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Sample records for class i-restricted cytolytic

  1. Features of target cell lysis by class I and class II MHC restricted cytolytic T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maimone, M.M.; Morrison, L.A.; Braciale, V.L.; Braciale, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    The lytic activity of influenza virus-specific muvine cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones that are restricted by either H-2K/D (class I) or H-2I (class II) major histocompatibility (MHC) locus products was compared on an influenza virus-infected target cell expressing both K/D and I locus products. With the use of two in vitro measurements of cytotoxicity, conventional 51 Cr release, and detergent-releasable radiolabeled DNA (as a measure of nuclear disintegration in the early post-lethal hit period), the authors found no difference between class I and class II MHC-restricted CTL in the kinetics of target cell destruction. In addition, class II MHC-restricted antiviral CTL failed to show any lysis of radiolabeled bystander cells. Killing of labeled specific targets by these class II MHC-restricted CTL was also efficiently inhibited by unlabeled specific competitor cells in a cold target inhibition assay. In sum, these data suggest that class I and class II MHC-restricted CTL mediate target cell destruction by an essentially similar direct mechanism

  2. pH dependence of MHC class I-restricted peptide presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Romme, T

    1996-01-01

    The function of MHC class I molecules is to bind and present antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T cells. Here, we report that class I-restricted peptide presentation is strongly pH dependent. The presentation of some peptides was enhanced at acidic pH, whereas the presentation of others was inhibited....... Biochemical peptide-MHC class I binding assays demonstrated that peptide-MHC class I complexes are more stable at neutral pH than at acidic pH. We suggest that acid-dependent peptide dissociation can generate empty class I molecules and that the resulting binding potential can be exploited by a subset...

  3. Immunogenicity of HLA Class I and II Double Restricted Influenza A-Derived Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sara Ram; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Buus, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify influenza A-derived peptides which bind to both HLA class I and -II molecules and by immunization lead to both HLA class I and class II restricted immune responses. Eight influenza A-derived 9-11mer peptides with simultaneous binding to both HLA-A*02...... four of the double binding peptides did result in HLA-A*02:01 restricted responses only. According to their cytokine profile, the CD4 T cell responses were of the Th2 type. In influenza infected mice, we were unable to detect natural processing in vivo of the double restricted peptides and in line...... with this, peptide vaccination did not decrease virus titres in the lungs of intranasally influenza challenged mice. Our data show that HLA class I and class II double binding peptides can be identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. By immunization, double binding peptides can give rise...

  4. Identification of MHC class II restricted T‐cell‐mediated reactivity against MHC class I binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Stryhn, Anette

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are known to play an important role in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection so identification of CTL epitopes from M. tuberculosis is of importance for the development of effective peptide...

  5. Human CD4+ T cells lyse target cells via granzyme/perforin upon circumvention of MHC class II restriction by an antibody-like immunoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach, Andreas; Köhler, Heike; Rappl, Gunter; Abken, Hinrich

    2006-10-15

    Immune elimination of tumor cells requires the close cooperation between CD8+ CTL and CD4+ Th cells. We circumvent MHC class II-restriction of CD4+ T cells by expression of a recombinant immunoreceptor with an Ab-derived binding domain redirecting specificity. Human CD4+ T cells grafted with an immunoreceptor specific for carcinoembryonic Ag (CEA) are activated to proliferate and secrete cytokines upon binding to CEA+ target cells. Notably, redirected CD4+ T cells mediate cytolysis of CEA+ tumor cells with high efficiencies. Lysis by redirected CD4+ T cells is independent of death receptor signaling via TNF-alpha or Fas, but mediated by perforin and granzyme because cytolysis is inhibited by blocking the release of cytotoxic granules, but not by blocking of Fas ligand or TNF-alpha. CD4+ T cells redirected by Ab-derived immunoreceptors in a MHC class II-independent fashion substantially extend the power of an adoptive, Ag-triggered immunotherapy not only by CD4+ T cell help, but also by cytolytic effector functions. Because cytolysis is predominantly mediated via granzyme/perforin, target cells that are resistant to death receptor signaling become sensitive to a cytolytic attack by engineered CD4+ T cells.

  6. Epitopes associated with MHC restriction site of T cells. III. I-J epitope on MHC-restricted T helper cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Kubo, M.; Yagi, J.; Tada, T.

    1987-01-01

    I-J epitopes were found to be associated with the functional site of the class II MHC-restricted helper T (Th) cells: Virtually all of the H-2k-restricted Th cell function of H-2kxbF1 T cells was inhibited by the anti-I-Jk mAb, leaving the H-2b-restricted function unaffected. The I-Jk epitope was inducible in Th cells of different genotype origin according to the environmental class II antigens present in the early ontogeny of T cells. Although above results suggested that I-J is the structure reflecting the inducible MHC restriction specificity, further studies revealed some interesting controversies: First, the I-J phenotype did not always correlate with the class II restriction specificity, e.g., I-Ab-restricted Th from 5R was I-Jk-positive, whereas I-Ak-restricted Th of 4R was not. Second, there was no trans expression of parental I-J phenotypes and restriction specificities in F1 Th, e.g., the I-J phenotype was detected only on I-Ab-restricted Th of (4R X 5R)F1, whereas it was absent on I-Ak-restricted Th. This strict linkage between the restriction specificity and I-J phenotype was also found on Th cells developed in bone marrow chimera constructed with intra-H-2-recombinant mice. The expression of I-Jk was always associated with the restriction specificity of the relevant host. Thus, the restriction specificity of Th cells followed the host type, and the I-J expression on Th was exactly the same as that expressed by the host haplotype. These results indicate that I-J is an isomorphic structure adaptively expressed on Th cells that is involved in the unidirectional regulatory cell interactions, and that the polymorphism cannot be explained merely by the restriction specificity of the conventional T cell receptor heterodimer

  7. Dissociation of alloantigen recognition from self major histocompatibility complex-restricted recognition of cytolytic T lymphocytes by monoclonal antireceptor antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanagawa, O.; Nagasawa, R.

    1987-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) directed to the dual reactive cytolytic T lymphocyte clone OH8 (D/sup b/T H-Y and H-2/sup d/) were established. Analysis by cell surface staining and immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled surface molecules of OH8 followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis reveled that both mAb recognized an identical heterodimeric, clonotypic structure on OH8 cells, i.e., T cell receptor. However, although the MR3-2 mAb inhibited the lysis of either D/sup b/ + H-Y or H-2/sup d/ targets by OH8, the MR3-6 mAb inhibited the lysis of H-2/sup d/ target cells, but not that of D/sup b/ + H-Y target cells. Modulation of T cell receptor by either MR3-2 or MR3-6 mAb rendered the OH8 cytolytic T lyrphocyte incapable of killing both D/sup b/ + H-Y and H-2/sup d/ target cells. These finding suggest that different epitopes of OH8 T cell receptor were involved for the recognition of self + antigen and alloantigen

  8. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I Restricted Epitope Discovery in Yellow Fewer and Dengue Viruses: Importance of HLA Binding Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Maciel, Milton, Jr

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV...... inoculated twice with the 17DD YFV vaccine strain. Three of the YFV A*02:01 restricted peptides activated T-cells from the infected mice in vitro. All three peptides that elicited responses had an HLA binding affinity of 2 nM or less. The results indicate the importance of the strength of HLA binding...

  9. Centriole polarisation to the immunological synapse directs secretion from cytolytic cells of both the innate and adaptive immune systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arico Maurizo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytolytic cells of the immune system destroy pathogen-infected cells by polarised exocytosis of secretory lysosomes containing the pore-forming protein perforin. Precise delivery of this lethal hit is essential to ensuring that only the target cell is destroyed. In cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs, this is accomplished by an unusual movement of the centrosome to contact the plasma membrane at the centre of the immunological synapse formed between killer and target cells. Secretory lysosomes are directed towards the centrosome along microtubules and delivered precisely to the point of target cell recognition within the immunological synapse, identified by the centrosome. We asked whether this mechanism of directing secretory lysosome release is unique to CTL or whether natural killer (NK and invariant NKT (iNKT cytolytic cells of the innate immune system use a similar mechanism to focus perforin-bearing lysosome release. Results NK cells were conjugated with B-cell targets lacking major histocompatibility complex class I 721.221 cells, and iNKT cells were conjugated with glycolipid-pulsed CD1-bearing targets, then prepared for thin-section electron microscopy. High-resolution electron micrographs of the immunological synapse formed between NK and iNKT cytolytic cells with their targets revealed that in both NK and iNKT cells, the centrioles could be found associated (or 'docked' with the plasma membrane within the immunological synapse. Secretory clefts were visible within the synapses formed by both NK and iNKT cells, and secretory lysosomes were polarised along microtubules leading towards the docked centrosome. The Golgi apparatus and recycling endosomes were also polarised towards the centrosome at the plasma membrane within the synapse. Conclusions These results reveal that, like CTLs of the adaptive immune system, the centrosomes of NK and iNKT cells (cytolytic cells of the innate immune system direct secretory lysosomes to

  10. Centriole polarisation to the immunological synapse directs secretion from cytolytic cells of both the innate and adaptive immune systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Jane C; Salio, Mariolina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Pende, Daniela; Arico, Maurizo; Griffiths, Gillian M

    2011-06-28

    Cytolytic cells of the immune system destroy pathogen-infected cells by polarised exocytosis of secretory lysosomes containing the pore-forming protein perforin. Precise delivery of this lethal hit is essential to ensuring that only the target cell is destroyed. In cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), this is accomplished by an unusual movement of the centrosome to contact the plasma membrane at the centre of the immunological synapse formed between killer and target cells. Secretory lysosomes are directed towards the centrosome along microtubules and delivered precisely to the point of target cell recognition within the immunological synapse, identified by the centrosome. We asked whether this mechanism of directing secretory lysosome release is unique to CTL or whether natural killer (NK) and invariant NKT (iNKT) cytolytic cells of the innate immune system use a similar mechanism to focus perforin-bearing lysosome release. NK cells were conjugated with B-cell targets lacking major histocompatibility complex class I 721.221 cells, and iNKT cells were conjugated with glycolipid-pulsed CD1-bearing targets, then prepared for thin-section electron microscopy. High-resolution electron micrographs of the immunological synapse formed between NK and iNKT cytolytic cells with their targets revealed that in both NK and iNKT cells, the centrioles could be found associated (or 'docked') with the plasma membrane within the immunological synapse. Secretory clefts were visible within the synapses formed by both NK and iNKT cells, and secretory lysosomes were polarised along microtubules leading towards the docked centrosome. The Golgi apparatus and recycling endosomes were also polarised towards the centrosome at the plasma membrane within the synapse. These results reveal that, like CTLs of the adaptive immune system, the centrosomes of NK and iNKT cells (cytolytic cells of the innate immune system) direct secretory lysosomes to the immunological synapse. Morphologically, the

  11. The differentiation and protective function of cytolytic CD4 T cells in influenza infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    CD4 T cells that recognize peptide antigen in the context of Class II MHC can differentiate into various subsets that are characterized by their helper functions. However, increasing evidence indicates that CD4 cells with direct cytolytic activity play a role in chronic, as well as, acute infections...

  12. ECO-generation for some restricted classes of compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Baril

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We study several restricted classes of compositions by giving one-to-one maps between them and different classes of restricted binary strings or pattern avoiding permutations. Inspired by the ECO method \\cite{BDPP99}, new succession rules for these classes are presented. Finally, we obtain generating algorithms in Constant Amortized Time (CAT for theses classes.

  13. Universal Cycles of Restricted Classes of Words

    OpenAIRE

    Leitner, Arielle; Godbole, Anant

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that Universal Cycles of $k$-letter words on an $n$-letter alphabet exist for all $k$ and $n$. In this paper, we prove that Universal Cycles exist for restricted classes of words, including: non-bijections, equitable words (under suitable restrictions), ranked permutations, and "passwords".

  14. A hybrid approach for predicting promiscuous MHC class I restricted ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2006-09-15

    Sep 15, 2006 ... with existing MHC binder prediction methods for alleles studied by both ... in locating the promiscuous MHC binding regions from antigen sequence. ... Artificial neural network; MHC class I alleles; promiscuous binders; ... this problem by developing methods for prediction for ... In case equal number of.

  15. The Differentiation and Protective Function of Cytolytic CD4 T Cells in Influenza Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah M. Brown

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available CD4 T cells that recognize peptide antigen in the context of Class II MHC can differentiate into various subsets that are characterized by their helper functions. However, increasing evidence indicates that CD4 cells with direct cytolytic activity (CD4 CTL play a role in chronic, as well as, acute infections such as influenza A virus (IAV infection. In the last couple of decades, techniques to measure the frequency and activity of these cytolytic cells has demonstrated their abundance in infections such as HIV, mouse pox, murine gamma herpes virus, CMV, EBV and influenza among others. We now appreciate a greater role for CD4 CTL as direct effectors in viral infections and anti-tumor immunity through their ability to acquire perforin mediated cytolytic activity and contribution to lysis of virally infected targets or tumors. As early as the 1980s, CD4 T cell clones with cytolytic potential were identified after influenza virus infection, yet much of this early work was dependent on in vitro culture and little was known about the physiological relevance of CD4 CTL. Here, we discuss the direct role CD4 CTL play in protection against lethal IAV infection and the factors that drive the generation of perforin mediated lytic activity in CD4 cells in vivo during IAV infection. While focusing on CD4 CTL generated during IAV infection, we pull comparisons from the literature in other anti-viral and anti-tumor systems. Further, we highlight what is currently known about CD4 CTL secondary and memory responses, as well as vaccination strategies to induce these potent killer cells that provide an extra layer of cell mediated immune protection against heterosubtypic IAV infection.

  16. Strong vaccine-induced CD8 T-cell responses have cytolytic function in a chimpanzee clearing HCV infection.

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    Babs E Verstrepen

    Full Text Available A single correlate of effective vaccine protection against chronic HCV infection has yet to be defined. In this study, we analyzed T-cell responses in four chimpanzees, immunized with core-E1-E2-NS3 and subsequently infected with HCV1b. Viral clearance was observed in one animal, while the other three became chronically infected. In the animal that cleared infection, NS3-specific CD8 T-cell responses were observed to be more potent in terms of frequency and polyfunctionality of cytokine producing cells. Unique to this animal was the presence of killing-competent CD8 T-cells, specific for NS3 1258-1272, being presented by the chimpanzee MHC class I molecule Patr-A*03∶01, and a high affinity recognition of this epitope. In the animals that became chronically infected, T-cells were able to produce cytokines against the same peptide but no cytolysis could be detected. In conclusion, in the animal that was able to clear HCV infection not only cytokine production was observed but also cytolytic potential against specific MHC class I/peptide-combinations.

  17. Type I bHLH Proteins Daughterless and Tcf4 Restrict Neurite Branching and Synapse Formation by Repressing Neurexin in Postmitotic Neurons

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    Mitchell D’Rozario

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Proneural proteins of the class I/II basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH family are highly conserved transcription factors. Class I bHLH proteins are expressed in a broad number of tissues during development, whereas class II bHLH protein expression is more tissue restricted. Our understanding of the function of class I/II bHLH transcription factors in both invertebrate and vertebrate neurobiology is largely focused on their function as regulators of neurogenesis. Here, we show that the class I bHLH proteins Daughterless and Tcf4 are expressed in postmitotic neurons in Drosophila melanogaster and mice, respectively, where they function to restrict neurite branching and synapse formation. Our data indicate that Daughterless performs this function in part by restricting the expression of the cell adhesion molecule Neurexin. This suggests a role for these proteins outside of their established roles in neurogenesis.

  18. Sequence diversity between class I MHC loci of African native and introduced <i>Bos taurusi> cattle in <i>Theileria parvai> endemic regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obara, Isaiah; Nielsen, Morten; Jeschek, Marie

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence that the immunity induced by live vaccination for control of the protozoan parasite Theileria parva is mediated by class I MHC-restricted CD8+ T cells directed against the schizont stage of the parasite that infects bovine lymphocytes. The functional competency of class I...... with peptides. In silico functional analysis resulted in peptide binding specificities that were largely distinct between the two breeds. We also demonstrate that CD8+ T cells derived from Ankole cattle that are seropositive for T. parva do not recognize vaccine candidate antigens originally identified...

  19. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I restricted epitope discovery in yellow fewer and dengue viruses: importance of HLA binding strength.

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    Ole Lund

    Full Text Available Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV and dengue fever virus (DENV restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV epitopes were selected using the EpiSelect algorithm to allow for optimal coverage of viral strains. The selected predicted epitopes were synthesized and approximately 75% were found to bind the predicted restricting HLA molecule with an affinity, K(D, stronger than 500 nM. The immunogenicity of 25 HLA-A*02:01, 28 HLA-A*24:02 and 28 HLA-B*07:02 binding peptides was tested in three HLA-transgenic mice models and led to the identification of 17 HLA-A*02:01, 4 HLA-A*2402 and 4 HLA-B*07:02 immunogenic peptides. The immunogenic peptides bound HLA significantly stronger than the non-immunogenic peptides. All except one of the immunogenic peptides had K(D below 100 nM and the peptides with K(D below 5 nM were more likely to be immunogenic. In addition, all the immunogenic peptides that were identified as having a high functional avidity had K(D below 20 nM. A*02:01 transgenic mice were also inoculated twice with the 17DD YFV vaccine strain. Three of the YFV A*02:01 restricted peptides activated T-cells from the infected mice in vitro. All three peptides that elicited responses had an HLA binding affinity of 2 nM or less. The results indicate the importance of the strength of HLA binding in shaping the immune response.

  20. Characterization of antigen-specific, Ia-restricted, L3T4+ cytolytic T lymphocytes and assessment of thymic influence on their self specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golding, H.; Munitz, T.I.; Singer, A.

    1985-01-01

    The goals of the present study were: (a) to generate antigen-specific L3T4+ cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL), (b) to determine their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction specificity, and (c) to assess the influence of thymic MHC determinants on their self specificity. The authors found that L3T4+ CTL specific for either trinitrophenyl (TNP)-modified self determinants or minor histocompatibility antigens could be generated from Lyt-2- responder T cells provided that the response cultures were supplemented with supernatants rich in helper factors. Such antigen-specific L3T4+ CTL were Ia-restricted by the criteria that they lysed only Ia+ target cells and that their lysis of Ia+ target cells was specifically inhibited by anti-Ia monoclonal antibodies. The relative frequency of L3T4+ pCTL was found to be only 5-10% of the total anti-TNP pCTL present in the spleens of normal mice. Finally, the authors utilized radiation bone marrow chimeras to assess the influence of the thymic haplotype on the self-Ia specificity of L3T4+ CTL. Both bulk culture and limiting dilution experiments revealed that the self-Ia specificity of L3T4+ anti-TNP CTL from F1----parent and A----B allogeneic chimeras was not markedly skewed toward the haplotype of the chimeric thymus. These results contrast with those obtained previously for L3T4+ anti-TNP Th cells and demonstrate that in the radiation bone marrow chimera model of T cell differentiation, the self specificity of Th cells but not pCTL is markedly influenced by the haplotype of the chimeric thymus

  1. Combined Cytolytic Effects of a Vaccinia Virus Encoding a Single Chain Trimer of MHC-I with a Tax-Epitope and Tax-Specific CTLs on HTLV-I-Infected Cells in a Rat Model

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    Takashi Ohashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult T cell leukemia (ATL is a malignant lymphoproliferative disease caused by human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I. To develop an effective therapy against the disease, we have examined the oncolytic ability of an attenuated vaccinia virus (VV, LC16m8Δ (m8Δ, and an HTLV-I Tax-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL line, 4O1/C8, against an HTLV-I-infected rat T cell line, FPM1. Our results demonstrated that m8Δ was able to replicate in and lyse tumorigenic FPM1 cells but was incompetent to injure 4O1/C8 cells, suggesting the preferential cytolytic activity toward tumor cells. To further enhance the cytolysis of HTLV-I-infected cells, we modified m8Δ and obtained m8Δ/RT1AlSCTax180L, which can express a single chain trimer (SCT of rat major histocompatibility complex class I with a Tax-epitope. Combined treatment with m8Δ/RT1AlSCTax180L and 4O1/C8 increased the cytolysis of FPM1V.EFGFP/8R cells, a CTL-resistant subclone of FPM1, compared with that using 4O1/C8 and m8Δ presenting an unrelated peptide, suggesting that the activation of 4O1/C8 by m8Δ/RT1AlSCTax180L further enhanced the killing of the tumorigenic HTLV-I-infected cells. Our results indicate that combined therapy of oncolytic VVs with SCTs and HTLV-I-specific CTLs may be effective for eradication of HTLV-I-infected cells, which evade from CTL lysis and potentially develop ATL.

  2. Polymethoxylated flavones potentiate the cytolytic activity of NK leukemia cell line KHYG-1 via enhanced expression of granzyme B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takeshi; Abe, Daigo; Nogata, Yoichi

    2015-01-16

    Polymethoxylated flavones (PMFs) are found in the peel tissues of some citrus species. Here, we report that PMFs, such as nobiletin, potentiate the cytolytic activity of KHYG-1 natural killer (NK) leukemia cells. Nobiletin markedly enhanced the expression of granzyme B, a serine protease that plays critical roles in the cytolytic activity of NK cells. The potentiated cytolytic activity induced by nobiletin was canceled by the granzyme B inhibitor Z-AAD-CMK. Nobiletin also increased the levels of phosphorylated CREB, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK in KHYG-1 cells, which are known to participate in NK cell function. Inhibition of an upstream kinase of ERK1/2 failed to reduce the granzyme B expression and KHYG-1 cytolytic activity. Meanwhile, inhibition of p38 MAPK attenuated both granzyme B expression and KHYG-1 cytolytic activity. These results suggest that the primary role of nobiletin in KHYG-1 cytolytic activity lies in upregulation of granzyme B expression, at least in part, mediated through p38 MAPK function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. CD8+ T lymphocytes of patients with AIDS maintain normal broad cytolytic function despite the loss of human immunodeficiency virus-specific cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantaleo, G.; De Maria, A.; Koenig, S.; Butini, L.; Moss, B.; Lane, H.C.; Fauci, A.S.; Baseler, M.

    1990-01-01

    In this study, the authors have investigated the potential mechanisms responsible for the loss of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific cytolytic activity in the advanced stages of HIV-1 infection. They have demonstrated that HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes are predominantly contained within the CD8 + DR + subset. Furthermore, they have shown by a redirected killing assay that there is a dichotomy between HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity and broad cytolytic potential since the cytolytic machinery of CD8 + DR + cells is still functioning even in patients with AIDS who have lost their HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity. In addition, by comparative analysis of these two types of cytolytic activity over time they have demonstrated a progressive loss of HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity in the advanced stages of the disease, whereas the cytolytic potential remained unchanged regardless of the clinical stage. On the basis of these results, they propose that the loss of HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity in HIV-1-infected individuals may result at least in part from a progressive decrease in the pool of HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes belonging to the CD8 + DR + subset whose ability to expand has been impaired

  4. MHC class I loaded ligands from breast cancer cell lines: A potential HLA-I-typed antigen collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, Dmitri V.; Rozanov, Nikita D.; Chiotti, Kami; Reddy, Ashok; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; David, Larry L.; Cha, Seung W.; Woo, Sunghee; Pevzner, Pavel; Bafna, Vineet; Burrows, Gregory G.; Rantala, Juha K.; Levin, Trevor; Anur, Pavana; Johnson-Camacho, Katie; Tabatabaei, Shaadi; Munson, Daniel J.; Bruno, Tullia C.; Slansky, Jill E.; Kappler, John W.; Hirano, Naoto; Boegel, Sebastian; Fox, Bernard A.; Egelston, Colt; Simons, Diana L.; Jimenez, Grecia; Lee, Peter P.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2018-01-01

    Breast cancer therapy based on amplifying a patient’s antitumor immune response depends on the availability of appropriate MHC class I-restricted, breast cancer-specific epitopes. To build a catalog of peptides presented by breast cancer cells, we undertook systematic MHC class I immunoprecipitation followed by elution of MHC class I-loaded peptides in breast cancer cell lines. We determined the sequence of 3,196 MHC class I-bound peptides representing 1,921 proteins from a panel of 20 breast cancer cell lines including basal, luminal, and claudin-low subtypes. The data has been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006406. After removing duplicate peptides, i.e., the same peptide eluted from more than one cell line, the total number of unique peptides was 2,740. Of the unique peptides eluted, more than 1,750 had been previously identified, and of these, sixteen have been shown to be immunogenic. Importantly, only 3 of these immunogenic peptides have been identified in breast cancer cells in earlier studies. MHC class I binding probability of eluted peptides was used to plot the distribution of MHC class I allele-specific peptides in accordance with the binding score for each breast cancer cell line. We also determined that the tested breast cancer cells presented 89 mutation-containing peptides and peptides derived from aberrantly translated genes, 7 of which were shared between four or two different cell lines. Overall, the high throughput identification of MHC class I-loaded peptides is an effective strategy for systematic characterization of cancer peptides, and could be employed for design of multi-peptide anticancer vaccines. PMID:29331515

  5. Dynamic range of Nef-mediated evasion of HLA class II-restricted immune responses in early HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiti, Macdonald; Brumme, Zabrina L; Jessen, Heiko; Brockman, Mark A; Ueno, Takamasa

    2015-07-31

    HLA class II-restricted CD4(+) T lymphocytes play an important role in controlling HIV-1 replication, especially in the acute/early infection stage. But, HIV-1 Nef counteracts this immune response by down-regulating HLA-DR and up-regulating the invariant chain associated with immature HLA-II (Ii). Although functional heterogeneity of various Nef activities, including down-regulation of HLA class I (HLA-I), is well documented, our understanding of Nef-mediated evasion of HLA-II-restricted immune responses during acute/early infection remains limited. Here, we examined the ability of Nef clones from 47 subjects with acute/early progressive infection and 46 subjects with chronic progressive infection to up-regulate Ii and down-regulate HLA-DR and HLA-I from the surface of HIV-infected cells. HLA-I down-regulation function was preserved among acute/early Nef clones, whereas both HLA-DR down-regulation and Ii up-regulation functions displayed relatively broad dynamic ranges. Nef's ability to down-regulate HLA-DR and up-regulate Ii correlated positively at this stage, suggesting they are functionally linked in vivo. Acute/early Nef clones also exhibited higher HLA-DR down-regulation and lower Ii up-regulation functions compared to chronic Nef clones. Taken together, our results support enhanced Nef-mediated HLA class II immune evasion activities in acute/early compared to chronic infection, highlighting the potential importance of these functions following transmission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cytolytic T lymphocyte responses to metabolically inactivated stimulator cells. I. Metabolic inactivation impairs both CD and LD antigen signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelso, A.; Boyle, W.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of metabolic inactivation of spleen cells on antigen presentation to precursors of alloreactive cytolytic T lymphocytes (T/sub c/) were examined. By serological methods, populations inactivated by ultraviolet irradiation, glutaraldehyde fixation or plasma membrane isolation were found to retain normal levels of H-2K/D and Ia antigens. However, comparison of the antigen doses required to stimulate secondary T/sub c/ responses in mixed leukocyte culture showed that the inactivated preparations were approximately 10-fold less immunogenic than X-irradiated spleen cells. Their total inability to stimulate primary cytolytic responses pointed to at least a 100-fold impairment of immunogenicity for unprimed T/sub c/ precursors in the case of uv-irradiated and glutaraldehyde-treated stimulator cells, and at least a 10-fold impairment for membrane fragments. Experiments showing that the capacity of cell monolayers to absorb precursor T/sub c/ from unprimed spleen populations was reduced following uv-irradiation or glutaraldehyde treatment provided direct evidence that this loss of immunogenicity was due in part to suboptimal antigen presentation to precursor T/sub c/. It is concluded that, in addition to the traditional view that these treatments damage the ''LD'' signal to helper T lymphocytes, metabolic inactivation also impairs recognition of ''CD'' determinants by precursor T/sub c/

  7. Pathological and non-pathological variants of restrictive eating behaviors in middle childhood: A latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ricarda; Vogel, Mandy; Hiemisch, Andreas; Kiess, Wieland; Hilbert, Anja

    2018-08-01

    Although restrictive eating behaviors are very common during early childhood, their precise nature and clinical correlates remain unclear. Especially, there is little evidence on restrictive eating behaviors in older children and their associations with children's shape concern. The present population-based study sought to delineate subgroups of restrictive eating patterns in N = 799 7-14 year old children. Using Latent Class Analysis, children were classified based on six restrictive eating behaviors (for example, picky eating, food neophobia, and eating-related anxiety) and shape concern, separately in three age groups. For cluster validation, sociodemographic and objective anthropometric data, parental feeding practices, and general and eating disorder psychopathology were used. The results showed a 3-cluster solution across all age groups: an asymptomatic class (Cluster 1), a class with restrictive eating behaviors without shape concern (Cluster 2), and a class showing restrictive eating behaviors with prominent shape concern (Cluster 3). The clusters differed in all variables used for validation. Particularly, the proportion of children with symptoms of avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder was greater in Cluster 2 than Clusters 1 and 3. The study underlined the importance of considering shape concern to distinguish between different phenotypes of children's restrictive eating patterns. Longitudinal data are needed to evaluate the clusters' predictive effects on children's growth and development of clinical eating disorders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cooperativity of HIV-Specific Cytolytic CD4 T Cells and CD8 T Cells in Control of HIV Viremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan; Eller, Michael; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Maloveste, Sebastien M.; Schultz, Bruce T.; Soghoian, Damien Z.; Lu, Richard; Oster, Alexander F.; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alter, Galit; Dittmer, Ulf; Marovich, Mary; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Bolton, Diane

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT CD4+ T cells play a pivotal role in the control of chronic viral infections. Recently, nontraditional CD4+ T cell functions beyond helper effects have been described, and a role for cytolytic CD4+ T cells in the control of HIV infection has been suggested. We define here the transcriptional, phenotypic, and functional profiles of HIV-specific cytolytic CD4+ T cells. Fluidigm BioMark and multiparameter flow cytometric analysis of HIV-specific cytolytic CD4+ T cells revealed a distinct transcriptional signature compared to Th1 CD4+ cells but shared similar features with HIV-specific cytolytic CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, HIV-specific cytolytic CD4+ T cells showed comparable killing activity relative to HIV-specific CD8+ T cells and worked cooperatively in the elimination of virally infected cells. Interestingly, we found that cytolytic CD4+ T cells emerge early during acute HIV infection and tightly follow acute viral load trajectory. This emergence was associated to the early viral set point, suggesting an involvement in early control, in spite of CD4 T cell susceptibility to HIV infection. Our data suggest cytolytic CD4+ T cells as an independent subset distinct from Th1 cells that show combined activity with CD8+ T cells in the long-term control of HIV infection. IMPORTANCE The ability of the immune system to control chronic HIV infection is of critical interest to both vaccine design and therapeutic approaches. Much research has focused on the effect of the ability of CD8+ T cells to control the virus, while CD4+ T cells have been overlooked as effectors in HIV control due to the fact that they are preferentially infected. We show here that a subset of HIV-specific CD4+ T cells cooperate in the cytolytic control of HIV replication. Moreover, these cells represent a distinct subset of CD4+ T cells showing significant transcriptional and phenotypic differences compared to HIV-specific Th1 cells but with similarities to CD8+ T cells. These findings are

  9. Natural host genetic resistance to lentiviral CNS disease: a neuroprotective MHC class I allele in SIV-infected macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L Mankowski

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection frequently causes neurologic disease even with anti-retroviral treatment. Although associations between MHC class I alleles and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS have been reported, the role MHC class I alleles play in restricting development of HIV-induced organ-specific diseases, including neurologic disease, has not been characterized. This study examined the relationship between expression of the MHC class I allele Mane-A*10 and development of lentiviral-induced central nervous system (CNS disease using a well-characterized simian immunodeficiency (SIV/pigtailed macaque model. The risk of developing CNS disease (SIV encephalitis was 2.5 times higher for animals that did not express the MHC class I allele Mane-A*10 (P = 0.002; RR = 2.5. Animals expressing the Mane-A*10 allele had significantly lower amounts of activated macrophages, SIV RNA, and neuronal dysfunction in the CNS than Mane-A*10 negative animals (P<0.001. Mane-A*10 positive animals with the highest CNS viral burdens contained SIV gag escape mutants at the Mane-A*10-restricted KP9 epitope in the CNS whereas wild type KP9 sequences dominated in the brain of Mane-A*10 negative animals with comparable CNS viral burdens. These concordant findings demonstrate that particular MHC class I alleles play major neuroprotective roles in lentiviral-induced CNS disease.

  10. The role of CD4+ T cells in cell-mediated immunity to LCMV: studies in MHC class I and class II deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1994-01-01

    Parameters of the virus-specific T-cell response were analysed in order to dissect the contribution of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to cell-mediated immunity to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. In MHC class II deficient mice, initial T-cell responsiveness was not impaired, but virus clearance...... was delayed, and virus-specific Td activity declined more rapidly. Furthermore, class I restricted Tc memory appeared to be impaired in these mice. To directly evaluate the role of CD4+ cells in virus clearance and T-cell mediated inflammation, MHC class I deficient mice were also studied. No virus...... exudate. This low-grade response was associated with some degree of virus control as organ titres were lower in these animals than in matched T-cell deficient nu/nu mice or class I deficient mice treated with anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. This confirms that CD4+ cells are not needed to induce a virus...

  11. Limited immune surveillance in lymphoid tissue by cytolytic CD4+ T cells during health and HIV disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLane, Laura M.; Steblyanko, Maria; Anikeeva, Nadia; Ablanedo-Terrazas, Yuria; Demers, Korey; Eller, Michael A.; Streeck, Hendrik; Jansson, Marianne; Sönnerborg, Anders; Canaday, David H.; Naji, Ali; Wherry, E. John; Robb, Merlin L.; Reyes-Teran, Gustavo; Sykulev, Yuri; Betts, Michael R.

    2018-01-01

    CD4+ T cells subsets have a wide range of important helper and regulatory functions in the immune system. Several studies have specifically suggested that circulating effector CD4+ T cells may play a direct role in control of HIV replication through cytolytic activity or autocrine β-chemokine production. However, it remains unclear whether effector CD4+ T cells expressing cytolytic molecules and β-chemokines are present within lymph nodes (LNs), a major site of HIV replication. Here, we report that expression of β-chemokines and cytolytic molecules are enriched within a CD4+ T cell population with high levels of the T-box transcription factors T-bet and eomesodermin (Eomes). This effector population is predominately found in peripheral blood and is limited in LNs regardless of HIV infection or treatment status. As a result, CD4+ T cells generally lack effector functions in LNs, including cytolytic capacity and IFNγ and β-chemokine expression, even in HIV elite controllers and during acute/early HIV infection. While we do find the presence of degranulating CD4+ T cells in LNs, these cells do not bear functional or transcriptional effector T cell properties and are inherently poor to form stable immunological synapses compared to their peripheral blood counterparts. We demonstrate that CD4+ T cell cytolytic function, phenotype, and programming in the peripheral blood is dissociated from those characteristics found in lymphoid tissues. Together, these data challenge our current models based on blood and suggest spatially and temporally dissociated mechanisms of viral control in lymphoid tissues. PMID:29652923

  12. MHC class I Dk locus and Ly49G2+ NK cells confer H-2k resistance to murine cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xuefang; Stadnisky, Michael D; Brown, Michael G

    2009-06-01

    Essential NK cell-mediated murine CMV (MCMV) resistance is under histocompatibility-2(k) (H-2(k)) control in MA/My mice. We generated a panel of intra-H2(k) recombinant strains from congenic C57L.M-H2(k/b) (MCMV resistant) mice for precise genetic mapping of the critical interval. Recombination breakpoint sites were precisely mapped and MCMV resistance/susceptibility traits were determined for each of the new lines to identify the MHC locus. Strains C57L.M-H2(k)(R7) (MCMV resistant) and C57L.M-H2(k)(R2) (MCMV susceptible) are especially informative; we found that allelic variation in a 0.3-megabase interval in the class I D locus confers substantial difference in MCMV control phenotypes. When NK cell subsets responding to MCMV were examined, we found that Ly49G2(+) NK cells rapidly expand and selectively acquire an enhanced capacity for cytolytic functions only in C57L.M-H2(k)(R7). We further show that depletion of Ly49G2(+) NK cells before infection abrogated MCMV resistance in C57L.M-H2(k)(R7). We conclude that the MHC class I D locus prompts expansion and activation of Ly49G2(+) NK cells that are needed in H-2(k) MCMV resistance.

  13. Class I Underground Injection Control Program: Study of the Risks Associated with Class I Underground Injection Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The document provides describes the current Class I UIC program, the history of Class I injection, and studies of human health risks associated with Class I injection wells, which were conducted for past regulatory efforts and policy documentation.

  14. A class of extensions of Restricted (s, t-Wythoff’s game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Sanyang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Restricted (s, t-Wythoff’s game, introduced by Liu et al. in 2014, is an impartial combinatorial game. We define and solve a class of games obtained from Restricted (s, t-Wythoff’s game by adjoining to it some subsets of its P-positions as additional moves. The results show that under certain conditions they are equivalent to one case in which only one P-position is adjoined as an additional move. Furthermore, two winning strategies of exponential and polynomial are provided for the games.

  15. Restriction fragment length polymorphism within the class I gene loci of the equine major histocompatibility complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, A.J.; Bailey, E.; Woodward, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Fourteen standard bred horses were serotyped as homozygous for 1 of 6 Equine Leukocyte Antigen (ELA) specificities. DNA was purified from peripheral leukocytes and digested with Hind III or Pvu II. Southern blot hybridization analysis was carried out using a 32 P-labeled mouse cDNA probe (PH2IIa) specific for class I MHC genes. Both enzymes generated blots that contained a large number of bands (23 to 30) per horse. Significant polymorphism existed among most fragment sizes, while a dozen highly conserved band sizes suggested the presence of Qa/tla - like genes. Only 2 animals (both W6's) showed identical band patterns. Polymorphism was greatest between horses of different serotypes and was significantly decreased within serotypes. Unique bands were present on both blots for both W1's and W6's and may account for the serologic specificity seen in ELA W1 and W6 horses. This study is consistent with the findings in other higher vertebrates and implies that the MHC of the horse includes a highly polymorphic class I multigene family

  16. Lipofection indirectly increases expression of endogenous major histocompatibility complex class I molecules on tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, B A; Drury, M; Hu, H M; Cao, Z; Huntzicker, E G; Qie, W; Urba, W J

    1998-01-01

    Direct intratumoral injection of a lipid/DNA complex encoding an allogeneic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule leads to regression of both an immunogenic murine tumor and also melanoma lesions in some patients. We have sought to understand the mechanism(s) for this augmentation of antitumor activity. While optimizing parameters for in vitro gene transfer into the D5 subclone of B16BL6, it was noted that lipofected tumors not only expressed the new alloantigen but also exhibited increased expression of endogenous MHC class I, both H-2 Kb and H-2 Db. This increase in expression was not restricted to the small percentage of cells that expressed the transfected gene, but appeared to affect the majority of cells in culture. Class I expression was not increased by lipopolysaccharide, DNA alone, lipid, or lipid/lipopolysaccharide mixtures. Enhanced class I expression required a DNA/lipid complex and was greatest when parameters optimized for gene transfer of the alloantigen were used. All DNA plasmids tested had this effect, including one plasmid whose DNA was not transcribed because it lacked an expression cassette. Because of the critical role that MHC class I antigens play in immune recognition, we propose that lipid complex-mediated gene transfer may provide immunological advantages beyond those that are attributable to expression of the specific gene transferred.

  17. Circumvention of MHC class II restriction by genetic immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, K; Lu, C; Chang, H D; Croft, M; Zanetti, M; Gerloni, M

    2001-11-12

    The fate of T cell responses to peptide-based vaccination is subject to constraints by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), MHC restriction. Using as a model system of T and B cell epitopes from the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite, we show that vaccination by somatic transgene immunization readily primes Balb/c mice (H-2(d)) a strain previously reported to be non-responder to immunization with a synthetic peptide vaccine encompassing these epitopes. Following genetic vaccination Balb/c mice developed a primary T cell response comparable to that of the responder strain C57Bl/6 (H-2(b)). Following booster immunization on day 45 Balb/c mice responded with a typical T cell memory response. Priming induced the formation of specific antibodies, which rose sharply after booster immunization. These findings suggests that genetic immunization can circumvent MHC class II restriction.

  18. 25 CFR 502.2 - Class I gaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Class I gaming. 502.2 Section 502.2 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.2 Class I gaming. Class I gaming means: (a) Social games played solely for prizes of minimal value...

  19. Subcellular localization of class I histone deacetylases in the developing Xenopus tectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia eGuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs are thought to localize in the nucleus to regulate gene transcription and play pivotal roles in neurogenesis, apoptosis and plasticity. However, the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the developing brain remains unclear. Here, we show that HDAC1 and HDAC2 are located in both the mitochondria and the nucleus in the Xenopus laevis stage 34 tectum and are mainly restricted to the nucleus following further brain development. HDAC3 is widely present in the mitochondria, nucleus and cytoplasm during early tectal development and is mainly distributed in the nucleus in stage 45 tectum. In contrast, HDAC8 is broadly located in the mitochondria, nucleus and cytoplasm during tectal development. These data demonstrate that HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3 are transiently localized in the mitochondria and that the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the Xenopus tectum is heterogeneous. Furthermore, we observed that spherical mitochondria accumulate in the cytoplasm at earlier stages, whereas elongated mitochondria are evenly distributed in the tectum at later stages. The activity of histone acetylation (H4K12 remains low in mitochondria during tectal development. Pharmacological blockades of HDACs using a broad spectrum HDAC inhibitor of Trichostatin A (TSA or specific class I HDAC inhibitors of MS-275 and MGCD0103 decrease the number of mitochondria in the tectum at stage 34. These findings highlight a link between the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs and mitochondrial dynamics in the developing optic tectum of Xenopus laevis.

  20. Duration of the pubertal peak in skeletal Class I and Class III subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuc-Michalska, Małgorzata; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-01-01

    To estimate and compare the duration of the pubertal growth peak in Class I and Class III subjects. The data examined consisted of pretreatment lateral cephalometric records of 218 skeletal Class I or Class III subjects (93 female and 125 male subjects) of white ancestry. The duration of the pubertal peak was calculated from the average chronological age intervals between stages CS3 and CS4 of the cervical vertebral maturation in Class I vs Class III groups (t-test). In skeletal Class I subjects, the pubertal peak had a mean duration of 11 months, whereas in Class III subjects it lasted 16 months. The average difference (5 months) was statistically significant (P < .001). The growth interval corresponding to the pubertal growth spurt (CS3-CS4) was longer in Class III subjects than in subjects with normal skeletal relationships; the larger increases in mandibular length during the pubertal peak reported in the literature for Class III subjects may be related to the longer duration of the pubertal peak.

  1. Structure and Dynamics Studies of Cytolytic Peptides in Lipid Bilayers using NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sara Krogh

    2015-01-01

    different and cytolytic peptides were investigated in this work. The peptides were SPF-5506-A4 from Trichoderma sp, Conolysin-Mt1 from Conus mustelinus, and Alamethicin from Trichoderma viride. The studies employed solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy in combination with different biophysical methods...

  2. High frequency of cytolytic 21-hydroxylase-specific CD8+ T cells in autoimmune Addison's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawoodji, Amina; Chen, Ji-Li; Shepherd, Dawn; Dalin, Frida; Tarlton, Andrea; Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Penna-Martinez, Marissa; Meyer, Gesine; Mitchell, Anna L; Gan, Earn H; Bratland, Eirik; Bensing, Sophie; Husebye, Eystein S; Pearce, Simon H; Badenhoop, Klaus; Kämpe, Olle; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms behind destruction of the adrenal glands in autoimmune Addison's disease remain unclear. Autoantibodies against steroid 21-hydroxylase, an intracellular key enzyme of the adrenal cortex, are found in >90% of patients, but these autoantibodies are not thought to mediate the disease. In this article, we demonstrate highly frequent 21-hydroxylase-specific T cells detectable in 20 patients with Addison's disease. Using overlapping 18-aa peptides spanning the full length of 21-hydroxylase, we identified immunodominant CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses in a large proportion of Addison's patients both ex vivo and after in vitro culture of PBLs ≤20 y after diagnosis. In a large proportion of patients, CD8(+) and CD4(+) 21-hydroxylase-specific T cells were very abundant and detectable in ex vivo assays. HLA class I tetramer-guided isolation of 21-hydroxylase-specific CD8(+) T cells showed their ability to lyse 21-hydroxylase-positive target cells, consistent with a potential mechanism for disease pathogenesis. These data indicate that strong CTL responses to 21-hydroxylase often occur in vivo, and that reactive CTLs have substantial proliferative and cytolytic potential. These results have implications for earlier diagnosis of adrenal failure and ultimately a potential target for therapeutic intervention and induction of immunity against adrenal cortex cancer. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. HLA class I expression predicts prognosis and therapeutic benefits from tyrosine kinase inhibitors in metastatic renal-cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajun; Liu, Li; Qu, Yang; Xi, Wei; Xia, Yu; Bai, Qi; Xiong, Ying; Long, Qilai; Xu, Jiejie; Guo, Jianming

    2018-01-01

    Classical HLA class I antigen is highly involved in antigen presentation and adaptive immune response against tumor. In this study, we explored its predictive value for treatment response and survival in metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. A TKI cohort of 111 mRCC patients treated with sunitinib or sorafenib and a non-TKI cohort of 160 mRCC patients treated with interleukin-2 or interferon-α-based immunotherapy at a single institution were retrospectively enrolled. HLA class I expression and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) density was assessed by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. Association between HLA class I and CTL was also assessed in the TCGA KIRC cohort. In the TKI cohort, down-regulated HLA class I was associated with lower objective response rate of TKI therapy (P = 0.004), shorter overall survival (OS) (P = 0.001), and shorter progression free survival (PFS) (P class I was not significantly associated with survival. HLA class I expression was associated with CTL infiltration and function, and its prognostic value was more predominant in CTL high-density tumors (P class I expression can serve as a potential predictive biomarker for TKI therapy in mRCC patients. Its predictive value was restricted in CTL high-density tumors. However, further external validations and functional investigations are still required.

  4. MHC-I-restricted epitopes conserved among variola and other related orthopoxviruses are recognized by T cells 30 years after vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Wang, M.; Lamberth, K.

    2008-01-01

    It is many years since the general population has been vaccinated against smallpox virus. Here, we report that human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I restricted T cell epitopes can be recognized more than 30 years after vaccination. Using bioinformatic methods, we predicted 177 potential cytotoxic T...... lymphocyte epitopes. Eight epitopes were confirmed to stimulate IFN-gamma release by T cells in smallpox-vaccinated subjects. The epitopes were restricted by five supertypes (HLA-A1, -A2, -A24 -A26 and -B44). Significant T cell responses were detected against 8 of 45 peptides with an HLA class I affinity...... of K(D) less than or equal to 5 nM, whereas no T cell responses were detected against 60 peptides with an HLA affinity of K(D) more than 5 nM. All epitopes were fully conserved in seven variola, vaccinia and cowpox strains. Knowledge of the long-term response to smallpox vaccination may lead...

  5. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuduk Katarzyna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major histocompatibility complex (MHC proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. Results We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Conclusions Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South–north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia.

  6. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuduk, Katarzyna; Babik, Wiesław; Bojarska, Katarzyna; Sliwińska, Ewa B; Kindberg, Jonas; Taberlet, Pierre; Swenson, Jon E; Radwan, Jacek

    2012-10-02

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS) at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South-north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia.

  7. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. Results We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS) at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Conclusions Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South–north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia. PMID:23031405

  8. Optimization of restricted ROC surfaces in three-class classification tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Darrin C; Metz, Charles E

    2007-10-01

    We have shown previously that an N-class ideal observer achieves the optimal receiver operating characteristic (ROC) hypersurface in a Neyman-Pearson sense. Due to the inherent complexity of evaluating observer performance even in a three-class classification task, some researchers have suggested a generally incomplete but more tractable evaluation in terms of a surface, plotting only the three "sensitivities." More generally, one can evaluate observer performance with a single sensitivity or misclassification probability as a function of two linear combinations of sensitivities or misclassification probabilities. We analyzed four such formulations including the "sensitivity" surface. In each case, we applied the Neyman-Pearson criterion to find the observer which achieves optimal performance with respect to each given set of "performance description variables" under consideration. In the unrestricted case, optimization with respect to the Neyman-Pearson criterion yields the ideal observer, as does maximization of the observer's expected utility. Moreover, during our consideration of the restricted cases, we found that the two optimization methods do not merely yield the same observer, but are in fact completely equivalent in a mathematical sense. Thus, for a wide variety of observers which maximize performance with respect to a restricted ROC surface in the Neyman-Pearson sense, that ROC surface can also be shown to provide a complete description of the observer's performance in an expected utility sense.

  9. Association of HY-restricting HLA class II alleles with pregnancy outcome in patients with recurrent miscarriage subsequent to a firstborn boy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Svarre; Steffensen, Rudi; Varming, Kim

    2009-01-01

    and in 203 of their children born prior to the miscarriages. The subsequent live birth in women with boys prior to the miscarriages compared with girls is lower in women with HY-restricting HLA class II alleles [odds ratio (OR): 0.17 (0.1-0.4), P = 0.0001]. One HY-restricting HLA class II allele in women...... with firstborn boys significantly reduces the chances of a live birth [OR: 0.46 (0.2-0.9), P = 0.02]. Two HY-restricting HLA class II alleles further reduced this chance [OR: 0.21 (0.1-0.7), P = 0.02]. HY-restricting HLA class II did not reduce the chances of a live birth in SRM women with firstborn girls. HY-restricting...... birth. This study explores the putative impact of known HY-presenting HLA alleles on future pregnancy outcome in women with at least three consecutive miscarriages following a birth [secondary recurrent miscarriage (SRM)]. HLA-A, -B, -DRB1, DRB3-5 and DQB1 genotyping was performed in 358 SRM patients...

  10. Restriction fragment polymorphisms in the major histocompatibility complex of diabetic BB rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastern, W.; Dyrberg, T.; Scholler, J.

    1984-01-01

    DNA isolated from diabetic BB (BB/Hagedorn) rats was examined for restriction fragment length differences within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as compared with nondiabetic (W-subline) BB rats. Polymorphisms were detected using a mouse class I MHC gene as probe. Specifically, a 2-kb Bam......HI fragment was present in all the nondiabetic rats examined, but absent in the diabetic rats. Similar polymorphisms were observed with various other restriction enzymes, particularly XbaI, HindII, and SacI. There were no polymorphisms detected using either a human DR-alpha (class II antigen heavy chain...

  11. High frequency of cytolytic 21-Hydroxylase specific CD8+ T cells in autoimmune Addison’s disease patients1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawoodji, Amina; Chen, Ji-Li; Shepherd, Dawn; Dalin, Frida; Tarlton, Andrea; Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Penna-Martinez, Marissa; Meyer, Gesine; Mitchell, Anna L; Gan, Earn H; Bratland, Eirik; Bensing, Sophie; Husebye, Eystein; Pearce, Simon H.; Badenhoop, Klaus; Kämpe, Olle; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the destruction of the adrenal glands in autoimmune Addison’s disease remain unclear. Autoantibodies against steroid 21-hydroxylase, an intracellular key enzyme of the adrenal cortex, are found in over 90% of patients, but these autoantibodies are not thought to mediate the disease. Here we demonstrate highly frequent 21-hydroxylase specific T cells detectable in 20 patients with Addison’s disease. Using overlapping 18aa peptides spanning the full length of 21-hydroxylase, we identified immunodominant CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses in a large proportion of Addison’s patients both ex-vivo and after in-vitro culture of peripheral blood lymphocytes up to 20 years after diagnosis. In a large proportion of patients, CD8+ 21-hydroxylase specific T cells and CD4+ 21-hydroxylase specific T cells were very abundant and detectable in ex-vivo assays. HLA class-I tetramer-guided isolation of 21-hydroxylase specific CD8+ T cells showed their ability to lyse 21-hydroxylase positive target cells, consistent with a potential mechanism for disease pathogenesis. These data indicate strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to 21-hydroxylase often occur in-vivo, and that reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes have substantial proliferative and cytolytic potential. These results have implications for earlier diagnosis of adrenal failure and ultimately a potential target for therapeutic intervention and induction of immunity against adrenal cortex cancer. PMID:25063864

  12. Specificity Characterization of SLA Class I Molecules Binding to Swine-Origin Viral Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitope Peptides in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Gao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Swine leukocyte antigen (SLA class I molecules play a crucial role in generating specific cellular immune responses against viruses and other intracellular pathogens. They mainly bind and present antigens of intracellular origin to circulating MHC I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs. Binding of an appropriate epitope to an SLA class I molecule is the single most selective event in antigen presentation and the first step in the killing of infected cells by CD8+ CTLs. Moreover, the antigen epitopes are strictly restricted to specific SLA molecules. In this study, we constructed SLA class I complexes in vitro comprising viral epitope peptides, the extracellular region of the SLA-1 molecules, and β2-microglobulin (β2m using splicing overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (SOE-PCR. The protein complexes were induced and expressed in an Escherichia coli prokaryotic expression system and subsequently purified and refolded. Specific binding of seven SLA-1 proteins to one classical swine fever virus (CSFV and four porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV epitope peptides was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA-based method. The SLA-1∗13:01, SLA-1∗11:10, and SLA-1∗11:01:02 proteins were able to bind specifically to different CTL epitopes of CSFV and PRRSV and the MHC restrictions of the five epitopes were identified. The fixed combination of Asn151Val152 residues was identified as the potentially key amino acid residues influencing the binding of viral several CTL epitope peptides to SLA-1∗13:01 and SLA-1∗04:01:01 proteins. The more flexible pocket E in the SLA-1∗13:01 protein might have fewer steric limitations and therefore be able to accommodate more residues of viral CTL epitope peptides, and may thus play a critical biochemical role in determining the peptide-binding motif of SLA-1∗13:01. Characterization of the binding specificity of peptides to SLA class I molecules provides an

  13. The relationship between Class I and Class II methanol masers at high angular resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, T. P.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Voronkov, M. A.; Cimò, G.

    2018-06-01

    We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) to make the first high-resolution observations of a large sample of class I methanol masers in the 95-GHz (80-71A+) transition. The target sources consist of a statistically complete sample of 6.7-GHz class II methanol masers with an associated 95-GHz class I methanol maser, enabling a detailed study of the relationship between the two methanol maser classes at arcsecond angular resolution. These sources have been previously observed at high resolution in the 36- and 44-GHz transitions, allowing comparison between all three class I maser transitions. In total, 172 95-GHz maser components were detected across the 32 target sources. We find that at high resolution, when considering matched maser components, a 3:1 flux density ratio is observed between the 95- and 44-GHz components, consistent with a number of previous lower angular resolution studies. The 95-GHz maser components appear to be preferentially located closer to the driving sources and this may indicate that this transition is more strongly inverted nearby to background continuum sources. We do not observe an elevated association rate between 95-GHz maser emission and more evolved sources, as indicated by the presence of 12.2-GHz class II masers. We find that in the majority of cases where both class I and class II methanol emission is observed, some component of the class I emission is associated with a likely outflow candidate.

  14. Defective HLA class I antigen processing machinery in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lei; Michelakos, Theodoros; Yamada, Teppei; Fan, Song; Wang, Xinhui; Schwab, Joseph H; Ferrone, Cristina R; Ferrone, Soldano

    2018-02-27

    Malignant transformation of cells is frequently associated with defective HLA class I antigen processing machinery (APM) component expression. This abnormality may have functional relevance, since it may have a negative impact on tumor cell recognition by cognate T cells. Furthermore, HLA class I APM abnormalities appear to have clinical significance, since they are associated with poor prognosis in several malignant diseases and may play a role in the resistance to immune checkpoint inhibitor-based immunotherapy. In this paper, we have reviewed the literature describing abnormalities in HLA class I APM component expression in many types of cancer. These abnormalities have been reported in all types of cancer analyzed with a frequency ranging between a minimum of 35.8% in renal cancer and a maximum of 87.9% in thyroid cancer for HLA class I heavy chains. In addition, we have described the molecular mechanisms underlying defects in HLA class I APM component expression and function by malignant cells. Lastly, we have discussed the clinical significance of HLA class I APM component abnormalities in malignant tumors.

  15. NLRC5: a newly discovered MHC class I transactivator (CITA)

    OpenAIRE

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. An NLR protein, CIITA (MHC class II transactivator), is a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression as well as of some of the genes involved in MHC class II antigen presentation. It has recently been discovered that another member of the NLR protein family, NLRC5, transcriptionally activates MHC class I genes, and thus acts as “CITA” (MHC class I transactivator)...

  16. A novel strategy for the identification of antigens that are recognised by bovine MHC class I restricted cytotoxic T cells in a protozoan infection using reverse vaccinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Simon P; Honda, Yoshikazu; Pellé, Roger; Mwangi, Duncan M; Glew, E Jane; de Villiers, Etienne P; Shah, Trushar; Bishop, Richard; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Nene, Vishvanath; Taracha, Evans L N

    2007-02-09

    Immunity against the bovine protozoan parasite Theileria parva has previously been shown to be mediated through lysis of parasite-infected cells by MHC class I restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. It is hypothesized that identification of CTL target schizont antigens will aid the development of a sub-unit vaccine. We exploited the availability of the complete genome sequence data and bioinformatics tools to identify genes encoding secreted or membrane anchored proteins that may be processed and presented by the MHC class I molecules of infected cells to CTL. Of the 986 predicted open reading frames (ORFs) encoded by chromosome 1 of the T. parva genome, 55 were selected based on the presence of a signal peptide and/or a transmembrane helix domain. Thirty six selected ORFs were successfully cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector, transiently transfected into immortalized bovine skin fibroblasts and screened in vitro using T. parva-specific CTL. Recognition of gene products by CTL was assessed using an IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. A 525 base pair ORF encoding a 174 amino acid protein, designated Tp2, was identified by T. parva-specific CTL from 4 animals. These CTL recognized and lysed Tp2 transfected skin fibroblasts and recognized 4 distinct epitopes. Significantly, Tp2 specific CD8+ T cell responses were observed during the protective immune response against sporozoite challenge. The identification of an antigen containing multiple CTL epitopes and its apparent immunodominance during a protective anti-parasite response makes Tp2 an attractive candidate for evaluation of its vaccine potential.

  17. Hev b 11, a peculiar class I chitinase?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    The recently identified rubber allergen Hev b 11, which is a class I chitinase, may be a cytosolic (C-serum) protein. This is a rather unique feature, as all other known plant class I chitinases are vacuolar proteins.

