066

  12. Non-equilibrium statistical field theory for classical particles: Linear and mildly non-linear evolution of cosmological density power spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Bartelmann, Matthias; Berg, Daniel; Kozlikin, Elena; Lilow, Robert; Viermann, Celia

    2014-01-01

    We use the non-equlibrium statistical field theory for classical particles, recently developed by Mazenko and Das and Mazenko, together with the free generating functional we have previously derived for point sets initially correlated in phase space, to calculate the time evolution of power spectra in the free theory, i.e. neglecting particle interactions. We provide expressions taking linear and quadratic momentum correlations into account. Up to this point, the expressions are general with respect to the free propagator of the microscopic degrees of freedom. We then specialise the propagator to that expected for particles in cosmology treated within the Zel'dovich approximation and show that, to linear order in the momentum correlations, the linear growth of the cosmological power spectrum is reproduced. Quadratic momentum correlations return a first contribution to the non-linear evolution of the power spectrum, for which we derive a simple closed expression valid for arbitrary wave numbers. This expressio...

  13. Communication: Wigner functions in action-angle variables, Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization, the Heisenberg correspondence principle, and a symmetrical quasi-classical approach to the full electronic density matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William H; Cotton, Stephen J

    2016-08-28

    It is pointed out that the classical phase space distribution in action-angle (a-a) variables obtained from a Wigner function depends on how the calculation is carried out: if one computes the standard Wigner function in Cartesian variables (p, x), and then replaces p and x by their expressions in terms of a-a variables, one obtains a different result than if the Wigner function is computed directly in terms of the a-a variables. Furthermore, the latter procedure gives a result more consistent with classical and semiclassical theory-e.g., by incorporating the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition (quantum states defined by integer values of the action variable) as well as the Heisenberg correspondence principle for matrix elements of an operator between such states-and has also been shown to be more accurate when applied to electronically non-adiabatic applications as implemented within the recently developed symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) Meyer-Miller (MM) approach. Moreover, use of the Wigner function (obtained directly) in a-a variables shows how our standard SQC/MM approach can be used to obtain off-diagonal elements of the electronic density matrix by processing in a different way the same set of trajectories already used (in the SQC/MM methodology) to obtain the diagonal elements.

  14. Communication: Wigner functions in action-angle variables, Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization, the Heisenberg correspondence principle, and a symmetrical quasi-classical approach to the full electronic density matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William H.; Cotton, Stephen J.

    2016-08-01

    It is pointed out that the classical phase space distribution in action-angle (a-a) variables obtained from a Wigner function depends on how the calculation is carried out: if one computes the standard Wigner function in Cartesian variables (p, x), and then replaces p and x by their expressions in terms of a-a variables, one obtains a different result than if the Wigner function is computed directly in terms of the a-a variables. Furthermore, the latter procedure gives a result more consistent with classical and semiclassical theory—e.g., by incorporating the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition (quantum states defined by integer values of the action variable) as well as the Heisenberg correspondence principle for matrix elements of an operator between such states—and has also been shown to be more accurate when applied to electronically non-adiabatic applications as implemented within the recently developed symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) Meyer-Miller (MM) approach. Moreover, use of the Wigner function (obtained directly) in a-a variables shows how our standard SQC/MM approach can be used to obtain off-diagonal elements of the electronic density matrix by processing in a different way the same set of trajectories already used (in the SQC/MM methodology) to obtain the diagonal elements.

  15. On the Casimir effect. Energy density of the free Klein-Gordon-field in front of static classical backgrounds; Zum Casimir-Effekt. Energiedichte des freien Klein-Gordon-Feldes vor statischen klassischen Hintergruenden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D.J.

    2008-01-15

    We study the Casimir energy density of the Klein-Gordon-field in the case of two static geometries. We model the effect by coupling the free quantum field to a static classical scalar field. We work out the dependence on the coupling {lambda}, including the limit {lambda}={infinity} (Dirichlet boundary condition). The chosen geometries are described by a {delta}-funktion ({sigma}(x)={delta}(x{sub 3})) and a step function of finite height ({sigma}(x)= (1)/(2{epsilon})1{sub [{epsilon},{epsilon}]}(x{sub 3})), respectively. In the area outside the support of the background the density energy converges; calculations for the distorted area lead to divergent surface terms. (orig.)

  16. [Classical taxomomies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liubarskiĭ, G Iu

    2006-01-01

    The sequence of classic paradigms in taxonomy that partly replaced each other and partly co-exist is given as follows: the theory of "organ and organism similarity", the naturalistic theory, the descriptive theory, and the phylogenetic theory. The naturalistic classics accepted the notion of "the plan of creation". The rejection of appealing to this plan brought forth certain problems in the formulation of the purpose of taxonomy; these problems were differently solved by the descriptive and the phylogenetic classic traditions. The difficulties of the current paradigms arising from the loss of a "strong purpose", a problem to be solved by taxonomists that is to be clear and interesting to a wide range of non-professionals. The paradox of formalization led to the losing of content of the methods due to their formalization. To attract attention to taxonomy, a new "image of the results" of its work that would be interesting to the non-professionals is necessary. The co-existence of different methods of reseach applied to different groups of facts leads to the loss of integrity of the research. It is not only that the taxon becomes a hypothesis and such hypotheses multiply. The comparison of these hypotheses is problematic, because each of them is supported by its own independent scope of facts. Because of the existence of a fundamental meronotaxonomic discrepancy, taxonomic systems based on different groups of characters appear to be incomparable, being rather systems of characters than systems of taxa. Systems of characters are not directly comparable with each other; they can be compared only through appealing to taxa, but taxa themselves exist only in the form of a number of hypotheses. Consequently, each separate taxonomic approach creates its own nature, its own subject of research. Therefore, it is necessary to describe the subject of research correctly (and indicate the purpose of research), as well as to distinguish clearly between results achieved through

  17. The Effect of Modification Methods on the Performance Characteristics of Composites Based on a Linear Low-Density Polyethylene and Natural Hemp Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajaks, J.; Zelca, Z.; Kukle, S.

    2015-11-01

    Influence of the content of hemp fibers (harvested in 2012) and their modification methods (treatment with boiling water, sodium hydroxide, and acetic anhydride) and addition of an interfacial modifier, maleated polyethylene (MAPE), on the performance characteristics (tensile strength, modulus, elongation at break, microhardness, and water resistance) of composites based on a linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) was investigated. The results obtained are compared with data found earlier for the same type of hemp fibers, but harvested in 2011. It is shown that optimum content of untreated hemp fibers in the LLDPE matrix is 30 wt.% and optimum length of the fibers is less than 1 mm. An increase in the content of hemp fibers (to 30 wt.%) raised the tensile strength and modulus of the composites, but reduced their elasticity and deformation ability. Simultaneously, the microhardness of the composite materials grew. Pretreating the fibers with sodium hydroxide improved the mechanical properties of the composites only slightly, but treating with acetic anhydride allowed us to elevate the content of the fibers up to 40 and 50 wt.%. The best results were achieved by addition of 50 wt.% MAPE, when the tensile modulus increased by about 47% and the tensile strength by 27% as compared with those of composites with fibers pretreated by other methods. To estimate the processing possibilities of the composites, the melt flow index (MFI) was determined. It is established that the pretreatment of the fibers significantly affects the numerical values of MFI. For example, upon treatment with acetic anhydride, a sufficiently high fluidity of the composites was retained even at a 50 wt.% content of fibers. The lowest fluidity was observed for composites with alkali-pretreated hemp fibers. The surface microhardness decreased upon their chemical pretreatment. The highest microhardness showed composites with 30 wt.% untreated fibers. The chemical pretreatment considerably raised the

  18. Part i: the Quadratic Pade Method for Calculating Local Densities of States. Part II: Classical Stochasticity and Ionisation in a Square Potential Well Driven by AN Oscillating Laser Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Ilan Lippa

    Part I. A new method of calculating local densities of states from the moments of the Hamiltonian is developed and studied. A finite number of moments of the Hamiltonian at a given lattice site are first calculated. The quadratic Pade approximant, which is a special case of the Hermite -Pade approximant, is then used to obtain an approxi- mation for the local Green function. The local density of states is then obtained from there. The new method was tested on several cases, which included regular lattices, a regular binary alloy, the semi-infinite simple cubic lattice, and a realistic model for the valence band of silicon. The results have been compared with those obtained from other methods. The new method produces fairly accurate results in most parts of the energy band(s) if the number of singularity points is small. The accuracy obtained is comparable to or better than that of other methods of similar generality and complexity. Part II. A square potential well can be experimentally fabricated, and used in quantum well lasers. By irradiating it with a driving laser beam the quantum well laser can be made tunable. When the number of quantum emergy levels is fairly large, the behaviour of the electrons in the well can be studied by means of classical dynamics. The presence of the oscillating laser field causes the motion of the electrons to become stochastic, and thus they can escape from the well into the conduction band. Stochasticity and ionisation have been studied by looking at the solutions to the classical equations of motion. Their dependence on the frequency and intensity of the driving laser has been studied for square wells of different dimensions. The classical ionisation rate has been found to bear the charac- teristics of a multiphoton ionisation process. This unusual behaviour has been explained as the effect of the higher harmonics of the oscillating square potential well, as seen by the electron. Finally, an experimental study of this physical

  19. Classical and quantum wormholes with tachyon field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高长军; 沈有根

    2003-01-01

    The wormhole equations are presented in the presence of tachyon field. Specializing at some values of ω (the ratio of pressure to energy density), we find a family of classical and quantum wormhole solutions.

  20. Radiographic Bone Density around Dental Implants with Surface Modification by Laser Ablation followed by Hydroxyapatite Coating: A Study in Rabbit Tibiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazelato, Tiago; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Morais, J

    Surface chemistry seems to affect peri-implant bone healing, increasing bone-to-implant contact and biological andmechanical properties. The present study aim to assess the radiographic bone density around implants with different surface treatment, comparing a surface treated by laser ablation...... followed by hydroxyapatite coating with a surface that was oxide-blasted followed by acid etching. On this study twenty-four rabbits received two implants in each tibia, an oxide-blasted + acid-etched (ATS) and a hydroxyapatite-coated (HAP) implant. Radiographs of the implants were recorded after 4, 8......, and 12 weeks of healing (8 animals in each healing period), and bone density was assessed in regions of interest (ROI) in cortical and cancellous bone adjacent to the implant using the shade of grey in the bone ROIs compared to a reference ROI in each image (a ratio was calculated: bone ROI/reference ROI...

  1. What classicality? Decoherence and Bohr's classical concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Schlosshauer, Maximilian

    2010-01-01

    Niels Bohr famously insisted on the indispensability of what he termed "classical concepts." In the context of the decoherence program, on the other hand, it has become fashionable to talk about the "dynamical emergence of classicality" from the quantum formalism alone. Does this mean that decoherence challenges Bohr's dictum and signifies a break with the Copenhagen interpretation-for example, that classical concepts do not need to be assumed but can be derived? In this paper we'll try to shine some light down the murky waters where formalism and philosophy cohabitate. To begin, we'll clarify the notion of classicality in the decoherence description. We'll then discuss Bohr's and Heisenberg's take on the quantum-classical problem and reflect on different meanings of the terms "classicality" and "classical concepts" in the writings of Bohr and his followers. This analysis will allow us to put forward some tentative suggestions for how we may better understand the relation between decoherence-induced classical...

  2. [Modification of bone quality by extreme physical stress. Bone density measurements in high-performance athletes using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, D; Reiter, A; Pfeil, J; Güssbacher, A; Niethard, F U

    1996-01-01

    The treatment of osteoporosis is still controversial. Rehabilitation programs which stress strengthening exercises as well as impact loading activities increase the bone mass. On the other side activity level early in life has not been proven to correlate with increased bone mineral content later in life. Little is known on the influence of high performance sports on the bone density especially in athletes with high demands on weight bearing of the spine. In (n = 40) internationally top ranked high performance athletes of different disciplines (n = 28 weight-lifters, n = 6 sports-boxers and n = 6 bicycle-racers) bone density measurements of the lumbar spine and the left hip were performed. The measurements were carried out by dual-photonabsorptiometry (DEXA; QDR 2000, Siemens) and evaluated by an interactive software-programme (Hologic Inc.). The results were compared to the measurements of 21 age-matched male control individuals. In the high performance weight lifters there was an increase of bone density compared to the control individuals of 23% in the Ward's triangle (p boxers had an increase up to 17% (lumbar spine), 9% (hip) and 7% (Wards' triangle). In the third athletes group (Tour de France-bikers) BMD was decreased 10% in the lumbar spine, 14% in the hip and 17% in the Wards' triangle. Our results show that training programs stressing axial loads of the skeletal system may lead to an increase of BMD in the spine and the hip of young individuals. Other authors findings, that the BMD of endurance athletes may decrease, is confirmed. Nevertheless the bikers BMD-loss of 10 to 17% was surprisingly high.

  3. Study of high energy (MeV) N{sup 6+} ion and gamma radiation induced modifications in low density polyethylene (LDPE) polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhillon, Ramandeep Kaur [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Singh, Paramjit [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi 110078 (India); Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi 110078 (India); Department of Physics, Aggarwal College, Ballabgarh 121004 Faridabad (India); Singh, Surinder [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Kumar, Rajesh, E-mail: rajeshkumaripu@gmail.com [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi 110078 (India)

    2013-04-15

    The optical and structural response of low density polyethylene (LDPE) under the influence of 80 MeV N{sup 6+} ion at various fluences (5 × 10{sup 11} to 1 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}) and gamma rays at doses 100 and 1000 kGy were studied using UV–Vis spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The optical absorption spectra of N{sup 6+} ion irradiated LDPE showed a shift in the absorption edge towards higher wavelength side, which indicated a significant decrease in the direct and indirect band gaps of the films. The optical data showed decrease in the calculated band gap with increasing gamma dose. The diffraction pattern of pristine sample showed the semi crystalline nature of the polymer. The decrease in peak intensity and hence increase in amorphous nature was observed in N{sup 6+} ion irradiated samples. The opposite behavior is seen in case of gamma ray exposed samples at 100 kGy dose. The crystallite size (L) decreased but the other factors like interchain separation (R), interplanar distance (d), micro strain (ε), dislocation density (δ) and distortion parameters (g) increased for N{sup 6+} ion irradiated samples.

  4. Increased upconversion quantum yield in photonic structures due to local field enhancement and modification of the local density of states--a simulation-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Barbara; Wolf, Sebastian; Fischer, Stefan; Gutmann, Johannes; Bläsi, Benedikt; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph

    2013-09-09

    In upconversion processes, two or more low-energy photons are converted into one higher-energy photon. Besides other applications, upconversion has the potential to decrease sub-band-gap losses in silicon solar cells. Unfortunately, upconverting materials known today show quantum yields, which are too low for this application. In order to improve the upconversion quantum yield, two parameters can be tuned using photonic structures: first, the irradiance can be increased within the structure. This is beneficial, as upconversion is a non-linear process. Second, the rates of the radiative transitions between ionic states within the upconverter material can be altered due to a varied local density of photonic states. In this paper, we present a theoretical model of the impact of a photonic structure on upconversion and test this model in a simulation based analysis of the upconverter material β -NaYF(4):20% Er(3+) within a dielectric waveguide structure. The simulation combines a finite-difference time-domain simulation model that describes the variations of the irradiance and the change of the local density of photonic states within a photonic structure, with a rate equation model of the upconversion processes. We find that averaged over the investigated structure the upconversion luminescence is increased by a factor of 3.3, and the upconversion quantum yield can be improved in average by a factor of 1.8 compared to the case without the structure for an initial irradiance of 200 Wm(-2).

  5. Classical mechanics without determinism

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolic, H.

    2005-01-01

    Classical statistical particle mechanics in the configuration space can be represented by a nonlinear Schrodinger equation. Even without assuming the existence of deterministic particle trajectories, the resulting quantum-like statistical interpretation is sufficient to predict all measurable results of classical mechanics. In the classical case, the wave function that satisfies a linear equation is positive, which is the main source of the fundamental difference between classical and quantum...

  6. Quantum computing classical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, David A

    2002-03-15

    In the past decade, quantum algorithms have been found which outperform the best classical solutions known for certain classical problems as well as the best classical methods known for simulation of certain quantum systems. This suggests that they may also speed up the simulation of some classical systems. I describe one class of discrete quantum algorithms which do so--quantum lattice-gas automata--and show how to implement them efficiently on standard quantum computers.

  7. Ubiquitin modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Swatek, Kirby N.; Komander, David

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is a dynamic multifaceted post-translational modification involved in nearly all aspects of eukaryotic biology. Once attached to a substrate, the 76-amino acid protein ubiquitin is subjected to further modifications, creating a multitude of distinct signals with distinct cellular outcomes, referred to as the 'ubiquitin code'. Ubiquitin can be ubiquitinated on seven lysine (Lys) residues or on the N-terminus, leading to polyubiquitin chains that can encompass complex top...

  8. Modification of Ultra-Low Density Fiberboards by an Inorganic Film Formed by Si-Al Deposition and their Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingjie Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To improve mechanical properties of ultra-low density fiberboards (ULDFs, Si-Al compounds were mixed together with fibers during preparation of ULDFs, forming a thin film on the surface of the fibers via hydrogen bonding. This work mainly optimized two proposed methods in which the inorganic thin film was assembled on the surface of fibers, in terms of its effect on the mechanical properties of fibers. Microstructural characterization (such as micromorphology and elemental distribution, chemical bonding, and crystalline phase of Si-Al compounds and ULDFs was done to evaluate the effects. The results revealed that an inorganic thin film (probably Al2O3-SiO2 covered the surface of the fibers. Compared with the control specimen, the modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture, and internal bond strength of the specimen treated by the sol-gel process increased from 3.87 MPa to 13.19 MPa, 0.05 MPa to 0.16 MPa, and 0.010 MPa to 0.025 MPa, respectively. Based on its higher mechanical properties, a combined sol-gel method was judged to be better for enhancement of fibers than a separate deposition method.

  9. Entanglement in Classical Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Ghose, Partha

    2013-01-01

    The emerging field of entanglement or nonseparability in classical optics is reviewed, and its similarities with and differences from quantum entanglement clearly pointed out through a recapitulation of Hilbert spaces in general, the special restrictions on Hilbert spaces imposed in quantum mechanics and the role of Hilbert spaces in classical polarization optics. The production of Bell-like states in classical polarization optics is discussed, and new theorems are proved to discriminate between separable and nonseparable states in classical wave optics where no discreteness is involved. The influence of the Pancharatnam phase on a classical Bell-like state is deived. Finally, to what extent classical polarization optics can be used to simulate quantum information processing tasks is also discussed. This should be of great practical importance because coherence and entanglement are robust in classical optics but not in quantum systems.

  10. Anion-π recognition between [M(CN)6](3-) complexes and HAT(CN)6: structural matching and electronic charge density modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobylarczyk, Jedrzej; Pinkowicz, Dawid; Srebro-Hooper, Monika; Hooper, James; Podgajny, Robert

    2017-03-14

    Hexacyanidometalates (M = Fe(III), Co(III)) and multisite anion receptor HAT(CN)6 (1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylenehexacarbonitrile) recognize each other in acetonitrile solution and self-assemble into the novel molecular networks (PPh4)3[M(CN)6][HAT(CN)6] (M = Fe, 1; Co, 2) and (AsPh4)3[M(CN)6][HAT(CN)6]·2MeCN·H2O (M = Fe, 3; Co, 4). 1-4 contain the stacked columns {[M(CN)6](3-);[HAT(CN)6]}∞ separated by the organic cations. All of the M-C[triple bond, length as m-dash]N vectors point collectively towards the centroids of pyrazine rings on neighboring HAT(CN)6 molecules, with Ncyanidecentroidpyrazine distances that are under 3 Å. The directional character and structural parameters of the new supramolecular synthons correspond to collective triple anion-π interactions between the CN(-) ligands of the metal complexes and the π-deficient areas of HAT(CN)6. Physicochemical characterisation (IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry) and dispersion-corrected DFT studies reveal the dominating charge-transfer (CT) and polarisation characters of the interactions. The electronic density flow occurs from the CN(-) ligands of [M(CN)6](3-) to the HAT(CN)6 orbital systems and further, toward the peripheral -CN groups of HAT(CN)6. Solid-state DFT calculations determined the total interaction energy of HAT(CN)6 to be ca. -125 kcal mol(-1), which gives ca. -15 kcal mol(-1) per one CN(-)HAT(CN)6 contact after subtraction of the interaction with organic cations. The UV-Vis electronic absorption measurements prove that the intermolecular interactions persist in solution and suggest a 1 : 1 composition of the anion-π {[M(CN)6](3-);[HAT(CN)6]} chromophore, with the formation constant Kadd = (5.8 ± 6) × 10(2) dm(3) mol(-1) and the molar absorption coefficient εadd = 180 ± 9 cm(-1) dm(3) mol(-1) at 600 nm, as estimated from concentration-dependent studies.

  11. Classical and quantum free motions in the tomographic probability representation

    CERN Document Server

    Man'ko, Vladimir I

    2011-01-01

    Based on a geometric picture, the example of free particle motion for both classical and quantum domains is considered in the tomographic probability representation. Wave functions and density operators as well as optical and symplectic tomograms are obtained as solutions of kinetic classical and quantum equations for the state tomograms. The difference of tomograms of free particle for classical and quantum states is discussed.

  12. Classical, Semi-classical and Quantum Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Poor, H; Scully, Marlan

    2012-01-01

    David Middleton was a towering figure of 20th Century engineering and science and one of the founders of statistical communication theory. During the second World War, the young David Middleton, working with Van Fleck, devised the notion of the matched filter, which is the most basic method used for detecting signals in noise. Over the intervening six decades, the contributions of Middleton have become classics. This collection of essays by leading scientists, engineers and colleagues of David are in his honor and reflect the wide  influence that he has had on many fields. Also included is the introduction by Middleton to his forthcoming book, which gives a wonderful view of the field of communication, its history and his own views on the field that he developed over the past 60 years. Focusing on classical noise modeling and applications, Classical, Semi-Classical and Quantum Noise includes coverage of statistical communication theory, non-stationary noise, molecular footprints, noise suppression, Quantum e...

  13. Fluctuations of wavefunctions about their classical average

    CERN Document Server

    Bénet, L; Hernandez-Saldana, H; Izrailev, F M; Leyvraz, F; Seligman, T H

    2003-01-01

    Quantum-classical correspondence for the average shape of eigenfunctions and the local spectral density of states are well-known facts. In this paper, the fluctuations of the quantum wavefunctions around the classical value are discussed. A simple random matrix model leads to a Gaussian distribution of the amplitudes whose width is determined by the classical shape of the eigenfunction. To compare this prediction with numerical calculations in chaotic models of coupled quartic oscillators, we develop a rescaling method for the components. The expectations are broadly confirmed, but deviations due to scars are observed. This effect is much reduced when both Hamiltonians have chaotic dynamics.

  14. Fluctuations of wavefunctions about their classical average

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benet, L [Centro Internacional de Ciencias, Ciudad Universitaria, Chamilpa, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Flores, J [Centro Internacional de Ciencias, Ciudad Universitaria, Chamilpa, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Hernandez-Saldana, H [Centro Internacional de Ciencias, Ciudad Universitaria, Chamilpa, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Izrailev, F M [Centro Internacional de Ciencias, Ciudad Universitaria, Chamilpa, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Leyvraz, F [Centro Internacional de Ciencias, Ciudad Universitaria, Chamilpa, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Seligman, T H [Centro Internacional de Ciencias, Ciudad Universitaria, Chamilpa, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2003-02-07

    Quantum-classical correspondence for the average shape of eigenfunctions and the local spectral density of states are well-known facts. In this paper, the fluctuations of the quantum wavefunctions around the classical value are discussed. A simple random matrix model leads to a Gaussian distribution of the amplitudes whose width is determined by the classical shape of the eigenfunction. To compare this prediction with numerical calculations in chaotic models of coupled quartic oscillators, we develop a rescaling method for the components. The expectations are broadly confirmed, but deviations due to scars are observed. This effect is much reduced when both Hamiltonians have chaotic dynamics.

  15. Deduction of Lorentz Transformations from Classical Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M. Ares de Parga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lorentz transformations are obtained by assuming that the laws of classical thermodynamics are invariant under changes of inertial reference frames. As Maxwell equations are used in order to deduce a wave equation that shows the constancy of the speed of light, by means of the laws of classical thermodynamics, the invariance of the Carnot cycle is deduced under reference frame changes. Starting with this result and the blackbody particle number density in a rest frame, the Lorentz transformations are obtained. A discussion about the universality of classical thermodynamics is given.

  16. On the relationship between the modifications to the Raychaudhuri equation and the canonical Hamiltonian structures

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Parampreet

    2015-01-01

    The problem of obtaining canonical Hamiltonian structures from the equations of motion is studied in the context of the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models. Modifications to Raychaudhuri equation are implemented independently as quadratic and cubic terms of energy density without introducing additional degrees of freedom. Depending on its sign, modifications make gravity repulsive above a curvature scale for matter satisfying strong energy condition, or more attractive than in the classical theory. Canonical structure of the modified theories is determined demanding that the total Hamiltonian be a linear combination of gravity and matter Hamiltonians. Both of the repulsive modifications are found to yield singularity avoidance. In the quadratic repulsive case, the modified canonical phase space of gravity is a polymerized phase space with canonical momentum as inverse trigonometric function of Hubble rate; the canonical Hamiltonian can be identified with the effective Hamiltonian in loop quantum ...

  17. Lectures on Classical Integrability

    CERN Document Server

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the lectures consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schroedinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel'fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  18. Fermions from classical statistics

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    We describe fermions in terms of a classical statistical ensemble. The states $\\tau$ of this ensemble are characterized by a sequence of values one or zero or a corresponding set of two-level observables. Every classical probability distribution can be associated to a quantum state for fermions. If the time evolution of the classical probabilities $p_\\tau$ amounts to a rotation of the wave function $q_\\tau(t)=\\pm \\sqrt{p_\\tau(t)}$, we infer the unitary time evolution of a quantum system of fe...

  19. Davidson and classical pragmatism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Rossi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I wish to trace some connections between Donald Davidson's work (1917-2003 and two major representatives of the classical pragmatist movement: Charles S. Peirce (1839-1914 and William James (1842-1910. I will start with a basic characterization of classical pragmatism; then, I shall examine certain conceptions in Peirce's and James' pragmatism, in order to establish affinities with Davidson´s thought. Finally, and bearing in mind the previous con-nections, I will reflect briefly on the relevance –often unrecognized- of classical pragmatist ideas in the context of contemporary philosophi-cal discussions.

  20. Advanced classical field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Giachetta, Giovanni; Sardanashvily, Gennadi

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary quantum field theory is mainly developed as quantization of classical fields. Therefore, classical field theory and its BRST extension is the necessary step towards quantum field theory. This book aims to provide a complete mathematical foundation of Lagrangian classical field theory and its BRST extension for the purpose of quantization. Based on the standard geometric formulation of theory of nonlinear differential operators, Lagrangian field theory is treated in a very general setting. Reducible degenerate Lagrangian theories of even and odd fields on an arbitrary smooth manifold are considered. The second Noether theorems generalized to these theories and formulated in the homology terms provide the strict mathematical formulation of BRST extended classical field theory

  1. On Noncommutative Classical Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Djemai, A E F

    2003-01-01

    In this work, I investigate the noncommutative Poisson algebra of classical observables corresponding to a proposed general Noncommutative Quantum Mechanics, \\cite{1}. I treat some classical systems with various potentials and some Physical interpretations are given concerning the presence of noncommutativity at large scales (Celeste Mechanics) directly tied to the one present at small scales (Quantum Mechanics) and its possible relation with UV/IR mixing.

  2. Between classical and quantum

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between classical and quantum theory is of central importance to the philosophy of physics, and any interpretation of quantum mechanics has to clarify it. Our discussion of this relationship is partly historical and conceptual, but mostly technical and mathematically rigorous, including over 500 references. On the assumption that quantum mechanics is universal and complete, we discuss three ways in which classical physics has so far been believed to emerge from quantum physic...

  3. Quantum and Classic Brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Kisil, Vladimir V.

    2000-01-01

    We describe an $p$-mechanical (see funct-an/9405002 and quant-ph/9610016) brackets which generate quantum (commutator) and classic (Poisson) brackets in corresponding representations of the Heisenberg group. We \\emph{do not} use any kind of semiclassic approximation or limiting procedures for $\\hbar \\to 0$. Harmonic oscillator considered within the approach. Keywords: Classic and quantum mechanics, Hamilton and Heisenberg equations, Poisson brackets, commutator, Heisenberg group.

  4. On the relationship between modifications to the Raychaudhuri equation and the canonical Hamiltonian structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Parampreet; Soni, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    The problem of obtaining canonical Hamiltonian structures from the equations of motion, without any knowledge of the action, is studied in the context of the spatially flat Friedmann, ‘Robertson’, and Walker models. Modifications to the Raychaudhuri equation are implemented independently as quadratic and cubic terms of energy density without introducing additional degrees of freedom. Depending on their sign, modifications make gravity repulsive above a curvature scale for matter satisfying strong energy conditions, or more attractive than in the classical theory. The canonical structure of the modified theories is determined by demanding that the total Hamiltonian be a linear combination of gravity and matter Hamiltonians. In the quadratic repulsive case, the modified canonical phase space of gravity is a polymerized phase space with canonical momentum as inverse a trigonometric function of the Hubble rate; the canonical Hamiltonian can be identified with the effective Hamiltonian in loop quantum cosmology. The repulsive cubic modification results in a ‘generalized polymerized’ canonical phase space. Both the repulsive modifications are found to yield singularity avoidance. In contrast, the quadratic and cubic attractive modifications result in a canonical phase space in which canonical momentum is nontrigonometric and singularities persist. Our results hint at connections between the repulsive/attractive nature of modifications to gravity arising from the gravitational sector and polymerized/non polymerized gravitational phase space.

  5. Quantum-classical crossover in electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Polonyi, J

    2006-01-01

    A classical field theory is proposed for the electric current and the electromagnetic field interpolating between microscopic and macroscopic domains. It represents a generalization of the density functional for the dynamics of the current and the electromagnetic field in the quantum side of the crossover and reproduces standard classical electrodynamics on the other side. The effective action derived in the closed time path formalism and the equations of motion follow from the variational principle. The polarization of the Dirac-see can be taken into account in the quadratic approximation of the action by the introduction of the deplacement field strengths as in conventional classical electrodynamics. Decoherence appears naturally as a simple one-loop effect in this formalism. It is argued that the radiation time arrow is generated from the quantum boundary conditions in time by decoherence at the quantum-classical crossover and the Abraham-Lorentz force arises from the accelerating charge or from other char...

  6. Equilibration properties of classical integrable field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Andrea; Mussardo, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    We study the equilibration properties of classical integrable field theories at a finite energy density, with a time evolution that starts from initial conditions far from equilibrium. These classical field theories may be regarded as quantum field theories in the regime of high occupation numbers. This observation permits to recover the classical quantities from the quantum ones by taking a proper \\hslash \\to 0 limit. In particular, the time averages of the classical theories can be expressed in terms of a suitable version of the LeClair-Mussardo formula relative to the generalized Gibbs ensemble. For the purposes of handling time averages, our approach provides a solution of the problem of the infinite gap solutions of the inverse scattering method.

  7. Quantum state smoothing for classical mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, D; Mølmer, K; Murch, K W

    2016-01-01

    In quantum mechanics, wave functions and density matrices represent our knowledge about a quantum system and give probabilities for the outcomes of measurements. If the combined dynamics and measurements on a system lead to a density matrix $\\rho(t)$ with only diagonal elements in a given basis $\\{|n\\rangle\\}$, it may be treated as a classical mixture, i.e., a system which randomly occupies the basis states $|n\\rangle$ with probabilities $\\rho_{nn}(t)$. Fully equivalent to so-called smoothing in classical probability theory, subsequent probing of the occupation of the states $|n\\rangle$ improves our ability to retrodict what was the outcome of a projective state measurement at time $t$. Here, we show with experiments on a superconducting qubit that the smoothed probabilities do not, in the same way as the diagonal elements of $\\rho$, permit a classical mixture interpretation of the state of the system at the past time $t$.

  8. Unified classical path theories of pressure broadening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottcher, C.

    1971-01-01

    Derivation of a unified classical path theory of pressure broadening, using only elementary concepts. It is shown that the theory of Smith, Cooper and Vidal (1969) is only correct at all frequencies to first order in the number density of perturbers.

  9. Relationship of quantum mechanics to classical electromagnetism and classical relativistic mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, J H [Departement de Physique Nucleaire et Corpusculaire, Universite de Geneve, 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2004-05-14

    Some connections between quantum mechanics and classical physics are explored. The Planck-Einstein and De Broglie relations, the wavefunction and its probabilistic interpretation, the canonical commutation relations and the Maxwell-Lorentz equation may be understood in a simple way by comparing classical electromagnetism and the photonic description of light provided by classical relativistic kinematics. The method used may be described as 'inverse correspondence' since quantum phenomena become apparent on considering the low photon number density limit of classical electromagnetism. Generalization to massive particles leads to the Klein-Gordon and Schroedinger equations. The difference between the quantum wavefunction of the photon and a classical electromagnetic wave is discussed in some detail.

  10. Quantum-Classical Correspondence: Dynamical Quantization and the Classical Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2004-11-12

    In only 150 pages, not counting appendices, references, or the index, this book is one author's perspective of the massive theoretical and philosophical hurdles in the no-man's-land separating the classical and quantum domains of physics. It ends with him emphasizing his own theoretical contribution to this area. In his own words, he has attempted to answer: 1. How can we obtain the quantum dynamics of open systems initially described by the equations of motion of classical physics (quantization process) 2. How can we retrieve classical dynamics from the quantum mechanical equations of motion by means of a classical limiting process (dequantization process). However, this monograph seems overly ambitious. Although the publisher's description refers to this book as an accessible entre, we find that this author scrambles too hastily over the peaks of information that are contained in his large collection of 272 references. Introductory motivating discussions are lacking. Profound ideas are glossed over superficially and shoddily. Equations morph. But no new convincing understanding of the physical world results. The author takes the viewpoint that physical systems are always in interaction with their environment and are thus not isolated and, therefore, not Hamiltonian. This impels him to produce a method of quantization of these stochastic systems without the need of a Hamiltonian. He also has interest in obtaining the classical limit of the quantized results. However, this reviewer does not understand why one needs to consider open systems to understand quantum-classical correspondence. The author demonstrates his method using various examples of the Smoluchowski form of the Fokker--Planck equation. He then renders these equations in a Wigner representation, uses what he terms an infinitesimality condition, and associates with a constant having the dimensions of an action. He thereby claims to develop master equations, such as the Caldeira

  11. Discrete Classical Electromagnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    De Souza, M M

    1997-01-01

    The classical electromagnetic field of a spinless point electron is described in a formalism with extended causality by discrete finite transverse point-vector fields with discrete and localized point interactions. These fields are taken as a classical representation of photons, ``classical photons". They are all transversal photons; there are no scalar nor longitudinal photons as these are definitely eliminated by the gauge condition. The angular distribution of emitted photons coincides with the directions of maximum emission in the standard formalism. The Maxwell formalism and its standard field are retrieved by the replacement of these discrete fields by their space-time averages, and in this process scalar and longitudinal photons are necessarily created and added. Divergences and singularities are by-products of this averaging process. This formalism enlighten the meaning and the origin of the non-physical photons, the ones that violate the Lorentz condition in manifestly covariant quantization methods.