  18. Somatic HLA Mutations Expose the Role of Class I-Mediated Autoimmunity in Aplastic Anemia and its Clonal Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babushok, Daria V; Duke, Jamie L; Xie, Hongbo M; Stanley, Natasha; Atienza, Jamie; Perdigones, Nieves; Nicholas, Peter; Ferriola, Deborah; Li, Yimei; Huang, Hugh; Ye, Wenda; Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Kearns, Jane; Porter, David L; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Eisenlohr, Laurence C; Biegel, Jaclyn A; Chou, Stella T; Monos, Dimitrios S; Bessler, Monica; Olson, Timothy S

    2017-10-10

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is an acquired deficiency of early hematopoietic cells, characterized by inadequate blood production, and a predisposition to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and leukemia. Although its exact pathogenesis is unknown, aAA is thought to be driven by Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-restricted T cell immunity, with earlier studies favoring HLA class II-mediated pathways. Using whole exome sequencing (WES), we recently identified two aAA patients with somatic mutations in HLA class I genes. We hypothesized that HLA class I mutations are pathognomonic for autoimmunity in aAA, but were previously underappreciated because the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) region is notoriously difficult to analyze by WES. Using a combination of targeted deep sequencing of HLA class I genes and single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A) genotyping we screened 66 aAA patients for somatic HLA class I loss. We found somatic HLA loss in eleven patients (17%), with thirteen loss-of-function mutations in HLA-A *33:03, HLA-A *68:01, HLA-B *14:02 and HLA-B *40:02 alleles. Three patients had more than one mutation targeting the same HLA allele. Interestingly, HLA-B *14:02 and HLA-B *40:02 were significantly overrepresented in aAA patients, compared to ethnicity-matched controls. Patients who inherited the targeted HLA alleles, regardless of HLA mutation status, had a more severe disease course with more frequent clonal complications as assessed by WES, SNP-A, and metaphase cytogenetics, and more frequent secondary MDS. The finding of recurrent HLA class I mutations provides compelling evidence for a predominant HLA class I-driven autoimmunity in aAA, and establishes a novel link between aAA patients' immunogenetics and clonal evolution.

  19. Peptide-loaded dendritic cells prime and activate MHC-class I-restricted T cells more efficiently than protein-loaded cross-presenting DC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Met, Ozcan; Buus, Søren; Claesson, Mogens H

    2003-01-01

    -pulsed DC. Moreover, SIINFEKL-loaded DC were up to 50 times more efficient than DC-pulsed with OVA-protein for generation of an H-2K(b)-restricted response. Immunization of mice with SIINFEKL-loaded DC resulted in a much stronger H-2K(b)-restricted response than immunization with OVA-pulsed DC. These data......Undifferentiated and differentiated dendritic cells (uDC and dDC, respectively), derived from the bone marrow, were studied in vitro and in vivo. Ovalbumin (OVA) and two OVA-derived peptides binding to H-2K(b) and I-A(b), respectively, were used. Two IL-2 secreting T cell hybridomas specific...... for the OVA-derived epitopes were used in the in vitro read-out. The ability to cross-present the H-2K(b) binding OVA(257-264)-peptide (SIINFEKL) was restricted to dDC, which express CD11c(+), CD86(+), and MHC-II(+). In vitro, the antigenicity of SIINFEKL-loaded DC declined at a slower rate than that of OVA...

  20. Genotyping of major histocompatibility complex Class II DRB gene in Rohilkhandi goats by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kush Shrivastava

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the major histocompatibility complex (MHC Class II DRB1 gene polymorphism in Rohilkhandi goat using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP and nucleotide sequencing techniques. Materials and Methods: DNA was isolated from 127 Rohilkhandi goats maintained at sheep and goat farm, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Bareilly. A 284 bp fragment of exon 2 of DRB1 gene was amplified and digested using BsaI and TaqI restriction enzymes. Population genetic parameters were calculated using Popgene v 1.32 and SAS 9.0. The genotypes were then sequenced using Sanger dideoxy chain termination method and were compared with related breeds/species using MEGA 6.0 and Megalign (DNASTAR software. Results: TaqI locus showed three and BsaI locus showed two genotypes. Both the loci were found to be in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (HWE, however, population genetic parameters suggest that heterozygosity is still maintained in the population at both loci. Percent diversity and divergence matrix, as well as phylogenetic analysis revealed that the MHC Class II DRB1 gene of Rohilkhandi goats was found to be in close cluster with Garole and Scottish blackface sheep breeds as compared to other goat breeds included in the sequence comparison. Conclusion: The PCR-RFLP patterns showed population to be in HWE and absence of one genotype at one locus (BsaI, both the loci showed excess of one or the other homozygote genotype, however, effective number of alleles showed that allelic diversity is present in the population. Sequence comparison of DRB1 gene of Rohilkhandi goat with other sheep and goat breed assigned Rohilkhandi goat in divergence with Jamanupari and Angora goats.

  1. Maternal HY-restricting HLA class II alleles are associated with poor long-term outcome in recurrent pregnancy loss after a boy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Astrid Marie; Steffensen, Rudi; Christiansen, Ole Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    PROBLEM: Women with secondary recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) after a boy have a reduced chance of live birth in the first pregnancy after referral if they carry HY-restricting HLA class II alleles, but long-term chance of live birth is unknown. METHODS OF STUDY: Live birth was compared for 540...... women with unexplained secondary RPL according to firstborn's sex and maternal carriage of HLA-DRB3*03:01, HLA-DQB1*05:01/02, HLA-DRB1*15, and HLA-DRB1*07. The groups were compared by Cox proportional hazard ratios. RESULTS: For women with at firstborn boy, maternal carriage of HY-restricting HLA class...... of HY-restricting HLA class II alleles decreases long-term chance of live birth in women with RPL after a boy....

  2. Mamu-A*01/Kb transgenic and MHC Class I knockout mice as a tool for HIV vaccine development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinliang; Srivastava, Tumul; Rawal, Ravindra; Manuel, Edwin; Isbell, Donna; Tsark, Walter; La Rosa, Corinna; Wang Zhongde; Li Zhongqi; Barry, Peter A.; Hagen, Katharine D.; Longmate, Jeffrey; Diamond, Don J.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a murine model expressing the rhesus macaque (RM) Mamu-A*01 MHC allele to characterize immune responses and vaccines based on antigens of importance to human disease processes. Towards that goal, transgenic (Tg) mice expressing chimeric RM (α1 and α2 Mamu-A*01 domains) and murine (α3, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic H-2K b domains) MHC Class I molecules were derived by transgenesis of the H-2K b D b double MHC Class I knockout strain. After immunization of Mamu-A*01/K b Tg mice with rVV-SIVGag-Pol, the mice generated CD8 + T-cell IFN-γ responses to several known Mamu-A*01 restricted epitopes from the SIV Gag and Pol antigen sequence. Fusion peptides of highly recognized CTL epitopes from SIV Pol and Gag and a strong T-help epitope were shown to be immunogenic and capable of limiting an rVV-SIVGag-Pol challenge. Mamu-A*01/K b Tg mice provide a model system to study the Mamu-A*01 restricted T-cell response for various infectious diseases which are applicable to a study in RM.

  3. Thin-plate spline analysis of craniofacial growth in Class I and Class II subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Lorenzo; Baccetti, Tiziano; Stahl, Franka; McNamara, James A

    2007-07-01

    To compare the craniofacial growth characteristics of untreated subjects with Class II division 1 malocclusion with those of subjects with normal (Class I) occlusion from the prepubertal through the postpubertal stages of development. The Class II division 1 sample consisted of 17 subjects (11 boys and six girls). The Class I sample also consisted of 17 subjects (13 boys and four girls). Three craniofacial regions (cranial base, maxilla, and mandible) were analyzed on the lateral cephalograms of the subjects in both groups by means of thin-plate spline analysis at T1 (prepubertal) and T2 (postpubertal). Both cross-sectional and longitudinal comparisons were performed on both size and shape differences between the two groups. The results showed an increased cranial base angulation as a morphological feature of Class II malocclusion at the prepubertal developmental phase. Maxillary changes in either shape or size were not significant. Subjects with Class II malocclusion exhibited a significant deficiency in the size of the mandible at the completion of active craniofacial growth as compared with Class I subjects. A significant deficiency in the size of the mandible became apparent in Class II subjects during the circumpubertal period and it was still present at the completion of active craniofacial growth.

  4. Maternal HY-restricting HLA class II alleles are associated with poor long-term outcome in recurrent pregnancy loss after a boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolte, Astrid Marie; Steffensen, Rudi; Christiansen, Ole Bjarne; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre

    2016-11-01

    Women with secondary recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) after a boy have a reduced chance of live birth in the first pregnancy after referral if they carry HY-restricting HLA class II alleles, but long-term chance of live birth is unknown. Live birth was compared for 540 women with unexplained secondary RPL according to firstborn's sex and maternal carriage of HLA-DRB3*03:01, HLA-DQB1*05:01/02, HLA-DRB1*15, and HLA-DRB1*07. The groups were compared by Cox proportional hazard ratios. For women with at firstborn boy, maternal carriage of HY-restricting HLA class II alleles decreased chance of live birth: 0 vs 1: hazard ratio 0.75 (95% CI 0.55-1.02); 0 vs 2: HR 0.62 (0.40-0.94). Carriage of HY-restricting HLA class II alleles decreased chance of live birth only if the firstborn was a boy: boy vs girl: HR 0.72 (95% CI 0.55-0.98). Maternal carriage of HY-restricting HLA class II alleles decreases long-term chance of live birth in women with RPL after a boy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. 40 CFR 82.4 - Prohibitions for class I controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... violation of this subpart. Any person selling unused class I controlled substances produced or imported... substances. 82.4 Section 82.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Prohibitions for class I controlled substances. (a)(1) Prior to January 1, 1996, for all Groups of class I...

  6. Spectral energy distribution analysis of class I and class II FU Orionis stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gramajo, Luciana V.; Gómez, Mercedes [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina, Laprida 854, 5000 Córdoba (Argentina); Rodón, Javier A., E-mail: luciana@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: mercedes@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: jrodon@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

    2014-06-01

    FU Orionis stars (FUors) are eruptive pre-main sequence objects thought to represent quasi-periodic or recurring stages of enhanced accretion during the low-mass star-forming process. We characterize the sample of known and candidate FUors in a homogeneous and consistent way, deriving stellar and circumstellar parameters for each object. We emphasize the analysis in those parameters that are supposed to vary during the FUor stage. We modeled the spectral energy distributions of 24 of the 26 currently known FUors, using the radiative transfer code of Whitney et al. We compare our models with those obtained by Robitaille et al. for Taurus class II and I sources in quiescence periods by calculating the cumulative distribution of the different parameters. FUors have more massive disks: we find that ∼80% of the disks in FUors are more massive than any Taurus class II and I sources in the sample. Median values for the disk mass accretion rates are ∼10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} versus ∼10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for standard young stellar objects (YSOs) and FUors, respectively. While the distributions of envelope mass accretion rates for class I FUors and standard class I objects are similar, FUors, on average, have higher envelope mass accretion rates than standard class II and class I sources. Most FUors (∼70%) have envelope mass accretion rates above 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. In contrast, 60% of the classical YSO sample has an accretion rate below this value. Our results support the current scenario in which changes experimented by the circumstellar disk explain the observed properties of these stars. However, the increase in the disk mass accretion rate is smaller than theoretically predicted, although in good agreement with previous determinations.

  7. Cupiennin 1a exhibits a remarkably broad, non-stereospecific cytolytic activity on bacteria, protozoan parasites, insects, and human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Willems, Jean; Seebeck, Thomas; Shalaby, Tarek; Kaiser, Marcel; Nentwig, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Cupiennin 1a, a cytolytic peptide isolated from the venom of the spider Cupiennius salei, exhibits broad membranolytic activity towards bacteria, trypanosomes, and plasmodia, as well as human blood and cancer cells. In analysing the cytolytic activity of synthesised all-D: - and all-L: -cupiennin 1a towards pro- and eukaryotic cells, a stereospecific mode of membrane destruction could be excluded. The importance of negatively charged sialic acids on the outer leaflet of erythrocytes for the binding and haemolytic activity of L: -cupiennin 1a was demonstrated. Reducing the overall negative charges of erythrocytes by partially removing their sialic acids or by protecting them with tri- or pentalysine results in reduced haemolytic activity of the peptide.

  8. 78 FR 23246 - Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9804-8] Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for Exemption--Class I Hazardous Waste Injection; BASF... exemption to the land disposal Restrictions, under the 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste [[Page 23247...

  9. 49 CFR 238.313 - Class I brake test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... intercity passenger train shall receive a Class I brake test once each calendar day that the train is placed...-distance intercity passenger train shall receive a Class I brake test: (1) Prior to the train's departure... shoes or pads are firmly seated against the wheel or disc with the brakes applied; (3) Piston travel is...

  10. NLRC5: a key regulator of MHC class I-dependent immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Koichi S; van den Elsen, Peter J

    2012-12-01

    The expression of MHC class I molecules is crucial for the initiation and regulation of adaptive immune responses against pathogens. NOD-, LRR- and CARD-containing 5 (NLRC5) was recently identified as a specific transactivator of MHC class I genes (CITA). NLRC5 and the master regulator for MHC class II genes, class II transactivator (CIITA), interact with similar MHC promoter-bound factors. Here, we provide a broad overview of the molecular mechanisms behind MHC class I transcription and the role of the class I transactivator NLRC5 in MHC class I-dependent immune responses.

  11. 77 FR 26755 - Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9669-6] Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for Exemption--Class I Hazardous Waste Injection; Diamond... reissuance of an exemption to the land disposal Restrictions, under the 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste...

  12. 76 FR 55908 - Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9461-5] Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for Exemption--Class I Hazardous Waste Injection; Great Lakes... of an exemption to the land disposal restrictions, under the 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste...

  13. 76 FR 36129 - Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9321-3] Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for Exemption--Class I Hazardous Waste Injection; ExxonMobil... disposal Restrictions, under the 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and...

  14. 78 FR 42776 - Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL9834-8] Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for Exemption--Class I Hazardous Waste Injection; Blanchard Refining... disposal Restrictions, under the 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and...

  15. 77 FR 52717 - Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9724-1] Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for Exemption--Class I Hazardous Waste Injection; Cornerstone... exemption to the land disposal Restrictions, under the 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the...

  16. Características cefalométricas de pacientes portadores de más oclusões Classe I e Classe II de Angle Cephalometric characteristics of patients with Angle Class I and Class II malocclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Lacerda dos Santos

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: o presente estudo comparou algumas medidas cefalométricas relacionadas às características faciais em pacientes com má oclusão Classe I, Classe II 1ª divisão e Classe II 2ª divisão. METODOLOGIA: foram selecionadas 130 telerradiografias de pacientes leucodermas em fase inicial de tratamento ortodôntico, com idades entre 10 e 16 anos (média de 12,6 anos; e divididos em 3 grupos. As medidas cefalométricas utilizadas neste estudo foram: ANB, ı-SN, IMPA, AML, Ls-ı, Li-ī e EI. A análise de variância e o teste de Tukey foram realizados nas medidas ANB, IMPA, AML, ı-SN e Li-ī. Para as demais variáveis (EI e Ls-ı foi utilizado o teste de Kruskal Wallis e Dunn. RESULTADOS: os resultados mostraram que as medidas Ls-ı e EI tiveram diferença estatisticamente significativa entre os grupos I e II-1 e entre os grupos II-1 e II-2 (p AIM: The present study compared some cephalometric measurements related to facial characteristics in patients having Class I, Class II division 1, and Class II division 2 malocclusions. METHODS: One hundred and thirty teleradiographs of Caucasian patients aged 10-16 years (mean age of 12.6 years under initial orthodontic treatment were selected for study and divided into 3 groups. The cephalometric measurements used in the present study were the following: ANB, ı-SN, IMPA, AML, Ls-ı, Li-ī, and EI. Variance analysis and Tukey's test were carried out for ANB, IMPA, AML, ı-SN, and Li-ī measurements, whereas Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests were used for EI and Ls-ı. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were found for EI and Ls-ı measurements when Group II-1 was compared to Group I and Group II-2 (p < 0.05. ANB and IMPA measurements also had statistically significant differences when Group I was compared to Group II-1 and Group II-2 (p < 0.05. The measurement ı-SN had statistically significant differences between the 3 groups (p < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: One can conclude that the measurement

  17. 76 FR 42125 - Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9440-3] Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for Exemption--Class I Hazardous Waste Injection; ConocoPhillips... Restrictions, under the 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act...

  18. 78 FR 76294 - Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9904-21-OW] Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for Exemption--Class I Hazardous Waste Injection; Mosaic... Restrictions, under the 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act...

  19. Human leukocyte antigen class I, class II, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha polymorphisms in a healthy elder Mexican Mestizo population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llorente Luis

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is strong evidence that an individual's genetic background is an important predisposing factor to longevity. In the present study we analysed the frequency of HLA class I, class II, as well as the TNF-α -308 polymorphism that may be related to an increased life span in Mexican Mestizo healthy elders. Results HLA typing was performed by polymerase chain reaction sequence specific oligonucleotide (PCR SSO reverse dot blot. The TNF-α -308 polymorphism was assessed by PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism. A significant increased frequency of HLA-DRB1*11 was found in elderly women whereas this allele was not present in elderly males. The TNF2 allele was also increased in the elder group when compared to young controls. The frequencies of the remaining alleles tested were not statistically different among groups. Conclusion These data suggest an ethnicity independent tendency of HLA-DRB1*11 in elder females to increase life span and a possible role of the TNF2 allele with the successful remodelling of senescent immune system.

  20. Biologically-directed modeling reflects cytolytic clearance of SIV-infected cells in vivo in macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W David Wick

    Full Text Available The disappointing outcomes of cellular immune-based vaccines against HIV-1 despite strong evidence for the protective role of CD8⁺ T lymphocytes (CTLs has prompted revisiting the mechanisms of cellular immunity. Prior data from experiments examining the kinetics of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV clearance in infected macaques with or without in vivo CD8 depletion were interpreted as refuting the concept that CTLs suppress SIV/HIV by direct killing of infected cells. Here we briefly review the biological evidence for CTL cytolytic activity in viral infections, and utilize biologically-directed modeling to assess the possibility of a killing mechanism for the antiviral effect of CTLs, taking into account the generation, proliferation, and survival of activated CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T lymphocytes, as well as the life cycle of the virus. Our analyses of the published macaque data using these models support a killing mechanism, when one considers T lymphocyte and HIV-1 lifecycles, and factors such as the eclipse period before release of virions by infected cells, an exponential pattern of virion production by infected cells, and a variable lifespan for acutely infected cells. We conclude that for SIV/HIV pathogenesis, CTLs deserve their reputation as being cytolytic.

  1. The C Terminus of the Nucleoprotein of Influenza A Virus Delivers Antigens Transduced by Tat to the trans-Golgi Network and Promotes an Efficient Presentation through HLA Class I

    OpenAIRE

    Bettosini, Francesca; Fiorillo, Maria Teresa; Magnacca, Adriana; Leone, Laura; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Sorrentino, Rosa

    2005-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are the most powerful weapon of the immune system to eliminate cells infected by intracellular parasites or tumors. However, very often, escape mechanisms overcome CTL immune surveillance by impairing the classical HLA class I antigen-processing pathway. Here, we describe a strategy for CTL activation based on the ability of Tat to mediate transcellular delivery of viral proteins encompassing HLA class I-restricted epitopes. In this system, the recombinant prote...

  2. A common minimal motif for the ligands of HLA-B*27 class I molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Alejandro; Lorente, Elena; Johnstone, Carolina; Mir, Carmen; del Val, Margarita; López, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    CD8(+) T cells identify and kill infected cells through the specific recognition of short viral antigens bound to human major histocompatibility complex (HLA) class I molecules. The colossal number of polymorphisms in HLA molecules makes it essential to characterize the antigen-presenting properties common to large HLA families or supertypes. In this context, the HLA-B*27 family comprising at least 100 different alleles, some of them widely distributed in the human population, is involved in the cellular immune response against pathogens and also associated to autoimmune spondyloarthritis being thus a relevant target of study. To this end, HLA binding assays performed using nine HLA-B*2705-restricted ligands endogenously processed and presented in virus-infected cells revealed a common minimal peptide motif for efficient binding to the HLA-B*27 family. The motif was independently confirmed using four unrelated peptides. This experimental approach, which could be easily transferred to other HLA class I families and supertypes, has implications for the validation of new bioinformatics tools in the functional clustering of HLA molecules, for the identification of antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, and for future vaccine development.

  3. A common minimal motif for the ligands of HLA-B*27 class I molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Barriga

    Full Text Available CD8(+ T cells identify and kill infected cells through the specific recognition of short viral antigens bound to human major histocompatibility complex (HLA class I molecules. The colossal number of polymorphisms in HLA molecules makes it essential to characterize the antigen-presenting properties common to large HLA families or supertypes. In this context, the HLA-B*27 family comprising at least 100 different alleles, some of them widely distributed in the human population, is involved in the cellular immune response against pathogens and also associated to autoimmune spondyloarthritis being thus a relevant target of study. To this end, HLA binding assays performed using nine HLA-B*2705-restricted ligands endogenously processed and presented in virus-infected cells revealed a common minimal peptide motif for efficient binding to the HLA-B*27 family. The motif was independently confirmed using four unrelated peptides. This experimental approach, which could be easily transferred to other HLA class I families and supertypes, has implications for the validation of new bioinformatics tools in the functional clustering of HLA molecules, for the identification of antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, and for future vaccine development.

  4. Characterization of the Endothelial Cell Cytoskeleton following HLA Class I Ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Mary E.; Souda, Puneet; Jin, Yi-Ping; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are a target of antibody-mediated allograft rejection. In vitro, when the HLA class I molecules on the surface of ECs are ligated by anti-HLA class I antibodies, cell proliferation and survival pathways are activated and this is thought to contribute to the development of antibody-mediated rejection. Crosslinking of HLA class I molecules by anti-HLA antibodies also triggers reorganization of the cytoskeleton, which induces the formation of F-actin stress fibers. HLA class I induced stress fiber formation is not well understood. Methodology and Principal Findings The present study examines the protein composition of the cytoskeleton fraction of ECs treated with HLA class I antibodies and compares it to other agonists known to induce alterations of the cytoskeleton in endothelial cells. Analysis by tandem mass spectrometry revealed unique cytoskeleton proteomes for each treatment group. Using annotation tools a candidate list was created that revealed 12 proteins, which were unique to the HLA class I stimulated group. Eleven of the candidate proteins were phosphoproteins and exploration of their predicted kinases provided clues as to how these proteins may contribute to the understanding of HLA class I induced antibody-mediated rejection. Three of the candidates, eukaryotic initiation factor 4A1 (eIF4A1), Tropomyosin alpha 4-chain (TPM4) and DDX3X, were further characterized by Western blot and found to be associated with the cytoskeleton. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that class I ligation stimulated increased eIF4A1 co-localization with F-actin and paxillin. Conclusions/Significance Colocalization of eIF4A1 with F-actin and paxillin following HLA class I ligation suggests that this candidate protein could be a target for understanding the mechanism(s) of class I mediated antibody-mediated rejection. This proteomic approach for analyzing the cytoskeleton of ECs can be applied to other agonists and various cells types

  5. Haemophilus ducreyi Cutaneous Ulcer Strains Diverged from Both Class I and Class II Genital Ulcer Strains: Implications for Epidemiological Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharanesh Gangaiah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Haemophilus ducreyi has emerged as a major cause of cutaneous ulcers (CU in yaws-endemic regions of the tropics in the South Pacific, South East Asia and Africa. H. ducreyi was once thought only to cause the genital ulcer (GU disease chancroid; GU strains belong to 2 distinct classes, class I and class II. Using whole-genome sequencing of 4 CU strains from Samoa, 1 from Vanuatu and 1 from Papua New Guinea, we showed that CU strains diverged from the class I strain 35000HP and that one CU strain expressed β-lactamase. Recently, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention released the genomes of 11 additional CU strains from Vanuatu and Ghana; however, the evolutionary relationship of these CU strains to previously-characterized CU and GU strains is unknown.We performed phylogenetic analysis of 17 CU and 10 GU strains. Class I and class II GU strains formed two distinct clades. The class I strains formed two subclades, one containing 35000HP and HD183 and the other containing the remainder of the class I strains. Twelve of the CU strains formed a subclone under the class I 35000HP subclade, while 2 CU strains formed a subclone under the other class I subclade. Unexpectedly, 3 of the CU strains formed a subclone under the class II clade. Phylogenetic analysis of dsrA-hgbA-ncaA sequences yielded a tree similar to that of whole-genome phylogenetic tree.CU strains diverged from multiple lineages within both class I and class II GU strains. Multilocus sequence typing of dsrA-hgbA-ncaA could be reliably used for epidemiological investigation of CU and GU strains. As class II strains grow relatively poorly and are relatively more susceptible to vancomycin than class I strains, these findings have implications for methods to recover CU strains. Comparison of contemporary CU and GU isolates would help clarify the relationship between these entities.

  6. Haemophilus ducreyi Cutaneous Ulcer Strains Diverged from Both Class I and Class II Genital Ulcer Strains: Implications for Epidemiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Spinola, Stanley M

    2016-12-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi has emerged as a major cause of cutaneous ulcers (CU) in yaws-endemic regions of the tropics in the South Pacific, South East Asia and Africa. H. ducreyi was once thought only to cause the genital ulcer (GU) disease chancroid; GU strains belong to 2 distinct classes, class I and class II. Using whole-genome sequencing of 4 CU strains from Samoa, 1 from Vanuatu and 1 from Papua New Guinea, we showed that CU strains diverged from the class I strain 35000HP and that one CU strain expressed β-lactamase. Recently, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention released the genomes of 11 additional CU strains from Vanuatu and Ghana; however, the evolutionary relationship of these CU strains to previously-characterized CU and GU strains is unknown. We performed phylogenetic analysis of 17 CU and 10 GU strains. Class I and class II GU strains formed two distinct clades. The class I strains formed two subclades, one containing 35000HP and HD183 and the other containing the remainder of the class I strains. Twelve of the CU strains formed a subclone under the class I 35000HP subclade, while 2 CU strains formed a subclone under the other class I subclade. Unexpectedly, 3 of the CU strains formed a subclone under the class II clade. Phylogenetic analysis of dsrA-hgbA-ncaA sequences yielded a tree similar to that of whole-genome phylogenetic tree. CU strains diverged from multiple lineages within both class I and class II GU strains. Multilocus sequence typing of dsrA-hgbA-ncaA could be reliably used for epidemiological investigation of CU and GU strains. As class II strains grow relatively poorly and are relatively more susceptible to vancomycin than class I strains, these findings have implications for methods to recover CU strains. Comparison of contemporary CU and GU isolates would help clarify the relationship between these entities.

  7. Different Roles Of Class-I And Class-II Clostridium-histolyticum Collagenase In Rat Pancreatic-islet Isolation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, G. H. J.; Vos-Scheperkeuter, Greetje; Lin, Hun-Chi; van Schilfaarde, R

    Crude Clostridium histolyticum collagenase was purified by gel filtration and fractionated by anion exchange chromatography into class I with high collagen digestion activity (CDA) and low FALGPA (2-furanacryloyl-L-leucylglycyl-L-prolyI-L-alanine )hydrolysis activity (FHA), class II with low CDA and

  8. Proteasome, transporter associated with antigen processing, and class I genes in the nurse shark Ginglymostoma cirratum: evidence for a stable class I region and MHC haplotype lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yuko; McKinney, E Churchill; Criscitiello, Michael F; Flajnik, Martin F

    2002-01-15

    Cartilaginous fish (e.g., sharks) are derived from the oldest vertebrate ancestor having an adaptive immune system, and thus are key models for examining MHC evolution. Previously, family studies in two shark species showed that classical class I (UAA) and class II genes are genetically linked. In this study, we show that proteasome genes LMP2 and LMP7, shark-specific LMP7-like, and the TAP1/2 genes are linked to class I/II. Functional LMP7 and LMP7-like genes, as well as multiple LMP2 genes or gene fragments, are found only in some sharks, suggesting that different sets of peptides might be generated depending upon inherited MHC haplotypes. Cosmid clones bearing the MHC-linked classical class I genes were isolated and shown to contain proteasome gene fragments. A non-MHC-linked LMP7 gene also was identified on another cosmid, but only two exons of this gene were detected, closely linked to a class I pseudogene (UAA-NC2); this region probably resulted from a recent duplication and translocation from the functional MHC. Tight linkage of proteasome and class I genes, in comparison with gene organizations of other vertebrates, suggests a primordial MHC organization. Another nonclassical class I gene (UAA-NC1) was detected that is linked neither to MHC nor to UAA-NC2; its high level of sequence similarity to UAA suggests that UAA-NC1 also was recently derived from UAA and translocated from MHC. These data further support the principle of a primordial class I region with few class I genes. Finally, multiple paternities in one family were demonstrated, with potential segregation distortions.

  9. A novel role of HLA class I in the pathology of medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Courtney; Santi, Mariarita; Rajan, Bhargavi; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Choi, Mi Rim; Rood, Brian R; Cornelison, Robert; MacDonald, Tobey J; Vukmanovic, Stanislav

    2009-07-12

    MHC class I expression by cancer cells enables specific antigen recognition by the immune system and protection of the host. However, in some cancer types MHC class I expression is associated with an unfavorable outcome. We explored the basis of MHC class I association with unfavorable prognostic marker expression in the case of medulloblastoma. We investigated expression of four essential components of MHC class I (heavy chain, beta2m, TAP1 and TAP2) in 10 medulloblastoma mRNA samples, a tissue microarray containing 139 medulloblastoma tissues and 3 medulloblastoma cell lines. Further, in medulloblastoma cell lines we evaluated the effects of HLA class I engagement on activation of ERK1/2 and migration in vitro. The majority of specimens displayed undetectable or low levels of the heavy chains. Medulloblastomas expressing high levels of HLA class I displayed significantly higher levels of anaplasia and c-myc expression, markers of poor prognosis. Binding of beta2m or a specific antibody to open forms of HLA class I promoted phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in medulloblastoma cell line with high levels, but not in the cell line with low levels of HLA heavy chain. This treatment also promoted ERK1/2 activation dependent migration of medulloblastoma cells. MHC class I expression in medulloblastoma is associated with anaplasia and c-myc expression, markers of poor prognosis. Peptide- and/or beta2m-free forms of MHC class I may contribute to a more malignant phenotype of medulloblastoma by modulating activation of signaling molecules such as ERK1/2 that stimulates cell mobility.

  10. Vaccination against lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection in MHC class II-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2011-01-01

    response could be elicited in MHC class II-deficient mice by vaccination with adenovirus encoding lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) glycoprotein tethered to MHC class II-associated invariant chain. Moreover, the response induced conferred significant cytolytic CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection...... against challenge with a high dose of the invasive clone 13 strain of LCMV. In contrast, vaccination with adenovirus encoding unlinked LCMV glycoprotein induced weak virus control in the absence of CD4(+) T cells, and mice may die of increased immunopathology associated with incomplete protection. Acute...... mortality was not observed in any vaccinated mice following infection with the less-invasive Traub strain. However, LCMV Traub infection caused accelerated late mortality in unvaccinated MHC class II-deficient mice; in this case, we observed a strong trend toward delayed mortality in vaccinated mice...

  11. Axotomy induces MHC class I antigen expression on rat nerve cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maehlen, J; Schröder, H D; Klareskog, L

    1988-01-01

    Immunomorphological staining demonstrates that class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-coded antigen expression can be selectively induced on otherwise class I-negative rat nerve cells by peripheral axotomy. Induction of class I as well as class II antigen expression was simultaneously seen...... on non-neural cells in the immediate vicinity of the injured nerve cells. As nerve regeneration after axotomy includes growth of new nerve cell processes and formation of new nerve cell contacts, the present findings raise the question of a role for MHC-coded molecules in cell-cell interactions during...... nerve cell growth....

  12. Pan-specific MHC class I predictors: A benchmark of HLA class I pan-specific prediction methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hao; Lundegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    not previously been compared using independent evaluation sets. Results: A diverse set of quantitative peptide binding affinity measurements was collected from IEDB, together with a large set of HLA class I ligands from the SYFPEITHI database. Based on these data sets, three different pan-specific HLA web...

  13. An MHC class I immune evasion gene of Marek׳s disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Cari; Preeyanon, Likit; Hunt, Henry D; York, Ian A

    2015-01-15

    Marek׳s disease virus (MDV) is a widespread α-herpesvirus of chickens that causes T cell tumors. Acute, but not latent, MDV infection has previously been shown to lead to downregulation of cell-surface MHC class I (Virology 282:198-205 (2001)), but the gene(s) involved have not been identified. Here we demonstrate that an MDV gene, MDV012, is capable of reducing surface expression of MHC class I on chicken cells. Co-expression of an MHC class I-binding peptide targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (bypassing the requirement for the TAP peptide transporter) partially rescued MHC class I expression in the presence of MDV012, suggesting that MDV012 is a TAP-blocking MHC class I immune evasion protein. This is the first unique non-mammalian MHC class I immune evasion gene identified, and suggests that α-herpesviruses have conserved this function for at least 100 million years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel role of HLA class I in the pathology of medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rood Brian R

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MHC class I expression by cancer cells enables specific antigen recognition by the immune system and protection of the host. However, in some cancer types MHC class I expression is associated with an unfavorable outcome. We explored the basis of MHC class I association with unfavorable prognostic marker expression in the case of medulloblastoma. Methods We investigated expression of four essential components of MHC class I (heavy chain, β2m, TAP1 and TAP2 in 10 medulloblastoma mRNA samples, a tissue microarray containing 139 medulloblastoma tissues and 3 medulloblastoma cell lines. Further, in medulloblastoma cell lines we evaluated the effects of HLA class I engagement on activation of ERK1/2 and migration in vitro. Results The majority of specimens displayed undetectable or low levels of the heavy chains. Medulloblastomas expressing high levels of HLA class I displayed significantly higher levels of anaplasia and c-myc expression, markers of poor prognosis. Binding of β2m or a specific antibody to open forms of HLA class I promoted phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in medulloblastoma cell line with high levels, but not in the cell line with low levels of HLA heavy chain. This treatment also promoted ERK1/2 activation dependent migration of medulloblastoma cells. Conclusion MHC class I expression in medulloblastoma is associated with anaplasia and c-myc expression, markers of poor prognosis. Peptide- and/or β2m-free forms of MHC class I may contribute to a more malignant phenotype of medulloblastoma by modulating activation of signaling molecules such as ERK1/2 that stimulates cell mobility.

  15. Hyoid bone position and head posture comparison in skeletal Class I and Class II subjects: A retrospective cephalometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawankumar Dnyandeo Tekale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the hyoid bone position and the head posture using lateral cephalograms in subjects with skeletal Class I and skeletal Class II pattern and to investigate the gender differences. Materials and Methods: The study used lateral cephalograms of 40 subjects (20 skeletal Class I pattern; 20 skeletal Class II pattern. Lateral cephalograms were traced and analyzed for evaluation of the hyoid bone position and the head posture using 34 parameters. Independent sample t-test was performed to compare the differences between the two groups and between genders in each group. Statistical tests were performed using NCSS 2007 software (NCSST, Kaysville, Utah, USA. Results: The linear measurements between the hyoid bone (H and cervical spine (CV2ia, the nasion-sella line, palatal line nasion line, the anterior nasal spine (ANS to perpendicular projection of H on the NLP (NLP- Nasal Linear Projection (H-NLP/ANS as well as the posterior cranial points (Bo, Ar and S points were found to be less in skeletal Class II subjects. The measurement H-CV2ia was found to be less in males with skeletal Class I pattern and H-CV4ia was found to be less in males with skeletal Class II pattern. The natural head posture showed no significant gender differences. Conclusion: The position of hyoid bone was closer to the cervical vertebra horizontally in skeletal Class II subjects when compared with skeletal Class I subjects. In males, the hyoid bone position was closer to the cervical vertebra horizontally both in skeletal Class I and skeletal Class II subjects.

  16. Cutting Edge: Impaired MHC Class I Expression in Mice Deficient for Nlrc5/CITA

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Amlan; Meissner, Torsten B.; Taro Kawai,; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-01-01

    MHC class I and class II are crucial for the adaptive immune system. Although regulation of MHC class II expression by CIITA (class II transactivator) has long been recognized, the mechanism of MHC class I transactivation has been largely unknown until the recent discovery of NLRC5/CITA. Here we show using Nlrc5-deficient mice that NLRC5 is required for both constitutive and inducible MHC class I expression. Loss of Nlrc5 resulted in severe reduction in the expression of MHC class I and relat...

  17. Facilitation of syngeneic stem cell engraftment by anti-class I monoclonal antibody pretreatment of unirradiated recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voralia, M.; Semeluk, A.; Wegmann, T.G.

    1987-01-01

    We have established a murine model of syngeneic bone marrow transplantation based on the use of monoclonal antibody as the sole conditioning regimen in unirradiated recipients. Administration of a single injection of monoclonal antibody directed against major histocompatibility complex-encoded class I determinants facilitated permanent hemopoietic stem cell engraftment without any apparent side-effects. Whereas untreated hosts exhibited a maximal chimerism of 15% at donor cell doses of up to 12 X 10(7) bone marrow cells, pretreatment by 2 mg of anti-class I antibody one week prior to transplantation of 3 X 10(7) syngeneic bone marrow cells resulted in a mean donor representation of about 80%. The antibody can be given up to four weeks prior to transplantation, and the degree of donor engraftment observed is a function of the dose of antibody administered. The fact that specific antibody enhanced engraftment in two strain combinations indicates that antibody is the active agent in facilitating engraftment and that facilitation is not strain-restricted. Anti-class I antibodies of the IgG2a, but not IgG1, isotype are effective in promoting engraftment. Although the isotype requirement suggests a role for antibody-mediated cytotoxicity in promoting stem cell engraftment, the extensive time-frame of facilitation suggests that other effects of the antibody may also be involved. The model of syngeneic bone marrow transplantation we describe here will be useful in studying the mechanisms regulating stem cell engraftment and may have potential clinical application as an approach to autologous marrow transplantation

  18. Identification, inheritance, and linkage of B-G-like and MHC class I genes in cranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Goto, R.M.; Gee, G.F.; Briles, W.E.; Miller, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    We identified B-G-like genes in the whooping and Florida sandhill cranes and linked them to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We evaluated the inheritance of B-G-like genes in families of whooping and Florida sandhill cranes using restriction fragment patterns (RFPs). Two B-G-like genes, designated wcbgl and wcbg2, were located within 8 kb of one another. The fully sequenced wcbg2 gene encodes a B-G IgV-like domain, an additional Ig-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a single heptad domain typical of '-helical coiled coils. Patterns of restriction fragments in DNA from the whooping crane and from a number of other species indicate that the B-G-like gene families of cranes are large with diverse sequences. Segregation of RFPs in families of Florida sandhill cranes provide evidence for genetic polymorphism in the B-G-like genes. The restriction fragments generally segregated in concert with MHC haplotypes assigned by serological typing and by single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) assays based in the second exon of the crane MHC class I genes. This study supports the concept of a long-term association of polymorphic B-G-like genes with the MHC. It also establishes SSCP as a means for evaluating MHC genetic variability in cranes.

  19. Identification, inheritance, and linkage of B-G-like and MHC class I genes in cranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S I; Goto, R M; Gee, G F; Briles, W E; Miller, M M

    1999-01-01

    We identified B-G-like genes in the whooping and Florida sandhill cranes and linked them to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We evaluated the inheritance of B-G-like genes in families of whooping and Florida sandhill cranes using restriction fragment patterns (RFPs). Two B-G-like genes, designated wcbg1 and wcbg2, were located within 8 kb of one another. The fully sequenced wcbg2 gene encodes a B-G IgV-like domain, an additional Ig-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a single heptad domain typical of alpha-helical coiled coils. Patterns of restriction fragments in DNA from the whooping crane and from a number of other species indicate that the B-G-like gene families of cranes are large with diverse sequences. Segregation of RFPs in families of Florida sandhill cranes provide evidence for genetic polymorphism in the B-G-like genes. The restriction fragments generally segregated in concert with MHC haplotypes assigned by serological typing and by single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) assays based in the second exon of the crane MHC class I genes. This study supports the concept of a long-term association of polymorphic B-G-like genes with the MHC. It also establishes SSCP as a means for evaluating MHC genetic variability in cranes.

  20. Facial attractiveness of skeletal class I and class II malocclusion as perceived by laypeople, patients and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Michela; Cioffi, Iacopo; D'antò, Vincenzo; Valletta, Alessandra; Valletta, Rosa; Amato, Massimo

    2018-06-01

    Physical attractiveness is dependent on facial appearance. The facial profile plays a crucial role in facial attractiveness and can be improved with orthodontic treatment. The aesthetic assessment of facial appearance may be influenced by the cultural background and education of the assessor and dependent upon the experience level of dental professionals. This study aimed to evaluate how the sagittal jaw relationship in Class I and Class II individuals affects facial attractiveness, and whether the assessor's professional education and background affect the perception of facial attractiveness. Facial silhouettes simulating mandibular retrusion, maxillary protrusion, mandibular retrusion combined with maxillary protrusion, bimaxillary protrusion and severe bimaxillary protrusion in class I and class II patients were assessed by five groups of people with different backgrounds and education levels (i.e., 23 expert orthodontists, 21 orthodontists, 15 maxillofacial surgeons, 19 orthodontic patients and 28 laypeople). Straight facial profiles were judged to be more attractive than convex profiles due to severe mandibular retrusion and to mandibular retrusion combined with maxillary protrusion (all Pattractive by clinicians than by patients and laypeople (all Pattractive than Class I profiles. The assessment of facial attractiveness is dependent on the assessor's education and background. Laypeople and patients are considerably less sensitive to abnormal sagittal jaw relationships than orthodontists.

  1. Survival of Saccharomyces cerevisiae after treatment with the restriction endonuclease Alu I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winckler, K.; Bach, B.; Obe, G.

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of yeast cells proficient in the repair of radiation damage (Saccharomyces cervisiae) with the restriction endonuclease Alu I leads to a positive dose-effect relationship between inactivation level and enzyme concentration. The data suggest an uptake of the active restriction enzyme into the cells and a relationship between induction of DNA double-strand breaks and cell killing. (author)

  2. Comprehensive Analysis of Cytomegalovirus pp65 Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses According to Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Allotypes and Intraindividual Dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Joo Hyun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available To define whether individual human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I allotypes are used preferentially in human cytomegalovirus (CMV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, CD8+ T cell responses restricted by up to six HLA class I allotypes in an individual were measured in parallel using K562-based artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing both CMV pp65 antigen and one of 32 HLA class I allotypes (7 HLA-A, 14 HLA-B, and 11 HLA-C present in 50 healthy Korean donors. The CD8+ T cell responses to pp65 in the HLA-C allotypes were lower than responses to those in HLA-A and -B allotypes and there was no difference between the HLA-A and HLA-B loci. HLA-A*02:01, -B*07:02, and -C*08:01 showed the highest magnitude and frequency of immune responses to pp65 at each HLA class I locus. However, HLA-A*02:07, -B*59:01, -B*58:01, -B*15:11, -C*03:02, and -C*02:02 did not show any immune responses. Although each individual has up to six different HLA allotypes, 46% of the donors showed one allotype, 24% showed two allotypes, and 2% showed three allotypes that responded to pp65. Interestingly, the frequencies of HLA-A alleles were significantly correlated with the positivity of specific allotypes. Our results demonstrate that specific HLA class I allotypes are preferentially used in the CD8+ T cell immune response to pp65 and that a hierarchy among HLA class I allotypes is present in an individual.

  3. Comparison of second molar eruption patterns in patients with skeletal Class II and skeletal Class I malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brin, Ilana; Camasuvi, Semin; Dali, Nasser; Aizenbud, Dror

    2006-12-01

    The eruptive positions of the second molars in Class I and Class II malocclusions were studied. Pretreatment records of 221 patients with a mean age of 11.3 years were evaluated. About 19% of them had skeletal Class I, 31% had skeletal maxillary Class II, and 50% had skeletal mandibular Class II malocclusions. The mean values of the dental and chronologic ages of the subjects were similar. The eruptive positions in relation to a reference line, the developmental stages of the patients' second molars and dental ages were recorded from the panoramic roentgenograms. The distribution of the various developmental stages in each malocclusion group was similar, and no association between skeletal malocclusion and dental developmental stage of the second molars was encountered. The eruptive position of the maxillary second molars was more occlusal only in the oldest maxillary Class II group, above 12 years of age (P = .02). These results support, in part, previous reports suggesting that the maxillary second molars may erupt earlier in patients with skeletal maxillary Class II malocclusions.

  4. Inefficient exogenous loading of a tapasin-dependent peptide onto HLA-B*44:02 can be improved by acid treatment or fixation of target cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroobant, Vincent; Demotte, Nathalie; Luiten, Rosalie M.; Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Cresswell, Peter; Bonehill, Aude; Michaux, Alexandre; Ma, Wenbin; Mulder, Arend; van den Eynde, Benoît J.; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Vigneron, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Antitumor cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs) recognize peptides derived from cellular proteins and presented on MHC class I. One category of peptides recognized by these CTLs is derived from proteins encoded by cancer-germline genes, which are specifically expressed in tumors, and therefore represent

  5. Polytypism in CdI2: a consequence of restrictions in close-packed arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahab, M.A.; Kant, R.

    1986-01-01

    Based on theoretical and experimental observations, it has been established that the polytypes 2H and 4H act as basic structural units as regard to the formation of CdI 2 polytypes. As a result of this, some general rules have been formulated which help understand (i) the nature of restrictions in the close-packed arrangements and to deduce the genuine CdI 2 polytypes, and (ii) the classification of CdI 2 polytypes into various possible groups. This further helps to conclude that (i) the CdI 2 polytypes are simply a consequence of restrictions in the close-packed arrangements, (ii) the concept of stacking fault is superfluous as far as the formation of ordered polytypes are concerned, and (iii) the identification of CdI 2 polytypes on the basis of intensity data has limited implications unless some practical use of polytypes are found. (author)

  6. Expression and Purification of BmrI Restriction Endonuclease and Its N-terminal Cleavage Domain Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Yongming; Higgins, Lauren; Zhang, Penghua; Chan, Siu-hong; Laget, Sophie; Sweeney, Suzanne; Lunnen, Keith; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2007-01-01

    BmrI (ACTGGG N5/N4) is one of the few metal-independent restriction endonucleases (REases) found in bacteria. The BmrI restriction-modification system was cloned by the methylase selection method, inverse PCR, and PCR. BmrI REase shows significant amino acid sequence identity to BfiI and a putative endonuclease MspBNCORF3798 from the sequenced Mesorhizobium sp. BNC1 genome. The EDTA-resistant BmrI REase was successfully over-expressed in a pre-modified E. coli strain from pET21a or pBAC-expIQ...

  7. Evolution of MHC class I in the Order Crocodylia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Isberg, Sally R; Higgins, Damien P

    2014-01-01

    have mostly focused on model species. However, the investigation of this region in non-avian reptiles is still in its infancy. To provide insights into the evolutionary mechanisms that have shaped the diversity of this region in the Order Crocodylia, we investigated MHC class I exon 3, intron 3...... events of gene duplication, particularly in Crocodilidae. These findings enhance our understanding of MHC class I evolution and provide a preliminary framework for comparative studies of other non-avian reptiles as well as diversity assessment within Crocodylia....

  8. Restrictions placed on constitutive relations by angular momentum balance and Galilean invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, K. R.; Srinivasa, A. R.

    2013-04-01

    In this note, we will show that for describing the response of a wide class of bodies, it is sufficient to invoke only the balance of angular momentum to obtain the restrictions on the constitutive functions that one obtains by appealing to frame indifference. While this result is known for hyperelastic materials (although it is not found in any standard text on the subject), we extend this result to classes of elasto-plastic and viscoelastic materials as well as for a class of implicit constitutive equations for viscous fluids. In particular, we show that for a class of bodies capable of instantaneous elastic response that is dictated by a stored energy function, the symmetry of the Cauchy stress alone is enough to obtain all the necessary restrictions. The result is related to Noether's theorem; if we know that there is a conserved quantity (i.e., angular momentum), we can then show that the energy function must be invariant under a group of transformations. For a class of generalized Newtonian fluids (including the Navier Stokes fluid and the Bingham fluid), the symmetry of the stress and Galilean invariance of the response functions are all that are required to obtain restrictions that are usually obtained by enforcing frame indifference.

  9. LOFT blowdown loop piping thermal analysis Class I review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnaman, T.L.

    1978-01-01

    In accordance with ASME Code, Section III requirements, all analyses of Class I components must be independently reviewed. Since the LOFT blowdown loop piping up through the blowdown valve is a Class I piping system, the thermal analyses are reviewed. The Thermal Analysis Branch comments to this review are also included. It is the opinion of the Thermal Analysis Branch that these comments satisfy all of the reviewers questions and that the analyses should stand as is, without additional considerations in meeting the ASME Code requirements and ANC Specification 60139

  10. Lysis of cells infected with typhus group rickettsiae by a human cytotoxic T cell clone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, M.; Robbins, F.; Hartzman, R.J.; Dasch, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Cytolytic human T cells clones generated in response to the intracellular bacterium Rickettsia typhi were characterized. Growing clones were tested for their ability to proliferate specifically in response to antigens derived from typhus group rickettsiae or to lyse targets infected with R. typhi or Rickettsia prowazekii, as measured by 51 Cr-release from target cells. Two clones were able to lyse targets infected with typhus group rickettsiae. One of these clones was more fully characterized because of its rapid growth characteristics. This cytolytic clone was capable of lysing an autologous infected target as well as a target matched for class I and II histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA). It was not capable, however, of lysing either a target mismatched for both class I and II HLA or a target partially matched for class I HLA. In addition, the clone exhibited specificity in that it was able to lyse an autologous target infected with typhus group rickettsiae, but did not lyse an autologous target infected with an antigenically distinct rickettsial species, Rickettsia tsutsugamushi. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that cells infected with intracellular bacteria can be lysed by human cytotoxic T lymphocytes

  11. Gene transfer preferentially selects MHC class I positive tumour cells and enhances tumour immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Ulrich T; Schildhauer, Ines; Barroso, Margarita Céspedes; Kofler, David M; Gerner, Franz M; Mysliwietz, Josef; Buening, Hildegard; Hallek, Michael; King, Susan B S

    2006-05-01

    The modulated expression of MHC class I on tumour tissue is well documented. Although the effect of MHC class I expression on the tumorigenicity and immunogenicity of MHC class I negative tumour cell lines has been rigorously studied, less is known about the validity of gene transfer and selection in cell lines with a mixed MHC class I phenotype. To address this issue we identified a C26 cell subline that consists of distinct populations of MHC class I (H-2D/K) positive and negative cells. Transient transfection experiments using liposome-based transfer showed a lower transgene expression in MHC class I negative cells. In addition, MHC class I negative cells were more sensitive to antibiotic selection. This led to the generation of fully MHC class I positive cell lines. In contrast to C26 cells, all transfectants were rejected in vivo and induced protection against the parental tumour cells in rechallenge experiments. Tumour cell specificity of the immune response was demonstrated in in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. Transfectants expressing CD40 ligand and hygromycin phosphotransferase were not more immunogenic than cells expressing hygromycin resistance alone. We suggest that the MHC class I positive phenotype of the C26 transfectants had a bearing on their immunogenicity, because selected MHC class I positive cells were more immunogenic than parental C26 cells and could induce specific anti-tumour immune responses. These data demonstrate that the generation of tumour cell transfectants can lead to the selection of subpopulations that show an altered phenotype compared to the parental cell line and display altered immunogenicity independent of selection marker genes or other immune modulatory genes. Our results show the importance of monitoring gene transfer in the whole tumour cell population, especially for the evaluation of in vivo therapies targeted to heterogeneous tumour cell populations.

  12. Semantic Analysis of Virtual Classes and Nested Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    1999-01-01

    Virtual classes and nested classes are distinguishing features of BETA. Nested classes originated from Simula, but until recently they have not been part of main stream object- oriented languages. C++ has a restricted form of nested classes and they were included in Java 1.1. Virtual classes...... classes and parameterized classes have been made. Although virtual classes and nested classes have been used in BETA for more than a decade, their implementation has not been published. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of virtual classes and nested classes by presenting...

  13. Anteroposterior condylar position: a comparative study between subjects with normal occlusion and patients with Class I, Class II Division 1, and Class III malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Marcelo Reis; Rodrigues, Andréia Fialho; Ribeiro, Luiz Claudio; Campos, Marcio José da Silva; Vitral, Robert Willer Farinazzo

    2013-10-29

    The present study aimed to determine and compare the anteroposterior position of the condyle in the mandibular fossa between groups of asymptomatic subjects with normal occlusion and asymptomatic subjects with Class I, Class II Division 1, and Class III malocclusions. Thirty persons with normal occlusion, 30 with Class I malocclusion, 30 with Class II Division 1, and 30 with Class III had computed tomography scans of their temporomandibular joints. The anterior joint space/posterior joint space (AJS/PJS) ratio was determined for the right and left joints. The paired t test was used to analyze the AJS/PJS ratio between both sides for each group. The ANOVA test was applied to verify the differences between the groups for the measurements of the right and left sides. In case the ANOVA test confirmed significance, the Dunnett's t test was performed to compare the groups of malocclusion with that of normal occlusion. The paired t test between the AJS/PJS relationships in the right and left sides showed the following p values: Class I (0.168), Class II Division 1 (0.662), Class III (0.991), and normal occlusion (0.390). The ANOVA test showed a p value of 0.445 for the comparisons of the right side and 0.040 for the left side. The Dunnett's t test demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the Class II group and the normal occlusion group (p value of 0.026) in the joints of the left side. Bilateral symmetry and lack of condyle centralization were common characteristics among all groups. The greatest condylar decentralization was observed in the Class II group, whereas the least condylar decentralization was found in the normal occlusion group.

  14. NLRC5/MHC class I transactivator is a target for immune evasion in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihama, Sayuri; Roszik, Jason; Downs, Isaac; Meissner, Torsten B; Vijayan, Saptha; Chapuy, Bjoern; Sidiq, Tabasum; Shipp, Margaret A; Lizee, Gregory A; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-05-24

    Cancer cells develop under immune surveillance, thus necessitating immune escape for successful growth. Loss of MHC class I expression provides a key immune evasion strategy in many cancers, although the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. MHC class I transactivator (CITA), known as "NLRC5" [NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, caspase recruitment (CARD) domain containing 5], has recently been identified as a critical transcriptional coactivator of MHC class I gene expression. Here we show that the MHC class I transactivation pathway mediated by CITA/NLRC5 constitutes a target for cancer immune evasion. In all the 21 tumor types we examined, NLRC5 expression was highly correlated with the expression of MHC class I, with cytotoxic T-cell markers, and with genes in the MHC class I antigen-presentation pathway, including LMP2/LMP7, TAP1, and β2-microglobulin. Epigenetic and genetic alterations in cancers, including promoter methylation, copy number loss, and somatic mutations, were most prevalent in NLRC5 among all MHC class I-related genes and were associated with the impaired expression of components of the MHC class I pathway. Strikingly, NLRC5 expression was significantly associated with the activation of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells and patient survival in multiple cancer types. Thus, NLRC5 constitutes a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cancers.

  15. Tapasin-related protein TAPBPR is an additional component of the MHC class I presentation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Louise H; Hermann, Clemens; Boname, Jessica M

    2013-01-01

    Tapasin is an integral component of the peptide-loading complex (PLC) important for efficient peptide loading onto MHC class I molecules. We investigated the function of the tapasin-related protein, TAPBPR. Like tapasin, TAPBPR is widely expressed, IFN-γ-inducible, and binds to MHC class I coupled...... with β2-microglobulin in the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast to tapasin, TAPBPR does not bind ERp57 or calreticulin and is not an integral component of the PLC. β2-microglobulin is essential for the association between TAPBPR and MHC class I. However, the association between TAPBPR and MHC class I...... occurs in the absence of a functional PLC, suggesting peptide is not required. Expression of TAPBPR decreases the rate of MHC class I maturation through the secretory pathway and prolongs the association of MHC class I on the PLC. The TAPBPR:MHC class I complex trafficks through the Golgi apparatus...

  16. Immune response to uv-induced tumors: transplantation immunity and lymphocyte populations exhibiting anti-tumor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeter, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ultraviolet light-induced murine skin tumors were analyzed for their ability to induce tumor-specific and cross-protective transplantation immunity in immunocompetent syngeneic mice. These studies revealed that progressor UV-tumors, like regressor UV-tumors, possess tumor-specific transplantation antigens. Cross-protective transplantation immunity to UV-tumors, however, was associated with sensitization to the serum used to culture the tumor lines rather than to cross-reactive or common determinants on UV-tumors. An analysis of the cytolytic activity of lymphocytes from the spleens of mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors revealed a striking difference between the two immune splenocyte populations. From regressor tumor-immune animals, cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes with specificity for the immunizing tumor were found. However, the analysis of splenic lymphocytes from progressor tumor immune animals revealed no such effector cells. To more effectively examine those lymphocytes exhibiting cytolytic activity in vitro, T lymphocyte cloning technology was used as a means of isolating homogeneous lymphocyte populations with the effector activities described above. The mechanisms where NK cells and other nonspecific effector cells could be induced in tumor-immune animals are discussed in the context of class II restricted immune responses

  17. Constraining the disk masses of the class I binary protostar GV Tau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehan, Patrick D.; Eisner, Josh A., E-mail: psheehan@email.arizona.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    We present new spatially resolved 1.3 mm imaging with CARMA of the GV Tau system. GV Tau is a Class I binary protostar system in the Taurus Molecular Cloud, the components of which are separated by 1.''2. Each protostar is surrounded by a protoplanetary disk, and the pair may be surrounded by a circumbinary envelope. We analyze the data using detailed radiative transfer modeling of the system. We create synthetic protostar model spectra, images, and visibilities and compare them with CARMA 1.3 mm visibilities, a Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared scattered light image, and broadband spectral energy distributions from the literature to study the disk masses and geometries of the GV Tau disks. We show that the protoplanetary disks around GV Tau fall near the lower end of estimates of the Minimum Mass Solar Nebula, and may have just enough mass to form giant planets. When added to the sample of Class I protostars from Eisner, we confirm that Class I protostars are on average more massive than their Class II counterparts. This suggests that substantial dust grain processing occurs between the Class I and Class II stages, and may help to explain why the Class II protostars do not appear to have, on average, enough mass in their disks to form giant planets.

  18. Increase in DNA vaccine efficacy by virosome delivery and co-expression of a cytolytic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargett, Tessa; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Miller, Darren; Garrod, Tamsin; Yu, Stanley; Wesselingh, Steve; Suhrbier, Andreas; Gowans, Eric J

    2014-06-01

    The potential of DNA vaccines has not been realised due to suboptimal delivery, poor antigen expression and the lack of localised inflammation, essential for antigen presentation and an effective immune response to the immunogen. Initially, we examined the delivery of a DNA vaccine encoding a model antigen, luciferase (LUC), to the respiratory tract of mice by encapsulation in a virosome. Virosomes that incorporated influenza virus haemagglutinin effectively delivered DNA to cells in the mouse respiratory tract and resulted in antigen expression and systemic and mucosal immune responses to the immunogen after an intranasal (IN) prime/intradermal (ID) boost regimen, whereas a multidose ID regimen only generated systemic immunity. We also examined systemic immune responses to LUC after ID vaccination with a DNA vaccine, which also encoded one of the several cytolytic or toxic proteins. Although the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, in the presence of the prodrug, ganciclovir, resulted in cell death, this failed to increase the humoral or cell-mediated immune responses. In contrast, the co-expression of LUC with the rotavirus non-structural protein 4 (NSP4) protein or a mutant form of mouse perforin, proteins which are directly cytolytic, resulted in increased LUC-specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity. On the other hand, co-expression of LUC with diphtheria toxin subunit A or overexpression of perforin or NSP4 resulted in a lower level of immunity. In summary, the efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved by targeted IN delivery of DNA or by the induction of cell death in vaccine-targeted cells after ID delivery.

  19. 75 FR 60457 - Underground Injection Control Program Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9208-4] Underground Injection Control Program Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for Exemption--Class I Hazardous Waste Injection Dow Chemical Company (DOW... 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act have been...

  20. Interferon beta 1, an intermediate in the tumor necrosis factor alpha- induced increased MHC class I expression and an autocrine regulator of the constitutive MHC class I expression

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    In conclusion, our observations indicate that the constitutive MHC class I expression is regulated by autocrine production of IFN-beta 1. TNF-alpha acts as an enhancer of the autocrine production of IFN-beta 1, and consequently as an enhancer of the MHC class I expression and viral protection.

  1. Migration of allosensitized helper but not cytolytic T-lymphocyte clones is inhibited by prostaglandin E2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, M.L.; Hoffman, R.A.; Simmons, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that random migration of one clone of C57BL/6 anti DBA/2 helper lymphocytes is significantly inhibited by physiologic concentrations of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ). The present studies were designed to determine if lymphocyte locomotor responses to PGE 2 are dictated by (1) clone effector function and/or (2) the presence of specific cell surface binding sites for PGE 2 . Random locomotion of eight different lymphocyte clones (all C57BL/6 anti DBA/2) was studied in a modified Boyden chamber assay. Clone function was characterized as helper (H, n = 3), cytolytic (C, n = 4) or cytolytic only in the presence of lectin (L, n = 1). Random migration of all H clones was consistently inhibited by PGE 2 . However, none of the clones possessing a lytic mechanism (C or L) were inhibited by even the highest (1000 ng/ml) concentration of PGE 2 tested. Incubation of clones with 3 H-PGE 2 in the presence of excess unlabelled PGE 2 did not demonstrate specific binding of PGE 2 to either H or C clones. The authors conclude that (1) the effects of PGE 2 on lymphocyte random migration are effector function specific and (2) these responses do not appear to be mediated by specialized cell surface receptors for PGE 2 . Subset specific locomotor responses to PGE 2 may constitute a mechanism whereby lymphocytes with distinct effector functions may differentially accumulate at sites of inflammation

  2. 40 CFR 82.13 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements for class I controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... subpart) and will not be resold or used in manufacturing. (xiii) The amount of class I, Group VI... class II controlled substances; (xii) The U.S. Customs entry form; (xiii) Dated records documenting the..., an annual list of the amount of critical use methyl bromide bought; (ii) For critical uses of class I...

  3. Stimulation of cytolytic T lymphocytes by azaguanine-resistant mouse tumor cells in selective hat medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snick, J. van; Uyttenhove, C.; Pel, A. van; Boon, T.

    1981-01-01

    Primed syngeneic or umprimed allogeneic mouse spleen cells were stimulated with azaguanine-resistant P815 tumor cells that were killed by the addition of aminopterin to the stimulation medium. The recovery of lymphocytes and their cytolytic activity and specificity were similar to those obtained after stimulation with irradiated cells. This method conveniently replaces the inactivation of stimulatory cells by irradiation or mitomycin treatment. Moreover, it has the advantage of inactivating not only the stimulatory cells but also the tumor cells that often contaminate the spleens of tumor-bearing animals, provided these animals have been inoculated with azaguanine-resistant tumor cell mutants. (Auth.)

  4. Alveolar bone thickness and lower incisor position in skeletal Class I and Class II malocclusions assessed with cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysal, Asli; Ucar, Faruk Izzet; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmis; Ozer, Torun; Uysal, Tancan

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate lower incisor position and bony support between patients with Class II average- and high-angle malocclusions and compare with the patients presenting Class I malocclusions. CBCT records of 79 patients were divided into 2 groups according to sagittal jaw relationships: Class I and II. Each group was further divided into average- and high-angle subgroups. Six angular and 6 linear measurements were performed. Independent samples t-test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn post-hoc tests were performed for statistical comparisons. Labial alveolar bone thickness was significantly higher in Class I group compared to Class II group (p = 0.003). Lingual alveolar bone angle (p = 0.004), lower incisor protrusion (p = 0.007) and proclination (p = 0.046) were greatest in Class II average-angle patients. Spongious bone was thinner (p = 0.016) and root apex was closer to the labial cortex in high-angle subgroups when compared to the Class II average-angle subgroup (p = 0.004). Mandibular anterior bony support and lower incisor position were different between average- and high-angle Class II patients. Clinicians should be aware that the range of lower incisor movement in high-angle Class II patients is limited compared to average- angle Class II patients.

  5. A cell-based MHC stabilization assay for the detection of peptide binding to the canine classical class I molecule, DLA-88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Peter; Holmes, Jennifer C; Gojanovich, Gregory S; Hess, Paul R

    2012-12-15

    Identifying immunodominant CTL epitopes is essential for studying CD8+ T-cell responses in populations, but remains difficult, as peptides within antigens typically are too numerous for all to be synthesized and screened. Instead, to facilitate discovery, in silico scanning of proteins for sequences that match the motif, or binding preferences, of the restricting MHC class I allele - the largest determinant of immunodominance - can be used to predict likely candidates. The high false positive rate with this analysis ideally requires binding confirmation, which is obtained routinely by an assay using cell lines such as RMA-S that have defective transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) machinery, and consequently, few surface class I molecules. The stabilization and resultant increased life-span of peptide-MHC complexes on the cell surface by the addition of true binders validates their identity. To determine whether a similar assay could be developed for dogs, we transfected a prevalent class I allele, DLA-88*50801, into RMA-S. In the BARC3 clone, the recombinant heavy chain was associated with murine β2-microglobulin, and importantly, could differentiate motif-matched and -mismatched peptides by surface MHC stabilization. This work demonstrates the potential to use RMA-S cells transfected with canine alleles as a tool for CTL epitope discovery in this species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of interradicular distances and cortical bone thickness in Thai patients with class I and class II skeletal patterns using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khumsarn, Nattida [Dental Division of Lamphun Hospital, Lamphun (Thailand); Patanaporn, Virush; Janhom, Apirum; Jotikasthira, Dhirawat [Faculty of Dentistry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2016-06-15

    This study evaluated and compared interradicular distances and cortical bone thickness in Thai patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Pretreatment CBCT images of 24 Thai orthodontic patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns were included in the study. Three measurements were chosen for investigation: the mesiodistal distance between the roots, the width of the buccolingual alveolar process, and buccal cortical bone thickness. All distances were recorded at five different levels from the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). Descriptive statistical analysis and t-tests were performed, with the significance level for all tests set at p<0.05. Patients with a Class II skeletal pattern showed significantly greater maxillary mesiodistal distances (between the first and second premolars) and widths of the buccolingual alveolar process (between the first and second molars) than Class I skeletal pattern patients at 10 mm above the CEJ. The maxillary buccal cortical bone thicknesses between the second premolar and first molar at 8 mm above the CEJ in Class II patients were likewise significantly greater than in Class I patients. Patients with a Class I skeletal pattern showed significantly wider mandibular buccolingual alveolar processes than did Class II patients (between the first and second molars) at 4, 6, and 8 mm below the CEJ. In both the maxilla and mandible, the mesiodistal distances, the width of the buccolingual alveolar process, and buccal cortical bone thickness tended to increase from the CEJ to the apex in both Class I and Class II skeletal patterns.

  7. Comparison of interradicular distances and cortical bone thickness in Thai patients with class I and class II skeletal patterns using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khumsarn, Nattida; Patanaporn, Virush; Janhom, Apirum; Jotikasthira, Dhirawat

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated and compared interradicular distances and cortical bone thickness in Thai patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Pretreatment CBCT images of 24 Thai orthodontic patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns were included in the study. Three measurements were chosen for investigation: the mesiodistal distance between the roots, the width of the buccolingual alveolar process, and buccal cortical bone thickness. All distances were recorded at five different levels from the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). Descriptive statistical analysis and t-tests were performed, with the significance level for all tests set at p<0.05. Patients with a Class II skeletal pattern showed significantly greater maxillary mesiodistal distances (between the first and second premolars) and widths of the buccolingual alveolar process (between the first and second molars) than Class I skeletal pattern patients at 10 mm above the CEJ. The maxillary buccal cortical bone thicknesses between the second premolar and first molar at 8 mm above the CEJ in Class II patients were likewise significantly greater than in Class I patients. Patients with a Class I skeletal pattern showed significantly wider mandibular buccolingual alveolar processes than did Class II patients (between the first and second molars) at 4, 6, and 8 mm below the CEJ. In both the maxilla and mandible, the mesiodistal distances, the width of the buccolingual alveolar process, and buccal cortical bone thickness tended to increase from the CEJ to the apex in both Class I and Class II skeletal patterns

  8. Transmission of the PabI family of restriction DNA glycosylase genes: mobility and long-term inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kenji K; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2015-10-19

    R.PabI is an exceptional restriction enzyme that functions as a DNA glycosylase. The enzyme excises an unmethylated base from its recognition sequence to generate apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, and also displays AP lyase activity, cleaving the DNA backbone at the AP site to generate the 3'-phospho alpha, beta-unsaturated aldehyde end in addition to the 5'-phosphate end. The resulting ends are difficult to religate with DNA ligase. The enzyme was originally isolated in Pyrococcus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon, and additional homologs subsequently identified in the epsilon class of the Gram-negative bacterial phylum Proteobacteria, such as Helicobacter pylori. Systematic analysis of R.PabI homologs and their neighboring genes in sequenced genomes revealed co-occurrence of R.PabI with M.PabI homolog methyltransferase genes. R.PabI and M.PabI homolog genes are occasionally found at corresponding (orthologous) loci in different species, such as Helicobacter pylori, Helicobacter acinonychis and Helicobacter cetorum, indicating long-term maintenance of the gene pair. One R.PabI and M.PabI homolog gene pair is observed immediately after the GMP synthase gene in both Campylobacter and Helicobacter, representing orthologs beyond genera. The mobility of the PabI family of restriction-modification (RM) system between genomes is evident upon comparison of genomes of sibling strains/species. Analysis of R.PabI and M.PabI homologs in H. pylori revealed an insertion of integrative and conjugative elements (ICE), and replacement with a gene of unknown function that may specify a membrane-associated toxin (hrgC). In view of the similarity of HrgC with toxins in type I toxin-antitoxin systems, we addressed the biological significance of this substitution. Our data indicate that replacement with hrgC occurred in the common ancestor of hspAmerind and hspEAsia. Subsequently, H. pylori with and without hrgC were intermixed at this locus, leading to complex distribution of hrgC in East

  9. A HLA class I cis-regulatory element whose activity can be modulated by hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, B C; Hui, K M

    1994-12-01

    To elucidate the basis of the down-regulation in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I gene expression and to identify possible DNA-binding regulatory elements that have the potential to interact with class I MHC genes, we have studied the transcriptional regulation of class I HLA genes in human breast carcinoma cells. A 9 base pair (bp) negative cis-regulatory element (NRE) has been identified using band-shift assays employing DNA sequences derived from the 5'-flanking region of HLA class I genes. This 9-bp element, GTCATGGCG, located within exon I of the HLA class I gene, can potently inhibit the expression of a heterologous thymidine kinase (TK) gene promoter and the HLA enhancer element. Furthermore, this regulatory element can exert its suppressive function in either the sense or anti-sense orientation. More interestingly, NRE can suppress dexamethasone-mediated gene activation in the context of the reported glucocorticoid-responsive element (GRE) in MCF-7 cells but has no influence on the estrogen-mediated transcriptional activation of MCF-7 cells in the context of the reported estrogen-responsive element (ERE). Furthermore, the presence of such a regulatory element within the HLA class I gene whose activity can be modulated by hormones correlates well with our observation that the level of HLA class I gene expression can be down-regulated by hormones in human breast carcinoma cells. Such interactions between negative regulatory elements and specific hormone trans-activators are novel and suggest a versatile form of transcriptional control.

  10. Haemophilus ducreyi Cutaneous Ulcer Strains Are Nearly Identical to Class I Genital Ulcer Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharanesh Gangaiah

    Full Text Available Although cutaneous ulcers (CU in the tropics is frequently attributed to Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue, the causative agent of yaws, Haemophilus ducreyi has emerged as a major cause of CU in yaws-endemic regions of the South Pacific islands and Africa. H. ducreyi is generally susceptible to macrolides, but CU strains persist after mass drug administration of azithromycin for yaws or trachoma. H. ducreyi also causes genital ulcers (GU and was thought to be exclusively transmitted by microabrasions that occur during sex. In human volunteers, the GU strain 35000HP does not infect intact skin; wounds are required to initiate infection. These data led to several questions: Are CU strains a new variant of H. ducreyi or did they evolve from GU strains? Do CU strains contain additional genes that could allow them to infect intact skin? Are CU strains susceptible to azithromycin?To address these questions, we performed whole-genome sequencing and antibiotic susceptibility testing of 5 CU strains obtained from Samoa and Vanuatu and 9 archived class I and class II GU strains. Except for single nucleotide polymorphisms, the CU strains were genetically almost identical to the class I strain 35000HP and had no additional genetic content. Phylogenetic analysis showed that class I and class II strains formed two separate clusters and CU strains evolved from class I strains. Class I strains diverged from class II strains ~1.95 million years ago (mya and CU strains diverged from the class I strain 35000HP ~0.18 mya. CU and GU strains evolved under similar selection pressures. Like 35000HP, the CU strains were highly susceptible to antibiotics, including azithromycin.These data suggest that CU strains are derivatives of class I strains that were not recognized until recently. These findings require confirmation by analysis of CU strains from other regions.

  11. Frequency of class I anti-HLA alloantibodies in patients infected by HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Regina Manzolli Leite

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of class I anti-HLA alloantibodies in patients infected by HIV-1 and relate it with the different clinical courses of the disease. Blood samples were collected in EDTA tubes from 145 individuals. HIV-1 infection was confirmed by ELISA test. The presence of class I anti-HLA alloantibodies and HLA allele's were determined. Clinical evolution was set as fast (3 years. Class I anti-HLA alloantibodies presence was lower in healthy individuals than in those infected by HIV-1 (4.2% against 32.4%. However, an equal distribution of these alloantibodies was found among the individuals infected, independent on the clinical evolution. Thus, class I anti-HLA alloantibodies was not a determinant factor for patient worsening.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I em pacientes infectados pelo HIV-1 e relacioná-la aos diferentes cursos clínicos da doença. Amostras de sangue de 145 indivíduos HIV positivo foram coletadas em tubos com EDTA. A infecção pelo HIV-1 foi confirmada por teste ELISA e a presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I determinada em seguida. A evolução clínica foi definida como rápida (3 anos. A presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I foi menor em indivíduos saudáveis em relação aos infectados pelo HIV-1 (4,2% contra 32,4%. Porém, a distribuição destes aloanticorpos entre os indivíduos infectados foi igual, independente da evolução clínica. Deste modo, a presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I não é um fator determinante na piora clínica do paciente.

  12. A roentgenocephalometric study on the condylar displacement in angle's class I and III malocclusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hwa; Park, Chang Seo

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to know correlation of mean values between centric occlusion and centric relation by the cephalogram in Angle's Class I and III malocclusion subjects. 22 adults with Angle's Class I malocclusion (17 men and 5 women, 21 to 27 years of age) and 14 adult with Angle's class III malocclusion (10 men and 4 women, 21 to 27 years of age) were selected form the dental students in Yonsei University. Each subject was given two lateral cephalometric radiographics and cephalometric analysis was performed. All data form these analyses was recorded and statistically processed with CYBER computer system. The results were obtained as follows: 1. There was a strong positive correlation between centric occlusion and centric relation in all subjects with Angle's Class I and III malocclusion. 2. In Angle's Class I malocclusion, measurements in lower facial height revealed significant difference between centric occlusion and centric relation (p<0.05). 3.When the mandible was movement was 1.27 mm (0.2-2.8 mm) in Angle's Class I malocclusion, 1.70 mm(0.55-4.15 mm) in Angle's Class III malocclusion, and 1.44 mm (0.2- 4.15 mm) in all subjects.

  13. Immunomodulation of glioma cells after gene therapy: induction of major histocompatibility complex class I but not class II antigen in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, A T; Chi, J H; Hurley, P T; Jeyapalan, S A; Bruce, J N

    2001-09-01

    Acquired immunity has been demonstrated in Fischer rats bearing syngeneic 9L tumors after herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene transfection and ganciclovir treatment. The nature of this immunity in rats and its relevance to the HSV TK/ganciclovir protocol for human subjects remain to be determined. In this study, levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I and II antigen expression were measured before and after HSV TK transfection, in an effort to document immunomodulatory changes caused by gene therapy. Tumor cells from the 9L gliosarcoma cell line, three primary human glioma cultures, and the human glioma cell line U87 MG were transduced with HSV TK vector-containing supernatant from fibroblast-producing cells (titer of 5 x 10(6) colony-forming units/ml) and selected in G418 medium for neomycin resistance. Clones were pooled or individually selected for cell-killing assays with ganciclovir, to confirm TK expression (10(3) cells/well in a 96-well dish). Northern analyses using MHC Class I and Class II complementary deoxyribonucleic acid probes were performed on blots containing total ribonucleic acid from wild-type tumor cells and HSV TK transfectants. A beta-actin complementary deoxyribonucleic acid probe served as an internal control. Cell surface expression was confirmed with flow cytometry. The induction of MHC Class I was tested for cycloheximide and genistein sensitivity. All cell cultures exhibited increases in MHC Class I but not MHC Class II expression, as determined by Northern analysis densitometry and flow cytometry. Cycloheximide treatment did not diminish the up-regulation of MHC Class I after retroviral transfection, implicating a signal transduction pathway that does not require ongoing protein synthesis. Genistein pretreatment of cell cultures did diminish the up-regulation of MHC Class I, implicating a tyrosine kinase in the signaling cascade. Induction of MHC Class I in rat and human glioma cells after HSV TK

  14. Tumor-cytolytic human macrophages cultured as nonadherent cells: potential for the adoptive immunotherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helinski, E H; Hurley, E L; Streck, R J; Bielat, K L; Pauly, J L

    1990-01-01

    Tumor-cytolytic lymphokine (e.g., interleukin-2; IL-2)-activated killer cells are currently being evaluated in IL-2/LAK cell adoptive immunotherapy regimens for the treatment of cancer. Monocyte-derived macrophages (M phi) are also known to be efficient tumor killer cells; accordingly, M phi that have been activated in vitro may also be of therapeutic merit. However, attempts to cultivate M phi for morphological and functional studies have often been compromised because M phi adhere rapidly and tenaciously to cultureware. Studies that we have conducted to address this problem have proven successful in developing procedures for the long-term cultivation of non-adherent immunocompetent M phi in serum-free medium using petri dishes containing a thin Teflon liner. The utility of this technology is documented by the results of studies presented herein in which light and scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze tumor-cytolytic human M phi. In these experiments, we demonstrated that nonadherent immunocompetent human M phi can be prepared for detailed examinations of their pleomorphic membrane architecture. Moreover, nonadherent human M phi could readily be collected for preparing conjugates of M phi and tumor cells. It is anticipated that this technology should prove useful for future structure-function studies defining the topographical location and spatial distribution of antigens and receptors on M phi membrane ultrastructures, particularly the microvilli-like projections that bridge together an immunocompetent effector M phi and target cell (e.g., tumor cells and microbial pathogens) and which provide the physical interaction required for the initial phases of a cellular immune response that includes antigen recognition and cell-to-cell adhesion.

  15. Native IgG2a(b) is barely antigenic to major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted T cells owing to inefficient internalization by professional antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnes, K; Hannestad, K

    2000-04-01

    Peptide epitopes derived from immunoglobulin variable regions represent tumour-specific antigens on B-cell neoplasms and can be recognized by syngeneic, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted T cells. Immunoglobulin peptide/MHC class II complexes may also be involved in autoimmunity and CD4+ T-cell-mediated B-cell regulation. Thus, the IgG2a(b) H-chain allopeptide gamma2a(b) 435-451 presented on I-Ad mimics the epitope implicated in herpes simplex virus-induced autoimmune stromal keratitis and is the target of T helper 1 (Th1) clones that suppress IgG2a(b) production in vivo. We here report that spleen and thymus cells constitutively present the autologous gamma2a(b) epitope to a gamma2a(b) 435-451/I-A(d) reactive T-cell hybridoma as a function of the animal housing conditions (specific pathogen-free or not) and the serum levels of IgG2a(b). Constitutive presentation in the spleen was predominantly performed by dendritic cells. Whereas spleen cells poorly presented native IgG2a(b) to a gamma2a(b) 435-451/I-A(d) reactive T-cell hybridoma, IgG2a(b) in the form of immune complexes were presented > 200-fold more efficiently owing to internalization via low-affinity FcgammaR on macrophages. The antigenicity could also be improved by homotypic aggregation and by targeting IgG2a(b) to complement receptors on the A20 B-cell lymphoma. Mice without detectable IgG2a(b)-containing immune complexes typically exhibited minimal constitutive presentation. Nevertheless, native IgG2a(b) can sensitize antigen-presenting cells in vivo, as mice that were devoid of immune complexes and carried an IgG2a(b)-producing tumour did present constitutively, even at physiological IgG2a(b) serum levels. Whereas the amounts of IgG released from most B-cell lymphomas may be too low to allow spontaneous priming of tumour-specific MHC class II-restricted T cells, administration of tumour immunoglobulin in aggregated form might improve the efficacy of idiotype vaccination.

  16. Glass-ionomer-silver-cermet interim Class I restorations for permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, T P; Killian, C M

    1992-11-01

    Glass-ionomer-silver-cermet cement has proved to be a worthy alternative to silver amalgam for restoring certain Class I lesions in primary teeth. Such restorations are now known to last up to 8 years without need for repair or replacement. Cermet cement has also been used for interim restoration of permanent teeth in special cases, with ideal results. The procedure for placing a glass-ionomer-silver-cermet cement Class I restoration is described.

  17. A SEARCH FOR 95 GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASERS IN MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Cong-Gui; Chen, Xi; Shen, Zhi-Qiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan RD, Shanghai 200030 (China); Xu, Ye; Ju, Bing-Gang, E-mail: cggan@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Radio Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2013-01-20

    We have observed a sample of 288 molecular outflow sources including 123 high-mass and 165 low-mass sources in order to search for class I methanol masers at the 95 GHz transition and to investigate the relationship between outflow characteristics and class I methanol maser emission with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m radio telescope. Our survey detected 62 sources with 95 GHz methanol masers above a 3{sigma} detection limit, which includes 47 high-mass sources and 15 low-mass sources. Therefore, the detection rate is 38% for high-mass outflow sources and 9% for low-mass outflow sources, suggesting that class I methanol masers are relatively easily excited in high-mass sources. There are 37 newly detected 95 GHz methanol masers (including 27 high-mass and 10 low-mass sources), 19 of which are newly identified (i.e., first identification) class I methanol masers (including 13 high-mass and 6 low-mass sources). A statistical analysis of the distributions of maser detections with the outflow parameters reveals that the maser detection efficiency increases with the outflow properties (e.g., mass, momentum, kinetic energy, mechanical luminosity of outflows, etc.). Systematic investigations of the relationships between the intrinsic luminosity of methanol masers and the outflow properties (including mass, momentum, kinetic energy, bolometric luminosity, and mass-loss rate of the central stellar sources) indicate a positive correlation. This further supports the theory that class I methanol masers are collisionally pumped and associated with shocks when outflows interact with the surrounding ambient medium.

  18. Expression of a cucumber class III chitinase and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia class I glucanase genes in transgenic potato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moravcikova, J.; Matusikova, I.; Libantova, J.; Bauer, M.; Mlynarova, L.

    2004-01-01

    The genes encoding for a cucumber class III chitinase and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia class I glucanase were co-introduced into Slovak potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) breeding line 116/86 using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. For both transgenes the number of integrated copies and level of RNA expression

  19. Cancer cells become susceptible to natural killer cell killing after exposure to histone deacetylase inhibitors due to glycogen synthase kinase-3-dependent expression of MHC class I-related chain A and B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Søren; Pedersen, Marianne Terndrup; Andresen, Lars

    2005-01-01

    We show that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors lead to functional expression of MHC class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) on cancer cells, making them potent targets for natural killer (NK) cell-mediated killing through a NK group 2, member D (NKG2D) restricted mechanism. Blocking either...

  20. HLA class I expression and its alteration by preoperative hyperthermo-chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiro Sato

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Enhancing immunologic responses, including human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I expression on tumor cells and recognition and elimination of tumor cells by tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL, is considered a novel concept of radiotherapy. The present study examined patients who underwent preoperative hyperthermo-chemoradiotherapy (HCRT for locally advanced rectal cancer to assess the correlation between HLA class I expression and clinical outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-eight patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma who received preoperative HCRT were enrolled. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range, 33-85 years and 4, 18, and 56 patients had clinical stage I, II and III disease, respectively. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues excised before and after HCRT were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis with an anti-HLA class I-A, B, C antibody. HLA class I expression was graded according to tumor cell positivity. RESULTS: In pre-HCRT, the number of specimens categorized as Grade 0 and 1 were 19 (24% and 58 (74%, respectively. Only 1 patient (1% showed Grade 2 expression. However, 6 (8%, 27 (35%, 7 (9%, and 12 (15% post-HCRT specimens were graded as Grade 0, 1, 2, and 3, respectively. There was a significant increase in HLA class I expression in post-HCRT specimens (p<0.01. However, neither pre- nor post-HCRT HLA class I expression affected overall survival and distant metastasis-free survival in clinical stage III patients. Univariate analysis revealed that Post-HCRT HLA class I expression showed a significant negative relationship with LC (p<0.05. Nevertheless, multivariate analysis showed that there was no correlation between HLA class I expression and clinical outcome. CONCLUSION: HCRT increased HLA class I expression in rectal cancer patients. However, multivariate analysis failed to show any correlation between the level of HLA class I expression and prognosis.

  1. Microleakage of different provisionalization techniques for class I inlays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Erkut

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: The microleakage in class I inlay cavities could be reduced by the application of dentin-bonding agents after cavity preparation followed by the placement of light-polymerized provisional restorative materials.

  2. CD1d-Restricted Type II NKT Cells Reactive With Endogenous Hydrophobic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Yusuke; Masuda, Sakiko; Tomaru, Utano; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2018-01-01

    NKT cells belong to a distinct subset of T cells that recognize hydrophobic antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex class I-like molecules, such as CD1d. Because NKT cells stimulated by antigens can activate or suppress other immunocompetent cells through an immediate production of a large amount of cytokines, they are regarded as immunological modulators. CD1d-restricted NKT cells are classified into two subsets, namely, type I and type II. CD1d-restricted type I NKT cells express invariant T cell receptors (TCRs) and react with lipid antigens, including the marine sponge-derived glycolipid α-galactosylceramide. On the contrary, CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells recognize a wide variety of antigens, including glycolipids, phospholipids, and hydrophobic peptides, by their diverse TCRs. In this review, we focus particularly on CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells that recognize endogenous hydrophobic peptides presented by CD1d. Previous studies have demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type I NKT cells usually act as pro-inflammatory cells but sometimes behave as anti-inflammatory cells. It has been also demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells play opposite roles to CD1d-restricted type I NKT cells; thus, they function as anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory cells depending on the situation. In line with this, CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells that recognize type II collagen peptide have been demonstrated to act as anti-inflammatory cells in diverse inflammation-induction models in mice, whereas pro-inflammatory CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells reactive with sterol carrier protein 2 peptide have been demonstrated to be involved in the development of small vessel vasculitis in rats.

  3. Macrocyclic Peptoid–Peptide Hybrids as Inhibitors of Class I Histone Deacetylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Christian Adam; Montero, Ana; Leman, Luke J.

    2012-01-01

    We report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of the first macrocyclic peptoid-containing histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. The compounds selectively inhibit human class I HDAC isoforms in vitro, with no inhibition of the tubulin deacetylase activity associated with class IIb HDAC...

  4. Class I mhc genes of cichlid fishes: identification, expression, and polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, A; Klein, D; Sültmann, H; Figueroa, F; O'hUigin, C; Klein, J

    1997-01-01

    Cichlid fishes of the East African Rift Valley lakes constitute an important model of adaptive radiation. Explosive speciation in the Great Lakes, in some cases as recently as 12 400 years ago, generated large species flocks that have been the focus of evolutionary studies for some time. The studies have, however, been hampered by the paucity of biochemical markers for phylogenetic reconstruction. Here, we describe a set of markers which should help to alleviate this problem. They are the class I genes of the major histocompatibility complex. We provide evidence for the existence of at least 17 class I loci in cichlid fishes, and for extensive polymorphism of three of these loci. Since the polymorphism has a trans-species character, it will be possible to use it in investigating the founding events of the individual species. The sequences of the cichlid class I fishes support the monophyly of actinopterygian fish on the one hand, and of tetrapods on the other.

  5. Class I structures license renewal industry report; revision 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, D.; Renfro, J.; Statton, J.

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. nuclear power industry, through coordination by the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), and sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has evaluated age-related degradation effects for a number of major plant systems, structures, and components, in the license renewal technical Industry Reports (IRs). License renewal applicants may choose to reference these IRs in support of their plant-specific license renewal applications, as an equivalent to the integrated plant assessment provisions of the license renewal rule (10 CFR Part 54). This IR provides the technical basis for license renewal for U.S. nuclear power plant Class I structures, with the IR evaluating which structures are Class I. Seventeen structures are explicitly described and evaluated in this IR. These structures are not necessarily classified as Class I at all plants, therefore the license renewal applicant should consult this IR for correct identification

  6. Iron-Regulated Phospholipase C Activity Contributes to the Cytolytic Activity and Virulence of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E Fiester

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen that causes a wide range of infections including pneumonia, septicemia, necrotizing fasciitis and severe wound and urinary tract infections. Analysis of A. baumannii representative strains grown in Chelex 100-treated medium for hemolytic activity demonstrated that this pathogen is increasingly hemolytic to sheep, human and horse erythrocytes, which interestingly contain increasing amounts of phosphatidylcholine in their membranes. Bioinformatic, genetic and functional analyses of 19 A. baumannii isolates showed that the genomes of each strain contained two phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC genes, which were named plc1 and plc2. Accordingly, all of these strains were significantly hemolytic to horse erythrocytes and their culture supernatants tested positive for PC-PLC activity. Further analyses showed that the transcriptional expression of plc1 and plc2 and the production of phospholipase and thus hemolytic activity increased when bacteria were cultured under iron-chelation as compared to iron-rich conditions. Testing of the A. baumannii ATCC 19606T plc1::aph-FRT and plc2::aph isogenic insertion derivatives showed that these mutants had a significantly reduced PC-PLC activity as compared to the parental strain, while testing of plc1::ermAM/plc2::aph demonstrated that this double PC-PLC isogenic mutant expressed significantly reduced cytolytic and hemolytic activity. Interestingly, only plc1 was shown to contribute significantly to A. baumannii virulence using the Galleria mellonella infection model. Taken together, our data demonstrate that both PLC1 and PLC2, which have diverged from a common ancestor, play a concerted role in hemolytic and cytolytic activities; although PLC1 seems to play a more critical role in the virulence of A. baumannii when tested in an invertebrate model. These activities would provide access to intracellular iron stores this pathogen

  7. An Evaluation of Mandibular Dental and Basal Arch Dimensions in Class I and Class II Division 1 Adult Syrian Patients using Cone-beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hilal, Layal H; Sultan, Kinda; Hajeer, Mohammad Y; Mahmoud, Ghiath; Wanli, Abdulrahman A

    2018-04-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is (1) to inspect any difference in mandibular arch widths between males and females in class I and class II division 1 (class malocclusions using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), (2) to compare the mandibular dental and basal widths between the two groups, and (3) to investigate any possible correlation between dental and basal arch widths in both groups. Materials and methods: The CBCT images of 68 patients aged between 18 and 25 years consisted of 34 class I (17 males and 17 females) and 34 class (17 males and 17 females) who were recruited at the Department of Orthodontics, University of Damascus Dental School (Syria). Using on-demand three-dimensional (3D) on axial views, facial axis points for dental measurements and basal bone center (BBC) points for basal measurements were identified on lower canines and first molars. Dental and basal intercanine width (ICW) and intermolar width (IMW) were measured. Results: Independent t-test showed a statistically significant difference between males and females in several variables in both groups and a statistically significant difference between class I and class groups in the basal ICW for both genders and in the dental ICW for females only (p class I group, Pearson's correlation coefficients between dental and basal measurements showed a strong correlation in the IMW for both genders (r > 0.73; p class group, a moderate correlation in females' IMW (r = 0.67; p Class I patients had larger ICW than class II-1 patients in all measurements and had narrower IMW than class in most measurements for both genders. There were moderate-to-strong correlations between dental and basal dimensions. BBC points might be landmarks that accurately represent the basal bone arch. Clinical significance: CBCT-based assessments of dental and basal arch dimensions provide a great opportunity to accurately evaluate these aspects, to enhance clinicians' decisions regarding proper tooth movements, and to achieve

  8. Identifying Effective Enzyme Activity Targets for Recombinant Class I and Class II Collagenase for Successful Human Islet Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Balamurugan, Appakalai N.; Green, Michael L.; Breite, Andrew G.; Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Wilhelm, Joshua J.; Tweed, Benjamin; Vargova, Lenka; Lockridge, Amber; Kuriti, Manikya; Hughes, Michael G.; Williams, Stuart K.; Hering, Bernhard J.; Dwulet, Francis E.; McCarthy, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation following a good manufacturing practice-compliant, human islet product requires development of a robust islet isolation procedure where effective limits of key reagents are known. The enzymes used for islet isolation are critical but little is known about the doses of class I and class II collagenase required for successful islet isolation.

  9. Prospects for immunotherapy of MHC class I-deficient tumours

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2003), s. 95-99 ISSN 0015-5500 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : MHC class I * immunotherapy Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 0.527, year: 2003

  10. Characterization of 47 MHC class I sequences in Filipino cynomolgus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kevin J.; Detmer, Ann M.; Karl, Julie A.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Blasky, Alex J.; Hughes, Austin L.; Bimber, Benjamin N.; O’Connor, Shelby L.; O’Connor, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) provide increasingly common models for infectious disease research. Several geographically distinct populations of these macaques from Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius are available for pathogenesis studies. Though host genetics may profoundly impact results of such studies, similarities and differences between populations are often overlooked. In this study we identified 47 full-length MHC class I nucleotide sequences in 16 cynomolgus macaques of Filipino origin. The majority of MHC class I sequences characterized (39 of 47) were unique to this regional population. However, we discovered eight sequences with perfect identity and six sequences with close similarity to previously defined MHC class I sequences from other macaque populations. We identified two ancestral MHC haplotypes that appear to be shared between Filipino and Mauritian cynomolgus macaques, notably a Mafa-B haplotype that has previously been shown to protect Mauritian cynomolgus macaques against challenge with a simian/human immunodeficiency virus, SHIV89.6P. We also identified a Filipino cynomolgus macaque MHC class I sequence for which the predicted protein sequence differs from Mamu-B*17 by a single amino acid. This is important because Mamu-B*17 is strongly associated with protection against simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) challenge in Indian rhesus macaques. These findings have implications for the evolutionary history of Filipino cynomolgus macaques as well as for the use of this model in SIV/SHIV research protocols. PMID:19107381

  11. DNA synapsis through transient tetramerization triggers cleavage by Ecl18kI restriction enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaremba, M.; Lyubchenko, Y.L.; Laurens, N.; van den Broek, B.; Wuite, G.J.L.; Siksnys, V.

    2010-01-01

    To cut DNA at their target sites, restriction enzymes assemble into different oligomeric structures. The Ecl18kI endonuclease in the crystal is arranged as a tetramer made of two dimers each bound to a DNA copy. However, free in solution Ecl18kI is a dimer. To find out whether the Ecl18kI dimer or

  12. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A E; Skov, Svend; Bregenholt, S

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...... and functioning, MHC-I molecules might be of importance for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis not only within the immune system, but also in the interplay between the immune system and other organ systems....

  13. Self-esteem in adolescents with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion in a Peruvian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florián-Vargas, Karla; Honores, Marcos J Carruitero; Bernabé, Eduardo; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    To compare self-esteem scores in 12 to 16-year-old adolescents with different Angle malocclusion types in a Peruvian sample. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 276 adolescents (159, 52 and 65 with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusions, respectively) from Trujillo, Peru. Participants were asked to complete the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and were also clinically examined, so as to have Angle malocclusion classification determined. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare RSES scores among adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions, with participants' demographic factors being controlled. Mean RSES scores for adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions were 20.47 ± 3.96, 21.96 ± 3.27 and 21.26 ± 4.81, respectively. The ANCOVA test showed that adolescents with Class II malocclusion had a significantly higher RSES score than those with Class I malocclusion, but there were no differences between other malocclusion groups. Supplemental analysis suggested that only those with Class II, Division 2 malocclusion might have greater self-esteem when compared to adolescents with Class I malocclusion. This study shows that, in general, self-esteem did not vary according to adolescents' malocclusion in the sample studied. Surprisingly, only adolescents with Class II malocclusion, particularly Class II, Division 2, reported better self-esteem than those with Class I malocclusion. A more detailed analysis assessing the impact of anterior occlusal features should be conducted.

  14. The role of class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) on gluconeogenesis in liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oiso, Hiroshi [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Furukawa, Noboru, E-mail: n-furu@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Suefuji, Mihoshi; Shimoda, Seiya [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Ito, Akihiro; Furumai, Ryohei [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Saitama (Japan); Nakagawa, Junichi [Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Bio-Industry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, Hokkaido (Japan); Yoshida, Minoru [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Saitama (Japan); Nishino, Norikazu [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu (Japan); Araki, Eiichi [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} A novel class I HDAC inhibitor decreased hepatic PEPCK mRNA and gluconeogenesis. {yields} Inhibition of HDAC decreased PEPCK by reducing HNF4{alpha} expression and FoxO1 activity. {yields} siRNA knockdown of HDAC1 in HepG2 cells reduced the expression of PEPCK and HNF4{alpha}. {yields} Inhibition of class I HDAC improves glucose homeostasis in HFD mice. -- Abstract: Hepatic gluconeogenesis is crucial for glucose homeostasis. Although sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) is implicated in the regulation of gluconeogenesis in the liver, the effects of other histone deacetylases (HDAC) on gluconeogenesis are unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the role of class I HDACs in hepatic gluconeogenesis. In HepG2 cells and the liver of mice, the expressions of phosphoenol pyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) were significantly decreased by treatment with a newly designed class I HDAC inhibitor, Ky-2. SiRNA knockdown of HDAC1 expression, but not of HDAC2 or HDAC3, in HepG2 cells decreased PEPCK and HNF4{alpha} expression. In HepG2 cells, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and forkhead box O 1 (FoxO1) was increased by Ky-2. Pyruvate tolerance tests in Ky-2-treated high-fat-diet (HFD)-fed mice showed a marked reduction in blood glucose compared with vehicle-treated HFD mice. These data suggest that class I HDACs increase HNF4{alpha} protein expression and the transcriptional activity of FoxO1, followed by the induction of PEPCK mRNA expression and gluconeogenesis in liver.

  15. The role of class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) on gluconeogenesis in liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oiso, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Noboru; Suefuji, Mihoshi; Shimoda, Seiya; Ito, Akihiro; Furumai, Ryohei; Nakagawa, Junichi; Yoshida, Minoru; Nishino, Norikazu; Araki, Eiichi

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → A novel class I HDAC inhibitor decreased hepatic PEPCK mRNA and gluconeogenesis. → Inhibition of HDAC decreased PEPCK by reducing HNF4α expression and FoxO1 activity. → siRNA knockdown of HDAC1 in HepG2 cells reduced the expression of PEPCK and HNF4α. → Inhibition of class I HDAC improves glucose homeostasis in HFD mice. -- Abstract: Hepatic gluconeogenesis is crucial for glucose homeostasis. Although sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) is implicated in the regulation of gluconeogenesis in the liver, the effects of other histone deacetylases (HDAC) on gluconeogenesis are unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the role of class I HDACs in hepatic gluconeogenesis. In HepG2 cells and the liver of mice, the expressions of phosphoenol pyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) were significantly decreased by treatment with a newly designed class I HDAC inhibitor, Ky-2. SiRNA knockdown of HDAC1 expression, but not of HDAC2 or HDAC3, in HepG2 cells decreased PEPCK and HNF4α expression. In HepG2 cells, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and forkhead box O 1 (FoxO1) was increased by Ky-2. Pyruvate tolerance tests in Ky-2-treated high-fat-diet (HFD)-fed mice showed a marked reduction in blood glucose compared with vehicle-treated HFD mice. These data suggest that class I HDACs increase HNF4α protein expression and the transcriptional activity of FoxO1, followed by the induction of PEPCK mRNA expression and gluconeogenesis in liver.

  16. Classes of modules

    CERN Document Server

    Dauns, John

    2006-01-01

    Because traditional ring theory places restrictive hypotheses on all submodules of a module, its results apply only to small classes of already well understood examples. Often, modules with infinite Goldie dimension have finite-type dimension, making them amenable to use with type dimension, but not Goldie dimension. By working with natural classes and type submodules (TS), Classes of Modules develops the foundations and tools for the next generation of ring and module theory. It shows how to achieve positive results by placing restrictive hypotheses on a small subset of the complement submodules, Furthermore, it explains the existence of various direct sum decompositions merely as special cases of type direct sum decompositions. Carefully developing the foundations of the subject, the authors begin by providing background on the terminology and introducing the different module classes. The modules classes consist of torsion, torsion-free, s[M], natural, and prenatural. They expand the discussion by exploring...

  17. HLA Class I Binding 9mer Peptides from Influenza A Virus Induce CD4(+) T Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M. J.; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Nielsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    of the pan-specific anti-HLA class II (HLA-II) antibody IVA12. Blocking of HLA-II subtype reactivity revealed that 8 and 6 peptide responses were blocked by anti-HLA-DR and -DP antibodies, respectively. Peptide reactivity of PBMC depleted of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells prior to the ELISPOT culture revealed...... that effectors are either CD4(+) (the majority of reactivities) or CD8(+) T cells, never a mixture of these subsets. Three of the peptides, recognized by CD4(+) T cells showed binding to recombinant DRA1*0101/DRB1*0401 or DRA1*0101/DRB5*0101 molecules in a recently developed biochemical assay. Conclusions....../Significance: HLA-I binding 9mer influenza virus-derived peptides induce in many cases CD4(+) T cell responses restricted by HLA-II molecules....

  18. ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE Class I Genes Promote Root Hair Development in the Grass Brachypodium distachyon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul Min Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Genes encoding ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE (RSL class I basic helix loop helix proteins are expressed in future root hair cells of the Arabidopsis thaliana root meristem where they positively regulate root hair cell development. Here we show that there are three RSL class I protein coding genes in the Brachypodium distachyon genome, BdRSL1, BdRSL2 and BdRSL3, and each is expressed in developing root hair cells after the asymmetric cell division that forms root hair cells and hairless epidermal cells. Expression of BdRSL class I genes is sufficient for root hair cell development: ectopic overexpression of any of the three RSL class I genes induces the development of root hairs in every cell of the root epidermis. Expression of BdRSL class I genes in root hairless Arabidopsis thaliana root hair defective 6 (Atrhd6 Atrsl1 double mutants, devoid of RSL class I function, restores root hair development indicating that the function of these proteins has been conserved. However, neither AtRSL nor BdRSL class I genes is sufficient for root hair development in A. thaliana. These data demonstrate that the spatial pattern of class I RSL activity can account for the pattern of root hair cell differentiation in B. distachyon. However, the spatial pattern of class I RSL activity cannot account for the spatial pattern of root hair cells in A. thaliana. Taken together these data indicate that that the functions of RSL class I proteins have been conserved among most angiosperms-monocots and eudicots-despite the dramatically different patterns of root hair cell development.

  19. <i>Toxoplasma gondiii> peptide ligands open the gate of the HLA class I binding groove

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Trolle, Thomas; Sansom, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I presentation of pathogen-derived peptide ligands is essential for CD8+ T cell recognition of Toxoplasma gondii infected cells. Currently, little data exist pertaining to peptides that are presented after T. gondii infection. Herein we purify HLA-A*02:01 complexes from T. gondii infect...

  20. Discovery of novel MHC-class I alleles and haplotypes in Filipino cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) by pyrosequencing and Sanger sequencing: Mafa-class I polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Takashi; Yamada, Yukiho; Aarnink, Alice; Suzuki, Shingo; Masuya, Anri; Ito, Sayaka; Ido, Daisuke; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Iwatani, Chizuru; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Ishigaki, Hirohito; Itoh, Yasushi; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Kulski, Jerzy K; Blancher, Antoine

    2015-10-01

    Although the low polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) transplantation genes in the Filipino cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) is expected to have important implications in the selection and breeding of animals for medical research, detailed polymorphism information is still lacking for many of the duplicated class I genes. To better elucidate the degree and types of MHC polymorphisms and haplotypes in the Filipino macaque population, we genotyped 127 unrelated animals by the Sanger sequencing method and high-resolution pyrosequencing and identified 112 different alleles, 28 at cynomolgus macaque MHC (Mafa)-A, 54 at Mafa-B, 12 at Mafa-I, 11 at Mafa-E, and seven at Mafa-F alleles, of which 56 were newly described. Of them, the newly discovered Mafa-A8*01:01 lineage allele had low nucleotide similarities (Filipino macaque population would identify these and other high-frequency Mafa-class I haplotypes that could be used as MHC control animals for the benefit of biomedical research.

  1. Self-esteem in adolescents with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion in a Peruvian sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Florián-Vargas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare self-esteem scores in 12 to 16-year-old adolescents with different Angle malocclusion types in a Peruvian sample. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 276 adolescents (159, 52 and 65 with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusions, respectively from Trujillo, Peru. Participants were asked to complete the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES and were also clinically examined, so as to have Angle malocclusion classification determined. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA was used to compare RSES scores among adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions, with participants' demographic factors being controlled. Results: Mean RSES scores for adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions were 20.47 ± 3.96, 21.96 ± 3.27 and 21.26 ± 4.81, respectively. The ANCOVA test showed that adolescents with Class II malocclusion had a significantly higher RSES score than those with Class I malocclusion, but there were no differences between other malocclusion groups. Supplemental analysis suggested that only those with Class II, Division 2 malocclusion might have greater self-esteem when compared to adolescents with Class I malocclusion. Conclusion: This study shows that, in general, self-esteem did not vary according to adolescents' malocclusion in the sample studied. Surprisingly, only adolescents with Class II malocclusion, particularly Class II, Division 2, reported better self-esteem than those with Class I malocclusion. A more detailed analysis assessing the impact of anterior occlusal features should be conducted.

  2. The Cancer Exome Generated by Alternative mRNA Splicing Dilutes Predicted HLA Class I Epitope Density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stranzl, Thomas; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Lund, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that cancers actively regulate alternative splicing. Altered splicing mechanisms in cancer lead to cancer-specific transcripts different from the pool of transcripts occurring only in healthy tissue. At the same time, altered presentation of HLA class I epitopes...... is frequently observed in various types of cancer. Down-regulation of genes related to HLA class I antigen processing has been observed in several cancer types, leading to fewer HLA class I antigens on the cell surface. Here, we use a peptidome wide analysis of predicted alternative splice forms, based...... on a publicly available database, to show that peptides over-represented in cancer splice variants comprise significantly fewer predicted HLA class I epitopes compared to peptides from normal transcripts. Peptides over-represented in cancer transcripts are in the case of the three most common HLA class I...

  3. Angle Class I malocclusion with anterior negative overjet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Ávila de Souza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This clinical case report describes the orthodontic treatment of an 8-year and 9-month old female patient with Angle Class I malocclusion, anterior crossbite and canine Class III relationship. Orthodontic treatment was carried out in two stages. The first one was orthopedic, while the second one included the use of a fixed appliance and the need for space gain for reshaping of maxillary lateral incisors. The two-stage treatment combined with multidisciplinary Restorative Cosmetic Dentistry allowed excellent esthetic and functional outcomes to be achieved. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO.

  4. Identification of naturally processed hepatitis C virus-derived major histocompatibility complex class I ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benno Wölk

    Full Text Available Fine mapping of human cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses against hepatitis C virus (HCV is based on external loading of target cells with synthetic peptides which are either derived from prediction algorithms or from overlapping peptide libraries. These strategies do not address putative host and viral mechanisms which may alter processing as well as presentation of CTL epitopes. Therefore, the aim of this proof-of-concept study was to identify naturally processed HCV-derived major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I ligands. To this end, continuous human cell lines were engineered to inducibly express HCV proteins and to constitutively express high levels of functional HLA-A2. These cell lines were recognized in an HLA-A2-restricted manner by HCV-specific CTLs. Ligands eluted from HLA-A2 molecules isolated from large-scale cultures of these cell lines were separated by high performance liquid chromatography and further analyzed by electrospray ionization quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (MS/tandem MS. These analyses allowed the identification of two HLA-A2-restricted epitopes derived from HCV nonstructural proteins (NS 3 and 5B (NS3₁₄₀₆₋₁₄₁₅ and NS5B₂₅₉₄₋₂₆₀₂. In conclusion, we describe a general strategy that may be useful to investigate HCV pathogenesis and may contribute to the development of preventive and therapeutic vaccines in the future.

  5. Backbone Brackets and Arginine Tweezers delineate Class I and Class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, V. Joachim; Schroeder, Michael; Labudde, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    The origin of the machinery that realizes protein biosynthesis in all organisms is still unclear. One key component of this machinery are aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRS), which ligate tRNAs to amino acids while consuming ATP. Sequence analyses revealed that these enzymes can be divided into two complementary classes. Both classes differ significantly on a sequence and structural level, feature different reaction mechanisms, and occur in diverse oligomerization states. The one unifying aspect of both classes is their function of binding ATP. We identified Backbone Brackets and Arginine Tweezers as most compact ATP binding motifs characteristic for each Class. Geometric analysis shows a structural rearrangement of the Backbone Brackets upon ATP binding, indicating a general mechanism of all Class I structures. Regarding the origin of aaRS, the Rodin-Ohno hypothesis states that the peculiar nature of the two aaRS classes is the result of their primordial forms, called Protozymes, being encoded on opposite strands of the same gene. Backbone Brackets and Arginine Tweezers were traced back to the proposed Protozymes and their more efficient successors, the Urzymes. Both structural motifs can be observed as pairs of residues in contemporary structures and it seems that the time of their addition, indicated by their placement in the ancient aaRS, coincides with the evolutionary trace of Proto- and Urzymes. PMID:29659563

  6. Tumour MHC class I downregulation and immunotherapy (Review)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 6 (2003), s. 2005-2008 ISSN 1021-335X R&D Projects: GA MZd NC7148; GA ČR GA301/01/0985; GA AV ČR IAA5052203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : tumour vaccines * MHC class I downregulation Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 1.256, year: 2003

  7. Tailoring of EIA-649-1: Definition of Major (Class I) Engineering Change Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-15

    MISSILE SYSTEMS CENTER TAILORING TAILORING OF EIA -649-1: DEFINITION OF MAJOR (CLASS I) ENGINEERING CHANGE PROPOSAL APPROVED FOR...PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION IS UNLIMITED 1 Tailoring of EIA -649-1: Definition of Major (Class I) ECP. 1. Intent of this Tailoring Document...This tailoring document remedies a requirements gap in the industry consensus standard, EIA -649-1: 2015. Specifically, this tailoring provides a

  8. MHC class I+ and class I(-)HPV16-associated tumours expressing the E7 oncoprotein do not cross-react in immunization/challenge experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šímová, Jana; Mikyšková, Romana; Vonka, V.; Bieblová, Jana; Bubeník, Jan; Jandlová, Táňa

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 2003, č. 49 (2003), s. 230-234 ISSN 0015-5500 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : HPV 16 * MHC class I expression * tumour vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.527, year: 2003

  9. A gut-homing, oligoclonal CD4+ T cell population in severe-combined immunodeficient mice expressing a rearranged, transgenic class I-restricted alpha beta T cell receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, J; Rudolphi, A; Spiess, S

    1995-01-01

    We studied the peripheral T cell compartment of H-2b severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice that express a transgenic (tg) alpha beta T cell receptor (TcR) specific for the H-Y (male) epitope presented by the H-2 class I Db molecule. Large populations of CD3+ NK1.1-TCR beta T+ T cells were...

  10. Immunotherapy of MHC class I-deficient tumors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reiniš, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 10 (2010), s. 1577-1589 ISSN 1479-6694 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/07/1410; GA ČR GAP301/10/2174; GA AV ČR IAA500520807; GA AV ČR IAA500520605 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 18933 - CLINIGENE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : tumor vaccine * MHC class I expression * antigen presenting machinery Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.455, year: 2010

  11. Designing the Sniper: Improving Targeted Human Cytolytic Fusion Proteins for Anti-Cancer Therapy via Molecular Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bochicchio

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Targeted human cytolytic fusion proteins (hCFPs are humanized immunotoxins for selective treatment of different diseases including cancer. They are composed of a ligand specifically binding to target cells genetically linked to a human apoptosis-inducing enzyme. hCFPs target cancer cells via an antibody or derivative (scFv specifically binding to e.g., tumor associated antigens (TAAs. After internalization and translocation of the enzyme from endocytosed endosomes, the human enzymes introduced into the cytosol are efficiently inducing apoptosis. Under in vivo conditions such enzymes are subject to tight regulation by native inhibitors in order to prevent inappropriate induction of cell death in healthy cells. Tumor cells are known to upregulate these inhibitors as a survival mechanism resulting in escape of malignant cells from elimination by immune effector cells. Cytosolic inhibitors of Granzyme B and Angiogenin (Serpin P9 and RNH1, respectively, reduce the efficacy of hCFPs with these enzymes as effector domains, requiring detrimentally high doses in order to saturate inhibitor binding and rescue cytolytic activity. Variants of Granzyme B and Angiogenin might feature reduced affinity for their respective inhibitors, while retaining or even enhancing their catalytic activity. A powerful tool to design hCFPs mutants with improved potency is given by in silico methods. These include molecular dynamics (MD simulations and enhanced sampling methods (ESM. MD and ESM allow predicting the enzyme-protein inhibitor binding stability and the associated conformational changes, provided that structural information is available. Such “high-resolution” detailed description enables the elucidation of interaction domains and the identification of sites where particular point mutations may modify those interactions. This review discusses recent advances in the use of MD and ESM for hCFP development from the viewpoints of scientists involved in both fields.

  12. Early Intervention in Skeletal Class II and dental Class II division I malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Iqbal Bhat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A Class II malocclusion may occur as a result of mandibular deficiency, maxillary excess, or a combination of both. However, the most common finding is mandibular skeletal retrusion. The use of functional jaw orthopedics, at the right time during growth, can ultimately result in malocclusion patients achieving an excellent functional occlusion, a broad beautiful smile, a full face with a beautiful jaw line, and profile. Functional jaw orthopedic (FJO appliances are designed to encourage adaptive skeletal growth by maintaining the mandible in a corrected forward position. The activator developed by Andresen is one of the most widely used for this purpose. A 12-year-old boy with skeletal Class II malocclusion and dental Class II div I malocclusion, a low mandibular plane angle was treated with growth modulation using an activator followed by molar distalization using fixed orthodontics for detailing of the occlusion. The major effects of the activator treatment in this case have been due to increase in condylar growth and also an increase in mandibular base length. Further, non-extraction fixed orthodontic treatment for proper interdigitation of the dentition also helped to maintain the stability of the satisfactory results achieved.

  13. Cyclophilin C Participates in the US2-Mediated Degradation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Daniel C; Stocki, Pawel; Williams, David B

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus uses a variety of mechanisms to evade immune recognition through major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. One mechanism mediated by the immunoevasin protein US2 causes rapid disposal of newly synthesized class I molecules by the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway. Although several components of this degradation pathway have been identified, there are still questions concerning how US2 targets class I molecules for degradation. In this study we identify cyclophilin C, a peptidyl prolyl isomerase of the endoplasmic reticulum, as a component of US2-mediated immune evasion. Cyclophilin C could be co-isolated with US2 and with the class I molecule HLA-A2. Furthermore, it was required at a particular expression level since depletion or overexpression of cyclophilin C impaired the degradation of class I molecules. To better characterize the involvement of cyclophilin C in class I degradation, we used LC-MS/MS to detect US2-interacting proteins that were influenced by cyclophilin C expression levels. We identified malectin, PDIA6, and TMEM33 as proteins that increased in association with US2 upon cyclophilin C knockdown. In subsequent validation all were shown to play a functional role in US2 degradation of class I molecules. This was specific to US2 rather than general ER-associated degradation since depletion of these proteins did not impede the degradation of a misfolded substrate, the null Hong Kong variant of α1-antitrypsin.

  14. High efficiency class-I audio power amplifier using a single adaptive supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Zhenfei; Yang Shanshand; Feng Yong; Hong Zhiliang; Liu Yang

    2012-01-01

    A high efficiency class-I linear audio power amplifier (PA) with an adaptive supply is presented. Its efficiency is improved by a dynamic supply to reduce the power transistors' voltage drop. A gain compression technique is adopted to make the amplifier accommodate a single positive supply. Circuit complicity and chip area are reduced because no charge pump is necessary for the negative supply. A common shared mode voltage and a symmetric layout pattern are used to minimize the non-linearity. A peak efficiency of 80% is reached at peak output power. The measured THD+N before and after the supply switching point are 0.01% and 0.05%, respectively. The maximum output power is 410 mW for an 8 Ω speaker load. Unlike switching amplifiers, the class-I amplifier operates as a linear amplifier and hence has a low EMI. The advantage of a high efficiency and low EMI makes the class-I amplifier suitable for portable and RF sensitive applications. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  15. Peptide-binding motifs of two common equine class I MHC molecules in Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Tobias; Lindvall, Mikaela; Moore, Erin; Moore, Eugene; Sidney, John; Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Myers, Paisley T; Malaker, Stacy A; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Peters, Bjoern; Hunt, Donald F; Antczak, Douglas F; Sette, Alessandro

    2017-05-01

    Quantitative peptide-binding motifs of MHC class I alleles provide a valuable tool to efficiently identify putative T cell epitopes. Detailed information on equine MHC class I alleles is still very limited, and to date, only a single equine MHC class I allele, Eqca-1*00101 (ELA-A3 haplotype), has been characterized. The present study extends the number of characterized ELA class I specificities in two additional haplotypes found commonly in the Thoroughbred breed. Accordingly, we here report quantitative binding motifs for the ELA-A2 allele Eqca-16*00101 and the ELA-A9 allele Eqca-1*00201. Utilizing analyses of endogenously bound and eluted ligands and the screening of positional scanning combinatorial libraries, detailed and quantitative peptide-binding motifs were derived for both alleles. Eqca-16*00101 preferentially binds peptides with aliphatic/hydrophobic residues in position 2 and at the C-terminus, and Eqca-1*00201 has a preference for peptides with arginine in position 2 and hydrophobic/aliphatic residues at the C-terminus. Interestingly, the Eqca-16*00101 motif resembles that of the human HLA A02-supertype, while the Eqca-1*00201 motif resembles that of the HLA B27-supertype and two macaque class I alleles. It is expected that the identified motifs will facilitate the selection of candidate epitopes for the study of immune responses in horses.