  12. Between classical and quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Landsman, N P

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between classical and quantum theory is of central importance to the philosophy of physics, and any interpretation of quantum mechanics has to clarify it. Our discussion of this relationship is partly historical and conceptual, but mostly technical and mathematically rigorous, including over 500 references. On the assumption that quantum mechanics is universal and complete, we discuss three ways in which classical physics has so far been believed to emerge from quantum physics, namely in the limit h -> 0 of small Planck's constant (in a finite system), in the limit of a large system, and through decoherence and consistent histores. The first limit is closely related to modern quantization theory and microlocal analysis, whereas the second involves methods of C*-algebras and the concepts of superselection sectors and macroscopic observables. In these limits, the classical world does not emerge as a sharply defined objective reality, but rather as an approximate appearance relative to certain "...

  13. Randomness: Quantum versus classical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Recent tremendous development of quantum information theory has led to a number of quantum technological projects, e.g. quantum random generators. This development had stimulated a new wave of interest in quantum foundations. One of the most intriguing problems of quantum foundations is the elaboration of a consistent and commonly accepted interpretation of a quantum state. Closely related problem is the clarification of the notion of quantum randomness and its interrelation with classical randomness. In this short review, we shall discuss basics of classical theory of randomness (which by itself is very complex and characterized by diversity of approaches) and compare it with irreducible quantum randomness. We also discuss briefly “digital philosophy”, its role in physics (classical and quantum) and its coupling to the information interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM).

  14. Analysing a complementarity experiment on the quantum-classical boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Terra-Cunha, M O

    2002-01-01

    The complementarity experiment reported in Bertet [{\\it{et al.}} (2001), {\\it{Nature}} {\\bf{411}}, 166.] is discussed. The role played by entanglement in reaching the classical limit is pointed out. Dissipative and thermal effects of the cavity are calculated and a simple modification of the experiment is proposed in order to observe the progressive loss of the capacity of ``quantum erasing''as a manifestation of the classical limit of quantum mechanics.

  15. Classical glueballs in non-Abelian Born-Infeld theory

    CERN Document Server

    Galtsov, D V; Gal'tsov, Dmitri; Kerner, Richard

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the Born-Infeld-type modification of the quadratic Yang-Mills action suggested by the superstring theory gives rise to classical particle-like solutions prohibited in the standard Yang-Mills theory. This becomes possible due to the scale invariance breaking by the Born-Infeld non-linearity. New classical glueballs are sphaleronic in nature and exhibit a striking similarity with the Bartnik-McKinnon solutions of the Yang-Mills theory coupled to gravity.

  16. Classical mechanics with Maxima

    CERN Document Server

    Timberlake, Todd Keene

    2016-01-01

    This book guides undergraduate students in the use of Maxima—a computer algebra system—in solving problems in classical mechanics. It functions well as a supplement to a typical classical mechanics textbook. When it comes to problems that are too difficult to solve by hand, computer algebra systems that can perform symbolic mathematical manipulations are a valuable tool. Maxima is particularly attractive in that it is open-source, multiple-platform software that students can download and install free of charge. Lessons learned and capabilities developed using Maxima are easily transferred to other, proprietary software.

  17. Covariantizing Classical Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    López, Marco Castrillón

    2010-01-01

    We show how to enlarge the covariance group of any classical field theory in such a way that the resulting "covariantized" theory is 'essentially equivalent' to the original. In particular, our technique will render any classical field theory generally covariant, that is, the covariantized theory will be spacetime diffeomorphism-covariant and free of absolute objects. Our results thus generalize the well-known parametrization technique of Dirac and Kucha\\v{r}. Our constructions apply equally well to internal covariance groups, in which context they produce natural derivations of both the Utiyama minimal coupling and St\\"uckelberg tricks.

  18. Problems in classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Katkar, L N

    2014-01-01

    Problems in classical mechanics presents a lucid treatment of the formulations of Lagrangian, Hamiltonian, and the Principles of Calculus of Variations etc. important for the study of modern physics. The study of classical mechanics prepares students to apply the principles and the mathematical tools to solve real life problems. The book also incorporates and discusses in detail topics such as Central Force Motion, Rigid Body Motion and Canonical Transformations. KEY FEATURES: Around 200 solved examples with complete mathematical theory Around 70 examples given as an exercise to test and develop students understanding The physical interpretation of the Hamiltonian is highlighted

  19. Classic Problems of Probability

    CERN Document Server

    Gorroochurn, Prakash

    2012-01-01

    "A great book, one that I will certainly add to my personal library."—Paul J. Nahin, Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering, University of New Hampshire Classic Problems of Probability presents a lively account of the most intriguing aspects of statistics. The book features a large collection of more than thirty classic probability problems which have been carefully selected for their interesting history, the way they have shaped the field, and their counterintuitive nature. From Cardano's 1564 Games of Chance to Jacob Bernoulli's 1713 Golden Theorem to Parrondo's 1996 Perplexin

  20. Classical Holographic Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Brehm, Enrico M

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we introduce classical holographic codes. These can be understood as concatenated probabilistic codes and can be represented as networks uniformly covering hyperbolic space. In particular, classical holographic codes can be interpreted as maps from bulk degrees of freedom to boundary degrees of freedom. Interestingly, they are shown to exhibit features similar to those expected from the AdS/CFT correspondence. Among these are a version of the Ryu-Takayanagi formula and intriguing properties regarding bulk reconstruction and boundary representations of bulk operations. We discuss the relation of our findings with expectations from AdS/CFT and, in particular, with recent results from quantum error correction.

  1. Learning Classical Music Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Learning Classical Music Club

    2010-01-01

    There is a new CERN Club called “Learning Classical Music at CERN”. We are aiming to give classical music lessons for different instruments (see link) for students from 5 to 100 years old. We are now ready to start our activities in the CERN barracks. We are now in the enrollment phase and hope to start lessons very soon ! Club info can be found in the list of CERN Club: http://user.web.cern.ch/user/Communication/SocialLifeActivities/Clubs/Clubs.html Salvatore Buontempo Club President

  2. Strong Coupling and Classicalization

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2016-01-01

    Classicalization is a phenomenon in which a theory prevents itself from entering into a strong-coupling regime, by redistributing the energy among many weakly-interacting soft quanta. In this way, the scattering process of some initial hard quanta splits into a large number of soft elementary processes. In short, the theory trades the strong coupling for a high-multiplicity of quanta. At very high energies, the outcome of such a scattering experiment is a production of soft states of high occupation number that are approximately classical. It is evident that black hole creation in particle collision at super-Planckian energies is a result of classicalization, but there is no a priory reason why this phenomenon must be limited to gravity. If the hierarchy problem is solved by classicalization, the LHC has a chance of detecting a tower of new resonances. The lowest-lying resonances must appear right at the strong coupling scale in form of short-lived elementary particles. The heavier members of the tower must b...

  3. Classical Mythology. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morford, Mark P. O.; Lenardon, Robert J.

    Designed for students with little or no background in classical literature, this book introduces the Greek and Roman myths of creation, myths of the gods, Greek sagas and local legends, and presents contemporary theories about the myths. Drawing on Homer, Hesiod, Pindar, Vergil, and others, the book provides many translations and paraphrases of…

  4. Classical galactosaemia revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Bosch

    2006-01-01

    Classical galactosaemia (McKusick 230400) is an: autosomal recessive disorder of galactose metabolism, caused by a deficiency of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT; EC 2.7.712). Most patients present in the neonatal period, after ingestion of galactose, with jaundice, hepatospl

  5. Classicism and Romanticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, Gregory H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes one teacher's methods for introducing to secondary English students the concepts of Classicism and Romanticism in relation to pictures of gardens, architecture, music, and literary works. Outlines how the unit leads to a writing assignment based on collected responses over time. (HB)

  6. Mecanica Clasica (Classical Mechanics)

    OpenAIRE

    Rosu, H. C.

    1999-01-01

    First Internet graduate course on Classical Mechanics in Spanish (Castellano). This is about 80% of the material I covered during the January-June 1999 semester at IFUG in the Mexican city of Leon. English and Romanian versions are in (slow) progress and hopefully will be arXived. For a similar course on Quantum Mechanics, see physics/9808031

  7. Nuclear motion is classical

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    The notion from ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations that nuclear motion is best described by classical Newton dynamics instead of the time-dependent Schr{\\"o}dinger equation is substantiated. In principle a single experiment should bring clarity. Caution is however necessary, as temperature dependent effects must be eliminated when trying to determine the existence of a zero-point energy.

  8. Mecanica Clasica (Classical Mechanics)

    CERN Document Server

    Rosu, H C

    1999-01-01

    First Internet undergraduate course on Classical Mechanics in Spanish (Castellano). This is about 80% of the material I covered during the January-June 1999 semester at IFUG in the Mexican city of Leon. English and Romanian versions are in (slow) progress and hopefully will be arXived. For a similar course on Quantum Mechanics, see physics/9808031

  9. Classical Mechanics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosing, Juliet W.

    2006-12-01

    At Pacific University we have included a lab with our upper division Classical Mechanics class. We do a combination of physical labs (air resistance, harmonic motion, amusement park physics), Maple labs (software), and projects. Presentation of some of the labs, results and challenges with this course will be included.

  10. Children's Classics. Fifth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Alice M.

    "Children's Classics," a 1947 article by Alice M. Jordan reprinted from "The Horn Book Magazine," examines the dynamics and appeal of some of the most famous books for young readers, including "Alice in Wonderland,""The Wind in the Willows,""Robinson Crusoe," and "Andersen's Fairy Tales." Paul Hein's annotated bibliography, a revision of Jordan's…

  11. Exact Classical Correspondence in Quantum Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    John, Moncy V

    2014-01-01

    We find a Friedmann model with appropriate matter/energy density such that the solution of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation exactly corresponds to the classical evolution. The well-known problems in quantum cosmology disappear in the resulting coasting evolution. The exact quantum-classical correspondence is demonstrated with the help of the de Broglie-Bohm and modified de Broglie-Bohm approaches to quantum mechanics. It is reassuring that such a solution leads to a robust model for the universe, which agrees well with cosmological expansion indicated by SNe Ia data.

  12. Effect of geometry on the classical entanglement in a chaotic optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Sijo K; Sabuco, Juan; Chew, Lock Yue; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2015-12-14

    The effect of boundary deformation on the classical entanglement which appears in the classical electromagnetic field is considered. A chaotic billiard geometry is used to explore the influence of the mechanical modification of the optical fiber cross-sectional geometry on the production of classical entanglement within the electromagnetic fields. For the experimental realization of our idea, we propose an optical fiber with a cross section that belongs to the family of Robnik chaotic billiards. Our results show that a modification of the fiber geometry from a regular to a chaotic regime can enhance the transverse mode classical entanglement.

  13. The Classical Version of Stokes' Theorem Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen

    2005-01-01

    Using only fairly simple and elementary considerations - essentially from first year undergraduate mathematics - we prove that the classical Stokes' theorem for any given surface and vector field in $\\mathbb{R}^{3}$ follows from an application of Gauss' divergence theorem to a suitable modification...... of the vector field in a tubular shell around the given surface. The intuitive appeal of the divergence theorem is thus applied to bootstrap a corresponding intuition for Stokes' theorem. The two stated classical theorems are (like the fundamental theorem of calculus) nothing but shadows of the general version...... to above. Our proof that Stokes' theorem follows from Gauss' divergence theorem goes via a well known and often used exercise, which simply relates the concepts of divergence and curl on the local differential level. The rest of the paper uses only integration in $1$, $2$, and $3$ variables together...

  14. The classical version of Stokes' Theorem revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen

    2008-01-01

    Using only fairly simple and elementary considerations - essentially from first year undergraduate mathematics - we show how the classical Stokes' theorem for any given surface and vector field in $\\mathbb{R}^{3}$ follows from an application of Gauss' divergence theorem to a suitable modification...... of the vector field in a tubular shell around the given surface. The two stated classical theorems are (like the fundamental theorem of calculus) nothing but shadows of the general version of Stokes' theorem for differential forms on manifolds. The main points in the present paper, however, is firstly...... exercise, which simply relates the concepts of divergence and curl on the local differential level. The rest of the paper uses only integration in $1$, $2$, and $3$ variables together with a 'fattening' technique for surfaces and the inverse function theorem....

  15. Classical Weyl Transverse Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We study various classical aspects of the Weyl transverse (WTDiff) gravity in a general space-time dimension. First of all, we clarify a classical equivalence among three kinds of gravitational theories, those are, the conformally-invariant scalar tensor gravity, Einstein's general relativity and the WTDiff gravity via the gauge fixing procedure. Secondly, we show that in the WTDiff gravity the cosmological constant is a mere integration constant as in unimodular gravity, but it does not receive any radiative corrections unlike the unimodular gravity. A key point in this proof is to construct a covariantly conserved energy-momentum tensor, which is achieved on the basis of this equivalence relation. Thirdly, we demonstrate that the Noether current for the Weyl transformation is identically vanishing, thereby implying that the Weyl symmetry existing in both the conformally-invariant scalar tensor gravity and the WTDiff gravity is a "fake" symmetry. We find it possible to extend this proof to all matter fields,...

  16. Classical Diophantine equations

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The author had initiated a revision and translation of "Classical Diophantine Equations" prior to his death. Given the rapid advances in transcendence theory and diophantine approximation over recent years, one might fear that the present work, originally published in Russian in 1982, is mostly superseded. That is not so. A certain amount of updating had been prepared by the author himself before his untimely death. Some further revision was prepared by close colleagues. The first seven chapters provide a detailed, virtually exhaustive, discussion of the theory of lower bounds for linear forms in the logarithms of algebraic numbers and its applications to obtaining upper bounds for solutions to the eponymous classical diophantine equations. The detail may seem stark--- the author fears that the reader may react much as does the tourist on first seeing the centre Pompidou; notwithstanding that, Sprind zuk maintainsa pleasant and chatty approach, full of wise and interesting remarks. His emphases well warrant, ...

  17. Electrodynamics classical inconsistencies

    CERN Document Server

    De Souza, M M

    1995-01-01

    The problems of Classical Electrodynamics with the electron equation of motion and with non-integrable singularity of its self-field stress tensor are well known. They are consequences, we show, of neglecting terms that are null off the charge world line but that gives a non null contribution on its world line. The self-field stress tensor of a point classical electron is integrable, there is no causality violation and no conflict with energy conservation in its equation of motion, and there is no need of any kind of renormalization nor of any change in the Maxwell's theory for this. (This is part of the paper hep-th/9510160, stripped , for simplicity, of its non-Minkowskian geometrization of causality and of its discussion about the physical meaning of the Maxwell-Faraday concept of field).

  18. Injuries in classical ballet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Coutinho de Azevedo Guimarães

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to elucidate what injuries are most likely to occur due to classical ballet practice. The research used national and international bibliography. The bibliography analysis indicated that technical and esthetical demands lead to a practice of non-anatomical movements, causing the ballet dancer to suffer from a number of associated lesions. Most of the injuries are caused by technical mistakes and wrong training. Troubles in children are usually due to trying to force external rotation at hip level and to undue use of point ballet slippers. The commonest lesions are in feet and ankles, followed by knees and hips. The rarest ones are in the upper limbs. These injuries are caused by exercise excess, by repetitions always in the same side and by wrong and early use of point slippers. The study reached the conclusion that incorrect application of classical ballet technique predisposes the dancers to characteristic injuries.

  19. Classical and statistical thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rizk, Hanna A

    2016-01-01

    This is a text book of thermodynamics for the student who seeks thorough training in science or engineering. Systematic and thorough treatment of the fundamental principles rather than presenting the large mass of facts has been stressed. The book includes some of the historical and humanistic background of thermodynamics, but without affecting the continuity of the analytical treatment. For a clearer and more profound understanding of thermodynamics this book is highly recommended. In this respect, the author believes that a sound grounding in classical thermodynamics is an essential prerequisite for the understanding of statistical thermodynamics. Such a book comprising the two wide branches of thermodynamics is in fact unprecedented. Being a written work dealing systematically with the two main branches of thermodynamics, namely classical thermodynamics and statistical thermodynamics, together with some important indexes under only one cover, this treatise is so eminently useful.

  20. Randomness: quantum versus classical

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Recent tremendous development of quantum information theory led to a number of quantum technological projects, e.g., quantum random generators. This development stimulates a new wave of interest in quantum foundations. One of the most intriguing problems of quantum foundations is elaboration of a consistent and commonly accepted interpretation of quantum state. Closely related problem is clarification of the notion of quantum randomness and its interrelation with classical randomness. In this short review we shall discuss basics of classical theory of randomness (which by itself is very complex and characterized by diversity of approaches) and compare it with irreducible quantum randomness. The second part of this review is devoted to the information interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM) in the spirit of Zeilinger and Brukner (and QBism of Fuchs et al.) and physics in general (e.g., Wheeler's "it from bit") as well as digital philosophy of Chaitin (with historical coupling to ideas of Leibnitz). Finally, w...

  1. Computation in Classical Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Timberlake, Todd

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing consensus that physics majors need to learn computational skills, but many departments are still devoid of computation in their physics curriculum. Some departments may lack the resources or commitment to create a dedicated course or program in computational physics. One way around this difficulty is to include computation in a standard upper-level physics course. An intermediate classical mechanics course is particularly well suited for including computation. We discuss the ways we have used computation in our classical mechanics courses, focusing on how computational work can improve students' understanding of physics as well as their computational skills. We present examples of computational problems that serve these two purposes. In addition, we provide information about resources for instructors who would like to include computation in their courses.

  2. Lectures on classical electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2014-01-01

    These lecture notes cover classical electrodynamics at the level of advanced undergraduates or postgraduates. There is a strong emphasis on the general features of the electromagnetic field and, in particular, on the properties of electromagnetic radiation. It offers a comprehensive and detailed, as well as self-contained, account of material that can be covered in a one-semester course for students with a solid undergraduate knowledge of basic electricity and magnetism.

  3. Concepts of classical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Strong, John

    2004-01-01

    An intermediate course in optics, this volume explores both experimental and theoretical concepts, offering practical knowledge of geometrical optics that will enhance students' comprehension of any relevant applied science. Its exposition of the concepts of classical optics is presented with a minimum of mathematical detail but presumes some knowledge of calculus, vectors, and complex numbers.Subjects include light as wave motion; superposition of wave motions; electromagnetic waves; interaction of light and matter; velocities and scattering of light; polarized light and dielectric boundarie

  4. Revisiting a Classic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Ibram

    2008-01-01

    As a 26-year-old English teacher in 1958, Chinua Achebe had no idea that the book he was writing would become a literary classic, not only in Africa but also throughout the world. He could only try to articulate the feelings he had for his countrymen and women. Achebe had a burning desire to tell the true story of Africa and African humanity. The…

  5. Fisher Information of Wavefunctions: Classical and Quantum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Shun-Long

    2006-01-01

    A parametric quantum mechanical wavefunction naturally induces parametric probability distributions by taking absolute square, and we can consider its classical Fisher information. On the other hand, it also induces parametric rank-one projections which may be viewed as density operators, and we can talk about its quantum Fisher information. Among many versions of quantum Fisher information, there are two prominent ones. The first,deiined via a quantum score function, was introduced by Helstrom in 1967 and is well known. The second,defined via the square root of the density operator, has its origin in the skew information introduced by Wigner and Yanase in 1963 and remains relatively unnoticed. This study is devoted to investigating the relationships between the classical Fisher information and these two versions of quantum Fisher information for wavefunctions.It is shown that the two versions of quantum Fisher information differ by a factor 2 and that they dominate the classical Fisher information. The non-coincidence of these two versions of quantum Fisher information may be interpreted as a manifestation of quantum discord. We further calculate the difference between the Helstrom quantum Fisher information and the classical Fisher information, and show that it is precisely the instantaneous phase fluctuation of the wavefunctions.

  6. Semi-classical methods in nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, David M.

    These lecture notes present an introduction to some semi-classical techniques which have applications in nuclear physics. Topics discussed include the WKB method, approaches based on the Feynman path integral, the Gutzwiller trace formula for level density fluctuations and the Thomas-Fermi approximation and the Vlasov equation for many-body problems. There are applications to heavy ion fusion reactions, bremsstrahlung emission in alpha decay and nuclear response functions.

  7. Classical Trace Anomaly

    OpenAIRE

    Farhoudi, M.

    1995-01-01

    We seek an analogy of the mathematical form of the alternative form of Einstein's field equations for Lovelock's field equations. We find that the price for this analogy is to accept the existence of the trace anomaly of the energy-momentum tensor even in classical treatments. As an example, we take this analogy to any generic second order Lagrangian and exactly derive the trace anomaly relation suggested by Duff. This indicates that an intrinsic reason for the existence of such a relation sh...

  8. The classical task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillis, Steven; Souman, Agnita; Dhollander, Sim

    -year-olds to 9-year-olds. The experiment was also administered with a control group of adults. Procedure: The procedure consists of a classical set-up in which the subjects are shown pictures of objects. On presenting each object, the test leader says: "Here is a X (name of the object)". The next...... articulated: Prediction 1: a global analysis of the plural forms provided by the subjects is expected to show an increase of the correct responses as children grow older. Prediction 2: As to suffix selection, we expect that the plural of nouns selecting a fully predictable suffix will be more readily mastered...

  9. A Classic Through Eternity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    FIVE years ago, an ancient Chinese air was beamed to outer space as a PR exercise. To humankind, music is a universal language, so the tune seemed an ideal medium for communication with extraterrestrial intelligence. So far there has been no response, but it is believed that the tune will play for a billion years, and eventually be heard and understood. The melody is called High Mountain and Flowing Stream, and it is played on the guqin, a seven-stringed classical musical instrument similar to the zither.

  10. On Classical Ideal Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Chusseau

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We show that the thermodynamics of ideal gases may be derived solely from the Democritean concept of corpuscles moving in vacuum plus a principle of simplicity, namely that these laws are independent of the laws of motion, aside from the law of energy conservation. Only a single corpuscle in contact with a heat bath submitted to a z and t-invariant force is considered. Most of the end results are known but the method appears to be novel. The mathematics being elementary, the present paper should facilitate the understanding of the ideal gas law and of classical thermodynamics even though not-usually-taught concepts are being introduced.

  11. Semi-classical Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestone, John

    2016-03-01

    Quantum electrodynamics is complex and its associated mathematics can appear overwhelming for those not trained in this field. We describe semi-classical approaches that can be used to obtain a more intuitive physical feel for several QED processes including electro-statics, Compton scattering, pair annihilation, the anomalous magnetic moment, and the Lamb shift, that could be taught easily to undergraduate students. Any physicist who brings their laptop to the talk will be able to build spread sheets in less than 10 minutes to calculate g/2 =1.001160 and a Lamb shift of 1057 MHz.

  12. Classical cytogenetics: karyotyping techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Steven E

    2011-01-01

    Classical cytogenetics by karyotyping has been utilized in clinical research laboratories for more than 50 years and remains the key method used in the stem cell laboratory to assess the genetic stability of stem cell cultures. It is currently the most readily accessible method for detecting chromosomal abnormalities in pluripotent stem cell cultures. This chapter will describe (1) how to prepare a culture to maximize the number of metaphase cells, (2) how to prepare slides containing chromosome spreads (3) methods used to stain chromosomes, and (4) how to interpret the cytogenetic report.

  13. Mechanics classical and quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, T T

    2015-01-01

    Mechanics: Classical and Quantum explains the principles of quantum mechanics via the medium of analytical mechanics. The book describes Schrodinger's formulation, the Hamilton-Jacobi equation, and the Lagrangian formulation. The author discusses the Harmonic Oscillator, the generalized coordinates, velocities, as well as the application of the Lagrangian formulation to systems that are partially or entirely electromagnetic in character under certain conditions. The book examines waves on a string under tension, the isothermal cavity radiation, and the Rayleigh-Jeans result pertaining to the e

  14. Energy conditions and classical scalar fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bellucci, S

    2002-01-01

    Attention has been recently called upon the fact that the weak and null energy conditions and the second law of thermodynamics are violated in wormhole solutions of Einstein's theory with classical, nonminimally coupled, scalar fields as material source. It is shown that the discussion is only meaningful when ambiguities in the definitions of stress-energy tensor and energy density of a nonminimally coupled scalar are resolved. The three possible approaches are discussed with emphasis on the positivity of the respective energy densities and covariant conservation laws. The root of the ambiguities is traced to the energy localization problem for the gravitational field.

  15. Probability representation of classical states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Man'ko, OV; Man'ko, [No Value; Pilyavets, OV

    2005-01-01

    Probability representation of classical states described by symplectic tomograms is discussed. Tomographic symbols of classical observables which are functions on phase-space are studied. Explicit form of kernel of commutative star-product of the tomographic symbols is obtained.

  16. Chaos And Quantum-classical Correspondence For Two- Coupled Spins

    CERN Document Server

    Emerson, J V

    2001-01-01

    Two approaches to quantum-classical correspondence are distinguished according to the classical dynamical theory with which quantum theory is compared. The first of these, Ehrenfest correspondence, defines a dynamical regime in which the quantum expectation values follow approximately a classical trajectory. The second of these, Liouville correspondence, applies when the quantum probability distributions remain well approximated by a density in the classical phase space. The former applies only for narrow states, whereas the latter may remain valid even for quantum states that have spread to the system size. A spin model is adopted for this correspondence study because the quantum state is discrete and finite- dimensional, and thus no artificial truncation of the Hilbert space is required. The quantum time-evolution is given by a discrete unitary mapping. The corresponding classical model is volume-preserving (non-dissipative) and the time-evolution is given by a symplectic map. In classically chaotic regimes...

  17. Classical helium atom with radiation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelio, G; Carati, A; Galgani, L

    2012-06-01

    We study a classical model of helium atom in which, in addition to the Coulomb forces, the radiation reaction forces are taken into account. This modification brings in the model a new qualitative feature of a global character. Indeed, as pointed out by Dirac, in any model of classical electrodynamics of point particles involving radiation reaction one has to eliminate, from the a priori conceivable solutions of the problem, those corresponding to the emission of an infinite amount of energy. We show that the Dirac prescription solves a problem of inconsistency plaguing all available models which neglect radiation reaction, namely, the fact that in all such models, most initial data lead to a spontaneous breakdown of the atom. A further modification is that the system thus acquires a peculiar form of dissipation. In particular, this makes attractive an invariant manifold of special physical interest, the zero-dipole manifold that corresponds to motions in which no energy is radiated away (in the dipole approximation). We finally study numerically the invariant measure naturally induced by the time-evolution on such a manifold, and this corresponds to studying the formation process of the atom. Indications are given that such a measure may be singular with respect to that of Lebesgue.

  18. Readers of histone modifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miyong Yun; Jun Wu; Jerry L Workman; Bing Li

    2011-01-01

    Histone modifications not only play important roles in regulating chromatin structure and nuclear processes but also can be passed to daughter cells as epigenetic marks.Accumulating evidence suggests that the key function of histone modifications is to signal for recruitment or activity of downstream effectors. Here, we discuss the latest discovery of histone-modification readers and how the modification language is interpreted.

  19. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  20. Perspective: Quantum or classical coherence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William H

    2012-06-07

    Some coherence effects in chemical dynamics are described correctly by classical mechanics, while others only appear in a quantum treatment--and when these are observed experimentally it is not always immediately obvious whether their origin is classical or quantum. Semiclassical theory provides a systematic way of adding quantum coherence to classical molecular dynamics and thus provides a useful way to distinguish between classical and quantum coherence. Several examples are discussed which illustrate both cases. Particularly interesting is the situation with electronically non-adiabatic processes, where sometimes whether the coherence effects are classical or quantum depends on what specific aspects of the process are observed.

  1. Mechanical Systems, Classical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Teodorescu, Petre P

    2009-01-01

    This third volume completes the Work Mechanical Systems, Classical Models. The first two volumes dealt with particle dynamics and with discrete and continuous mechanical systems. The present volume studies analytical mechanics. Topics like Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, the Hamilton-Jacobi method, and a study of systems with separate variables are thoroughly discussed. Also included are variational principles and canonical transformations, integral invariants and exterior differential calculus, and particular attention is given to non-holonomic mechanical systems. The author explains in detail all important aspects of the science of mechanics, regarded as a natural science, and shows how they are useful in understanding important natural phenomena and solving problems of interest in applied and engineering sciences. Professor Teodorescu has spent more than fifty years as a Professor of Mechanics at the University of Bucharest and this book relies on the extensive literature on the subject as well as th...

  2. Grassmannization of classical models

    CERN Document Server

    Pollet, Lode; Prokof'ev, Nikolay V; Svistunov, Boris V

    2016-01-01

    Applying Feynman diagrammatics to non-fermionic strongly correlated models with local constraints might seem generically impossible for two separate reasons: (i) the necessity to have a Gaussian (non-interacting) limit on top of which the perturbative diagrammatic expansion is generated by Wick's theorem, and (ii) the Dyson's collapse argument implying that the expansion in powers of coupling constant is divergent. We show that for arbitrary classical lattice models both problems can be solved/circumvented by reformulating the high-temperature expansion (more generally, any discrete representation of the model) in terms of Grassmann integrals. Discrete variables residing on either links, plaquettes, or sites of the lattice are associated with the Grassmann variables in such a way that the partition function (and correlations) of the original system and its Grassmann-field counterpart are identical. The expansion of the latter around its Gaussian point generates Feynman diagrams. A proof-of-principle implement...

  3. Classical and quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    This comprehensive textbook is devoted to classical and quantum cosmology, with particular emphasis on modern approaches to quantum gravity and string theory and on their observational imprint. It covers major challenges in theoretical physics such as the big bang and the cosmological constant problem. An extensive review of standard cosmology, the cosmic microwave background, inflation and dark energy sets the scene for the phenomenological application of all the main quantum-gravity and string-theory models of cosmology. Born of the author's teaching experience and commitment to bridging the gap between cosmologists and theoreticians working beyond the established laws of particle physics and general relativity, this is a unique text where quantum-gravity approaches and string theory are treated on an equal footing. As well as introducing cosmology to undergraduate and graduate students with its pedagogical presentation and the help of 45 solved exercises, this book, which includes an ambitious bibliography...

  4. Citation classics in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryann Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of a scientific article is proportional to the citations it has received. In this study, we set out to identify the most cited works in epileptology in order to evaluate research trends in this field. METHODS: According to the Web of Science database, articles with more than 400 citations qualify as "citation classics". We conducted a literature search on the ISI Web of Science bibliometric database for scientific articles relevant to epilepsy. RESULTS: We retrieved 67 highly cited articles (400 or more citations, which were published in 31 journals: 17 clinical studies, 42 laboratory studies, 5 reviews and 3 classification articles. Clinical studies consisted of epidemiological analyses (n=3, studies on the clinical phenomenology of epilepsy (n=5 – including behavioral and prognostic aspects – and articles focusing on pharmacological (n=6 and non-pharmacological (n=3 treatment. The laboratory studies dealt with genetics (n=6, animal models (n=27, and neurobiology (n=9 – including both neurophysiology and neuropathology studies. The majority (61% of citation classics on epilepsy were published after 1986, possibly reflecting the expansion of research interest in laboratory studies driven by the development of new methodologies, specifically in the fields of genetics and animal models. Consequently, clinical studies were highly cited both before and after the mid 80s, whilst laboratory researches became widely cited after 1990. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the main drivers of scientific impact in the field of epileptology have increasingly become genetic and neurobiological studies, along with research on animal models of epilepsy. These articles are able to gain the highest numbers of citations in the time span of a few years and suggest potential directions for future research.

  5. Entanglement in Quantum-Classical Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail

    2011-01-01

    It is noted that the phenomenon of entanglement is not a prerogative of quantum systems, but also occurs in other, non-classical systems such as quantum-classical hybrids, and covers the concept of entanglement as a special type of global constraint imposed upon a broad class of dynamical systems. Application of hybrid systems for physics of life, as well as for quantum-inspired computing, has been outlined. In representing the Schroedinger equation in the Madelung form, there is feedback from the Liouville equation to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the form of the quantum potential. Preserving the same topology, the innovators replaced the quantum potential with other types of feedback, and investigated the property of these hybrid systems. A function of probability density has been introduced. Non-locality associated with a global geometrical constraint that leads to an entanglement effect was demonstrated. Despite such a quantum like characteristic, the hybrid can be of classical scale and all the measurements can be performed classically. This new emergence of entanglement sheds light on the concept of non-locality in physics.

  6. Metal Ion Modeling Using Classical Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Merz, Kenneth M

    2017-02-08

    Metal ions play significant roles in numerous fields including chemistry, geochemistry, biochemistry, and materials science. With computational tools increasingly becoming important in chemical research, methods have emerged to effectively face the challenge of modeling metal ions in the gas, aqueous, and solid phases. Herein, we review both quantum and classical modeling strategies for metal ion-containing systems that have been developed over the past few decades. This Review focuses on classical metal ion modeling based on unpolarized models (including the nonbonded, bonded, cationic dummy atom, and combined models), polarizable models (e.g., the fluctuating charge, Drude oscillator, and the induced dipole models), the angular overlap model, and valence bond-based models. Quantum mechanical studies of metal ion-containing systems at the semiempirical, ab initio, and density functional levels of theory are reviewed as well with a particular focus on how these methods inform classical modeling efforts. Finally, conclusions and future prospects and directions are offered that will further enhance the classical modeling of metal ion-containing systems.

  7. Metal Ion Modeling Using Classical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Metal ions play significant roles in numerous fields including chemistry, geochemistry, biochemistry, and materials science. With computational tools increasingly becoming important in chemical research, methods have emerged to effectively face the challenge of modeling metal ions in the gas, aqueous, and solid phases. Herein, we review both quantum and classical modeling strategies for metal ion-containing systems that have been developed over the past few decades. This Review focuses on classical metal ion modeling based on unpolarized models (including the nonbonded, bonded, cationic dummy atom, and combined models), polarizable models (e.g., the fluctuating charge, Drude oscillator, and the induced dipole models), the angular overlap model, and valence bond-based models. Quantum mechanical studies of metal ion-containing systems at the semiempirical, ab initio, and density functional levels of theory are reviewed as well with a particular focus on how these methods inform classical modeling efforts. Finally, conclusions and future prospects and directions are offered that will further enhance the classical modeling of metal ion-containing systems. PMID:28045509

  8. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of interfaces using classical density functional theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johannessen, E.; Gross, J.; Bedeaux, D.

    2008-01-01

    A vapor-liquid interface introduces resistivities for mass and heat transfer. These resistivities have recently been determined from molecular simulations, as well as theoretically using the van der Waals square gradient model. This model, however, does not allow for direct quantitative comparison t

  9. Classical-Quantum Correspondence by Means of Probability Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegas, Gabino Torres; Morales-Guzman, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    Within the frame of the recently introduced phase space representation of non relativistic quantum mechanics, we propose a Lagrangian from which the phase space Schrodinger equation can be derived. From that Lagrangian, the associated conservation equations, according to Noether's theorem, are obtained. This shows that one can analyze quantum systems completely in phase space as it is done in coordinate space, without additional complications.

  10. Classical Fourier analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Grafakos, Loukas

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this text is to present the theoretical foundation of the field of Fourier analysis on Euclidean spaces. It covers classical topics such as interpolation, Fourier series, the Fourier transform, maximal functions, singular integrals, and Littlewood–Paley theory. The primary readership is intended to be graduate students in mathematics with the prerequisite including satisfactory completion of courses in real and complex variables. The coverage of topics and exposition style are designed to leave no gaps in understanding and stimulate further study. This third edition includes new Sections 3.5, 4.4, 4.5 as well as a new chapter on “Weighted Inequalities,” which has been moved from GTM 250, 2nd Edition. Appendices I and B.9 are also new to this edition.  Countless corrections and improvements have been made to the material from the second edition. Additions and improvements include: more examples and applications, new and more relevant hints for the existing exercises, new exercises, and...