  16. Template-directed addition of nucleosides to DNA by the BfiI restriction enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Connolly, Bernard A.; Halford, Stephen E.; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2008-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases catalyse DNA cleavage at specific sites. The BfiI endonuclease cuts DNA to give staggered ends with 1-nt 3′-extensions. We show here that BfiI can also fill in the staggered ends: while cleaving DNA, it can add a 2′-deoxynucleoside to the reaction product to yield directly a blunt-ended DNA. We propose that nucleoside incorporation proceeds through a two-step reaction, in which BfiI first cleaves the DNA to make a covalent enzyme–DNA intermediate and then resolves it...

  17. Estudo cefalométrico comparativo dos espaços naso e bucofaríngeo nas más oclusões Classe I e Classe II, Divisão 1, sem tratamento ortodôntico, com diferentes padrões de crescimento A Comparative cephalometric study of the naso and oropharyngeal space in malocclusions Class I and Class II Division 1, without orthodontic treatment with different growth patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadyr M. Penteado Virmond Alcazar

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available A finalidade deste estudo foi comparar os espaços aéreos naso e bucofaríngeo em indivíduos com má oclusão Classe I e Classe II, divisão 1, segundo Angle, do gênero masculino e feminino, com idade média de 11 anos e 6 meses, com padrão de crescimento normal e vertical, não tratados ortodonticamente. A amostra desse estudo foi dividida em dois grupos: 40 pacientes apresentando Classe I e 40 pacientes com Classe II, divisão 1, cada grupo subdividido de acordo com o padrão de crescimento facial: normal e vertical. Os espaços aéreos naso e bucofaríngeo foram avaliados segundo a análise de McNamara Jr., pelas medidas NFa-NFp e BFa-BFp. A análise dos resultados obtidos revelou que, a medida do espaço bucofaríngeo para Classe I com padrão de crescimento vertical e para o espaço nasofaríngeo para Classe II com padrão normal de crescimento apresentaram-se semelhantes à medida padrão da amostra de McNamara Jr.. As outras medidas apresentaram-se estatisticamente menores. Na comparação entre os grupos, o espaço nasofaríngeo no grupo Classe I com padrão de crescimento vertical, apresentou-se menor do que nos grupos Classe I e grupo Classe II divisão 1, ambos com padrão de crescimento normal. O espaço bucofaríngeo não sofreu alteração significante de um grupo para outro. Em relação à hipertrofia da tonsila faringeana, apenas o grupo Classe I com padrão de crescimento vertical apresentou obstrução; para hipertrofia das tonsilas palatinas, apenas o grupo Classe I com padrão de crescimento vertical e Classe II com padrão de crescimento normal apresentou hipertrofia das tonsilas palatinas.The aim of this study is to compare the naso and oropharyngeal air space in people with malocclusion class I and class II division 1, according to Angle, with mean age from 8 to 15 years old with normal and vertical growth pattern not treated orthodontically. This study was divided into two groups: 40 patients with class I, and 40

  18. Major histocompatibility complex class II compatibility, but not class I, predicts mate choice in a bird with highly developed olfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandh, Maria; Westerdahl, Helena; Pontarp, Mikael; Canbäck, Björn; Dubois, Marie-Pierre; Miquel, Christian; Taberlet, Pierre; Bonadonna, Francesco

    2012-11-07

    Mate choice for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) compatibility has been found in several taxa, although rarely in birds. MHC is a crucial component in adaptive immunity and by choosing an MHC-dissimilar partner, heterozygosity and potentially broad pathogen resistance is maximized in the offspring. The MHC genotype influences odour cues and preferences in mammals and fish and hence olfactory-based mate choice can occur. We tested whether blue petrels, Halobaena caerulea, choose partners based on MHC compatibility. This bird is long-lived, monogamous and can discriminate between individual odours using olfaction, which makes it exceptionally well suited for this analysis. We screened MHC class I and II B alleles in blue petrels using 454-pyrosequencing and quantified the phylogenetic, functional and allele-sharing similarity between individuals. Partners were functionally more dissimilar at the MHC class II B loci than expected from random mating (p = 0.033), whereas there was no such difference at the MHC class I loci. Phylogenetic and non-sequence-based MHC allele-sharing measures detected no MHC dissimilarity between partners for either MHC class I or II B. Our study provides evidence of mate choice for MHC compatibility in a bird with a high dependency on odour cues, suggesting that MHC odour-mediated mate choice occurs in birds.

  19. LINEAR POLARIZATION OF CLASS I METHANOL MASERS IN MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ji-hyun; Byun, Do-Young; Kim, Kee-Tae; Kim, Jongsoo; Lyo, A-Ran; Vlemmings, W. H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Class I methanol masers are found to be good tracers of the interaction between outflows from massive young stellar objects with their surrounding media. Although polarization observations of Class II methanol masers have been able to provide information about magnetic fields close to the central (proto)stars, polarization observations of Class I methanol masers are rare, especially at 44 and 95 GHz. We present the results of linear polarization observations of 39 Class I methanol maser sources at 44 and 95 GHz. These two lines are observed simultaneously with one of the 21 m Korean VLBI Network telescopes in single-dish mode. Approximately 60% of the observed sources have fractional polarizations of a few percent in at least one transition. This is the first reported detection of linear polarization of the 44 GHz methanol maser. The two maser transitions show similar polarization properties, indicating that they trace similar magnetic environments, although the fraction of the linear polarization is slightly higher at 95 GHz. We discuss the association between the directions of polarization angles and outflows. We also discuss some targets having different polarization properties at both lines, including DR21(OH) and G82.58+0.20, which show the 90° polarization angle flip at 44 GHz.

  20. Generation in vivo of peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells and presence of regulatory T cells during vaccination with hTERT (class I and II peptide-pulsed DCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satthaporn Sukchai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal techniques for DC generation for immunotherapy in cancer are yet to be established. Study aims were to evaluate: (i DC activation/maturation milieu (TNF-α +/- IFN-α and its effects on CD8+ hTERT-specific T cell responses to class I epitopes (p540 or p865, (ii CD8+ hTERT-specific T cell responses elicited by vaccination with class I alone or both class I and II epitope (p766 and p672-pulsed DCs, prepared without IFN-α, (iii association between circulating T regulatory cells (Tregs and clinical responses. Methods Autologous DCs were generated from 10 patients (HLA-0201 with advanced cancer by culturing CD14+ blood monocytes in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 supplemented with TNF-α [DCT] or TNF-α and IFN-α [DCTI]. The capacity of the DCs to induce functional CD8+ T cell responses to hTERT HLA-0201 restricted nonapeptides was assessed by MHC tetramer binding and peptide-specific cytotoxicity. Each DC preparation (DCT or DCTI was pulsed with only one type of hTERT peptide (p540 or p865 and both preparations were injected into separate lymph node draining regions every 2–3 weeks. This vaccination design enabled comparison of efficacy between DCT and DCTI in generating hTERT peptide specific CD8+ T cells and comparison of class I hTERT peptide (p540 or p865-loaded DCT with or without class II cognate help (p766 and p672 in 6 patients. T regulatory cells were evaluated in 8 patients. Results (i DCTIs and DCTs, pulsed with hTERT peptides, were comparable (p = 0.45, t-test in inducing peptide-specific CD8+ T cell responses. (ii Class II cognate help, significantly enhanced (p (iii Clinical responders had significantly lower (p Conclusion Addition of IFN-α to ex vivo monocyte-derived DCs, did not significantly enhance peptide-specific T cell responses in vivo, compared with TNF-α alone. Class II cognate help significantly augments peptide-specific T cell responses. Clinically favourable responses were seen in patients

  1. Alteration of Sequence Specificity of the Type IIS Restriction Endonuclease BtsI

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Shengxi; Blanchard, Aine; Zhang, Penghua; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2010-01-01

    The Type IIS restriction endonuclease BtsI recognizes and digests at GCAGTG(2/0). It comprises two subunits: BtsIA and BtsIB. The BtsIB subunit contains the recognition domain, one catalytic domain for bottom strand nicking and part of the catalytic domain for the top strand nicking. BtsIA has the rest of the catalytic domain that is responsible for the DNA top strand nicking. BtsIA alone has no activity unless it mixes with BtsIB to reconstitute the BtsI activity. During characterization of ...

  2. Evaluation depth of the curve of Spee in class I, class II, and class III malocclusion: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjna Nayar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Occlusal plane is an essential consideration when multiple long-span posterior restorations are designed. When restorations are added to an existing tooth arrangement characterized by rotated, tipped, or extruded teeth, excursive interferences may be incorporated, resulting in detrimental squeal. The curve of Spee, which exists in the ideal natural dentition, allows harmony to exist between the anterior tooth and condylar guidance. This curve exists in the sagittal plane and is the best viewed from a lateral aspect. It permits total posterior disclusion on mandibular protrusion, given proper anterior tooth guidance. It is unclear that whether the curve of Spee is a description of the occlusal surface of each arch separately or in maximal intercuspation. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in the depth of curve of Spee between the class I, class II, class III and to investigate the relationship of depth of curve of Spee with over jet, over-bite.

  3. An Approach for a Synthetic CTL Vaccine Design against Zika Flavivirus Using Class I and Class II Epitopes Identified by Computer Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edecio Cunha-Neto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The threat posed by severe congenital abnormalities related to Zika virus (ZKV infection during pregnancy has turned development of a ZKV vaccine into an emergency. Recent work suggests that the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response to infection is an important defense mechanism in response to ZKV. Here, we develop the rationale and strategy for a new approach to developing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL vaccines for ZKV flavivirus infection. The proposed approach is based on recent studies using a protein structure computer model for HIV epitope selection designed to select epitopes for CTL attack optimized for viruses that exhibit antigenic drift. Because naturally processed and presented human ZKV T cell epitopes have not yet been described, we identified predicted class I peptide sequences on ZKV matching previously identified DNV (Dengue class I epitopes and by using a Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC binding prediction tool. A subset of those met the criteria for optimal CD8+ attack based on physical chemistry parameters determined by analysis of the ZKV protein structure encoded in open source Protein Data File (PDB format files. We also identified candidate ZKV epitopes predicted to bind promiscuously to multiple HLA class II molecules that could provide help to the CTL responses. This work suggests that a CTL vaccine for ZKV may be possible even if ZKV exhibits significant antigenic drift. We have previously described a microsphere-based CTL vaccine platform capable of eliciting an immune response for class I epitopes in mice and are currently working toward in vivo testing of class I and class II epitope delivery directed against ZKV epitopes using the same microsphere-based vaccine.

  4. Emerging ST121/agr4 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA with strong adhesin and cytolytic activities: trigger for MRSA pneumonia and fatal aspiration pneumonia in an influenza-infected elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.-W. Wan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA pneumonia in influenza-infected elderly individuals has not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, a 92-year-old man infected with influenza developed CA-MRSA pneumonia. His CA-MRSA was an emerging type, originated in ST121/agr4 S. aureus, with diversities of Panton–Valentine leucocidin (PVL−/spat5110/SCCmecV+ versus PVL+/spat159(etc./SCCmec−, but with common virulence potentials of strong adhesin and cytolytic activities. Resistance to erythromycin/clindamycin (inducible-type and gentamicin was detected. Pneumonia improved with the administration of levofloxacin, but with the subsequent development of fatal aspiration pneumonia. Hence, characteristic CA-MRSA with strong adhesin and cytolytic activities triggered influenza-related sequential complications.

  5. Distinct mechanisms of loss of IFN-gamma mediated HLA class I inducibility in two melanoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez, Teresa; Méndez, Rosa; Del Campo, Ana; Jiménez, Pilar; Aptsiauri, Natalia; Garrido, Federico; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    The inability of cancer cells to present antigen on the cell surface via MHC class I molecules is one of the mechanisms by which tumor cells evade anti-tumor immunity. Alterations of Jak-STAT components of interferon (IFN)-mediated signaling can contribute to the mechanism of cell resistance to IFN, leading to lack of MHC class I inducibility. Hence, the identification of IFN-γ-resistant tumors may have prognostic and/or therapeutic relevance. In the present study, we investigated a mechanism of MHC class I inducibility in response to IFN-γ treatment in human melanoma cell lines. Basal and IFN-induced expression of HLA class I antigens was analyzed by means of indirect immunofluorescence flow cytometry, Western Blot, RT-PCR, and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (TaqMan ® Gene Expression Assays). In demethylation studies cells were cultured with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) was used to assay whether IRF-1 promoter binding activity is induced in IFN-γ-treated cells. Altered IFN-γ mediated HLA-class I induction was observed in two melanoma cells lines (ESTDAB-004 and ESTDAB-159) out of 57 studied, while treatment of these two cell lines with IFN-α led to normal induction of HLA class I antigen expression. Examination of STAT-1 in ESTDAB-004 after IFN-γ treatment demonstrated that the STAT-1 protein was expressed but not phosphorylated. Interestingly, IFN-α treatment induced normal STAT-1 phosphorylation and HLA class I expression. In contrast, the absence of response to IFN-γ in ESTDAB-159 was found to be associated with alterations in downstream components of the IFN-γ signaling pathway. We observed two distinct mechanisms of loss of IFN-γ inducibility of HLA class I antigens in two melanoma cell lines. Our findings suggest that loss of HLA class I induction in ESTDAB-004 cells results from a defect in the earliest steps of the IFN-γ signaling pathway due to absence of STAT-1 tyrosine-phosphorylation, while absence

  6. Effect of monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to class I and class II HLA antigens on lectin- and MoAb OKT3-induced lymphocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Y; Zicht, R; Ferrone, S; Bonnard, G D; Herberman, R B

    1985-04-01

    We have examined the effect of several monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to monomorphic determinants of class II HLA antigens, and MoAb to monomorphic determinants of class I HLA antigens and to beta-2-microglobulin (beta 2-mu) on lectin- and MoAb OKT3-induced proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) and cultured T cells (CTC). Some, but not all, anti-class II HLA MoAb inhibited the proliferative response of PBMNC to MoAb OKT3 and pokeweed mitogen (PWM). The degree of inhibitory effect varied considerably. This effect was not limited to anti-class II HLA MoAb since anti-class I HLA MoAb and anti-beta 2-mu MoAb also inhibited MoAb OKT3- or PWM-induced proliferative responses. In contrast, the response of PBMNC to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) was not blocked by any anti-class II HLA MoAb. However, some anti-class II HLA MoAb also inhibited the proliferative response of CTC plus allogeneic peripheral blood adherent accessory cells (AC) to PHA or Con A as well as to MoAb OKT3 or PWM. This may be attributable to the substantially greater class II HLA antigen expression by CTC than by fresh lymphocytes. Pretreatment of either CTC or AC with anti-class II HLA MoAb inhibited OKT3-induced proliferation. In contrast, pretreatment of CTC, but not AC, with anti-class I HLA MoAb inhibited the proliferative response of CTC to OKT3. Pretreatment of CTC with anti-class I HLA MoAb inhibited PHA-, Con A and PWM-induced proliferation, to a greater degree than the anti-class II HLA MoAb. It appears as if lymphocyte activation by different mitogens exhibits variable requirements for the presence of cells expressing major histocompatibility determinants. Binding of Ab to membrane markers may interfere with lymphocyte-AC cooperation, perhaps by inhibiting binding of mitogens to their receptors or by interfering with lymphocyte and AC function. We also have examined the role of class II HLA antigens on CTC by depleting class II HLA-positive cells

  7. Collapse of Cytolytic Potential in SIV-Specific CD8+ T Cells Following Acute SIV Infection in Rhesus Macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily R Roberts

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Poor maintenance of cytotoxic factor expression among HIV-specific CD8+ T cells, in part caused by dysregulated expression of the transcription factor T-bet, is associated with HIV disease progression. However, the precise evolution and context in which CD8+ T cell cytotoxic functions become dysregulated in HIV infection remain unclear. Using the rhesus macaque (RM SIV infection model, we evaluated the kinetics of SIV-specific CD8+ T cell cytolytic factor expression in peripheral blood, lymph node, spleen, and gut mucosa from early acute infection through chronic infection. We identified rapid acquisition of perforin and granzyme B expression in SIV-specific CD8+ T cells in blood, secondary lymphoid tissues and gut mucosa that collapsed rapidly during the transition to chronic infection. The evolution of this expression profile was linked to low expression of T-bet and occurred independent of epitope specificity, viral escape patterns and tissue origin. Importantly, during acute infection SIV-specific CD8+ T cells that maintained T-bet expression retained the ability to express granzyme B after stimulation, but this relationship was lost in chronic infection. Together, these data demonstrate the loss of cytolytic machinery in SIV-specific CD8+ T cells in blood and at tissue sites of viral reservoir and active replication during the transition from acute to chronic infection. This phenomenon occurs despite persistent high levels of viremia suggesting that an inability to maintain properly regulated cytotoxic T cell responses in all tissue sites enables HIV/SIV to avoid immune clearance, establish persistent viral reservoirs in lymphoid tissues and gut mucosa, and lead ultimately to immunopathogenesis and death.

  8. Evaluation of cervical posture of children in skeletal class I, II, and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Attilio, Michele; Caputi, Sergio; Epifania, Ettore; Festa, Felice; Tecco, Simona

    2005-07-01

    Previous studies on the relationship between morphological structure of the face and cervical posture have predominantly focused on vertical dimensions of the face. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there are significant differences in cervical posture in subjects with a different sagittal morphology of the face, i.e., a different skeletal class. One hundred twenty (120) children (60 males and 60 females, average age 9.5 yrs., SD+/-0.5) were admitted for orthodontic treatment. Selection criteria was: European ethnic origin, date of birth, considerable skeletal growth potential remaining and an absence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD). Lateral skull radiographs were taken in mirror position. Subjects were divided into three groups based on their skeletal class. The cephalometric tracings included postural variables. The most interesting findings were: 1. children in skeletal class III showed a significantly lower cervical lordosis angle (phead upon the spinal column compared to children in skeletal class I and skeletal class III (pposture of the neck seems to be strongly associated with the sagittal as well as the vertical structure of the face.

  9. Forming a complex with MHC class I molecules interferes with mouse CD1d functional expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renukaradhya J Gourapura

    Full Text Available CD1d molecules are structurally similar to MHC class I, but present lipid antigens as opposed to peptides. Here, we show that MHC class I molecules physically associate with (and regulate the functional expression of mouse CD1d on the surface of cells. Low pH (3.0 acid stripping of MHC class I molecules resulted in increased surface expression of murine CD1d on antigen presenting cells as well as augmented CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells. Consistent with the above results, TAP1-/- mice were found to have a higher percentage of type I NKT cells as compared to wild type mice. Moreover, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells from TAP1-/- mice showed increased antigen presentation by CD1d compared to wild type mice. Together, these results suggest that MHC class I molecules can regulate NKT cell function, in part, by masking CD1d.

  10. Long-term skeletal effects of high-pull headgear followed by fixed appliances for the treatment of Class II malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbo, E Erin; Marshall, Steven D; Southard, Karin A; Allareddy, Verrasathpurush; Holton, Nathan; Thames, Allyn M; Otsby, Marlene S; Southard, Thomas E

    2018-04-18

    The long-term skeletal effects of Class II treatment in growing individuals using high-pull facebow headgear and fixed edgewise appliances have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term skeletal effects of treatment using high-pull headgear followed by fixed orthodontic appliances compared to an untreated control group. Changes in anteroposterior and vertical cephalometric measurements of 42 Class II subjects (n = 21, mean age = 10.7 years) before treatment, after headgear correction to Class I molar relationship, after treatment with fixed appliances, and after long-term retention (mean 4.1 years), were compared to similar changes in a matched control group (n = 21, mean age = 10.9 years) by multivariable linear regression models. Compared to control, the study group displayed significant long-term horizontal restriction of A-point (SNA = -1.925°, P appliances resulted in correction to Class I molar through restriction of horizontal maxillary growth with continued horizontal mandibular growth and vertical skeletal changes unaffected. The anteroposterior molar correction and skeletal effects of this treatment were stable long term.

  11. Multiple major histocompatibility complex class I genes in Asian anurans: Ontogeny and phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didinger, Chelsea; Eimes, John A; Lillie, Mette; Waldman, Bruce

    2017-05-01

    Amphibians, as the first terrestrial vertebrates, offer a window into early major histocompatibility complex (MHC) evolution. We characterized the MHC class I of two Korean amphibians, the Asiatic toad (Bufo gargarizans) and the Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica). We found at least four transcribed MHC class I (MHC I) loci, the highest number confirmed in any anuran to date. Furthermore, we identified MHC I transcripts in terrestrial adults, and possibly in aquatic larvae, of both species. We conducted a phylogenetic analysis based on MHC I sequence data and found that B. gargarizans and H. japonica cluster together in the superfamily Nobleobatrachia. We further identified three supertypes shared by the two species. Our results reveal substantial variation in the number of MHC I loci in anurans and suggest that certain supertypes have particular physiochemical properties that may confer pathogen resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Oligoclonal band phenotypes in MS differ in their HLA class II association, while specific KIR ligands at HLA class I show association to MS in general

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsen, Marte W; Viken, Marte K; Celius, Elisabeth G

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have been reported to have different HLA class II allele profiles depending on oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the cerebrospinal fluid, but HLA class I alleles and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligands have not been studied. We investigated the associ......Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have been reported to have different HLA class II allele profiles depending on oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the cerebrospinal fluid, but HLA class I alleles and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligands have not been studied. We investigated...

  13. Machine learning competition in immunology – Prediction of HLA class I binding peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guang Lan; Ansari, Hifzur Rahman; Bradley, Phil

    2011-01-01

    of peptide binding, therefore, determines the accuracy of the overall method. Computational predictions of peptide binding to HLA, both class I and class II, use a variety of algorithms ranging from binding motifs to advanced machine learning techniques ( [Brusic et al., 2004] and [Lafuente and Reche, 2009...

  14. Immunization with MHC class I-negative but not -positive HPV16-associated tumour cells inhibits growth of MHC class I-negative tumours

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reiniš, Milan; Šímová, Jana; Indrová, Marie; Bieblová, Jana; Přibylová, Hana; Moravcová, Simona; Jandlová, Táňa; Bubeník, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 4 (2007), s. 1011-1017 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR7807 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 18933 - CLINIGENE Grant - others:Liga proti rakovině, Praha(CZ) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HPV16 * MHC class I-deficient tumours * immunologic crossreaction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.295, year: 2007

  15. Applications of Functional Amyloids from Fungi: Surface Modification by Class I Hydrophobins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Piscitelli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Class I hydrophobins produced from fungi are amongst the first proteins recognized as functional amyloids. They are amphiphilic proteins involved in the formation of aerial structures such as spores or fruiting bodies. They form chemically robust layers which can only be dissolved in strong acids. These layers adhere to different surfaces, changing their wettability, and allow the binding of other proteins. Herein, the modification of diverse types of surfaces with Class I hydrophobins is reported, highlighting the applications of the coated surfaces. Indeed, these coatings can be exploited in several fields, spanning from biomedical to industrial applications, which include biosensing and textile manufacturing.

  16. Treatment of PCR products with exonuclease I and heat-labile alkaline phosphatase improves the visibility of combined bisulfite restriction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kousuke; Emoto, Noriko; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Kawakami, Masanori; Kage, Hidenori; Nagase, Takahide; Ohishi, Nobuya; Takai, Daiya

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Incubating PCR products at a high temperature causes smears in gel electrophoresis. → Smears interfere with the interpretation of methylation analysis using COBRA. → Treatment with exonuclease I and heat-labile alkaline phosphatase eliminates smears. → The elimination of smears improves the visibility of COBRA. -- Abstract: DNA methylation plays a vital role in the regulation of gene expression. Abnormal promoter hypermethylation is an important mechanism of inactivating tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA) is a widely used method for identifying the DNA methylation of specific CpG sites. Here, we report that exonuclease I and heat-labile alkaline phosphatase can be used for PCR purification for COBRA, improving the visibility of gel electrophoresis after restriction digestion. This improvement is observed when restriction digestion is performed at a high temperature, such as 60 o C or 65 o C, with BstUI and TaqI, respectively. This simple method can be applied instead of DNA purification using spin columns or phenol/chloroform extraction. It can also be applied to other situations when PCR products are digested by thermophile-derived restriction enzymes, such as PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis.

  17. Inhibition of MHC class I is a virulence factor in herpes simplex virus infection of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T Orr

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV has a number of genes devoted to immune evasion. One such gene, ICP47, binds to the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP 1/2 thereby preventing transport of viral peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum, loading of peptides onto nascent major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I molecules, and presentation of peptides to CD8 T cells. However, ICP47 binds poorly to murine TAP1/2 and so inhibits antigen presentation by MHC class I in mice much less efficiently than in humans, limiting the utility of murine models to address the importance of MHC class I inhibition in HSV immunopathogenesis. To address this limitation, we generated recombinant HSVs that efficiently inhibit antigen presentation by murine MHC class I. These recombinant viruses prevented cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing of infected cells in vitro, replicated to higher titers in the central nervous system, and induced paralysis more frequently than control HSV. This increase in virulence was due to inhibition of antigen presentation to CD8 T cells, since these differences were not evident in MHC class I-deficient mice or in mice in which CD8 T cells were depleted. Inhibition of MHC class I by the recombinant viruses did not impair the induction of the HSV-specific CD8 T-cell response, indicating that cross-presentation is the principal mechanism by which HSV-specific CD8 T cells are induced. This inhibition in turn facilitates greater viral entry, replication, and/or survival in the central nervous system, leading to an increased incidence of paralysis.

  18. Cloning and analysis of the genes encoding the type IIS restriction-modification system HphI from Haemophilus parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubys, A; Lubienè, J; Kulakauskas, S; Stankevicius, K; Timinskas, A; Janulaitis, A

    1996-07-15

    The genomic region encoding the type IIS restriction-modification (R-M) system HphI (enzymes recognizing the asymmetric sequence 5'-GGTGA-3'/5'-TCACC-3') from Haemophilus parahaemolyticus were cloned into Escherichia coli and sequenced. Sequence analysis of the R-M HphI system revealed three adjacent genes aligned in the same orientation: a cytosine 5 methyltransferase (gene hphIMC), an adenine N6 methyltransferase (hphIMA) and the HphI restriction endonuclease (gene hphIR). Either methyltransferase is capable of protecting plasmid DNA in vivo against the action of the cognate restriction endonuclease. hphIMA methylation renders plasmid DNA resistant to R.Hindill at overlapping sites, suggesting that the adenine methyltransferase modifies the 3'-terminal A residue on the GGTGA strand. Strong homology was found between the N-terminal part of the m6A methyltransferasease and an unidentified reading frame interrupted by an incomplete gaIE gene of Neisseria meningitidis. The HphI R-M genes are flanked by a copy of a 56 bp direct nucleotide repeat on each side. Similar sequences have also been identified in the non-coding regions of H.influenzae Rd DNA. Possible involvement of the repeat sequences in the mobility of the HphI R-M system is discussed.

  19. A dichotomy for upper domination in monogenic classes

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2014-01-01

    An upper dominating set in a graph is a minimal (with respect to set inclusion) dominating set of maximum cardinality. The problem of finding an upper dominating set is NP-hard for general graphs and in many restricted graph families. In the present paper, we study the computational complexity of this problem in monogenic classes of graphs (i.e. classes defined by a single forbidden induced subgraph) and show that the problem admits a dichotomy in this family. In particular, we prove that if the only forbidden induced subgraph is a P4 or a 2K2 (or any induced subgraph of these graphs), then the problem can be solved in polynomial time. Otherwise, it is NP-hard.

  20. Articulación de fones en individuos clase esqueletal I,II y III Speech patterns in skeletal class I, II and III subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pía Villanueva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: determinar los patrones de articulación de fones consonánticos en sujetos de habla española chilena clases I, II y III esqueletal; comparar las diferencias fonéticas que existan entre clases esqueletales. MÉTODOS: se seleccionaron 54 individuos que cumplían con los criterios de inclusión determinados mediante un examen clínico intraoral y a través del análisis de Ricketts, y se conformaron los grupos de estudio de pacientes clases esqueletales I, II y III. Se les realizó un examen fonoarticulatorio estandarizado para determinar los fones modificados y el patrón articulatorio compensatorio realizado. RESULTADOS: se observaron cambios en el punto de articulación de fones consonánticos en las tres clases esqueletales, con diferencias significativas en los grupos de fones anteriores y medios entre pacientes clases I y II, sólo en el grupo de los fones anteriores entre pacientes I y III. Entre pacientes clases II y III no se observaron diferencias significativas. Se reportan modificaciones y compensaciones cualitativamente distintas entre las clases esqueletales. CONCLUSIONES: en relación a pacientes clase I, los pacientes clase II o III, presentan distinto grado de modificación en el punto de articulación de fones consonánticos. Las diferencias observadas se relacionan con los patrones esqueletales propios de cada clase.PURPOSE: to determine the consonant phonemes articulation patterns in Chilean skeletal class I, II and III Spanish speakers and compare their phonetic differences. METHODS: fifty-four skeletal class I, II and III subjects were selected, based on intraoral clinical examination and Ricketts cephalometric analysis, constituting the study groups. A standardized phonoarticulatory test was applied to each patient to determine the modified phonemes and their compensatory patterns. RESULTS: the findings indicate changes in articulation in all three groups. Significant differences were found in anterior and medium

  1. [Evaluation of accuracy of virtual occlusal definition in Angle class I molar relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L; Liu, X J; Li, Z L; Wang, X

    2018-02-18

    To evaluate the accuracy of virtual occlusal definition in non-Angle class I molar relationship, and to evaluate the clinical feasibility. Twenty pairs of models of orthognathic patients were included in this study. The inclusion criteria were: (1) finished with pre-surgical orthodontic treatment and (2) stable final occlusion. The exclusion criteria were: (1) existence of distorted teeth, (2) needs for segmentation, (3) defect of dentition except for orthodontic extraction ones, and (4) existence of tooth space. The tooth-extracted test group included 10 models with two premolars extracted during preoperative orthodontic treatment. Their molar relationships were not Angle class I relationship. The non-tooth-extracted test group included another 10 models without teeth extracted, therefore their molar relationships were Angle class I. To define the final occlusion in virtual environment, two steps were included: (1) The morphology data of upper and lower dentition were digitalized by surface scanner (Smart Optics/Activity 102; Model-Tray GmbH, Hamburg, Germany); (2) the virtual relationships were defined using 3Shape software. The control standard of final occlusion was manually defined using gypsum models and then digitalized by surface scanner. The final occlusion of test group and control standard were overlapped according to lower dentition morphology. Errors were evaluated by calculating the distance between the corresponding reference points of testing group and control standard locations. The overall errors for upper dentition between test group and control standard location were (0.51±0.18) mm in non-tooth-extracted test group and (0.60±0.36) mm in tooth-extracted test group. The errors were significantly different between these two test groups (P0.05); and the accuracy of non-tooth-extracted group was significantly smaller than 1 mm (Pdefinition of none class I molar relationship is higher than that of class I relationship, with an accuracy of 1 mm

  2. Reduced insulin-like growth factor-I serum levels in formerly obese women subjected to laparoscopic-adjustable gastric banding or diet-induced long-term caloric restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterberger, Maria C; Mattesich, Monika; Klaver, Elise; Piza-Katzer, Hildegunde; Zwerschke, Werner

    2011-11-01

    Life-span extension in laboratory rodents induced by long-term caloric restriction correlates with decreased serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels. Reduced activity of the growth hormone/IGF-I signaling system slows aging and increases longevity in mutant mouse models. In the present study, we show that long-term caloric restriction achieved by two different interventions for 4 years, either laparoscopic-adjustable gastric banding or reducing diet, leads to reduced IGF-I serum levels in formerly obese women relative to normal-weight women eating ad libitum. Moreover, we present evidence that the long-term caloric restriction interventions reduce fasting growth hormone serum levels. The present study indicates that the activity of the growth hormone/IGF-I axis is reduced in long-term calorically restricted formerly obese humans. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the duration and severity of the caloric restriction intervention are important for the outcome on the growth hormone/IGF-I axis in humans.

  3. Clinical Significance and Characteristic Clinical Differences of Cytolytic Vaginosis in Recurrent Vulvovaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuhua; Zhang, Yuexiang; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jianhong; Chen, Shuqin; Li, Shuxia

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate whether cytolytic vaginosis (CV) has important clinical implications for recurrent vulvovaginitis and to identify clinical differences between CV and vulvovaginal candidosis (VVC). Medical histories, physical examinations and laboratory findings were used to diagnose and assess the prevalence rates of various vulvovaginal infections among 536 women with recurrent vulvovaginitis. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to compare age, menstrual cycle phase at episode onset, symptoms/signs of infection and discharge characteristics between CV and VVC with single infection. Among the 484 women with a single-infection recurrent vulvovaginitis, the prevalence of CV (n = 143; 26.7%) was second only to VVC (n = 196; 36.6%). CV symptoms occurred predominantly during the ovulatory and luteal phases. Meanwhile, VVC episodes were not concentrated premenstrually, but rather occurred throughout the menstrual cycle. Significant differences were found in the vaginal pH, discharge characteristics and frequency of inflammatory symptoms between the 2 groups. CV is clinically important, because it is a common cause of recurrent vulvovaginitis. To distinguish CV from VVC, gynecologists should consider the patient's medical history, physical and laboratory findings, vaginal pH and vaginal discharge characteristics. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Sequence-Based Genotyping of Expressed Swine Leukocyte Antigen Class I Alleles by Next-Generation Sequencing Reveal Novel Swine Leukocyte Antigen Class I Haplotypes and Alleles in Belgian, Danish, and Kenyan Fattening Pigs and Göttingen Minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Maria Rathmann; Ilsøe, Mette; Strube, Mikael Lenz

    2017-01-01

    for the prediction of epitope binding in pigs. The low number of known SLA class I alleles and the limited knowledge of their prevalence in different pig breeds emphasizes the need for efficient SLA typing methods. This study utilizes an SLA class I-typing method based on next-generation sequencing of barcoded PCR...

  5. Molecular characterization of classical and nonclassical MHC class I genes from the golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Q-Q; Zhong, G-H; He, K; Sun, D-D; Wan, Q-H

    2016-02-01

    Classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I allelic polymorphism is essential for competent antigen presentation. To improve the genotyping efforts in the golden pheasant, it is necessary to differentiate more accurately between classical and nonclassical class I molecules. In our study, all MHC class I genes were isolated from one golden pheasant based on two overlapping PCR amplifications. In total, six full-length class I nucleotide sequences (A-F) were identified, and four were novel. Two (A and C) belonged to the IA1 gene, two (B and D) were alleles derived from the IA2 gene through transgene amplification, and two (E and F) comprised a third novel locus, IA3 that was excluded from the core region of the golden pheasant MHC-B. IA1 and IA2 exhibited the broad expression profiles characteristic of classical loci, while IA3 showed no expression in multiple tissues and was therefore defined as a nonclassical gene. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the three IA genes in the golden pheasant share a much closer evolutionary relationship than the corresponding sequences in other galliform species. This observation was consistent with high sequence similarity among them, which likely arises from the homogenizing effect of recombination. Our careful distinction between the classical and nonclassical MHC class I genes in the golden pheasant lays the foundation for developing locus-specific genotyping and establishing a good molecular marker system of classical MHC I loci. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Infectious mononucleosis-linked HLA class I single nucleotide polymorphism is associated with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Naghmeh; Broer, Linda; Hoppenbrouwers, Ilse A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2010-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a presumed autoimmune disease associated with genetic and environmental risk factors such as infectious mononucleosis. Recent research has shown infectious mononucleosis to be associated with a specific HLA class I polymorphism. Our aim was to test if the infectious mononucleosis-linked HLA class I single nucleotide polymorphism (rs6457110) is also associated with multiple sclerosis. Genotyping of the HLA-A single nucleotide polymorphism rs6457110 using TaqMan was performed in 591 multiple sclerosis cases and 600 controls. The association of multiple sclerosis with the HLA-A single nucleotide polymorphism was tested using logistic regression adjusted for age, sex and HLA-DRB1*1501. HLA-A minor allele (A) is associated with multiple sclerosis (OR = 0.68; p = 4.08 × 10( -5)). After stratification for HLA-DRB1*1501 risk allele (T) carrier we showed a significant OR of 0.70 (p = 0.003) for HLA-A. HLA class I single nucleotide polymorphism rs6457110 is associated with infectious mononucleosis and multiple sclerosis, independent of the major class II allele, supporting the hypothesis that shared genetics may contribute to the association between infectious mononucleosis and multiple sclerosis.

  7. Constitutive MHC class I molecules negatively regulate TLR-triggered inflammatory responses via the Fps-SHP-2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sheng; Liu, Xingguang; Bao, Yan; Zhu, Xuhui; Han, Chaofeng; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Xuemin; Li, Weihua; Cao, Xuetao

    2012-04-22

    The molecular mechanisms that fine-tune Toll-like receptor (TLR)-triggered innate inflammatory responses remain to be fully elucidated. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules can mediate reverse signaling and have nonclassical functions. Here we found that constitutively expressed membrane MHC class I molecules attenuated TLR-triggered innate inflammatory responses via reverse signaling, which protected mice from sepsis. The intracellular domain of MHC class I molecules was phosphorylated by the kinase Src after TLR activation, then the tyrosine kinase Fps was recruited via its Src homology 2 domain to phosphorylated MHC class I molecules. This led to enhanced Fps activity and recruitment of the phosphatase SHP-2, which interfered with TLR signaling mediated by the signaling molecule TRAF6. Thus, constitutive MHC class I molecules engage in crosstalk with TLR signaling via the Fps-SHP-2 pathway and control TLR-triggered innate inflammatory responses.

  8. CXA La Paloma, LLC: UIC Class I Permit No.CA10710001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents related to La Paloma Generating Company, LLC's (LPGC) application for a UIC permit renewal (of permit #CA199000001) to operate a Class I injection well facility to dispose of non-hazardous wastewater from the La Paloma Generating Plant.

  9. Diagnostic value of MHC class I staining in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, J. van der; Hengstman, G.J.D.; Laak, H.J. ter; Borm, G.F.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of mononuclear cellular infiltrates in skeletal muscle tissue is the histological cornerstone of the diagnosis of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM). However, these infiltrates are not always present. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether MHC class I antigen expression on

  10. On Dimension Theory for a Certain Class of Simple AH Algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Toan M.

    2010-06-01

    A class of unital diagonal AH algebras will be studied in this paper. The density property of the set of all elements which are nilpotent up to (left and right multiple) unitaries is presented. As a consequence, these algebras have stable rank one. Section 3 also shows that an algebra in this class has the property LP (i.e., the linear span of projections is dense) provided a certain condition. Finally, restricting our attention to a special subclass which includes Villadsen algebras of the first type, we give the necessary and sufficient condition of real rank zero. (author)

  11. Pst I restriction fragment length polymorphism of the human placental alkaline phosphatase gene in normal placentae and tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsavaler, L.; Penhallow, R.C.; Kam, W.; Sussman, H.H.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the human placental alkaline phosphatase gene from normal term placentae was studied by restriction enzyme digestion and Southern blot analysis using a cDNA probe to the gene for the placental enzyme. The DNA digests fall into three distinct patterns based on the presence and intensity of an extra 1.1-kilobase Pst I Band. The extra 1.1-kilobase band is present in 9 of 27 placenta samples, and in 1 of these samples the extra band is present at double intensity. No polymorphism was revealed by digestion with restriction enzymes EcoRI, Sma I, BamHI, or Sac I. The extra Pst I-digestion site may lie in a noncoding region of the gene because no correlation was observed between the restriction fragment length polymorphism and the common placental alkaline phosphatase alleles identified by starch gel electrophoresis. In addition, because placental alkaline phosphatase is frequently re-expressed in neoplasms, the authors examined tissue from ovarian, testicular, and endometrial tumors and from BeWo choriocarcinoma cells in culture. The Pst I-DNA digestion patterns from these cells and tissues were identical to those seen in the normal ovary and term placentae. The consistent reproducible digestion patterns seen in DNA from normal and tumor tissue indicate that a major gene rearrangement is not the basis for the ectopic expression of placental alkaline phosphatase in neoplasia

  12. Evidence from Animal Models: Is a Restricted or Conventional Intestinal Microbiota Composition Predisposing to Risk for High-LET Radiation Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Irene; Schiestl, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal microbiota affect cell responses to ionizing radiation at the molecular level and can be linked to the development of the immune system, controlled cell death or apoptosis. We have developed a microbiota mouse model and report here that high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induced the repair of chromosomal DNA lesions more efficiently in conventional than in restricted intestinal microbiota mice. Based on different phylotype densities after whole-body irradiation, bacterial indicator phylotypes were found to be more abundant in restricted in microbiota than in conventional microbiota. Genotoxic phenotypes of irradiated restricted and conventional microbiota mice were compared with ataxia telangiectasia-deficient restricted and conventional microbiota mice, respectively. Those indicator phylotypes, including Bacteroides (Gram-negative bacterium cTPY-13), Barnesiella intestinihominis and others, which were identified in nonirradiated restricted microbiota mice, increase in radiation-exposed conventional microbiota along with a reduction of persistent DNA double-strand breaks in blood lymphocytes. The dynamic change of phylotype abundances elucidated a feedback mechanism and effect of intestinal microbiota composition on the adaptive response to high-LET radiation. Several other bacterial phylotypes ( Helicobacter hepaticus , Helicobacter spp and others) were found to be more abundant in conventional than restricted microbiota. In this commentary, mouse models used in cancer research and radiotherapy for the study on the effects of intestinal microbiota composition on normal tissue radiation response are characterized and discussed. Highlights of this commentary: 1. Restricted microbiota phylotypes were correlated with persistent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and were found to orchestrate onco-protective controlled cell death after radiation; 2. Restricted microbiota composition reduced proinflammatory extracellular-stimulated immune responses, but

  13. Class I HDAC inhibition is a novel pathway for regulating astrocytic apoE secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresselhaus, Erica; Duerr, James M; Vincent, Fabien; Sylvain, Emily K; Beyna, Mercedes; Lanyon, Lorraine F; LaChapelle, Erik; Pettersson, Martin; Bales, Kelly R; Ramaswamy, Gayathri

    2018-01-01

    Despite the important role of apolipoprotein E (apoE) secretion from astrocytes in brain lipid metabolism and the strong association of apoE4, one of the human apoE isoforms, with sporadic and late onset forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) little is known about the regulation of astrocytic apoE. Utilizing annotated chemical libraries and a phenotypic screening strategy that measured apoE secretion from a human astrocytoma cell line, inhibition of pan class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) was identified as a mechanism to increase apoE secretion. Knocking down select HDAC family members alone or in combination revealed that inhibition of the class I HDAC family was responsible for enhancing apoE secretion. Knocking down LXRα and LXRβ genes revealed that the increase in astrocytic apoE in response to HDAC inhibition occurred via an LXR-independent pathway. Collectively, these data suggest that pan class I HDAC inhibition is a novel pathway for regulating astrocytic apoE secretion.

  14. MHC polymorphism and disease resistance in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar); facing pathogens with single expressed major histocompatibility class I and class II loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimholt, U.; Larsen, S.; Nordmo, R.; Midtlyng, P.; Kjoeglum, S.; Storset, A.; Saebo, S.; Stet, R.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Few studies have yet addressed the functional aspects of MHC molecules in fish. To lay the foundation for this, we evaluated the association between disease resistance and MHC class I and class II polymorphism in Atlantic salmon. Standardized disease challenge trials were performed on a semi-wild

  15. Novel HLA Class I Alleles Associated with Indian Leprosy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Shankarkumar

    2003-01-01

    A*0101, Cw*04011, and Cw*0602 leprosy patients was observed when compared to the controls. Further haplotype A*1102-B*4006-Cw*1502 was significantly increased among the lepromatous leprosy patients when compared to the controls. It seems that HLA class I alleles play vital roles in disease association/pathogenesis with leprosy among Indians.

  16. Lower incisor dentoalveolar compensation and symphysis dimensions among Class I and III malocclusion patients with different facial vertical skeletal patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Berlanga, Núria; Llopis-Perez, Jaume; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Puigdollers, Andreu

    2013-11-01

    To compare lower incisor dentoalveolar compensation and mandible symphysis morphology among Class I and Class III malocclusion patients with different facial vertical skeletal patterns. Lower incisor extrusion and inclination, as well as buccal (LA) and lingual (LP) cortex depth, and mandibular symphysis height (LH) were measured in 107 lateral cephalometric x-rays of adult patients without prior orthodontic treatment. In addition, malocclusion type (Class I or III) and facial vertical skeletal pattern were considered. Through a principal component analysis (PCA) related variables were reduced. Simple regression equation and multivariate analyses of variance were also used. Incisor mandibular plane angle (P Class I P  =  .03 and Class III P  =  .01) and a positive correlation with LH (Class I P  =  .01 and Class III P  =  .02) in both groups. Within the Class III group, there was a negative correlation between the mandibular plane and LP (P  =  .02). PCA showed that the tendency toward a long face causes the symphysis to elongate and narrow. In Class III, alveolar narrowing is also found in normal faces. Vertical facial pattern is a significant factor in mandibular symphysis alveolar morphology and lower incisor positioning, both for Class I and Class III patients. Short-faced Class III patients have a widened alveolar bone. However, for long-faced and normal-faced Class III, natural compensation elongates the symphysis and influences lower incisor position.

  17. The optimization of peptide cargo bound to MHC class I molecules by the peptide-loading complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Tim; Williams, Anthony

    2005-10-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I complexes present peptides from both self and foreign intracellular proteins on the surface of most nucleated cells. The assembled heterotrimeric complexes consist of a polymorphic glycosylated heavy chain, non-polymorphic beta(2) microglobulin, and a peptide of typically nine amino acids in length. Assembly of the class I complexes occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum and is assisted by a number of chaperone molecules. A multimolecular unit termed the peptide-loading complex (PLC) is integral to this process. The PLC contains a peptide transporter (transporter associated with antigen processing), a thiooxido-reductase (ERp57), a glycoprotein chaperone (calreticulin), and tapasin, a class I-specific chaperone. We suggest that class I assembly involves a process of optimization where the peptide cargo of the complex is edited by the PLC. Furthermore, this selective peptide loading is biased toward peptides that have a longer off-rate from the assembled complex. We suggest that tapasin is the key chaperone that directs this action of the PLC with secondary contributions from calreticulin and possibly ERp57. We provide a framework model for how this may operate at the molecular level and draw parallels with the proposed mechanism of action of human leukocyte antigen-DM for MHC class II complex optimization.

  18. Meat quality of castrated and non-castrated Santa Ines lambs subjected to food restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayanne Lima de Sousa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the quality of meat of castrated and non-castrated Santa Ines lambs submitted to food restriction. Were used 30 lambs, 15 castrated and 15 non-castrated, about two months of age and average initial body weight of 13.00 ± 1.49 kg. The lambs were distributed in a completely randomized design in a factorial arrangement 3 x 2 (restriction level x sex class, according to the amount of food provided. The duration of the experiment was determined by the time required for the animals in the one of the groups achieved 28 kg of body weight. There was interaction between food restriction levels and sex class to the variables intensity of yellow color and pH in the longissimus lumborum muscle and the shear force in the semimembranosus muscle. In non-castrated animals, the intensity of yellow color was higher in the longissimus lumborum muscle at the level of 30% of food restriction. There was no significant interaction between food restriction levels and sex class for the quality aspects related to color saturation, color tone, luminosity, red intensity, water holding capacity and cooking losses in longissimus lumborum and semimembranosus muscles. Although food restriction and sex class have influenced the variables related to the quality of meat of the animals evaluated, the mean values are considered acceptable by the literature. The feeding restriction levels and sex class influence some important features of quality of Santa Ines lamb meat.

  19. HLA-DPB1 and HLA class I confer risk of and protection from narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, Hanna M; Ravel, Jean-Marie; Han, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, a disorder caused by a lack of hypocretin (orexin), is so strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II HLA-DQA1(∗)01:02-DQB1(∗)06:02 (DQ0602) that very few non-DQ0602 cases have been reported. A known triggering factor for narcolepsy is pandemic 2009 influenza......-class-II-independent associations with HLA-A(∗)11:01 (OR = 1.32 [1.13-1.54], p = 4.92 × 10(-4)), HLA-B(∗)35:03 (OR = 1.96 [1.41-2.70], p = 5.14 × 10(-5)), and HLA-B(∗)51:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.25-1.78], p = 1.09 × 10(-5)) were also seen across ethnic groups in the HLA class I region. These effects might reflect modulation...... of autoimmunity or indirect effects of HLA class I and HLA-DP alleles on response to viral infections such as that of influenza....

  20. The link between CD8⁺ T-cell antigen-sensitivity and HIV-suppressive capacity depends on HLA restriction, target epitope and viral isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissina, Anna; Fastenackels, Solène; Inglesias, Maria C; Ladell, Kristin; McLaren, James E; Briceño, Olivia; Gostick, Emma; Papagno, Laura; Autran, Brigitte; Sauce, Delphine; Price, David A; Saez-Cirion, Asier; Appay, Victor

    2014-02-20

    Although it is established that CD8 T-cell immunity is critical for the control of HIV replication in vivo, the key factors that determine antiviral efficacy are yet to be fully elucidated. Antigen-sensitivity and T-cell receptor (TCR) avidity have been identified as potential determinants of CD8⁺ T-cell efficacy. However, there is no general consensus in this regard because the relationship between these parameters and the control of HIV infection has been established primarily in the context of immunodominant CD8⁺ T-cell responses against the Gag₂₆₃₋₂₇₂ KK10 epitope restricted by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27. To investigate the relationship between antigen-sensitivity, TCR avidity and HIV-suppressive capacity in vitro across epitope specificities and HLA class I restriction elements, we used a variety of techniques to study CD8⁺ T-cell clones specific for Nef₇₃₋₈₂ QK10 and Gag₂₀₋₂₉ RY10, both restricted by HLA-A3, alongside CD8⁺ T-cell clones specific for Gag₂₆₃₋₂₇₂ KK10. For each targeted epitope, the linked parameters of antigen-sensitivity and TCR avidity correlated directly with antiviral efficacy. However, marked differences in HIV-suppressive capacity were observed between epitope specificities, HLA class I restriction elements and viral isolates. Collectively, these data emphasize the central role of the TCR as a determinant of CD8⁺ T-cell efficacy and demonstrate that the complexities of antigen recognition across epitope and HLA class I boundaries can confound simple relationships between TCR engagement and HIV suppression.

  1. An Optimizing Compiler for Petascale I/O on Leadership Class Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Alok [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Kandemir, Mahmut [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-03-18

    In high-performance computing systems, parallel I/O architectures usually have very complex hierarchies with multiple layers that collectively constitute an I/O stack, including high-level I/O libraries such as PnetCDF and HDF5, I/O middleware such as MPI-IO, and parallel file systems such as PVFS and Lustre. Our project explored automated instrumentation and compiler support for I/O intensive applications. Our project made significant progress towards understanding the complex I/O hierarchies of high-performance storage systems (including storage caches, HDDs, and SSDs), and designing and implementing state-of-the-art compiler/runtime system technology that targets I/O intensive HPC applications that target leadership class machine. This final report summarizes the major achievements of the project and also points out promising future directions.

  2. I PROMESSI SPOSI: PERCORSO DIDATTICO IN UNA CLASSE INTERCULTURALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Colombo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Il percorso proposto nasce dalla consapevolezza che la presenza di alunni non italofoni nel nostro sistema scolastico è, per i docenti, occasione di aggiornarsi e cercare nuove strategie didattiche, e, per tutti, motivo di arricchimento umano e culturale. Le innegabili difficoltà che presenta l’insegnamento in una classe multiculturale sono particolarmente evidenti quando si affrontano testi letterari, per una serie di ovvie ragioni: le difficoltà legate ad una lingua spesso lontanissima dall’italiano standard, vicende che sono inserite in un passato storico-sociale completamente sconosciuto ai non italofoni, uso di figure retoriche, richiami mitologici, riferimenti religiosi ed artistici. Si è colta la sfida con il presentare un percorso attraverso i primi otto capitoli dei Promessi Sposi che persegua l’obiettivo di sviluppare le competenze linguistiche e di favorire la conoscenza reciproca e l’integrazione, attraverso la narrazione, l’attività di didattica attiva e laboratoriale e il cooperative learning.I PROMESSI SPOSI: A DIDACTIC EXPERIENCE IN ANINTERCULTURAL CLASSThis experience stems from the awareness that the presence of non-Italian speaking students in our school system is an occasion for teachers to acquire new teaching strategies as well as offering human and cultural enrichment for everyone. The undeniable difficulties in teaching a multicultural class are particularly evident when literary texts are dealt with, for a series of obvious reasons: difficulties linked to unusual, non-standardized Italian, events set in historical-social settings which are completely unfamiliar to foreign students, the use of rhetorical figures, mythological, religious and artistic references. To face this challenge, we present an experience dealing with the first 8 chapters of I Promessi Sposi aimed at developing linguistic competence and encouraging mutual knowledge and integration, through narration, active learning activities and

  3. Selective changes in expression of HLA class I polymorphic determinants in human solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natali, P.G.; Nicotra, M.R.; Bigotti, A.; Venturo, I.; Giacomini, P.; Marcenaro, L.; Russo, C.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of surgical biopsies with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to framework determinants of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens has shown that malignant transformation is frequently associated with a marked loss of these cell surface molecules. The present study sought to determine whether more selective losses of major histocompatibility complex class I expression occur. Multiple specimens from 13 different types of primary and metastatic tumors were tested utilizing mAb BB7.2, which recognizes a polymorphic HLA-A2 epitope. In each case, expression of HLA-A,B,C molecules was determined by testing with mAb W6/32 directed to a framework HLA class I determinant. The authors have found that in HLA-A2-positive patients, HLA-A2 products are not detectable or are reduced in their expression in 70-80% of endometrial, colorectal, mammary, and renal tumors; in 40-60% of soft-tissue, skin, ovary, urinary bladder, prostate, and stomach tumors; and in 25-30% of melanomas and lung carcinomas tested. All tumors expressed the framework HLA-A,B.C determinant. The HLA-A2 epitope recognized by mAb BB7.2 is located in a portion of the HLA-A2 molecule postulated to react with the T-cell receptor. The selective loss of an HLA class I polymorphic epitope shown in this study may explain the mechanism by which tumor cells escape both T-cell recognition and natural killer cell surveillance

  4. Outcome quality and long-term (≥15 years) stability after Class II:2 Herbst-multibracket appliance treatment in comparison to untreated Class I controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Niko C; Saffar, Mitra; Hudel, Helge; Evälahti, Marjut; Heikinheimo, Kaisa; Rice, David P; Ruf, Sabine

    2017-12-09

    To investigate the outcome quality and the long-term (≥15 years) post-treatment (Tx) changes after Class II:2 Herbst-multibracket appliance (MBA) Tx. In this longitudinal observational study, a recall of Class II:2 patients who had been treated by a Herbst-MBA during adolescence was conducted. Study models from before and after active Tx, after retention and after recall were assessed using standard occlusal variables and the peer assessment rating index (PAR). These data were compared to historical untreated Class I controls. Twenty out of 33 patients (61%) could be located and participated at age 33.9 ± 2.7 years. When comparing their data to the 13 patients who did not participate, the pre- and post-Tx occlusal findings did not differ systematically; however, the PAR scores of the non-participants were by 3.3-8.2 points higher at all times and the non-participants were 2.1-2.5 years older. Pre-Tx at age 14.4 ± 2.7 years, the participants showed the following mean values: PAR = 15.0 ± 7.0, Class II molar relationship (MR) = 0.8 ± 0.3 cusp widths (cw), overbite = 5.3 ± 1.3 mm. After Tx, a PAR score of 2.9 ± 1.3 and a super Class I MR (-0.1 ± 0.1 cw) with normal overbite (1.2 ± 0.8 mm) existed. At recall, a PAR score increase to 5.9 ± 3.6 points had occurred, mainly caused by an increase of overbite to 2.5 ± 1.5 mm. The average MR remained Class I (0.0 ± 0.2 cw). For all variables, the untreated controls exhibited similar findings. The occlusal outcome of Class II:2 Herbst-MBA Tx exhibited very good long-term stability. While mild post-Tx changes occurred, the long-term findings are similar to untreated Class I controls. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. HLA class I variation controlled for genetic admixture in the Gila River Indian Community of Arizona: a model for the Paleo-Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R C; McAuley, J E

    1992-01-01

    The genetic distribution of the HLA class I loci is presented for 619 "full blooded" Pima and Tohono O'odham Native Americans (Pimans) in the Gila River Indian Community. Variation in the Pimans is highly restricted. There are only three polymorphic alleles at the HLA-A locus, *A2, *A24, and *A31, and only 10 alleles with a frequency greater than 0.01 at HLA-B where *Bw48 (0.187), *B35 (0.173), and the new epitope *BN21 (0.143) have the highest frequencies. Two and three locus disequilibria values and haplotype frequencies are presented. Ten three-locus haplotypes account for more than 50% of the class I variation, with *A24 *BN21 *Cw3 (0.085) having the highest frequency. Gm allotypes demonstrate that little admixture from non-Indian populations has entered the Community since the 17th century when Europeans first came to this area. As a consequence many alleles commonly found in Europeans and European Americans are efficient markers for Caucasian admixture, while the "private" Indian alleles, *BN21 and *Bw48, can be used to measure Native American admixture in Caucasian populations. It is suggested that this distribution in "full blooded" Pimans approximates that of the Paleo-Indian migrants who first entered the Americas between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago.

  6. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Rocca, Rosanna; Tallerico, Rossana; Hassan, Almosawy Talib

    2014-01-01

    In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were...... treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells...... between 700–1800 cm-1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased...

  7. Modes of salmonid MHC class I and II evolution differ from the primate paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shum, B.P.; Guethlein, L.; Flodin, L.R.; Adkison, M.A.; Hedrick, R.P.; Nehring, R.B.; Stet, R.J.M.; Secombes, C.; Parham, P.

    2001-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) represent two salmonid genera separated for 15-20 million years. cDNA sequences were determined for the classical MHC class I heavy chain gene UBA and the MHC class II β-chain gene DAB from 15 rainbow and 10 brown trout. Both genes

  8. Human leucocyte antigen class I-redirected anti-tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M P; Dolton, G M; Gerry, A B; Brewer, J E; Bennett, A D; Pumphrey, N J; Jakobsen, B K; Sewell, A K

    2017-01-01

    CD4 + T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour-specific CD4 + T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low-affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4 + T cells with tumour-specific HLA class I-restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co-receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4 + cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4 + and CD8 + T cells expressing wild-type and a range of affinity-enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201-restricted NY-ESO-1- and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4 + T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4 + T cells than CD8 + T cells. These results indicate that the CD4 + T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8 + T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical & Experimental Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Society for Immunology.

  9. Class I self-splicing introns are found in the T-even bacteriophage family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, F.K.; Maley, F.; Maley, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    The thymidylate synthase gene (td) and ribonucleotide reductase B2 subunit gene (nrdB) EMBO both of bacteriophage T4 in origin, are procaryotic intron-containing protein-encoding genes. To screen for other procaryotic introns, southern hybridization analysis of several procaryotic genomes was carried out, using T4 phage td DNA restriction fragments and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides defining strategic td exon and intron regions. Furthermore, the labeling pattern of total RNA with [α- 32 P]GTP, a typical reaction of self-splicing RNAs (class I), was examined. Experimental data implicate multiple self-splicing introns only in the T-even phages: five (1, 0.9, 0.83, 0.75 and 0.6 kb) in T4 and three (1, 0.9 and 0.75 kb) each in T2 and T6 phages. Northern hybridization analysis of total RNA extracted from T-even phage-infected cells confirms that the 1 kb RNA from each phage is in fact the excised intron segment from the precursor RNA transcribed from an intron-containing td gene in each case. This RNA cyclizes to form a contiguous circular molecule. The 0.6 kb RNA is most likely the T4 phage nrdB intron which seems to be absent from the corresponding gene in T2 and T6. The remaining RNA species are candidates for other self-splicing introns in these phages

  10. The Relationship Between Class I and II Integrons and Antibiotic Resistance Among Escherichia coli Isolates From Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Nojoomi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the aim of this study was determination of antibiotic resistance profile, investigation of class I and II integrons among Escherichia coli (E. coli isolates from urinary tract infections. This study was conducted for the investigation of the prevalence of class I and II Integrons among E. coli Isolates from urinary tract infections. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 E. coli clinical isolates were collected from urinary tract infections in Borujerd city, Iran, from… to …. All the isolates were identified with standard laboratory procedures as described everywhere. The antibiotic susceptibility profile was conducted against adopted antibiotic disks following CLSI 2016 guidelines. All the isolates were enrolled in the PCR technique for the presence of class I and II integrons. Results: the highest resistance was against amoxicillin (72%, ciprofloxacin (69%, nalidixic acid (55% and tetracycline (51%. The prevalence of class I and II integrons was 31% and 21%, respectively. A significant relation was observed between resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (p<0.001, nalidixic acid (p<0.01 and tetracycline (p<0.005 with the presence of class I integron. The rate of class I integron in the E. coli isolates was high, possibly playing a role in the spread of multidrug resistant isolates. Conclusion: considering the significant relation observed between the presence of class I integron among multidrug-resistant isolates, establishment implementation of proper procedures to control and suitable treatment strategies in hospitals seems essential for the prevention of more spread of these isolates.

  11. Identification of conserved subdominant HIV Type 1 CD8(+) T Cell epitopes restricted within common HLA Supertypes for therapeutic HIV Type 1 vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Kløverpris, Henrik; Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov

    2012-01-01

    The high HIV-1 prevalence, up to 4.6% in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa, makes it a relevant location for testing of therapeutic vaccines. With the aim of performing a clinical study in Guinea-Bissau, after first testing the vaccine for safety in Denmark, Europe, we here describe the design...... of a universal epitope peptide-based T cell vaccine with relevance for any geographic locations. The two major obstacles when designing such a vaccine are the high diversities of the HIV-1 genome and of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. We selected 15 CD8-restricted epitopes predicted......-specific, HLA-restricted T cell specificities using peptide-MHC class I tetramer labeling of CD8(+) T cells from HIV-1-infected individuals. The selected vaccine epitopes are infrequently targeted in HIV-1-infected individuals from both locations. Moreover, we HLA-typed HIV-1-infected individuals...

  12. Zika Virus Escapes NK Cell Detection by Upregulating Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasner, Ariella; Oiknine-Djian, Esther; Weisblum, Yiska; Diab, Mohammad; Panet, Amos; Wolf, Dana G; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2017-11-15

    NK cells are innate lymphocytes that participate in many immune processes encompassing cancer, bacterial and fungal infection, autoimmunity, and even pregnancy and that specialize in antiviral defense. NK cells express inhibitory and activating receptors and kill their targets when activating signals overpower inhibitory signals. The NK cell inhibitory receptors include a uniquely diverse array of proteins named killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), the CD94 family, and the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor (LIR) family. The NK cell inhibitory receptors recognize mostly major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (MHC-I) proteins. Zika virus has recently emerged as a major threat due to its association with birth defects and its pandemic potential. How Zika virus interacts with the immune system, and especially with NK cells, is unclear. Here we show that Zika virus infection is barely sensed by NK cells, since little or no increase in the expression of activating NK cell ligands was observed following Zika infection. In contrast, we demonstrate that Zika virus infection leads to the upregulation of MHC class I proteins and consequently to the inhibition of NK cell killing. Mechanistically, we show that MHC class I proteins are upregulated via the RIGI-IRF3 pathway and that this upregulation is mediated via beta interferon (IFN-β). Potentially, countering MHC class I upregulation during Zika virus infection could be used as a prophylactic treatment against Zika virus. IMPORTANCE NK cells are innate lymphocytes that recognize and eliminate various pathogens and are known mostly for their role in controlling viral infections. NK cells express inhibitory and activating receptors, and they kill or spare their targets based on the integration of inhibitory and activating signals. Zika virus has recently emerged as a major threat to humans due to its pandemic potential and its association with birth defects. The role of NK cells in Zika virus

  13. Upregulation of HLA Class I Expression on Tumor Cells by the Anti-EGFR Antibody Nimotuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Garrido

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Defining how epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeting therapies influence the immune response is essential to increase their clinical efficacy. A growing emphasis is being placed on immune regulator genes that govern tumor – T cell interactions. Previous studies showed an increase in HLA class I cell surface expression in tumor cell lines treated with anti-EGFR agents. In particular, earlier studies of the anti-EGFR blocking antibody cetuximab, have suggested that increased tumor expression of HLA class I is associated with positive clinical response. We investigated the effect of another commercially available anti-EGFR antibody nimotuzumab on HLA class I expression in tumor cell lines. We observed, for the first time, that nimotuzumab increases HLA class I expression and its effect is associated with a coordinated increase in mRNA levels of the principal antigen processing and presentation components. Moreover, using 7A7 (a specific surrogate antibody against murine EGFR, we obtained results suggesting the importance of the increased MHC-I expression induced by EGFR-targeted therapies display higher in antitumor immune response. 7A7 therapy induced upregulation of tumor MHC-I expression in vivo and tumors treated with this antibody display higher susceptibility to CD8+ T cells-mediated lysis. Our results represent the first evidence suggesting the importance of the adaptive immunity in nimotuzumab-mediated antitumor activity. More experiments should be conducted in order to elucidate the relevance of this mechanism in cancer patients. This novel immune-related antitumor mechanism mediated by nimotuzumab opens new perspectives for its combination with various immunotherapeutic agents and cancer vaccines.

  14. Probing natural killer cell education by Ly49 receptor expression analysis and computational modelling in single MHC class I mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Johansson

    Full Text Available Murine natural killer (NK cells express inhibitory Ly49 receptors for MHC class I molecules, which allows for "missing self" recognition of cells that downregulate MHC class I expression. During murine NK cell development, host MHC class I molecules impose an "educating impact" on the NK cell pool. As a result, mice with different MHC class I expression display different frequency distributions of Ly49 receptor combinations on NK cells. Two models have been put forward to explain this impact. The two-step selection model proposes a stochastic Ly49 receptor expression followed by selection for NK cells expressing appropriate receptor combinations. The sequential model, on the other hand, proposes that each NK cell sequentially expresses Ly49 receptors until an interaction of sufficient magnitude with self-class I MHC is reached for the NK cell to mature. With the aim to clarify which one of these models is most likely to reflect the actual biological process, we simulated the two educational schemes by mathematical modelling, and fitted the results to Ly49 expression patterns, which were analyzed in mice expressing single MHC class I molecules. Our results favour the two-step selection model over the sequential model. Furthermore, the MHC class I environment favoured maturation of NK cells expressing one or a few self receptors, suggesting a possible step of positive selection in NK cell education. Based on the predicted Ly49 binding preferences revealed by the model, we also propose, that Ly49 receptors are more promiscuous than previously thought in their interactions with MHC class I molecules, which was supported by functional studies of NK cell subsets expressing individual Ly49 receptors.

  15. An Optimizing Compiler for Petascale I/O on Leadership-Class Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandemir, Mahmut Taylan [PSU; Choudary, Alok [Northwestern; Thakur, Rajeev [ANL

    2014-03-01

    In high-performance computing (HPC), parallel I/O architectures usually have very complex hierarchies with multiple layers that collectively constitute an I/O stack, including high-level I/O libraries such as PnetCDF and HDF5, I/O middleware such as MPI-IO, and parallel file systems such as PVFS and Lustre. Our DOE project explored automated instrumentation and compiler support for I/O intensive applications. Our project made significant progress towards understanding the complex I/O hierarchies of high-performance storage systems (including storage caches, HDDs, and SSDs), and designing and implementing state-of-the-art compiler/runtime system technology that targets I/O intensive HPC applications that target leadership class machine. This final report summarizes the major achievements of the project and also points out promising future directions Two new sections in this report compared to the previous report are IOGenie and SSD/NVM-specific optimizations.

  16. Effects of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, DHPG, and injection stress on striatal cell signaling in food-restricted and ad libitum fed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carr Kenneth D

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic food restriction augments the rewarding effect of centrally administered psychostimulant drugs and this effect may involve a previously documented upregulation of D-1 dopamine receptor-mediated MAP kinase signaling in nucleus accumbens (NAc and caudate-putamen (CPu. Psychostimulants are known to induce striatal glutamate release, and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR have been implicated in the cellular and behavioral responses to amphetamine. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether chronic food restriction increases striatal MAP kinase signaling in response to the group I mGluR agonist, DHPG. Results Western immunoblotting was used to demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. injection of DHPG (500 nmol produces greater activation of ERK1/2 and CREB in CPu and NAc of food-restricted as compared to ad libitum fed rats. Fos-immunostaining induced by DHPG was also stronger in CPu and NAc core of food-restricted relative to ad libitum fed rats. However, i.c.v. injection of saline-vehicle produced greater activation of ERK1/2 and CREB in CPu and NAc of food-restricted relative to ad libitum fed rats, and this difference was not seen when subjects received no i.c.v. injection prior to sacrifice. In addition, although DHPG activated Akt, there was no difference in Akt activation between feeding groups. To probe whether the augmented ERK1/2 and CREB activation in vehicle-injected food-restricted rats are mediated by one or more GluR types, effects of an NMDA antagonist (MK-801, 100 nmol, AMPA antagonist (DNQX, 10 nmol, and group I mGluR antagonist (AIDA, 100 nmol were compared to saline-vehicle. Antagonist injections did not diminish activation of ERK1/2 or CREB. Conclusions These results indicate that a group I mGluR agonist induces phosphorylation of Akt, ERK1/2 and CREB in both CPu and NAc. However, group I mGluR-mediated signaling may not be upregulated in food-restricted rats

  17. Effects of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Combined with Caloric Restriction on Circulating Estrogens and IGF-I in Premenopausal Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    The proposal entitled "Effects of moderate aerobic exercise combined with caloric restriction on circulating estrogens and IGF-I in premenopausal women will provide important scientific contributions...

  18. Perinatal Changes of Cardiac Troponin-I in Normal and Intrauterine Growth-Restricted Pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Iacovidou

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR implies fetal hypoxia, resulting in blood flow redistribution and sparing of vital organs (brain, heart. Serum cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI, a well-established marker of myocardial ischaemia, was measured in 40 mothers prior to delivery, the doubly clamped umbilical cords (representing fetal state, and their 20 IUGR and 20 appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA neonates on day 1 and 4 postpartum. At all time points, no differences in cTnI levels were observed between the AGA and IUGR groups. Strong positive correlations were documented between maternal and fetal/neonatal values (r≥.498, P≤.025 in all cases in the AGA and r≥.615, P≤.009 in all cases in the IUGR group. These results may indicate (a normal heart function, due to heart sparing, in the IUGR group (b potential crossing of the placental barrier by cTnI in both groups

  19. Overall major histocompatibility complex class I expression is not downregulated in cervix cancer, as detected by immunoelectron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijkeren, MA; Roovers, JP; Oorschot, [No Value; Geuze, HJ

    2004-01-01

    Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules in cervix cancer has been proposed as a mechanism for cancer cells to escape immunodetection. By means of light microscopic immunohistochemistry, it has been shown that in 20-70% of cervix cancers MHC class I is

  20. Operationalizing Max Weber's probability concept of class situation: the concept of social class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2007-03-01

    In this essay I take seriously Max Weber's astonishingly neglected claim that class situation may be defined, not in categorial terms, but probabilistically. I then apply this idea to another equally neglected claim made by Weber that the boundaries of social classes may be determined by the degree of social mobility within such classes. Taking these two ideas together I develop the idea of a non-categorial boundary 'surface' between classes and of a social class 'corridor' made up of all those people who are still to be found within the boundaries of the social class into which they were born. I call social mobility within a social class 'intra-class social mobility' and social mobility between classes 'inter-class social mobility'. I also claim that this distinction resolves the dispute between those sociologists who claim that late industrial societies are still highly class bound and those who think that this is no longer the case. Both schools are right I think, but one is referring to a high degree of intra-class social mobility and the other to an equally high degree of inter-class mobility. Finally I claim that this essay provides sociology with only one example among many other possible applications of how probability theory might usefully be used to overcome boundary problems generally in sociology.

  1. Kidney graft recipients with pretransplantation HLA CLASS I antibodies and high soluble CD30 are at high risk for graft loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Libia M; París, Sara C; Arbeláez, Mario; Cotes, José M; Süsal, Caner; Torres, Yolanda; García, Luís F

    2007-08-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether pretransplantation HLA class I and class II antibodies and pretransplantation levels of soluble CD30 (sCD30) and IgA anti-Fab autoantibodies are predictive of kidney allograft survival. Pretransplantation sera of 504 deceased-donor kidney recipients were tested for IgG HLA class I and class II antibodies, sCD30, and IgA anti-Fab levels using the CTS 4 ELISA kit. Kidney graft survival was estimated by Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate Cox regression. Regardless of the presence of HLA class II antibodies, recipients with high HLA class I reactivity had lower 1-year graft survival than recipients with low reactivity (p sCD30 had lower 5-year graft survival rate than those with low sCD30 (p sCD30 effect was observed in presensitized and nonsensitized recipients, demonstrated a synergistic effect with HLA class I antibodies (p kidney graft survival. Our results indicate that high pretransplantation sCD30 levels and HLA class I positivity increase the risk of kidney graft loss regardless of other factors. Consequently, such determinations should be routinely performed to estimate recipients' risks of graft rejection before transplantation.

  2. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    KAUST Repository

    La Rocca, Rosanna; Tallerico, Rossana; Talib Hassan, Almosawy; Das, Gobind; Tadepally, Lakshmikanth; Matteucci, Marco; Liberale, Carlo; Mesuraca, Maria; Scumaci, Domenica; Gentile, Francesco; Cojoc, Gheorghe; Perozziello, Gerardo; Ammendolia, Antonio; Gallo, Adriana; Kä rre, Klas; Cuda, Giovanni; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Carbone, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700–1800 cm−1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also

  3. AN MHC class I immune evasion gene of Marek's disease virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a widespread a-herpesvirus of chickens that causes T cell tumors. Acute, but not latent, MDV infection has previously been shown to lead to downregulation of cell-surface MHC class I (Virology 282:198–205 (2001)), but the gene(s) involved have not been identified. Here...

  4. Factors associated with prescribing restriction on oncology formulary drugs in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatokun, Omotayo; Olawepo, Michael N

    2016-10-01

    Background Drugs listed on formularies are often subjected to a variety of utilization restriction measures. However, the degree of restriction is influenced by multiple factors, including the characteristics and attributes of the listed drugs. Objective To identify the factors that are associated with the levels of prescribing restriction on oncology formulary drugs in Malaysia. Setting Oncology formulary in Malaysia. Method The Malaysia Drug Code assigned to each of the drug products on the Malaysia Ministry of Health (MOH) drug formulary was used to identify oncology drugs belonging to WHO ATC class L (antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents). Main outcome measures Categories of prescribing restrictions, therapeutic class, drug type, administration mode, number of sources and the post-approval use period. Results Oncology drugs having a shorter post-approval use period (p Malaysia MOH drug formulary.

  5. MHC class II-derived peptides can bind to class II molecules, including self molecules, and prevent antigen presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosloniec, E F; Vitez, L J; Buus, S

    1990-01-01

    the alpha k-3 peptide binds slightly less well. These combined data, suggesting that class II-derived peptides can bind to MHC class II molecules, including the autologous molecule from which they are derived, have important implications for the molecular basis of alloreactivity and autoreactivity. Further...... found in the first and third polymorphic regions (PMR) of the A alpha k chain (alpha k-1 and alpha k-3) were capable of inhibiting the presentation of three different HEL-derived peptide antigens to their appropriate T cells. In addition, the alpha k-1 peptide inhibited the presentation of the OVA(323......-339) immunodominant peptide to the I-Ad-restricted T cell hybridomas specific for it. Prepulsing experiments demonstrated that the PMR peptides were interacting with the APC and not with the T cell hybridomas. These observations were confirmed and extended by the demonstration that the alpha k-1 and alpha k-3...

  6. An overview of Class I Structures license renewal Industry Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statton, J.A.; Renfro, L.J.; Peeifer, B.W.; Deng, D.Z.; Byron, J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of this evaluation indicate that license renewal of Class I Structures is technically achievable and that most age-related degradation can be managed by existing effective programs such that the continued safe operation of the plant is assured. Existing effective programs are satisfactory as long as plant-unique verification of design and operating features is performed. Thus, the conclusions of this IR can be applied to individual plants. (author)

  7. iNKT cell cytotoxic responses control T-lymphoma growth in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiri, Hamid; Das, Rupali; Guan, Peng; Barrett, David M.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Banerjee, Pinaki P.; Wiener, Susan J.; Orange, Jordan S.; Brenner, Michael B.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Nichols, Kim E.

    2013-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells comprise a lineage of CD1d-restricted glycolipid-reactive T lymphocytes with important roles in host immunity to cancer. iNKT cells indirectly participate in antitumor responses by inducing dendritic cell maturation and producing cytokines that promote tumor clearance by CD8+ T and NK cells. Although iNKT cells thereby act as potent cellular adjuvants, it is less clear whether they directly control the growth of tumors. To gain insights into the direct contribution of iNKT cells to tumor immune surveillance, we developed in vitro and in vivo systems to selectively examine the antitumor activity of iNKT cells in the absence of other cytolytic effectors. Using the EL4 T-lymphoma cell line as a model, we find that iNKT cells exert robust and specific lysis of tumor cells in vitro in a manner that is differentially-induced by iNKT cell agonists of varying TCR affinities, such as OCH, α-galactosyl ceramide and PBS44. In vitro blockade of CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation, disruption of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, or loss of perforin expression significantly reduce iNKT cell killing. Consistent with these findings, iNKT cell reconstitution of T, B, and NK cell-deficient mice slows EL4 growth in vivo via TCR-CD1d and perforin-dependent mechanisms. Together, these observations establish that iNKT cells are sufficient to control the growth of T-lymphoma in vitro and in vivo. They also suggest that the induction of iNKT cell cytotoxic responses in situ might serve as a more effective strategy to prevent and/or treat CD1d+ cancers, such as T-lymphoma. PMID:24563871

  8. iNKT cell cytotoxic responses control T-lymphoma growth in vitro and in vivo .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiri, Hamid; Das, Rupali; Guan, Peng; Barrett, David M; Brennan, Patrick J; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Wiener, Susan J; Orange, Jordan S; Brenner, Michael B; Grupp, Stephan A; Nichols, Kim E

    2014-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells comprise a lineage of CD1d-restricted glycolipid-reactive T lymphocytes with important roles in host immunity to cancer. iNKT cells indirectly participate in antitumor responses by inducing dendritic cell maturation and producing cytokines that promote tumor clearance by CD8+ T and NK cells. Although iNKT cells thereby act as potent cellular adjuvants, it is less clear whether they directly control the growth of tumors. To gain insights into the direct contribution of iNKT cells to tumor immune surveillance, we developed in vitro and in vivo systems to selectively examine the antitumor activity of iNKT cells in the absence of other cytolytic effectors. Using the EL4 T-lymphoma cell line as a model, we found that iNKT cells exert robust and specific lysis of tumor cells in vitro in a manner that is differentially induced by iNKT cell agonists of varying T-cell receptor (TCR) affinities, such as OCH, α-galactosyl ceramide, and PBS44. In vitro blockade of CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation, disruption of TCR signaling, or loss of perforin expression significantly reduce iNKT cell killing. Consistent with these findings, iNKT cell reconstitution of T, B, and NK cell–deficient mice slows EL4 growth in vivo via TCR-CD1d and perforin-dependent mechanisms. Together, these observations establish that iNKT cells are sufficient to control the growth of T lymphoma in vitro and in vivo. They also suggest that the induction of iNKT cell cytotoxic responses in situ might serve as a more effective strategy to prevent and/or treat CD1d+ cancers, such as T lymphoma. ©2013 AACR.

  9. Epigenetic priming restores the HLA class-I antigen processing machinery expression in Merkel cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Cathrin; Fan, Kaiji; Paschen, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive, yet highly immunogenic skin cancer. The latter is due to its viral or UV-associated carcinogenesis. For tumor progression MCC has to escape the host's immuno-surveillance, e.g. by loss of HLA class-I expression. Indeed, a reduced HLA class...

  10. Virtual Class Support at the Virtual Machine Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Bach; Ernst, Erik

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes how virtual classes can be supported in a virtual machine.  Main-stream virtual machines such as the Java Virtual Machine and the .NET platform dominate the world today, and many languages are being executed on these virtual machines even though their embodied design choices...... conflict with the design choices of the virtual machine.  For instance, there is a non-trivial mismatch between the main-stream virtual machines mentioned above and dynamically typed languages.  One language concept that creates an even greater mismatch is virtual classes, in particular because fully...... general support for virtual classes requires generation of new classes at run-time by mixin composition.  Languages like CaesarJ and ObjectTeams can express virtual classes restricted to the subset that does not require run-time generation of classes, because of the restrictions imposed by the Java...

  11. MHC class I epitope binding prediction trained on small data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Morten; Lamberth, K.

    2004-01-01

    The identification of potential T-cell epitopes is important for development of new human or vetenary vaccines, both considering single protein/subunit vaccines, and for epitope/peptide vaccines as such. The highly diverse MHC class I alleles bind very different peptides, and accurate binding pre...... in situations where only very limited data are available for training....

  12. MHC class I down-regulation: Tumour escape from immune surveillance? (Review)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 2 (2004), s. 487-491 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC7148; GA ČR GA301/04/0492; GA AV ČR IAA5052203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : MHC class I- tumour cells * immune surveillance Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.056, year: 2004

  13. Effect of insulin-like growth factor-I during the early postnatal period in intrauterine growth-restricted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Naho; Shoji, Hiromichi; Suganuma, Hiroki; Ohkawa, Natsuki; Kantake, Masato; Murano, Yayoi; Sakuraya, Koji; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-05-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is essential for perinatal growth and development; low serum IGF-I has been observed during intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). We investigated the effects of recombinant human (rh) IGF-I in IUGR rats during the early postnatal period. Intrauterine growth restriction was induced by bilateral uterine artery ligation in pregnant rats. IUGR pups were divided into two groups injected daily with rhIGF-I (2 mg/kg; IUGR/IGF-I, n = 16) or saline (IUGR/physiologic saline solution (PSS), n = 16) from postnatal day (PND) 7 to 13. Maternal sham-operated pups injected with saline were used as controls (control, n = 16). Serum IGF-I and IGF binding proteins (IGFBP) 3 and 5 were measured on PND25. The expression of Igf-i, IGF-I receptor (Igf-ir), Igfbp3, and 5 mRNA in the liver and brain was measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction on PND25. Immunohistochemical staining of the liver for IGF expression was performed. Mean bodyweight on PND3 and PND25 in the IUGR pups (IUGR/IGF-I and IUGR/PSS) was significantly lower than that of the control pups. Serum IGF-I and hepatic Igf-ir mRNA in the IUGR pups were significantly lower than those in the control pups. In the IUGR/IGF-I group, hepatic Igfbp3 mRNA and liver immunohistochemical staining were increased. In the IUGR/PSS and control pups, there were no significant differences between these two groups in serum IGFBP3 and IGFBP5, hepatic Igf-i and Igfbp-5 mRNA, or brain Igf mRNA. No benefits on body and brain weight gain but an effective increase in hepatic IGFBP-3 was observed after treatment with 2 mg/kg rhIGF-I during the early postnatal period. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  14. Focusing Leaky Waves: A Class of Electromagnetic Localized Waves with Complex Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuscaldo, Walter; Comite, Davide; Boesso, Alessandro; Baccarelli, Paolo; Burghignoli, Paolo; Galli, Alessandro

    2018-05-01

    Localized waves, i.e., the wide class of limited-diffraction, limited-dispersion solutions to the wave equation are generally characterized by real wave numbers. We consider the role played by localized waves with generally complex "leaky" wave numbers. First, the impact of the imaginary part of the wave number (i.e., the leakage constant) on the diffractive (spatial broadening) features of monochromatic localized solutions (i.e., beams) is rigorously evaluated. Then general conditions are derived to show that only a restricted class of spectra (either real or complex) allows for generating a causal localized wave. It turns out that backward leaky waves fall into this category. On this ground, several criteria for the systematic design of wideband radiators, namely, periodic radial waveguides based on backward leaky waves, are established in the framework of leaky-wave theory. An effective design method is proposed to minimize the frequency dispersion of the proposed class of devices and the impact of the "leakage" on the dispersive (temporal broadening) features of polychromatic localized solutions (i.e., pulses) is accounted for. Numerical results corroborate the concept, clearly highlighting the advantages and limitations of the leaky-wave approach for the generation of localized pulses at millimeter-wave frequencies, where energy focusing is in high demand in modern applications.

  15. Modeling the interactions of a peptide-major histocompatibility class I ligand with its receptors. II. Cross-reaction between a monoclonal antibody and two alpha beta T cell receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rognan, D; Engberg, J; Stryhn, A

    2000-01-01

    -peptide pair into the Fab combining site. Interestingly, the most energetically favored binding mode shows numerous analogies to the recently determined recognition of class I MHC-peptide complexes by alpha beta T cell receptors (TCRs). The pSAN13.4.1 also binds diagonally across the MHC binding groove......The recombinant antibody, pSAN13.4.1, has a unique T cell like specificity; it binds an Influenza Hemagglutinin octapeptide (Ha255-262) in an MHC (H-2Kk)-restricted manner, and a detailed comparison of the fine specificity of pSAN13.4.1 with the fine specificity of two Ha255-262-specific, H-2Kk......-restricted T cell hybridomas has supported this contention. A three-dimensional model of pSAN13.4.1 has been derived by homology modeling techniques. Subsequently, the structure of the pSAN13.4.1 antibody in complex with the antigenic Ha-Kk ligand was derived after a flexible and automated docking of the MHC...

  16. Characterization of insulin-like growth factor I receptors in the median eminence of the brain and their modulation by food restriction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohannon, N.J.; Corp, E.S.; Wilcox, B.J.; Figlewicz, D.P.; Dorsa, D.M.; Baskin, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    High affinity binding sites for 125I-labeled [Thr59]insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) were measured in rat median eminence by in vitro autoradiography with slide-mounted sections of frozen rat brain. Specific binding of 0.1 nM iodo-[Thr59]IGF-I to brain slices reached maximum by 12 h at 4 C and was unchanged at 24 h. Densitometry by computer digital image analysis of autoradiographic images indicated that specific binding of iodo-[Thr59]IGF-I to the median eminence was reversible. The specificity of binding was evaluated with competition of iodo-[Thr59]IGF-I with unlabeled [Thr59]IGF-I, rat IGF-II (multiplication-stimulating activity), and porcine insulin. All were recognized by the binding site, but the rank order of potency was [Thr59]IGF-I greater than IGF-II greater than insulin. Somatostatin was completely ineffective. Further, an antibody against the rat IGF-II receptor did not block binding of iodo-[Thr59]IGF-I to the median eminence. Fourteen days of food restriction (75% of food intake of controls) resulted in significant weight loss and reduction of plasma immunoreactive IGF-I in six food-restricted rats (0.9 +/- 0.1 U/ml) compared with values in six controls (2.6 +/- 0.5 U/ml; P less than 0.001). Binding of 125I-labeled [Thr59]IGF-I in the median eminence was significantly increased in the food-restricted rats, primarily due to an increase in the concentration of iodo-[Thr59]IGF-I-binding sites in the median eminence; the affinity (Kd) of binding was unchanged. The results indicate that the median eminence has type I IGF-I receptors, which become more numerous under metabolic conditions associated with decreased caloric intake and lowered plasma IGF-I levels

  17. Phase I clinical trial of the vaccination for the patients with metastatic melanoma using gp100-derived epitope peptide restricted to HLA-A*2402

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baba Toshiyuki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor associated antigen (TAA gp100 was one of the first identified and has been used in clinical trials to treat melanoma patients. However, the gp100 epitope peptide restricted to HLA-A*2402 has not been extensively examined clinically due to the ethnic variations. Since it is the most common HLA Class I allele in the Japanese population, we performed a phase I clinical trial of cancer vaccination using the HLA-A*2402 gp100 peptide to treat patients with metastatic melanoma. Methods The phase I clinical protocol to test a HLA-A*2402 gp100 peptide-based cancer vaccine was designed to evaluate safety as the primary endpoint and was approved by The University of Tokyo Institutional Review Board. Information related to the immunologic and antitumor responses were also collected as secondary endpoints. Patients that were HLA-A*2402 positive with stage IV melanoma were enrolled according to the criteria set by the protocol and immunized with a vaccine consisting of epitope peptide (VYFFLPDHL, gp100-in4 emulsified with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA for the total of 4 times with two week intervals. Prior to each vaccination, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were separated from the blood and stored at -80°C. The stored PBMCs were thawed and examined for the frequency of the peptide specific T lymphocytes by IFN-γ- ELISPOT and MHC-Dextramer assays. Results No related adverse events greater than grade I were observed in the six patients enrolled in this study. No clinical responses were observed in the enrolled patients although vitiligo was observed after the vaccination in two patients. Promotion of peptide specific immune responses was observed in four patients with ELISPOT assay. Furthermore, a significant increase of CD8+ gp100-in4+ CTLs was observed in all patients using the MHC-Dextramer assay. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs clones specific to gp100-in4 were successfully established from the PBMC of some

  18. Pan-specific prediction of peptide-MHC Class I complex stability, a correlate of T cell immunogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Fenoy, Emilio; Harndahl, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    Binding of peptides to MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules is the most selective event in the processing and presentation of Ags to CTL, and insights into the mechanisms that govern peptide-MHC-I binding should facilitate our understanding of CTL biology. Peptide-MHC-I interactions have traditionally b...

  19. Characterization of MHC class I and II genes in a subantarctic seabird, the blue petrel, Halobaena caerulea (Procellariiformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandh, Maria; Lannefors, Mimi; Bonadonna, Francesco; Westerdahl, Helena

    2011-10-01

    The great polymorphism observed in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes is thought to be maintained by pathogen-mediated selection possibly combined with MHC-disassortative mating, guided by MHC-determined olfactory cues. Here, we partly characterize the MHC class I and II B of the blue petrel, Halobaena caerulea (Procellariiformes), a bird with significant olfactory abilities that lives under presumably low pathogen burdens in Subantarctica. Blue petrels are long-lived, monogamous birds which suggest the necessity of an accurate mate choice process. The species is ancestral to songbirds (Passeriformes; many MHC loci), although not to gamefowls (Galliformes; few MHC loci). Considering the phylogenetic relationships and the low subantarctic pathogen burden, we expected few rather than many MHC loci in the blue petrel. However, when we analysed partial MHC class I and class II B cDNA and gDNA sequences we found evidence for as many as at least eight MHC class I loci and at least two class II B loci. These class I and II B sequences showed classical MHC characteristics, e.g. high nucleotide diversity, especially in putative peptide-binding regions where signatures of positive selection was detected. Trans-species polymorphism was found between MHC class II B sequences of the blue petrel and those of thin-billed prion, Pachyptila belcheri, two species that diverged ∼25 MYA. The observed MHC allele richness in the blue petrel may well serve as a basis for mate choice, especially since olfactory discrimination of MHC types may be possible in this species.

  20. "I'm a Geek I Am": Academic Achievement and the Performance of a Studious Working-Class Masculinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael R. M.

    2014-01-01

    During the last few decades, the South Wales Valleys (UK) have undergone a considerable economic, social, cultural and political transformation, altering youth transitions from school to work. Drawing on a two and a half year ethnographic study, in the paper I concentrate on a group of academically successful young white working-class men aged…

  1. The Viral Transcription Group Determines the HLA Class I Cellular Immune Response Against Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Carolina; Lorente, Elena; Barriga, Alejandro; Barnea, Eilon; Infantes, Susana; Lemonnier, François A.; David, Chella S.; Admon, Arie; López, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated killing of virus-infected cells requires previous recognition of short viral antigenic peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen class I molecules that are exposed on the surface of infected cells. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response is critical for the clearance of human respiratory syncytial virus infection. In this study, naturally processed viral human leukocyte antigen class I ligands were identified with mass spectrometry analysis of complex human leukocyte antigen-bound peptide pools isolated from large amounts of human respiratory syncytial virus-infected cells. Acute antiviral T-cell response characterization showed that viral transcription determines both the immunoprevalence and immunodominance of the human leukocyte antigen class I response to human respiratory syncytial virus. These findings have clear implications for antiviral vaccine design. PMID:25635267

  2. HLA Class I and Class II Alleles and Haplotypes Confirm the Berber Origin of the Present Day Tunisian Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhafidh Hajjej

    Full Text Available In view of its distinct geographical location and relatively small area, Tunisia witnessed the presence of many civilizations and ethnic groups throughout history, thereby questioning the origin of present-day Tunisian population. We investigated HLA class I and class II gene profiles in Tunisians, and compared this profile with those of Mediterranean and Sub-Sahara African populations. A total of 376 unrelated Tunisian individuals of both genders were genotyped for HLA class I (A, B and class II (DRB1, DQB1, using reverse dot-blot hybridization (PCR-SSO method. Statistical analysis was performed using Arlequin software. Phylogenetic trees were constructed by DISPAN software, and correspondence analysis was carried out by VISTA software. One hundred fifty-three HLA alleles were identified in the studied sample, which comprised 41, 50, 40 and 22 alleles at HLA-A,-B,-DRB1 and -DQB1 loci, respectively. The most frequent alleles were HLA-A*02:01 (16.76%, HLA-B*44:02/03 (17.82%, HLA-DRB1*07:01 (19.02%, and HLA-DQB1*03:01 (17.95%. Four-locus haplotype analysis identified HLA-A*02:01-B*50:01-DRB1*07:01-DQB1*02:02 (2.2% as the common haplotype in Tunisians. Compared to other nearby populations, Tunisians appear to be genetically related to Western Mediterranean population, in particular North Africans and Berbers. In conclusion, HLA genotype results indicate that Tunisians are related to present-day North Africans, Berbers and to Iberians, but not to Eastern Arabs (Palestinians, Jordanians and Lebanese. This suggests that the genetic contribution of Arab invasion of 7th-11th century A.D. had little impact of the North African gene pool.

  3. Expression, refolding and crystallization of murine MHC class I H-2Db in complex with human β2-microglobulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandalova, Tatyana; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Harris, Robert A.; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Kärre, Klas; Schneider, Gunter; Achour, Adnane

    2005-01-01

    Mouse MHC class I H-2Db in complex with human β2m and the LCMV-derived peptide gp33 has been produced and crystallized. Resolution of the structure of this complex combined with the structural comparison with the previously solved crystal structure of H-2Db/mβ2m/gp33 should lead to a better understanding of how the β2m subunit affects the overall conformation of MHC complexes as well as the stability of the presented peptides. β 2 -Microglobulin (β 2 m) is non-covalently linked to the major histocompatibility (MHC) class I heavy chain and interacts with CD8 and Ly49 receptors. Murine MHC class I can bind human β 2 m (hβ 2 m) and such hybrid molecules are often used in structural and functional studies. The replacement of mouse β 2 m (mβ 2 m) by hβ 2 m has important functional consequences for MHC class I complex stability and specificity, but the structural basis for this is unknown. To investigate the impact of species-specific β 2 m subunits on MHC class I conformation, murine MHC class I H-2D b in complex with hβ 2 m and the peptide gp33 derived from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) has been expressed, refolded in vitro and crystallized. Crystals containing two complexes per asymmetric unit and belonging to the space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 68.1, b = 65.2, c = 101.9 Å, β = 102.4°, were obtained

  4. Proteolysis of the heavy chain of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens by complement component C1s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1990-01-01

    weights of the fragments are in agreement with the cleavage located in the area between the disulphide loops of the alpha 2-and alpha 3-domains of the heavy chain. In addition human C1s complement is able to cleave H-2 antigens from mouse in a similar fashion but not rat MHC class I antigen or mouse MHC...... class II antigen (I-Ad). Mouse MHC class I antigen-specific determinants could also be detected in supernatant from mouse spleen cells incubated with C1r and C1s. These results indicate the presence in the body fluids of a non-membrane-bound soluble form of the alpha 1-and alpha 2-domains which...

  5. Visualization of cytolytic T cell differentiation and granule exocytosis with T cells from mice expressing active fluorescent granzyme B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Mouchacca

    Full Text Available To evaluate acquisition and activation of cytolytic functions during immune responses we generated knock in (KI mice expressing Granzyme B (GZMB as a fusion protein with red fluorescent tdTomato (GZMB-Tom. As for GZMB in wild type (WT lymphocytes, GZMB-Tom was absent from naïve CD8 and CD4 T cells in GZMB-Tom-KI mice. It was rapidly induced in most CD8 T cells and in a subpopulation of CD4 T cells in response to stimulation with antibodies to CD3/CD28. A fraction of splenic NK cells expressed GZMB-Tom ex vivo with most becoming positive upon culture in IL-2. GZMB-Tom was present in CTL granules and active as a protease when these degranulated into cognate target cells, as shown with target cells expressing a specific FRET reporter construct. Using T cells from mice expressing GZMB-Tom but lacking perforin, we show that the transfer of fluorescent GZMB-Tom into target cells was dependent on perforin, favoring a role for perforin in delivery of GZMB at the target cells' plasma membranes. Time-lapse video microscopy showed Ca++ signaling in CTL upon interaction with cognate targets, followed by relocalization of GZMB-Tom-containing granules to the synaptic contact zone. A perforin-dependent step was next visualized by the fluorescence signal from the non-permeant dye TO-PRO-3 at the synaptic cleft, minutes before the labeling of the target cell nucleus, characterizing a previously undescribed synaptic event in CTL cytolysis. Transferred OVA-specific GZMB-Tom-expressing CD8 T cells acquired GZMB-Tom expression in Listeria monocytogenes-OVA infected mice as soon as 48h after infection. These GZMB-Tom positive CD8 T cells localized in the splenic T-zone where they interacted with CD11c positive dendritic cells (DC, as shown by GZMB-Tom granule redistribution to the T/DC contact zone. GZMB-Tom-KI mice thus also provide tools to visualize acquisition and activation of cytolytic function in vivo.

  6. Identifying Effective Enzyme Activity Targets for Recombinant Class I and Class II Collagenase for Successful Human Islet Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, Appakalai N; Green, Michael L; Breite, Andrew G; Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Wilhelm, Joshua J; Tweed, Benjamin; Vargova, Lenka; Lockridge, Amber; Kuriti, Manikya; Hughes, Michael G; Williams, Stuart K; Hering, Bernhard J; Dwulet, Francis E; McCarthy, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Isolation following a good manufacturing practice-compliant, human islet product requires development of a robust islet isolation procedure where effective limits of key reagents are known. The enzymes used for islet isolation are critical but little is known about the doses of class I and class II collagenase required for successful islet isolation. We used a factorial approach to evaluate the effect of high and low target activities of recombinant class I (rC1) and class II (rC2) collagenase on human islet yield. Consequently, 4 different enzyme formulations with divergent C1:C2 collagenase mass ratios were assessed, each supplemented with the same dose of neutral protease. Both split pancreas and whole pancreas models were used to test enzyme targets (n = 20). Islet yield/g pancreas was compared with historical enzymes (n = 42). Varying the Wunsch (rC2) and collagen degradation activity (CDA, rC1) target dose, and consequently the C1:C2 mass ratio, had no significant effect on tissue digestion. Digestions using higher doses of Wunsch and CDA resulted in comparable islet yields to those obtained with 60% and 50% of those activities, respectively. Factorial analysis revealed no significant main effect of Wunsch activity or CDA for any parameter measured. Aggregate results from 4 different collagenase formulations gave 44% higher islet yield (>5000 islet equivalents/g) in the body/tail of the pancreas (n = 12) when compared with those from the same segment using a standard natural collagenase/protease mixture (n = 6). Additionally, islet yields greater than 5000 islet equivalents/g pancreas were also obtained in whole human pancreas. A broader C1:C2 ratio can be used for human islet isolation than has been used in the past. Recombinant collagenase is an effective replacement for the natural enzyme and we have determined that high islet yield can be obtained even with low doses of rC1:rC2, which is beneficial for the survival of islets.

  7. The Ia.2 Epitope Defines a Subset of Lipid Raft Resident MHC Class II Molecules Crucial to Effective Antigen Presentation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busman-Sahay, Kathleen; Sargent, Elizabeth; Harton, Jonathan A.; Drake, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has established that binding of the 11-5.2 anti-I-Ak mAb, which recognizes the Ia.2 epitope on I-Ak class II molecules, elicits MHC class II signaling, whereas binding of two other anti-I-Ak mAb that recognize the Ia.17 epitope fail to elicit signaling. Using a biochemical approach, we establish that the Ia.2 epitope recognized by the widely used 11-5.2 mAb defines a subset of cell surface I-Ak molecules predominantly found within membrane lipid rafts. Functional studies demonstrate that the Ia.2 bearing subset of I-Ak class II molecules is critically necessary for effective B cell–T cell interactions especially at low antigen doses, a finding consistent with published studies on the role of raft-resident class II molecules in CD4 T cell activation. Interestingly, B cells expressing recombinant I-Ak class II molecules possessing a β chain-tethered HEL peptide lack the Ia.2 epitope and fail to partition into lipid rafts. Moreover, cells expressing Ia.2 negative tethered peptide-class II molecules are severely impaired in their ability to present both tethered peptide or peptide derived from exogenous antigen to CD4 T cells. These results establish the Ia.2 epitope as defining a lipid raft-resident MHC class II confomer vital to the initiation of MHC class II restricted B cell–T cell interactions. PMID:21543648

  8. Effects of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Combined With Calorie Restriction on Circulating Estrogens and IGF-I in Premenopausal Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Nancy I

    2004-01-01

    ... the primary prevention of breast cancer in women. This study has examined the effects of exercise training combined with caloric restriction, resulting in weight loss, on two hormonal biomarkers for breast cancer i.e...

  9. Effects of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Combined With Caloric Restriction on Circulating Estrogens and IGF-I in Premenopausal Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Nancy I

    2004-01-01

    ... the primary prevention of breast cancer in women. This study has examined the effects of exercise training combined with caloric restriction, resulting in weight loss, on two hormonal biomarkers for breast cancer i.e...

  10. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandya, Mital; Rasmussen, Michael; Hansen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8+ T cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presentation......, and different antigen peptide motifs are associated with specific genetic sequences of class I molecules. Understanding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA), peptide-MHC class I binding specificities may facilitate development of vaccines or reagents for quantifying the adaptive immune response to intracellular...... pathogens, such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Six synthetic BoLA class I (BoLA-I) molecules were produced, and the peptide binding motif was generated for five of the six molecules using a combined approach of positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries (PSCPLs) and neural network...

  11. Identification of SIV Nef CD8(+) T cell epitopes restricted by a MHC class I haplotype associated with lower viral loads in a macaque AIDS model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Takushi; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Naofumi; Naruse, Taeko K; Kimura, Akinori; Matano, Tetsuro

    2014-07-25

    Virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses are crucial for the control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication. Multiple studies on HIV-infected individuals and SIV-infected macaques have indicated association of several major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) genotypes with lower viral loads and delayed AIDS progression. Understanding of the viral control mechanism associated with these MHC-I genotypes would contribute to the development of intervention strategy for HIV control. We have previously reported a rhesus MHC-I haplotype, 90-120-Ia, associated with lower viral loads after SIVmac239 infection. Gag206-216 and Gag241-249 epitope-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses have been shown to play a central role in the reduction of viral loads, whereas the effect of Nef-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses induced in all the 90-120-Ia(+) macaques on SIV replication remains unknown. Here, we identified three CD8(+) T-cell epitopes, Nef9-19, Nef89-97, and Nef193-203, associated with 90-120-Ia. Nef9-19 and Nef193-203 epitope-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses frequently selected for mutations resulting in viral escape from recognition by these CD8(+) T cells, indicating that these CD8(+) T cells exert strong suppressive pressure on SIV replication. Results would be useful for elucidation of the viral control mechanism associated with 90-120-Ia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The viral transcription group determines the HLA class I cellular immune response against human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Carolina; Lorente, Elena; Barriga, Alejandro; Barnea, Eilon; Infantes, Susana; Lemonnier, François A; David, Chella S; Admon, Arie; López, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated killing of virus-infected cells requires previous recognition of short viral antigenic peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen class I molecules that are exposed on the surface of infected cells. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response is critical for the clearance of human respiratory syncytial virus infection. In this study, naturally processed viral human leukocyte antigen class I ligands were identified with mass spectrometry analysis of complex human leukocyte antigen-bound peptide pools isolated from large amounts of human respiratory syncytial virus-infected cells. Acute antiviral T-cell response characterization showed that viral transcription determines both the immunoprevalence and immunodominance of the human leukocyte antigen class I response to human respiratory syncytial virus. These findings have clear implications for antiviral vaccine design. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Class I ADP-ribosylation factors are involved in enterovirus 71 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Wang

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease in infants and children. Replication of enterovirus 71 depends on host cellular factors. The viral replication complex is formed in novel, cytoplasmic, vesicular compartments. It has not been elucidated which cellular pathways are hijacked by the virus to create these vesicles. Here, we investigated whether proteins associated with the cellular secretory pathway were involved in enterovirus 71 replication. We used a loss-of-function assay, based on small interfering RNA. We showed that enterovirus 71 RNA replication was dependent on the activity of Class I ADP-ribosylation factors. Simultaneous depletion of ADP-ribosylation factors 1 and 3, but not three others, inhibited viral replication in cells. We also demonstrated with various techniques that the brefeldin-A-sensitive guanidine nucleotide exchange factor, GBF1, was critically important for enterovirus 71 replication. Our results suggested that enterovirus 71 replication depended on GBF1-mediated activation of Class I ADP-ribosylation factors. These results revealed a connection between enterovirus 71 replication and the cellular secretory pathway; this pathway may represent a novel target for antiviral therapies.

  14. Class I ADP-ribosylation factors are involved in enterovirus 71 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianmin; Du, Jiang; Jin, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease in infants and children. Replication of enterovirus 71 depends on host cellular factors. The viral replication complex is formed in novel, cytoplasmic, vesicular compartments. It has not been elucidated which cellular pathways are hijacked by the virus to create these vesicles. Here, we investigated whether proteins associated with the cellular secretory pathway were involved in enterovirus 71 replication. We used a loss-of-function assay, based on small interfering RNA. We showed that enterovirus 71 RNA replication was dependent on the activity of Class I ADP-ribosylation factors. Simultaneous depletion of ADP-ribosylation factors 1 and 3, but not three others, inhibited viral replication in cells. We also demonstrated with various techniques that the brefeldin-A-sensitive guanidine nucleotide exchange factor, GBF1, was critically important for enterovirus 71 replication. Our results suggested that enterovirus 71 replication depended on GBF1-mediated activation of Class I ADP-ribosylation factors. These results revealed a connection between enterovirus 71 replication and the cellular secretory pathway; this pathway may represent a novel target for antiviral therapies.

  15. The Position of Hyoici Bone in Skeletal Class I, II and III Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravanmehr H

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the position of hyoid bone was compared in three skeletal groups of class I, II and III. The study was based on evaluating 77 lateral cephalometric radiographs, 40 girls and 37 boys, which were divided into 3 groups. Group 1, 2, and 3 consist of 26, 25, and 26 radiographs. 19 cephalometric landmarks and 10 planes were used in order to tracing the radiographs. In all patients, 9 skeletal and 4 cervical vertebrae parameters were measured to determine the hyoid bone. These parameters were compared between three skeletal groups regardless of sex and then, in another statistical analysis, parameters were compared based on patients sex. Statistical analysis showed that in class III patients, the hyoid bone was positioned more anteriorly than two other groups. Also in this group, the hyoid bone had less inclination and it was more horizontal in relation to mandibular plane. In skeletal class II patients this bone was positioned more superiorly than two other groups. Due to these findings it can be concluded that perimandibular muscles and bones could affect the growth of mandible. In addition, comparison of the parameters between two sexes revealed that the hyoid bone was positioned more anteriorly and inferiorly in boys. Also it was shown that in the girls, the position of hyoid bone was closer to the position of this bone in skeletal class I patients.

  16. Coding Class

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Stine; Hansbøl, Mikala

    Denne rapport rummer evaluering og dokumentation af Coding Class projektet1. Coding Class projektet blev igangsat i skoleåret 2016/2017 af IT-Branchen i samarbejde med en række medlemsvirksomheder, Københavns kommune, Vejle Kommune, Styrelsen for IT- og Læring (STIL) og den frivillige forening...... Coding Pirates2. Rapporten er forfattet af Docent i digitale læringsressourcer og forskningskoordinator for forsknings- og udviklingsmiljøet Digitalisering i Skolen (DiS), Mikala Hansbøl, fra Institut for Skole og Læring ved Professionshøjskolen Metropol; og Lektor i læringsteknologi, interaktionsdesign......, design tænkning og design-pædagogik, Stine Ejsing-Duun fra Forskningslab: It og Læringsdesign (ILD-LAB) ved Institut for kommunikation og psykologi, Aalborg Universitet i København. Vi har fulgt og gennemført evaluering og dokumentation af Coding Class projektet i perioden november 2016 til maj 2017...

  17. Origins and Consequences of Religious Restrictions: A Global Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Despite the international controversies surrounding religious restrictions and freedoms, the topic has only recently received substantial research attention. Drawing on this new body of research, and multiple research projects in progress, this address explores both the origins and consequences of religious restrictions in the global arena. To understand the motives for restrictions, I propose hypotheses in three areas: the relationship or lack of relationship between institutional religion and the state, the willingness and capacity of the state to ensure freedoms, and the larger social and cultural pressures restricting freedoms, including social and political movements targeting minority religions. Turning to the consequences of religious restrictions, I explore how and why restrictions alter the religious economy (i.e., formation, supply and operation of religions) and are associated with higher levels of religious persecution, religious violence and intrastate conflict in general. Finally, I review additional areas where research is needed. PMID:25364225

  18. Development of a rapid in vitro protein refolding assay which discriminates between peptide-bound and peptide-free forms of recombinant porcine major histocompatibility class I complex (SLA-I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Kristensen, B.; Ladekjaer-Mikkelsen, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    The extracellular domains of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I, major histocompatibility complex protein class 1) were cloned and sequenced for two haplotypes (114 and H7) which do not share any alleles based on serological typing, and which are the most important in Danish farmed pigs...

  19. Establishment of a quantitative ELISA capable of determining peptide - MHC class I interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Kristensen, N; Blicher, T

    2002-01-01

    dependent manner. Here, we exploit the availability of these molecules to generate a quantitative ELISA-based assay capable of measuring the affinity of the interaction between peptide and MHC-I. This assay is simple and sensitive, and one can easily envisage that the necessary reagents, standards......Many different assays for measuring peptide-MHC interactions have been suggested over the years. Yet, there is no generally accepted standard method available. We have recently generated preoxidized recombinant MHC class I molecules (MHC-I) which can be purified to homogeneity under denaturing...

  20. NetMHCpan, a method for MHC class I binding prediction beyond humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Peters, B; Sidney, J

    2009-01-01

    molecules. We show that the NetMHCpan-2.0 method can accurately predict binding to uncharacterized HLA molecules, including HLA-C and HLA-G. Moreover, NetMHCpan-2.0 is demonstrated to accurately predict peptide binding to chimpanzee and macaque MHC class I molecules. The power of NetMHCpan-2.0 to guide...

  1. Stimulation of HIV-1-specific cytolytic T-lymphocytes facilitates elimination of latent viral reservoir after virus reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Liang; Deng, Kai; Shroff, Neeta S.; Durand, Christine; Rabi, S. Alireza.; Yang, Hung-Chih; Zhang, Hao; Margolick, Joseph B.; Blankson, Joel N.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses HIV-1 replication but cannot eliminate the virus because HIV-1 establishes latent infection. Interruption of HAART leads to a rapid rebound of viremia. Life-long treatment is therefore required. Efforts to purge the latent reservoir have focused on reactivating latent proviruses without inducing global T-cell activation. However, the killing of the infected cells after virus reactivation, which is essential for elimination of the reservoir, has not been assessed. Here we show that after reversal of latency in an in vitro model, infected resting CD4+ T cells survived despite viral cytopathic effects, even in the presence of autologous cytolytic T-lymphocytes (CTL) from most patients on HAART. Antigen-specific stimulation of patient CTLs led to efficient killing of infected cells. These results demonstrate that stimulating HIV-1-specific CTLs prior to reactivating latent HIV-1 may be essential for successful eradication efforts and should be considered in future clinical trials. PMID:22406268

  2. Moment Restriction-based Econometric Methods: An Overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Kunitomo (Naoto); M.J. McAleer (Michael); Y. Nishiyama (Yoshihiko)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMoment restriction-based econometric modelling is a broad class which includes the parametric, semiparametric and nonparametric approaches. Moments and conditional moments themselves are nonparametric quantities. If a model is specified in part up to some finite dimensional parameters,

  3. Expression of rat class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alloantigens and hepatocytes and hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.M.; Desai, P.A.; Chakraborty, S.

    1986-01-01

    Altered expression of Class I MHC alloantigens has been reported for murine tumors, and may be associated with the tumorigenic phenotype of tumor cells. To characterize MHC Class I alloantigen expression on a chemically-induced transplantable rat hepatoma cell line, 17X, derived from a (WF x F344) F 1 rat, polyvalent anti-F344 and anti-WF rat alloantisera were first used to immunoprecipitate the rat RT1.A Class I MHC alloantigens expressed on primary (WF x F344) F 1 hepatocyptes in short-term monolayer cultures. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing and SDS-PAGE of immunoprecipitates from 35 S-methionine-labeled (WF x F344) F 1 hepatocytes clearly resolved the RT1.A/sup u/ (WF) and RT1.A/sup LvI/ (F344) parental alloantigens. Identical radiolabeling and immunoprecipitation failed to detect either parental alloantigen on the 17X hepatoma cells. However, indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses demonstrated the presence of parental alloantigens on the 17X cells. Immunization of F344 rats but not of WF rats with 17X cells resulted in antibodies cytotoxic for normal (WF X F344) F 1 spleen cells in the presence of complement. These findings indicate that a combination of detection techniques will be necessary to characterize altered alloantigen expression on rat hepatoma cells

  4. Ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I) prevents apoptosis induced by Fas or SAPK/JNK activation in T-lymphoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberth, K; Claesson, M H

    2001-01-01

    Early apoptosis in Jurkat T-lymphoma cells was induced by agonistic anti-Fas Ab or by anisomycin which activates the stress kinases SAPK/JNK. Apoptosis was inhibited by ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I). MHC-I ligation induced upregulation of the anti-apoptotic......Early apoptosis in Jurkat T-lymphoma cells was induced by agonistic anti-Fas Ab or by anisomycin which activates the stress kinases SAPK/JNK. Apoptosis was inhibited by ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I). MHC-I ligation induced upregulation of the anti......-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and stabilized the mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsim). MHC-I ligation also prevented downregulation of Bcl-2 and destabilization of Deltapsim induced by anti-Fas Ab treatment or anisomycin exposure. Studies on three different Jurkat cell mutants deficient for src p56(lck), ZAP......-70 kinase, or TCR/CD3 gamma-chain showed that the cells undergo apoptosis after Fas ligation. Anisomycin exposure induced apoptosis in the src p56(lck)-deficient cell line but not in the two other mutant cell lines. Simultaneous cross-linking of MHC-I and Fas ligation inhibited apoptosis in the ZAP...

  5. Characterization of EBV gB indicates properties of both class I and class II viral fusion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backovic, Marija; Leser, George P.; Lamb, Robert A.; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2007-01-01

    To gain insight into Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein B (gB), recombinant, secreted variants were generated. The role of putative transmembrane regions, the proteolytic processing and the oligomerization state of the gB variants were investigated. Constructs containing 2 of 3 C-terminal hydrophobic regions were secreted, indicating that these do not act as transmembrane anchors. The efficiency of cleavage of the gB furin site was found to depend on the nature of C-terminus. All of the gB constructs formed rosette structures reminiscent of the postfusion aggregates formed by other viral fusion proteins. However, substitution of putative fusion loop residues, WY 112-113 and WLIY 193-196 , with less hydrophobic amino acids from HSV-1 gB, produced trimeric protein and abrogated the ability of the EBV gB ectodomains to form rosettes. These data demonstrate biochemical features of EBV gB that are characteristic of other class I and class II viral fusion proteins, but not of HSV-1 gB

  6. The leader peptide of mutacin 1140 has distinct structural components compared to related class I lantibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escano, Jerome; Stauffer, Byron; Brennan, Jacob; Bullock, Monica; Smith, Leif

    2014-12-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized peptide antibiotics composed of an N-terminal leader peptide that promotes the core peptide's interaction with the post translational modification (PTM) enzymes. Following PTMs, mutacin 1140 is transported out of the cell and the leader peptide is cleaved to yield the antibacterial peptide. Mutacin 1140 leader peptide is structurally unique compared to other class I lantibiotic leader peptides. Herein, we further our understanding of the structural differences of mutacin 1140 leader peptide with regard to other class I leader peptides. We have determined that the length of the leader peptide is important for the biosynthesis of mutacin 1140. We have also determined that mutacin 1140 leader peptide contains a novel four amino acid motif compared to related lantibiotics. PTM enzyme recognition of the leader peptide appears to be evolutionarily distinct from related class I lantibiotics. Our study on mutacin 1140 leader peptide provides a basis for future studies aimed at understanding its interaction with the PTM enzymes. © 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A statistical mechanical approach to restricted integer partition functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chi-Chun; Dai, Wu-Sheng

    2018-05-01

    The main aim of this paper is twofold: (1) suggesting a statistical mechanical approach to the calculation of the generating function of restricted integer partition functions which count the number of partitions—a way of writing an integer as a sum of other integers under certain restrictions. In this approach, the generating function of restricted integer partition functions is constructed from the canonical partition functions of various quantum gases. (2) Introducing a new type of restricted integer partition functions corresponding to general statistics which is a generalization of Gentile statistics in statistical mechanics; many kinds of restricted integer partition functions are special cases of this restricted integer partition function. Moreover, with statistical mechanics as a bridge, we reveal a mathematical fact: the generating function of restricted integer partition function is just the symmetric function which is a class of functions being invariant under the action of permutation groups. Using this approach, we provide some expressions of restricted integer partition functions as examples.