  11. Grassmannization of classical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet, Lode; Kiselev, Mikhail N.; Prokof'ev, Nikolay V.; Svistunov, Boris V.

    2016-11-01

    Applying Feynman diagrammatics to non-fermionic strongly correlated models with local constraints might seem generically impossible for two separate reasons: (i) the necessity to have a Gaussian (non-interacting) limit on top of which the perturbative diagrammatic expansion is generated by Wick’s theorem, and (ii) Dyson’s collapse argument implying that the expansion in powers of coupling constant is divergent. We show that for arbitrary classical lattice models both problems can be solved/circumvented by reformulating the high-temperature expansion (more generally, any discrete representation of the model) in terms of Grassmann integrals. Discrete variables residing on either links, plaquettes, or sites of the lattice are associated with the Grassmann variables in such a way that the partition function (as well as all correlation functions) of the original system and its Grassmann-field counterpart are identical. The expansion of the latter around its Gaussian point generates Feynman diagrams. Our work paves the way for studying lattice gauge theories by treating bosonic and fermionic degrees of freedom on equal footing.

  12. Time, classical and quantum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniello, P.; Ciaglia, F. M.; Di Cosmo, F.; Marmo, G.; Pérez-Pardo, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a new point of view regarding the problem of time in quantum mechanics, based on the idea of replacing the usual time operator T with a suitable real-valued function T on the space of physical states. The proper characterization of the function T relies on a particular relation with the dynamical evolution of the system rather than with the infinitesimal generator of the dynamics (Hamiltonian). We first consider the case of classical hamiltonian mechanics, where observables are functions on phase space and the tools of differential geometry can be applied. The idea is then extended to the case of the unitary evolution of pure states of finite-level quantum systems by means of the geometric formulation of quantum mechanics. It is found that T is a function on the space of pure states which is not associated with any self-adjoint operator. The link between T and the dynamical evolution is interpreted as defining a simultaneity relation for the states of the system with respect to the dynamical evolution itself. It turns out that different dynamical evolutions lead to different notions of simultaneity, i.e., the notion of simultaneity is a dynamical notion.

  13. Classical competing risks

    CERN Document Server

    Crowder, Martin J

    2001-01-01

    If something can fail, it can often fail in one of several ways and sometimes in more than one way at a time. There is always some cause of failure, and almost always, more than one possible cause. In one sense, then, survival analysis is a lost cause. The methods of Competing Risks have often been neglected in the survival analysis literature. Written by a leading statistician, Classical Competing Risks thoroughly examines the probability framework and statistical analysis of data of Competing Risks. The author explores both the theory of the subject and the practicalities of fitting the models to data. In a coherent, self-contained, and sequential account, the treatment moves from the bare bones of the Competing Risks setup and the associated likelihood functions through survival analysis using hazard functions. It examines discrete failure times and the difficulties of identifiability, and concludes with an introduction to the counting-process approach and the associated martingale theory.With a dearth of ...

  14. Classics in radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Woodruff Turner

    1982-01-01

    Radio techniques were the nrst to lead astronomy away from the quiescent and limited Universe revealed by traditional observations at optical wave­ lengths. In the earliest days of radio astronomy, a handful of radio physicists and engineers made one startling discovery after another as they opened up the radio sky. With this collection of classic papers and the extensive intro­ ductory material, the reader can experience these exciting discoveries, as well as understand the developing techniques and follow the motivations which prompted the various lines of inquiry. For instance he or she will follow in detail the several attempts to detect radio waves from the sun at the turn of the century; the unravelling by Jansky of a "steady hiss type static"; the incredible story of Reber who built a 9 meter dish in his backyard in 1937 and then mapped the Milky Way; the vital discoveries by Hey and colleagues of radio bursts from the Sun and of a discrete source in the constellation of Cygnus; the development of re...

  15. Behavior Modification in Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Annette Rutt; Stillman, Stephen M.

    1979-01-01

    An example of behavior modification used in athletic coaching is presented. The case study involves a member of a women's basketball team and details the use of behavior modification for both weight reduction and skill improvement. (JMF)

  16. Information transport in classical statistical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wetterich, C

    2016-01-01

    In many materials or equilibrium statistical systems the information of boundary conditions is lost inside the bulk of the material. In contrast, we describe here static classical statistical probability distributions for which bulk properties depend on boundary conditions. Such "static memory materials" can be realized if no unique equilibrium state exists. The propagation of information from the boundary to the bulk is described by a classical wave function or a density matrix, which obey generalized Schr\\"odinger or von Neumann equations. For static memory materials the evolution within a subsector is unitary, as characteristic for the time evolution in quantum mechanics. The space-dependence in static memory materials can be used as an analogue representation of the time evolution in quantum mechanics - such materials are "quantum simulators". For example, an asymmetric Ising model represents the time evolution of relativistic fermions in two-dimensional Minkowski space.

  17. The classic: Bone morphogenetic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urist, Marshall R; Strates, Basil S

    2009-12-01

    This Classic Article is a reprint of the original work by Marshall R. Urist and Basil S. Strates, Bone Morphogenetic Protein. An accompanying biographical sketch of Marshall R. Urist, MD is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-009-1067-4; a second Classic Article is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-009-1069-2; and a third Classic Article is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-009-1070-9. The Classic Article is copyright 1971 by Sage Publications Inc. Journals and is reprinted with permission from Urist MR, Strates BS. Bone morphogenetic protein. J Dent Res. 1971;50:1392-1406.

  18. Unbiased estimators for spatial distribution functions of classical fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, Artur B; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    We use a statistical-mechanical identity closely related to the familiar virial theorem, to derive unbiased estimators for spatial distribution functions of classical fluids. In particular, we obtain estimators for both the fluid density rho(r) in the vicinity of a fixed solute and the pair correlation g(r) of a homogeneous classical fluid. We illustrate the utility of our estimators with numerical examples, which reveal advantages over traditional histogram-based methods of computing such distributions.

  19. Quantum-like picture for intrinsic, classical, arrival distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Vega, Gabino [Physics Department, Cinvestav, Apdo. postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: gabino@fis.cinvestav.mx

    2009-11-20

    We introduce a marginal, quantum-like picture for the arrival of classical quantities in which the representation vectors are the quantities that evolve and probability densities remain static. The representation functions can be seen as probe functions which are the evolution of delta functions with support on a curve in phase space, the time fronts. This procedure provides a classical analog as well as a clear physical interpretation of the 'time eigenstates' used in quantum systems.

  20. Innovation: the classic traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    Never a fad, but always in or out of fashion, innovation gets rediscovered as a growth enabler every half dozen years. Too often, though, grand declarations about innovation are followed by mediocre execution that produces anemic results, and innovation groups are quietly disbanded in cost-cutting drives. Each managerial generation embarks on the same enthusiastic quest for the next new thing. And each generation faces the same vexing challenges- most of which stem from the tensions between protecting existing revenue streams critical to current success and supporting new concepts that may be crucial to future success. In this article, Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter reflects on the four major waves of innovation enthusiasm she's observed over the past 25 years. She describes the classic mistakes companies make in innovation strategy, process, structure, and skills assessment, illustrating her points with a plethora of real-world examples--including AT&T Worldnet, Timberland, and Ocean Spray. A typical strategic blunder is when managers set their hurdles too high or limit the scope of their innovation efforts. Quaker Oats, for instance, was so busy in the 1990s making minor tweaks to its product formulas that it missed larger opportunities in distribution. A common process mistake is when managers strangle innovation efforts with the same rigid planning, budgeting, and reviewing approaches they use in their existing businesses--thereby discouraging people from adapting as circumstances warrant. Companies must be careful how they structure fledgling entities alongside existing ones, Kanter says, to avoid a clash of cultures and agendas--which Arrow Electronics experienced in its attempts to create an online venture. Finally, companies commonly undervalue and underinvest in the human side of innovation--for instance, promoting individuals out of innovation teams long before their efforts can pay off. Kanter offers practical advice for avoiding

  1. Machining, joining and modifications of advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Altenbach, Holm

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the latest advances in mechanical and materials engineering applied to the machining, joining and modification of modern engineering materials. The contributions cover the classical fields of casting, forming and injection moulding as representative manufacturing methods, whereas additive manufacturing methods (rapid prototyping and laser sintering) are treated as more innovative and recent technologies that are paving the way for the manufacturing of shapes and features that traditional methods are unable to deliver. The book also explores water jet cutting as an innovative cutting technology that avoids the heat build-up typical of classical mechanical cutting. It introduces readers to laser cutting as an alternative technology for the separation of materials, and to classical bonding and friction stir welding approaches in the context of joining technologies. In many cases, forming and machining technologies require additional post-treatment to achieve the required level of surface quali...

  2. Operator Formulation of Classical Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Jack

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the construction of an operator formulation of classical mechanics which is directly concerned with wave packets in configuration space and is more similar to that of convential quantum theory than other extant operator formulations of classical mechanics. (Author/HM)

  3. Dynamical Symmetries in Classical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    We show how symmetries of a classical dynamical system can be described in terms of operators that act on the state space for the system. We illustrate our results by considering a number of possible symmetries that a classical dynamical system might have, and for each symmetry we give examples of dynamical systems that do and do not possess that…

  4. Teaching and Demonstrating Classical Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, John; Fernald, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Discusses classroom demonstrations of classical conditioning and notes tendencies to misrepresent Pavlov's procedures. Describes the design and construction of the conditioner that is used for demonstrating classical conditioning. Relates how students experience conditioning, generalization, extinction, discrimination, and spontaneous recovery.…

  5. Classic writings on instructional technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ely, Donald P.; Plomp, Tjeerd

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the selection process of 17 articles for inclusion in the book, "Classic Writings on Instructional Technology." The book brings together original "classic" educational technology articles into one volume to document the history of the field through its literature. It is also an

  6. COMPETITION: CLASSICAL VERSUS NEOCLASSICAL VIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela Cornelia Sandu

    2013-01-01

    Competition is an important element from economical theory. Over time it has experienced several definitions and classifications much of them being contradictory. In this paper I will make a parallel between classical and neoclassical point of view according to competition. Keywords. Competition; neoclassical theory; classical theory; monopolistic; perfect competition.

  7. Classic African American Children's Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Jonda C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to assert that there are classic African American children's books and to identify a sampling of them. The author presents multiple definitions of the term classic based on the responses of children's literature experts and relevant scholarship. Next, the manner in which data were collected and analyzed in regard to…

  8. Classical Music Fan Chen Li

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The heyday of Beijing’s classical music beganin 1993, when top-quality sound equipment andrecords were imported. Also in that year, BeijingMusic Radio presented a classical music programtitled "Fan’s Club" and founded the "Music and

  9. Classical approach in quantum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Solov'ev, Evgeni A

    2010-01-01

    The application of a classical approach to various quantum problems - the secular perturbation approach to quantization of a hydrogen atom in external fields and a helium atom, the adiabatic switching method for calculation of a semiclassical spectrum of hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields, a spontaneous decay of excited states of a hydrogen atom, Gutzwiller's approach to Stark problem, long-lived excited states of a helium atom recently discovered with the help of Poincar$\\acute{\\mathrm{e}}$ section, inelastic transitions in slow and fast electron-atom and ion-atom collisions - is reviewed. Further, a classical representation in quantum theory is discussed. In this representation the quantum states are treating as an ensemble of classical states. This approach opens the way to an accurate description of the initial and final states in classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and a purely classical explanation of tunneling phenomenon. The general aspects of the structure of the semicla...

  10. Classical dynamics a modern perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sudarshan, Ennackal Chandy George

    2016-01-01

    Classical dynamics is traditionally treated as an early stage in the development of physics, a stage that has long been superseded by more ambitious theories. Here, in this book, classical dynamics is treated as a subject on its own as well as a research frontier. Incorporating insights gained over the past several decades, the essential principles of classical dynamics are presented, while demonstrating that a number of key results originally considered only in the context of quantum theory and particle physics, have their foundations in classical dynamics.Graduate students in physics and practicing physicists will welcome the present approach to classical dynamics that encompasses systems of particles, free and interacting fields, and coupled systems. Lie groups and Lie algebras are incorporated at a basic level and are used in describing space-time symmetry groups. There is an extensive discussion on constrained systems, Dirac brackets and their geometrical interpretation. The Lie-algebraic description of ...

  11. Classical limit for semirelativistic Hartree systems

    KAUST Repository

    Aki, Gonca L.

    2008-01-01

    We consider the three-dimensional semirelativistic Hartree model for fast quantum mechanical particles moving in a self-consistent field. Under appropriate assumptions on the initial density matrix as a (fully) mixed quantum state we prove by using Wigner transformation techniques that its classical limit yields the well known relativistic Vlasov-Poisson system. The result holds for the case of attractive and repulsive mean-field interactions, with an additional size constraint in the attractive case. © 2008 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Classical and quantum anisotropic Heisenberg antiferromagnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Selke

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study classical and quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnets with exchange anisotropy of XXZ-type and crystal field single-ion terms of quadratic and quartic form in a field. The magnets display a variety of phases, including the spin-flop (or, in the quantum case, spin-liquid and biconical (corresponding, in the quantum lattice gas description, to supersolid phases. Applying ground-state considerations, Monte Carlo and density matrix renormalization group methods, the impact of quantum effects and lattice dimension is analysed. Interesting critical and multicritical behaviour may occur at quantum and thermal phase transitions.

  13. Monopoles and Modifications of Bundles over Elliptic Curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey M. Levin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of bundles over complex curves is an operation that allows one to construct a new bundle from a given one. Modifications can change a topological type of bundle. We describe the topological type in terms of the characteristic classes of the bundle. Being applied to the Higgs bundles modifications establish an equivalence between different classical integrable systems. Following Kapustin and Witten we define the modifications in terms of monopole solutions of the Bogomolny equation. We find the Dirac monopole solution in the case R × (elliptic curve. This solution is a three-dimensional generalization of the Kronecker series. We give two representations for this solution and derive a functional equation for it generalizing the Kronecker results. We use it to define Abelian modifications for bundles of arbitrary rank. We also describe non-Abelian modifications in terms of theta-functions with characteristic.

  14. On Classical Ideal Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaud, Jacques; Philippe, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    The air density on earth decays as a function of altitude $z$ approximately according to an $\\exp(-w\\,z/\\theta)$-law, where $w$ denotes the weight of a nitrogen molecule and $\\theta=\\kB T$ where $k_B$ is a constant and $T$ is the thermodynamic temperature. To derive this law one usually invokes the Boltzmann factor, itself derived from statistical considerations. We show that this (barometric) law may be derived solely from the democritian concept of corpuscles moving in vacuum. We employ a principle of simplicity, namely that this law is \\emph{independent} of the law of corpuscle motion. This view-point puts aside restrictive assumptions that are source of confusion. Similar observations apply to the ideal-gas law. In the absence of gravity, when a cylinder terminated by a piston, containing a single corpuscle and with height $h$ has temperature $\\theta$, the average force that the corpuscle exerts on the piston is: $\\ave{F}=\\theta/h$. This law is valid at any temperature, except at very low temperatures whe...

  15. ENVIRONMENTALISM AND CLASSIC PARADIGMS OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Miniaeva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines an environmentalism integration process into Three classical paradigms of international relations theory (Liberalism, Realism and Marxism into Three classical paradigms of international relations theory (Liberalism, Realism and Marxism. The main purpose of this study is to reveal the result of this integration. Methods used in this article include analysis and comparison of "ecological" paradigms on selected parameters (the nature of international relations, actors, targets, tools, processes. Results of research show that the beginning of the XXI century is distinguished by the development of new types of political concepts that explain interaction of elements in modern international relations in the area of environmental protection. The reason of these changes lies in the phenomena of environmentalism integration into Three paradigms of international relations. However, we cannot say that any of the examined paradigms accumulated all features of environmentalism without their modification. Better to say, it's rather similar to adaptation of environmental ideas. Therefore, to understand modern international relations processes, it is necessary to take into account their environmental element. Purchase on Elibrary.ru > Buy nowDOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2070-7568-2014-3-4

  16. Testing single-parameter classical standpoint cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Chew, Geoffrey Foucar

    1995-01-01

    Experimental tests of homogeneous-universe classical standpoint cosmology are proposed after presentation of conceptual considerations that encourage this radical departure from the standard model. Among predictions of the new model are standpoint age equal to Hubble time, energy-density parameter \\Omega_0 = 2 - \\sqrt{2} =.586, and relations between redshift, Hubble-scale distribution of matter and galaxy luminosity and angular diameter. These latter relations coincide with those of the standard model for zero deceleration. With eye to further tests, geodesics of the non-Riemannian standpoint metric are explicitly given. Although a detailed thermodynamic ``youthful-standpoint'' approximation remains to be developed (for particle mean free path small on standpoint scale), standpoint temperature depending only on standpoint age is a natural concept, paralleling energy density and redshift that perpetuates thermal spectrum for cosmic background radiation. Prospects for primordial nucleosynthesis are promising.

  17. Classical Knowledge for Quantum Security

    CERN Document Server

    D'Hondt, Ellie

    2008-01-01

    We propose a decision procedure for analysing security of quantum cryptographic protocols, combining a classical algebraic rewrite system for knowledge with an operational semantics for quantum distributed computing. As a test case, we use our procedure to reason about security properties of a recently developed quantum secret sharing protocol that uses graph states. We analyze three different scenarios based on the safety assumptions of the classical and quantum channels and discover the path of an attack in the presence of an adversary. The epistemic analysis that leads to this and similar types of attacks is purely based on our classical notion of knowledge.

  18. Quantum localization of Classical Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Batalin, Igor A

    2016-01-01

    Quantum localization of classical mechanics within the BRST-BFV and BV (or field-antifield) quantization methods are studied. It is shown that a special choice of gauge fixing functions (or BRST-BFV charge) together with the unitary limit leads to Hamiltonian localization in the path integral of the BRST-BFV formalism. In turn, we find that a special choice of gauge fixing functions being proportional to extremals of an initial non-degenerate classical action together with a very special solution of the classical master equation result in Lagrangian localization in the partition function of the BV formalism.

  19. Quantum localization of classical mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalin, Igor A.; Lavrov, Peter M.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum localization of classical mechanics within the BRST-BFV and BV (or field-antifield) quantization methods are studied. It is shown that a special choice of gauge fixing functions (or BRST-BFV charge) together with the unitary limit leads to Hamiltonian localization in the path integral of the BRST-BFV formalism. In turn, we find that a special choice of gauge fixing functions being proportional to extremals of an initial non-degenerate classical action together with a very special solution of the classical master equation result in Lagrangian localization in the partition function of the BV formalism.

  20. The Wigner representation of classical mechanics, quantization and classical limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolivar, A.O. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2001-08-01

    Starting from the Liouvillian formulation of classical physics it is possible by means of a Fourier transform to introduce the Wigner representation and to derive an operator structure to classical mechanisms. The importance of this new representation lies on the fact that it turns out to be suitable route to establish a general method of quantization directly from the equations of motion without alluding to the existence of Hamiltonian and Lagrangian functions. Following this approach we quantize only the motion of a Browian particle with non-linear friction in the Markovian approximation - the thermal bath may be quantum or classical -, thus when the bath is classically described we obtain a master equation which reduces to Caldeira-Legget equation for the linear friction case, and when the reservoir is quantum we get an equation reducing to the one found by Caldeira et al. By neglecting the environmental influence we show that the system can be approximately described by equations of motion in terms of wave function, such as the Schrodinger-Langevin equation and equations of the Caldirola-Kanai type. Finally to make the present study self-consistent we evaluate the classical limit of these dynamical equations employing a new classical limiting method h/2{pi} {yields} 0. (author)

  1. Enzymatic modification of starch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Susanne Langgård

    In the food industry approaches for using bioengineering are investigated as alternatives to conventional chemical and physical starch modification techniques in development of starches with specific properties. Enzyme-assisted post-harvest modification is an interesting approach to this, since...... branching connecting larger chain segments. In case of high BE activity this transfer happened prior to hydration and phase separation. The starch substrates thereby became locked in their granular structure and blocked furher access of BE. Transferase-based modification of starch has today almost...... exclusively been conducted on gelatinized starch. This study provides a new concept for transferase-based modification of starches in granular state....

  2. New perspectives on classical electromagnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Cote, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    The fallacies associated with the gauge concept in electromagnetism are illustrated. A clearer and more valid formulation of the basics of classical electromagnetism is provided by recognizing existing physical constraints as well as the physical reality of the vector potential.

  3. Soundscape of classical Chinese garden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With deep humanized connotation,the classical Chinese garden uses human intuitive sensation and personal poetic observation to express natural sound phenomena.It differs from the rational modern soundscape in western countries.

  4. Invariants from classical field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a method that generates invariant functions from classical field theories depending on external parameters. We apply our method to several field theories such as abelian BF, Chern-Simons and 2-dimensional Yang-Mills theory.

  5. From Classical to Quantum Transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjeev Kumar

    2009-01-01

    In this article the classical transistor and the basic physics underlying the operation of single electron transistor are presented; a brief history of transistor and current technological issues are discussed.

  6. From Classical to Quantum Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article the classical transistor and the basic physics underlying the operation of single electron transistor are presented; a brief history of transistor and current technological issues are discussed.

  7. Classical Mechanics and Symplectic Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordkvist, Nikolaj; Hjorth, Poul G.

    2005-01-01

    Content: Classical mechanics: Calculus of variations, Lagrange’s equations, Symmetries and Noether’s theorem, Hamilton’s equations, cannonical transformations, integrable systems, pertubation theory. Symplectic integration: Numerical integrators, symplectic integrators, main theorem on symplectic...

  8. Electrostatics interactions in classical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, G Andrés; Babin, Volodymyr; Sagui, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions are crucial for both the accuracy and performance of atomistic biomolecular simulations. In this chapter we review well-established methods and current developments aiming at efficiency and accuracy. Specifically, we review the classical Ewald summations, particle-particle particle-method particle-method Ewald algorithms, multigrid, fast multipole, and local methods. We also highlight some recent developments targeting more accurate, yet classical, representation of the molecular charge distribution.

  9. Classical Transitions for Flux Vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Deskins, J Tate; Yang, I-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    We present the simplest model for classical transitions in flux vacua. A complex field with a spontaneously broken U(1) symmetry is embedded in $M_2\\times S_1$. We numerically construct different winding number vacua, the vortices interpolating between them, and simulate the collisions of these vortices. We show that classical transitions are generic at large boosts, independent of whether or not vortices miss each other in the compact $S_1$.

  10. New Perspective on Classical Electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    R. Feynman , R. Leighton, and M. Sands, The Feynman Lectures in Physics vol II (Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA, 1964). 6. W.K.H. Panofsky and M...of the basics of classical electromagnetism is provided by recognizing a previously overlooked law of induction as well as the physical reality of the...classical electromagnetism is provided by recognizing a previously overlooked law of induction as well as the physical reality of the vector potential

  11. Classical theory of radiating strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Edmund J.; Haws, D.; Hindmarsh, M.

    1990-01-01

    The divergent part of the self force of a radiating string coupled to gravity, an antisymmetric tensor and a dilaton in four dimensions are calculated to first order in classical perturbation theory. While this divergence can be absorbed into a renormalization of the string tension, demanding that both it and the divergence in the energy momentum tensor vanish forces the string to have the couplings of compactified N = 1 D = 10 supergravity. In effect, supersymmetry cures the classical infinities.

  12. No-broadcasting theorem and its classical counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalev, Amir; Hen, Itay

    2008-05-30

    Although it is widely accepted that "no-broadcasting"-the nonclonability of quantum information-is a fundamental principle of quantum mechanics, an impossibility theorem for the broadcasting of general density matrices has not yet been formulated. In this Letter, we present a general proof for the no-broadcasting theorem, which applies to arbitrary density matrices. The proof relies on entropic considerations, and as such can also be directly linked to its classical counterpart, which applies to probabilistic distributions of statistical ensembles.

  13. Principles of maximally classical and maximally realistic quantum mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S M Roy

    2002-08-01

    Recently Auberson, Mahoux, Roy and Singh have proved a long standing conjecture of Roy and Singh: In 2-dimensional phase space, a maximally realistic quantum mechanics can have quantum probabilities of no more than + 1 complete commuting cets (CCS) of observables coexisting as marginals of one positive phase space density. Here I formulate a stationary principle which gives a nonperturbative definition of a maximally classical as well as maximally realistic phase space density. I show that the maximally classical trajectories are in fact exactly classical in the simple examples of coherent states and bound states of an oscillator and Gaussian free particle states. In contrast, it is known that the de Broglie–Bohm realistic theory gives highly nonclassical trajectories.

  14. Permit application modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils.

  15. Semi-classical limit of relativistic quantum mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Kocis

    2005-07-01

    It is shown that the semi-classical limit of solutions to the Klein–Gordon equation gives the particle probability density that is in direct proportion to the inverse of the particle velocity. It is also shown that in the case of the Dirac equation a different result is obtained.

  16. Road density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  17. Comparison of several innovative bridge cable surface modifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleissl, Kenneth; Georgakis, Christos T.

    Over the last two decades, several bridge cable manufacturers have introduced surface modifications on the high-density polyethylene (HDPE) sheathing that is installed for the protection of inner cable strands or wires. The modifications are based on research undertaken predominantly in Europe an...

  18. Hermeneutic reading of classic texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Camilla A-L; Lindström, Unni Å

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to broaden the understandinfg of the hermeneutic reading of classic texts. The aim is to show how the choice of a specific scientific tradition in conjunction with a methodological approach creates the foundation that clarifies the actual realization of the reading. This hermeneutic reading of classic texts is inspired by Gadamer's notion that it is the researcher's own research tradition and a clearly formulated theoretical fundamental order that shape the researcher's attitude towards texts and create the starting point that guides all reading, uncovering and interpretation. The researcher's ethical position originates in a will to openness towards what is different in the text and which constantly sets the researcher's preunderstanding and research tradition in movement. It is the researcher's attitude towards the text that allows the text to address, touch and arouse wonder. Through a flexible, lingering and repeated reading of classic texts, what is different emerges with a timeless value. The reading of classic texts is an act that may rediscover and create understanding for essential dimensions and of human beings' reality on a deeper level. The hermeneutic reading of classic texts thus brings to light constantly new possibilities of uncovering for a new envisioning and interpretation for a new understanding of the essential concepts and phenomena within caring science.

  19. Does classical liberalism imply democracy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ellerman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a fault line running through classical liberalism as to whether or not democratic self-governance is a necessary part of a liberal social order. The democratic and non-democratic strains of classical liberalism are both present today—particularly in the United States. Many contemporary libertarians and neo-Austrian economists represent the non-democratic strain in their promotion of non-democratic sovereign city-states (start-up cities or charter cities. We will take the late James M. Buchanan as a representative of the democratic strain of classical liberalism. Since the fundamental norm of classical liberalism is consent, we must start with the intellectual history of the voluntary slavery contract, the coverture marriage contract, and the voluntary non-democratic constitution (or pactum subjectionis. Next we recover the theory of inalienable rights that descends from the Reformation doctrine of the inalienability of conscience through the Enlightenment (e.g. Spinoza and Hutcheson in the abolitionist and democratic movements. Consent-based governments divide into those based on the subjects’ alienation of power to a sovereign and those based on the citizens’ delegation of power to representatives. Inalienable rights theory rules out that alienation in favor of delegation, so the citizens remain the ultimate principals and the form of government is democratic. Thus the argument concludes in agreement with Buchanan that the classical liberal endorsement of sovereign individuals acting in the marketplace generalizes to the joint action of individuals as the principals in their own organizations.

  20. No Return to Classical Reality

    CERN Document Server

    Jennings, David

    2015-01-01

    At a fundamental level, the classical picture of the world is dead, and has been dead now for almost a century. Pinning down exactly which quantum phenomena are responsible for this has proved to be a tricky and controversial question, but a lot of progress has been made in the past few decades. We now have a range of precise statements showing that whatever the ultimate laws of Nature are, they cannot be classical. In this article, we review results on the fundamental phenomena of quantum theory that cannot be understood in classical terms. We proceed by first granting quite a broad notion of classicality, describe a range of quantum phenomena (such as randomness, discreteness, the indistinguishability of states, measurement-uncertainty, measurement-disturbance, complementarity, noncommutativity, interference, the no-cloning theorem, and the collapse of the wave-packet) that do fall under its liberal scope, and then finally describe some aspects of quantum physics that can never admit a classical understandi...

  1. Classical approach in atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solov'ev, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    The application of a classical approach to various quantum problems - the secular perturbation approach to quantization of a hydrogen atom in external fields and a helium atom, the adiabatic switching method for calculation of a semiclassical spectrum of a hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields, a spontaneous decay of excited states of a hydrogen atom, Gutzwiller's approach to Stark problem, long-lived excited states of a helium atom discovered with the help of Poincaré section, inelastic transitions in slow and fast electron-atom and ion-atom collisions - is reviewed. Further, a classical representation in quantum theory is discussed. In this representation the quantum states are treated as an ensemble of classical states. This approach opens the way to an accurate description of the initial and final states in classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and a purely classical explanation of tunneling phenomenon. The general aspects of the structure of the semiclassical series such as renormgroup symmetry, criterion of accuracy and so on are reviewed as well.

  2. Classical approach in atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solov' ev, E.A. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    The application of a classical approach to various quantum problems - the secular perturbation approach to quantization of a hydrogen atom in external fields and a helium atom, the adiabatic switching method for calculation of a semiclassical spectrum of a hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields, a spontaneous decay of excited states of a hydrogen atom, Gutzwiller's approach to Stark problem, long-lived excited states of a helium atom discovered with the help of Poincare section, inelastic transitions in slow and fast electron-atom and ion-atom collisions - is reviewed. Further, a classical representation in quantum theory is discussed. In this representation the quantum states are treated as an ensemble of classical states. This approach opens the way to an accurate description of the initial and final states in classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and a purely classical explanation of tunneling phenomenon. The general aspects of the structure of the semiclassical series such as renormalization group symmetry, criterion of accuracy and so on are reviewed as well. (author)

  3. Population in the classic economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Doğruyol

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Growth subject in economics is an important factor of development. Classic economics ecole indicates the population as main variable which tender of growth. On the other hand T. R. Malthus is known as economist who regards population as a problem and brings up it among the classical economists. However, Adam Smith is an intellectual who discussed population problem earlier on the classic economics theory. According to Adam Smith one of the main factors that realise the growth is labour. In addition to population made it established. The aim of this study is analyzing the mental relationship between Malthus whose name has been identified with relation between population-growth and Smith who discussed this subject first time but put it off on process of theorisation.

  4. Optimum Onager: The Classical Mechanics of a Classical Siege Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The onager is a throwing weapon of classical antiquity, familiar to both the ancient Greeks and Romans. Here we analyze the dynamics of onager operation and derive the optimum angle for launching a projectile to its maximum range. There is plenty of scope for further considerations about increasing onager range, and so by thinking about how this…

  5. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  6. Classical planning and causal implicatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blackburn, Patrick Rowan; Benotti, Luciana

    In this paper we motivate and describe a dialogue manager (called Frolog) which uses classical planning to infer causal implicatures. A causal implicature is a type of Gricean relation implicature, a highly context dependent form of inference. As we shall see, causal implicatures are important...... to generate clarification requests"; as a result we can model task-oriented dialogue as an interactive process locally structured by negotiation of the underlying task. We give several examples of Frolog-human dialog, discuss the limitations imposed by the classical planning paradigm, and indicate...

  7. Comparing classical and quantum equilibration

    CERN Document Server

    Malabarba, Artur S L; Short, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    By using a physically-relevant and theory independent definition of measurement-based equilibration, we show quantitatively that equilibration is easier for quantum systems than for classical systems, in the situation where the initial state of the system is completely known (pure state). This shows that quantum equilibration is a fundamental, nigh unavoidable, aspect of physical systems, while classical equilibration relies on experimental ignorance. When the state is not completely known, a mixed state, this framework also shows quantum equilibration requires weaker conditions.

  8. Principal bundles the classical case

    CERN Document Server

    Sontz, Stephen Bruce

    2015-01-01

    This introductory graduate level text provides a relatively quick path to a special topic in classical differential geometry: principal bundles.  While the topic of principal bundles in differential geometry has become classic, even standard, material in the modern graduate mathematics curriculum, the unique approach taken in this text presents the material in a way that is intuitive for both students of mathematics and of physics. The goal of this book is to present important, modern geometric ideas in a form readily accessible to students and researchers in both the physics and mathematics communities, providing each with an understanding and appreciation of the language and ideas of the other.

  9. Quantum teleportation without classical channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Amri, M.; Li, Zheng-Hong; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-11-01

    For the first time, we show how quantum teleportation can be achieved without the assistance of classical channels. Our protocol does not need any pre-established entangled photon pairs beforehand. Just by utilizing quantum Zeno effect and couterfactual communication idea, we can achieve two goals; entangling a photon and an atom and also disentangling them by non-local interaction. Information is completely transferred from atom to photon with controllable disentanglement processes. More importantly, there is no need to confirm teleportation results via classical channels.

  10. 氩气低温等离子体处理HDPE薄膜表面的性能研究%Study on Surface Modification of High Density Polyethylene ( HDPE ) Film by Low Temperature Plasma Treatment of Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建龙; 王正祥; 解林坤; 顾丽争

    2012-01-01

    The surface of high density polyethylene was modified using low temperature Ar plasma technology under the condition of vacuum pressure of 20 Pa and treatment power of 30 W. The results have been analyzed and characterized with water contact angle measurement, scanned electron microscopy(SEM), atomic force microscopy(AFM), XPS, etc. The results show that the weight loss rate of per unit area has reached maximum value at discharge time of 90 seconds during the treatment time of 0 -300 s; the water contact angle sharply decreased in the 0 - 160 s treatment time and their values did not cause significant changes during the 160 -300 s treatment time; the water contact angle gradually increased with the longer standing time; the surface of HDPE could form some polar species such as carbonyl, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups and the binding energy of the surface changed after treatment by low temperature Ar plasma.%利用低温等离子体,以氩气为工作气体,在工作压强为20Pa、处理功率为30w的条件下对HDPE薄膜进行了表面改性。用接触角、SEM、AFM、XPS等手段对改性结果进行了分析和表征。研究结果表明:在0~300s的处理时间内,失重率在处理时间为90s左右时达最大值;接触角在0~160s内随处理时间的增加显著减小,而在160~300s的处理时间内没有发生明显变化;改性后的接触角随着放置时间的推移出现微弱回复;HDPE薄膜经过氩气低温等离子体处理后,能在其表面形成各种极性基团,主要是羰基、羟基和羧基,且薄膜经处理后,其表面的结合能及平面光洁度发生了改变。

  11. Classical and relativistic flux of energy conservation in astrophysical jets

    CERN Document Server

    Zaninetti, L

    2016-01-01

    The conservation of the energy flux in turbulent jets which propagate in the intergalactic medium (IGM) allows deducing the law of motion in the classical and relativistic cases. Three types of IGM are considered: constant density, hyperbolic and inverse power law decrease of density. An analytical law for the evolution of the magnetic field along the radio-jets is deduced using a linear relation between the magnetic pressure and the rest density. Astrophysical applications are made to the centerline intensity of synchrotron emission in NGC315 and to the magnetic field of 3C273.

  12. Generation of longitudinal electric current by the transversal electromagnetic field in classical and quantum plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, A V

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of nonlinear interaction of transversal electromagnetic field with degenerate collisionless classical and quantum plasmas is carried out. Formulas for calculation electric current in degenerate collisionless classical and quantum plasmas are deduced. It has appeared, that the nonlinearity account leads to occurrence of longitudinal electric current directed along a wave vector. This second current is orthogonal to the known transversal current, received at the classical linear analysis. Graphic comparison of density of electric current for classical degenerate Fermi plasmas and Fermi-Dirac plasmas (plasmas with any degree of degeneration of electronic gas) is carried out. Graphic comparison of density of electric current for classical and quantum degenerate plasmas is carried out. Also comparison of dependence of density of electric current of quantum degenerate plasmas from dimensionless wave number at various values of dimensionless frequency of oscillations of electromagnetic field is carried ...

  13. End Group Modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnsen, Rasmus O; Sandberg-Schaal, Anne; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2015-01-01

    modification with hydrophobic moieties led to increased activity towards the Gram-negative Acinetobacter baumannii. Despite increased cytotoxicity against murine fibroblasts and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, the optimized peptide analogues exhibited significantly improved cell selectivity. Overall...

  14. Benign Weather Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    operational interest in modifying weather to support combat operations increased, ultimately leading to a multi-service effort called PROJECT POPEYE . The goal...This, coupled with the revelations concerning weather modification use in the Vietnam War (PROJECT POPEYE ), was a double blow to weather modification...AWS-TR-74-247, June 1984. Cobb, James T., Jr., et. al. Project Popeye : Final Report. China Lake, CA: Naval Weapons Center, 1967. Langmuir, Irving

  15. Quantitative proteomic approaches to studying histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, Barry M; Young, Nicolas L; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2011-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) positively and negatively regulate gene expression, and are consequently a vital influence on the genomic profile of all eukaryotic species. The study of histone PTMs using classical methods in molecular biology, such as immunofluorescence and Western blotting, is challenging given the technical issues of the approaches, and chemical diversity and combinatorial patterns of the modifications. In light of these many technical limitations, mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as the most unbiased and rigorous experimental platform to identify and quantify histone PTMs in a high-throughput manner. This review covers the latest developments in mass spectrometry for the analysis of histone PTMs, with the hope of inspiring the continued integration of proteomic, genomic and epigenetic research.

  16. Teaching Classical Mechanics Using Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrier, Joel; Madani, Laya; Ledenmat, Simon; Bsiesy, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    A number of articles published in this column have dealt with topics in classical mechanics. This note describes some additional examples employing a smartphone and the new software iMecaProf. Steve Jobs presented the iPhone as "perfect for gaming." Thanks to its microsensors connected in real time to the numerical world, physics…

  17. Supersymmetric classical mechanics: free case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R. de Lima [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]|[Paraiba Univ., Cajazeiras, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e da Natureza]. E-mail: rafael@cfp.ufpb.br; Almeida, W. Pires de [Paraiba Univ., Cajazeiras, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e da Natureza; Fonseca Neto, I. [Paraiba Univ., Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2001-06-01

    We present a review work on Supersymmetric Classical Mechanics in the context of a Lagrangian formalism, with N = 1-supersymmetry. We show that the N = 1 supersymmetry does not allow the introduction of a potencial energy term depending on a single commuting supercoordinate, {phi}(t;{theta}). (author)

  18. Agglomeration Economies in Classical Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borowiecki, Karol Jan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates agglomeration effects for classical music production in a wide range of cities for a global sample of composers born between 1750 and 1899. Theory suggests a trade-off between agglomeration economies (peer effects) and diseconomies (peer crowding). I test this hypothesis...

  19. Classical and quantum Coulomb crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Bonitz, M; Baumgartner, H; Henning, C; Filinov, A; Block, D; Arp, O; Piel, A; Kading, S; Ivanov, Y; Melzer, A; Fehske, H; Filinov, V

    2008-01-01

    Strong correlation effects in classical and quantum plasmas are discussed. In particular, Coulomb (Wigner) crystallization phenomena are reviewed focusing on one-component non-neutral plasmas in traps and on macroscopic two-component neutral plasmas. The conditions for crystal formation in terms of critical values of the coupling parameters and the distance fluctuations and the phase diagram of Coulomb crystals are discussed.

  20. Classical Syllogisms in Logic Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Peter; Sandborg-Petersen, Ulrik; Thorvaldsen, Steinar

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the challenges of introducing classical syllogisms in university courses in elementary logic and human reasoning. Using a program written in Prolog+CG, some empirical studies have been carried out involving three groups of students in Denmark; one group of philosophy student...

  1. On classical and quantum liftings

    CERN Document Server

    Accardi, L; Kossakowski, A; Matsuoka, T; Ohya, M

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the procedure of lifting in classical stochastic and quantum systems. It enables one to `lift' a state of a system into a state of `system+reservoir'. This procedure is important both in quantum information theory and the theory of open systems. We illustrate the general theory of liftings by a particular class related to so called circulant states.

  2. Relative Clauses in Classical Nahuatl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langacker, Ronald W.

    1975-01-01

    Jane Rosenthal's paper on relative clauses in Classical Nahuatl is discussed, and it is argued that she misses an important generalization. An alternative analysis to a class of relative pronouns and new rules for the distribution of relative pronouns are proposed. (SC)

  3. On Classical and Quantum Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Volovich, I V; Volovich, Ya.I.

    2001-01-01

    Lectures on classical and quantum cryptography. Contents: Private key cryptosystems. Elements of number theory. Public key cryptography and RSA cryptosystem. Shannon`s entropy and mutual information. Entropic uncertainty relations. The no cloning theorem. The BB84 quantum cryptographic protocol. Security proofs. Bell`s theorem. The EPRBE quantum cryptographic protocol.

  4. Minimum signals in classical physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓文基; 许基桓; 刘平

    2003-01-01

    The bandwidth theorem for Fourier analysis on any time-dependent classical signal is shown using the operator approach to quantum mechanics. Following discussions about squeezed states in quantum optics, the problem of minimum signals presented by a single quantity and its squeezing is proposed. It is generally proved that all such minimum signals, squeezed or not, must be real Gaussian functions of time.

  5. Classical and molecular genetic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brief history of classical genetic mapping in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is described. Detailed descriptions are given of the development of molecular genetic linkage maps based upon various types of DNA markers Like many plant and animal species, the first molecular map of soybean was bas...

  6. Classical Music as Enforced Utopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech-Wilkinson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In classical music composition, whatever thematic or harmonic conflicts may be engineered along the way, everything always turns out for the best. Similar utopian thinking underlies performance: performers see their job as faithfully carrying out their master's (the composer's) wishes. The more perfectly they represent them, the happier the…

  7. Picturing classical and quantum Bayesian inference

    CERN Document Server

    Coecke, Bob

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a graphical framework for Bayesian inference that is sufficiently general to accommodate not just the standard case but also recent proposals for a theory of quantum Bayesian inference wherein one considers density operators rather than probability distributions as representative of degrees of belief. The diagrammatic framework is stated in the graphical language of symmetric monoidal categories and of compact structures and Frobenius structures therein, in which Bayesian inversion boils down to transposition with respect to an appropriate compact structure. We characterize classical Bayesian inference in terms of a graphical property and demonstrate that our approach eliminates some purely conventional elements that appear in common representations thereof, such as whether degrees of belief are represented by probabilities or entropic quantities. We also introduce a quantum-like calculus wherein the Frobenius structure is noncommutative and show that it can accommodate Leifer's calculus of `cond...

  8. Human Rights and Behavior Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Philip

    1974-01-01

    Criticisms of behavior modification, which charge that it violates ethical and legal principles, are discussed and reasons are presented to explain behavior modification's susceptibility to attack. (GW)

  9. No return to classical reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, David; Leifer, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    At a fundamental level, the classical picture of the world is dead, and has been dead now for almost a century. Pinning down exactly which quantum phenomena are responsible for this has proved to be a tricky and controversial question, but a lot of progress has been made in the past few decades. We now have a range of precise statements showing that whatever the ultimate laws of nature are, they cannot be classical. In this article, we review results on the fundamental phenomena of quantum theory that cannot be understood in classical terms. We proceed by first granting quite a broad notion of classicality, describe a range of quantum phenomena (such as randomness, discreteness, the indistinguishability of states, measurement-uncertainty, measurement-disturbance, complementarity, non-commutativity, interference, the no-cloning theorem and the collapse of the wave-packet) that do fall under its liberal scope, and then finally describe some aspects of quantum physics that can never admit a classical understanding - the intrinsically quantum mechanical aspects of nature. The most famous of these is Bell's theorem, but we also review two more recent results in this area. Firstly, Hardy's theorem shows that even a finite-dimensional quantum system must contain an infinite amount of information, and secondly, the Pusey-Barrett-Rudolph theorem shows that the wave function must be an objective property of an individual quantum system. Besides being of foundational interest, results of this sort now find surprising practical applications in areas such as quantum information science and the simulation of quantum systems.

  10. Statistical origin of classical mechanics and quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, S. (Department of Physics, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States))

    1993-11-01

    The classical action for interacting strings, obtained by generalizing the time-symmetric electrodynamics of Wheeler and Feynman, is exactly additive. The additivity of the string action suggests a connection between the area of the string world sheets and entropy. We find that the action principle of classical mechanics is the condition that the total entropy of the strings be at an extremum, and the path-integral representation of the quantum density matrix element is an approximation to the partition function of the string theory.

  11. Does classical mechanics always adequately describe "classical physical reality"

    CERN Document Server

    Shemi-zadeh, V E

    2002-01-01

    The article is dedicated to discussion of irreversibility and foundation of statistical mechanics "from the first principles". Taking into account infinitesimal and, as it seems, neglectful for classical mechanics fluctuations of the physical vacuum, makes a deterministic motion of unstable dynamic systems is broken ("spontaneous determinism breaking", "spontaneous stochastization"). Vacuum fluctuations play part of the trigger, starting the powerful mechanism of exponent instability. The motion of the dynamic systems becomes irreversible and stochastic. Classical mechanics turns out to be applicable only for a small class of stable dynamic systems with zero Kolmogorov-Sinay entropy $h=0$. For alternative "Stochastic mechanics" there are corresponding equations of motion and Master Equation, describing irreversible evolution of the initial distribution function to equilibrium state.

  12. Spin-flux phase in the Kondo lattice model with classical localized spins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agterberg, DF; Yunoki, S

    2000-01-01

    We provide numerical evidence that a spin-flux phase exists as a ground state of the Kondo lattice model with classical local spins on a square lattice. This state manifests itself as a double-e magnetic order in the classical spins with spin density at both (0, pi) and (pi ,0) and further exhibits

  13. Why Can We Copy Classical Information?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Yao; HAO Liang; LONG Gui-Lu

    2011-01-01

    It is pointed out that the noncloning theorem in quantum mechanics also holds for unknown state in linear classical physics. The apparent capability of copying of a classical state is essentially the capability of perfect measurement in classical physics. The difference in copying between quantum and classical physics is the difference in measurement between the two theories. A classical copying process is the combined action of measurement of an unknown state and the preparation of this state onto another system. Hence perfect measurability in classical physics enables the copying of a classical state.

  14. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G

    1977-01-01

    breathing in the sitting position ranged from 0.25 to 0.37 g.cm-3. Subnormal values were found in patients with emphsema. In patients with pulmonary congestion and edema, lung density values ranged from 0.33 to 0.93 g.cm-3. The lung density measurement correlated well with the findings in chest radiographs...

  15. The Classical and Quantum Mechanics of lazy baker Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshminarayan, A

    1993-01-01

    We introduce and study the classical and quantum mechanics of certain non hyperbolic maps on the unit square. These maps are modifications of the usual baker's map and their behaviour ranges from chaotic motion on the whole measure to chaos on a set of measure zero. Thus we have called these maps ``lazy baker maps.'' The aim of introducing these maps is to provide the simplest models of systems with a mixed phase space, in which there are both regular and chaotic motions. We find that despite the obviously contrived nature of these maps they provide a good model for the study of the quantum mechanics of such systems. We notice the effect of a classically chaotic fractal set of measure zero on the corresponding quantum maps, which leads to a transition in the spectral statistics. Some periodic orbits belonging to this fractal set are seen to scar several eigenfunctions.

  16. A model for explaining fusion suppression using classical trajectory method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phookan, C. K.; Kalita, K.

    2015-01-01

    We adopt a semi-classical approach for explanation of projectile breakup and above barrier fusion suppression for the reactions 6Li+152Sm and 6Li+144Sm. The cut-off impact parameter for fusion is determined by employing quantum mechanical ideas. Within this cut-off impact parameter for fusion, the fraction of projectiles undergoing breakup is determined using the method of classical trajectory in two-dimensions. For obtaining the initial conditions of the equations of motion, a simplified model of the 6Li nucleus has been proposed. We introduce a simple formula for explanation of fusion suppression. We find excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated fusion cross section. A slight modification of the above formula for fusion suppression is also proposed for a three-dimensional model.

  17. A model for explaining fusion suppression using classical trajectory method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phookan C. K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We adopt a semi-classical approach for explanation of projectile breakup and above barrier fusion suppression for the reactions 6Li+152Sm and 6Li+144Sm. The cut-off impact parameter for fusion is determined by employing quantum mechanical ideas. Within this cut-off impact parameter for fusion, the fraction of projectiles undergoing breakup is determined using the method of classical trajectory in two-dimensions. For obtaining the initial conditions of the equations of motion, a simplified model of the 6Li nucleus has been proposed. We introduce a simple formula for explanation of fusion suppression. We find excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated fusion cross section. A slight modification of the above formula for fusion suppression is also proposed for a three-dimensional model.

  18. Teaching Classical Mechanics using Smartphones

    CERN Document Server

    Chevrier, Joel; Ledenmat, Simon; Bsiesy, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Using a personal computer and a smartphone, iMecaProf is a software that provides a complete teaching environment for practicals associated to a Classical Mechanics course. iMecaProf proposes a visual, real time and interactive representation of data transmitted by a smartphone using the formalism of Classical Mechanics. Using smartphones is more than using a set of sensors. iMecaProf shows students that important concepts of physics they here learn, are necessary to control daily life smartphone operations. This is practical introduction to mechanical microsensors that are nowadays a key technology in advanced trajectory control. First version of iMecaProf can be freely downloaded. It will be tested this academic year in Universit\\'e Joseph Fourier (Grenoble, France)

  19. Classical Equations for Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gell-Mann, Murray; Gell-Mann, Murray; Hartle, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the phenomenological deterministic laws that approximately govern the quasiclassical domain of familiar experience is considered in the context of the quantum mechanics of closed systems such as the universe as a whole. We investigate the requirements for coarse grainings to yield decoherent sets of histories that are quasiclassical, i.e. such that the individual histories obey, with high probability, effective classical equations of motion interrupted continually by small fluctuations and occasionally by large ones. We discuss these requirements generally but study them specifically for coarse grainings of the type that follows a distinguished subset of a complete set of variables while ignoring the rest. More coarse graining is needed to achieve decoherence than would be suggested by naive arguments based on the uncertainty principle. Even coarser graining is required in the distinguished variables for them to have the necessary inertia to approach classical predictability in the presence of t...

  20. Classical databases and knowledge organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers classical bibliographic databases based on the Boolean retrieval model (such as MEDLINE and PsycInfo). This model is challenged by modern search engines and information retrieval (IR) researchers, who often consider Boolean retrieval a less efficient approach. The paper...... examines this claim and argues for the continued value of Boolean systems, which suggests two further considerations: (1) the important role of human expertise in searching (expert searchers and “information literate” users) and (2) the role of library and information science and knowledge organization (KO......) in the design and use of classical databases. An underlying issue is the kind of retrieval system for which one should aim. Warner’s (2010) differentiation between the computer science traditions and an older library-oriented tradition seems important; the former aim to transform queries automatically...

  1. From classical to quantum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stehle, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Suitable for lay readers as well as students, this absorbing survey explores the twentieth-century transition from classical to quantum physics. Author Philip Stehle traces the shift in the scientific worldview from the work of Galileo, Newton, and Darwin to the modern-day achievements of Max Planck, Albert Einstein, Ernest Rutherford, Niels Bohr, and others of their generation. His insightful overview examines not only the history of quantum physics but also the ways that progress in the discipline changed our understanding of the physical world and forces of nature. This chronicle of the second revolution in the physical sciences conveys the excitement and suspense that new developments produced in the scientific community. The narrative ranges from the classical physics of the seventeenth-century to the emergence of quantum mechanics with the entrance of the electron, the rise of relativity theory, the development of atomic theory, and the recognition of wave-particle duality. Relevant mathematical details...

  2. A Companion to Classical Receptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. De Villiers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This recent addition to the excellent Blackwell Companions series looks at the various forms of classical reception currently being researched as well as those deemed to have future importance. The diversity and volume of the themes and approaches contained in this book are truly impressive. As Hardwick and Stray state in their introduction, this collection “has been constructed on the basis that the activators of reception are many and varied and that we all gain from encountering examples from outside our own immediate areas of knowledge” (p. 4. Throughout the book they stay true to this motto and traditional approaches to classical reception are not given prominence over more recent (sometimes contentious approaches such as film studies, cultural politics and photography. The same goes for the various cultures involved and there is even a chapter on Greek drama in South Africa.

  3. Quantum Models of Classical World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Hájíček

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of our recent work on three notorious problems of non-relativistic quantum mechanics: realist interpretation, quantum theory of classical properties, and the problem of quantum measurement. A considerable progress has been achieved, based on four distinct new ideas. First, objective properties are associated with states rather than with values of observables. Second, all classical properties are selected properties of certain high entropy quantum states of macroscopic systems. Third, registration of a quantum system is strongly disturbed by systems of the same type in the environment. Fourth, detectors must be distinguished from ancillas and the states of registered systems are partially dissipated and lost in the detectors. The paper has two aims: a clear explanation of all new results and a coherent and contradiction-free account of the whole quantum mechanics including all necessary changes of its current textbook version.

  4. Classical Corrections in String Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Brustein, Ram; Brustein, Ram; Madden, Richard

    1999-01-01

    An important element in a model of non-singular string cosmology is a phase in which classical corrections saturate the growth of curvature in a deSitter-like phase with a linearly growing dilaton (an `algebraic fixed point'). As the form of the classical corrections is not well known, here we look for evidence, based on a suggested symmetry of the action, scale factor duality and on conformal field theory considerations, that they can produce this saturation. It has previously been observed that imposing scale factor duality on the $O(\\alpha')$ corrections is not compatible with fixed point behavior. Here we present arguments that these problems persist to all orders in $\\alpha'$. We also present evidence for the form of a solution to the equations of motion using conformal perturbation theory, examine its implications for the form of the effective action and find novel fixed point structure.

  5. Potential Theory in Classical Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Engelhardt, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    In Maxwell's classical theory of electrodynamics the fields are frequently expressed by potentials in order to facilitate the solution of the first order system of equations. This method obscures, however, that there exists an inconsistency between Faraday's law of induction and Maxwell's flux law. As a consequence of this internal contradiction there is neither gauge invariance, nor exist unique solutions in general. It is also demonstrated that inhomogeneous wave equations cannot be solved by retarded integrals.

  6. Semi-classical signal analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem; Sorine, Michel

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces a new signal analysis method called SCSA, based on a semi-classical approach. The main idea in the SCSA is to interpret a pulse-shaped signal as a potential of a Schr\\"odinger operator and then to use the discrete spectrum of this operator for the analysis of the signal. We present some numerical examples and the first results obtained with this method on the analysis of arterial blood pressure waveforms.

  7. Quantum manifolds with classical limit

    CERN Document Server

    Hohmann, Manuel; Wohlfarth, Mattias N R

    2008-01-01

    We propose a mathematical model of quantum spacetime as an infinite-dimensional manifold locally homeomorphic to an appropriate Schwartz space. This extends and unifies both the standard function space construction of quantum mechanics and the manifold structure of spacetime. In this picture we demonstrate that classical spacetime emerges as a finite-dimensional manifold through the topological identification of all quantum points with identical position expectation value. We speculate on the possible relevance of this geometry to quantum field theory and gravity.

  8. Semi-classical signal analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2012-09-30

    This study introduces a new signal analysis method, based on a semi-classical approach. The main idea in this method is to interpret a pulse-shaped signal as a potential of a Schrödinger operator and then to use the discrete spectrum of this operator for the analysis of the signal. We present some numerical examples and the first results obtained with this method on the analysis of arterial blood pressure waveforms. © 2012 Springer-Verlag London Limited.

  9. Structural dynamic modification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Sestieri

    2000-06-01

    Vibration and acoustic requirements are becoming increasingly important in the design of mechanical structures, but they are not usually of primary concern in the design process. So the need to vary the structural behaviour to solve noise and vibration problems often occurs at the prototype stage, giving rise to the so-called structural modification problem. In this paper, the direct problem of determing the new response of a system, after some modifications are introduced into the sestem, is analysed using two different databases: the modal database and the frequency response function database. The limitaions of the modal database are discussed. Structural modifications that can be accounted for are lumped masses, springs, dampers and dynamic absorbers.

  10. The In-Medium Modifications of the Hadron Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A

    2006-01-01

    The in-medium modifications of the hadron properties are discussed. We focus on the lattice QCD calculations of the hadron masses, screening masses, decay constants and wave functions. We discuss the experimental results on the mass reduction as the density increases. We briefly address the phenomenological consequences and outline a working program to extend the lattice calculations to finite temperatures and densities.

  11. Quantum Transitions Between Classical Histories: Bouncing Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Hartle, James

    2015-01-01

    In a quantum theory of gravity spacetime behaves classically when quantum probabilities are high for histories of geometry and field that are correlated in time by the Einstein equation. Probabilities follow from the quantum state. This quantum perspective on classicality has important implications: (a) Classical histories are generally available only in limited patches of the configuration space on which the state lives. (b) In a given patch states generally predict relative probabilities for an ensemble of possible classical histories. (c) In between patches classical predictability breaks down and is replaced by quantum evolution connecting classical histories in different patches. (d) Classical predictability can break down on scales well below the Planck scale, and with no breakdown in the classical equations of motion. We support and illustrate (a)-(d) by calculating the quantum transition across the de Sitter like throat connecting asymptotically classical, inflating histories in the no-boundary quantu...

  12. Modification of evidence theory based on feature extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Feng; SHI Wen-kang; DENG Yong

    2005-01-01

    Although evidence theory has been widely used in information fusion due to its effectiveness of uncertainty reasoning, the classical DS evidence theory involves counter-intuitive behaviors when high conflict information exists. Many modification methods have been developed which can be classified into the following two kinds of ideas, either modifying the combination rules or modifying the evidence sources. In order to make the modification more reasonable and more effective, this paper gives a thorough analysis of some typical existing modification methods firstly, and then extracts the intrinsic feature of the evidence sources by using evidence distance theory. Based on the extracted features, two modified plans of evidence theory according to the corresponding modification ideas have been proposed. The results of numerical examples prove the good performance of the plans when combining evidence sources with high conflict information.

  13. Classical and quantum dynamics from classical paths to path integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Dittrich, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Graduate students who want to become familiar with advanced computational strategies in classical and quantum dynamics will find here both the fundamentals of a standard course and a detailed treatment of the time-dependent oscillator, Chern-Simons mechanics, the Maslov anomaly and the Berry phase, to name a few. Well-chosen and detailed examples illustrate the perturbation theory, canonical transformations, the action principle and demonstrate the usage of path integrals. This new edition has been revised and enlarged with chapters on quantum electrodynamics, high energy physics, Green’s functions and strong interaction.

  14. Intuitionism vs. classicism a mathematical attack on classical logic

    CERN Document Server

    Haverkamp, Nick

    2015-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, the Dutch mathematician L.E.J. Brouwer launched a powerful attack on the prevailing mathematical methods and theories. He developed a new kind of constructive mathematics, called intuitionism, which seems to allow for a rigorous refutation of widely accepted mathematical assumptions including fundamental principles of classical logic. Following an intense mathematical debate esp. in the 1920s, Brouwer's revolutionary criticism became a central philosophical concern in the 1970s, when Michael Dummett tried to substantiate it with meaning-theoretic considerations.

  15. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  16. Effect of the Inverse Volume Modification in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Hua-Hui; ZHU Jian-Yang

    2011-01-01

    After incorporating the inverse volume modifications both in the gravitational and matter part in the improved framework of LQC, we find that the inverse volume modification can decrease the bouncing energy scale, and the presence of nonsingular bounce is generic. For the backward evolution in the expanding branch, in terms of different initial states, the evolution trajectories classify into two classes. One class with larger initial energy density leads to the occurrence of bounce in the region a>ach where ash marks the different inverse volume modification region. The other class with smaller initial energy density evolves back into the region a<ach. In this region, both the energy density for the scalar field and the bouncing energy scale decrease with the backward evolution. The bounce is present when the bouncing energy scale decreases to be equal to the energy density of the scalar field.

  17. The Relation between Classical and Quantum Electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bacelar Valente

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum electrodynamics presents intrinsic limitations in the description of physical processes that make it impossible to recover from it the type of description we have in classical electrodynamics. Hence one cannot consider classical electrodynamics as reducing to quantum electrodynamics and being recovered from it by some sort of limiting procedure. Quantum electrodynamics has to be seen not as an more fundamental theory, but as an upgrade of classical electrodynamics, which permits an extension of classical theory to the description of phenomena that, while being related to the conceptual framework of the classical theory, cannot be addressed from the classical theory.

  18. Biblical behavior modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasure, L C; Mikulas, W L

    1996-07-01

    Although we may have formalized and systematized the field of behavior modification in the last few decades, people around the world have been using behavioral change strategies throughout history. Premack's (1965) theory of reinforcement is often called "Grandma's rule" because grandmothers have long been using it (e.g. You must finish your vegetables before you may go out and play). Franks (1969, p. 4), in one of the first behavioral texts, gave historical examples from China, Turkey, France, and Italy. Knapp and Shodahl (1974) showed how Benjamin Franklin used behavior modification. And de Silva (1984, 1985) gave examples of behavior modification by the Buddha and other early Buddhists. Conspicuously absent from our literature are examples from the Judeo-Christian tradition. In this paper, we provide a number of behavior modification examples from the Bible (New International Version). Footnotes provide references for many more examples. In the discussion, we explore implications for education and therapy. Examples are grouped by the following categories: operant conditioning, respondent conditioning, modeling, and cognitive interventions. However, the Biblical examples, like contemporary case studies, do not always fall neatly into discrete categories. They often are a combination, particularly operant and respondent conditioning interweaving.

  19. Context modification in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we develop the positive fragment of Context Modification Logic. This logical system is a variant of Dynamic Predicate Logic that employs multiple-access variables and that treats argument places in the same way as Latin. The positive fragment is purely incremental.

  20. Intramolecular tautomerisation and the conformational variability of some classical mutagens – cytosine derivatives: quantum chemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovorun D. M.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the lifetime of the mutagenic cytosine derivatives through the investigation of the physicochemical mechanisms of their intramolecular proton transfer. Methods. Non-empirical quantum chemistry, the analysis of the electron density by means of Bader’s atoms in molecules (AIM theory and physicochemical kinetics were used. Results. It is shown that the modification of all investigated compounds, except DCyt, prevents their pairing in both mutagenic and canonical tautomeric forms with a base which is an interacting partner. This effect can inhibit their mutagenic potential. It is also established that Watson-Crick tautomeric hypothesis can be formally expanded for the investigated molecules so far as a lifetime of the mutagenic tautomers much more exceeds characteristic time for the incorporation of one nucleotides pair by DNA biosynthesis machinery. It seems that just within the frame of this hypothesis it will be possible to give an adequate explanation of the mechanisms of mutagenic action of N4-aminocytosine, N4-methoxycytosine, N4-hydroxycytosine and N4dehydrocytosine, which have much more energy advantageous imino form in comparison with amino form. Conclusions. For the first time the comprehensive conformational analysis of a number of classical mutagens, namely cytosine derivatives, has been performed using the methods of non-empirical quantum chemistry at the MP2/6-311++G (2df,pd//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p level of theory

  1. Quantum-Classical Hybrid for Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail

    2011-01-01

    Based upon quantum-inspired entanglement in quantum-classical hybrids, a simple algorithm for instantaneous transmissions of non-intentional messages (chosen at random) to remote distances is proposed. The idea is to implement instantaneous transmission of conditional information on remote distances via a quantum-classical hybrid that preserves superposition of random solutions, while allowing one to measure its state variables using classical methods. Such a hybrid system reinforces the advantages, and minimizes the limitations, of both quantum and classical characteristics. Consider n observers, and assume that each of them gets a copy of the system and runs it separately. Although they run identical systems, the outcomes of even synchronized runs may be different because the solutions of these systems are random. However, the global constrain must be satisfied. Therefore, if the observer #1 (the sender) made a measurement of the acceleration v(sub 1) at t =T, then the receiver, by measuring the corresponding acceleration v(sub 1) at t =T, may get a wrong value because the accelerations are random, and only their ratios are deterministic. Obviously, the transmission of this knowledge is instantaneous as soon as the measurements have been performed. In addition to that, the distance between the observers is irrelevant because the x-coordinate does not enter the governing equations. However, the Shannon information transmitted is zero. None of the senders can control the outcomes of their measurements because they are random. The senders cannot transmit intentional messages. Nevertheless, based on the transmitted knowledge, they can coordinate their actions based on conditional information. If the observer #1 knows his own measurements, the measurements of the others can be fully determined. It is important to emphasize that the origin of entanglement of all the observers is the joint probability density that couples their actions. There is no centralized source

  2. Wigner phase space distribution via classical adiabatic switching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Amartya [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 600 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Makri, Nancy [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 600 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois, 1110 W. Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Evaluation of the Wigner phase space density for systems of many degrees of freedom presents an extremely demanding task because of the oscillatory nature of the Fourier-type integral. We propose a simple and efficient, approximate procedure for generating the Wigner distribution that avoids the computational difficulties associated with the Wigner transform. Starting from a suitable zeroth-order Hamiltonian, for which the Wigner density is available (either analytically or numerically), the phase space distribution is propagated in time via classical trajectories, while the perturbation is gradually switched on. According to the classical adiabatic theorem, each trajectory maintains a constant action if the perturbation is switched on infinitely slowly. We show that the adiabatic switching procedure produces the exact Wigner density for harmonic oscillator eigenstates and also for eigenstates of anharmonic Hamiltonians within the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. We generalize the approach to finite temperature by introducing a density rescaling factor that depends on the energy of each trajectory. Time-dependent properties are obtained simply by continuing the integration of each trajectory under the full target Hamiltonian. Further, by construction, the generated approximate Wigner distribution is invariant under classical propagation, and thus, thermodynamic properties are strictly preserved. Numerical tests on one-dimensional and dissipative systems indicate that the method produces results in very good agreement with those obtained by full quantum mechanical methods over a wide temperature range. The method is simple and efficient, as it requires no input besides the force fields required for classical trajectory integration, and is ideal for use in quasiclassical trajectory calculations.

  3. Classical Optics and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2009-02-01

    Preface; Introduction; 1. Abbe's sine condition; 2. Fourier optics; 3. Effect of polarization on diffraction in systems of high numerical aperture; 4. Gaussian beam optics; 5. Coherent and incoherent imaging; 6. First-order temporal coherence in classical optics; 7. The Van Cittert-Zernike theorem; 8. Partial polarization, Stokes parameters, and the Poincarè Sphere; 9. Second-order coherence and the Hanbury Brown - Twiss experiment; 10. What in the world are surface plasmons?; 11. Surface plasmon polaritons on metallic surfaces; 12. The Faraday effecy; 13. The magneto-optical Kerr effect; 14. The Sagnac interferometer; 15. Fabry-Perot etalons in polarized light; 16. The Ewald-Oseen extinction theorem; 17. Reciprocity in classical Linear optics; 18. Optical pulse compression; 19. The uncertainty principle in classical optics; 20. Omni-directional dielectric mirrors; 21. Optical vortices; 22. Geometric-optical rays, Poynting's vector, and field momenta; 23. Doppler shift, stellar aberration, and convection of light by moving Media; 24. Diffraction gratings; 25. Diffractive optical elements; 26. The talbot effect; 27. Some quirks of total internal reflection; 28. Evanescent coupling; 29. Internal and external conical refraction; 30. Transmission of light through small elliptical apertures; 31. The method of Fox and Li; 32. The beam propagation method; 33. Launching light into a Fiber; 34. The optics of demiconductor fiode Laser; 35. Michelson's dtellar interferometer; 36. Bracewell's interferometric telescope; 37. Scanning optical microscopy; 38. Zernike's method of phase contrast; 39. Polarization microscopy; 40. Nomarski's differential interference contrast microscope; 41. The Van Leeuwenhoek microscope; 42. Projection photolithography; 43. Interaction of light with subwavelength structures; 44 The Ronchi test; 45. The Shack-Hartmann Wavefront sensor; 46. Ellipsometry; 47. Holography and holographic interferometry; 48. Self-focusing in non-linear optical media; 49

  4. Classical trajectories and quantum tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, B I

    2003-01-01

    The problem of inter-band tunneling in a semiconductor (Zener breakdown) in a nonstationary and homogeneous electric field is solved exactly. Using the exact analytical solution, the approximation based on classical trajectories is studied. A new mechanism of enhanced tunneling through static non-one-dimensional barriers is proposed in addition to well known normal tunneling solely described by a trajectory in imaginary time. Under certain conditions on the barrier shape and the particle energy, the probability of enhanced tunneling is not exponentially small even for non-transparent barriers, in contrast to the case of normal tunneling.

  5. Motions of Classical Charged Tachyons

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, M P

    2001-01-01

    It is shown by numerical simulation that classical charged tachyons have self-orbiting helical solutions in a narrow neighborhood of certain discrete values for the velocity when the electromagnetic interaction is described by Feynman-Wheeler electrodynamics. The force rapidly oscillates between attractive and repulsive as a function of velocity in this neighborhood. Causal electrodynamics is also considered, and in this case it is found that when the force is attractive the tachyon loses energy to radiation. Only certain narrow ranges of velocity give attractive forces, and a geometrical derivation of these special velocities is given. Possible implications of these results for hidden variable theories of quantum mechanics are conjectured.

  6. Solar Activity and Classical Physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This review of solar physics emphasizes several of the more conspicuous scientific puzzles posed by contemporary observational knowledge of the magnetic activity of the Sun. The puzzles emphasize how much classical physics we have yet to learn from the Sun. The physics of solar activity is based on the principles of Newton, Maxwell, Lorentz, Boltzmann, et. al., along with the principles of radiative transfer. In the large, these principles are expressed by magnetohydrodynamics. A brief derivation of the magnetohydrodynamic induction and momentum equations is provided, with a discussion of popular misconceptions.

  7. Classical databases and knowledge organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2015-01-01

    examines this claim and argues for the continued value of Boolean systems, which suggests two further considerations: (1) the important role of human expertise in searching (expert searchers and “information literate” users) and (2) the role of library and information science and knowledge organization (KO......) in the design and use of classical databases. An underlying issue is the kind of retrieval system for which one should aim. Warner’s (2010) differentiation between the computer science traditions and an older library-oriented tradition seems important; the former aim to transform queries automatically...