  8. MHC class I chain-related A: Polymorphism, regulation and therapeutic value in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Kuang, Shuzhen; Wang, Liangjiang; Wei, Yanzhang

    2018-07-01

    MICA and MICB are stress-induced molecules recognized by NKG2D, one of major activation receptors of natural killer (NK) cells. Upon binding to NKG2D, NKG2D-mediated cytolytic immune response of immune effector cells will be activated against virally infected and tumor cells expressing MICA. In the early oncogenic development, membrane-bound MICA serves as a key signal to recruit anti-tumor immune effectors. Nevertheless, both MICA polymorphic features and its dysregulated expression in evolving tumors have resulted in tumor evasion in various cancer types. Therefore, in order to reconstitute tumor immunosurveilance, it is of great significance that we understand MICA genetics, polymorphisms, mechanisms of MICA-associated tumor escape and molecular/cellular modulation of MICA. In this review, the MICA-associated co-expression networks involving microRNAs (miRNAs) and novel candidate long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were also discussed. Given the current importance in the study of MICA gene, this review paper focuses on the role of MICA in different cancer types, and strategies that we manipulate MICA regulation against tumor proliferation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. beta. -endorphin augments the cytolytic activity and interferon production of natural killer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandler, R.N.; Biddison, W.E.; Mandler, R.; Serrate, S.A.

    1986-02-01

    The in vitro effects of the neurohormone ..beta..-endorphin (b-end) on natural killer (NK) activity and interferon (IFN) production mediated by large granular lymphocytes (LGL) were investigated. LGL-enriched fractions from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from normal human volunteers were obtained by fractionation over discontinuous Percoll gradients. LGL were preincubated with or without various concentrations of b-end or the closely related peptides ..cap alpha..-endorphin (a-end), ..gamma..-endorphin (g-end), or D-ALA/sub 2/-..beta..-endorphin (D-ALA/sub 2/-b-end), a synthetic b-end analogue. NK activity was assayed on /sup 51/Cr-labeled K562 target cells. Preincubation of LGL effectors (but not K562 targets) for 2 to 18 hr with concentrations of b-end between 10/sup -7/ M and 10/sup -10/ M produced significant augmentation of NK cytolytic activity (mean percentage increase: 63%). The classic opiate antagonist naloxone blocked the enhancing effect when used at a 100-fold molar excess relative to b-end. These findings demonstrate that b-end enhances NK activity and IFN production of purified LGL, and suggests that b-end might bind to an opioid receptor on LGL that can be blocked by naloxone. These results lend support to the concepts of regulation of the immune response by neurohormones and the functional relationship between the nervous and immune systems.

  10. Constitutively Active MAVS Inhibits HIV-1 Replication via Type I Interferon Secretion and Induction of HIV-1 Restriction Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Gupta

    Full Text Available Type I interferon is known to inhibit HIV-1 replication through the induction of interferon stimulated genes (ISG, including a number of HIV-1 restriction factors. To better understand interferon-mediated HIV-1 restriction, we constructed a constitutively active form of the RIG-I adapter protein MAVS. Constitutive MAVS was generated by fusion of full length MAVS to a truncated form of the Epstein Barr virus protein LMP1 (ΔLMP1. Supernatant from ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells contained high levels of type I interferons and inhibited HIV replication in both TZM-bl and primary human CD4+ T cells. Supernatant from ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells also inhibited replication of VSV-G pseudotyped single cycle SIV in TZM-bl cells, suggesting restriction was post-entry and common to both HIV and SIV. Gene array analysis of ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells and trans-activated CD4+ T cells showed significant upregulation of ISG, including previously characterized HIV restriction factors Viperin, Tetherin, MxB, and ISG56. Interferon blockade studies implicated interferon-beta in this response. In addition to direct viral inhibition, ΔLMP1-MAVS markedly enhanced secretion of IFN-β and IL-12p70 by dendritic cells and the activation and maturation of dendritic cells. Based on this immunostimulatory activity, an adenoviral vector (Ad5 expressing ΔLMP1-MAVS was tested as a molecular adjuvant in an HIV vaccine mouse model. Ad5-Gag antigen combined with Ad5-ΔLMP1-MAVS enhanced control of vaccinia-gag replication in a mouse challenge model, with 4/5 animals showing undetectable virus following challenge. Overall, ΔLMP1-MAVS is a promising reagent to inhibit HIV-1 replication in infected tissues and enhance vaccine-mediated immune responses, while avoiding toxicity associated with systemic type I interferon administration.

  11. Anionic Sites, Fucose Residues and Class I Human Leukocyte Antigen Fate During Interaction of Toxoplasma gondii with Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stumbo Ana Carolina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii invades and proliferates in human umbilical vein endothelial cells where it resides in a parasitophorous vacuole. In order to analyze which components of the endothelial cell plasma membrane are internalized and become part of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane, the culture of endothelial cells was labeled with cationized ferritin or UEA I lectin or anti Class I human leukocytte antigen (HLA before or after infection with T. gondii. The results showed no cationized ferritin and UEA I lectin in any parasitophorous vacuole membrane, however, the Class I HLA molecule labeling was observed in some endocytic vacuoles containing parasite until 1 h of interaction with T. gondii. After 24 h parasite-host cell interaction, the labeling was absent on the vacuolar membrane, but presents only in small vesicles near parasitophorous vacuole. These results suggest the anionic site and fucose residues are excluded at the time of parasitophorous vacuole formation while Class I HLA molecules are present only on a minority of Toxoplasma-containig vacuoles.

  12. Permanent, lowered HLA class I expression using lentivirus vectors with shRNA constructs: Averting cytotoxicity by alloreactive T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, K; Lemp, N A; Logg, C R; Nagashima, J; Faure-Kumar, E; Gomez, G G; Kruse, C A; Mendez, R; Stripecke, R; Kasahara, N; Kasahara, N A; Cicciarelli, J C

    2006-12-01

    Transplantation of many tissues requires histocompatibility matching of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) to prevent graft rejection, to reduce the level of immunosuppression needed to maintain graft survival, and to minimize the risk of graft-versus-host disease, particularly in the case of bone marrow transplantation. However, recent advances in fields of gene delivery and genetic regulation technologies have opened the possibility of engineering grafts that display reduced levels of HLA expression. Suppression of HLA expression could help to overcome the limitations imposed by extensive HLA polymorphisms that restrict the availability of suitable donors, necessitate the maintenance of large donor registries, and complicate the logistics of procuring and delivering matched tissues and organs to the recipient. Accordingly, we investigated whether knockdown of HLA by RNA interference (RNAi), a ubiquitous regulatory system that can efficiently and selectively inhibit the expression of specific gene products, would enable allogeneic cells to evade immune recognition. For efficient and stable delivery of short hairpin-type RNAi constructs (shRNA), we employed lentivirus-based gene transfer vectors, which provide a delivery system that can achieve integration into genomic DNA, thereby permanently modifying transduced graft cells. Our results show that lentivirus-mediated delivery of shRNA targeting pan-Class I and allele-specific HLA can achieve efficient and dose-dependent reduction in surface expression of HLA in human cells, associated with enhanced resistance to alloreactive T lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity, while avoiding MHC-non-restricted killing. We hypothesize that RNAi-induced silencing of HLA expression has the potential to create histocompatibility-enhanced, and, eventually, perhaps "universally" compatible cellular grafts.

  13. Regulation of T cell response to leishmania antigens by determinants of histocompatibility leukocyte class I and II molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacellar O.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that HLA class I molecules play a significant role in the regulation of the proliferation of T cells activated by mitogens and antigens. We evaluated the ability of mAb to a framework determinant of HLA class I molecules to regulate T cell proliferation and interferon gamma (IFN-g production against leishmania, PPD, C. albicans and tetanus toxoid antigens in patients with tegumentary leishmaniasis and healthy subjects. The anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC mAb (W6/32 suppressed lymphocyte proliferation by 90% in cultures stimulated with aCD3, but the suppression was variable in cultures stimulated with leishmania antigen. This suppression ranged from 30-67% and was observed only in 5 of 11 patients. IFN-g production against leishmania antigen was also suppressed by anti-HLA class I mAb. In 3 patients IFN-g levels were suppressed by more than 60%, while in the other 2 cultures IFN-g levels were 36 and 10% lower than controls. The suppression by HLA class I mAb to the proliferative response in leishmaniasis patients and in healthy controls varied with the antigens and the patients or donors tested. To determine whether the suppression is directed at antigen presenting cells (APCs or at the responding T cells, experiments with antigen-primed non-adherent cells, separately incubated with W6/32, were performed. Suppression of proliferation was only observed when the W6/32 mAb was added in the presence of T cells. These data provide evidence that a mAb directed at HLA class I framework determinants can suppress proliferation and cytokine secretion in response to several antigens.

  14. Vaccination and Infection as Causative Factors in Japanese Patients With Rasmussen Syndrome: Molecular Mimicry and HLA Class I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukitoshi Takahashi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasmussen syndrome is an intractable epilepsy with a putative causal relation with cellular and humoral autoimmunity. Almost half of the patients have some preceding causative factors, with infections found in 38.2%, vaccinations in 5.9% and head trauma in 8.9% of Japanese patients. In a patient with seizure onset after influenza A infections, cross-reaction of the patient's lymphocytes with GluRε2 and influenza vaccine components was demonstrated by lymphocyte stimulation test. Database analyses revealed that influenza A virus hemagglutinin and GluRε2 molecules contain peptides with the patient's HLA class I binding motif (HLA ࢤ A*0201. The relative risks of HLA class I genotypes for Rasmussen syndrome are 6.1 (A*2402, 6.4 (A*0201, 6.3 (A*2601 and 11.4 (B*4601. The relative risks of HLA class I-A and B haplotypes are infinity (A*2601+B*5401, 21.1 (A*2402+B*1501, 13.3 (A*2402+B*4801 and 5.1 (A*2402+B*5201. Some alleles and haplotypes of HLA class I may be the risk factors in Japanese patients. Cross-reactivity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes may contribute to the processes leading from infection to the involvement of CNS.

  15. Radial restricted solid-on-solid and etching interface-growth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Sidiney G.

    2018-03-01

    An approach to generate radial interfaces is presented. A radial network recursively obtained is used to implement discrete model rules designed originally for the investigation in flat substrates. I used the restricted solid-on-solid and etching models as to test the proposed scheme. The results indicate the Kardar, Parisi, and Zhang conjecture is completely verified leading to a good agreement between the interface radius fluctuation distribution and the Gaussian unitary ensemble. The evolution of the radius agrees well with the generalized conjecture, and the two-point correlation function exhibits also a good agreement with the covariance of the Airy2 process. The approach can be used to investigate radial interfaces evolution for many other classes of universality.

  16. Genetic diversity of the HpyC1I restriction modification system in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehours, Philippe; Dupouy, Sandrine; Chaineux, Julien; Ruskoné-Fourmestraux, Agnès; Delchier, Jean-Charles; Morgner, Andrea; Mégraud, Francis; Ménard, Armelle

    2007-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori is unique because of the unusually high number and diversity of its restriction modification (R-M) systems. HpyC1I R-M was recently characterized and contains an endonuclease which is an isoschizomer of the endonuclease BccI. This R-M is involved in adherence to gastric epithelial cells, a crucial step in bacterial pathogenesis. This observation illustrates the fact that R-M systems have other putative biological functions in addition to protecting the bacterial genome from external DNA. The genomic diversity of HpyC1I R-M was evaluated more precisely on a large collection of H. pylori strains by PCR, susceptibility to BccI digestion and sequencing. The results obtained support the mechanism of gain and loss of this R-M system in the H. pylori genome, and suggest that it is an ancestral system which gradually disappears during H. pylori evolution, following successive steps: (1) inactivation of the endonuclease gene, followed or accompanied by: (2) inactivation of the methyltransferase genes, and then: (3) definitive loss, leaving only short endonuclease remnant sequences.

  17. Analysis of associations between major histocompatibility complex (BoLA) class I haplotypes and subclinical mastitis of dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, N. E.; Østergård, H.

    1995-01-01

    The associations between BoLA class I haplotypes and subclinical mastitis were investigated using information on 333 cows from three different breeds and crossbreeds from 14 dairy herds in Denmark. Somatic cell count and bacteriological status were used as markers for subclinical mastitis....... Associations between BoLA class I haplotypes and IMI status were also determined. The association between BoLA class I haplotypes and subclinical mastitis was weak. The A10(W50), A11, A12(A30), A16, A19(A6), A21, A26, and A31(A30) alleles were associated with different markers of subclinical mastitis....... Susceptibility or resistance to the two bacteria categories was associated with different alleles. This study indicated that BoLA antigens may be involved in resistance to mastitis and that resistance may be specific for a particular pathogen....

  18. A screening procedure to evaluate air pollution effects on Class I wilderness areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas G. Fox; Ann M. Bartuska; James G. Byrne; Ellis Cowling; Richard Fisher; Gene E. Likens; Steven E. Lindberg; Rick A. Linthurst; Jay Messer; Dale S. Nichols

    1989-01-01

    This screening procedure is intended to help wilderness managers conduct "adverse impact determinations" as part of Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) applications for sources that emit air pollutants that might impact Class I wildernesses. The process provides an initial estimate of susceptibility to critical loadings for sulfur, nitrogen, and...

  19. Species-specific evolution of class I MHC genes in iguanas (order: Squamata; subfamily: Iguaninae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaberman, Scott; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2008-07-01

    Over the last few decades, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has emerged as a model for understanding the influence of natural selection on genetic diversity in populations as well as for investigating the genetic basis of host resistance to pathogens. However, many vertebrate taxa remain underrepresented in the field of MHC research, preventing its application to studies of disease, evolution, and conservation genetics in these groups. This is particularly true for squamates, which are by far the most diversified order of non-avian reptiles but have not been the subject of any recent MHC studies. In this paper, we present MHC class I complementary DNA data from three squamate species in the subfamily Iguaninae (iguanas): the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus), the Galápagos land iguana (Conolophus subcristatus), and the green iguana (Iguana iguana). All sequences obtained are related to the few published class I genes from other squamates. There is evidence for multiple loci in each species, and the conserved alpha-3 domain appears to be evolving in a species-specific manner. Conversely, there is some indication of shared polymorphism between species in the peptide-binding alpha-1 and alpha-2 domains, suggesting that these two regions have different phylogenetic histories. The great similarity between alpha-3 sequences in marine iguanas in particular suggests that concerted evolution is acting to homogenize class I loci within species. However, while less likely, the data are also compatible with a birth and death model of evolution.

  20. Model for how type I restriction enzymes select cleavage sites in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studier, F.W.; Bandyopadhyay, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Under appropriate conditions, digestion of phage T7 DNA by the type I restriction enzyme EcoK produces an orderly progression of discrete DNA fragments. All details of the fragmentation pattern can be explained on the basis of the known properties of type I enzymes, together with two further assumptions: (i) in the ATP-stimulated translocation reaction, the enzyme bound at the recognition sequence translocates DNA toward itself from both directions simultaneously; and (ii) when translocation causes neighboring enzymes to meet, they cut the DNA between them. The kinetics of digestion at 37 degree C indicates that the rate of translocation of DNA from each side of a bound enzyme is about 200 base pairs per second, and the cuts are completed within 15-25 sec of the time neighboring enzymes meet. The resulting DNA fragments each contain a single recognition site with an enzyme (or subunit) remaining bound to it. At high enzyme concentrations, such fragments can bu further degraded, apparently by cooperation between the specifically bound and excess enzymes. This model is consistent with a substantial body of previous work on the nuclease activity of EcoB and EcoK, and it explains in a simple way how cleavage sites are selected

  1. The dominantly expressed class I molecule of the chicken MHC is explained by coevolution with the polymorphic peptide transporter (TAP) genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, Brian A; Hunt, Lawrence G; Sowa, Anna K

    2011-01-01

    In most mammals, the MHC class I molecules are polymorphic and determine the specificity of peptide presentation, whereas the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) heterodimers are functionally monomorphic. In chickens, there are two classical class I genes but only one is expres...

  2. HLA non-class II genes may confer type I diabetes susceptibility in a Mapuche (Amerindian) affected family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Martinez-Laso, Jorge; Martin-Villa, Jose M; Moscoso, Juan; Moreno, Almudena; Serrano-Vela, Juan I; Zamora, Jorge; Asenjo, Silvia; Gleisner, Andrea; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A rare case of type I diabetes is studied in an Amerindian (Mapuche) family from Chile, analyzing glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet-cell autoantibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. The affected sib is the only one that has one specific HLA haplotype combination that differs from the other sibs only in the HLA class I genes. It is concluded that HLA diabetes susceptibility factors may be placed outside the class II region or even that susceptibility factors do not exist in the HLA region in this Amerindian family.

  3. NcoI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha) region in primary biliary cirrhosis and in healthy Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P

    1989-01-01

    The restriction fragment length polymorphism of the human tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha) region was investigated by means of 20 different restriction enzymes and a human TNF alpha cDNA probe. Only one of the enzymes, NcoI, revealed a polymorphic pattern consisting of fragments of 10.5 and 5.5...

  4. ER stress affects processing of MHC class I-associated peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meloche Sylvain

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral infection and neoplastic transformation trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Thus, a large proportion of the cells that must be recognized by the immune system are stressed cells. Cells respond to ER stress by launching the unfolded protein response (UPR. The UPR regulates the two key processes that control major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I-peptide presentation: protein synthesis and degradation. We therefore asked whether and how the UPR impinges on MHC I-peptide presentation. Results We evaluated the impact of the UPR on global MHC I expression and on presentation of the H2Kb-associated SIINFEKL peptide. EL4 cells stably transfected with vectors coding hen egg lysozyme (HEL-SIINFEKL protein variants were stressed with palmitate or exposed to glucose deprivation. UPR decreased surface expression of MHC I but did not affect MHC I mRNA level nor the total amount of intracellular MHC I proteins. Impaired MHC I-peptide presentation was due mainly to reduced supply of peptides owing to an inhibition of overall protein synthesis. Consequently, generation of H2Kb-SIINFEKL complexes was curtailed during ER stress, illustrating how generation of MHC I peptide ligands is tightly coupled to ongoing protein synthesis. Notably, the UPR-induced decline of MHC I-peptide presentation was more severe when the protein source of peptides was localized in the cytosol than in the ER. This difference was not due to changes in the translation rates of the precursor proteins but to increased stability of the cytosolic protein during ER stress. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that ER stress impairs MHC I-peptide presentation, and that it differentially regulates expression of ER- vs. cytosol-derived peptides. Furthermore, this work illustrates how ER stress, a typical feature of infected and malignant cells, can impinge on cues for adaptive immune recognition.

  5. Automated benchmarking of peptide-MHC class I binding predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolle, Thomas; Metushi, Imir G.; Greenbaum, Jason A.; Kim, Yohan; Sidney, John; Lund, Ole; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern; Nielsen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Numerous in silico methods predicting peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules have been developed over the last decades. However, the multitude of available prediction tools makes it non-trivial for the end-user to select which tool to use for a given task. To provide a solid basis on which to compare different prediction tools, we here describe a framework for the automated benchmarking of peptide-MHC class I binding prediction tools. The framework runs weekly benchmarks on data that are newly entered into the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB), giving the public access to frequent, up-to-date performance evaluations of all participating tools. To overcome potential selection bias in the data included in the IEDB, a strategy was implemented that suggests a set of peptides for which different prediction methods give divergent predictions as to their binding capability. Upon experimental binding validation, these peptides entered the benchmark study. Results: The benchmark has run for 15 weeks and includes evaluation of 44 datasets covering 17 MHC alleles and more than 4000 peptide-MHC binding measurements. Inspection of the results allows the end-user to make educated selections between participating tools. Of the four participating servers, NetMHCpan performed the best, followed by ANN, SMM and finally ARB. Availability and implementation: Up-to-date performance evaluations of each server can be found online at http://tools.iedb.org/auto_bench/mhci/weekly. All prediction tool developers are invited to participate in the benchmark. Sign-up instructions are available at http://tools.iedb.org/auto_bench/mhci/join. Contact: mniel@cbs.dtu.dk or bpeters@liai.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25717196

  6. The Class I HDAC Inhibitor RGFP963 Enhances Consolidation of Cued Fear Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Mallory E.; Xia, Bing; Carreiro, Samantha; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence indicates that broad, nonspecific histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition enhances learning and memory, however, the contribution of the various HDACs to specific forms of learning is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the Class I HDAC inhibitor, RGFP963, enhances consolidation of cued fear extinction. However, RGFP966, a strong…

  7. Peripheral nerve injury causes transient expression of MHC class I antigens in rat motor neurons and skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maehlen, J; Nennesmo, I; Olsson, A B

    1989-01-01

    After a peripheral nerve lesion (rat facial and sciatic) an induction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens class I was detected immunohistochemically in skeletal muscle fibers and motor neurons. This MHC expression was transient after a nerve crush, when regeneration occurred......, but persisted after a nerve cut, when regeneration was prevented. Since the time course of MHC class I expression correlates to that of regeneration a role for this cell surface molecule in regeneration may be considered....

  8. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    KAUST Repository

    La Rocca, Rosanna

    2014-12-26

    In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells) was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700–1800 cm−1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK) cells cytotoxic recognition.

  9. Mechanical stress downregulates MHC class I expression on human cancer cell membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna La Rocca

    Full Text Available In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal, depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700-1800 cm(-1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK cells cytotoxic recognition.

  10. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II alleles which confer susceptibility or protection in the Morphea in Adults and Children (MAC) cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobe, Heidi; Ahn, Chul; Arnett, Frank; Reveille, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-class I) and II (HLA-class II) alleles associated with morphea (localized scleroderma) in the Morphea in Adults and Children (MAC) cohort by a nested case–control association study. Methods Morphea patients were included from MAC cohort and matched controls from the NIH/NIAMS Scleroderma Family Registry and DNA Repository and Division of Rheumatology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. HLA- Class II genotyping and SSCP typing was performed of HLA-A, -B, -C alleles. Associations between HLA-Class I and II alleles and morphea as well as its subphenotypes were determined. Results There were 211 cases available for HLA-class I typing with 726 matched controls and 158 cases available for HLA Class-II typing with 1108 matched controls. The strongest associations were found with DRB1*04:04 (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4–4.0 P=0.002) and HLA-B*37 conferred the highest OR among Class I alleles (3.3, 95% CI 1.6–6.9, P= 0.0016). Comparison with risk alleles in systemic sclerosis determined using the same methods and control population revealed one common allele (DRB*04:04). Conclusion Results of the present study demonstrate specific HLA Class I and II alleles are associated with morphea and likely generalized and linear subtypes. The associated morphea alleles are different than in scleroderma, implicating morphea is also immunogenetically distinct. Risk alleles in morphea are also associated with conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune conditions. Population based studies indicate patients with RA have increased risk of morphea, implicating a common susceptibility allele. PMID:25223600

  11. The Escape of Cancer from T Cell-Mediated Immune Surveillance: HLA Class I Loss and Tumor Tissue Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Garrido

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor immune escape is associated with the loss of tumor HLA class I (HLA-I expression commonly found in malignant cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy depends on the expression levels of HLA class I molecules on tumors cells. It also depends on the molecular mechanism underlying the loss of HLA expression, which could be reversible/“soft” or irreversible/“hard” due to genetic alterations in HLA, β2-microglobulin or IFN genes. Immune selection of HLA-I negative tumor cells harboring structural/irreversible alterations has been demonstrated after immunotherapy in cancer patients and in experimental cancer models. Here, we summarize recent findings indicating that tumor HLA-I loss also correlates with a reduced intra-tumor T cell infiltration and with a specific reorganization of tumor tissue. T cell immune selection of HLA-I negative tumors results in a clear separation between the stroma and the tumor parenchyma with leucocytes, macrophages and other mononuclear cells restrained outside the tumor mass. Better understanding of the structural and functional changes taking place in the tumor microenvironment may help to overcome cancer immune escape and improve the efficacy of different immunotherapeutic strategies. We also underline the urgent need for designing strategies to enhance tumor HLA class I expression that could improve tumor rejection by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL.

  12. Complex assembly, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of duck MHC class I molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Yong; Gao, Feng; Chen, Weihong; Qi, Jianxun; Xia, Chun

    2009-01-01

    Using a peptide derived from H5N1, a complex of duck MHC class I molecule (DuMHC I) with duck β 2 -microglobulin (Duβ 2 m) was assembled and crystallized. Initial structure analysis indicated that the crystals did not contain the complete DuMHC I complex but instead contained DuMHC I α3-domain and Duβ 2 m subunits. In order to understand the biological properties of the immune systems of waterfowl and to establish a system for structural studies of duck class I major histocompatibility complex (DuMHC I), a complex of DuMHC I with duck β 2 -microglobulin (Duβ 2 m) and the peptide AEIEDLIF (AF8) derived from H5N1 NP residues 251–258 was assembled. The complex was crystallized; the crystals belonged to space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 54.7, b = 72.4, c = 102.2 Å, and diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution. Matthews coefficient calculation and initial structure determination by molecular replacement showed that the crystals did not contain the whole DuMHC I complex, but instead contained the DuMHC I α3 domain and a Duβ2m molecule (DuMHC I α3+β2m). Another complex of DuMHC I with the peptide IDWFDGKE derived from a chicken fusion protein also generated the same results. The stable structure of DuMHC I α3+β2m may reflect some unique characteristics of DuMHC I and pave the way for novel MHC structure-related studies in the future

  13. High-risk human papillomavirus E7 expression reduces cell-surface MHC class I molecules and increases susceptibility to natural killer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottley, G; Watherston, O G; Hiew, Y-L

    2007-01-01

    a role for E7 in tumour immune evasion. We show that knockdown of E7 expression in HPV16- and HPV18-transformed cervical carcinoma cells by RNA interference increased expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I at the cell surface and reduced susceptibility of these cells to natural...... killer (NK) cells. Tetracycline-regulated induction of HPV16 E7 resulted in reduced expression of cell surface MHC class I molecules and increased NK cell killing. Our results suggest that, for HPV-associated malignancies, reduced MHC class I expression is the result of an active immune evasion strategy...

  14. Somatic HLA mutations expose the role of class I–mediated autoimmunity in aplastic anemia and its clonal complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Jamie L.; Xie, Hongbo M.; Stanley, Natasha; Atienza, Jamie; Perdigones, Nieves; Nicholas, Peter; Ferriola, Deborah; Li, Yimei; Huang, Hugh; Ye, Wenda; Morrissette, Jennifer J. D.; Kearns, Jane; Porter, David L.; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Eisenlohr, Laurence C.; Biegel, Jaclyn A.; Chou, Stella T.; Monos, Dimitrios S.; Bessler, Monica; Olson, Timothy S.

    2017-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is an acquired deficiency of early hematopoietic cells, characterized by inadequate blood production, and a predisposition to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and leukemia. Although its exact pathogenesis is unknown, aAA is thought to be driven by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)–restricted T cell immunity, with earlier studies favoring HLA class II-mediated pathways. Using whole-exome sequencing (WES), we recently identified 2 patients with aAA with somatic mutations in HLA class I genes. We hypothesized that HLA class I mutations are pathognomonic for autoimmunity in aAA, but were previously underappreciated because the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region is notoriously difficult to analyze by WES. Using a combination of targeted deep sequencing of HLA class I genes and single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A) genotyping, we screened 66 patients with aAA for somatic HLA class I loss. We found somatic HLA loss in 11 patients (17%), with 13 loss-of-function mutations in HLA-A*33:03, HLA-A*68:01, HLA-B*14:02, and HLA-B*40:02 alleles. Three patients had more than 1 mutation targeting the same HLA allele. Interestingly, HLA-B*14:02 and HLA-B*40:02 were significantly overrepresented in patients with aAA compared with ethnicity-matched controls. Patients who inherited the targeted HLA alleles, regardless of HLA mutation status, had a more severe disease course with more frequent clonal complications as assessed by WES, SNP-A, and metaphase cytogenetics, and more frequent secondary MDS. The finding of recurrent HLA class I mutations provides compelling evidence for a predominant HLA class I-driven autoimmunity in aAA and establishes a novel link between immunogenetics and clonal evolution of patients with aAA. PMID:28971166

  15. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I, and class II DRB loci of captive and wild Indian leopards (Panthera pardus fusca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Drashti R; Mitra, Siuli; Bhadouriya, Snehalata; Rao, Tirupathi; Kunteepuram, Vaishnavi; Gaur, Ajay

    2017-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC), in vertebrate animals, is a multi-genic protein complex that encodes various receptors. During a disease, MHC interacts with the antigen and triggers a cascade of adaptive immune responses to overcome a disease outbreak. The MHC is very important region from immunological point of view, but it is poorly characterized among Indian leopards. During this investigation, we examined genetic diversity for MHC class I (MHC-I) and MHC class II-DRB (MHC-II) among wild and captive Indian leopards. This study estimated a pool of 9 and 17 alleles for MHC-I and MHC-II, respectively. The wild group of individuals showed higher nucleotide diversity and amino acid polymorphism compared to the captive group. A phylogenetic comparison with other felids revealed a clustering in MHC-I and interspersed presence in MHC-II sequences. A test for selection also revealed a deviation from neutrality at MHC-II DRB loci and higher non-synonymous substitution rate (dN) among the individuals from wild group. Further, the wild individuals showed higher dN for both MHC I and II genes compared to the group that was bred under captive conditions. These findings suggest the role of micro-evolutionary forces, such as pathogen-mediated selection, to cause MHC variations among the two groups of Indian leopards, because the two groups have been bred in two different environments for a substantial period of time. Since, MHC diversity is often linked with the quality of immunological health; the results obtained from this study fill the gap of knowledge on disease predisposition among wild and captive Indian leopards.

  16. 41 CFR 301-10.122 - What class of airline accommodations must I use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What class of airline accommodations must I use? 301-10.122 Section 301-10.122 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ALLOWABLE TRAVEL EXPENSES 10-TRANSPORTATION EXPENSES Common Carrier Transportatio...

  17. Oat (Avena sativa) Seed Extract as an Antifungal Food Preservative Through the Catalytic Activity of a Highly Abundant Class I Chitinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans; Madsen, Lone; Petersen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    candidates included thaumatin-like proteins, 1,3-beta-glucanase, permatin precursor, pathogenesis-related protein type 1, and chitinases of class I and II. Class I chitinase could be specifically removed from the extracts and was found to be indispensable for 50% of the P. roqueforti inhibiting activity...

  18. Efficient assembly of recombinant major histocompatibility complex class I molecules with preformed disulfide bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard Pedersen, L; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Hansen, N J

    2001-01-01

    The expression of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) crucially depends upon the binding of appropriate peptides. MHC-I from natural sources are therefore always preoccupied with peptides complicating their purification and analysis. Here, we present an efficient solution to this problem....... Recombinant MHC-I heavy chains were produced in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified under denaturing conditions. In contrast to common practice, the molecules were not reduced during the purification. The oxidized MHC-I heavy chain isoforms were highly active with respect to peptide binding....... This suggests that de novo folding of denatured MHC-I molecules proceed efficiently if directed by preformed disulfide bond(s). Importantly, these molecules express serological epitopes and stain specific T cells; and they bind peptides specifically. Several denatured MHC-I heavy chains were analyzed and shown...

  19. Expression, refolding and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of equine MHC class I molecule complexed with an EIAV-Env CTL epitope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Shugang; Qi, Jianxun; Liu, Jun; Chen, Rong; Pan, Xiaocheng; Li, Xiaoying; Gao, Feng; Xia, Chun

    2011-01-01

    The equine MHC class I molecule was crystallized in complex with β 2 -microglobulin and a CTL epitope and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.3 Å resolution. In order to clarify the structure and the peptide-presentation characteristics of the equine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule, a complex of equine MHC class I molecule (ELA-A1 haplotype, 7-6 allele) with mouse β 2 -microglobulin and the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope Env-RW12 (RVEDVTNTAEYW) derived from equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) envelope protein (residues 195–206) was refolded and crystallized. The crystal, which belonged to space group P2 1 , diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution and had unit-cell parameters a = 82.5, b = 71.4, c = 99.8 Å, β = 102.9°. The crystal structure contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit. These results should help to determine the first equine MHC class I molecule structure presenting an EIAV CTL epitope

  20. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Lv

    Full Text Available MHC class I (MHC-I molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade.

  1. Horse cDNA clones encoding two MHC class I genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbis, D.P.; Maher, J.K.; Stanek, J.; Klaunberg, B.A.; Antczak, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    Two full-length clones encoding MHC class I genes were isolated by screening a horse cDNA library, using a probe encoding in human HLA-A2.2Y allele. The library was made in the pcDNA1 vector (Invitrogen, San Diego, CA), using mRNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from a Thoroughbred stallion (No. 0834) homozygous for a common horse MHC haplotype (ELA-A2, -B2, -D2; Antczak et al. 1984; Donaldson et al. 1988). The clones were sequenced, using SP6 and T7 universal primers and horse-specific oligonucleotides designed to extend previously determined sequences.

  2. Major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted cytolytic activity of human T cells: analysis of precursor frequency and effector phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, S.S.; Thiele, D.L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    The frequency and phenotype of human T cells that mediate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted cytolysis were analyzed. T cell clones were generated by culturing adherent cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a density of 0.3 cell/well with phytohemagglutinin, recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2), and irradiated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and/or Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. All of the 198 clones generated by this method were T cells (CD2 + , CD3 + , CD4 + or CD2 + , CD3 + , CD8 + ) that possessed potent lytic activity against K562, an erythroleukemia line sensitive to lysis by human natural killer cells, and Cur, a renal carcinoma cell line resistant to human natural killer activity. Cytolysis, measured by 51 Cr release, was MHC-unrestricted, since the clones were able to lyse MHC class I or class II negative targets, as well as MHC class I and class II negative targets. Although the clones produced tissue necrosis factor/lymphotoxin-like molecules, lysis of Cur of K562 was not mediated by a soluble factor secreted by the clones. These data indicate that the capacity for MHC-unrestricted tumoricidal activity and expression of NKH1 and CD11b, but not CD 16, are properties common to all or nearly all human peripheral blood-derived T cell clones regardless of CD4 or CD8 phenotype

  3. A new polymorphic and multicopy MHC gene family related to nonmammalian class I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leelayuwat, C.; Degli-Esposti, M.A.; Abraham, L.J. [Univ. of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Townend, D.C. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); Dawkins, R.L. [Royal Perth Hospital, Perth (Australia)]|[Univ. of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)]|[Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    The authors have used genomic analysis to characterize a region of the central major histocompatibility complex (MHC) spanning {approximately} 300 kilobases (kb) between TNF and HLA-B. This region has been suggested to carry genetic factors relevant to the development of autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis (MG) and insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Genomic sequence was analyzed for coding potential, using two neural network programs, GRAIL and GeneParser. A genomic probe, JAB, containing putative coding sequences (PERB11) located 60 kb centromeric of HLA-B, was used for northern analysis of human tissues. Multiple transcripts were detected. Southern analysis of genomic DNA and overlapping YAC clones, covering the region from BAT1 to HLA-F, indicated that there are at least five copies of PERB11, four of which are located within this region of the MHC. The partial cDNA sequence of PERB11 was obtained from poly-A RNA derived from skeletal muscle. The putative amino acid sequence of PERB11 shares {approximately} 30% identity to MHC class I molecules from various species, including reptiles, chickens, and frogs, as well as to other MHC class I-like molecules, such as the IgG FcR of the mouse and rat and the human Zn-{alpha}2-glycoprotein. From direct comparison of amino acid sequences, it is concluded that PERB11 is a distinct molecule more closely related to nonmammalian than known mammalian MHC class I molecules. Genomic sequence analysis of PERB11 from five MHC ancestral haplotypes (AH) indicated that the gene is polymorphic at both DNA and protein level. The results suggest that the authors have identified a novel polymorphic gene family with multiple copies within the MHC. 48 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. 50 CFR 697.23 - Restricted gear areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restricted gear areas. 697.23 Section 697... Measures § 697.23 Restricted gear areas. (a) Resolution of lobster gear conflicts with fisheries managed...) Restricted Gear Area I—(1) Duration—(i) Mobile Gear. From October 1 through June 15 of each fishing year, no...

  5. Expanding Canadian renewable and conservation expenses class 43.1 to include solar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Class 43.1 is a tax measure that allows for accelerated write-offs of renewable energy products for business use. Technologies that are included in the class for accelerated write off include renewable energy sources such as wind, small hydro, geo-thermal, fuel cells, bio-gas, cogeneration systems, and district heating and solar. In 2005, the federal budget announced 2 changes to class 43.1 The write off rate has been increased from 30 per cent to 50 per cent. This change would reduce the effective cost of solar energy for business owners. The class has also been extended to include distribution assets for district energy assets and biogas equipment. However, no changes to the restrictions for solar were announced. The Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA) argues that class 43.1 currently does not help the solar industries, nor do the proposed changes solve this situation. The restrictions placed on solar eliminate about 90 per cent of the industrial applications for solar that class 43.1 should support. Class 43.1 currently covers only 1 per cent of photovoltaic applications, 2 per cent of solar hot water applications, and 9 per cent of solar air heating applications. CanSIA claims that an increase in tax write-offs for photovoltaic systems, solar hot water, and solar air heating would help increase the solar market from 1,060 kW to a market size of 11,600 kW. CanSIA has made recommendations to the federal government to remove the size restrictions for PV systems and to remove the restrictions on applications for solar thermal systems. 2 tabs

  6. Enhanced Prevalence of Plasmatic Soluble MHC Class I Chain-Related Molecule in Vascular Pregnancy Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Baptiste Haumonte

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex class I related chain (MIC is a stress-inducible protein modulating the function of immune natural killer (NK cells, a major leukocyte subset involved in proper trophoblast invasion and spiral artery remodeling. Aim of the study was to evaluate whether upregulation of soluble MIC (sMIC may reflect immune disorders associated to vascular pregnancy diseases (VPD. sMIC was more frequently detected in the plasma of women with a diagnostic of VPD (32% than in normal term-matched pregnancies (1.6%, P<0.0001, with highest prevalence in intrauterine fetal death (IUDF, 44% and vascular intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, 39%. sMIC levels were higher in preeclampsia (PE than in IUFD (P<0.01 and vascular IUGR (P<0.05. sMIC detection was associated with bilateral early diastolic uterine notches (P=0.037, thrombocytopenia (P=0.03, and high proteinuria (P=0.03 in PE and with the vascular etiology of IUGR (P=0.0038. Incubation of sMIC-positive PE plasma resulted in downregulation of NKG2D expression and NK cell-mediated IFN-γ production in vitro. Our work thus suggests that detection of sMIC molecule in maternal plasma may constitute a hallmark of altered maternal immune functions that contributes to vascular disorders that complicate pregnancy, notably by impairing NK-cell mediated production of IFN-γ, an essential cytokine favoring vascular modeling.

  7. Endogenous collagen peptide activation of CD1d-restricted NKT cells ameliorates tissue-specific inflammation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawei; Teige, Anna; Mondoc, Emma

    2011-01-01

    NKT cells in the mouse recognize antigen in the context of the MHC class I-like molecule CD1d and play an important role in peripheral tolerance and protection against autoimmune and other diseases. NKT cells are usually activated by CD1d-presented lipid antigens. However, peptide recognition...... in the context of CD1 has also been documented, although no self-peptide ligands have been reported to date. Here, we have identified an endogenous peptide that is presented by CD1d to activate mouse NKT cells. This peptide, the immunodominant epitope from mouse collagen type II (mCII707-721), was not associated...... with either MHC class I or II. Activation of CD1d-restricted mCII707-721-specific NKT cells was induced via TCR signaling and classical costimulation. In addition, mCII707-721-specific NKT cells induced T cell death through Fas/FasL, in an IL-17A-independent fashion. Moreover, mCII707-721-specific NKT cells...

  8. BoLA class I polymorphism and in vitro immune response to M. bovis antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longeri, M; Polli, M; Ponti, W; Zanotti, M

    1993-01-12

    From a sample of 119 Friesian calves, serologically typed for BoLA class I, 47 subjects were chosen expressing 9 different MHC types (A6, A6.9, A10, A11, A14, A15, A30, W16, M103) with the same age and reared in the same farm conditions. The animals were s.c. injected with a water in oil suspension of killed M. bovis and the treatment was repeated two days later. Before the treatment and 21 days later, calves were bled and on PBM (peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes) were performed the following tests: 1. Lymphocyte Stimulation with bovine and avian PPDs (Purified protein derivative of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium, respectively). 2. Phagocytic activity towards M. bovis. 3. Class II molecules expression on cell surface. 4. Percentage of leucocyte populations and subpopulations. In the in vitro Lymphocyte Stimulation test, all the animals and classes were responders. Animals bearing A10 BoLA class I presented c.p.m. (counts per minute) and index values higher than the other cattle; these values were significantly positively related both to bovine and avian PPDs (P celular de moleculas de clase II. 4. Porcentaje de poblaciones y de subpob-laciones de leucocitos. Todos los animales y todos los tipos de MHC dieron respuestas positivas en las pruebas de Stimulacion Lymphocitaria. Los animales que tenian la BoLA A10 presentaron valores de c.p.m. y indices mas altos de los demas animales. Estos valores se encontraron significativamente y positivamente relacionados sea a la PPD bovina que a la PPD avicola. Por medio de la analisis de varianzas se encontro que el tipo BoLA A14 muestraba una correlacion significativa y algo positiva con una mejor actividad fagocitaria. Los tipos de clase BoLA I no parecieron que influenzaran de manera appreciable el porcentaje de positividad por la clase II y el porcentaje de leucocitos en la sangre PBM. 1993 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Complex antigen presentation pathway for an HLA-A*0201-restricted epitope from Chikungunya 6K protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Elena; Barriga, Alejandro; García-Arriaza, Juan; Lemonnier, François A; Esteban, Mariano; López, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    The adaptive cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated immune response is critical for clearance of many viral infections. These CTL recognize naturally processed short viral antigenic peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on the surface of infected cells. This specific recognition allows the killing of virus-infected cells. The T cell immune T cell response to Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a mosquito-borne Alphavirus of the Togaviridae family responsible for severe musculoskeletal disorders, has not been fully defined; nonetheless, the importance of HLA class I-restricted immune response in this virus has been hypothesized. By infection of HLA-A*0201-transgenic mice with a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes the CHIKV structural polyprotein (rVACV-CHIKV), we identified the first human T cell epitopes from CHIKV. These three novel 6K transmembrane protein-derived epitopes are presented by the common HLA class I molecule, HLA-A*0201. One of these epitopes is processed and presented via a complex pathway that involves proteases from different subcellular locations. Specific chemical inhibitors blocked these events in rVACV-CHIKV-infected cells. Our data have implications not only for the identification of novel Alphavirus and Togaviridae antiviral CTL responses, but also for analyzing presentation of antigen from viruses of different families and orders that use host proteinases to generate their mature envelope proteins.

  10. Repression of MHC class I transcription by HPV16E7 through interaction with a putative RXRβ motif and NF-κB cytoplasmic sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hui; Zhan, TaiLan; Li, Chang; Liu, Mugen; Wang, Qing K.

    2009-01-01

    Down-regulation of transcription of the MHC class I genes in HPV16 tumorigenic cells is partly due to HPV16E7 associated with the MHC class I promoter and repressed chromatin activation. In this study, we further demonstrated that HPV16E7 is physically associated with a putative RXRβ binding motif (GGTCA) of the proximal promoter of the MHC class I genes by using reporter transcriptional assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Our data also provide evidence that HPV16E7 inhibits TNF-α-induced up-regulation of MHC class I transcription by impaired nuclear translocation of NF-κB. More importantly, CaSki tumor cells treated with TSA and transfected with the constitutively active mutant form of IKK-α (which can activate NF-κB directly) showed a maximal level of up-regulation of MHC-I expression. Taken together, our results suggest that HPV16E7 may employ two independent mechanisms to ensure that either the constitutive or inducible transcription of MHC class I genes is down-regulated.

  11. The prognostic role of classical and nonclassical MHC class I expression in endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijen, C.B.; Bantema-Joppe, E.J.; de Jong, Renske; Leffers, N.; Mourits, M.J.; Eggink, Henk F.; van der Zee, A.G.; Hollema, H.; de Bock, G.H.; Nijman, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate classical MHC class I and nonclassical MHC (human leukocyte antigen-G [HLA-GJ) expression in a large cohort of patients with endometrial cancer, to determine the prognostic value of these cell surface markers and their relation with clinicopathological

  12. Représentations de Weil et GL2 algèbres de division et GLn (vers les corps de classes galoisiens I, II)

    CERN Document Server

    Kaise, Tetsuo

    1987-01-01

    This monograph represents the first two parts of the author's research on the generalization of class field theory for the noncommutative case. Part I concentrates on the construction of all the irreducible representations of a multiplicative group B* of a quaternion algebra B over a local field k with residue field of characteristic 2. These results are of considerable significance in the light of the connections found by Jacquet-Langlands between representations of GL2 (k) and B* and although they concern GL2 they also provide a model for GLn. Part II deals with n > 2 unifying results previously obtained by Weil, Jacquet-Langlands, Bernstein-Zelevinskii, Deligne-Kazdan and others. More than a mere comparison of these results, it reveals an intrinsic correspondence found with the aid of the base restriction process of algebraic groups and the substitution of division of algebras for Cartan subalgebras. The approach is purely local and therefore may be applied also to other types of reductive groups, in parti...

  13. The production of KIR-Fc fusion proteins and their use in a multiplex HLA class I binding assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Hugo G; Moesta, Achim K; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Blokhuis, Jeroen; Parham, Peter; Norman, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    Soluble recombinant proteins that comprise the extracellular part of a surface expressed receptor attached to the Fc region of an IgG antibody have facilitated the determination of ligand specificity for an array of immune system receptors. Among such receptors is the family of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) that recognize HLA class I ligands. These receptors, expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and T cells, play important roles in both immune defense and placental development in early pregnancy. Here we describe a method for the production of two domain KIR-Fc fusion proteins using baculovirus infected insect cells. This method is more scalable than traditional mammalian cell expression systems and produces efficiently folded proteins that carry posttranslational modifications found in native KIR. We also describe a multiplex binding assay using the Luminex platform that determines the avidity and specificity of two domain KIR-Fc for a panel of microbeads, each coated with one of 97 HLA class I allotypes. This assay is simple to perform, and represents a major improvement over the assays used previously, which were limited in the number of KIR and HLA class I combinations that could be assayed at any one time. The results obtained from this assay can be used to predict the response of NK cell and T cells when their KIR recognize HLA class I. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of the MHC: the evolution of class I duplication blocks, diversity and complexity from shark to man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulski, Jerzy K; Shiina, Takashi; Anzai, Tatsuya; Kohara, Sakae; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2002-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genomic region is composed of a group of linked genes involved functionally with the adaptive and innate immune systems. The class I and class II genes are intrinsic features of the MHC and have been found in all the jawed vertebrates studied so far. The MHC genomic regions of the human and the chicken (B locus) have been fully sequenced and mapped, and the mouse MHC sequence is almost finished. Information on the MHC genomic structures (size, complexity, genic and intergenic composition and organization, gene order and number) of other vertebrates is largely limited or nonexistent. Therefore, we are mapping, sequencing and analyzing the MHC genomic regions of different human haplotypes and at least eight nonhuman species. Here, we review our progress with these sequences and compare the human MHC structure with that of the nonhuman primates (chimpanzee and rhesus macaque), other mammals (pigs, mice and rats) and nonmammalian vertebrates such as birds (chicken and quail), bony fish (medaka, pufferfish and zebrafish) and cartilaginous fish (nurse shark). This comparison reveals a complex MHC structure for mammals and a relatively simpler design for nonmammalian animals with a hypothetical prototypic structure for the shark. In the mammalian MHC, there are two to five different class I duplication blocks embedded within a framework of conserved nonclass I and/or nonclass II genes. With a few exceptions, the class I framework genes are absent from the MHC of birds, bony fish and sharks. Comparative genomics of the MHC reveal a highly plastic region with major structural differences between the mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates. Additional genomic data are needed on animals of the reptilia, crocodilia and marsupial classes to find the origins of the class I framework genes and examples of structures that may be intermediate between the simple and complex MHC organizations of birds and mammals, respectively.

  15. Regulation of <i>MIR165/166i> by class II and class III homeodomain leucine zipper proteins establishes leaf polarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merelo, Paz; Ram, Hathi; Caggiano, Monica Pia

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of plant leaves is their flattened shape. This shape depends on an antagonism between the genes that specify adaxial (top) and abaxial (bottom) tissue identity; however, the molecular nature of this antagonism remains poorly understood. Class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-...... show that class III and class II HD-ZIP proteins act together to repress MIR165/166 via a conserved cis-element in their promoters. Organ morphology and tissue patterning in plants, therefore, depend on a bidirectional repressive circuit involving a set of miRNAs and its targets....

  16. Molecular Basis of Natural Killer Cell Tumor Target Recognition: The NKr/MHC Class I Complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hasemann, Charles

    1999-01-01

    .... We have pursued this via the heterologous expression of wild type and mutant NK receptors for the purpose of the determination of the atomic structure of an NK receptor/ class I MHC complex via X-ray crystallography...

  17. CIITA promoter I CARD-deficient mice express functional MHC class II genes in myeloid and lymphoid compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinzow-Kramer, W M; Long, A B; Youngblood, B A; Rosenthal, K M; Butler, R; Mohammed, A-U-R; Skountzou, I; Ahmed, R; Evavold, B D; Boss, J M

    2012-06-01

    Three distinct promoters control the master regulator of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression, class II transactivator (CIITA), in a cell type-specific manner. Promoter I (pI) CIITA, expressed primarily by dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages, expresses a unique isoform that contains a caspase-recruitment domain (CARD). The activity and function of this isoform are not understood, but are believed to enhance the function of CIITA in antigen-presenting cells. To determine whether isoform I of CIITA has specific functions, CIITA mutant mice were created in which isoform I was replaced with isoform III sequences. Mice in which pI and the CARD-encoding exon were deleted were also created. No defect in the formation of CD4 T cells, the ability to respond to a model antigen or bacterial or viral challenge was observed in mice lacking CIITA isoform I. Although CIITA and MHC-II expression was decreased in splenic DCs, pI knockout animals expressed CIITA from downstream promoters, suggesting that control of pI activity is mediated by unknown distal elements that could act at pIII, the B-cell promoter. Thus, no critical function is linked to the CARD domain of CIITA isoform I with respect to basic immune system development, function and challenge.

  18. Foliated vector fields, the Godbillon-Vey invariant and the invariant I(F)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banyaga, A.; Landa, Alain Musesa

    2004-03-01

    We prove that if the invariant I(F) constructed in 'An invariant of contact structures and transversally oriented foliations', Ann. Global Analysis and Geom. 14(1996) 427-441 (A. Banyaga), through the Lie algebra of infinitesimal automorphisms of transversally oriented foliations F is trivial, then the Godbillon-Vey invariant GV (F) of F is also trivial, but that the converse is not true. For codimension one foliations, the restrictions I τ , (F) of I(F) to the Lie subalgebra of vector fields tangent to the leaves is the Reeb class R(F) of F. We also prove that if there exists a foliated vector field which is everywhere transverse to a codimension one foliation, then the Reeb class R(F) is trivial, hence so is the GV(F) invariant. (author)

  19. Use of lichen fumigation studies to evaluate the effects of new emission sources on class I areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.; Webb, P.G.; Biggs, R.H.; Portier, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    Allowable increments of SO 2 from new emission sources near Class I areas are severely limited by the PSD provisions of the Clean Air Act, unless the applicant can prove that the expected emissions will not adversely affect the air quality related values of Class I area. Lichens are considered to be the resource that is most sensitive to SO 2 . If projected concentrations will not injure lichens, other resources should not be affected. Four lichen species native to two Class I area, Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge and Everglades National Park, were fumigated in the laboratory with SO 2 doses that simulated the frequencies, duration, and concentrations expected from potential new sources. Lichens from Cape Romain were fumigated with 240 μg/m 3 , 400 μg/m 3 , and ambient air 3 hours/week for 6 weeks. No differences in biomass gain, percent electrolyte leakage in solution (an indicator of membrane damage) or 14 CO 2 assimilation were observed among treatments. Lichens from Everglades National Park were fumigated with 100 μg/m 3 , 200 μg/m 3 , 400 μg/m 3 , and ambient air 6 hours/week for 10 weeks. Percent electrolyte leakage of Parmotrema tinctorum was greater at the two high concentrations, but there was no significant effect on biomass gain or 14 CO 2 assimilation. Percent electrolyte leakage increased and biomass gain and 14 CO 2 assimilation decreased in Ramalina denticulata at 400 μg/m 3 SO 2 in comparison with lower concentrations. Studies of fumigation effects on lichens are a useful technique for the evaluation of impacts of emission sources on air quality related values in Class I areas

  20. Cytolytic T lymphocyte precursor cells in congenitally athymic C57BL/6 nu/nu mice: Quantitation, enrichment, and specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maryanski, J.L. (Ludwig Inst. for Cancer Research, Epalinges, Switzerland); MacDonald, H.R.; Sordat, B.; Cerottini, J.C.

    1981-03-01

    A sensitive limiting dilution microculture system was used to obtain minimal estimates of the frequency of CTL precursor cells (CTL-P) in spleens from 5- to 14-mo-old C57BL/6 nu/nu mice. Frequency determinations of CTL-P directed against H-2delta alloantigens ranged from 1/159,000 to 1/12,400. The relatively low frequency of CTL-P was enriched nearly 10-fold (to 1/2300) by passage of nude spleen cells over a column of nylon wool. After priming nude spleen cells for 7 days in conventional MLC, 1 to 3% of the MLC cells could be operationally identified as CTL-P. Furthermore, the progeny of MLC-primed nude CTL-P were specifically cytolytic for target cells of the strain used for priming. Such a system may be useful for analyzing the specificity repertoires of cells of the T cell lineage that have not undergone thymic influence.

  1. Characterization of a Nonclassical Class I MHC Gene in a Reptile, the Galápagos Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaberman, Scott; Du Pasquier, Louis; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2008-01-01

    Squamates are a diverse order of vertebrates, representing more than 7,000 species. Yet, descriptions of full-length major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in this group are nearly absent from the literature, while the number of MHC studies continues to rise in other vertebrate taxa. The lack of basic information about MHC organization in squamates inhibits investigation into the relationship between MHC polymorphism and disease, and leaves a large taxonomic gap in our understanding of amniote MHC evolution. Here, we use both cDNA and genomic sequence data to characterize a class I MHC gene (Amcr-UA) from the Galápagos marine iguana, a member of the squamate subfamily Iguaninae. Amcr-UA appears to be functional since it is expressed in the blood and contains many of the conserved peptide-binding residues that are found in classical class I genes of other vertebrates. In addition, comparison of Amcr-UA to homologous sequences from other iguanine species shows that the antigen-binding portion of this gene is under purifying selection, rather than balancing selection, and therefore may have a conserved function. A striking feature of Amcr-UA is that both the cDNA and genomic sequences lack the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that are necessary to anchor the class I receptor molecule into the cell membrane, suggesting that the product of this gene is secreted and consequently not involved in classical class I antigen-presentation. The truncated and conserved character of Amcr-UA lead us to define it as a nonclassical gene that is related to the few available squamate class I sequences. However, phylogenetic analysis placed Amcr-UA in a basal position relative to other published classical MHC genes from squamates, suggesting that this gene diverged near the beginning of squamate diversification. PMID:18682845

  2. Characterization of a nonclassical class I MHC gene in a reptile, the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Glaberman

    Full Text Available Squamates are a diverse order of vertebrates, representing more than 7,000 species. Yet, descriptions of full-length major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes in this group are nearly absent from the literature, while the number of MHC studies continues to rise in other vertebrate taxa. The lack of basic information about MHC organization in squamates inhibits investigation into the relationship between MHC polymorphism and disease, and leaves a large taxonomic gap in our understanding of amniote MHC evolution. Here, we use both cDNA and genomic sequence data to characterize a class I MHC gene (Amcr-UA from the Galápagos marine iguana, a member of the squamate subfamily Iguaninae. Amcr-UA appears to be functional since it is expressed in the blood and contains many of the conserved peptide-binding residues that are found in classical class I genes of other vertebrates. In addition, comparison of Amcr-UA to homologous sequences from other iguanine species shows that the antigen-binding portion of this gene is under purifying selection, rather than balancing selection, and therefore may have a conserved function. A striking feature of Amcr-UA is that both the cDNA and genomic sequences lack the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that are necessary to anchor the class I receptor molecule into the cell membrane, suggesting that the product of this gene is secreted and consequently not involved in classical class I antigen-presentation. The truncated and conserved character of Amcr-UA lead us to define it as a nonclassical gene that is related to the few available squamate class I sequences. However, phylogenetic analysis placed Amcr-UA in a basal position relative to other published classical MHC genes from squamates, suggesting that this gene diverged near the beginning of squamate diversification.