  8. Lectures on classical differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Struik, Dirk J

    1988-01-01

    Elementary, yet authoritative and scholarly, this book offers an excellent brief introduction to the classical theory of differential geometry. It is aimed at advanced undergraduate and graduate students who will find it not only highly readable but replete with illustrations carefully selected to help stimulate the student's visual understanding of geometry. The text features an abundance of problems, most of which are simple enough for class use, and often convey an interesting geometrical fact. A selection of more difficult problems has been included to challenge the ambitious student.Writ

  9. Posttranslational protein modification in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Jerry; Adams, Michael W W

    2005-09-01

    One of the first hurdles to be negotiated in the postgenomic era involves the description of the entire protein content of the cell, the proteome. Such efforts are presently complicated by the various posttranslational modifications that proteins can experience, including glycosylation, lipid attachment, phosphorylation, methylation, disulfide bond formation, and proteolytic cleavage. Whereas these and other posttranslational protein modifications have been well characterized in Eucarya and Bacteria, posttranslational modification in Archaea has received far less attention. Although archaeal proteins can undergo posttranslational modifications reminiscent of what their eucaryal and bacterial counterparts experience, examination of archaeal posttranslational modification often reveals aspects not previously observed in the other two domains of life. In some cases, posttranslational modification allows a protein to survive the extreme conditions often encountered by Archaea. The various posttranslational modifications experienced by archaeal proteins, the molecular steps leading to these modifications, and the role played by posttranslational modification in Archaea form the focus of this review.

  10. The revision of classical stock model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Bai-qing; WANG Hong-li

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of the analysis of classical stock model, according to th e limitation of the model, the article puts forward the revision of classical mo del and enforces the applicability of the stock model.

  11. The revision of classical stock model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶柏青; 王洪利

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of the analysis of classical stock model, according to the limitation of the model, the article puts forward the revision of classical model and enforces the applicability of the stock model.

  12. Epigenetic Landscape of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Genome in Classic Kaposi's Sarcoma Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Yang, Lei; Robertson, Erle S.; Lan, Ke

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is etiologically related to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). It typically displays two different phases in its life cycle, the default latency and occasional lytic replication. The epigenetic modifications are thought to determine the fate of KSHV infection. Previous studies elegantly depicted epigenetic landscape of latent viral genome in in vitro cell culture systems. However, the physiologically relevant scenario in clinical KS tissue samples is unclear. In the present study, we established a protocol of ChIP-Seq for clinical KS tissue samples and mapped out the epigenetic landscape of KSHV genome in classic KS tissues. We examined AcH3 and H3K27me3 histone modifications on KSHV genome, as well as the genome-wide binding sites of latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA). Our results demonstrated that the enriched AcH3 was mainly restricted at latent locus while H3K27me3 was widespread on KSHV genome in classic KS tissues. The epigenetic landscape at the region of vIRF3 gene confirmed its silenced state in KS tissues. Meanwhile, the abundant enrichment of LANA at the terminal repeat (TR) region was also validated in the classic KS tissues, however, different LANA binding sites were observed on the host genome. Furthermore, we verified the histone modifications by ChIP-qPCR and found the dominant repressive H3K27me3 at the promoter region of replication and transcription activator (RTA) in classic KS tissues. Intriguingly, we found that the TR region in classic KS tissues was lacking in AcH3 histone modifications. These data now established the epigenetic landscape of KSHV genome in classic KS tissues, which provides new insights for understanding KSHV epigenetics and pathogenesis. PMID:28118409

  13. Density Spectrums from Kinetic Inflations

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, J

    1996-01-01

    The pole-like accelerated expansion stages purely driven by the coupling between the gravity and the dilaton field without referring to the potential term can be realized in a class of generalized gravity theories. We consider three such scenarios based on the scalar-tensor gravity, the induced gravity and the string theory. Quantum fluctuations during the expansion stages (including more general situations) can be derived in exact analytic forms. Assuming that the pole-like acceleration stage provides a viable inflation scenario in the early universe we derive the generated classical density spectrums. The generated classical density field shows a generic tilted spectrum with $n \\simeq 4$ which differs from the observed spectrum supporting $n \\simeq 1$.

  14. More on neutrosophic soft rough sets and its modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Marei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to introduce and discuss anew mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainties, which is a combination of neutrosophic sets, soft sets and rough sets, namely neutrosophic soft rough set model. Also, its modification is introduced. Some of their properties are studied and supported with proved propositions and many counter examples. Some of rough relations are redefined as a neutrosophic soft rough relations. Comparisons among traditional rough model, suggested neutrosophic soft rough model and its modification, by using their properties and accuracy measures are introduced. Finally, we illustrate that, classical rough set model can be viewed as a special case of suggested models in this paper.

  15. Seven Steps Towards the Classical World

    OpenAIRE

    Allori, Valia; Dürr, Detlef; Goldstein, Shelly; Zanghí, Nino

    2001-01-01

    Classical physics is about real objects, like apples falling from trees, whose motion is governed by Newtonian laws. In standard Quantum Mechanics only the wave function or the results of measurements exist, and to answer the question of how the classical world can be part of the quantum world is a rather formidable task. However, this is not the case for Bohmian mechanics, which, like classical mechanics, is a theory about real objects. In Bohmian terms, the problem of the classical limit be...

  16. About the modern house - and the classical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauberg, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    In text and illustrations describes the classical house and the classical city, represented by Andrea Palladio (1508-80), and the modern house, the modern city and building task, represented by Le Corbusier (1857-1965).......In text and illustrations describes the classical house and the classical city, represented by Andrea Palladio (1508-80), and the modern house, the modern city and building task, represented by Le Corbusier (1857-1965)....

  17. Two-step flux penetration in classic antiferromagnetic superconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Krzyszton, T.; Rogacki, K.

    2001-01-01

    The influence of antiferromagnetic order on the mixed state of a superconductor may result in creation of spin-flop domains along vortices. This may happen when an external magnetic field is strong enough to flip over magnetic moments in the vortex core from their ground state configuration. The formation of domain structure causes modification of the surface energy barrier, and creation of the new state in which magnetic flux density is independent of the applied field. The modified surface ...

  18. Overuse injuries in classical ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, K; Brown, J; Way, S; Vass, N; Crichton, K; Alexander, R; Baxter, A; Butler, M; Wark, J

    1995-05-01

    Successful management of classical ballet dancers with overuse injuries requires an understanding of the art form, precise knowledge of anatomy and awareness of certain conditions. Turnout is the single most fundamental physical attribute in classical ballet and 'forcing turnout' frequently contributes to overuse injuries. Common presenting conditions arising from the foot and ankle include problems at the first metatarsophalangeal joint, second metatarsal stress fractures, flexor hallucis longus tendinitis and anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes. Persistent shin pain in dancers is often due to chronic compartment syndrome, stress fracture of the posteromedial or anterior tibia. Knee pain can arise from patellofemoral syndrome, patellar tendon insertional pathologies, or a combination of both. Hip and back problems are also prevalent in dancers. To speed injury recovery of dancers, it is important for the sports medicine team to cooperate fully. This permits the dancer to benefit from accurate diagnosis, technique correction where necessary, the full range of manual therapies to joint and soft tissue, appropriate strengthening programmes and maintenance of dance fitness during any time out of class with Pilates-based exercises and nutrition advice. Most overuse ballet conditions respond well to a combination of conservative therapies. Those dancers that do require surgical management still depend heavily on ballet-specific rehabilitation for a complete recovery.

  19. Classical equations for quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell-Mann, M. (Theoretical Astrophysics Group (T-6), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545) (United States) (Santa Fe Institute, 1660 Old Pecos Trail, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501); Hartle, J.B. (Department of Physics, University of California enSanta Barbara, Santa Barbara, (California) 93106)

    1993-04-15

    The origin of the phenomenological deterministic laws that approximately govern the quasiclassical domain of familiar experience is considered in the context of the quantum mechanics of closed systems such as the universe as a whole. A formulation of quantum mechanics is used that predicts probabilities for the individual members of a set of alternative coarse-grained histories that [ital decohere], which means that there is negligible quantum interference between the individual histories in the set. We investigate the requirements for coarse grainings to yield decoherent sets of histories that are quasiclassical, i.e., such that the individual histories obey, with high probability, effective classical equations of motion interrupted continually by small fluctuations and occasionally by large ones. We discuss these requirements generally but study them specifically for coarse grainings of the type that follows a distinguished subset of a complete set of variables while ignoring the rest. More coarse graining is needed to achieve decoherence than would be suggested by naive arguments based on the uncertainty principle. Even coarser graining is required in the distinguished variables for them to have the necessary inertia to approach classical predictability in the presence of the noise consisting of the fluctuations that typical mechanisms of decoherence produce. We describe the derivation of phenomenological equations of motion explicitly for a particular class of models.

  20. Physiological characteristics of classical ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schantz, P G; Astrand, P O

    1984-10-01

    The aerobic and anaerobic energy yield during professional training sessions ("classes") of classical ballet as well as during rehearsed and performed ballets has been studied by means of oxygen uptake, heart rate, and blood lactate concentration determinations on professional ballet dancers from the Royal Swedish Ballet in Stockholm. The measured oxygen uptake during six different normal classes at the theatre averaged about 35-45% of the maximal oxygen uptake, and the blood lactate concentration averaged 3 mM (N = 6). During 10 different solo parts of choreographed dance (median length = 1.8 min) representative for moderately to very strenuous dance, an average oxygen uptake (measured during the last minute) of 80% of maximum and blood lactate concentration of 10 mM was measured (N = 10). In addition, heart rate registrations from soloists in different ballets during performance and final rehearsals frequently indicated a high oxygen uptake relative to maximum and an average blood lactate concentration of 11 mM (N = 5). Maximal oxygen uptake, determined in 1971 (N = 11) and 1983 (N = 13) in two different groups of dancers, amounted to on the average 51 and 56 ml X min-1 X kg-1 for the females and males, respectively. In conclusion, classical ballet is a predominantly intermittent type of exercise. In choreographed dance each exercise period usually lasts only a few minutes, but can be very demanding energetically, while during the dancers' basic training sessions, the energy yield is low.

  1. Classical Black Holes Are Hot

    CERN Document Server

    Curiel, Erik

    2014-01-01

    In the early 1970s it is was realized that there is a striking formal analogy between the Laws of black-hole mechanics and the Laws of classical thermodynamics. Before the discovery of Hawking radiation, however, it was generally thought that the analogy was only formal, and did not reflect a deep connection between gravitational and thermodynamical phenomena. It is still commonly held that the surface gravity of a stationary black hole can be construed as a true physical temperature and its area as a true entropy only when quantum effects are taken into account; in the context of classical general relativity alone, one cannot cogently construe them so. Does the use of quantum field theory in curved spacetime offer the only hope for taking the analogy seriously? I think the answer is `no'. To attempt to justify that answer, I shall begin by arguing that the standard argument to the contrary is not physically well founded, and in any event begs the question. Looking at the various ways that the ideas of "tempe...

  2. Fluctuations in classical sum rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, John R; Lakshminarayan, Arul; Tomsovic, Steven

    2010-10-01

    Classical sum rules arise in a wide variety of physical contexts. Asymptotic expressions have been derived for many of these sum rules in the limit of long orbital period (or large action). Although sum-rule convergence may well be exponentially rapid for chaotic systems in a global phase-space sense with time, individual contributions to the sums may fluctuate with a width which diverges in time. Our interest is in the global convergence of sum rules as well as their local fluctuations. It turns out that a simple version of a lazy baker map gives an ideal system in which classical sum rules, their corrections, and their fluctuations can be worked out analytically. This is worked out in detail for the Hannay-Ozorio sum rule. In this particular case the rate of convergence of the sum rule is found to be governed by the Pollicott-Ruelle resonances, and both local and global boundaries for which the sum rule may converge are given. In addition, the width of the fluctuations is considered and worked out analytically, and it is shown to have an interesting dependence on the location of the region over which the sum rule is applied. It is also found that as the region of application is decreased in size the fluctuations grow. This suggests a way of controlling the length scale of the fluctuations by considering a time dependent phase-space volume, which for the lazy baker map decreases exponentially rapidly with time.

  3. Self compensation of classical non abelian charge

    OpenAIRE

    Bartnik, E. A.

    2009-01-01

    A new classical, non singular solution with arbitrarily low energy is found for SU(2) non abelian fields in the presence of a static charge. Physically it means that a classical charge coupled to any SU(N) non abelian gauge field will develop a pure gauge field, carrying no energy, that will completely screen it - there are no visible classical non abelian charges.

  4. Quantum-classical hybrid dynamics - a summary

    CERN Document Server

    Elze, Hans-Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A summary of a recently proposed description of quantum-classical hybrids is presented, which concerns quantum and classical degrees of freedom of a composite object that interact directly with each other. This is based on notions of classical Hamiltonian mechanics suitably extended to quantum mechanics.

  5. Collection of problems in classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Kotkin, G L; ter Haar, D

    1971-01-01

    Collection of Problems in Classical Mechanics presents a set of problems and solutions in physics, particularly those involving mechanics. The coverage of the book includes 13 topics relevant to classical mechanics, such as integration of one-dimensional equations of motion; the Hamiltonian equations of motion; and adiabatic invariants. The book will be of great use to physics students studying classical mechanics.

  6. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum-Classical Correspondence: Dynamical Quantization and the Classical Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, L.

    2004-11-01

    In only 150 pages, not counting appendices, references, or the index, this book is one author’s perspective of the massive theoretical and philosophical hurdles in the no-man’s-land separating the classical and quantum domains of physics. It ends with him emphasizing his own theoretical contribution to this area. In his own words, he has attempted to answer: 1. ‘How can we obtain the quantum dynamics of open systems initially described by the equations of motion of classical physics (quantization process)? 2. ‘How can we retrieve classical dynamics from the quantum mechanical equations of motion by means of a classical limiting process (dequantization process)?’ However, this monograph seems overly ambitious. Although the publisher’s description refers to this book as ‘an accessible entrée’, we find that this author scrambles too hastily over the peaks of information that are contained in his large collection of 272 references. Introductory motivating discussions are lacking. Profound ideas are glossed over superficially and shoddily. Equations morph. But no new convincing understanding of the physical world results. The author takes the viewpoint that physical systems are always in interaction with their environment and are thus not isolated and, therefore, not Hamiltonian. This impels him to produce a method of quantization of these stochastic systems without the need of a Hamiltonian. He also has interest in obtaining the classical limit of the quantized results. However, this reviewer does not understand why one needs to consider open systems to understand ‘quantum-classical correspondence’. The author demonstrates his method using various examples of the Smoluchowski form of the Fokker--Planck equation. He then renders these equations in a Wigner representation, uses what he terms ‘an infinitesimality condition’, and associates with a constant having the dimensions of an action. He thereby claims to develop master equations, such as

  7. Pectin modifications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Liu, Wei; Liu, Cheng-Mei; Li, Ti; Liang, Rui-Hong; Luo, Shun-Jing

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in studying modification of pectin has increased. A number of hydroxyl and carboxyl groups distributed along the backbone as well as a certain amount of neutral sugars presented as side chains make pectin capable of preparing a broad spectrum of derivatives. By forming pectin derivatives, their properties may be modified and some other new functional properties may be created. This article attempts to review the information about various methods used for pectin modification, including substitution (alkylation, amidation, quaternization, thiolation, sulfation, oxidation, etc.), chain elongation (cross-linking and grafting) and depolymerization (chemical, physical, and enzymatic degradation). Characteristics and applications of some pectin derivatives are also presented. In addition, the safety and regulatory status of pectin and its derivatives were reviewed.

  8. Geometrically Consistent Mesh Modification

    KAUST Repository

    Bonito, A.

    2010-01-01

    A new paradigm of adaptivity is to execute refinement, coarsening, and smoothing of meshes on manifolds with incomplete information about their geometry and yet preserve position and curvature accuracy. We refer to this collectively as geometrically consistent (GC) mesh modification. We discuss the concept of discrete GC, show the failure of naive approaches, and propose and analyze a simple algorithm that is GC and accuracy preserving. © 2010 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  9. The Progress on Laser Surface Modification Techniques of Titanium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Cheng; PAN Lin; Al Ding-fei; TAO Xi-qi; XIA Chun-huai; SONG Yan

    2004-01-01

    Titanium alloy is widely used in aviation, national defence, automobile, medicine and other fields because of their advantages in lower density, corrosion resistance, and fatigue resistance etc. As titanium alloy is higher friction coefficients, weak wear resistance, bad high temperature oxidation resistance and lower biocompatibility, its applications are restricted. Using laser surface modification techniques can significantly improve the surface properties of titanium alloy. a review is given for progress on laser surface modification techniques of titanium alloy in this paper.

  10. Contingent kernel density estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Fortmann-Roe

    Full Text Available Kernel density estimation is a widely used method for estimating a distribution based on a sample of points drawn from that distribution. Generally, in practice some form of error contaminates the sample of observed points. Such error can be the result of imprecise measurements or observation bias. Often this error is negligible and may be disregarded in analysis. In cases where the error is non-negligible, estimation methods should be adjusted to reduce resulting bias. Several modifications of kernel density estimation have been developed to address specific forms of errors. One form of error that has not yet been addressed is the case where observations are nominally placed at the centers of areas from which the points are assumed to have been drawn, where these areas are of varying sizes. In this scenario, the bias arises because the size of the error can vary among points and some subset of points can be known to have smaller error than another subset or the form of the error may change among points. This paper proposes a "contingent kernel density estimation" technique to address this form of error. This new technique adjusts the standard kernel on a point-by-point basis in an adaptive response to changing structure and magnitude of error. In this paper, equations for our contingent kernel technique are derived, the technique is validated using numerical simulations, and an example using the geographic locations of social networking users is worked to demonstrate the utility of the method.

  11. Inflation and classical scale invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Racioppi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    BICEP2 measurement of primordial tensor modes in CMB suggests that cosmological inflation is due to a slowly rolling inflaton taking trans-Planckian values and provides further experimental evidence for the absence of large $M_{\\rm P}$ induced operators. We show that classical scale invariance solves the problem and allows for a remarkably simple scale-free inflaton model without any gauge group. Due to trans-Planckian inflaton values and VEVs, a dynamically induced Coleman-Weinberg-type inflaton potential of the model can predict tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ in a large range. Precise determination of $r$ in future experiments will allow to test the proposed field-theoretic framework.

  12. Theoretical physics 1 classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Nolting, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    This textbook offers a clear and comprehensive introduction to classical mechanics, one of the core components of undergraduate physics courses. The book starts with a thorough introduction to the mathematical tools needed, to make this textbook self-contained for learning. The second part of the book introduces the mechanics of the free mass point and details conservation principles. The third part expands the previous to mechanics of many particle systems. Finally the mechanics of the rigid body is illustrated with rotational forces, inertia and gyroscope movement. Ideally suited to undergraduate students in their first year, the book is enhanced throughout with learning features such as boxed inserts and chapter summaries, with key mathematical derivations highlighted to aid understanding. The text is supported by numerous worked examples and end of chapter problem sets. About the Theoretical Physics series Translated from the renowned and highly successful German editions, the eight volumes of this series...

  13. A Classical Model of Gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagener P.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A classical model of gravitation is proposed with time as an independent coordinate. The dynamics of the model is determined by a proposed Lagrangian. Applying the canonical equations of motion to its associated Hamiltonian gives conservation equa- tions of energy, total angular momentum and the z component of the angular momen- tum. These lead to a Keplerian orbit in three dimensions, which gives the observed values of perihelion precession and bending of light by a massive object. An expression for gravitational redshift is derived by accepting the local validity of special relativity at all points in space. Exact expressions for the GEM relations, as well as their associated Lorentz-type force, are derived. An expression for Mach’s Principle is also derived.

  14. Classical electromagnetism in a nutshell

    CERN Document Server

    Garg, Anupam

    2012-01-01

    This graduate-level physics textbook provides a comprehensive treatment of the basic principles and phenomena of classical electromagnetism. While many electromagnetism texts use the subject to teach mathematical methods of physics, here the emphasis is on the physical ideas themselves. Anupam Garg distinguishes between electromagnetism in vacuum and that in material media, stressing that the core physical questions are different for each. In vacuum, the focus is on the fundamental content of electromagnetic laws, symmetries, conservation laws, and the implications for phenomena such as radiation and light. In material media, the focus is on understanding the response of the media to imposed fields, the attendant constitutive relations, and the phenomena encountered in different types of media such as dielectrics, ferromagnets, and conductors. The text includes applications to many topical subjects, such as magnetic levitation, plasmas, laser beams, and synchrotrons.

  15. A course in classical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bettini, Alessandro

    This first volume covers the mechanics of point particles, gravitation, extended systems (starting from the two-body system), the basic concepts of relativistic mechanics and the mechanics of rigid bodies and fluids. The four-volume textbook, which covers electromagnetism, mechanics, fluids and thermodynamics, and waves and light, is designed to reflect the typical syllabus during the first two years of a calculus-based university physics program. Throughout all four volumes, particular attention is paid to in-depth clarification of conceptual aspects, and to this end the historical roots of the principal concepts are traced. Writings by the founders of classical mechanics, G. Galilei and I. Newton, are reproduced, encouraging students to consult them. Emphasis is also consistently placed on the experimental basis of the concepts, highlighting the experimental nature of physics. Whenever feasible at the elementary level, concepts relevant to more advanced courses in modern physics are included. Each chapter b...

  16. Classical mechanics of nonconservative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galley, Chad R

    2013-04-26

    Hamilton's principle of stationary action lies at the foundation of theoretical physics and is applied in many other disciplines from pure mathematics to economics. Despite its utility, Hamilton's principle has a subtle pitfall that often goes unnoticed in physics: it is formulated as a boundary value problem in time but is used to derive equations of motion that are solved with initial data. This subtlety can have undesirable effects. I present a formulation of Hamilton's principle that is compatible with initial value problems. Remarkably, this leads to a natural formulation for the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics of generic nonconservative systems, thereby filling a long-standing gap in classical mechanics. Thus, dissipative effects, for example, can be studied with new tools that may have applications in a variety of disciplines. The new formalism is demonstrated by two examples of nonconservative systems: an object moving in a fluid with viscous drag forces and a harmonic oscillator coupled to a dissipative environment.

  17. Introducing Newton and classical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rankin, William

    2002-01-01

    The rainbow, the moon, a spinning top, a comet, the ebb and flood of the oceans ...a falling apple. There is only one universe and it fell to Isaac Newton to discover its secrets. Newton was arguably the greatest scientific genius of all time, and yet he remains a mysterious figure. Written and illustrated by William Rankin, "Introducting Newton and Classical Physics" explains the extraordinary ideas of a man who sifted through the accumulated knowledge of centuries, tossed out mistaken beliefs, and single-handedly made enormous advances in mathematics, mechanics and optics. By the age of 25, entirely self-taught, he had sketched out a system of the world. Einstein's theories are unthinkable without Newton's founding system. He was also a secret heretic, a mystic and an alchemist, the man of whom Edmund Halley said "Nearer to the gods may no man approach!". This is an ideal companion volume to "Introducing Einstein".

  18. Scientific Realism and Classical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Virendra

    2008-01-01

    We recount the successful long career of classical physics, from Newton to Einstein, which was based on the philosophy of scientific realism. Special emphasis is given to the changing status and number of ontological entitities and arguments for their necessity at any time. Newton, initially, began with (i) point particles, (ii) aether, (iii) absolute space and (iv) absolute time. The electromagnetic theory of Maxwell and Faraday introduced `fields' as a new ontological entity not reducible to earlier ones. Their work also unified electricity, magnetism and optics. Repeated failure to observe the motion of earth through aether led Einstein to modify the Newtonian absolute space and time concepts to a fused Minkowski space-time and the removal of aether from basic ontological entities in his special theory of relativity. Later Einstein in his attempts to give a local theory of gravitation was led to further modify flat Minkowski space-time to the curved Riemannian space time. This reduced gravitational phenome...

  19. Classical scattering from oscillating targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papachristou, P.K.; Diakonos, F.K.; Constantoudis, V.; Schmelcher, P.; Benet, L

    2002-12-30

    We study planar classical scattering from an oscillating heavy target whose dynamics defines a five-dimensional phase space. Although the system possesses no periodic orbits, and thus topological chaos is not present, the scattering functions display a variety of structures on different time scales. These structures are due to scattering events with a strong energy transfer from the projectile to the moving disk resulting in low-velocity peaks. We encounter initial conditions for which the projectile exhibits infinitely many bounces with the oscillating disk. Our numerical investigations are supported by analytical results on a specific model with a simple time-law. The observed properties possess universal character for scattering off oscillating targets.

  20. Classic ballet dancers postural patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseani Paulini Neves Simas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate classic ballet practice and its influence on postural patterns and (a identify the most frequent postural changes; (b determine the postural pattern; (c verify the existence of association of practice time and postural changes. The investigation was carried out in two stages: one, description in which 106 dancers participated; the other, causal comparative in which 50 dancers participated; and (a questionnaire; (b a checkerboard; (c postural chart; (d measure tape; (e camera and (f pedoscope were used as instrument. Descriptive and inferential statistics was used for analysis. The results revealed the most frequent postural changes such as hyperlordosis, unleveled shoulders and pronated ankles. Ballet seems to have negative implications in the postural development , affecting especially the vertebral spine, trunk and feet. The practice time was not a parameter to indicate the increase in postural changes. In conclusion, ballet may be associated with postural changes and determining a characteristic postural pattern.

  1. GALK inhibitors for classic galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kent; Boxer, Matthew B; Marabotti, Anna

    2014-06-01

    Classic galactosemia is an inherited metabolic disease for which, at present, no therapy is available apart from galactose-restricted diet. However, the efficacy of the diet is questionable, since it is not able to prevent the insurgence of chronic complications later in life. In addition, it is possible that dietary restriction itself could induce negative side effects. Therefore, there is a need for an alternative therapeutic approach that can avert the manifestation of chronic complications in the patients. In this review, the authors describe the development of a novel class of pharmaceutical agents that target the production of a toxic metabolite, galactose-1-phosphate, considered as the main culprit for the cause of the complications, in the patients.

  2. Hydrogen Beyond the Classic Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Scivetti, I

    2003-01-01

    The classical nucleus approximation is the most frequently used approach for the resolution of problems in condensed matter physics.However, there are systems in nature where it is necessary to introduce the nuclear degrees of freedom to obtain a correct description of the properties.Examples of this, are the systems with containing hydrogen.In this work, we have studied the resolution of the quantum nuclear problem for the particular case of the water molecule.The Hartree approximation has been used, i.e. we have considered that the nuclei are distinguishable particles.In addition, we have proposed a model to solve the tunneling process, which involves the resolution of the nuclear problem for configurations of the system away from its equilibrium position

  3. From classical to quantum fields

    CERN Document Server

    Baulieu, Laurent; Sénéor, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Quantum Field Theory has become the universal language of most modern theoretical physics. This introductory textbook shows how this beautiful theory offers the correct mathematical framework to describe and understand the fundamental interactions of elementary particles. The book begins with a brief reminder of basic classical field theories, electrodynamics and general relativity, as well as their symmetry properties, and proceeds with the principles of quantisation following Feynman's path integral approach. Special care is used at every step to illustrate the correct mathematical formulation of the underlying assumptions. Gauge theories and the problems encountered in their quantisation are discussed in detail. The last chapters contain a full description of the Standard Model of particle physics and the attempts to go beyond it, such as grand unified theories and supersymmetry. Written for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students in physics and mathematics, the book could also serve as a re...

  4. Gastrointestinal Health in Classic Galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kelly A; Mulle, Jennifer G; Epstein, Michael P; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2016-07-01

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is an autosomal recessive disorder of galactose metabolism that affects approximately 1/50,000 live births in the USA. Following exposure to milk, which contains large quantities of galactose, affected infants may become seriously ill. Early identification by newborn screening with immediate dietary galactose restriction minimizes or prevents the potentially lethal acute symptoms of CG. However, more than half of individuals with CG still experience long-term complications including cognitive disability, behavioral problems, and speech impairment. Anecdotal reports have also suggested frequent gastrointestinal (GI) problems, but this outcome has not been systematically addressed. In this study we explored the prevalence of GI symptoms among 183 children and adults with CG (cases) and 190 controls. Cases reported 4.5 times more frequent constipation (95% CI 1.8-11.5) and 4.2 times more frequent nausea (95% CI 1.2-15.5) than controls. Cases with genotypes predicting residual GALT activity reported less frequent constipation than cases without predicted GALT activity but this difference was not statistically significant. Because the rigor of dietary galactose restriction varies among individuals with galactosemia, we further tested whether GI symptoms associated with diet in infancy. Though constipation was almost four times as common among cases reporting a more restrictive diet in infancy, this difference was not statistically significant. These data confirm that certain GI symptoms are more common in classic galactosemia compared to controls and suggest that future studies should investigate associations with residual GALT activity and dietary galactose restriction in early life.

  5. Hilbert space theory of classical electrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAJAGOPAL A K; GHOSE PARTHA

    2016-06-01

    Classical electrodynamics is reformulated in terms of wave functions in the classical phase space of electrodynamics, following the Koopman–von Neumann–Sudarshan prescription for classical mechanics on Hilbert spaces sans the superselection rule which prohibits interference effects in classical mechanics. This is accomplished by transforming from a set of commutingobservables in one Hilbert space to another set of commuting observables in a larger Hilbert space. This is necessary to clarify the theoretical basis of the much recent work on quantum-like features exhibited by classical optics. Furthermore, following Bondar et al, {\\it Phys. Rev.} A 88, 052108 (2013), it is pointed out that quantum processes that preserve the positivity or nonpositivity of theWigner function can be implemented by classical optics. This may be useful in interpreting quantum information processing in terms of classical optics.

  6. On Heavy Element Enrichment in Classical Novae

    CERN Document Server

    Alexakis, A; Heger, A; Brown, E F; Dursi, L J; Truran, J W; Rosner, R; Lamb, D Q; Timmes, F X; Fryxell, B; Zingale, M A; Ricker, P M; Olson, K

    2004-01-01

    Many classical nova ejecta are enriched in CNO and Ne. Rosner et al. recently suggested that the enrichment might originate in the resonant interaction between large-scale shear flows in the accreted H/He envelope and gravity waves at the interface between the envelope and the underlying C/O white dwarf. The shear flow amplifies the waves, which eventually form cusps and break. This wave breaking injects a spray of C/O into the superincumbent H/He. Using two-dimensional simulations, we formulate a quantitative expression for the amount of C/O that can be entrained into the H/He at saturation. The fraction of the envelope that is enriched depends on the shear velocity and density contrast between the C/O white dwarf and the H/He layer but is roughly independent of the shape of the shear profile. Using this parameterization for the mixed mass, we then perform several one-dimensional Lagrangian calculations of an accreting white dwarf envelope and consider two scenarios: that the wave breaking and mixing is driv...

  7. Classical interaction model for the water molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyai, András; Bartók, Albert

    2007-05-14

    The authors propose a new classical model for the water molecule. The geometry of the molecule is built on the rigid TIP5P model and has the experimental gas phase dipole moment of water created by four equal point charges. The model preserves its rigidity but the size of the charges increases or decreases following the electric field created by the rest of the molecules. The polarization is expressed by an electric field dependent nonlinear polarization function. The increasing dipole of the molecule slightly increases the size of the water molecule expressed by the oxygen-centered sigma parameter of the Lennard-Jones interaction. After refining the adjustable parameters, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations to check the ability of the new model in the ice, liquid, and gas phases. They determined the density and internal energy of several ice polymorphs, liquid water, and gaseous water and calculated the heat capacity, the isothermal compressibility, the isobar heat expansion coefficients, and the dielectric constant of ambient water. They also determined the pair-correlation functions of ambient water and calculated the energy of the water dimer. The accuracy of theirs results was satisfactory.

  8. Genetic modification and genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-06-26

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  9. Quantum remnants in the classical limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, A.M., E-mail: kowalski@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Física (IFLP-CCT-Conicet), Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Científicas (CIC) (Argentina); Plastino, A., E-mail: plastino@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Física (IFLP-CCT-Conicet), Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Argentina' s National Research Council (CONICET) (Argentina); SThAR, EPFL Innovation Park, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2016-09-16

    We analyze here the common features of two dynamical regimes: a quantum and a classical one. We deal with a well known semi-classic system in its route towards the classical limit, together with its purely classic counterpart. We wish to ascertain i) whether some quantum remnants can be found in the classical limit and ii) the details of the quantum-classic transition. The so-called mutual information is the appropriate quantifier for this task. Additionally, we study the Bandt–Pompe's symbolic patterns that characterize dynamical time series (representative of the semi-classical system under scrutiny) in their evolution towards the classical limit. - Highlights: • We investigate the classical limit (CL) of a well known semi classical model. • The study is made by reference to the Bandt Pompe symbolic approach. • The number and type of associated symbols changes as one proceeds towards the CL. • We ascertain which symbols pertaining to the quantum zone remain in the CL.

  10. Religious ecstasy in classical Sufism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göran Ogén

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this essay is to shed some light on the phenomenon of religious ecstasy as met within Islamic mysticism and there particularly during its classical period. In this case, the expression "classical Sufism" refers to the period of Sufi history from about 850 A.D. until circa 1100 A.D. In the Sufi vocabulary there is even a rather differentiated terminology concerning these ecstatic experiences or states; whether different descriptions of one and the same experience are involved or whether the terms actually describe different experiences is a question that we must set aside for the present. There are, however, Sufis expressing the opinion that these different states of mind are based on one single experience in spite of the difference in terms. A generic term for these experiences or states is not to be found in the Sufi terminology however, so the problem of which of these phenomena must be present in order for ecstasy to be evidenced—or which of them would be sufficient— does not therefore arise for the Sufis. So instead of speaking of religious ecstasy in general, they either refer to the single specific terms in question or else use the plural of one of the words employed to designate one of the terms we include in "religious ecstasy". They thus speak of "ecstasies", mawagid from the singular form wagd—if one should at all attempt a translation of this plural. This plural is a genuine Sufi construction and does not otherwise seem to occur in the Arabic language, except as a later borrowing. Psalmody based on the Koranic vocabulary remains the main procedure for putting oneself in ecstasy. If we add 'and listening to psalmody', we then obtain a fairly satisfactory picture of the external conditions for the Sufis' ecstasy until the eleventh century, when various innovations begin to appear. As far as the darwiš-dance is concerned, it is not until the thirteenth century with Rumi that it becomes transformed from an expression

  11. Posttranslational Protein Modifications in Plant Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2015-11-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins greatly expand proteome diversity, increase functionality, and allow for rapid responses, all at relatively low costs for the cell. PTMs play key roles in plants through their impact on signaling, gene expression, protein stability and interactions, and enzyme kinetics. Following a brief discussion of the experimental and bioinformatics challenges of PTM identification, localization, and quantification (occupancy), a concise overview is provided of the major PTMs and their (potential) functional consequences in plants, with emphasis on plant metabolism. Classic examples that illustrate the regulation of plant metabolic enzymes and pathways by PTMs and their cross talk are summarized. Recent large-scale proteomics studies mapped many PTMs to a wide range of metabolic functions. Unraveling of the PTM code, i.e. a predictive understanding of the (combinatorial) consequences of PTMs, is needed to convert this growing wealth of data into an understanding of plant metabolic regulation.

  12. A ``fractal'' modification of Torricelli's formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maramathas, Athanasios J.; Boudouvis, Andreas G.

    2010-03-01

    A modification is proposed of Torricelli’s (1608-1647) formula for the velocity of water discharging from a small hole at the bottom of a large tank filled with fractal solid material. The new formula takes proper account of the mechanical energy losses due to flow in the solid matrix, thus expanding the area of validity of the classical Torricelli’s formula. Moreover, it offers a convenient alternative to Darcy’s law for estimating the discharge rate from an aquifer. The new formula was derived from laboratory experiments, with a low-Reynolds number discharge flow (Darcian flow). It was tested in a natural karst aquifer where the flow is non-Darcian, at Almiros spring on the island of Crete (Greece). In both cases, the predictive capability of the modified formula is established.

  13. Enzymatic Modification of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øbro, Jens; Hayashi, Takahisa; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2011-01-01

    fibres, hydrocolloids, paper,textile, animal feeds or biofuels. Classical microbial-based fermentation systems could in the future face serious competition from plant-based expression systems for enzyme production. Plant expressed enzymes can either be targeted to specific cellular compartments......Plant cell walls are intricate structures with remarkable properties, widely used in almost every aspect of our life. Cell walls consist largely of complex polysaccharides and there is often a need for chemical and biochemical processing before industrial use. There is an increasing demand...... for sustainable processes that replace chemical treatments with white biotechnology. Plants can contribute significantly to this sustainable process by producing plant or microbialenzymes in planta that are necessary for plant cell wall modification or total degradation. This will give rise to superior food...

  14. Classical topology and quantum states

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A P Balachandran

    2001-02-01

    Any two infinite-dimensional (separable) Hilbert spaces are unitarily isomorphic. The sets of all their self-adjoint operators are also therefore unitarily equivalent. Thus if all self-adjoint operators can be observed, and if there is no further major axiom in quantum physics than those formulated for example in Dirac’s ‘quantum mechanics’, then a quantum physicist would not be able to tell a torus from a hole in the ground. We argue that there are indeed such axioms involving observables with smooth time evolution: they contain commutative subalgebras from which the spatial slice of spacetime with its topology (and with further refinements of the axiom, its - and ∞ - structures) can be reconstructed using Gel’fand–Naimark theory and its extensions. Classical topology is an attribute of only certain quantum observables for these axioms, the spatial slice emergent from quantum physics getting progressively less differentiable with increasingly higher excitations of energy and eventually altogether ceasing to exist. After formulating these axioms, we apply them to show the possibility of topology change and to discuss quantized fuzzy topologies. Fundamental issues concerning the role of time in quantum physics are also addressed.

  15. Pembrolizumab in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Joseph; Alinari, Lapo

    2016-09-01

    Pembrolizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), a key immune-inhibitory molecule expressed on T cells and implicated in CD4+ T-cell exhaustion and tumor immune-escape mechanisms. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) is a unique B-cell malignancy in the sense that malignant Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells represent a small percentage of cells within an extensive immune cell infiltrate. PD-1 ligands are upregulated on RS cells as a consequence of both chromosome 9p24.1 amplification and Epstein-Barr virus infection and by interacting with PD-1 promote an immune-suppressive effect. By augmenting antitumor immune response, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, another monoclonal antibody against PD-1, have shown significant activity in patients with relapsed/refractory cHL as well as an acceptable toxicity profile with immune-related adverse events that are generally manageable. In this review, we explore the rationale for targeting PD-1 in cHL, review the clinical trial results supporting the use of checkpoint inhibitors in this disease, and present future directions for investigation in which this approach may be used.

  16. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  17. THE BUREAUCRATIC PHENOMENON: CLASSICAL CONCEPTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Дама Ибрагима

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this article - to analyze Hegel and Karl Marx’s classic bureaucracy theories and also Max Weber’s concept of rational bureaucracy and its development in the works of Herbert Simon, Robert Merton, Peter Blau and Michel Crozier. It shows that the above listed researchers only undertook a change of terminology within the same theoretical tradition. The article describes different approaches to the bureaucratic system of administrative schools of the late 1950s and early 1980s. Major conclusions in the article include the following: administering the state apparatus consists in the organization of government on the basis of regulated rights, mandatory procedures that are invoked to ensure balance in the interest of man and society; bad effectiveness of government, infringement of the rights and freedoms of the individual is the result of dysfunction in the state apparatus; the struggle against it can be carried out with the help of administrative, economical and legal methods.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-6-45

  18. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Uhi Rinn, E-mail: uhrisu1@math.snu.ac.kr [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Seoul National University, GwanAkRo 1, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  19. Determinants of Treatment Modification in Hypercholesterolemic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ko-Fan; Wu, Cheng-Hsueh; Chang, Chun-Chin; Chen, Lung-Ching; Wang, Kang-Ling; Lu, Tse-Min; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chiang, Chern-En

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a lack of knowledge of those contemporary factors associated with modifying subtherapeutic treatments in hypercholesterolemic patients. The aim of this study was to assess determinants of treatment modification in patients not attaining their low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals. Methods The centralized Pan-Asian survey on the under-treatment of hypercholesterolemia enrolled patients taking stable lipid-lowering medications. The study physicians then determined existing patient treatments, which were to be continued or modified when treatments failed. The patient questionnaire surveying patient attitudes and perceptions toward their hypercholesterolemia management was prospectively collected. The odds ratios (ORs) (95% confidence intervals) were calculated. Results Among the 420 patients included for analysis, 35.7% were designated for planned treatment modification. Those patients assigned to treatment modification were more likely to have a family history of premature coronary heart disease (40% vs. 19%), an indication for secondary prevention (76% vs. 61%), elevated triglyceride (60% vs. 48%) and fasting sugar (84% vs. 67%), and were less adherent to their medications (29% vs. 12%) than patients assigned to treatment continuation. Patient recognition of treatment failure [OR, 1.82 (1.13-2.94)], the lower frequency of cholesterol checkup [OR, 2.40 (1.41-4.08)], patient satisfaction with provided cholesterol information [OR, 2.30 (1.21-4.39)], and their feelings toward cholesterol management [OR, 0.25 (0.10-0.62) and 3.80 (2.28-6.32)] for confusion and no strong feeling, respectively were determinants of the treatment modification assignment. Conclusions There was a large gap between evidence-based goals and modification of subtherapeutic treatments, particularly among patients with lower treatment satisfaction and better compliance. Our findings have emphasized the need to further reduce inertia in implementing hypercholesterolemia

  20. Locking classical correlation in quantum states

    CERN Document Server

    Di Vincenzo, D P; Leung, D; Smolin, J A; Terhal, B M; Vincenzo, David Di; Horodecki, Michal; Leung, Debbie; Smolin, John; Terhal, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    We show that there exist bipartite quantum states which contain large hidden classical correlation that can be unlocked by a disproportionately small amount of classical communication. In particular, there are $(2n+1)$-qubit states for which a one bit message doubles the optimal classical mutual information between measurement results on the subsystems, from $n/2$ bits to $n$ bits. States exhibiting this behavior need not be entangled. We study the range of states exhibiting this phenomenon and bound its magnitude.

  1. Classical information capacity of superdense coding

    CERN Document Server

    Bowen, G H

    2001-01-01

    Classical communication through quantum channels may be enhanced by sharing entanglement. Superdense coding allows the encoding, and transmission, of up to two classical bits of information in a single qubit. In this paper, the maximum classical channel capacity for states that are not maximally entangled is derived. Particular schemes are then shown to attain this capacity, firstly for pairs of qubits, and secondly for pairs of qutrits.

  2. Digital Classics Outside the Echo-Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Bodard, Gabriel; Romanello, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    This volume, edited by the organizers of the “Digital Classicist” seminars series, presents research in classical studies, digital classics and digital humanities, bringing together scholarship that addresses the impact of the study of classical antiquity through computational methods on audiences such as scientists, heritage professionals, students and the general public. Within this context, chapters tackle particular aspects, from epigraphy, papyrology and manuscripts, via Greek language, ...

  3. Classical and quantum dissipation in non homogeneous environments

    CERN Document Server

    Illuminati, F; Sodano, P

    1994-01-01

    We generalize the oscillator model of a particle interacting with a thermal reservoir by introducing arbitrary nonlinear couplings in the particle coordinates.The equilibrium positions of the heat bath oscillators are promoted to space-time functions, which are shown to represent a modulation of the internal noise by the external forces. The model thus provides a description of classical and quantum dissipation in non homogeneous environments. In the classical case we derive a generalized Langevin equation with nonlinear multiplicative noise and a position-dependent fluctuation- dissipation theorem associated to non homogeneous dissipative forces. When time-modulation of the noise is present, a new force term is predicted besides the dissipative and random ones. The model is quantized to obtain the non homogenous influence functional and master equation for the reduced density matrix of the Brownian particle. The quantum evolution equations reproduce the correct Langevin dynamics in the semiclassical limit. T...

  4. Classical electromagnetic model of surface states in topological insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2016-01-01

    A topological insulator is classically modeled as an isotropic dielectric-magnetic with a magnetoelectric pseudoscalar $\\Psi$ existing in its bulk while its surface is charge-free and current-free. An alternative model is obtained by setting $\\Psi\\equiv0$ and incorporating surface charge and current densities characterized by an admittance $\\gamma$. Analysis of plane-wave reflection and refraction due to a topological-insulator half space reveals that the parameters $\\Psi$ and $\\gamma$ arise identically in the reflection and transmission coefficients, implying that the two classical models cannot be distinguished on the basis of any scattering scenario. However, as $\\Psi$ disappears from the Maxwell equations applicable to any region occupied by the topological insulator, and because surface states exist on topological insulators as protected conducting states, the alternative model must be chosen.

  5. Bianchi I model in terms of non-standard LQC: Classical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dzierzak, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    The cosmological singularities of the Bianchi I universe are analyzed in the setting of loop geometry underlying the loop quantum cosmology. We solve the Hamiltonian constraint of the theory and find the Lie algebra of elementary observables. Physical compound observables are defined in terms of elementary ones. Modification of classical theory by holonomy around a loop removes the singularities. However, our model has a free parameter that cannot be determined within our method. Testing the model by the data of observational cosmology may be possible after quantization of our modified classical theory.

  6. On the tomographic description of classical fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ibort, A; Man'ko, V I; Marmo, G; Simoni, A; Sudarshan, E C G; Ventriglia, F

    2012-01-01

    After a general description of the tomographic picture for classical systems, a tomographic description of free classical scalar fields is proposed both in a finite cavity and the continuum. The tomographic description is constructed in analogy with the classical tomographic picture of an ensemble of harmonic oscillators. The tomograms of a number of relevant states such as the canonical distribution, the classical counterpart of quantum coherent states and a new family of so called Gauss--Laguerre states, are discussed. Finally the Liouville equation for field states is described in the tomographic picture offering an alternative description of the dynamics of the system that can be extended naturally to other fields.

  7. Classical Fields and the Quantum Concept

    CERN Document Server

    De Souza, M M

    1996-01-01

    We do a critical review of the Faraday-Maxwell concept of classical field and of its quantization process. With the hindsight knowledge of the essentially quantum character of the interactions, we use a naive classical model of field, based on exchange of classical massless particles, for a comparative and qualitative analysis of the physical content of the Coulomb's and Gauss's laws. It enlightens the physical meaning of a field singularity and of a static field. One can understand the problems on quantizing a classical field but not the hope of quantizing the gravitational field right from General Relativity.

  8. Seven Steps Towards the Classical World

    CERN Document Server

    Allori, V; Goldstein, S; Zanghì, N; Allori, Valia; Goldstein, Shelly; Zangh\\'{\\i}, Nino

    2001-01-01

    Classical physics is about real objects, like apples falling from trees, whose motion is governed by Newtonian laws. In standard Quantum Mechanics only the wave function or the results of measurements exist, and to answer the question of how the classical world can be part of the quantum world is a rather formidable task. However, this is not the case for Bohmian mechanics, which, like classical mechanics, is a theory about real objects. In Bohmian terms, the problem of the classical limit becomes very simple: when do the Bohmian trajectories look Newtonian?

  9. Primitive Ontology and the Classical World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allori, Valia

    In this chapter, I present the common structure of quantum theories with a primitive ontology (PO), and discuss in what sense the classical world emerges from quantum theories as understood in this framework. In addition, I argue that the PO approach is better at analyzing the classical limit than the rival wave function ontology approach or any other approach in which the classical world is non-reductively "emergent:" even if the classical limit within this framework needs to be fully developed, the difficulties are technical rather than conceptual, while this is not true for the alternatives.

  10. Limitations on Cloning in Classical Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Fenyes, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we show that a result precisely analogous to the traditional quantum no-cloning theorem holds in classical mechanics. This classical no-cloning theorem does not prohibit classical cloning, we argue, because it is based on a too-restrictive definition of cloning. Using a less popular, more inclusive definition of cloning, we give examples of classical cloning processes. We also prove that a cloning machine must be at least as complicated as the object it is supposed to clone.

  11. Classical statistical mechanics of a few-body interacting spin model

    CERN Document Server

    Borgonovi, F

    1999-01-01

    We study the emergence of Boltzmann's law for the "single particle energy distribution" in a closed system of interacting classical spins. It is shown that for a large number of particles Boltzmann's law may occur, even if the interaction is very strong. Specific attention is paid to classical analogs of the average shape of quantum eigenstates and "local density of states", which are very important in quantum chaology. Analytical predictions are then compared with numerical data.

  12. Spectral Approach to Chaos and Quantum-Classical Correspondence in Quantum Mapas

    CERN Document Server

    García-Mata, I; Garcia-Mata, Ignacio; Saraceno, Marcos

    2005-01-01

    Correspondence in quantum chaotic systems is lost in short time scales. Introducing some noise we study the spectrum of the resulting coarse grained propagaor of density matrices. Some differen methods to compute the spectrum are reviewed. Moreover, the relationship between the eigenvalues of the coarse-grained superoperator and the classical Ruelle-Pollicott resonances is remarked. As a concequence, classical decay rates in quantum time dependent quantities appear.

  13. Molecular Density Functional Theory of Water

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Borgis, Daniel; 10.1021/jz301956b

    2013-01-01

    Three dimensional implementations of liquid state theories offer an efficient alternative to computer simulations for the atomic-level description of aqueous solutions in complex environments. In this context, we present a (classical) molecular density functional theory (MDFT) of water that is derived from first principles and is based on two classical density fields, a scalar one, the particle density, and a vectorial one, the multipolar polarization density. Its implementation requires as input the partial charge distribution of a water molecule and three measurable bulk properties, namely the structure factor and the k-dependent longitudinal and transverse dielectric constants. It has to be complemented by a solute-solvent three-body term that reinforces tetrahedral order at short range. The approach is shown to provide the correct three-dimensional microscopic solvation profile around various molecular solutes, possibly possessing H-bonding sites, at a computer cost two-three orders of magnitude lower tha...

  14. Infrared Modifications Of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Rombouts, J

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, we study theories that modify gravity at very large distances. Motivated by recent observations in cosmology, such as the dimming of type Ia supernovae and flattening of rotation curves of galaxies, we study two classes of theories that attempt to explain these observations as due to a change in the laws of gravity at large distances rather than due to the presence of new forms of exotic energy and matter. The first class of theories is massive gravity, obtained by adding a mass term to the action for the gravitational fluctuation in Einstein's general relativity. The second class of models we study are braneworlds that provide infrared modified gravity, in specific the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model and its extension to higher codimensional branes. We stress in our discussion the field theoretical consistency, both classically and quantum-mechanically, of these models.

  15. Classical molecular dynamics simulation of electronically non-adiabatic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William H; Cotton, Stephen J

    2016-12-22

    Both classical and quantum mechanics (as well as hybrids thereof, i.e., semiclassical approaches) find widespread use in simulating dynamical processes in molecular systems. For large chemical systems, however, which involve potential energy surfaces (PES) of general/arbitrary form, it is usually the case that only classical molecular dynamics (MD) approaches are feasible, and their use is thus ubiquitous nowadays, at least for chemical processes involving dynamics on a single PES (i.e., within a single Born-Oppenheimer electronic state). This paper reviews recent developments in an approach which extends standard classical MD methods to the treatment of electronically non-adiabatic processes, i.e., those that involve transitions between different electronic states. The approach treats nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom (DOF) equivalently (i.e., by classical mechanics, thereby retaining the simplicity of standard MD), and provides "quantization" of the electronic states through a symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) windowing model. The approach is seen to be capable of treating extreme regimes of strong and weak coupling between the electronic states, as well as accurately describing coherence effects in the electronic DOF (including the de-coherence of such effects caused by coupling to the nuclear DOF). A survey of recent applications is presented to illustrate the performance of the approach. Also described is a newly developed variation on the original SQC model (found universally superior to the original) and a general extension of the SQC model to obtain the full electronic density matrix (at no additional cost/complexity).

  16. Classical and semiclassical aspects of chemical dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, S.K.

    1982-08-01

    Tunneling in the unimolecular reactions H/sub 2/C/sub 2/ ..-->.. HC/sub 2/H, HNC ..-->.. HCN, and H/sub 2/CO ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + CO is studied with a classical Hamiltonian that allows the reaction coordinate and transverse vibrational modes to be considered directly. A combination of classical perturbation theory and the semiclassical WKB method allows tunneling probabilities to be obtained, and a statistical theory (RRKM) is used to construct rate constants for these reactions in the tunneling regime. In this fashion, it is found that tunneling may be important, particularly for low excitation energies. Nonadiabatic charge transfer in the reaction Na + I ..-->.. Na /sup +/ + I/sup -/ is treated with classical trajectories based on a classical Hamiltonian that is the analogue of a quantum matrix representation. The charge transfer cross section obtained is found to agree reasonably well with the exact quantum results. An approximate semiclassical formula, valid at high energies, is also obtained. The interaction of radiation and matter is treated from a classical viewpoint. The excitation of an HF molecule in a strong laser is described with classical trajectories. Quantum mechanical results are also obtained and compared to the classical results. Although the detailed structure of the pulse time averaged energy absorption cannot be reproduced classically, classical mechanics does predict the correct magnitude of energy absorption, as well as certain other qualitative features. The classical behavior of a nonrotating diatomic molecule in a strong laser field is considered further, by generating a period advance map that allows the solution over many periods of oscillation of the laser to be obtained with relative ease. Classical states are found to form beautiful spirals in phase space as time progresses. A simple pendulum model is found to describe the major qualitative features. (WHM)

  17. Enzymatic Modification of Sphingomyelin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due to its major role in maintaining the water-retaining properties of the epidermis, ceramide is of great commercial potential in cosmetic and pharmaceuticals such as hair and skin care products. Currently, chemical synthesis of ceramide is a costly process, and developments of alternative cost......-efficient, high yield production methods are of great interest. In the present study, the potential of producing ceramide through the enzymatic hydrolysis of sphingomyelin have been studied. sphingomyelin is a ubiquitous membrane-lipid and rich in dairy products or by-products. It has been verified...... that sphingomyelin modification gives a feasible approach to the potential production of ceramide. The reaction system has been improved through system evaluation and the optimization of several important factors, and phospholipase C from Clostridium perfringens shows higher activity towards the hydrolysis reaction...

  18. Surface modification technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wonbaek; Yu, Hyosin; Chung, Inwha; Rhee, Kang In; Choi, Good Sun; Lee, Chulkyung; Youn, In Ju; Chung, Jinki; Suh, Chang Youl; Yang, Dong Hyo [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Domestic production of rare metals has not been achieved due to the low metal content in their ores in the nation. For these reasons, a strategy for the value addition of rare metal sponges by processes like vacuum melting should be seek to meet the growing domestic demand for titanium metals and alloys. However, current domestic market appears not to be sufficient enough for the large scale investment for the expensive vacuum-melting equipment. Besides, related ingot-processing technologies like rolling, extrusion, and forging of titanium should be prepared in advance. In the mean time, the attempt to recycle expensive titanium scraps produced in our nation would be worthwhile in view of the reduction of import from foreign countries and of saving valuable secondary resources. The objectives for this research is to develop a multipurpose inductively-coupled plasma enhanced-surface modification (ICPESM) process to upgrade powder products. Stable plasma was obtained by the impedance harmonization between plasma generator and matching networks maintaining the reflected power at near zero. The chamber vacuum went down to 10{sup -3} torr offering no difficulties to maintain 1.0 torr at which the present experiments were conducted. However, the fluidization in the chamber was unstable when operated in vacuum. The gas distributor and chamber design may need modifications. Argon plasma treatment on the titanium powders changed the surface morphology slightly even though the effect was not significant due possibly to the short treatment duration of 60 minutes. Oxygen plasma oxidized the surface of titanium powders to TiO{sub 2} as confirmed by XRD. The carbon black powders were clustered during oxidation treatment by the fluidization or surface activation by the high power of low temperature plasma. (author). 4 tabs., 15 figs.

  19. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    OpenAIRE

    Vorhaus Daniel B; Resnik David B

    2006-01-01

    Abstract In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound....

  20. Quantum Corrections to Classical Kinetics: the Weight of Rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Chafin, Clifford

    2016-01-01

    Hydrodynamics of gases in the classical domain are examined from the perspective that the gas has a well-defined wavefunction description at all times. Specifically, the internal energy and volume exclusion of decorrelated vortex structures are included so that quantum corrections and modifications to Navier-Stokes behavior can be derived. This leads to a small deviation in rigid body rotation for a cylindrically bound gas and the internal energy changes associated with vorticity give deviations in the Reynolds' transport theorem. Some macroscopic observable features arising from this include variations in the specific heat, an anisotropic correction to thermal conductivity and a variation in optical scattering as a function of the declination from the axis of local vorticity. The improvements in magneto-optical traps suggests some interesting experiments to be done in higher temperature regimes where they are not usually employed. It is argued that the finite lifetime of observed vortices in ultracold bosoni...

  1. Factors Influencing the Learning of Classical Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Audrey B.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a study investigating the combined effect of certain variables on student achievement in classical mechanics. The purpose was to (1) describe preinstructional knowledge and skills; (2) correlate these variables with the student's success in learning classical mechanics; and (3) develop hypothesis about relationships between these…

  2. Classical and Quantum-Mechanical State Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, F. C.; Mello, P. A.; Revzen, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the subject of state reconstruction in classical and in quantum physics, a subject that deals with the experimentally acquired information that allows the determination of the physical state of a system. Our first purpose is to explain a method for retrieving a classical state in phase space, similar to that…

  3. On entanglement-assisted classical capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holevo, A. S.

    2002-09-01

    We give a modified proof of the recent result of C. H. Bennett, P. W. Shor, J. A. Smolin, and A. V. Thapliyal concerning entanglement-assisted classical capacity of a quantum channel and discuss the relation between entanglement-assisted and unassisted classical capacities.

  4. Classical Conditioning: Eliciting the Right Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Robert T.

    1990-01-01

    Classical conditioning is responsible for students' positive and negative feelings, whether directed toward subject matter, peers, teachers, or education in general. This article explains how educators can use classical conditioning principles (such as reinforcement, extinction, and paired stimuli) to create an anxiety-free learning environment.…

  5. Classical Music, liveness and digital technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steijn, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Performances of classical composition music have seen a decline in their audiences for some years. Does the classical concert ritual scare people off? This notion has spurred off a development of design concepts directed at rethinking concert rituals in order to create new audience experiences. T...

  6. Isomorphic Formulae in Classical Propositional Logic

    CERN Document Server

    Dosen, K

    2009-01-01

    Isomorphism between formulae is defined with respect to categories formalizing equality of deductions in classical propositional logic and in the multiplicative fragment of classical linear propositional logic caught by proof nets. This equality is motivated by generality of deductions. Characterizations are given for pairs of isomorphic formulae, which lead to decision procedures for this isomorphism.

  7. Why Do We See a Classical World?

    CERN Document Server

    Roemer, Hartmann

    2011-01-01

    From a general abstract system theoretical perspective, a quantum-like system description in the spirit of a generalized quantum theory may appear to be simpler and more natural than a classically inspired description. We investigate the reasons why we nevertheless conceive ourselves embedded into a classically structured world.

  8. Classical Swine Fever Virus-Rluc Replicons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Peter Christian; Belsham, Graham J.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the etiologic agent of the severe porcine disease, classical swine fever. Unraveling the molecular determinants of efficient replication is crucial for gaining proper knowledge of the pathogenic traits of this virus. Monitoring the replication competence within...

  9. Milgram's Obedience Study: A Contentious Classic Reinterpreted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Given the many older criticisms of Milgram's obedience study and the more damning recent criticisms based on analyses of materials available in the Milgram archives at Yale, this study has become a contentious classic. Yet, current social psychology textbooks present it as an uncontentious classic, with no coverage of the recent criticisms and…

  10. Converting Projects from STK Classic to STK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foucar, James G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The version of STK (Sierra ToolKit) that has long been provided with Trilinos is no longer supported by the core develop- ment team. With the introduction of a the new STK library into Trilinos, the old STK has been renamed to stk classic. This document contains a rough guide of how to port a stk classic code to STK.

  11. Classical decoherence in a nanomechanical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillet, O.; Vavrek, F.; Fefferman, A. D.; Bourgeois, O.; Collin, E.

    2016-07-01

    Decoherence is an essential mechanism that defines the boundary between classical and quantum behaviours, while imposing technological bounds for quantum devices. Little is known about quantum coherence of mechanical systems, as opposed to electromagnetic degrees of freedom. But decoherence can also be thought of in a purely classical context, as the loss of phase coherence in the classical phase space. Indeed the bridge between quantum and classical physics is under intense investigation, using, in particular, classical nanomechanical analogues of quantum phenomena. In the present work, by separating pure dephasing from dissipation, we quantitatively model the classical decoherence of a mechanical resonator: through the experimental control of frequency fluctuations, we engineer artificial dephasing. Building on the fruitful analogy introduced between spins/quantum bits and nanomechanical modes, we report on the methods available to define pure dephasing in these systems, while demonstrating the intrinsic almost-ideal properties of silicon nitride beams. These experimental and theoretical results, at the boundary between classical nanomechanics and quantum information fields, are prerequisite in the understanding of decoherence processes in mechanical devices, both classical and quantum.

  12. New Classical and New Keynesian Macroeconomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vane, Howard; Snowdon, Brian

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes underlying tenets and policy implications of new classical and new Keynesian macroeconomics. Compares new approaches with orthodox Keynesian and monetarist schools of thought. Identifies the fundamental difference between new classical and new Keynesian models as the assumption regarding the speed of wage and price adjustment following…

  13. Introducing quantum effects in classical theories

    CERN Document Server

    Fabris, J C; Rodrigues, D C; Daouda, M H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore two different ways of implementing quantum effects in a classical structure. The first one is through an external field. The other one is modifying the classical conservation laws. In both cases, the consequences for the description of the evolution of the universe are discussed.

  14. Classical transport in disordered systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Antonios

    This thesis reports on the manifestation of structural disorder on molecular transport and it consists of two parts. Part I discusses the relations between classical transport and the underlying structural complexity of the system. Both types of molecular diffusion, namely Gaussian and non- Gaussian are presented and the relevant time regimes are discussed. In addition the concept of structural universality is introduced and connected with the diffusion metrics. One of the most robust techniques for measuring molecular mean square displacements is magnetic resonance. This method requires encoding and subsequently reading out after an experimentally controlled time, a phase φ to the spins using magnetic field gradients. The main limitation for probing short diffusion lengths L(t) ˜ 1micro m with magnetic resonance is the requirement to encode and decode the phase φ in very short time intervals. Therefore, to probe such displacements a special probe was developed equipped with a gradient coil capable of delivering magnetic field gradients of approximately 90 G/cmA . The design of the probe is reported. Part I also includes a discussion of experiments of transport in two qualitatively different disordered phantoms and reports on a direct observation of universality in one-dimension. The results reveal the universal power law scaling of the diffusion coefficient at the long-time regime and illustrate the essence of structural universality by experimentally determining the structure correlation function of the phantoms. In addition, the scaling of the diffusive permeability of the phantoms with respect to the pore size is investigated. Additional work presented includes a detailed study of adsorption of methane gas in Vycor disordered glass. The techniques described in Part I of this thesis are widely used for measuring structural parameters of porous media, such as the surface-to-volume ratio or diffusive permeability. Part II of this thesis discusses the

  15. Quantum Communication Attacks on Classical Cryptographic Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre

    In the literature on cryptographic protocols, it has been studied several times what happens if a classical protocol is attacked by a quantum adversary. Usually, this is taken to mean that the adversary runs a quantum algorithm, but communicates classically with the honest players. In several cases......, one can show that the protocol remains secure even under such an attack. However, there are also cases where the honest players are quantum as well, even if the protocol uses classical communication. For instance, this is the case when classical multiparty computation is used as a “subroutine......” in quantum multiparty computation. Furthermore, in the future, players in a protocol may employ quantum computing simply to improve efficiency of their local computation, even if the communication is supposed to be classical. In such cases, it no longer seems clear that a quantum adversary must be limited...

  16. Enzymatic synthesis and modification of polymers and nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Yun

    Biocatalysis perform chemical reactions in mild reaction environments with high catalytic rates to transform a particular set of substrates to specific reaction products. The broad substrate specificity and exquisite selectivity of enzymes have made them applicable in diverse applications. This thesis work explores biocatalysis in varied modes of synthesis, discovery, and also functional application as nanomaterial immobilized catalysts. First, biocatalysis is explored as a synthesis tool to generate carbohydrate-based polymers with regioselective acylation of the disaccharides sucrose and trehalose with diester derivatives. Sugar-based polymers are difficult to synthesize chemically due to the presence of multiple hydroxyl moieties and a selective catalytic route enhances the systematic incorporation of sugars into the polymer to rationally alter physicochemical properties. The sugar esters (containing reactive end groups) are polymerized with a variety of diols and enzymes in diverse reaction solvent conditions. Biocatalysis is well suited to becoming a discovery tool for new materials. Enzyme-catalyzed reactions are performed in 96-well microtiter plates to implement a combinatorial methodology to polymer synthesis. Two libraries are generated: the first is synthesized with bifunctional monomers under varying solvent conditions and multiple enzymes to identify optimal reaction conditions. The second library includes diverse polyols (sugars, nucleic acids, and steroids) to demonstrate the positional selectivity and broad reactivity of enzyme-mediated polymerization. The last part of this work incorporates enzymes onto nanoscale materials for functional material synthesis and modification. Silicon nanopillars are used as three-dimensional supports for high-density enzyme immobilization. Maleic anhydride coupling chemistries are explored for attachment and enzyme kinetic measurements are compared to enzyme immobilized on flat supports with equal projected surface

  17. Wetting in hydrophobic nanochannels: a challenge of classical capillarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Roy; Kazakevich, Yuri; Ni, Chaoying; Fadeev, Alexander Y

    2005-09-14

    We report an investigation of the water-hydrophobic interface in well-defined nanochannels (R approximately 2-4 nm). Wetting in these systems cannot be described by classical (macroscopic) capillary theory: (1) water occupies only a fraction ( approximately 60%) of the pore volume, and (2) the capillary pressures are approximately 60-90% greater than predicted by the Laplace equation. The results suggest the presence of approximately 0.6 nm layer of low-density fluid (vapor) separating water from the hydrophobic solid.

  18. Projective limits of state spaces I. Classical formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanéry, Suzanne; Thiemann, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In this series of papers, we investigate the projective framework initiated by Jerzy Kijowski (1977) and Andrzej Okołów (2009, 2013, 2014), which describes the states of a quantum (field) theory as projective families of density matrices. A short reading guide to the series can be found in [27]. The present first paper aims at clarifying the classical structures that underlies this formalism, namely projective limits of symplectic manifolds [27, subsection 2.1]. In particular, this allows us to discuss accurately the issues hindering an easy implementation of the dynamics in this context, and to formulate a strategy for overcoming them [27, subsection 4.1].

  19. Bose Einstein condensation of the classical axion field in cosmology?

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, Sacha

    2013-01-01

    The axion is a motivated cold dark matter candidate, which it would be interesting to distinguish from weakly interacting massive particles. Sikivie has suggested that axions could behave differently during non-linear galaxy evolution, if they form a bose einstein condensate. Using classical equations of motion during linear structure formation, we explore whether "gravitational thermalisation" can drive axions to a bose einstein condensate. At linear order in G_N, we interpret that the principle activities of gravity are to expand the Universe and grow density fluctuations. From the anisotropic stress, we estimate a short dissipation scale for axions which does not confirm previous estimates of their gravitational thermalisation rate.

  20. Density functional theory and multiscale materials modeling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swapan K Ghosh

    2003-01-01

    One of the vital ingredients in the theoretical tools useful in materials modeling at all the length scales of interest is the concept of density. In the microscopic length scale, it is the electron density that has played a major role in providing a deeper understanding of chemical binding in atoms, molecules and solids. In the intermediate mesoscopic length scale, an appropriate picture of the equilibrium and dynamical processes has been obtained through the single particle number density of the constituent atoms or molecules. A wide class of problems involving nanomaterials, interfacial science and soft condensed matter has been addressed using the density based theoretical formalism as well as atomistic simulation in this regime. In the macroscopic length scale, however, matter is usually treated as a continuous medium and a description using local mass density, energy density and other related density functions has been found to be quite appropriate. A unique single unified theoretical framework that emerges through the density concept at these diverse length scales and is applicable to both quantum and classical systems is the so called density functional theory (DFT) which essentially provides a vehicle to project the many-particle picture to a single particle one. Thus, the central equation for quantum DFT is a one-particle Schrödinger-like Kohn–Sham equation, while the same for classical DFT consists of Boltzmann type distributions, both corresponding to a system of noninteracting particles in the field of a density-dependent effective potential. Selected illustrative applications of quantum DFT to microscopic modeling of intermolecular interaction and that of classical DFT to a mesoscopic modeling of soft condensed matter systems are presented.

  1. A Chemical-Adsorption Strategy to Enhance the Reaction Kinetics of Lithium-Rich Layered Cathodes via Double-Shell Surface Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lichao; Li, Jiajun; Cao, Tingting; Wang, Huayu; Zhao, Naiqin; He, Fang; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian; Liu, Enzuo

    2016-09-21

    Sluggish surface reaction kinetics hinders the power density of Li-ion battery. Thus, various surface modification techniques have been applied to enhance the electronic/ionic transfer kinetics. However, it is challenging to obtain a continuous and uniform surface modification layer on the prime particles with structure integration at the interface. Instead of classic physical-adsorption/deposition techniques, we propose a novel chemical-adsorption strategy to synthesize double-shell modified lithium-rich layered cathodes with enhanced mass transfer kinetics. On the basis of experimental measurement and first-principles calculation, MoO2S2 ions are proved to joint the layered phase via chemical bonding. Specifically, the Mo-O or Mo-S bonds can flexibly rotate to bond with the cations in the layered phase, leading to the good compatibility between the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and layered cathode. Followed by annealing treatment, the lithium-excess-spinel inner shell forms under the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and functions as favorable pathways for lithium and electron. Meanwhile, the nanothick MoO3-x(SO4)x outer shell protects the transition metal from dissolution and restrains electrolyte decomposition. The double-shell modified sample delivers an enhanced discharge capacity almost twice as much as that of the unmodified one at 1 A g(-1) after 100 cycles, demonstrating the superiority of the surface modification based on chemical adsorption.

  2. Reactive modification of polyesters and their blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chen

    2004-12-01

    the desired rheological and structural characteristics of the final products for potential applications such as low density extrusion foaming or compatibilization of immiscible polymer blends. Important modification conditions through coagents are identified and reaction mechanisms are proposed. A high MW saturated polyester, PET, can also be rheologically modified in extruders through low MW multifunctional anhydride and epoxy compounds by chain extension/branching. Several such modifiers were successfully screened in terms of their reactivity towards PET under controlled reactive extrusion conditions. A dianhydride with medium reactivity was then successfully used in a one-step reactive modification/extrusion foaming process to produce low density foams. A similar process was successfully used to produce small cell size foams from a four component system containing PET, PP and lesser amounts of a low molecular weight multifunctional epoxy compound and an acid functionalized polyolefin, the latter acting as compatibilizers.