  3. HLA Class I-Mediated HIV-1 Control in Vietnamese Infected with HIV-1 Subtype A/E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikata, Takayuki; Tran, Giang Van; Murakoshi, Hayato; Akahoshi, Tomohiro; Qi, Ying; Naranbhai, Vivek; Kuse, Nozomi; Tamura, Yoshiko; Koyanagi, Madoka; Sakai, Sachiko; Nguyen, Dung Hoai; Nguyen, Dung Thi; Nguyen, Ha Thu; Nguyen, Trung Vu; Oka, Shinichi; Martin, Maureen P; Carrington, Mary; Sakai, Keiko; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2018-03-01

    HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) play an important role in the control of HIV-1 subtype B or C infection. However, the role of CTLs in HIV-1 subtype A/E infection still remains unclear. Here we investigated the association of HLA class I alleles with clinical outcomes in treatment-naive Vietnamese infected with subtype A/E virus. We found that HLA-C*12:02 was significantly associated with lower plasma viral loads (pVL) and higher CD4 counts and that the HLA-A*29:01-B*07:05-C*15:05 haplotype was significantly associated with higher pVL and lower CD4 counts than those for individuals without these respective genotypes. Nine Pol and three Nef mutations were associated with at least one HLA allele in the HLA-A*29:01-B*07:05-C*15:05 haplotype, with a strong negative correlation between the number of HLA-associated Pol mutations and CD4 count as well as a positive correlation with pVL for individuals with these HLA alleles. The results suggest that the accumulation of mutations selected by CTLs restricted by these HLA alleles affects HIV control. IMPORTANCE Most previous studies on HLA association with disease progression after HIV-1 infection have been performed on cohorts infected with HIV-1 subtypes B and C, whereas few such population-based studies have been reported for cohorts infected with the Asian subtype A/E virus. In this study, we analyzed the association of HLA class I alleles with clinical outcomes for 536 HIV-1 subtype A/E-infected Vietnamese individuals. We found that HLA-C*12:02 is protective, while the HLA haplotype HLA-A*29:01-B*07:05-C*15:05 is deleterious. The individuals with HIV-1 mutations associated with at least one of the HLA alleles in the deleterious HLA haplotype had higher plasma viral loads and lower CD4 counts than those of individuals without the mutations, suggesting that viral adaptation and escape from HLA-mediated immune control occurred. The present study identifies a protective allele and a deleterious haplotype for HIV-1

  4. Understanding Class in Contemporary Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrits, Gitte Sommer

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that claims about the death of class and the coming of the classless society are premature. Such claims are seldom genuinely empirical, and the theoretical argument often refers to a simple and therefore easily dismissible concept of class. By rejecting the concept of class...... altogether, sociological theory runs the risk of loosing the capacity for analysing stratification and vertical differentiation of power and freedom, which in late modernity seem to be a of continuing importance. Hence, I argue that although class analysis faces a number of serious challenges, it is possible...... to reinvent class analysis. The sociology of Pierre Bourdieu in many ways introduces an appropriate paradigm, and the paper therefore critically discusses Bourdieu's concept of class. Since the "Bourdieuan" class concept is primarily epistemological, i.e. a research strategy more than a theory, empirical...

  5. Defining the HLA class I-associated viral antigen repertoire from HIV-1-infected human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ternette, Nicola; Yang, Hongbing; Partridge, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recognition and eradication of infected cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is a key defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens. High-throughput definition of HLA class I-associated immunopeptidomes by mass spectrometry is an increasingly important analytical tool to advance our understanding...

  6. MHC class I dowregulation, tumour escape from immune surveillance and design of therapeutic strategies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 1 (2005), s. 1-2 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/04/0492; GA MZd NR7807 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : MHC class I * immune surveillance * immunotherapy Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.719, year: 2005

  7. Evolution of MHC class I genes in the endangered loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) revealed by 454 amplicon sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiebens, Victor A; Merino, Sonia E; Chain, Frédéric J J; Eizaguirre, Christophe

    2013-04-30

    In evolutionary and conservation biology, parasitism is often highlighted as a major selective pressure. To fight against parasites and pathogens, genetic diversity of the immune genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are particularly important. However, the extensive degree of polymorphism observed in these genes makes it difficult to conduct thorough population screenings. We utilized a genotyping protocol that uses 454 amplicon sequencing to characterize the MHC class I in the endangered loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) and to investigate their evolution at multiple relevant levels of organization. MHC class I genes revealed signatures of trans-species polymorphism across several reptile species. In the studied loggerhead turtle individuals, it results in the maintenance of two ancient allelic lineages. We also found that individuals carrying an intermediate number of MHC class I alleles are larger than those with either a low or high number of alleles. Multiple modes of evolution seem to maintain MHC diversity in the loggerhead turtles, with relatively high polymorphism for an endangered species.

  8. T-cell activation. VI. Inhibitory and stimulatory effects of anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibodies in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röpke, M; Röpke, C; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1993-01-01

    Murine T splenocytes stimulated in primary allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) were incubated with soluble anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies induced inhibition in the cytotoxicity of the responding population and this inhibition...... was not dependent on the domain on class I molecules recognized by the antibodies. Cross-reactivity of the antibodies between the responder and stimulating cell population caused a marked reduction in the inhibitory effect compared to systems where no such cross-reactivity was present. Saturating levels...... of the antibodies caused a reduction in generation of T-cell cytotoxicity, whereas low concentrations stimulated the same response. These results demonstrate that the MHC class I molecules of T cells are of significant importance in antigen-induced signal transduction....

  9. MHC class II restricted innate-like double negative T cells contribute to optimal primary and secondary immunity to Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Zhirong; Liu, Dong; Okwor, Ifeoma; Jia, Ping; Orihara, Kanami; Uzonna, Jude Ezeh

    2014-09-01

    Although it is generally believed that CD4(+) T cells play important roles in anti-Leishmania immunity, some studies suggest that they may be dispensable, and that MHC II-restricted CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) (double negative, DN) T cells may be more important in regulating primary anti-Leishmania immunity. In addition, while there are reports of increased numbers of DN T cells in Leishmania-infected patients, dogs and mice, concrete evidence implicating these cells in secondary anti-Leishmania immunity has not yet been documented. Here, we report that DN T cells extensively proliferate and produce effector cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF and IL-17) and granzyme B (GrzB) in the draining lymph nodes and spleens of mice following primary and secondary L. major infections. DN T cells from healed mice display functional characteristics of protective anti-Leishmania memory-like cells: rapid and extensive proliferation and effector cytokines production following L. major challenge in vitro and in vivo. DN T cells express predominantly (> 95%) alpha-beta T cell receptor (αβ TCR), are Leishmania-specific, restricted mostly by MHC class II molecules and display transcriptional profile of innate-like genes. Using in vivo depletion and adoptive transfer studies, we show that DN T cells contribute to optimal primary and secondary anti-Leishmania immunity in mice. These results directly identify DN T cells as important players in effective and protective primary and secondary anti-L. major immunity in experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  10. Chemotherapy, IL-12 gene therapy and combined adjuvant therapy of HPV 16-associated MHC class I-proficient and -deficient tumours

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Indrová, Marie; Bieblová, Jana; Jandlová, Táňa; Vonka, V.; Pajtasz-Piasecka, E.; Reiniš, Milan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2006), s. 253-260 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR7807; GA MZd(CZ) NR8004 Grant - others:Ministry of Scientific Research Information Society Technologies(PL) PBZ-KBN-091/PO5/2003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HPV 16 * MHC class I-deficient and MHC class I-proficient tumour cells * CMRTD Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.556, year: 2006

  11. Duration of the peak of adolescent growth spurt in class i and ii malocclusion subjects using a cervical vertebrae maturation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Lazo, Rodrigo; Arriola-Guillén, Luis E; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to determine the duration of the adolescent peak growth spurt using cervical vertebral maturation analysis in class I and II malocclusion subjects. The study was conducted on a sample which consisted of 154 lateral cephalograms of children and adolescents aged 9-15 years (84 females and 70 males). The evaluation of skeletal maturation stage was performed using a visual morphological analysis of CS3 and CS4 cervical vertebrae. The sagittal skeletal relation was evaluated according to Steiner analysis. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize chronological age in each malocclusion group and for each CS3 and CS4 skeletal maturation stage. Due to a lack of normal distribution, comparisons of CS3 and CS4 age intervals on class I and II subjects were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test for independent samples. The results show that the mean duration of the adolescent peak growth spurt was 10 months between CS3 and CS4 stages in class I malocclusion subjects, whereas in class II malocclusion patients the duration was 6 months. This difference of 4 months was statistically significant (p<0.001). Finally, a clinically significant difference of 4 months in the duration of the adolescent peak growth spurt for class I and II malocclusion subjects was identified.

  12. Rejection of class I MHC-deficient haemopoietic cells by irradiated MHC-matched mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bix, M.; Nanshih Liao; Raulet, D.; Zijlstra, M.; Loring, J.; Jaenisch, R.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiated MHC-heterozygous mice often reject bone marrow cells transplanted from one of the homozygous parental strains, a phenomenon ('hybrid resistance') that appears to violate the laws of transplantation. Rejection of parental and allogeneic marrow cells also differs from conventional T cell-mediated rejection mechanisms as it is effected by NK1.1 + cells. To account for the unusual specificity of bone marrow rejection, it has been proposed that NK1.1 + cells destroy marrow cells that fail to express the full complement of self MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules. We show here that NK1.1 + cells in normal mice reject haemopoietic transplants from mice that are deficient for normal cell-surface MHC-I expression because of a targeted mutation in the β 2 -microglobulin gene. These findings demonstrate that deficient expression of MHC-I molecules renders marrow cells susceptible to rejection. (author)

  13. The interaction between beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) and purified class-I major histocompatibility (MHC) antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L O; Hansen, A S; Olsen, A C

    1994-01-01

    been generated recently and this paper reports on a similar assay for the interaction between beta 2m and class I. As a model system human beta 2m binding to mouse class I was used. The assay is strictly biochemical using purified reagents which interact in solution and complex formation is determined...... by size separation. It is specific and highly sensitive. The observed affinity of the interaction, KD, is close to 0.4 nM. The rate of association at 37 degrees C is very fast (the ka is around 5 x 10(4)/M/s) whereas the dissociation is slow (the kd is around 8 x 10(-6)/s); the ratio of dissociation...

  14. HBV-specific CD4+ cytotoxic T cells in hepatocellular carcinoma are less cytolytic toward tumor cells and suppress CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanzhi; Zhen, Shoumei; Song, Bin

    2017-08-01

    In East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, chronic infection is the main cause of the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, an aggressive cancer with low survival rate. Cytotoxic T cell-based immunotherapy is a promising treatment strategy. Here, we investigated the possibility of using HBV-specific CD4 + cytotoxic T cells to eliminate tumor cells. The naturally occurring HBV-specific cytotoxic CD4 + and CD8 + T cells were identified by HBV peptide pool stimulation. We found that in HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma patients, the HBV-specific cytotoxic CD4 + T cells and cytotoxic CD8 + T cells were present at similar numbers. But compared to the CD8 + cytotoxic T cells, the CD4 + cytotoxic T cells secreted less cytolytic factors granzyme A (GzmA) and granzyme B (GzmB), and were less effective at eliminating tumor cells. In addition, despite being able to secrete cytolytic factors, CD4 + T cells suppressed the cytotoxicity mediated by CD8 + T cells, even when CD4 + CD25 + regulator T cells were absent. Interestingly, we found that interleukin 10 (IL-10)-secreting Tr1 cells were enriched in the cytotoxic CD4 + T cells. Neutralization of IL-10 abrogated the suppression of CD8 + T cells by CD4 + CD25 - T cells. Neither the frequency nor the absolute number of HBV-specific CD4 + cytotoxic T cells were correlated with the clinical outcome of advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Together, this study demonstrated that in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma, CD4 + T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was present naturally in the host and had the potential to exert antitumor immunity, but its capacity was limited and was associated with immunoregulatory properties. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Deciphering the fine nucleotide diversity of full HLA class I and class II genes in a well-documented population from sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeury, T; Creary, L E; Brunet, L; Galan, M; Pasquier, M; Kervaire, B; Langaney, A; Tiercy, J-M; Fernández-Viña, M A; Nunes, J M; Sanchez-Mazas, A

    2018-01-01

    With the aim to understand how next-generation sequencing (NGS) improves both our assessment of genetic variation within populations and our knowledge on HLA molecular evolution, we sequenced and analysed 8 HLA loci in a well-documented population from sub-Saharan Africa (Mandenka). The results of full-gene NGS-MiSeq sequencing compared with those obtained by traditional typing techniques or limited sequencing strategies showed that segregating sites located outside exon 2 are crucial to describe not only class I but also class II population diversity. A comprehensive analysis of exons 2, 3, 4 and 5 nucleotide diversity at the 8 HLA loci revealed remarkable differences among these gene regions, notably a greater variation concentrated in the antigen recognition sites of class I exons 3 and some class II exons 2, likely associated with their peptide-presentation function, a lower diversity of HLA-C exon 3, possibly related to its role as a KIR ligand, and a peculiar molecular diversity of HLA-A exon 2, revealing demographic signals. Based on full-length HLA sequences, we also propose that the most frequent DRB1 allele in the studied population, DRB1*13:04, emerged from an allelic conversion involving 3 potential alleles as donors and DRB1*11:02:01 as recipient. Finally, our analysis revealed a high occurrence of the DRB1*13:04-DQA1*05:05:01-DQB1*03:19 haplotype, possibly resulting from a selective sweep due to protection to Onchorcerca volvulus, a prevalent pathogen in West Africa. This study unveils highly relevant information on the molecular evolution of HLA genes in relation to their immune function, calling for similar analyses in other populations living in contrasting environments. © 2017 The Authors HLA: Immune Response Genetics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. 41 CFR 301-10.162 - When may I use other than coach-class train accommodations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 10-TRANSPORTATION EXPENSES Common Carrier Transportation Train § 301-10.162 When may I use other than... require other than coach-class rail accommodations. Exceptional security circumstances are determined by... accommodations on an authorized/approved foreign rail carrier do not provide adequate sanitation or health...

  17. Má oclusão Classe I de Angle com agenesia de incisivos laterais Angle Class I malocclusion and agenesis of lateral incisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Catharino Menezes Franco

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available O planejamento ortodôntico de pacientes com agenesia de incisivos laterais envolve considerações estéticas e funcionais de grande relevância para um resultado clínico satisfatório. Tanto o fechamento dos espaços correspondentes aos dentes ausentes quanto sua abertura ou manutenção oferecem vantagens e desvantagens que devem ser avaliadas de acordo com as características individuais do paciente. Fatores importantes que influenciam o planejamento são o padrão esquelético, o tipo de má oclusão e a coloração e forma dos caninos, dentre outros. Neste artigo, teve-se como objetivo relatar o tratamento de uma paciente com má oclusão Classe I de Angle, agenesia de incisivos laterais, sobressaliência e sobremordida diminuídas, tendência à mordida aberta e mordida cruzada.A abordagem clínica foi realizada com expansão maxilar, seguida de fechamento dos espaços, com auxílio de ancoragem esquelética extrabucal. Esse caso foi apresentado à diretoria do Board Brasileiro de Ortodontia e Ortopedia Facial (BBO, como parte dos requisitos para a obtenção do título de Diplomado pelo BBO.Orthodontic planning for patients with agenesis of lateral incisors should include extremely relevant esthetic and functional considerations so that a satisfactory clinical result is achieved. Both space closure and space opening and maintenance have advantages and disadvantages that should be evaluated according to the patient's individual characteristics. Some of the important factors that affect planning are the skeletal pattern, the type of malocclusion and the color and shape of canines. This study reports on the treatment of a patients with Class I malocclusion and agenesis of lateral incisors, overjet, decreased overbite, and a tendency to open bite and crossbite. The clinical approach included palatal expansion followed by space closure using extraoral anchorage. This case was presented to the Committee of the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics

  18. Quantificação de antígenos HLA classe I solúveis pela técnica de ELISA - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v31i2.6758 Quantification of soluble HLA class I antigens by ELISA assay- DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v31i2.6758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marciele Coan Boian

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available As moléculas HLA (Human Leucocyte Antigens são consideradas, principalmente, estruturas de superfície celular envolvidas em uma variedade de reações imunes associadas com transplante, infecções e doenças autoimunes. Os antígenos HLA também podem ser encontrados, em forma solúvel, no soro e em diferentes fluidos do organismo humano. Este trabalho teve como objetivo desenvolver a técnica imunoenzimática (ELISA para quantificar os níveis séricos de antígenos HLA classe I, específicos e totais, em indivíduos normais e em pacientes renais. A técnica de ELISA foi desenvolvida para demonstrar a presença, no soro, de antígenos HLA classe I totais (sHLA-I e as especificidades HLA-A2 (sHLA-A2 e HLA-B7 (sHLA-B7. Oitenta e oito amostras de soro foram envolvidas neste estudo, sendo 61 amostras provenientes de indivíduos sadios cadastrados no Hemocentro Regional de Maringá, Estado do Paraná, e 27 pacientes renais, provenientes dos centros de diálise da cidade de Maringá, Estado do Paraná. As concentrações médias de sHLA para as especificidades -A2 e -B7, detectadas somente em indivíduos sadios, foram 504.06 ng mL-1 ± 142.10 e 427.33 ng mL-1 ± 140.73, respectivamente. Resultados preliminares mostraram que sHLA-I, em indivíduos sadios, foi de 253,77 ng mL-1 e, em indivíduos renais em diálise, de 381,67 ng mL-1. A técnica de ELISA para detecção de antígenos HLA solúveis poderá ser útil em estudos comparativos, em diferentes populações saudáveis, diferentes patologias e no monitoramento das rejeições em transplantes.HLA (Human Leucocyte Antigens molecules are regarded mainly as cell surface structures involved in several immune reactions associated with transplants, infections and auto-immune diseases. HLA antigens can be also found in soluble form in serum and in different fluids of the human body. The aim of this work was to develop the immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA to quantify serum levels of specific and total

  19. The emergence of non-cytolytic NK1.1+ T cells in the long-term culture of murine tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes: a possible role of transforming growth factor-beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamada, K; Harada, M; Ito, O; Takenoyama, M; Mori, T; Matsuzaki, G; Nomoto, K

    1996-12-01

    The mechanism by which murine tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) decreased their anti-tumour activity during an in vitro culture with interleukin-2 (IL-2) was investigated. A phenotype analysis revealed that the TIL cultured for 7 days (TIL-d7) were exclusively NKI.1- CD4- CD8+ CD3+ cells and that this population was replaced by natural killer (NK)1.1+ CD4- CD8 CD3+ cells by day 27 (TIL-d27) during the culture of TIL. The TIL-d7 cells showed a cytolytic activity against B16 melanoma, whereas the TIL-d27 cells had lost this activity, suggesting that the decrease in the anti tumour effect of TIL during the culture with IL-2 was due to their populational change. Analysis on the characteristics of the TIL-d27 cells revealed that they expressed skewed T-cell receptor (TCR) V beta 5 and increased mRNA expression of V alpha 14. In addition, they expressed transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) mRNA. Interestingly, TGF-beta augmented the proliferation of TIL-d27 cells under the presence of IL-2, but suppressed that of TIL-d7 cells. Moreover, the proliferation of TIL-d27 cells was suppressed by anti-TGF-beta monoclonal antibody. Collectively, these results suggest that, in contrast to its suppressive effect on anti-tumour effector T cells. TGF-beta could be an autocrine growth factor for NKL1.1+ T cells and thereby induce non-cytolytic NK1.1+ T cells in the long-term culture of TIL.

  20. Diversity of natural self-derived ligands presented by different HLA class I molecules in transporter antigen processing-deficient cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Lorente

    Full Text Available The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP translocates the cytosol-derived proteolytic peptides to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen where they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I molecules. Non-functional TAP complexes and viral or tumoral blocking of these transporters leads to reduced HLA class I surface expression and a drastic change in the available peptide repertoire. Using mass spectrometry to analyze complex human leukocyte antigen HLA-bound peptide pools isolated from large numbers of TAP-deficient cells, we identified 334 TAP-independent ligands naturally presented by four different HLA-A, -B, and -C class I molecules with very different TAP dependency from the same cell line. The repertoire of TAP-independent peptides examined favored increased peptide lengths and a lack of strict binding motifs for all four HLA class I molecules studied. The TAP-independent peptidome arose from 182 parental proteins, the majority of which yielded one HLA ligand. In contrast, TAP-independent antigen processing of very few cellular proteins generated multiple HLA ligands. Comparison between TAP-independent peptidome and proteome of several subcellular locations suggests that the secretory vesicle-like organelles could be a relevant source of parental proteins for TAP-independent HLA ligands. Finally, a predominant endoproteolytic peptidase specificity for Arg/Lys or Leu/Phe residues in the P(1 position of the scissile bond was found for the TAP-independent ligands. These data draw a new and intricate picture of TAP-independent pathways.

  1. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    a HLA-I molecule (HLA-A*11:01), thereby generating recombinant human/swine chimeric MHC-I molecules as well as the intact SLA-1*0401 molecule. Biochemical peptide-binding assays and positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries were used to analyze the peptide-binding motifs of these molecules....... A pan-specific predictor of peptide–MHC-I binding, NetMHCpan, which was originally developed to cover the binding specificities of all known HLA-I molecules, was successfully used to predict the specificities of the SLA-1*0401 molecule as well as the porcine/human chimeric MHC-I molecules. These data......In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules. These are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating CTLs. The polymorphism of the MHC...

  2. Development of low-energy houses of class 1; Udvikling af typehuse i lavenergiklasse 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-02-15

    This report describes two typehouses that fulfill the requirements to low energy class 1 buildings according to Danish Building Regulations. The low energy class 1 typehouses have been developed from standard typehouses as built today, i.e. houses that fulfill the minimum requirements regarding total energy consumption according to Danish Building Regulations. Through detailed calculations/simulations and in cooperation with the typehouse producers, i.e. Eurodan Huse A/S og Hjem A/S, new typehouse solutions that fulfil the requirements to low energy class 1 buildings have been developed. The report is split into two main chapters, one for each of the two typehouse solutions. Each main chapter starts with a detailed description of the original typehouse solution, and firstly detailed calculations of all heat loss coefficients for the constructions including windows and doors are carried out. Then the transmission areas are determined for each building construction, and finally a detailed description of the heating and ventilation systems are given , with emphasis on the parts relevant in the calculation of the total energy consumption for the building. All the calculated results are then entered into the program BE06, and a calculation of the total energy consumption is carried out. These calculations show that both original typehouses fulfill the minimum requirements in the Danish Building Regulations. The following section details the process of reducing the total energy consumption for the typehouses. The reduction of the total energy consumption is achieved with a starting point in two exam projects that has analyzed the respective original typehouse solutions, and through economical optimization processes, developed a series of proposals for reducing the total energy consumption. The final low energy class 1 solutions are determined by starting from the two exam projects and in cooperation with the two typehouse producers determining the final solutions. In the

  3. Peptide motifs of the single dominantly expressed class I molecule explain the striking MHC-determined response to Rous sarcoma virus in chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallny, Hans-Joachim; Avila, David; Hunt, Lawrence G.

    2006-01-01

    Compared with the MHC of typical mammals, the chicken MHC is smaller and simpler, with only two class I genes found in the B12 haplotype. We make five points to show that there is a single-dominantly expressed class I molecule that can have a strong effect on MHC function. First, we find only one...

  4. Evidence of differential HLA class I-mediated viral evolution in functional and accessory/regulatory genes of HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabrina L Brumme

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the formidable mutational capacity and sequence diversity of HIV-1, evidence suggests that viral evolution in response to specific selective pressures follows generally predictable mutational pathways. Population-based analyses of clinically derived HIV sequences may be used to identify immune escape mutations in viral genes; however, prior attempts to identify such mutations have been complicated by the inability to discriminate active immune selection from virus founder effects. Furthermore, the association between mutations arising under in vivo immune selection and disease progression for highly variable pathogens such as HIV-1 remains incompletely understood. We applied a viral lineage-corrected analytical method to investigate HLA class I-associated sequence imprinting in HIV protease, reverse transcriptase (RT, Vpr, and Nef in a large cohort of chronically infected, antiretrovirally naïve individuals. A total of 478 unique HLA-associated polymorphisms were observed and organized into a series of "escape maps," which identify known and putative cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL epitopes under selection pressure in vivo. Our data indicate that pathways to immune escape are predictable based on host HLA class I profile, and that epitope anchor residues are not the preferred sites of CTL escape. Results reveal differential contributions of immune imprinting to viral gene diversity, with Nef exhibiting far greater evidence for HLA class I-mediated selection compared to other genes. Moreover, these data reveal a significant, dose-dependent inverse correlation between HLA-associated polymorphisms and HIV disease stage as estimated by CD4(+ T cell count. Identification of specific sites and patterns of HLA-associated polymorphisms across HIV protease, RT, Vpr, and Nef illuminates regions of the genes encoding these products under active immune selection pressure in vivo. The high density of HLA-associated polymorphisms in Nef compared to other

  5. Effects of irradiation on the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I antigen and adhesion costimulation molecules ICAM-1 in human cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santin, Alessandro D.; Hermonat, Paul L.; Hiserodt, John C.; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Woodliff, Jeff; Theus, John W.; Barclay, David; Pecorelli, Sergio; Parham, Groesbeck P.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We initiated studies to analyze the effects of high doses of gamma irradiation on the surface antigen expression of MHC Class I, Class II, and ICAM-1 on human cervical carcinoma cell lines. Methods and Materials: The expression of surface antigens (MHC Class I, Class II, and ICAM-1) was evaluated by FACS analysis on two cervical cell lines at different time points, following their exposure to high doses of gamma irradiation (i.e., 25.00, 50.00, and 100.00 Gy). Results: The CaSki and SiHa cervical cancer cells we analyzed in this study expressed variable levels of MHC Class I and ICAM-1 antigens, while Class II surface antigens were not detectable. Whereas irradiation doses of 25.00 Gy were not sufficient to totally block cell replication in both cell lines, exposure to 50.00 or 100.00 Gy was able to completely inhibit cell replication. Range doses from 25.00 to 100.00 Gy significantly and consistently increased the expression of all surface antigens present on the cells prior to irradiation but were unable to induce neoexpression of antigens previously not expressed by these cells (i.e., MHC Class II). Importantly, such upregulation was shown to be dose dependent, with higher radiation doses associated with increased antigen expression. Moreover, when the kinetic of this upregulation was studied after 2 and 6 days after irradiation, it was shown to be persistent and lasted until all the cells died. Conclusions: These findings may partially explain the increased immunogenicity of tumor cells following irradiation and may suggest enhanced immune recognition in tumor tissue in patients receiving radiation therapy

  6. Effect of cavity disinfectants on antibacterial activity and microtensile bond strength in class I cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo-Ram; Oh, Man-Hwan; Shin, Dong-Hoon

    2017-05-31

    This study was performed to compare the antibacterial activities of three cavity disinfectants [chlorhexidine (CHX), NaOCl, urushiol] and to evaluate their effect on the microtensile bond strength of Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (3M-ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) in class I cavities. In both experiments, class I cavities were prepared in dentin. After inoculation with Streptococcus mutans, the cavities of control group were rinsed and those of CHX, NaOCl and urushiol groups were treated with each disinfectant. Standardized amounts of dentin chips were collected and number of S. mutans was determined. Following the same cavity treatment, same adhesive was applied in etch-and-rinse mode. Then, microtensile bond strength was evaluated. The number of S. mutans was significantly reduced in the cavities treated with CHX, NaOCl, and urushiol compared with control group (p<0.05). However, there was a significant bond strength reduction in NaOCl group, which showed statistical difference compared to the other groups (p<0.05).

  7. How Harmful are Adaptation Restrictions

    OpenAIRE

    Bruin, de, K.C.; Dellink, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    The dominant assumption in economic models of climate policy remains that adaptation will be implemented in an optimal manner. There are, however, several reasons why optimal levels of adaptation may not be attainable. This paper investigates the effects of suboptimal levels of adaptation, i.e. adaptation restrictions, on the composition and level of climate change costs and on welfare. Several adaptation restrictions are identified and then simulated in a revised DICE model, extended with ad...

  8. Direct Evidence for Maser Emission from the 36.2 GHz Class I Transition of Methanol in NGC253

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; McCarthy, Tiege P.; Zhong, Wei-Ye; Deng, Hui

    2018-04-01

    Observations made with the Jansky Very large Array (JVLA) at an angular resolution of ∼0.″1 have detected class I methanol maser emission from the 36.2 GHz transition toward the starburst galaxy NGC 253. The methanol emission is detected toward four sites which lie within the regions of extended methanol emission detected in previous lower angular resolution (a few arcseconds) observations. The peak flux densities of the detected compact components are in the range 3–9 mJy beam‑1. Combining the JVLA data with single-dish observations from the Shanghai Tianma Radio Telescope (TMRT) and previous interferometric observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), we show that the 36.2 GHz class I methanol emission consists of both extended and compact structures, with typical scales of ∼6″ (0.1 kpc) and ∼0.″05 (1 pc), respectively. The strongest components have a brightness temperature of >103 K, much higher than the maximum kinetic temperature (∼100 K) of the thermal methanol emission from NGC 253. Therefore, these observations conclusively demonstrate for the first time the presence of maser emission from a class I methanol transition in an external galaxy.

  9. Down-regulation of MHC class I by the Marek's disease virus (MDV) UL49.5 gene product mildly affects virulence in a haplotype-specific fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosinski, Keith W; Hunt, Henry D; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2010-09-30

    Marek's disease is a devastating neoplastic disease of chickens caused by Marek's disease virus (MDV). MDV down-regulates surface expression of MHC class I molecules, although the mechanism has remained elusive. MDV harbors a UL49.5 homolog that has been shown to down-regulate MHC class I expression in other Varicelloviruses. Using in vitro assays, we showed that MDV pUL49.5 down-regulates MHC class I directly and identified its cytoplasmic tail as essential for this function. In vivo, viruses lacking the cytoplasmic tail of pUL49.5 showed no differences in MD pathogenesis compared to revertant viruses in highly susceptible chickens of the B(19)B(19) MHC class I haplotype, while there was a mild reduction in pathogenic potential of the deletion viruses in chickens more resistant to MD pathogenesis (MHC:B(21)B(21)). We concluded that the pathogenic effect of MHC class I down-regulation mediated by pUL49.5 is small because virus immune evasion possibly requires more than one viral protein. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Major histocompatibility complex class I molecule expression is normal on peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, W; Gladstone, P; Engardt, S; Greenbaum, C; Palmer, J P

    1996-01-01

    Recent work from one laboratory has shown, in both nonobese diabetic mice and humans, an association between insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and quantitative difference in MHC class I molecule expression. This reported decrease in MHC class I molecule expression is very controversial in the nonobese diabetic mouse model of IDDM, but to our knowledge, it has not been evaluated by another group in human IDDM. To evaluate this question, we studied 30 patients with IDDM and 30 age- and...

  11. Arginine (Di)methylated Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Peptides Are Favorably Presented by HLA-B*07

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marino, Fabio; Mommen, Geert P M; Jeko, Anita; Meiring, Hugo D; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A M; Scheltema, Richard A; van Els, Cécile A C M; Heck, Albert J R

    Alterations in protein post-translational modification (PTM) are recognized hallmarks of diseases. These modifications potentially provide a unique source of disease-related human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I-presented peptides that can elicit specific immune responses. While phosphorylated HLA

  12. Organization of the BcgI restriction-modification protein for the cleavage of eight phosphodiester bonds in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel M.; Marshall, Jacqueline J. T.; Jacklin, Alistair J.; Retter, Susan E.; Halford, Stephen E.; Sobott, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Type IIB restriction-modification systems, such as BcgI, feature a single protein with both endonuclease and methyltransferase activities. Type IIB nucleases require two recognition sites and cut both strands on both sides of their unmodified sites. BcgI cuts all eight target phosphodiester bonds before dissociation. The BcgI protein contains A and B polypeptides in a 2:1 ratio: A has one catalytic centre for each activity; B recognizes the DNA. We show here that BcgI is organized as A2B protomers, with B at its centre, but that these protomers self-associate to assemblies containing several A2B units. Moreover, like the well known FokI nuclease, BcgI bound to its site has to recruit additional protomers before it can cut DNA. DNA-bound BcgI can alternatively be activated by excess A subunits, much like the activation of FokI by its catalytic domain. Eight A subunits, each with one centre for nuclease activity, are presumably needed to cut the eight bonds cleaved by BcgI. Its nuclease reaction may thus involve two A2B units, each bound to a recognition site, with two more A2B units bridging the complexes by protein–protein interactions between the nuclease domains. PMID:23147005

  13. The impact of pneumolysin on the macrophage response to Streptococcus pneumoniae is strain-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M Harvey

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the world's leading cause of pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis and otitis media. A major pneumococcal virulence factor is the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, which has the defining property of forming pores in cholesterol-containing membranes. In recent times a clinically significant and internationally successful serotype 1 ST306 clone has been found to express a non-cytolytic variant of Ply (Ply306. However, while the pneumococcus is a naturally transformable organism, strains of the ST306 clonal group have to date been virtually impossible to transform, severely restricting efforts to understand the role of non-cytolytic Ply in the success of this clone. In this study isogenic Ply mutants were constructed in the D39 background and for the first time in the ST306 background (A0229467 to enable direct comparisons between Ply variants for their impact on the immune response in a macrophage-like cell line. Strains that expressed cytolytic Ply were found to induce a significant increase in IL-1β release from macrophage-like cells compared to the non-cytolytic and Ply-deficient strains in a background-independent manner, confirming the requirement for pore formation in the Ply-dependent activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. However, cytolytic activity in the D39 background was found to induce increased expression of the genes encoding GM-CSF (CSF2, p19 subunit of IL-23 (IL23A and IFNβ (IFNB1 compared to non-cytolytic and Ply-deficient D39 mutants, but had no effect in the A0229467 background. The impact of Ply on the immune response to the pneumococcus is highly dependent on the strain background, thus emphasising the importance of the interaction between specific virulence factors and other components of the genetic background of this organism.

  14. Magnitude of Alloresponses to MHC Class I/II Expressing Human Cardiac Myocytes is Limited by their Intrinsic Ability to Process and Present Antigenic Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftab A. Ansari

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation we have explored the relationship between the weak allogenicity of cardiac myocytes and their capacity to present allo-antigens by examining the ability of a human cardiac myocyte cell line (W-1 to process and present nominal antigens. W-1 cells (HLA-A*0201 and HLA-DR β1*0301 pulsed with the influenza A matrix 1 (58-66 peptide (M1 were able to serve as targets for the HLA-A*0201 restricted CTL line PG, specific for M1-peptide. However, PG-CTLs were unable to lyse W-1 target cells infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the M1 protein (M1-VAC. Pretreatment of these M1-VAC targets with IFN-γ partially restored their ability to process and present the M1 peptide. However, parallel studies demonstrated that IFN-γ pretreated W-1's could not process tetanus toxin (TT or present the TT(830-843 peptide to HLA-DR3 restricted TT-primed T cells. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR measurements revealed significantly lower constitutive levels of expression for MHC class I, TAP-1/2, and LMP-2/7 genes in W-1s that could be elevated by pretreatment with IFN-γ to values equal to or greater than those expressed in EBV-PBLs. However, mRNA levels for the genes encoding MHC class II, Ii, CIITA, and DMA/B were markedly lower in both untreated and IFN-γ pretreated W-1s relative to EBV-PBLs. Furthermore, pulse-chase analysis of the corresponding genes revealed significantly lower protein levels and longer half-life expression in W-1s relative to EBV-PBLs. These results suggest that weak allogenicity of cardiac myocytes may be governed by their limited expression of MHC genes and gene products critical for antigen processing and presentation.

  15. Class 1 Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A "Class 1" area is a geographic area recognized by the EPA as being of the highest environmental quality and requiring maximum protection. Class I areas are areas...

  16. NetMHCcons: a consensus method for the major histocompatibility complex class I predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole

    2012-01-01

    A key role in cell-mediated immunity is dedicated to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules that bind peptides for presentation on the cell surface. Several in silico methods capable of predicting peptide binding to MHC class I have been developed. The accuracy of these methods depe...... at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCcons, and allows the user in an automatic manner to obtain the most accurate predictions for any given MHC molecule....

  17. Characterization of class II alpha genes and DLA-D region allelic associations in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, U M; Storb, R F

    1988-10-01

    Human major histocompatibility complex (HLA) cDNA probes were used to analyze the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the alpha genes of the DLA-D region in dogs. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood leucocytes of 23 unrelated DLA-D homozygous dogs representing nine DLA-D types (defined by mixed leucocyte reaction) was digested with restriction enzymes (BamHI, EcoRI, Hind III, Pvu II, Taq I, Rsa I, Msp I, Pst I and Bgl II), separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and transferred onto Biotrace membrane. The Southern blots were successively hybridized with radiolabelled HLA cDNA probes corresponding to DQ, DP, DZ and DR alpha genes. Clear evidence was obtained for the canine homologues of DQ and DR alpha genes with simple bi- or tri-allelic polymorphism respectively. Evidence for a single, nonpolymorphic DP alpha gene was also obtained. However, the presence of a DZ alpha gene could not be clearly demonstrated in canine genomic DNA. This report extends our previous RFLP analysis documenting polymorphism of DLA class II beta genes in the same panel of homozygous typing cell dogs, and provides the basis for DLA-D genotyping at a population level. This study also characterizes the RFLP-defined preferential allelic associations across the DLA-D region in nine different homozygous typing cell specificities.

  18. Improved pan-specific MHC class I peptide-binding predictions using a novel representation of the MHC-binding cleft environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco Pro, S.; Zimic, M.; Nielsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    of the current state-of-the-art methods for MHC class I is NetMHCpan, which has a core ingredient for the representation of the MHC class I molecule using a pseudo-sequence representation of the binding cleft amino acid environment. New and large MHC-peptide-binding data sets are constantly being made available...... of different MHC data sets including human leukocyte antigen (HLA), non-human primates (chimpanzee, macaque and gorilla) and other animal alleles (cattle, mouse and swine). From these constructs, we showed that by focusing on MHC sequence positions found to be polymorphic across the MHC molecules used to train...

  19. Complement component C1r mediated cleavage of the heavy chain of the major histocompatibility class I antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1992-01-01

    Apart from cleaving C1s, we demonstrate for the first time that: 1) at concentrations found in serum, the activated forms of the complement components C1r in addition to C1s can cleave the heavy chain of MHC class I antigens, 2) the cleavage by C1r and C1s is seemingly dependent upon a native con......-chain of MHC class I was shown to take place between the alpha 2- and alpha 3- domains as estimated by the Con A-Sepharose precipitation pattern on SDS-PAGE. The alpha 1/alpha 2 fragment was still shown to interact with beta 2-microglobulin as shown by immunoprecipitation....

  20. Structure-Based Design of a Novel Series of Potent, Selective Inhibitors of the Class I Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Adrian L.; D’Angelo, Noel D.; Bo, Yunxin Y.; Booker, Shon K.; Cee, Victor J.; Herberich, Brad; Hong, Fang-Tsao; Jackson, Claire L.M.; Lanman, Brian A.; Liu, Longbin; Nishimura, Nobuko; Pettus, Liping H.; Reed, Anthony B.; Tadesse, Seifu; Tamayo, Nuria A.; Wurz, Ryan P.; Yang, Kevin; Andrews, Kristin L.; Whittington, Douglas A.; McCarter, John D.; Miguel, Tisha San; Zalameda, Leeanne; Jiang, Jian; Subramanian, Raju; Mullady, Erin L.; Caenepeel, Sean; Freeman, Daniel J.; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Nancy; Wu, Tian; Hughes, Paul E.; Norman, Mark H. (Amgen)

    2012-09-17

    A highly selective series of inhibitors of the class I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) has been designed and synthesized. Starting from the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor 5, a structure-based approach was used to improve potency and selectivity, resulting in the identification of 54 as a potent inhibitor of the class I PI3Ks with excellent selectivity over mTOR, related phosphatidylinositol kinases, and a broad panel of protein kinases. Compound 54 demonstrated a robust PD-PK relationship inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway in vivo in a mouse model, and it potently inhibited tumor growth in a U-87 MG xenograft model with an activated PI3K/Akt pathway.

  1. 41 CFR 301-10.123 - When may I use other than coach-class airline accommodations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When may I use other than coach-class airline accommodations? 301-10.123 Section 301-10.123 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ALLOWABLE TRAVEL EXPENSES 10-TRANSPORTATION EXPENSES Common Carrier...

  2. Cardiac resynchronization induces major structural and functional reverse remodeling in patients with New York Heart Association class I/II heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    St John Sutton, Martin; Ghio, Stefano; Plappert, Ted

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves LV structure, function, and clinical outcomes in New York Heart Association class III/IV heart failure with prolonged QRS. It is not known whether patients with New York Heart Association class I/II systolic heart failure exhibit left...... ventricular (LV) reverse remodeling with CRT or whether reverse remodeling is modified by the cause of heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: Six hundred ten patients with New York Heart Association class I/II heart failure, QRS duration > or =120 ms, LV end-diastolic dimension > or =55 mm, and LV ejection...... reduction in LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volume indexes and a 3-fold greater increase in LV ejection fraction in patients with nonischemic causes of heart failure. CONCLUSIONS: CRT in patients with New York Heart Association I/II resulted in major structural and functional reverse remodeling at 1 year...

  3. Development of a rapid in vitro protein refolding assay which discriminates between peptide-bound and peptide-free forms of recombinant porcine major histocompatibility class I complex (SLA-I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Kristensen, B.; Ladekjaer-Mikkelsen, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    The extracellular domains of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I, major histocompatibility complex protein class 1) were cloned and sequenced for two haplotypes (114 and H7) which do not share any alleles based on serological typing, and which are the most important in Danish farmed pigs....... The extracellular domain of SLA-I was connected to porcine beta2 microglobulin by glycine-rich linkers. The engineered sin.-le-chain proteins, consisting of fused SLA-I and beta2 microglobulin, were overexpressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. Also, variants were made of the single-chain proteins......, by linking them through glycine-rich linkers to peptides representing T-cell epitopes from classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). An in vitro refold assay was developed, using a monoclonal anti-SLA antibody (PT85A) to gauge refolding. The single best-defined, SLA...

  4. Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibits HLA Class I Antibody-Dependent Endothelial Cell Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Zilian

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is a key limiting factor for long-term graft survival in solid organ transplantation. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I (HLA I antibodies (Abs play a major role in the pathogenesis of AMR via their interactions with HLA molecules on vascular endothelial cells (ECs. The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase (HO-1 has anti-inflammatory functions in the endothelium. As complement-independent effects of HLA I Abs can activate ECs, it was the goal of the current study to investigate the role of HO-1 on activation of human ECs by HLA I Abs. In cell cultures of various primary human macro- and microvascular ECs treatment with monoclonal pan- and allele-specific HLA I Abs up-regulated the expression of inducible proinflammatory adhesion molecules and chemokines (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [VCAM-1], intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1], interleukin-8 [IL-8] and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1]. Pharmacological induction of HO-1 with cobalt-protoporphyrin IX reduced, whereas inhibition of HO-1 with either zinc-protoporphyrin IX or siRNA-mediated knockdown increased HLA I Ab-dependent up-regulation of VCAM-1. Treatment with two carbon monoxide (CO-releasing molecules, which liberate the gaseous HO product CO, blocked HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation. Finally, in an in vitro adhesion assay exposure of ECs to HLA I Abs led to increased monocyte binding, which was counteracted by up-regulation of HO-1. In conclusion, HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation is modulated by endothelial HO-1 and targeted induction of this enzyme may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AMR in solid organ transplantation.

  5. Class I Cytokine Receptors: Structure and function in the Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Katrine Østergaard

    bilayer via structural characterizations of TMD representatives. To enable structural studies of these domains, an organic-extraction based strategy for efficient production of isotope-labeled TMDs with or without short intrinsically disordered regions was developed. This strategy successfully provided...... of these challenging domains. Supplemented by a review of the current collection of TMD structures from single-pass transmembrane receptors, the thesis as a whole provides important insights on the structure and function in the membrane as well as highlight the open questions to be addressed in the years to come.......Class I cytokine receptors are involved in important biological functions of both physiological and pathological nature in mammals. However, the molecular details of the cross-membrane signal transduction through these receptors remain obscure. One of the major reasons for this is the lack...

  6. Task-specific enhancement of short-term, but not long-term, memory by class I metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, G.R.J.; Christensen, Lone H.; Harrington, Nicholas R.

    1999-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors; Class I antagonist; 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid; spatial learning; contextual conditioning; rats......Metabotropic glutamate receptors; Class I antagonist; 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid; spatial learning; contextual conditioning; rats...

  7. Expression and characterization of recombinant single-chain salmon class I MHC fused with beta2-microglobulin with biological activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Heng; Stet, René J M; Skjødt, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    Heterodimeric class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules consist of a putative 45-kDa heavy chain and a 12-kDa beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) light chain. The knowledge about MHC genes in Atlantic salmon accumulated during the last decade has allowed us to generate soluble and stable ...... MHC class I molecules with biological activity. We report here the use of a bacterial expression system to produce the recombinant single-chain MHC molecules based on a specific allele Sasa-UBA*0301. This particular allele was selected because previous work has shown its association...... antibodies were successfully produced against both the MHC class I heavy chain and beta(2)m, and showed binding to the recombinant molecule. The recombinant complex Sasabeta2mUBA*0301 was expressed and isolated; the production was scaled up by adjusting to its optimal conditions. Subsequently......, the recombinant proteins were purified by affinity chromatography using mAb against beta2m and alpha3. Eluates were analyzed by Western blot and refolded by the removal of denaturant. The correct folding was confirmed by measuring its binding capacity against mAb produced to recognize the native form of MHC...

  8. The interaction of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) with mouse class I major histocompatibility antigens and its ability to support peptide binding. A comparison of human and mouse beta 2m

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L O; Stryhn, A; Holter, T L

    1995-01-01

    of class I molecules are involved in peptide binding, whereas most of class I molecules are involved in beta 2m binding. We propose that mouse beta 2m interacts with the minor peptide binding (i.e. the "empty") fraction with a lower affinity than human beta 2m does, whereas mouse and human beta 2m interact......The function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is to sample peptides derived from intracellular proteins and to present these peptides to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this paper, biochemical assays addressing MHC class I binding of both peptide and beta 2-microglobulin...... (beta 2m) have been used to examine the assembly of the trimolecular MHC class I/beta 2m/peptide complex. Recombinant human beta 2m and mouse beta 2ma have been generated to compare the binding of the two beta 2m to mouse class I. It is frequently assumed that human beta 2m binds to mouse class I heavy...

  9. From use cases to UML class diagrams using logic grammars and constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning; Have, Christian Theil; Tveitane, Knut

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the possibilities for automated transition from Use Cases in a restricted natural language syntax into UML class diagrams, by trying to capture the semantics of the natural language and map it into building blocks of the object oriented programming paradigm (classes, objects, methods...

  10. Approach to defining de minimis, intermediate, and other classes of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, J.J.; Smith, C.F.

    1986-01-01

    This study has developed a framework within which the complete spectrum of radioactive wastes can be defined. An approach has been developed that reflects both concerns in the framework of a radioactive waste classification system. In this approach, the class of any radioactive waste stream is dependent on its degree of radioactivity and its persistence. To be consistent with conventional systems, four waste classes are defined. In increasing order of concern due to radioactivity and/or duration, these are: 1. De Minimis Wastes: This waste has such a low content of radioactive material that it can be considered essentially nonradioactive and managed according to its nonradiological characteristics. 2. Low-Level Waste (LLW): Maximum concentrations for wastes considered to be in this class are prescribed in 10CFR61 as wastes that can be disposed of by shallow land burial methods. 3. Intermediate Level Waste (ILW): This category defines a class of waste whose content exceeds class C (10CFR61) levels, yet does not pose a sufficient hazard to justify management as a high-level waste (i.e., permanent isolation by deep geologic disposal). 4. High-Level Waste: HLW poses the most serious management problem and requires the most restrictive disposal methods. It is defined in NWPA as waste derived from the reprocessing of nuclear fuel and/or as highly radioactive wastes that require permanent isolation

  11. Má oclusão Classe I de Angle, com mordida aberta anterior, tratada com extração de dentes permanentes Angle Class I malocclusion, with anterior open bite, treated with extraction of permanent teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mírian Aiko Nakane Matsumoto

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A mordida aberta é uma anomalia com características distintas que, além da complexidade dos múltiplos fatores etiológicos, traz consequências estéticas e funcionais. Muitas alternativas têm sido utilizadas em seu tratamento, entre elas a grade palatina, forças ortopédicas, ajuste oclusal, camuflagem com ou sem exodontias, mini-implantes ou miniplacas e cirurgia ortognática. O diagnóstico preciso e a determinação da etiologia permitem estabelecer os objetivos e o plano de tratamento ideal para essa má oclusão. O presente relato descreve o tratamento de uma má oclusão Classe I de Angle, com padrão esquelético de Classe II e mordida aberta anterior, realizado em duas fases e que foi apresentado à diretoria do Board Brasileiro de Ortodontia e Ortopedia Facial (BBO, representando a categoria 2, como parte dos requisitos para a obtenção do título de Diplomado pelo BBO.Open bite is an anomaly with distinct characteristics which, in addition to involving complex, multiple etiologic factors, entails aesthetic and functional consequences. Many alternative approaches have been employed to treat open bite, including palatal crib, orthopedic forces, occlusal adjustment, camouflage with or without extractions, mini-implants or mini-plates, and orthognathic surgery. By determining accurate diagnosis and etiology professionals can set the goals and ideal treatment plan for this malocclusion. This report, describing the two stages treatment of a Angle Class I malocclusion with Class II skeletal pattern and anterior open bite, was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO, representative of category 2, as partial fulfillment of the requirements for obtaining the title of BBO Diplomate.

  12. Peptide-MHC class I stability is a stronger predictor of CTL immunogenicity than peptide affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harndahl, Mikkel Nors; Rasmussen, Michael; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Peptide-MHC class I stability is a stronger predictor of CTL immunogenicity than peptide affinity Mikkel Harndahla, Michael Rasmussena, Morten Nielsenb, Soren Buusa,∗ a Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark b Center for Biological Seq...... al., 2007. J. Immunol. 178, 7890–7901. doi:10.1016/j.molimm.2012.02.025...

  13. A viral, transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)-independent, high affinity ligand with alternative interactions endogenously presented by the nonclassical human leukocyte antigen E class I molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Elena; Infantes, Susana; Abia, David; Barnea, Eilon; Beer, Ilan; García, Ruth; Lasala, Fátima; Jiménez, Mercedes; Mir, Carmen; Morreale, Antonio; Admon, Arie; López, Daniel

    2012-10-12

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) enables the flow of viral peptides generated in the cytosol by the proteasome and other proteases to the endoplasmic reticulum, where they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I. Later, these peptide-HLA class I complexes can be recognized by CD8(+) lymphocytes. Cancerous cells and infected cells in which TAP is blocked, as well as individuals with unusable TAP complexes, are able to present peptides on HLA class I by generating them through TAP-independent processing pathways. Here, we identify a physiologically processed HLA-E ligand derived from the D8L protein in TAP-deficient vaccinia virus-infected cells. This natural high affinity HLA-E class I ligand uses alternative interactions to the anchor motifs previously described to be presented on nonclassical HLA class I molecules. This octameric peptide was also presented on HLA-Cw1 with similar binding affinity on both classical and nonclassical class I molecules. In addition, this viral peptide inhibits HLA-E-mediated cytolysis by natural killer cells. Comparison between the amino acid sequences of the presenting HLA-E and HLA-Cw1 alleles revealed a shared structural motif in both HLA class molecules, which could be related to their observed similar cross-reactivity affinities. This motif consists of several residues located on the floor of the peptide-binding site. These data expand the role of HLA-E as an antigen-presenting molecule.

  14. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate an...

  15. Restriction of phage T4 internal protein I mutants by a strain of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, L.W.; Abremski, K.

    1974-01-01

    Phage T4 internal protein I(IPI), a small (ca, 10,000 MW), basic protein injected into the host with the phage DNA, is not required for infection of most hosts, but mutants defective in IPI are restricted by at least one naturally occurring strain of Escherichia coli, CT 596 (CT). Phages lacking IPI (IPI - ) appear to inject their DNA and bind it to the membrane of CT cells as well as wild-type phage T4 does, but shutoff of host protein synthesis, initiation of T4 protein synthesis, and cell killing are abnormal in the IPI - mutant infected CT host. The injection of IPI appears to be important in allowing T4 DNA to carry out early steps involved in takeover of this host. Restriction of IPI - phage growth by CT cells appears to be due, at least in part, to a defective prophage it harbors which renders the host resistant to successful infection by phage T4 which lack IPI or rII functions. Bacteria cured of this prophage can be infected by mutants defective in these functions. The resistance of CT cells to other coliphages, and the question of T-even phage internal protein diversity are discussed. (U.S.)

  16. Phase transition universality classes of classical, nonequilibrium systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ódor, G

    2004-01-01

    In the first chapter I summarize the most important critical exponents and relations used in this work. In the second chapter I briefly address the question of scaling behavior at first order phase transitions.In chapter three I review dynamical extensions of basic static classes, show the effect of mixing dynamics and percolation behavior. The main body of this work is given in chapter four where genuine, dynamical universality classes specific to nonequilibrium systems are introduced. In chapter five I continue overviewing such nonequilibrium classes but in coupled, multi-component systems. Most of known transitions in low dimensional systems are between active and absorbing states of reaction-diffusion type systems, but I briefly introduce related classes that appear in interface growth models in chapter six. Some of them are related to critical behavior of coupled, multi-component systems. Finally in chapter seven I summarize families of absorbing state system classes, mean-field classes and the most freq...

  17. Patterns of genetic differentiation at MHC class I genes and microsatellites identify conservation units in the giant panda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Wan, Qiu-Hong; Yu, Bin; Ge, Yun-Fa; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2013-10-22

    Evaluating patterns of genetic variation is important to identify conservation units (i.e., evolutionarily significant units [ESUs], management units [MUs], and adaptive units [AUs]) in endangered species. While neutral markers could be used to infer population history, their application in the estimation of adaptive variation is limited. The capacity to adapt to various environments is vital for the long-term survival of endangered species. Hence, analysis of adaptive loci, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, is critical for conservation genetics studies. Here, we investigated 4 classical MHC class I genes (Aime-C, Aime-F, Aime-I, and Aime-L) and 8 microsatellites to infer patterns of genetic variation in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and to further define conservation units. Overall, we identified 24 haplotypes (9 for Aime-C, 1 for Aime-F, 7 for Aime-I, and 7 for Aime-L) from 218 individuals obtained from 6 populations of giant panda. We found that the Xiaoxiangling population had the highest genetic variation at microsatellites among the 6 giant panda populations and higher genetic variation at Aime-MHC class I genes than other larger populations (Qinling, Qionglai, and Minshan populations). Differentiation index (FST)-based phylogenetic and Bayesian clustering analyses for Aime-MHC-I and microsatellite loci both supported that most populations were highly differentiated. The Qinling population was the most genetically differentiated. The giant panda showed a relatively higher level of genetic diversity at MHC class I genes compared with endangered felids. Using all of the loci, we found that the 6 giant panda populations fell into 2 ESUs: Qinling and non-Qinling populations. We defined 3 MUs based on microsatellites: Qinling, Minshan-Qionglai, and Daxiangling-Xiaoxiangling-Liangshan. We also recommended 3 possible AUs based on MHC loci: Qinling, Minshan-Qionglai, and Daxiangling-Xiaoxiangling-Liangshan. Furthermore, we recommend

  18. Killing of Human Melanoma Cells Induced by Activation of Class I Interferon–Regulated Signaling Pathways via MDA-7/IL-24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Mumm, John B.; Udtha, Malini; Chada, Sunil; Grimm, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    Restoration of the tumor-suppression function by gene transfer of the melanoma differentiation-associated gene 7 (MDA7)/interleukin 24 (IL-24) successfully induces apoptosis in melanoma tumors in vivo. To address the molecular mechanisms involved, we previously revealed that MDA7/IL-24 treatment of melanoma cells down-regulates interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-1 expression and concomitantly up-regulates IRF-2 expression, which competes with the activity of IRF-1 and reverses the induction of IRF-1–regulated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Interferons (IFNs) influence melanoma cell survival by modulating apoptosis. A class I IFN (IFN alfa) has been approved for the treatment of advanced melanoma with some limited success. A class II IFN (IFN gamma), on the other hand, supports melanoma cell survival, possibly through constitutive activation of iNOS expression. We therefore conducted this study to explore the molecular pathways of MDA7/IL-24 regulation of apoptosis via the intracellular induction of IFNs in melanoma. We hypothesized that the restoration of the MDA7/IL-24 axis leads to upregulation of Class I IFNs and induction of the apoptotic cascade. We found that MDA7/IL-24 induces the secretion of endogenous IFN beta, another class I IFN, leading to the arrest of melanoma cell growth and apoptosis. We also identified a series of apoptotic markers that play a role in this pathway, including the regulation of tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Fas-FasL. In summary, we described a novel pathway of MDA7/IL-24 regulation of apoptosis in melanoma tumors via endogenous IFN beta induction followed by IRF regulation and TRAIL/FasL system activation. PMID:18511292

  19. Anti-tumor efficacy of lymphokine-activated killer cells and recombinant interleukin 2 in vivo: direct correlation between reduction of established metastases and cytolytic activity of lymphokine-activated killer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mule, J.J.; Yang, J.; Shu, S.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that the incubation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes or murine splenocytes in recombinant interleukin 2 (RIL 2) resulted in the generation of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells capable of lysing a broad spectrum of fresh tumors in short-term chromium-release assays. Moreover, injections of LAK cells plus RIL 2 were highly effective in eliminating established 3 day metastases in the lung and liver. We have examined several parameters to define whether or not the cytolytic activity of LAK cells as measured in vitro correlated directly with the in vivo anti-tumor efficacy of adoptively transferred LAK cells. LAK cells plus RIL 2 could mediate marked reductions of established pulmonary metastases in mice rendered T cell deficient by adult thymectomy and lethal, total body irradiation followed by reconstitution with T cell-depleted bone marrow and spleen cells. Thus there was no requirement for additional T lymphocytes of host origin for successful therapy with adoptively transferred LAK cells plus RIL 2. Fresh splenocytes depleted of T cells by anti-Thy-1.2 monoclonal antibody plus complement generated LAK cells that were as highly lytic to fresh tumor in vitro and were as effective in reducing established pulmonary metastases as those generated from untreated or complement-treated splenocytes. Thus, the precursor to LAK cells with anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo did not express the Thy-1 antigenic marker. In contrast, treatment of LAK effector cells (those generated from a 3-day incubation of fresh, normal splenocytes in RIL 2) with anti-Thy-1.2 antibody plus complement reduced or abolished their in vitro cytolytic activity

  20. Tumor-associated Tn-MUC1 glycoform is internalized through the macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin and delivered to the HLA class I and II compartments in dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napoletano, Chiara; Rughetti, Aurelia; Agervig Tarp, Mads P

    2007-01-01

    . This results in the expression of tumor-associated glycoforms and in MUC1 carrying the tumor-specific glycan Tn (GalNAcalpha1-O-Ser/Thr). Glycopeptides corresponding to three tandem repeats of MUC1, enzymatically glycosylated with 9 or 15 mol of GalNAc, were shown to specifically bind and to be internalized...... and ELISA done on subcellular fractions of iDCs showed that the Tn-MUC1 glycopeptides colocalized with HLA class I and II compartments after internalization. Importantly, although Tn-MUC1 recombinant protein was bound and internalized by MGL, the glycoprotein entered the HLA class II compartment......, but not the HLA class I pathway. These data indicate that MGL expressed on iDCs is an optimal receptor for the internalization of short GalNAcs carrying immunogens to be delivered into HLA class I and II compartments. Such glycopeptides therefore represent a new way of targeting the HLA class I and II pathways...