  3. Introduction of a Classical Level in Quantum Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosperi, G. M.

    2016-11-01

    In an old paper of our group in Milano a formalism was introduced for the continuous monitoring of a system during a certain interval of time in the framework of a somewhat generalized approach to quantum mechanics (QM). The outcome was a distribution of probability on the space of all the possible continuous histories of a set of quantities to be considered as a kind of coarse grained approximation to some ordinary quantum observables commuting or not. In fact the main aim was the introduction of a classical level in the context of QM, treating formally a set of basic quantities, to be considered as beables in the sense of Bell, as continuously taken under observation. However the effect of such assumption was a permanent modification of the Liouville-von Neumann equation for the statistical operator by the introduction of a dissipative term which is in conflict with basic conservation rules in all reasonable models we had considered. Difficulties were even encountered for a relativistic extension of the formalism. In this paper I propose a modified version of the original formalism which seems to overcome both difficulties. First I study the simple models of an harmonic oscillator and a free scalar field in which a coarse grain position and a coarse grained field respectively are treated as beables. Then I consider the more realistic case of spinor electrodynamics in which only certain coarse grained electric and magnetic fields are introduced as classical variables and no matter related quantities.

  4. Rational top and its classical r-matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminov, G.; Arthamonov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Zotov, A.

    2014-08-01

    We construct a rational integrable system (the rational top) on a co-adjoint orbit of SL N Lie group. It is described by the Lax operator with spectral parameter and classical non-dynamical skew-symmetric r-matrix. In the case of the orbit of minimal dimension the model is gauge equivalent to the rational Calogero-Moser (CM) system. To obtain the results we represent the Lax operator of the CM model in two different factorized forms—without spectral parameter (related to the spinless case) and another one with the spectral parameter. The latter gives rise to the rational top while the first one is related to generalized Cremmer-Gervais r-matrices. The gauge transformation relating the rational top and CM model provides the classical rational version of the IRF-Vertex correspondence. From the geometrical point of view it describes the modification of SL(N,{C})-bundles over degenerated elliptic curve. In view of the Symplectic Hecke Correspondence the rational top is related to the rational spin CM model. Possible applications and generalizations of the suggested construction are discussed. In particular, the obtained r-matrix defines a class of KZB equations.

  5. Rational Top and its Classical R-matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Aminov, G; Smirnov, A; Zotov, A

    2014-01-01

    We construct a rational integrable system (the rational top) on a coadjoint orbit of ${\\rm SL}_N$ Lie group. It is described by the Lax operator with spectral parameter and classical non-dynamical skew-symmetric $r$-matrix. In the case of the orbit of minimal dimension the model is gauge equivalent to the rational Calogero-Moser (CM) system. To obtain the results we represent the Lax operator of the CM model in two different factorized forms -- without spectral parameter (related to spinless case) and another one with the spectral parameter. The later gives rise to the rational top while the first one is related to generalized Cremmer-Gervais $r$-matrices. The gauge transformation relating the rational top and CM model provides a classical rational version of the IRF-Vertex correspondence. From a geometrical point of view it describes the modification of ${\\rm SL}(N,\\mathbb C)$-bundles over degenerated elliptic curve. In view of Symplectic Hecke Correspondence the rational top is related to the rational spin ...

  6. Surface Modification of Intraocular Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This paper aimed to review the current literature on the surface modification of intraocular lenses (IOLs. Data Sources: All articles about surface modification of IOLs published up to 2015 were identified through a literature search on both PubMed and ScienceDirect. Study Selection: The articles on the surface modification of IOLs were included, but those on design modification and surface coating were excluded. Results: Technology of surface modification included plasma, ion beam, layer-by-layer self-assembly, ultraviolet radiation, and ozone. The main molecules introduced into IOLs surface were poly (ethylene glycol, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine, TiO 2 , heparin, F-heparin, titanium, titanium nitride, vinyl pyrrolidone, and inhibitors of cytokines. The surface modification either resulted in a more hydrophobic lens, a more hydrophilic lens, or a lens with a hydrophilic anterior and hydrophobic posterior surface. Advances in research regarding surface modification of IOLs had led to a better biocompatibility in both in vitro and animal experiments. Conclusion: The surface modification is an efficient, convenient, economic and promising method to improve the biocompatibility of IOLs.

  7. Surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyley, Samuel; Thielemans, Wim

    2014-06-01

    Chemical modification of cellulose nanocrystals is an increasingly popular topic in the literature. This review analyses the type of cellulose nanocrystal modification reactions that have been published in the literature thus far and looks at the steps that have been taken towards analysing the products of the nanocrystal modifications. The main categories of reactions carried out on cellulose nanocrystals are oxidations, esterifications, amidations, carbamations and etherifications. More recently nucleophilic substitutions have been used to introduce more complex functionality to cellulose nanocrystals. Multi-step modifications are also considered. This review emphasizes quantification of modification at the nanocrystal surface in terms of degree of substitution and the validity of conclusions drawn from different analysis techniques in this area. The mechanisms of the modification reactions are presented and considered with respect to the effect on the outcome of the reactions. While great strides have been made in the quality of analytical data published in the field of cellulose nanocrystal modification, there is still vast scope for improvement, both in data quality and the quality of analysis of data. Given the difficulty of surface analysis, cross-checking of results from different analysis techniques is fundamental for the development of reliable cellulose nanocrystal modification techniques.

  8. Driven topological systems in the classical limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Callum W.; Öhberg, Patrik; Valiente, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Periodically driven quantum systems can exhibit topologically nontrivial behavior, even when their quasienergy bands have zero Chern numbers. Much work has been conducted on noninteracting quantum-mechanical models where this kind of behavior is present. However, the inclusion of interactions in out-of-equilibrium quantum systems can prove to be quite challenging. On the other hand, the classical counterpart of hard-core interactions can be simulated efficiently via constrained random walks. The noninteracting model, proposed by Rudner et al. [Phys. Rev. X 3, 031005 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevX.3.031005], has a special point for which the system is equivalent to a classical random walk. We consider the classical counterpart of this model, which is exact at a special point even when hard-core interactions are present, and show how these quantitatively affect the edge currents in a strip geometry. We find that the interacting classical system is well described by a mean-field theory. Using this we simulate the dynamics of the classical system, which show that the interactions play the role of Markovian, or time-dependent disorder. By comparing the evolution of classical and quantum edge currents in small lattices, we find regimes where the classical limit considered gives good insight into the quantum problem.

  9. Chemical Protein Modification through Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnoo, Smita B; Madder, Annemieke

    2016-04-01

    The modification of proteins with non-protein entities is important for a wealth of applications, and methods for chemically modifying proteins attract considerable attention. Generally, modification is desired at a single site to maintain homogeneity and to minimise loss of function. Though protein modification can be achieved by targeting some natural amino acid side chains, this often leads to ill-defined and randomly modified proteins. Amongst the natural amino acids, cysteine combines advantageous properties contributing to its suitability for site-selective modification, including a unique nucleophilicity, and a low natural abundance--both allowing chemo- and regioselectivity. Native cysteine residues can be targeted, or Cys can be introduced at a desired site in a protein by means of reliable genetic engineering techniques. This review on chemical protein modification through cysteine should appeal to those interested in modifying proteins for a range of applications.

  10. RNA modification in Cajal bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, U Thomas

    2016-10-24

    Aside from nucleoli, Cajal bodies (CBs) are the best-characterized organelles of mammalian cell nuclei. Like nucleoli, CBs concentrate ribonucleoproteins (RNPs), in particular, spliceosomal small nuclear RNPs (snRNPs) and small nucleolar RNPs (snoRNPs). In one of the best-defined functions of CBs, most of the snoRNPs are involved in site-specific modification of snRNAs. The two major modifications are pseudouridylation and 2'-O-methylation that are guided by the box H/ACA and C/D snoRNPs, respectively. This review details the modifications, their function, the mechanism of modification, and the machineries involved. We dissect the different classes of noncoding RNAs that meet in CBs, guides and substrates. Open questions and conundrums, often raised and appearing due to experimental limitations, are pointed out and discussed. The emphasis of the review is on mammalian CBs and their function in modification of noncoding RNAs.

  11. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorhaus Daniel B

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  12. Callen-like method for the classical Heisenberg ferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, L. S.; Cavallo, A.; De Cesare, L.; Esposito, U.; Naddeo, A.

    2012-02-01

    A study of the d-dimensional classical Heisenberg ferromagnetic model in the presence of a magnetic field is performed within the two-time Green function's framework in classical statistical physics. We extend the well known quantum Callen method to derive analytically a new formula for magnetization. Although this formula is valid for any dimensionality, we focus on one- and three- dimensional models and compare the predictions with those arising from a different expression suggested many years ago in the context of the classical spectral density method. Both frameworks give results in good agreement with the exact numerical transfer-matrix data for the one-dimensional case and with the exact high-temperature-series results for the three-dimensional one. In particular, for the ferromagnetic chain, the zero-field susceptibility results are found to be consistent with the exact analytical ones obtained by M.E. Fisher. However, the formula derived in the present paper provides more accurate predictions in a wide range of temperatures of experimental and numerical interest.

  13. Classical Information Storage in an n-Level Quantum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Péter E.; Weiner, Mihály

    2015-12-01

    A game is played by a team of two—say Alice and Bob—in which the value of a random variable x is revealed to Alice only, who cannot freely communicate with Bob. Instead, she is given a quantum n-level system, respectively a classical n-state system, which she can put in possession of Bob in any state she wishes. We evaluate how successfully they managed to store and recover the value of x by requiring Bob to specify a value z and giving a reward of value f ( x, z) to the team. We show that whatever the probability distribution of x and the reward function f are, when using a quantum n-level system, the maximum expected reward obtainable with the best possible team strategy is equal to that obtainable with the use of a classical n-state system. The proof relies on mixed discriminants of positive matrices and—perhaps surprisingly—an application of the Supply-Demand Theorem for bipartite graphs. As a corollary, we get an infinite set of new, dimension dependent inequalities regarding positive operator valued measures and density operators on complex n-space. As a further corollary, we see that the greatest value, with respect to a given distribution of x, of the mutual information I ( x; z) that is obtainable using an n-level quantum system equals the analogous maximum for a classical n-state system.

  14. Minisuperspace Stellar Collapse in Semi-Classical Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Balakrishna, Jayashree; Moran, Christine Corbett

    2015-01-01

    We compute the Schr\\"odinger and WKB propagators for the semi-classical collapse of a sphere of dust. This extends the work by Redmount and Suen (1993) from the free particle case to nontrivial gravity. In the Oppenheimer-Snyder model, a star can be idealised as a collapsing dust sphere of uniform density and zero pressure. The particles that make up the star have the attributes of classical dust where each particle is assumed to be infinitesimal in size and to interact only gravitationally with other matter. We include quantum mechanical effects, which lift some of these assumptions. This allows for the possibility that some configurations will not collapse to black holes. We find analytic, closed-form solutions for classical paths of a particle on the surface of a collapsing star in Schwarzschild and Kruskal geometries. Kruskal coordinates can be used to study the wavefunction inside the apparent horizon. The propagator is written in closed form in Schwarzschild coordinates in both the WKB and in the Schr\\"...

  15. Geometry of Lagrangian First-order Classical Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Echeverría-Enríquez, A; Román-Roy, N; Echeverr\\'ia-Enr\\'iquez, Arturo; Muñoz-Lecanda, Miguel C.; Román-Roy, Narciso

    1996-01-01

    We construct a lagrangian geometric formulation for first-order field theories using the canonical structures of first-order jet bundles, which are taken as the phase spaces of the systems in consideration. First of all, we construct all the geometric structures associated with a first-order jet bundle and, using them, we develop the lagrangian formalism, defining the canonical forms associated with a lagrangian density and the density of lagrangian energy, obtaining the {\\sl Euler-Lagrange equations} in two equivalent ways: as the result of a variational problem and developing the {\\sl jet field formalism} (which is a formulation more similar to the case of mechanical systems). A statement and proof of Noether's theorem is also given, using the latter formalism. Finally, some classical examples are briefly studied.

  16. Classical r-matrices and the Feigin-Odesskii algebra via Hamiltonian and Poisson reductions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braden, H W [School of Mathematics, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Dolgushev, V A [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Olshanetsky, M A [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Zotov, A V [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2003-06-27

    We present a formula for a classical r-matrix of an integrable system obtained by Hamiltonian reduction of some free field theories using pure gauge symmetries. The framework of the reduction is restricted only by the assumption that the respective gauge transformations are Lie group ones. Our formula is in terms of Dirac brackets, and some new observations on these brackets are made. We apply our method to derive a classical r-matrix for the elliptic Calogero-Moser system with spin starting from the Higgs bundle over an elliptic curve with marked points. In the paper, we also derive a classical Feigin-Odesskii algebra by a Poisson reduction of some modification of the Higgs bundle over an elliptic curve. This allows us to include integrable lattice models in a Hitchin-type construction.

  17. Three-stage classical molecular dynamics model for simulation of heavy-ion fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godre Subodh S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-stage Classical Molecular Dynamics (3S-CMD approach for heavy-ion fusion is developed. In this approach the Classical Rigid-Body Dynamics simulation for heavy-ion collision involving light deformed nucleus is initiated on their Rutherford trajectories at very large initial separation. Collision simulation is then followed by relaxation of the rigid-body constrains for one or both the colliding nuclei at distances close to the barrier when the trajectories of all the nucleons are obtained in a Classical Molecular Dynamics approach. This 3S-CMD approach explicitly takes into account not only the long range Coulomb reorientation of the deformed collision partner but also the internal vibrational excitations of one or both the nuclei at distances close to the barrier. The results of the dynamical simulation for 24Mg+208Pb collision show significant modification of the fusion barrier and calculated fusion cross sections due to internal excitations.

  18. Classical Gravitational Interactions and Gravitational Lorentz Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In quantum gauge theory of gravity, the gravitational field is represented by gravitational gauge field.The field strength of gravitational gauge field has both gravitoelectric component and gravitomagnetic component. In classical level, gauge theory of gravity gives classical Newtonian gravitational interactions in a relativistic form. Besides,it gives gravitational Lorentz force, which is the gravitational force on a moving object in gravitomagnetic field The direction of gravitational Lorentz force is not the same as that of classical gravitational Newtonian force. Effects of gravitational Lorentz force should be detectable, and these effects can be used to discriminate gravitomagnetic field from ordinary electromagnetic magnetic field.

  19. A Classical Introduction to Galois Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, Stephen C

    2012-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to Galois theory and focuses on one central theme - the solvability of polynomials by radicals. Both classical and modern approaches to the subject are described in turn in order to have the former (which is relatively concrete and computational) provide motivation for the latter (which can be quite abstract). The theme of the book is historically the reason that Galois theory was created, and it continues to provide a platform for exploring both classical and modern concepts. This book examines a number of problems arising in the area of classical mathematic

  20. Effective Privacy Amplification for Secure Classical Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, Tamas; Scheuer, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    We study the effectiveness of privacy amplification for classical key-distribution schemes. We find that, unlike quantum key distribution schemes, the high fidelity of the raw key in classical systems allow the users to always sift a secure shorter key, given that they have an upper bound of eavesdropper probability to correctly guess the exchanged key-bits. We establish the number of privacy amplification iterations needed to achieve information leak of 10^-8 in several classical systems and highlight the inherent tradeoff between the number of iterations and the security of the raw key.

  1. Classical dynamics of particles and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Marion, Jerry B

    1965-01-01

    Classical Dynamics of Particles and Systems presents a modern and reasonably complete account of the classical mechanics of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies for physics students at the advanced undergraduate level. The book aims to present a modern treatment of classical mechanical systems in such a way that the transition to the quantum theory of physics can be made with the least possible difficulty; to acquaint the student with new mathematical techniques and provide sufficient practice in solving problems; and to impart to the student some degree of sophistication in handl

  2. Classical thermodynamics of non-electrolyte solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Van Ness, H C

    1964-01-01

    Classical Thermodynamics of Non-Electrolyte Solutions covers the historical development of classical thermodynamics that concerns the properties of vapor and liquid solutions of non-electrolytes. Classical thermodynamics is a network of equations, developed through the formal logic of mathematics from a very few fundamental postulates and leading to a great variety of useful deductions. This book is composed of seven chapters and begins with discussions on the fundamentals of thermodynamics and the thermodynamic properties of fluids. The succeeding chapter presents the equations of state for

  3. Classical realizability in the CPS target language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by considerations about Krivine's classical realizability, we introduce a term calculus for an intuitionistic logic with record types, which we call the CPS target language. We give a reformulation of the constructions of classical realizability in this language, using the categorical...... techniques of realizability triposes and toposes. We argue that the presentation of classical realizability in the CPS target language simplifies calculations in realizability toposes, in particular it admits a nice presentation of conjunction as intersection type which is inspired by Girard's ludics....

  4. Classical Statistical Mechanics and Landau Damping

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    We study the retarded response function in scalar $\\phi^4$-theory at finite temperature. We find that in the high-temperature limit the imaginary part of the self-energy is given by the classical theory to leading order in the coupling. In particular the plasmon damping rate is a purely classical effect to leading order, as shown by Aarts and Smit. The dominant contribution to Landau damping is given by the propagation of classical fields in a heat bath of non-interacting fields.

  5. Applying classical geometry intuition to quantum spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durfee, Dallin S.; Archibald, James L.

    2016-09-01

    Using concepts of geometric orthogonality and linear independence, we logically deduce the form of the Pauli spin matrices and the relationships between the three spatially orthogonal basis sets of the spin-1/2 system. Rather than a mathematically rigorous derivation, the relationships are found by forcing expectation values of the different basis states to have the properties we expect of a classical, geometric coordinate system. The process highlights the correspondence of quantum angular momentum with classical notions of geometric orthogonality, even for the inherently non-classical spin-1/2 system. In the process, differences in and connections between geometrical space and Hilbert space are illustrated.

  6. Bohmian measures and their classical limit

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter

    2010-09-01

    We consider a class of phase space measures, which naturally arise in the Bohmian interpretation of quantum mechanics. We study the classical limit of these so-called Bohmian measures, in dependence on the scale of oscillations and concentrations of the sequence of wave functions under consideration. The obtained results are consequently compared to those derived via semi-classical Wigner measures. To this end, we shall also give a connection to the theory of Young measures and prove several new results on Wigner measures themselves. Our analysis gives new insight on oscillation and concentration effects in the semi-classical regime. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  7. Density Functional Theory and Materials Modeling at Atomistic Length Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapan K. Ghosh

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We discuss the basic concepts of density functional theory (DFT as applied to materials modeling in the microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic length scales. The picture that emerges is that of a single unified framework for the study of both quantum and classical systems. While for quantum DFT, the central equation is a one-particle Schrodinger-like Kohn-Sham equation, the classical DFT consists of Boltzmann type distributions, both corresponding to a system of noninteracting particles in the field of a density-dependent effective potential, the exact functional form of which is unknown. One therefore approximates the exchange-correlation potential for quantum systems and the excess free energy density functional or the direct correlation functions for classical systems. Illustrative applications of quantum DFT to microscopic modeling of molecular interaction and that of classical DFT to a mesoscopic modeling of soft condensed matter systems are highlighted.

  8. Surface modification of bioceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkawa, Akira

    Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAp] is a major inorganic component of bone and teeth tissues and has the excellent biocompatibility and high osteoconductivity. The interactions between HAp and protein or cell have been studied. The HAp related bioceramics such as bone substitute, coating substance of metal implants, inorganic-polymer composites, and cell culture. We described two methods; (1) surface modification of HAp using organosilane; (2) fabrication of HAp ultra-thin layer on gold surface for protein adsorption analyzed with QCM-D technique. The interfacial interaction between collagen and HAp in a nano-region was controlled by depositing the organosilane of n-octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODS: -CH3) or aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS: -NH2) with a chemical vapor deposition method. The morphologies of collagen adsorbed on the surfaces of HAp and HAp deposited with APTS were similar, however that of the surface with ODS was apparently different, due to the hydrophobic interaction between the organic head group of -CH3 and residual groups of collagen. We present a method for coating gold quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) sensor with ultra-thin layer of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals evenly covering and tightly bound to the surface. The hydroxyapatite sensor operated in liquid with high stability and sensitivity. The in-situ adsorption mechanism and conformational change of fibrinogen on gold, titanium and hydroxyapatite surfaces were investigated by QCM-D technique and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The study indicates that the hydroxyapatite sensor is applicable for qualitative and conformational analysis of protein adsorption.

  9. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information › Bone Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your ... compared to people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine ...

  10. Correlation Functions in Open Quantum-Classical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Yu Hsieh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantum time correlation functions are often the principal objects of interest in experimental investigations of the dynamics of quantum systems. For instance, transport properties, such as diffusion and reaction rate coefficients, can be obtained by integrating these functions. The evaluation of such correlation functions entails sampling from quantum equilibrium density operators and quantum time evolution of operators. For condensed phase and complex systems, where quantum dynamics is difficult to carry out, approximations must often be made to compute these functions. We present a general scheme for the computation of correlation functions, which preserves the full quantum equilibrium structure of the system and approximates the time evolution with quantum-classical Liouville dynamics. Several aspects of the scheme are discussed, including a practical and general approach to sample the quantum equilibrium density, the properties of the quantum-classical Liouville equation in the context of correlation function computations, simulation schemes for the approximate dynamics and their interpretation and connections to other approximate quantum dynamical methods.

  11. A classical case of the Gasul phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabnis, Girish R; Phadke, Milind S; Kerkar, Prafulla G

    2016-02-01

    This case demonstrates the development of secondary infundibular stenosis in a 10-year-old male child with documented large non-restrictive perimembranous ventricular septal defect in infancy - the classical Gasul phenomenon.

  12. The Zoology of the classical islamic culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Provencal, Philippe; Aarab, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This article brings a survey of research on the science of zoology in the Classical Arabic/Islamic Culture as revealed in texts on this subject written in Classical Arabic from the second half of the 8th century to the 15th century A.D. In the light of recent research and by use of examples from ...... the Arabic texts themselves, a new evaluation on the scientific content of these texts will be proposed.......This article brings a survey of research on the science of zoology in the Classical Arabic/Islamic Culture as revealed in texts on this subject written in Classical Arabic from the second half of the 8th century to the 15th century A.D. In the light of recent research and by use of examples from...

  13. Chaos in effective classical and quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Casetti, L; Modugno, M; Casetti, Lapo; Gatto, Raoul; Modugno, Michele

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of classical and quantum N-component phi^4 oscillators in presence of an external field. In the large N limit the effective dynamics is described by two-degree-of-freedom classical Hamiltonian systems. In the classical model we observe chaotic orbits for any value of the external field, while in the quantum case chaos is strongly suppressed. A simple explanation of this behaviour is found in the change in the structure of the orbits induced by quantum corrections. Consistently with Heisenberg's principle, quantum fluctuations are forced away from zero, removing in the effective quantum dynamics a hyperbolic fixed point that is a major source of chaos in the classical model.

  14. A new supersymmetric classical Boussinesq equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Meng-Xia; Liu Qing-Ping; Wang Juan; Wu Ke

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,we obtain a supersymmetric generalization for the classical Boussinesq equation.We show that the supersymmetric equation system passes the Painlevé test and we also calculate its one- and two-soliton solutions.

  15. Classical algebra its nature, origins, and uses

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Roger L

    2008-01-01

    This insightful book combines the history, pedagogy, and popularization of algebra to present a unified discussion of the subject. Classical Algebra provides a complete and contemporary perspective on classical polynomial algebra through the exploration of how it was developed and how it exists today. With a focus on prominent areas such as the numerical solutions of equations, the systematic study of equations, and Galois theory, this book facilitates a thorough understanding of algebra and illustrates how the concepts of modern algebra originally developed from classical algebraic precursors. This book successfully ties together the disconnect between classical and modern algebraand provides readers with answers to many fascinating questions that typically go unexamined, including: What is algebra about? How did it arise? What uses does it have? How did it develop? What problems and issues have occurred in its history? How were these problems and issues resolved? The author answers these questions and more,...

  16. Rough sets: the classical and extended views

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZIARKO Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    The article is a comprehensive review of two major approaches to rough set theory: the classic rough setmodel introduced by Pawlak and the probabilistic approaches. The classic model is presented as a staging ground to the discussion of two varieties of the probabilistic approach, i.e. of the variable precision and Bayesian rough set models. Both of these models extend the classic model to deal with stochastic interactions while preserving the basicideas of the original rough set theory, such as set approximations, data dependencies, reducts etc. The probabilistic models are able to handle weaker data interactions than the classic model, thus extending the applicability of the rough set paradigm. The extended models are presented in considerable detail with some illustrative examples.

  17. Observable Signatures of a Classical Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    Eternal inflation arising from a potential landscape predicts that our universe is one realization of many possible cosmological histories. One way to access different cosmological histories is via the nucleation of bubble universes from a metastable false vacuum. Another way to sample different cosmological histories is via classical transitions, the creation of pocket universes through the collision between bubbles. Using relativistic numerical simulations, we examine the possibility of observationally determining if our observable universe resulted from a classical transition. We find that classical transitions produce spatially infinite, approximately open Friedman-Robertson-Walker universes. The leading set of observables in the aftermath of a classical transition are negative spatial curvature and a contribution to the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature quadrupole. The level of curvature and magnitude of the quadrupole are dependent on the position of the observer, and we determine the possible ran...

  18. Hermite polynomials and quasi-classical asymptotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S. Twareque, E-mail: twareque.ali@concordia.ca [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Concordia University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1M8 (Canada); Engliš, Miroslav, E-mail: englis@math.cas.cz [Mathematics Institute, Silesian University in Opava, Na Rybníčku 1, 74601 Opava, Czech Republic and Mathematics Institute, Žitná 25, 11567 Prague 1 (Czech Republic)

    2014-04-15

    We study an unorthodox variant of the Berezin-Toeplitz type of quantization scheme, on a reproducing kernel Hilbert space generated by the real Hermite polynomials and work out the associated quasi-classical asymptotics.

  19. Classical enhancement of quantum vacuum fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    De Lorenci, V A

    2016-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for the enhancement of vacuum fluctuations by means of a classical field. The basic idea is that if an observable quantity depends quadratically upon a quantum field, such as the electric field, then the application of a classical field produces a cross term between the classical and quantum fields. This cross term may be significantly larger than the purely quantum part, but also undergoes fluctuations driven by the quantum field. We illustrate this effect in a model for lightcone fluctuations involving pulses in a nonlinear dielectric. Vacuum electric field fluctuations produce fluctuations in the speed of a probe pulse, and form an analog model for quantum gravity effects. If the material has a nonzero third-order susceptibility, then the fractional light speed fluctuations are proportional to the square of the fluctuating electric field. Hence the application of a classical electric field can enhance the speed fluctuations. We give an example where this enhancement can be an increas...

  20. Classics in the Classroom: Great Expectations Fulfilled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Shela

    1986-01-01

    Describes how an English teacher in a Queens, New York, ghetto school introduced her grade nine students to Charles Dickens's "Great Expectations." Focuses on students' responses, which eventually became enthusiastic, and discusses the use of classics within the curriculum. (KH)

  1. Classical and quantum resonances for hyperbolic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Guillarmou, Colin; Hilgert, Joachim; Weich, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    For compact and for convex co-compact oriented hyperbolic surfaces, we prove an explicit correspondence between classical Ruelle resonant states and quantum resonant states, except at negative integers where the correspondence involves holomorphic sections of line bundles.

  2. Ambiguities in Quantizing a Classical System

    CERN Document Server

    Redmount, I H; Young, K; Redmount, Ian; Suen, Wai-Mo; Young, Kenneth

    1999-01-01

    One classical theory, as determined by an equation of motion or set of classical trajectories, can correspond to many unitarily {\\em in}equivalent quantum theories upon canonical quantization. This arises from a remarkable ambiguity, not previously investigated, in the construction of the classical (and hence the quantized) Hamiltonian or Lagrangian. This ambiguity is illustrated for systems with one degree of freedom: An arbitrary function of the constants of motion can be introduced into this construction. For example, the nonrelativistic and relativistic free particles follow identical classical trajectories, but the Hamiltonians or Lagrangians, and the canonically quantized versions of these descriptions, are inequivalent. Inequivalent descriptions of other systems, such as the harmonic oscillator, are also readily obtained.

  3. Secure quantum communication using classical correlated channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, D.; de Almeida, N. G.; Villas-Boas, C. J.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a secure protocol to send quantum information from one part to another without a quantum channel. In our protocol, which resembles quantum teleportation, a sender (Alice) and a receiver (Bob) share classical correlated states instead of EPR ones, with Alice performing measurements in two different bases and then communicating her results to Bob through a classical channel. Our secure quantum communication protocol requires the same amount of classical bits as the standard quantum teleportation protocol. In our scheme, as in the usual quantum teleportation protocol, once the classical channel is established in a secure way, a spy (Eve) will never be able to recover the information of the unknown quantum state, even if she is aware of Alice's measurement results. Security, advantages, and limitations of our protocol are discussed and compared with the standard quantum teleportation protocol.

  4. Classical geometry from the quantum Liouville theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hadasz, L; Piatek, M; Hadasz, Leszek; Jaskolski, Zbigniew; Piatek, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Zamolodchikov's recursion relations are used to analyze the existence and approximations to the classical conformal block in the case of four parabolic weights. Strong numerical evidence is found that the saddle point momenta arising in the classical limit of the DOZZ quantum Liouville theory are simply related to the geodesic length functions of the hyperbolic geometry on the 4-punctured Riemann sphere. Such relation provides new powerful methods for both numerical and analytical calculations of these functions. The consistency conditions for the factorization of the 4-point classical Liouville action in different channels are numerically verified. The factorization yields efficient numerical methods to calculate the 4-point classical action and, by the Polyakov conjecture, the accessory parameters of the Fuchsian uniformization of the 4-punctured sphere.

  5. Classical geometry from the quantum Liouville theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadasz, Leszek [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: hadasz@th.if.uj.edu.pl; Jaskolski, Zbigniew [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of WrocIaw, pl. M. Borna, 950-204 WrocIaw (Poland)]. E-mail: jask@ift.uni.wroc.pl; Piatek, Marcin [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of WrocIaw, pl. M. Borna, 950-204 WrocIaw (Poland)]. E-mail: piatek@ift.uni.wroc.pl

    2005-09-26

    Zamolodchikov's recursion relations are used to analyze the existence and approximations to the classical conformal block in the case of four parabolic weights. Strong numerical evidence is found that the saddle point momenta arising in the classical limit of the DOZZ quantum Liouville theory are simply related to the geodesic length functions of the hyperbolic geometry on the 4-punctured Riemann sphere. Such relation provides new powerful methods for both numerical and analytical calculations of these functions. The consistency conditions for the factorization of the 4-point classical Liouville action in different channels are numerically verified. The factorization yields efficient numerical methods to calculate the 4-point classical action and, by the Polyakov conjecture, the accessory parameters of the Fuchsian uniformization of the 4-punctured sphere.

  6. Quantum Reading of a Classical Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    We consider a digital memory where each memory cell is a mirror with two possible reflectivities (used to encode a bit of information). Adopting this model, we show that a non-classical source of light, possessing Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations, can retrieve the stored information more efficiently than every classical source. The improvement brought by this quantum reading of the memory can be dramatic for high reflectivities and can be tested with current technology.

  7. Classical theory of electric and magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Good, Roland H

    1971-01-01

    Classical Theory of Electric and Magnetic Fields is a textbook on the principles of electricity and magnetism. This book discusses mathematical techniques, calculations, with examples of physical reasoning, that are generally applied in theoretical physics. This text reviews the classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell's Equations, Lorentz Force, and Faraday's Law of Induction. The book also focuses on electrostatics and the general methods for solving electrostatic problems concerning images, inversion, complex variable, or separation of variables. The text also explains ma

  8. Classical geometry Euclidean, transformational, inversive, and projective

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, I E; Liu, A C F; Tokarsky, G W

    2014-01-01

    Features the classical themes of geometry with plentiful applications in mathematics, education, engineering, and science Accessible and reader-friendly, Classical Geometry: Euclidean, Transformational, Inversive, and Projective introduces readers to a valuable discipline that is crucial to understanding bothspatial relationships and logical reasoning. Focusing on the development of geometric intuitionwhile avoiding the axiomatic method, a problem solving approach is encouraged throughout. The book is strategically divided into three sections: Part One focuses on Euclidean geometry, which p

  9. Voice disorders in children with classic galactosemia

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Children with classic galactosemia are at risk for motor speech disorders resulting from disruptions in motor planning and programming (childhood apraxia of speech or CAS) or motor execution (dysarthria). In the present study of 33 children with classic galactosemia, 21% were diagnosed with CAS, 3% with ataxic dysarthria, and 3% with mixed CAS-dysarthria. Voice disorders due to laryngeal insufficiency were common in children with dysarthria and co-occurred with CAS. Most (58%) of the children...

  10. FSH isoform pattern in classic galactosemia

    OpenAIRE

    Gubbels, C.S.; Thomas, C. M.; Wodzig, K.W.H.; Olthaar, A. J.; Jaeken, J.; Sweep, F.C.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Female classic galactosemia patients suffer from primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). The cause for this long-term complication is not fully understood. One of the proposed mechanisms is that hypoglycosylation of complex molecules, a known secondary phenomenon of galactosemia, leads to FSH dysfunction. An earlier study showed less acidic isoforms of FSH in serum samples of two classic galactosemia patients compared to controls, indicating hypoglycosylation. In this study, FSH isoform patterns...

  11. A classical approach to smooth supermanifolds

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This is the author's Master's thesis written under the supervision of Dr. Gregor Weingart at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. The purpose of this study is to rewrite differential supergeometry in terms of classical differential geometry. This rewriting from "first principles" has two main motivations: 1 avoid using local (and usually not very well-defined) odd coordinates; 2 use both the language and the tools (both highly-developed) of classical differential geometry to state an...

  12. On entanglement-assisted classical capacity

    CERN Document Server

    Holevo, A S

    2001-01-01

    This paper is essentially a lecture from the author's course on quantum information theory, which is devoted to the result of C. H. Bennett, P. W. Shor, J. A. Smolin and A. V. Thapliyal (quant-ph/0106052) concerning entanglement-assisted classical capacity of a quantum channel. A modified proof of this result is given and relation between entanglement-assisted and unassisted classical capacities is discussed.

  13. Generalized Expression for Polarization Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Wang and T.S. Hahm

    2009-04-23

    A general polarization density which consists of classical and neoclassical parts is system-atically derived via modern gyrokinetics and bounce-kinetics by employing a phase-space Lagrangian Lie-transform perturbation method. The origins of polarization density are further elucidated. Extending the work on neoclassical polarization for long wavelength compared to ion banana width [M. N. Rosenbluth and F. L. Hinton, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)], an analytical formula for the generalized neoclassical polarization including both finite-banana-width (FBW) and finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) effects for arbitrary radial wavelength in comparison to banana width and gyroradius is derived. In additional to the contribution from trapped particles, the contribution of passing particles to the neoclassical polarization is also explicitly calculated. Our analytic expression agrees very well with the previous numerical results for a wide range of radial wavelength.

  14. Modification of dendritic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; del Angel, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez-Burgos, Ignacio

    2002-01-01

    Since 1890 Ramón y Cajal strongly defended the theory that dendrites and their processes and spines had a function of not just nutrient transport to the cell body, but they had an important conductive role in neural impulse transmission. He extensively discussed and supported this theory in the Volume 1 of his extraordinary book Textura del Sistema Nervioso del Hombre y de los Vertebrados. Also, Don Santiago significantly contributed to a detailed description of the various neural components of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex during development. Extensive investigation has been done in the last Century related to the functional role of these complex brain regions, and their association with learning, memory and some limbic functions. Likewise, the organization and expression of neuropsychological qualities such as memory, exploratory behavior and spatial orientation, among others, depend on the integrity and adequate functional activity of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is known that brain serotonin synthesis and release depend directly and proportionally on the availability of its precursor, tryptophan (TRY). By using a chronic TRY restriction model in rats, we studied their place learning ability in correlation with the dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in field CA1 of the hippocampus during postnatal development. We have also reported alterations in the maturation pattern of the ability for spontaneous alternation and task performance evaluating short-term memory, as well as adverse effects on the density of dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 field pyramidal neurons and on the dendritic arborization and the number of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons from the third layer of the prefrontal cortex using the same model of TRY restriction. The findings obtained in these studies employing a modified Golgi method, can be interpreted as a trans-synaptic plastic response due to understimulation of serotoninergic receptors located in the

  15. From Quantum to Classical in the Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Suprit

    2016-01-01

    Inflation has by-far set itself as one of the prime ideas in the current cosmological models that seemingly has an answer for every observed phenomenon in cosmology. More importantly, it serves as a bridge between the early quantum fluctuations and the present-day classical structures. Although the transition from quantum to classical is still not completely understood till date, there are two assumptions made in the inflationary paradigm in this regard: (i) the modes (metric perturbations or fluctuations) behave classically once they are well outside the Hubble radius and, (ii) once they become classical they stay classical and hence can be described by standard perturbation theory after they re-enter the Hubble radius. We critically examine these assumptions for the tensor modes of (linear) metric perturbations in a toy three stage universe with (i) inflation, (ii) radiation-dominated and (iii) late-time accelerated phases. The quantum-to-classical transition for these modes is evident from the evolution of...

  16. System Evolution by Metalevel Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Vagač

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes system evolution managed by corresponding metasystem. The metasystem builds a metamodel of base system and allows its modification. The modification is propagated back to the base system. The application model presents the example of standard graphics user interface developed with Java Abstract Windowing Toolkit (AWT, which is a part of the Java Foundation Classes (JFC. The main aim is to confirm the possibility of application properties monitoring using aspect-oriented programming, their abstraction in ametamodel, possibility of their alternations by metamodel modifications and consequent change in the original application model.

  17. On the existence of convex classical solutions to a generalized Prandtl-Batchelor free boundary problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, A.

    Under reasonably general assumptions, we prove the existence of convex classical solutions for the Prandtl-Batchelor free boundary problem in fluid dynamics, in which a flow of constant vorticity density is embedded in a potential flow, with a vortex sheet of constant vorticity density as the flow interface. These results apply to Batchelor flows which are confined to a bounded, convex vessel, and for which the limiting interior flow-speed exceeds the limiting exterior flow-speed along the interface.

  18. ELEMENTARY DENSITY BOUNDS FOR SELF-SIMILAR SETS AND APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Falconer[1] used the relationship between upper convex density and upper spherical density to obtain elementary density bounds for s-sets at HS-almost all points of the sets. In this paper, following Falconer[1], we first provide a basic method to estimate the lower bounds of these two classes of set densities for the self-similar s-sets satisfying the open set condition (OSC), and then obtain elementary density bounds for such fractals at all of their points. In addition, we apply the main results to the famous classical fractals and get some new density bounds.

  19. Quantum-like model of processing of information in the brain based on classical electromagnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    We propose a model of quantum-like (QL) processing of mental information. This model is based on quantum information theory. However, in contrast to models of ``quantum physical brain'' reducing mental activity (at least at the highest level) to quantum physical phenomena in the brain, our model matches well with the basic neuronal paradigm of the cognitive science. QL information processing is based (surprisingly) on classical electromagnetic signals induced by joint activity of neurons. This novel approach to quantum information is based on representation of quantum mechanics as a version of classical signal theory which was recently elaborated by the author. The brain uses the QL representation (QLR) for working with abstract concepts; concrete images are described by classical information theory. Two processes, classical and QL, are performed parallely. Moreover, information is actively transmitted from one representation to another. A QL concept given in our model by a density operator can generate a var...

  20. Trajectory description of the quantum–classical transition for wave packet interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Chia-Chun, E-mail: ccchou@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2016-08-15

    The quantum–classical transition for wave packet interference is investigated using a hydrodynamic description. A nonlinear quantum–classical transition equation is obtained by introducing a degree of quantumness ranging from zero to one into the classical time-dependent Schrödinger equation. This equation provides a continuous description for the transition process of physical systems from purely quantum to purely classical regimes. In this study, the transition trajectory formalism is developed to provide a hydrodynamic description for the quantum–classical transition. The flow momentum of transition trajectories is defined by the gradient of the action function in the transition wave function and these trajectories follow the main features of the evolving probability density. Then, the transition trajectory formalism is employed to analyze the quantum–classical transition of wave packet interference. For the collision-like wave packet interference where the propagation velocity is faster than the spreading speed of the wave packet, the interference process remains collision-like for all the degree of quantumness. However, the interference features demonstrated by transition trajectories gradually disappear when the degree of quantumness approaches zero. For the diffraction-like wave packet interference, the interference process changes continuously from a diffraction-like to collision-like case when the degree of quantumness gradually decreases. This study provides an insightful trajectory interpretation for the quantum–classical transition of wave packet interference.

  1. Respiratory psychophysiology and behavior modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, R

    2001-09-01

    This article was written as an introduction to a special issue of Behavior Modification dedicated to studies in the field of respiratory psychophysiology. Although the invited articles that constitute this special issue cover a fairly broad range of topics, priority was given to articles that focus on the role of respiration in panic disorder. Attention is directed to the fundamental role of breathing in applied psychophysiology and to the encouragement of research in the modification of breathing behavior. The connection between respiratory psychophysiology and behavior modification is explained by reference to (a) a recent article on Pavlovian and operant control of breathing behavior and (b) four published volumes of selected articles dedicated exclusively to the field of respiratory psychophysiology. The present special issue of Behavior Modification marks the fifth volume.

  2. On a loss of information in a transition from quantum to a quasi-classical regime

    CERN Document Server

    Granik, A

    2002-01-01

    By defining information entropy in terms of probabilities densities $|\\Psi|^2$ ($\\Psi$ is a wave function in the coordinate representation) a more or less trivial statement about a loss of quantum information in a transition to a quasi-classical regime is formally proven.

  3. Classical simulation of quantum many-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yichen

    Classical simulation of quantum many-body systems is in general a challenging problem for the simple reason that the dimension of the Hilbert space grows exponentially with the system size. In particular, merely encoding a generic quantum many-body state requires an exponential number of bits. However, condensed matter physicists are mostly interested in local Hamiltonians and especially their ground states, which are highly non-generic. Thus, we might hope that at least some physical systems allow efficient classical simulation. Starting with one-dimensional (1D) quantum systems (i.e., the simplest nontrivial case), the first basic question is: Which classes of states have efficient classical representations? It turns out that this question is quantitatively related to the amount of entanglement in the state, for states with "little entanglement'' are well approximated by matrix product states (a data structure that can be manipulated efficiently on a classical computer). At a technical level, the mathematical notion for "little entanglement'' is area law, which has been proved for unique ground states in 1D gapped systems. We establish an area law for constant-fold degenerate ground states in 1D gapped systems and thus explain the effectiveness of matrix-product-state methods in (e.g.) symmetry breaking phases. This result might not be intuitively trivial as degenerate ground states in gapped systems can be long-range correlated. Suppose an efficient classical representation exists. How can one find it efficiently? The density matrix renormalization group is the leading numerical method for computing ground states in 1D quantum systems. However, it is a heuristic algorithm and the possibility that it may fail in some cases cannot be completely ruled out. Recently, a provably efficient variant of the density matrix renormalization group has been developed for frustration-free 1D gapped systems. We generalize this algorithm to all (i.e., possibly frustrated) 1D

  4. HMG Modifications and Nuclear Function

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qingchun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2010-01-01

    High mobility group (HMG) proteins assume important roles in regulating chromatin dynamics, transcriptional activities of genes and other cellular processes. Post-translational modifications of HMG proteins can alter their interactions with DNA and proteins, and consequently, affect their biological activities. Although the mechanisms through which these modifications are involved in regulating biological processes in different cellular contexts are not fully understood, new insights into the...

  5. Posttranslational Protein Modification in Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Eichler, Jerry; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2005-01-01

    One of the first hurdles to be negotiated in the postgenomic era involves the description of the entire protein content of the cell, the proteome. Such efforts are presently complicated by the various posttranslational modifications that proteins can experience, including glycosylation, lipid attachment, phosphorylation, methylation, disulfide bond formation, and proteolytic cleavage. Whereas these and other posttranslational protein modifications have been well characterized in Eucarya and B...

  6. Fisher information and quantum-classical field theory: classical statistics similarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syska, J. [Department of Field Theory and Particle Physics, Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)

    2007-07-15

    The classical statistics indication for the impossibility to derive quantum mechanics from classical mechanics is proved. The formalism of the statistical Fisher information is used. Next the Fisher information as a tool of the construction of a self-consistent field theory, which joins the quantum theory and classical field theory, is proposed. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Biomolecular Modification of Inorganic Crystal Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Yoreo, J J

    2007-04-27

    The fascinating shapes and hierarchical designs of biomineralized structures are an inspiration to materials scientists because of the potential they suggest for biomolecular control over materials synthesis. Conversely, the failure to prevent or limit tissue mineralization in the vascular, skeletal, and urinary systems is a common source of disease. Understanding the mechanisms by which organisms direct or limit crystallization has long been a central challenge to the biomineralization community. One prevailing view is that mineral-associated macromolecules are responsible for either inhibiting crystallization or initiating and stabilizing non-equilibrium crystal polymorphs and morphologies through interactions between anionic moieties and cations in solution or at mineralizing surfaces. In particular, biomolecules that present carboxyl groups to the growing crystal have been implicated as primary modulators of growth. Here we review the results from a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling (MM) studies to investigate the effect of specific interactions between carboxylate-rich biomolecules and atomic steps on crystal surfaces during the growth of carbonates, oxalates and phosphates of calcium. Specifically, we how the growth kinetics and morphology depend on the concentration of additives that include citrate, simple amino acids, synthetic Asp-rich polypeptides, and naturally occurring Asp-rich proteins found in both functional and pathological mineral tissues. The results reveal a consistent picture of shape modification in which stereochemical matching of modifiers to specific atomic steps drives shape modification. Inhibition and other changes in growth kinetics are shown to be due to a range of mechanisms that depend on chemistry and molecular size. Some effects are well described by classic crystal growth theories, but others, such as step acceleration due to peptide charge and hydrophylicity, were previously unrealized

  8. Modification Management for Construction Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wolfgang Huhnt; Sven Richter; Felix Enge

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to handle different types of subsequent modifications in con-struction processes. It is focused on a formalized approach with the objective that effects of subsequent modifications are detected automatically. The approach presented in this paper makes use of an existing modeling technique specifically focused on construction processes. The modeling techniques result in a process description where all technological interdependencies between construction activities are consid-ered and where consistency between the sequence of activities and the history of components is guaran-teed. This modeling technique is expanded by an existing concept for handling versions and dependencies between objects. The integration of these different concepts makes it possible to track effects of relevant types of subsequent modifications in construction processes on a formalized basis. Effects of subsequent modifications are detected by algorithms, different versions can be compared by algorithms and different versions are stored so that subsequent modifications are documented. The innovation of the approach pre-sented is the completeness. Effects of different relevant types of subsequent modifications in construction processes are tracked on a formalized basis.

  9. Quantum-mechanical machinery for rational decision-making in classical guessing game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Jeongho; Ryu, Junghee; Pawłowski, Marcin; Ham, Byoung S.; Lee, Jinhyoung

    2016-02-01

    In quantum game theory, one of the most intriguing and important questions is, “Is it possible to get quantum advantages without any modification of the classical game?” The answer to this question so far has largely been negative. So far, it has usually been thought that a change of the classical game setting appears to be unavoidable for getting the quantum advantages. However, we give an affirmative answer here, focusing on the decision-making process (we call ‘reasoning’) to generate the best strategy, which may occur internally, e.g., in the player’s brain. To show this, we consider a classical guessing game. We then define a one-player reasoning problem in the context of the decision-making theory, where the machinery processes are designed to simulate classical and quantum reasoning. In such settings, we present a scenario where a rational player is able to make better use of his/her weak preferences due to quantum reasoning, without any altering or resetting of the classically defined game. We also argue in further analysis that the quantum reasoning may make the player fail, and even make the situation worse, due to any inappropriate preferences.

  10. Classical Theory, Postmodernism, and the Sociology Liberal Arts Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembcke, Jerry Lee

    1993-01-01

    Discusses classical theory as a modernist endeavor to apprehend the phenomenon of "unity of disunity." Presents three ways that classical theory approaches the philosophy views of Durkheim, Marx, and Weber. Concludes that postmodernism validates the relevancy of classical theory. (CFR)

  11. Classical theory of the hydrogen atom

    CERN Document Server

    Rashkovskiy, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that all of the basic properties of the hydrogen atom can be consistently described in terms of classical electrodynamics instead of taking the electron to be a particle; we consider an electrically charged classical wave field, an "electron wave", which is held in a limited region of space by the electrostatic field of the proton. It is shown that quantum mechanics must be considered to be not a theory of particles but a classical field theory in the spirit of classical electrodynamics. In this case, we are not faced with difficulties in interpreting the results of the theory. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, all of the well-known regularities of the spontaneous emission of the hydrogen atom are obtained, which is usually derived in the framework of quantum electrodynamics. It is shown that there are no discrete states and discrete energy levels of the atom: the energy of the atom and its states change continuously. An explanation of the conventional corpuscular-statistical interpre...

  12. A Case of Classic Raymond Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas George Zaorsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Classic Raymond syndrome consists of ipsilateral abducens impairment, contralateral central facial paresis, and contralateral hemiparesis. However, subsequent clinical observations argued on the presentation of facial involvement. To validate this entity, we present a case of classic Raymond syndrome with contralateral facial paresis. A 50 year-old man experienced acute onset of horizontal diplopia, left mouth drooling and left-sided weakness. Neurological examination showed he had right abducens nerve palsy, left-sided paresis of the lower part of the face and limbs, and left hyperreflexia. A brain MRI showed a subacute infarct in the right mid-pons. The findings were consistent with those of classic Raymond syndrome. To date, only a few cases of Raymond syndrome, commonly without facial involvement, have been reported. Our case is a validation of classic Raymond syndrome with contralateral facial paresis. We propose the concept of two types of Raymond syndrome: (1 the classic type, which may be produced by a lesion in the mid-pons involving the ipsilateral abducens fascicle and undecussated corticofacial and corticospinal fibers; and (2 the common type, which may be produced by a lesion involving the ipsilateral abducens fascicle and undecussated corticospinal fibers but sparing the corticofacial fibers.

  13. Population structure of the Classic period Maya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Andrew K

    2007-03-01

    This study examines the population structure of Classic period (A.D. 250-900) Maya populations through analysis of odontometric variation of 827 skeletons from 12 archaeological sites in Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras. The hypothesis that isolation by distance characterized Classic period Maya population structure is tested using Relethford and Blangero's (Hum Biol 62 (1990) 5-25) approach to R matrix analysis for quantitative traits. These results provide important biological data for understanding ancient Maya population history, particularly the effects of the competing Tikal and Calakmul hegemonies on patterns of lowland Maya site interaction. An overall F(ST) of 0.018 is found for the Maya area, indicating little among-group variation for the Classic Maya sites tested. Principal coordinates plots derived from the R matrix analysis show little regional patterning in the data, though the geographic outliers of Kaminaljuyu and a pooled Pacific Coast sample did not cluster with the lowland Maya sites. Mantel tests comparing the biological distance matrix to a geographic distance matrix found no association between genetic and geographic distance. In the Relethford-Blangero analysis, most sites possess negative or near-zero residuals, indicating minimal extraregional gene flow. The exceptions were Barton Ramie, Kaminaljuyu, and Seibal. A scaled R matrix analysis clarifies that genetic drift is a consideration for understanding Classic Maya population structure. All results indicate that isolation by distance does not describe Classic period Maya population structure.

  14. Origin of classical structure from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Kiefer, C

    2000-01-01

    According to the inflationary scenario, all structure in the Universe can be traced back to quantum fluctuations of the metric and scalar field(s) during inflation. The seeds of this structure can be observed as classical anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. I briefly review how the transition from the inherent quantum nature of these fluctuations to classical behaviour comes about. Two features play a crucial role: Firstly, the quantum state of the fluctuations becomes highly squeezed for wavelengths that exceed the Hubble radius. Secondly, decoherence due to other fields distinguishes the field-amplitude basis as the classical pointer basis. I also discuss the entropy of the fluctuations and make a brief comparison with chaotic systems.

  15. Quantum approach to classical statistical mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somma, R D; Batista, C D; Ortiz, G

    2007-07-20

    We present a new approach to study the thermodynamic properties of d-dimensional classical systems by reducing the problem to the computation of ground state properties of a d-dimensional quantum model. This classical-to-quantum mapping allows us to extend the scope of standard optimization methods by unifying them under a general framework. The quantum annealing method is naturally extended to simulate classical systems at finite temperatures. We derive the rates to assure convergence to the optimal thermodynamic state using the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. For simulated and quantum annealing, we obtain the asymptotic rates of T(t) approximately (pN)/(k(B)logt) and gamma(t) approximately (Nt)(-c/N), for the temperature and magnetic field, respectively. Other annealing strategies are also discussed.

  16. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Kodrat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuralgia is a debilitating pain syndrome with a distinct symptom mainly excruciating facial pain that tends to come and go unpredictably in sudden shock-like attacks. Medical management remains the primary treatment for classical trigeminal neuralgia. When medical therapy failed, surgery with microvascular decompression can be performed. Radiosurgery can be offered for classical trigeminal neuralgia patients who are not surgical candidate or surgery refusal and they should not in acute pain condition. Radiosurgery is widely used because of good therapeutic result and low complication rate. Weakness of this technique is a latency period, which is time required for pain relief. It usually ranges from 1 to 2 months. This review enlightens the important role of radiosurgery in the treatment of classical trigeminal neuralgia.

  17. Modeling Classical Heat Conduction in FLAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hendon, Raymond Cori [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-12

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory FLAG code contains both electron and ion heat conduction modules; these have been constructed to be directly relevant to user application problems. However, formal code verification of these modules requires quantitative comparison to exact solutions of the underlying mathematical models. A wide variety of exact solutions to the classical heat conduction equation are available for this purpose. This report summarizes efforts involving the representation of the classical heat conduction equation as following from the large electron-ion coupling limit of the electron and ion 3T temperature equations, subject to electron and ion conduction processes. In FLAG, this limiting behavior is quantitatively verified using a simple exact solution of the classical heat conduction equation. For this test problem, both heat conduction modules produce nearly identical spatial electron and ion temperature profiles that converge at slightly less than 2nd order to the corresponding exact solution.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of classical stopping power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Paul E; Surh, Michael P; Richards, David F; Graziani, Frank R; Murillo, Michael S

    2013-11-22

    Molecular dynamics can provide very accurate tests of classical kinetic theory; for example, unambiguous comparisons can be made for classical particles interacting via a repulsive 1/r potential. The plasma stopping power problem, of great interest in its own right, provides an especially stringent test of a velocity-dependent transport property. We have performed large-scale (~10(4)-10(6) particles) molecular dynamics simulations of charged-particle stopping in a classical electron gas that span the weak to moderately strong intratarget coupling regimes. Projectile-target coupling is varied with projectile charge and velocity. Comparisons are made with disparate kinetic theories (both Boltzmann and Lenard-Balescu classes) and fully convergent theories to establish regimes of validity. We extend these various stopping models to improve agreement with the MD data and provide a useful fit to our results.

  19. Learning, Realizability and Games in Classical Arithmetic

    CERN Document Server

    Aschieri, Federico

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation we provide mathematical evidence that the concept of learning can be used to give a new and intuitive computational semantics of classical proofs in various fragments of Predicative Arithmetic. First, we extend Kreisel modified realizability to a classical fragment of first order Arithmetic, Heyting Arithmetic plus EM1 (Excluded middle axiom restricted to Sigma^0_1 formulas). We introduce a new realizability semantics we call "Interactive Learning-Based Realizability". Our realizers are self-correcting programs, which learn from their errors and evolve through time. Secondly, we extend the class of learning based realizers to a classical version PCFclass of PCF and, then, compare the resulting notion of realizability with Coquand game semantics and prove a full soundness and completeness result. In particular, we show there is a one-to-one correspondence between realizers and recursive winning strategies in the 1-Backtracking version of Tarski games. Third, we provide a complete and fully...

  20. General linear dynamics - quantum, classical or hybrid

    CERN Document Server

    Elze, H-T; Vallone, F

    2011-01-01

    We describe our recent proposal of a path integral formulation of classical Hamiltonian dynamics. Which leads us here to a new attempt at hybrid dynamics, which concerns the direct coupling of classical and quantum mechanical degrees of freedom. This is of practical as well as of foundational interest and no fully satisfactory solution of this problem has been established to date. Related aspects will be observed in a general linear ensemble theory, which comprises classical and quantum dynamics in the form of Liouville and von Neumann equations, respectively, as special cases. Considering the simplest object characterized by a two-dimensional state-space, we illustrate how quantum mechanics is special in several respects among possible linear generalizations.

  1. Classical Ising model test for quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Joseph; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2010-07-01

    We exploit a recently constructed mapping between quantum circuits and graphs in order to prove that circuits corresponding to certain planar graphs can be efficiently simulated classically. The proof uses an expression for the Ising model partition function in terms of quadratically signed weight enumerators (QWGTs), which are polynomials that arise naturally in an expansion of quantum circuits in terms of rotations involving Pauli matrices. We combine this expression with a known efficient classical algorithm for the Ising partition function of any planar graph in the absence of an external magnetic field, and the Robertson-Seymour theorem from graph theory. We give as an example a set of quantum circuits with a small number of non-nearest-neighbor gates which admit an efficient classical simulation.

  2. Voice disorders in children with classic galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Nancy L

    2011-04-01

    Children with classic galactosemia are at risk for motor speech disorders resulting from disruptions in motor planning and programming (childhood apraxia of speech or CAS) or motor execution (dysarthria). In the present study of 33 children with classic galactosemia, 21% were diagnosed with CAS, 3% with ataxic dysarthria, and 3% with mixed CAS-dysarthria. Voice disorders due to laryngeal insufficiency were common in children with dysarthria and co-occurred with CAS. Most (58%) of the children with classic galactosemia had decreased respiratory-phonatory support for speech, and 33% had disturbed vocal quality that was indicative of cerebellar dysfunction. Three children, two diagnosed with CAS and one not diagnosed with a motor speech disorder, had vocal tremors. Treatment of voice dysfunction in neurogenic speech disorders is discussed.

  3. Quantum field theory from classical statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Wetterich, C

    2011-01-01

    An Ising-type classical statistical model is shown to describe quantum fermions. For a suitable time-evolution law for the probability distribution of the Ising-spins our model describes a quantum field theory for Dirac spinors in external electromagnetic fields, corresponding to a mean field approximation to quantum electrodynamics. All quantum features for the motion of an arbitrary number of electrons and positrons, including the characteristic interference effects for two-fermion states, are described by the classical statistical model. For one-particle states in the non-relativistic approximation we derive the Schr\\"odinger equation for a particle in a potential from the time evolution law for the probability distribution of the Ising-spins. Thus all characteristic quantum features, as interference in a double slit experiment, tunneling or discrete energy levels for stationary states, are derived from a classical statistical ensemble. Concerning the particle-wave-duality of quantum mechanics, the discret...

  4. Non-Classical Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomelino, Carrie L.; Supuran, Claudiu T.; McKenna, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Specific isoforms from the carbonic anhydrase (CA) family of zinc metalloenzymes have been associated with a variety of diseases. Isoform-specific carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) are therefore a major focus of attention for specific disease treatments. Classical CAIs, primarily sulfonamide-based compounds and their bioisosteres, are examined as antiglaucoma, antiepileptic, antiobesity, antineuropathic pain and anticancer compounds. However, many sulfonamide compounds inhibit all CA isoforms nonspecifically, diluting drug effectiveness and causing undesired side effects due to off-target inhibition. In addition, a small but significant percentage of the general population cannot be treated with sulfonamide-based compounds due to a sulfa allergy. Therefore, CAIs must be developed that are not only isoform specific, but also non-classical, i.e. not based on sulfonamides, sulfamates, or sulfamides. This review covers the classes of non-classical CAIs and the recent advances in the development of isoform-specific inhibitors based on phenols, polyamines, coumarins and their derivatives. PMID:27438828

  5. Classical Ergodicity and Modern Portfolio Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Poitras

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available What role have theoretical methods initially developed in mathematics and physics played in the progress of financial economics? What is the relationship between financial economics and econophysics? What is the relevance of the “classical ergodicity hypothesis” to modern portfolio theory? This paper addresses these questions by reviewing the etymology and history of the classical ergodicity hypothesis in 19th century statistical mechanics. An explanation of classical ergodicity is provided that establishes a connection to the fundamental empirical problem of using nonexperimental data to verify theoretical propositions in modern portfolio theory. The role of the ergodicity assumption in the ex post/ex ante quandary confronting modern portfolio theory is also examined.

  6. Progress on nuclear modifications of structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kumano, S

    2016-01-01

    We report progress on nuclear structure functions, especially on their nuclear modifications and a new tensor structure function for the deuteron. To understand nuclear structure functions is an important step toward describing nuclei and QCD matters from low to high densities and from low to high energies in terms of fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom beyond conventional hadron and nuclear physics. It is also practically important for understanding new phenomena in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Furthermore, since systematic errors of current neutrino-oscillation experiments are dominated by uncertainties of neutrino-nucleus interactions, such studies are valuable for finding new physics beyond current framework. Next, a new tensor-polarized structure function $b_1$ is discussed for the deuteron. There was a measurement by HERMES; however, its data are inconsistent with the conventional convolution estimate based on the standard deuteron model with D-state admixture. This fact ...

  7. Selective Surface Modification on Lubricant Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2016-11-01

    While surface patterns are effective in improving tribological properties, nevertheless they alter the surface wettability, which will in turn affect the surface-lubricant interactions. When there is a shortage of lubricant on a patterned surface, the lubricant stored inside the cavities will be extracted to compensate the surface lubricant dissipation. Additionally, the lubricant retention effect provided by the cavities is competing with the release of the lubricant. With weak surface-lubricant interaction, the retention is limited. Therefore, the lubrication will have a sudden failure, giving a dramatic transition to abrasive wear. To improve the performance of polar lubricants on hydrophobic polymer surfaces, both topographical and selective surface modifications were incorporated on injection molded polypropylene surfaces. Distinctive lubrication improvement was observed when the surface structure density for the lubricant storage was high, and the release of the lubricant was controlled by the interaction with the selectively modified surfaces.

  8. Gold Nanowires and Their Chemical Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häkkinen, Hannu; Barnett, Robert N.; Landman, Uzi

    2000-03-01

    Atomic structure, electronic structure, and ballistic transport in thin gold nanowires at their final stages before break-up, recently imaged by high-resolution electron microscopy,(H. Ohnishi et al., Nature 395), 780 (1998) are investigated with density functional simulations.(H. Häkkinen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 103), 8814 (1999) We discuss stretching mechanisms leading to elongated chain-like structures showing dimerization akin to a Peierls transition and retaining conductance close to unity for stretching lengths that exceed considerably a typical interatomic bond length. We also demonstrate a chemical modification of the wire via adsorption of a methyl thiol molecule and discuss its effects on the structure and conductance.

  9. The classic. Review article: Traffic accidents. 1966.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscherne, H

    2013-09-01

    This Classic Article is a translation of the original work by Prof. Harald Tscherne, Der Straßenunfall [Traffic Accidents]. An accompanying biographical sketch of Prof. Tscherne is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-013-3011-x . An online version of the original German article is available as supplemental material. The Classic Article is reproduced with permission from Brüder Hollinek & Co. GesmbH, Purkersdorf, Austria. The original article was published in Wien Med Wochenschr. 1966;116:105-108. (Translated by Dr. Roman Pfeifer.).

  10. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in a classical particle

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, L A; Sanchez, Luis Alberto; Mahecha, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Due to the fact that only matter fields have phase, frequently is believed that the gauge principle can induce gauge fields only in quantum systems. But this is not necessary. This paper, of pedagogical scope, presents a classical system constituted by a particle in a classical potential, which is used as a model to illustrate the gauge principle and the spontaneous symmetry breaking. Those concepts appear in the study of second order phase transitions. Ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, superconductivity, plasmons in a free electron gas, and the mass of vector bosons in the gauge field Yang-Mills theories, are some of the phenomena in which these transitions occur.

  11. Thermodynamic integration from classical to quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott; Manolopoulos, David E

    2011-12-14

    We present a new method for calculating quantum mechanical corrections to classical free energies, based on thermodynamic integration from classical to quantum mechanics. In contrast to previous methods, our method is numerically stable even in the presence of strong quantum delocalization. We first illustrate the method and its relationship to a well-established method with an analysis of a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator. We then show that our method can be used to calculate the quantum mechanical contributions to the free energies of ice and water for a flexible water model, a problem for which the established method is unstable.

  12. Dynamics of Non-Classical Interval Exchanges

    CERN Document Server

    Gadre, Vaibhav S

    2009-01-01

    Train tracks with a single vertex are a generalization of interval exchange maps. Here, we consider non-classical interval exchanges: complete train tracks with a single vertex. These can be studied as a dynamical system by considering Rauzy induction in this context. This gives a refinement process on the parameter space similar to Kerckhoff's simplicial systems. We show that the refinement process gives an expansion that has a key dynamical property called uniform distortion. We use uniform distortion to prove normality of the expansion. Consequently we prove an analog of Keane's conjecture: almost every non-classical interval exchange is uniquely ergodic.

  13. Beam structures classical and advanced theories

    CERN Document Server

    Carrera, Erasmo; Petrolo, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Beam theories are exploited worldwide to analyze civil, mechanical, automotive, and aerospace structures. Many beam approaches have been proposed during the last centuries by eminent scientists such as Euler, Bernoulli, Navier, Timoshenko, Vlasov, etc.  Most of these models are problem dependent: they provide reliable results for a given problem, for instance a given section and cannot be applied to a different one. Beam Structures: Classical and Advanced Theories proposes a new original unified approach to beam theory that includes practically all classical and advanced models for be

  14. Classical particle exchange: a quantitative treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Lancaster, Jarrett L; Titus, Aaron P

    2015-01-01

    The "classic" analogy of classical repulsive interactions via exchange of particles is revisited with a quantitative model and analyzed. This simple model based solely upon the principle of momentum conservation yields a nontrivial, conservative approximation at low energies while also including a type of "relativistic" regime in which the conservative formulation breaks down. Simulations are presented which are accessible to undergraduate students at any level in the physics curriculum as well as analytic treatments of the various regimes which should be accessible to advanced undergraduate physics majors.

  15. Quantization of soluble classical constrained systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belhadi, Z. [Laboratoire de physique et chimie quantique, Faculté des sciences, Université Mouloud Mammeri, BP 17, 15000 Tizi Ouzou (Algeria); Laboratoire de physique théorique, Faculté des sciences exactes, Université de Bejaia, 06000 Bejaia (Algeria); Menas, F. [Laboratoire de physique et chimie quantique, Faculté des sciences, Université Mouloud Mammeri, BP 17, 15000 Tizi Ouzou (Algeria); Ecole Nationale Préparatoire aux Etudes d’ingéniorat, Laboratoire de physique, RN 5 Rouiba, Alger (Algeria); Bérard, A. [Equipe BioPhysStat, Laboratoire LCP-A2MC, ICPMB, IF CNRS No 2843, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex (France); Mohrbach, H., E-mail: herve.mohrbach@univ-lorraine.fr [Equipe BioPhysStat, Laboratoire LCP-A2MC, ICPMB, IF CNRS No 2843, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex (France)

    2014-12-15

    The derivation of the brackets among coordinates and momenta for classical constrained systems is a necessary step toward their quantization. Here we present a new approach for the determination of the classical brackets which does neither require Dirac’s formalism nor the symplectic method of Faddeev and Jackiw. This approach is based on the computation of the brackets between the constants of integration of the exact solutions of the equations of motion. From them all brackets of the dynamical variables of the system can be deduced in a straightforward way.

  16. Knot Invariants from Classical Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Leal, L C

    1999-01-01

    We consider the Non-Abelian Chern-Simons term coupled to external particles, in a gauge and diffeomorphism invariant form. The classical equations of motion are perturbativelly studied, and the on-shell action is shown to produce knot-invariants associated with the sources. The first contributions are explicitly calculated, and the corresponding knot-invariants are recognized. We conclude that the interplay between Knot Theory and Topological Field Theories is manifested not only at the quantum level, but in a classical context as well.

  17. On the Classical and Quantum Momentum Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esposito, Chiara

    In this thesis we study the classical and quantum momentum maps and the theory of reduction. We focus on the notion of momentum map in Poisson geometry and we discuss the classification of the momentum map in this framework. Furthermore, we describe the so-called Poisson Reduction, a technique...... that allows us to reduce the dimension of a manifold in presence of symmetries implemented by Poisson actions. Using techniques of deformation quantization and quantum groups, we introduce the quantum momentum map as a deformation of the classical momentum map, constructed in such a way that it factorizes...

  18. Classical Higgs fields on gauge gluon bundles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palese Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical Higgs fields and related canonical conserved quantities are defined by invariant variational problems on suitably defined gauge gluon bundles. We consider Lagrangian field theories which are assumed to be invariant with respect to the action of a gauge-natural group. As an illustrative example we exploit the ‘gluon Lagrangian’, i.e. a Yang-Mills Lagrangian on the (1, 1-order gauge-natural bundle of SU(3-principal connections. The kernel of the gauge-natural Jacobi morphism for such a Lagrangian, by inducing a reductive split structure, canonically defines a ‘gluon classical Higgs field’.

  19. CLASSICAL RISK MODEL WITH THRESHOLD DIVIDEND STRATEGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Ming; Guo Junyi

    2008-01-01

    In this article, a threshold dividend strategy is used for classical risk model.Under this dividend strategy, certain probability of ruin, which occurs in case of constant barrier strategy, is avoided. Using the strong Markov property of the surplus process and the distribution of the deficit in classical risk model, the survival probability for this model is derived, which is more direct than that in Asmussen(2000, P195, Proposition 1.10). The occupation time of non-dividend of this model is also discussed by means of Martingale method.

  20. Hidden invariance of the free classical particle

    CERN Document Server

    García, S

    1993-01-01

    A formalism describing the dynamics of classical and quantum systems from a group theoretical point of view is presented. We apply it to the simple example of the classical free particle. The Galileo group $G$ is the symmetry group of the free equations of motion. Consideration of the free particle Lagrangian semi-invariance under $G$ leads to a larger symmetry group, which is a central extension of the Galileo group by the real numbers. We study the dynamics associated with this group, and characterize quantities like Noether invariants and evolution equations in terms of group geometric objects. An extension of the Galileo group by $U(1)$ leads to quantum mechanics.