  1. Longer peptide can be accommodated in the MHC class I binding site by a protrusion mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Holm, A

    2000-01-01

    and C termini of a bound peptide interact through hydrogen bonding networks to conserved residues at either end of the class I binding site. Accordingly, it is thought that the termini are fixed and that only minor variations in peptide size are possible through a central bulging mechanism. We find...

  2. An amino acid sequence coded by the exon 2 of the BoLA DRB3 gene associated with a BoLA class I specificity constitutes a likely genetic marker of resistance to dermatophilosis in Brahman zebu cattle of Martinique (FWI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, J C; Martinez, D; Bensaid, A

    1996-07-23

    One hundred and twenty-seven Brahman cattle from several locations in Martinique (FWI), reared under different environmental conditions, were followed over three years and checked for clinical signs of dermatophilosis. To confirm that these animals had been in contact with the pathogen Dermatophilus congolensis, their sera were tested by ELISA. On the basis of this epidemiological study, 12 animals were classified as resistant (seropositive without clinical signs), belonging to herds in which the prevalence of the disease ranged from 25 to nearly 98%. Eighteen animals classified as highly susceptible displayed severe characteristic skin lesions. These 30 selected animals were typed for class I antigens of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). MHC class II genes were analyzed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) techniques, on the exon 2 of the bovine leucocyte antigen (BoLA) DRB3 gene. Several alleles were found, according to patterns provided by the restriction enzymes used: Fnu 4HI, Dpn II, Hae III, and Rsa I. A particular sequence "EIAY" at amino acid positions 66/67/74/78 located in the antigen recognition sites (ARS) was found in the 12 animals classified as resistant, and 10 of them displayed also class I BoLA-A8 specificity. On the other hand, only 3 out of the 18 susceptible animals showed simultaneously the BoLA-DRB3 "EIAY" sequence and BoLA-A8 specificity. Interestingly, a serine residue at position 30 of the ARS was found in 8 of the susceptible animals and was completely absent from all resistant animals. Furthermore, in a same animal, the serine at position 30 and the EIAY sequence were never found simultaneously on the same haplotype. These results show a strong correlation between the resistant character to dermatophilosis and the association of MHC haplotypes: the BoLA-A8 specificity and the BoLA-DRB3 "EIAY" sequence at ARS positions 66/67/74/78 with the lack of serine in position 30. To

  3. Systemic treatment with n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids attenuates EL4 thymoma growth and metastasis through enhancing specific and non-specific anti-tumor cytolytic activities and production of TH1 cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed Labib

    2005-06-01

    Recently, there has been a great interest in the effects of different types of n-6 polyunsaturated acids (n-6 PUFAs) upon the immune system and cancer development. However, the effects of n-6 PUFAs are still controversial and as yet undefined. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-tumor effects of n-6 PUFAs against EL4 thymoma and the associated immune mechanisms. To this, sesame oil, a vegetable oil enriched with n-6 PUFAs, or free linoleic acid (LA) were administered intraperitoneally into C57BL/6 mice before and after challenge with EL4 lymphoma cells. Treatment with either sesame oil or LA attenuated the growth and metastasis of EL4 lymphoma. The anti-tumor effect of LA was superior to that of sesame oil, and associated with an increase in the survival rate of the tumor-bearing mice. In addition, both sesame oil and LA showed dose-dependent anti-lymphoma growth in vitro. Treatment with LA generated significant increases in the anti-lymphoma cytolytic and cytostatic activities of T cells and macrophages, respectively, and enhanced production of IL-2 and IFN-gamma while decreased production of IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10. In summation, the results suggest that n-6 PUFAs, represented by LA, can attenuate EL4 lymphoma growth and metastasis through enhancing the specific and non-specific anti-tumor cytolytic activities and production of TH1 cytokines. These findings might be of great importance for a proper design of systemic nourishment with PUFAs emulsions for cancer patients.

  4. Why quota trade should be restricted: The arguments behind the EU position on emissions trading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westskog, Hege

    2001-01-01

    In this paper I try to clarify the background and arguments behind the EU position on emissions trading in negotiating the Kyoto Protocol and their suggestions of how the supplementary cap in the Kyoto agreement can be operationalized. I discuss economic arguments for restricting quota trade with a focus on the market power issue, transaction costs, and ancillary benefits of reducing emissions of climate gases. I also address the problem of hot air as an important argument to restrict quota trade, and arguments for restrictions connected to technological innovation. Finally, I look into the ethical considerations of restrictions. (author)

  5. Why quota trade should be restricted: The arguments behind the EU position on emissions trading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westskog, Hege

    2001-07-01

    In this paper I try to clarify the background and arguments behind the EU position on emissions trading in negotiating the Kyoto Protocol and their suggestions of how the supplementarity cap in the Kyoto agreement can be operationalized. I discuss economic arguments for restricting quota trade with a focus on the market power issue, transaction costs, and ancillary benefits of reducing emissions of climate gases. I also address the problem of hot air as an important argument to restrict quota trade, and arguments for restrictions connected to technological innovation. Finally, I look into the ethical considerations of restrictions. (author)

  6. Application of a latent class analysis to empirically define eating disorder phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, Pamela K; Fichter, Manfred; Quadflieg, Norbert; Bulik, Cynthia M; Baxter, Mark G; Thornton, Laura; Halmi, Katherine A; Kaplan, Allan S; Strober, Michael; Woodside, D Blake; Crow, Scott J; Mitchell, James E; Rotondo, Alessandro; Mauri, Mauro; Cassano, Giovanni; Treasure, Janet; Goldman, David; Berrettini, Wade H; Kaye, Walter H

    2004-02-01

    Diagnostic criteria for eating disorders influence how we recognize, research, and treat eating disorders, and empirically valid phenotypes are required for revealing their genetic bases. To empirically define eating disorder phenotypes. Data regarding eating disorder symptoms and features from 1179 individuals with clinically significant eating disorders were submitted to a latent class analysis. The resulting latent classes were compared on non-eating disorder variables in a series of validation analyses. Multinational, collaborative study with cases ascertained through diverse clinical settings (inpatient, outpatient, and community). Members of affected relative pairs recruited for participation in genetic studies of eating disorders in which probands met DSM-IV-TR criteria for anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa and had at least 1 biological relative with a clinically significant eating disorder. Main Outcome Measure Number and clinical characterization of latent classes. A 4-class solution provided the best fit. Latent class 1 (LC1) resembled restricting AN; LC2, AN and bulimia nervosa with the use of multiple methods of purging; LC3, restricting AN without obsessive-compulsive features; and LC4, bulimia nervosa with self-induced vomiting as the sole form of purging. Biological relatives were significantly likely to belong to the same latent class. Across validation analyses, LC2 demonstrated the highest levels of psychological disturbance, and LC3 demonstrated the lowest. The presence of obsessive-compulsive features differentiates among individuals with restricting AN. Similarly, the combination of low weight and multiple methods of purging distinguishes among individuals with binge eating and purging behaviors. These results support some of the distinctions drawn within the DSM-IV-TR among eating disorder subtypes, while introducing new features to define phenotypes.

  7. Morphological caracteristics of malocclusion class II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Class II malocclusion are complex anomalies of the skeletal and dental systems. The aim of this study is that the rengenkefalometrics analysis closer determine the morphological characteristics of this malocclusion. For this study were used 30 patients aged 18-30, previously clinically diagnosed class II, before the planned orthodontic treatment. The results analisis lateral cephalometric radiographs were compared with the 30 patients with class I malocclusion. Analyzed three linear and two angular cranial base dimensions and nine angular and four linear measures from the facial skeleton. The Results show: No statistically significant differensis in cranial base angle (SNBa and anterior cranial base length (S-N between class II and control Class I. Angle maxillar prognathism ( SNA is no signifikant different between class I and Class II but SNB angle were signifikant smaller. The length of maxillary base (A'-SnP is longer and the length of mandibule (Pg'-MT1/MT is signifficantly smaller. The gonial angle (ArGo-Me was smaller with open articular angle (GoArSN. Morphological characteristics of class II malocclusion are , retrognathic and smaller mandibular ligth, normognathic and longer maxilla, open articular angle with vertical tendency of the craniofacial growth pattern.

  8. 14 CFR 61.419 - How do I obtain privileges to provide training in an additional category or class of light-sport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... training in an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.419 Section 61.419 Aeronautics and...: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.419 How do I obtain privileges to provide training in an additional category or class of light-sport...

  9. Positive regulation of plasmacytoid dendritic cell function via Ly49Q recognition of class I MHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Lee-Hwa; Goulet, Marie-Line; Belanger, Simon; Toyama-Sorimachi, Noriko; Fodil-Cornu, Nassima; Vidal, Silvia M.; Troke, Angela D.; McVicar, Daniel W.; Makrigiannis, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are an important source of type I interferon (IFN) during initial immune responses to viral infections. In mice, pDCs are uniquely characterized by high-level expression of Ly49Q, a C-type lectin-like receptor specific for class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Despite having a cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif, Ly49Q was found to enhance pDC function in vitro, as pDC cytokine production in response to the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 agonist CpG-oligonucleotide (ODN) could be blocked using soluble monoclonal antibody (mAb) to Ly49Q or H-2Kb. Conversely, CpG-ODN–dependent IFN-α production by pDCs was greatly augmented upon receptor cross-linking using immobilized anti-Ly49Q mAb or recombinant H-2Kb ligand. Accordingly, Ly49Q-deficient pDCs displayed a severely reduced capacity to produce cytokines in response to TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, TLR9-dependent antiviral responses were compromised in Ly49Q-null mice infected with mouse cytomegalovirus. Thus, class I MHC recognition by Ly49Q on pDCs is necessary for optimal activation of innate immune responses in vivo. PMID:19075287

  10. Structural analysis program of plant piping system. Introduction of AutoPIPE V8i new feature. JSME PPC-class 2 piping code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motohashi, Kazuhiko

    2009-01-01

    After an integration with ADLPipe, AutoPIPE V8i (ver.9.1) became the structural analysis program of plant piping system featured with analysis capability for the ASME NB Class 1 and JSME PPC-Class 2 piping codes including ASME NC Class 2 and ASME ND Class 3. This article described analysis capability for the JSME PPC-Class 2 piping code as well as new general features such as static analysis up to 100 thermal, 10 seismic and 10 wind load cases including different loading scenarios and pipe segment edit function: join, split, reverse and re-order segments. (T. Tanaka)

  11. Cephalometric-radiographic study, in lateral norm, considering the established standards of white Brazilian teenagers who presented normal occlusions and mal-occlusions of Class I and Class II, 1st Division and the ones from Ricketts' analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bismarck, V.E.

    1986-01-01

    In the present work, our purpose was make a cephalometric-radiographic study, comparing white Brazilian teenagers who presented normal occlusion and the ones who presented malocclusions of Class I and Class II, according to RICKETT'S analysis (1960). (author) [pt

  12. Enabling Event Tracing at Leadership-Class Scale through I/O Forwarding Middleware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilsche, Thomas [Technische Universitat Dresden; Schuchart, Joseph [Technische Universitat Dresden; Cope, Joseph [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kimpe, Dries [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Jones, Terry R [ORNL; Knuepfer, Andreas [Technische Universitat Dresden; Iskra, Kamil [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ross, Robert [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Nagel, Wolfgang E. [Technische Universitat Dresden; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Event tracing is an important tool for understanding the performance of parallel applications. As concurrency increases in leadership-class computing systems, the quantity of performance log data can overload the parallel file system, perturbing the application being observed. In this work we present a solution for event tracing at leadership scales. We enhance the I/O forwarding system software to aggregate and reorganize log data prior to writing to the storage system, significantly reducing the burden on the underlying file system for this type of traffic. Furthermore, we augment the I/O forwarding system with a write buffering capability to limit the impact of artificial perturbations from log data accesses on traced applications. To validate the approach, we modify the Vampir tracing tool to take advantage of this new capability and show that the approach increases the maximum traced application size by a factor of 5x to more than 200,000 processors.

  13. A classe da NYHA tem relação com a condição funcional e qualidade de vida na insuficiência cardíaca The relationship between NYHA class and the functional condition and quality of life in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Cangeri Di Naso

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A insuficiência cardíaca (IC é uma síndrome que se apresenta com crescente prevalência, podendo limitar o indivíduo quanto à capacidade físico-funcional, condição pulmonar e qualidade de vida. Este estudo tem como objetivo verificar as limitações pulmonares e físicas, bem como a qualidade de vida dos pacientes e compará-las com as classes funcionais da New York Heart Association (NYHA. Estudo transversal, com amostra de 66 pacientes (45 homens. Foram aplicados uma ficha de avaliação padronizada e o questionário de qualidade de vida Short Form-36 (SF-36. Foram realizados espirometria, manovacuometria e o teste da caminhada de seis minutos (TC6M. Os pacientes (classe I: 24 indivíduos, classe II: 27 e classe III: 15 possuíam uma média de idade de 57,95±10,96 anos e representaram uma amostra com características antropométricas homogêneas. Para a condição pulmonar, observou-se diferença estatística quanto a Capacidade Vital Forçada (CVF, Pico de Fluxo Expiratório e Pressão Expiratória Máxima (Pemáx. Na distância do TC6M houve diferença entre classe I e III e entre II e III (classe I: 439,27±58,85 m, classe II: 370,96±74,41 m e classe III: 268,96±83,88 m, com pHeart failure (HF is a syndrome that presents with increasing prevalence, and can restrict the individual as to the physical-functional, lung condition and quality of life. Check the quality of life, lung and physical limitations of patients and compare them with those in New York Heart Association (NYHA functional class. Cross-sectional study, a sample of 66 patients (45 men. It applied a form of standardized assessment, spirometry, manovacuometry, of the six minute walk test (6MWT and questioning the quality of life Short-Form 36 (SF-36. Patients average age of 57.95±10.96 years (Class I: 24, Class II: 27 and Class III: 15 and represented a sample with anthropometric characteristics homogeneous. For the lung condition, we observed a statistical

  14. An overview of the class I structures license renewal industry report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renfro, L.J.; Statton, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    License renewal of a commercial nuclear power plant requires verification that systems, structures and components important to license renewal can perform their intended safety functions throughout the license renewal term. The verification of this continuing performance includes a technical evaluation of the effects of age-related degradation. An industry report (IR) sponsored by the nuclear industry was developed which identifies potentially significant age-related degradation mechanisms that may affect Class I structures and evaluates their impact on the ability of the structures to continue to perform their safety functions. Preventive and/or mitigative options are outlined for managing degradation mechanisms that could significantly affect plant performance during the license renewal period. This paper provides a summary of the IR. (author)

  15. Semiparametric regression for restricted mean residual life under right censoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansourvar, Zahra; Martinussen, Torben; Scheike, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    is not observed, the restricted mean residual life must be considered. In this paper, we propose the proportional restricted mean residual life model for fitting survival data under right censoring. For inference on the model parameters, martingale estimating equations are developed, and the asymptotic properties...... of the proposed estimators are established. In addition, a class of goodness-of-fit test is presented to assess the adequacy of the model. The finite sample behavior of the proposed estimators is evaluated through simulation studies, and the approach is applied to a set of real life data collected from...

  16. Randomized 3-year Clinical Evaluation of Class I and II Posterior Resin Restorations Placed with a Bulk-fill Resin Composite and a One-step Self-etching Adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan Wv; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the 3-year clinical durability of the flowable bulk-fill resin composite SDR in Class I and Class II restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight pairs of Class I and 62 pairs of Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female patients (mean age 52.4 years......). Each patient received at least two extended Class I or Class II restorations that were as similar as possible. In all cavities, a one-step self-etching adhesive (XenoV+) was applied. One of the cavities of each pair was randomly assigned to receive the flowable bulk-fill resin composite SDR...... in increments up to 4 mm as needed to fill the cavity 2 mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with an ormocer-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, only the resin composite CeramX mono+ was placed in 2 mm increments. The restorations were...

  17. Intrauterine growth-restricted sheep fetuses exhibit smaller hindlimb muscle fibers and lower proportions of insulin-sensitive Type I fibers near term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Dustin T; Cadaret, Caitlin N; Beede, Kristin A; Riley, Hannah E; Macko, Antoni R; Anderson, Miranda J; Camacho, Leticia E; Limesand, Sean W

    2016-06-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) reduces muscle mass and insulin sensitivity in offspring. Insulin sensitivity varies among muscle fiber types, with Type I fibers being most sensitive. Differences in fiber-type ratios are associated with insulin resistance in adults, and thus we hypothesized that near-term IUGR sheep fetuses exhibit reduced size and proportions of Type I fibers. Placental insufficiency-induced IUGR fetuses were ∼54% smaller (P fetal muscles develop smaller fibers and have proportionally fewer Type I fibers, which is indicative of developmental adaptations that may help explain the link between IUGR and adulthood insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Má oclusão de Classe I com biprotrusão e ausência dos primeiros molares inferiores Angle Class I malocclusion with bimaxillary dental protrusion and missing mandibular first molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldino Puppin Filho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente relato de caso descreve o tratamento ortodôntico de uma paciente de 24 anos de idade, portadora de má oclusão de Classe I de Angle, com protrusão dos incisivos superiores e inferiores, além de perda recente dos primeiros molares inferiores. O tratamento idealizado envolveu a exodontia dos primeiros pré-molares superiores, aliada ao fechamento dos espaços presentes na arcada inferior. O resultado obtido demonstra a necessidade de planos de tratamento individualizados e a importância dos conceitos biomecânicos para movimentar adequadamente os dentes. Esse caso clínico foi apresentado à Diretoria do Board Brasileiro de Ortodontia e Ortopedia Facial (BBO, representando a categoria livre escolha, como parte dos requisitos para obtenção do título de Diplomado pelo BBO.This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a 24-year-old patient presenting with Angle Class I malocclusion, bimaxillary dental protrusion and recent loss of mandibular molars. Treatment involved extraction of the maxillary first premolars and closing of mandibular first molar spaces. Treatment outcomes demonstrate the need for individualized treatment planning and highlight the key role played by biomechanical concepts in achieving proper orthodontic tooth movement. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO as representative of the free choice category in partial fulfillment of the requirements for obtaining the BBO Diploma.

  19. Ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I) prevents apoptosis induced by Fas or SAPK/JNK activation in T-lymphoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberth, K; Claesson, M H

    2001-01-01

    Early apoptosis in Jurkat T-lymphoma cells was induced by agonistic anti-Fas Ab or by anisomycin which activates the stress kinases SAPK/JNK. Apoptosis was inhibited by ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I). MHC-I ligation induced upregulation of the anti......-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and stabilized the mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsim). MHC-I ligation also prevented downregulation of Bcl-2 and destabilization of Deltapsim induced by anti-Fas Ab treatment or anisomycin exposure. Studies on three different Jurkat cell mutants deficient for src p56(lck), ZAP......-70 kinase, or TCR/CD3 gamma-chain showed that the cells undergo apoptosis after Fas ligation. Anisomycin exposure induced apoptosis in the src p56(lck)-deficient cell line but not in the two other mutant cell lines. Simultaneous cross-linking of MHC-I and Fas ligation inhibited apoptosis in the ZAP...

  20. Flexible image evaluation: iPad versus secondary-class monitors for review of MR spinal emergency cases, a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Jonathan P; Ryan, John T; Evanoff, Michael G; Rainford, Louise A

    2012-08-01

    Studies have highlighted the potential of handheld viewing devices for rapid diagnosis and increased smartphone usage among physicians and radiologists is known as is the clinical applicability of hand-held devices for computed tomography (CT) spinal injury cases. Magnetic resonance (MR), however, is the accepted gold standard for spinal imaging, providing visualization of both ligament and spinal cord pathology. This study investigated the diagnostic accuracy of the iPad, the most probable alternative display device outside the radiology environment and financially viable alternative, when reviewing emergency spinal MR images, in comparison with secondary-class LCD devices in the case of the interpretation of CT and MR imaging examinations. In total 31 MR cases including both positives (n = 13) containing one of four possible presentations: spinal cord compression, cauda equine syndrome, spinal cord hemorrhage, or spinal cord edema and controls (n = 18) were reviewed. Ziltron iPad software facilitated the display of cases and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Thirteen American Board of Radiology board-certified radiologists reviewed all cases on both displays. Standardized viewing conditions were maintained. Dorfman-Berbaum-Metz multireader-multicase (DBM MRMC) analysis was performed including random readers/random cases, fixed readers/random cases and random readers/fixed cases. No differences of statistical significance (P ≤ .05) could be found in terms of area under the curve, sensitivity and specificity between the iPad and secondary-class display. The iPad performed with equal diagnostic accuracy when compared with the secondary-class LCD device after DBM MRMC analysis, demonstrating the iPad as an option to aid initial review of MR spinal emergency cases. Copyright © 2012 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. F pocket flexibility influences the tapasin dependence of two differentially disease-associated MHC Class I proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abualrous, Esam T; Fritzsche, Susanne; Hein, Zeynep; Al-Balushi, Mohammed S; Reinink, Peter; Boyle, Louise H; Wellbrock, Ursula; Antoniou, Antony N; Springer, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The human MHC class I protein HLA-B*27:05 is statistically associated with ankylosing spondylitis, unlike HLA-B*27:09, which differs in a single amino acid in the F pocket of the peptide-binding groove. To understand how this unique amino acid difference leads to a different behavior of the proteins in the cell, we have investigated the conformational stability of both proteins using a combination of in silico and experimental approaches. Here, we show that the binding site of B*27:05 is conformationally disordered in the absence of peptide due to a charge repulsion at the bottom of the F pocket. In agreement with this, B*27:05 requires the chaperone protein tapasin to a greater extent than the conformationally stable B*27:09 in order to remain structured and to bind peptide. Taken together, our data demonstrate a method to predict tapasin dependence and physiological behavior from the sequence and crystal structure of a particular class I allotype. Also watch the Video Abstract. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Effective Adoption of Tablets in Post-Secondary Education: Recommendations Based on a Trial of iPads in University Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Colin F.; Wardley, Leslie J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the integration of tablets, such as the Apple iPad, in university classes and provides recommendations for other instructors to consider when adopting tablet technology. During the trial conducted in the summer of 2011 using iPads, we found that tablets had both academic and social uses, which should be considered when using…

  3. Rapport: Coding Class - Dokumentation og evaluering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansbøl, Mikala; Ejsing-Duun, Stine

    2017-01-01

    Denne rapport rummer evaluering og dokumentation af Coding Class projektet . Coding Class projektet blev igangsat i skoleåret 2016/2017 af IT-Branchen i samarbejde med en række medlemsvirksomheder, Københavns kommune, Vejle Kommune, Styrelsen for IT- og Læring (STIL) og den frivillige forening...... Coding Pirates . Rapporten er forfattet af Docent i digitale læringsressourcer og faglig leder af forsknings- og udviklingsmiljøet Digitalisering i Skolen (DiS), Mikala Hansbøl, fra Institut for Skole og Læring ved professionshøjskolen Metropol; og Lektor i læringsteknologi, interaktionsdesign, design...... tænkning og design-pædagogik, Stine Ejsing-Duun fra Forskningslab: It og Læringsdesign (ILD-LAB) ved Institut for Kommunikation ved Aalborg Universitet i København. Vi har fulgt og gennemført evaluering og dokumentation af Coding Class projektet i perioden november 2016 til maj 2017...

  4. 40 CFR 82.10 - Availability of consumption allowances in addition to baseline consumption allowances for class I...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Availability of consumption allowances in addition to baseline consumption allowances for class I controlled substances. 82.10 Section 82.10... STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.10 Availability of consumption allowances in...

  5. Dissemination of Multidrug-Resistant, Class I and II Integrons and Molecular Typing of CTX-M-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akya, Alisha; Elahi, Azam; Chegenelorestani, Roya; Rezaee, Mahya

    2018-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae ( K. pneumoniae ) is an important opportunistic pathogen causes serious community and hospital-acquired infections, which is highly resistant to antibiotics. We aimed to determine the frequency of multidrug resistant (MDR) and molecular typing of clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae . One hundred isolates of K. pneumoniae were collected from clinical samples in three general hospitals in Kermanshah. The antimicrobial susceptibility and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) production of isolates were determined using disk diffusion and combined disk methods, respectively. The bla CTX-M gene, class I and II integrons were detected using polymerase chain reaction. The bla CTX-M positive isolates were selected for genotyping using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). MDR phenotype was observed in 56% of isolates. The 40% of isolates were ESBL positive and 35 isolates contained bla CTX-M . Class I and II of integrons were detected in 50 (89.2%) and 39 (69.6%) of MDR isolates, respectively. PFGE patterns of K. pneumoniae bla CTX-M positive isolates indicated 19 clusters (X 1-19 ) with different genotype patterns. The study findings highlight the concern of circulating MDR strains of K. pneumoniae with bla CTX-M and class I and II integrons in Kermanshah hospitals. The presence of integrons among isolates may facilitate the spread of new resistance genes in this bacterium. Therefore, surveillance for the spread of MDR strains of this bacterium is recommended in hospitals.

  6. Guiding IEP Teams on Meeting the Least Restrictive Environment Mandate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Teri A.; Hart, Jennifer L.; Nelson, Leslie; Love, Jessica; Baxter, Christine M.; Gartin, Barbara; Schaefer Whitby, Peggy J.

    2014-01-01

    Two diametrically opposed beliefs are held concerning the meaning of the least restrictive environment (LRE) when determining the class placements of students with disabilities. One group adheres to the placement philosophy that the LRE is always the general education setting. The other group believes that the LRE is where the students' needs may…

  7. Peptide-binding motif prediction by using phage display library for SasaUBA*0301, a resistance haplotype of MHC class I molecule from Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Heng; Hermsen, Trudi; Stet, Rene J M

    2008-01-01

    The structure of the peptide-binding specificity of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I has been analyzed extensively in human and mouse. For fish, there are no crystallographic models of MHC molecules, neither are there data on the peptide-binding specificity. In this study, we descri...... and there is a significant association between MHC polymorphism and the disease resistance. Therefore, our study might contribute to designing a peptide vaccine against this viral disease....... class I molecule might have a very similar binding motif at the C-terminus compared with a known mouse class I molecule H2-Kb which has L, or I, V, M at p8. Previous work showed that Atlantic Salmon carrying the allele SasaUBA*0301 are resistant to infectious Salmon aneamia virus...

  8. Graft rejection by cytolytic T cells. Specificity of the effector mechanism in the rejection of allogeneic marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, H.; Gress, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Cellular effector mechanisms of allograft rejection remain incompletely described. Characterizing the rejection of foreign-marrow allografts rather than solid-organ grafts has the advantage that the cellular composition of the marrow graft, as a single cell suspension, can be altered to include cellular components with differing antigen expression. Rejection of marrow grafts is sensitive to lethal doses of radiation in the mouse but resistant to sublethal levels of radiation. In an effort to identify cells mediating host resistance, lymphocytes were isolated and cloned from spleens of mice 7 days after sublethal TBI (650 cGy) and inoculation with allogeneic marrow. All clones isolated were cytolytic with specificity for MHC encoded gene products of the allogeneic marrow donor. When cloned cells were transferred in vivo into lethally irradiated (1025 cGy) recipients unable to reject allogeneic marrow, results utilizing splenic 125IUdR uptake indicated that these MHC-specific cytotoxic clones could suppress marrow proliferation. In order to characterize the effector mechanism and the ability of the clones to affect final engraftment, double donor chimeras were constructed so that 2 target cell populations differing at the MHC from each other and from the host were present in the same marrow allograft. Results directly demonstrated an ability of CTL of host MHC type to mediate graft rejection and characterized the effector mechanism as one with specificity for MHC gene products

  9. Leukocyte Ig-Like Receptors – a model for MHC class I disease associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Louise Allen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available MHC class I (MHC-I polymorphisms are associated with the outcome of some viral infections and autoimmune diseases. MHC-I proteins present antigenic peptides and are recognised by receptors on Natural Killer cells and Cytotoxic T lymphocytes, thus enabling the immune system to detect self-antigens and eliminate targets lacking self or expressing foreign antigens. Recognition of MHC-I, however, extends beyond receptors on cytotoxic leukocytes. Members of the Leukocyte Ig-like receptor (LILR family are expressed on monocytic cells and can recognise both classical and non-classical MHC-I alleles. Despite their relatively broad specificity when compared to the T Cell Receptor or Killer Ig-like Receptors, variations in the strength of LILR binding between different MHC-I alleles have recently been shown to correlate with control of HIV infection. We suggest that LILR recognition may mediate MHC-I disease association in a manner that does not depend on a binary discrimination of self/non-self by cytotoxic cells. Instead, the effects of LILR activity following engagement by MHC-I may represent a degrees of self model, whereby strength of binding to different alleles determines the degree of influence exerted by these receptors on immune cell functions. LILR are expressed by myelomonocytic cells and lymphocytes, extending their influence across antigen presenting cell subsets including dendritic cells, macrophages and B cells. They have been identified as important players in the response to infection, inflammatory diseases and cancer, with recent literature to indicate that MHC-I recognition by these receptors and consequent allelic effects could extend an influence beyond the immune system.

  10. New design of MHC class II tetramers to accommodate fundamental principles of antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landais, Elise; Romagnoli, Pablo A; Corper, Adam L; Shires, John; Altman, John D; Wilson, Ian A; Garcia, K Christopher; Teyton, Luc

    2009-12-15

    Direct identification and isolation of Ag-specific T cells became possible with the development of MHC tetramers, based on fluorescent avidins displaying biotinylated peptide-MHC complexes. This approach, extensively used for MHC class I-restricted T cells, has met very limited success with class II peptide-MHC complex tetramers (pMHCT-2) for the detection of CD4(+)-specific T cells. In addition, a very large number of these reagents, although capable of specifically activating T cells after being coated on solid support, is still unable to stain. To try to understand this puzzle and design usable tetramers, we examined each parameter critical for the production of pMHCT-2 using the I-A(d)-OVA system as a model. Through this process, the geometry of peptide-MHC display by avidin tetramers was examined, as well as the stability of rMHC molecules. However, we discovered that the most important factor limiting the reactivity of pMHCT-2 was the display of peptides. Indeed, long peptides, as presented by MHC class II molecules, can be bound to I-A/HLA-DQ molecules in more than one register, as suggested by structural studies. This mode of anchorless peptide binding allows the selection of a broader repertoire on single peptides and should favor anti-infectious immune responses. Thus, beyond the technical improvements that we propose, the redesign of pMHCT-2 will give us the tools to evaluate the real size of the CD4 T cell repertoire and help us in the production and testing of new vaccines.

  11. Nonequivalence of classical MHC class I loci in ability to direct effective antiviral immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D Pavelko

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Structural diversity in the peptide binding sites of the redundant classical MHC antigen presenting molecules is strongly selected in humans and mice. Although the encoded antigen presenting molecules overlap in antigen presenting function, differences in polymorphism at the MHC I A, B and C loci in humans and higher primates indicate these loci are not functionally equivalent. The structural basis of these differences is not known. We hypothesize that classical class I loci differ in their ability to direct effective immunity against intracellular pathogens. Using a picornavirus infection model and chimeric H-2 transgenes, we examined locus specific functional determinants distinguishing the ability of class I sister genes to direct effective anti viral immunity. Whereas, parental FVB and transgenic FVB mice expressing the H-2K(b gene are highly susceptible to persisting Theiler's virus infection within the CNS and subsequent demyelination, mice expressing the D(b transgene clear the virus and are protected from demyelination. Remarkably, animals expressing a chimeric transgene, comprised primarily of K(b but encoding the peptide binding domain of D(b, develop a robust anti viral CTL response yet fail to clear virus and develop significant demyelination. Differences in expression of the chimeric K(bα1α2D(b gene (low and D(b (high in the CNS of infected mice mirror expression levels of their endogenous H-2(q counterparts in FVB mice. These findings demonstrate that locus specific elements other than those specifying peptide binding and T cell receptor interaction can determine ability to clear virus infection. This finding provides a basis for understanding locus-specific differences in MHC polymorphism, characterized best in human populations.

  12. Motivating students to read the textbook before class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Rachel E.

    2016-11-01

    Many faculty in STEM courses assign textbook reading in advance of lecture, yet evidence shows few students actually read the textbook. Those students that do read often do so only after the material has been presented in class. Preparing for class by reading the textbook beforehand improves student learning and is particularly critical for classes that employ active engagement strategies. Here I present strategies I have used to successfully motivate my students to read the textbook before class in physics classes ranging from introductory algebra-based physics to advanced courses for physics majors. In the introductory course, I used pre-class reading quizzes, a common strategy that has been shown effective in previous studies, but one that is somewhat time-consuming to implement. In my more advanced courses I used reading reflections, which required considerably less time. While it was typical for less than 25% of students to read the textbook before I implemented reading quizzes or reflections, after implementing these strategies 70-90% of students reported reading the textbook before class most of the time. Students also report finding both the readings themselves and the quizzes and reflections valuable for their learning.

  13. Proposed research on class I components to test a general approach to accelerated aging under combined stress environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, K.T.; Salazar, E.A.; Frank, C.W.

    1977-04-01

    This report summarizes research on the aging of Class I components in environments representative of nuclear power plants. It discusses Class IE equipment used in nuclear power plants, typical environments encountered by Class IE components, and aging techniques used to qualify this equipment. General discussions of radiation chemistry of polymers and accelerated aging techniques are also included. Based on the inadequacies of present aging techniques for Class IE equipment, a proposal for an experimental program on electrical cables is presented. One of the main purposes of the proposed work is to obtain relevant data in two areas of particular concern--the effect of radiation dose rate on polymer degradation, and the importance of synergism for combined thermal and radiation environments. A new model that allows combined environment accelerated aging to be carried out is introduced, and it is shown how the experimental data to be generated can be used to test this model

  14. Uncovering the Peptide-Binding Specificities of HLA-C: A General Strategy To Determine the Specificity of Any MHC Class I Molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel; Stryhn, Anette

    2014-01-01

    MHC class I molecules (HLA-I in humans) present peptides derived from endogenous proteins to CTLs. Whereas the peptide-binding specificities of HLA-A and -B molecules have been studied extensively, little is known about HLA-C specificities. Combining a positional scanning combinatorial peptide...... library approach with a peptide-HLA-I dissociation assay, in this study we present a general strategy to determine the peptide-binding specificity of any MHC class I molecule. We applied this novel strategy to 17 of the most common HLA-C molecules, and for 16 of these we successfully generated matrices...... representing their peptide-binding motifs. The motifs prominently shared a conserved C-terminal primary anchor with hydrophobic amino acid residues, as well as one or more diverse primary and auxiliary anchors at P1, P2, P3, and/or P7. Matrices were used to generate a large panel of HLA-C-specific peptide...

  15. Identification of two invasive Cacopsylla chinensis (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) lineages based on two mitochondrial sequences and restriction fragment length polymorphism of cytochrome oxidase I amplicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsien-Chung; Yang, Man-Miao; Yeh, Wen-Bin

    2008-08-01

    The occurrence of pear decline, a disease found in some pear (Pyrus spp.) orchards of Taiwan in recent years, is accompanied by an outbreak of Cacopsylla chinensis (Yang & Li). Two major morphological forms (summer and winter forms) with a variety of intermediate body color and two phylogenetic lineages of this psyllid have been described. The work herein used sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and 16S rDNA regions to delineate the genetic differentiation of this color-variable insect and to elucidate their relationship. Sequence divergence and phylogenetic analysis have shown that C. chinensis individuals could be divided into two lineages with 3.3 and 2.3% divergence of COI and 16S rDNA, respectively. All specimens from China were found to belong to lineage I. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of COI with restriction enzymes AcuI, AseI, BccI, and FokI on 263 specimens of six populations from Taiwan produced two digestion patterns, which are in agreement with the two lineages described above. Both patterns could be found in each population, with most individuals belonging to lineage I and 5-21% of the individuals belonging to lineage II. Because these two lineages included summer as well as winter morphological forms, the lineage differentiation is apparently not related to morphological characters of this psyllid. Because the invasive records are not in favor of a sympatric differentiation, this psyllid is more likely introduced as different populations from countries in temperate regions.

  16. T cell-mediated hepatitis in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Liver cell destruction by H-2 class I-restricted virus-specific cytotoxic T cells as a physiological correlate of the 51Cr-release assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkernagel, R.M.; Haenseler, E.; Leist, T.; Cerny, A.; Hengartner, H.; Althage, A.

    1986-01-01

    A model for immunologically T cell-mediated hepatitis was established in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The severity of hepatitis was monitored histologically and by determination of changes in serum levels of the enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), and alkaline phosphatase (AP). Kinetics of histological disease manifestations, increases of liver enzyme levels in the serum, and cytotoxic T cell activities in livers and spleens all correlated and were dependent upon several parameters: LCMV-isolate; LCMV-WE caused extensive hepatitis, LCMV-Armstrong virtually none. Virus dose. Route of infection; i.v. or i.p. infection caused hepatitis, whereas infection into the footpad did not. The general genetic background of the murine host; of the strains tested, Swiss mice and A-strain mice were more susceptible than C57BL or CBA mice; BALB/c and DBA/2 mice were least susceptible. The degree of immunocompetence of the murine host; T cell deficient nu/nu mice never developed hepatitis, whereas nu/+ or +/+ mice always did. B cell-depleted anti-IgM-treated mice developed immune-mediated hepatitis comparably or even more extensively than control mice. Local cytotoxic T cell activity; mononuclear cells isolated from livers during the period of overt hepatitis were two to five times more active than equal numbers of spleen cells. Adoptive transfer of nylon wool-nonadherent anti-Thy-1.2 and anti-Lyt-2 plus C-sensitive, anti-L3T4 plus C-resistant lymphocytes into irradiated mice preinfected with LCMV-WE caused a rapid time- and dose-dependent linear increase of serum enzyme levels. This increase was caused by adoptive transfer of lymphocytes if immune cell donors and recipient mice shared class I, but not when they shared class II histocompatibility antigens

  17. MHC class I phenotype and function of human beta 2-microglobulin transgenic murine lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerager, L; Pedersen, L O; Bregenholt, S

    1996-01-01

    . Based on data from cellular binding studies, Scatchard analyses and flow cytometry, it is concluded that exogenous h beta 2m does not bind to hybrid MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules composed of mouse heavy chain/h beta 2m molecules expressed on lymphocytes of transgenic mice. Immunoprecipitation and SDS......-PAGE analysis of metabolically labelled normal C57BL/6 lymph node cells showed binding of exogenous h beta 2m to MHC-I, in particular, to the H-2Db molecule through an exchange with endogenous mouse beta 2m. In contrast to normal H-2Db molecules, hybrid H-2Db expressed on the surface of transgenic lymphocytes...... binds radiolabelled peptide in the absence of exogenous added h beta 2m suggesting that a stable fraction of hybrid H-2Db molecules is empty or contain peptides with very low affinity. In a one-way allogenic mixed lymphocyte culture, transgenic splenocytes were found to be far less stimulatory than...

  18. Deciphering complex patterns of class-I HLA-peptide cross-reactivity via hierarchical grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sumanta; Warwicker, Jim; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2015-07-01

    T-cell responses in humans are initiated by the binding of a peptide antigen to a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecule. The peptide-HLA complex then recruits an appropriate T cell, leading to cell-mediated immunity. More than 2000 HLA class-I alleles are known in humans, and they vary only in their peptide-binding grooves. The polymorphism they exhibit enables them to bind a wide range of peptide antigens from diverse sources. HLA molecules and peptides present a complex molecular recognition pattern, as many peptides bind to a given allele and a given peptide can be recognized by many alleles. A powerful grouping scheme that not only provides an insightful classification, but is also capable of dissecting the physicochemical basis of recognition specificity is necessary to address this complexity. We present a hierarchical classification of 2010 class-I alleles by using a systematic divisive clustering method. All-pair distances of alleles were obtained by comparing binding pockets in the structural models. By varying the similarity thresholds, a multilevel classification was obtained, with 7 supergroups, each further subclassifying to yield 72 groups. An independent clustering performed based only on similarities in their epitope pools correlated highly with pocket-based clustering. Physicochemical feature combinations that best explain the basis of clustering are identified. Mutual information calculated for the set of peptide ligands enables identification of binding site residues contributing to peptide specificity. The grouping of HLA molecules achieved here will be useful for rational vaccine design, understanding disease susceptibilities and predicting risk of organ transplants.

  19. HLA class I sequence-based typing using DNA recovered from frozen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Laura A; Abdur Rahman, Manal; Ng, Carmond; Le, Anh Q; Milloy, M-J; Mo, Theresa; Brumme, Zabrina L

    2012-08-31

    We describe a rapid, reliable and cost-effective method for intermediate-to-high-resolution sequence-based HLA class I typing using frozen plasma as a source of genomic DNA. The plasma samples investigated had a median age of 8.5 years. Total nucleic acids were isolated from matched frozen PBMC (~2.5 million) and plasma (500 μl) samples from a panel of 25 individuals using commercial silica-based kits. Extractions yielded median [IQR] nucleic acid concentrations of 85.7 [47.0-130.0]ng/μl and 2.2 [1.7-2.6]ng/μl from PBMC and plasma, respectively. Following extraction, ~1000 base pair regions spanning exons 2 and 3 of HLA-A, -B and -C were amplified independently via nested PCR using universal, locus-specific primers and sequenced directly. Chromatogram analysis was performed using commercial DNA sequence analysis software and allele interpretation was performed using a free web-based tool. HLA-A, -B and -C amplification rates were 100% and chromatograms were of uniformly high quality with clearly distinguishable mixed bases regardless of DNA source. Concordance between PBMC and plasma-derived HLA types was 100% at the allele and protein levels. At the nucleotide level, a single partially discordant base (resulting from a failure to call both peaks in a mixed base) was observed out of >46,975 bases sequenced (>99.9% concordance). This protocol has previously been used to perform HLA class I typing from a variety of genomic DNA sources including PBMC, whole blood, granulocyte pellets and serum, from specimens up to 30 years old. This method provides comparable specificity to conventional sequence-based approaches and could be applied in situations where cell samples are unavailable or DNA quantities are limiting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Shared IgG Infection Signatures vs. Hemorrhage-Restricted IgA Clusters in Human Dengue: A Phenotype of Differential Class-Switch via TGFβ1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hao Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic manifestations of infectious diseases are closely related to individual immune responses. Methods to extract information from patients’ own immune reactions would be of great use for both diagnosis and treatment. Dengue fever is one of the diseases that clinical aggravations could occur paradoxically after humoral immunity appears. This property makes dengue fever an excellent disease model to explore. A principal component analyses (PCAs-based framework derived from a prior vaccination study was developed. The framework was verified by successful demonstrations of known IgG signatures from a Mexico Dengue data set. Afterward the pipeline was tested upon de novo IgG and IgA libraries of Dengue patients from southern Taiwan. We discovered four infection signatures within IgG repertoires, two of which were identical to previous reports. However, it was IgA but not IgG that could differentiate hemorrhagic from non-hemorrhagic patients. IgA repertoires were found more diversified among bleeders, from whom seven signature clusters were characterized. The expressions of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1 and accordingly mediated class-switch activity of IgA were distinct only among the PCA-segregated bleeding group. In sum, intercontinental sharing of IgG signatures in dengue fever was demonstrated via a unified working flow. Differential regulation of IgA class-switch with associated diversity expansion plus existences of hemorrhage-restricted clusters were shown. The ability of the framework to find common IgG signatures would implicate applications to infections even from unknown pathogens. The clusters within IgA repertoires could offer perspectives to other IgA-related bleeding disorders such as Henoch-Schönlein purpura or IgA nephropathy. Substantiated grounds for IgA-specific effector function via TGFβ1-mediated class-switch would be a new factor to consider for infectious diseases.

  1. Immunobiology of T cell responses to Mls-locus-disparate stimulator cells. III. Helper and cytolytic functions of cloned, Mls-reactive T cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, M.E.; Tite, J.P.; Janeway, C.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Mls-specific T cell clones derived by limiting dilution were tested for cytotoxic activity in a lectin-dependent 51 Cr-release assay. All the T cell clones tested were cytotoxic in such an assay in apparent contrast to previous reports (1, 2). However, only those target cells sensitive to cytolysis by other L3T4a + cytolytic T cells (3) were killed by Mls-specific T cell clones in short term 51 Cr-release assays, possibly explaining this discrepancy. All the T cell clones tested were L3T4a + ,Lyt-2 - and stimulated B cells from Mls strains of mice to proliferate and secrete immunoglobulin. Furthermore, lysis of innocent bystander targets was observed when the T cells were stimulated with Mls-disparate stimulator cells. These results are consistent with those obtained with L3T4a - T cells specific for protein antigen:self Ia and that express cytotoxic potential (3)

  2. Class prediction for high-dimensional class-imbalanced data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusa Lara

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of class prediction studies is to develop rules to accurately predict the class membership of new samples. The rules are derived using the values of the variables available for each subject: the main characteristic of high-dimensional data is that the number of variables greatly exceeds the number of samples. Frequently the classifiers are developed using class-imbalanced data, i.e., data sets where the number of samples in each class is not equal. Standard classification methods used on class-imbalanced data often produce classifiers that do not accurately predict the minority class; the prediction is biased towards the majority class. In this paper we investigate if the high-dimensionality poses additional challenges when dealing with class-imbalanced prediction. We evaluate the performance of six types of classifiers on class-imbalanced data, using simulated data and a publicly available data set from a breast cancer gene-expression microarray study. We also investigate the effectiveness of some strategies that are available to overcome the effect of class imbalance. Results Our results show that the evaluated classifiers are highly sensitive to class imbalance and that variable selection introduces an additional bias towards classification into the majority class. Most new samples are assigned to the majority class from the training set, unless the difference between the classes is very large. As a consequence, the class-specific predictive accuracies differ considerably. When the class imbalance is not too severe, down-sizing and asymmetric bagging embedding variable selection work well, while over-sampling does not. Variable normalization can further worsen the performance of the classifiers. Conclusions Our results show that matching the prevalence of the classes in training and test set does not guarantee good performance of classifiers and that the problems related to classification with class

  3. Cloning and analysis of a bifunctional methyltransferase/restriction endonuclease TspGWI, the prototype of a Thermus sp. enzyme family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zylicz-Stachula Agnieszka

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restriction-modification systems are a diverse class of enzymes. They are classified into four major types: I, II, III and IV. We have previously proposed the existence of a Thermus sp. enzyme family, which belongs to type II restriction endonucleases (REases, however, it features also some characteristics of types I and III. Members include related thermophilic endonucleases: TspGWI, TaqII, TspDTI, and Tth111II. Results Here we describe cloning, mutagenesis and analysis of the prototype TspGWI enzyme that recognises the 5'-ACGGA-3' site and cleaves 11/9 nt downstream. We cloned, expressed, and mutagenised the tspgwi gene and investigated the properties of its product, the bifunctional TspGWI restriction/modification enzyme. Since TspGWI does not cleave DNA completely, a cloning method was devised, based on amino acid sequencing of internal proteolytic fragments. The deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme shares significant sequence similarity with another representative of the Thermus sp. family – TaqII. Interestingly, these enzymes recognise similar, yet different sequences in the DNA. Both enzymes cleave DNA at the same distance, but differ in their ability to cleave single sites and in the requirement of S-adenosylmethionine as an allosteric activator for cleavage. Both the restriction endonuclease (REase and methyltransferase (MTase activities of wild type (wt TspGWI (either recombinant or isolated from Thermus sp. are dependent on the presence of divalent cations. Conclusion TspGWI is a bifunctional protein comprising a tandem arrangement of Type I-like domains; particularly noticeable is the central HsdM-like module comprising a helical domain and a highly conserved S-adenosylmethionine-binding/catalytic MTase domain, containing DPAVGTG and NPPY motifs. TspGWI also possesses an N-terminal PD-(D/EXK nuclease domain related to the corresponding domains in HsdR subunits, but lacks the ATP-dependent translocase module

  4. Treating dental crowding with mandibular incisor extraction in an Angle Class I patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislana Braga Machado

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular dental crowding often encourages patients to seek orthodontic treatment. The orthodontist should decide between protrusion of incisors or decrease in dental volume so as to achieve proper alignment and leveling. The present study reports the treatment of an Angle Class I malocclusion adolescent female brachyfacial patient with severe mandibular dental crowding, increased curve of Spee and deep overbite. The patient was treated with extraction of a mandibular incisor. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO.

  5. Class I malocclusion with severe double rotrusion treated with first premolars extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Moresca

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Angle Class I malocclusion with bimaxillary protrusion is characterized by severe buccal tipping of incisors, which causes upper and lower lip protrusion. First premolars extraction is recommended to reduce facial convexity as a result of anterior teeth retraction, which keeps canines and first molars in key to occlusion. In order to yield orthodontic results that are compatible with ideal esthetic and cephalometric outcomes, the space closure phase needs to be carried out with overbite and incisors torque control. The majority of cases also requires maximum anchorage of posterior teeth. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO.

  6. Class I malocclusion with severe double rotrusion treated with first premolars extraction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresca, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Angle Class I malocclusion with bimaxillary protrusion is characterized by severe buccal tipping of incisors, which causes upper and lower lip protrusion. First premolars extraction is recommended to reduce facial convexity as a result of anterior teeth retraction, which keeps canines and first molars in key to occlusion. In order to yield orthodontic results that are compatible with ideal esthetic and cephalometric outcomes, the space closure phase needs to be carried out with overbite and incisors torque control. The majority of cases also requires maximum anchorage of posterior teeth. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO) as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO. PMID:25162577

  7. Orf virus interferes with MHC class I surface expression by targeting vesicular transport and Golgi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohde Jörg

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Orf virus (ORFV, a zoonotic Parapoxvirus, causes pustular skin lesions in small ruminants (goat and sheep. Intriguingly, ORFV can repeatedly infect its host, despite the induction of a specific immunity. These immune modulating and immune evading properties are still unexplained. Results Here, we describe that ORFV infection of permissive cells impairs the intracellular transport of MHC class I molecules (MHC I as a result of structural disruption and fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Depending on the duration of infection, we observed a pronounced co-localization of MHC I and COP-I vesicular structures as well as a reduction of MHC I surface expression of up to 50%. These subversion processes are associated with early ORFV gene expression and are accompanied by disturbed carbohydrate trimming of post-ER MHC I. The MHC I population remaining on the cell surface shows an extended half-life, an effect that might be partially controlled also by late ORFV genes. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that ORFV down-regulates MHC I surface expression in infected cells by targeting the late vesicular export machinery and the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus, which might aid to escape cellular immune recognition.

  8. On the Effects of Social Class on Language Use: A Fresh Look at Bernstein's Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbari, Mohammad; Allahmoradi, Nazal

    2014-01-01

    Basil Bernstein (1971) introduced the notion of the Restricted and the Elaborated code, claiming that working-class speakers have access only to the former but middle-class members to both. In an attempt to test this theory in the Iranian context and to investigate the effect of social class on the quality of students language use, we examined the…

  9. Effects of different levels of food restriction on passive-avoidance memory and the expression of synapsin I in young mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, L; Wu, Z-N; Han, P-Z

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of food restriction (FR) on memory and the expression of synapsin I in the brain of young mice. The results showed that 20% FR did not retard the body weight gain of mice, while the 60% and 80% FR reduced the mice's body weight. The memory after 24 hr of learning was not changed by FR, whereas long-term memory was improved significantly in 20% FR mice. In addition, 60% and 80% FR did not impair the mice's memory. The transcriptional expression of synapsin I in mice brain was up-regulated by 20% FR, and down-regulated by 60% and 80% FR.

  10. Dynamics of major histocompatibility complex class I association with the human peptide-loading complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter, Michaela S; Jain, Ankur; Leonhardt, Ralf M; Ha, Taekjip; Cresswell, Peter

    2012-09-07

    Although the human peptide-loading complex (PLC) is required for optimal major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) antigen presentation, its composition is still incompletely understood. The ratio of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and MHC I to tapasin, which is responsible for MHC I recruitment and peptide binding optimization, is particularly critical for modeling of the PLC. Here, we characterized the stoichiometry of the human PLC using both biophysical and biochemical approaches. By means of single-molecule pulldown (SiMPull), we determined a TAP/tapasin ratio of 1:2, consistent with previous studies of insect-cell microsomes, rat-human chimeric cells, and HeLa cells expressing truncated TAP subunits. We also report that the tapasin/MHC I ratio varies, with the PLC population comprising both 2:1 and 2:2 complexes, based on mutational and co-precipitation studies. The MHC I-saturated PLC may be particularly prevalent among peptide-selective alleles, such as HLA-C4. Additionally, MHC I association with the PLC increases when its peptide supply is reduced by inhibiting the proteasome or by blocking TAP-mediated peptide transport using viral inhibitors. Taken together, our results indicate that the composition of the human PLC varies under normal conditions and dynamically adapts to alterations in peptide supply that may arise during viral infection. These findings improve our understanding of the quality control of MHC I peptide loading and may aid the structural and functional modeling of the human PLC.

  11. Involvement of HLA class I molecules in the immune escape of urologic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero, R; Gil-Julio, H; Vázquez-Alonso, F; Garrido, F; Castiñeiras, J; Cózar, J M

    2014-04-01

    To analyze the influence of different alterations in human leukocyte antigen class I molecules (HLA I) in renal cell carcinoma, as well as in bladder and prostate cancer. We also study the correlation between HLA I expression and the progression of the disease and the response after immunotherapy protocols. It has been shown, experimentally, that the immune system can recognize and kill neoplastic cells. By analyzing the expression of HLA I molecules on the surface of cancer cells, we were able to study the tumor escape mechanisms against the immune system. Alteration or irreversible damage in HLA I molecules is used by the neoplastic cells to escape the immune system. The function of these molecules is to recognize endogenous peptides and present them to T cells of the immune system. There is a clear relationship between HLA I reversible alterations and success of therapy. Irreversible lesions also imply a lack of response to treatment. The immune system activation can reverse HLA I molecules expression in tumors with reversible lesions, whereas tumors with irreversible ones do not respond to such activation. Determine the type of altered HLA I molecules in tumors is of paramount importance when choosing the type of treatment to keep looking for therapeutic success. Those tumors with reversible lesions can be treated with traditional immunotherapy; however, tumour with irreversible alterations should follow alternative protocols, such as the use of viral vectors carrying the HLA genes to achieve damaged re-expression of the protein. From studies in urologic tumors, we can conclude that the HLA I molecules play a key role in these tumors escape to the immune system. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. 78 FR 24985 - Amendment of Restricted Areas R-6703A, B, C, D; and Establishment of Restricted Areas R-6703E, F...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-29

    ...-0371; Airspace Docket No. 12-ANM-14] RIN 2120-AA66 Amendment of Restricted Areas R-6703A, B, C, D; and Establishment of Restricted Areas R-6703E, F, G, H, I, and J; WA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action modifies the internal boundaries of R-6703 by further...

  13. Association of SNP variants of MHC Class II DRB gene with thermo-physiological traits in tropical goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubu, Abdulmojeed; Salako, Adebowale E; De Donato, Marcos; Peters, Sunday O; Takeet, Michael I; Wheto, Mathew; Okpeku, Moses; Imumorin, Ikhide G

    2017-02-01

    Host defense in vertebrates depend on many secreted regulatory proteins such as major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II which provide important regulatory and effector functions of T cells. Gene polymorphism in the second exon of Capra-DRB gene in three major Nigerian goat breeds [West African Dwarf (WAD), Red Sokoto (RS), and Sahel (SH)] was analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP). Four restriction enzymes, BsaHI, AluI, HaeIII, and SacII, were utilized. The association between the polymorphic sites and some heat tolerance traits were also investigated in a total of 70 WAD, 90 RS, and 50 SH goats. Fourteen different types of alleles identified in the Nigerian goats, four of which were found in the peptide coding region (A57G, Q89R, G104D, and T112I), indicate a high degree of polymorphism at the DRB locus in this species. An obvious excess (P  0.05), except AluI in RS goats and HaeIII in WAD goats (P goat populations, ranged from 0.16 to 0.50. Genotypes AA (BsaHI), GG, GC and CC (AluI) and GG, GA, AA (HaeIII) appeared better in terms of heat tolerance. The heat-tolerant ability of SH and RS goats to the hot and humid tropical environment of Nigeria seemed better than that of the WAD goats. Sex effect (P tropics.

  14. Tumour-cytolytic human monocyte-derived macrophages: a simple and efficient method for the generation and long-term cultivation as non-adherent cells in a serum-free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streck, R J; Hurley, E L; Epstein, D A; Pauly, J L

    1992-01-01

    We report a simple and efficient culture procedure for the generation of tumour-cytolytic human monocyte-derived macrophages (MAC). In this method, normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, isolated using a conventional Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient procedure, are cultured as a heterogenous leukocyte population in Teflon or other hydrophobic cultureware, in a commercially available serum-free culture medium (M-SFM) that has been formulated specifically for the cultivation and ex vivo stimulation of human monocytes and MAC, and in the absence of exogenous mitogens, antigens, cytokines or other stimulants. This procedure features a negative-selection technique that takes advantage of the differential survival of blood leukocytes. Using the prescribed in vitro conditions, lymphocytes survived relatively poorly, whereas monocytes differentiated in the absence of exogenous stimulants into mature tumour-cytolytic MAC. The MAC were present as non-adherent, single cells that expressed good viability (greater than 95%) for a prolonged period (greater than 60 days). When compared to conventional procedures for generating MAC, the prescribed technique is thought to offer several important advantages in that it: (a) eliminates the tedious and cumbersome monocyte isolation procedures, thus providing a significant savings not only in time and money but also in eliminating repetitive cell manipulations that have often been associated with damage to monocyte morphology and/or function; (b) reduces the loss of monocyte subsets that are not recovered during specific isolation procedures; (c) facilitates harvesting a single cell, non-adherent suspension of immunocompetent MAC suitable for various examinations including analyses defining MAC morphology, cytochemistry, phenotype and function; and (d) eliminates variability and artifacts associated with different sera that are utilised frequently as medium supplements. The utility of the prescribed method is illustrated by the

  15. Novel host restriction factors implicated in HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Dibya; Rai, Madhu; Gaur, Ritu

    2018-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is known to interact with multiple host cellular proteins during its replication in the target cell. While many of these host cellular proteins facilitate viral replication, a number of them are reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication at various stages of its life cycle. These host cellular proteins, which are known as restriction factors, constitute an integral part of the host's first line of defence against the viral pathogen. Since the discovery of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme 3G (APOBEC3G) as an HIV-1 restriction factor, several human proteins have been identified that exhibit anti-HIV-1 restriction. While each restriction factor employs a distinct mechanism of inhibition, the HIV-1 virus has equally evolved complex counter strategies to neutralize their inhibitory effect. APOBEC3G, tetherin, sterile alpha motif and histidine-aspartate domain 1 (SAMHD1), and trim-5α are some of the best known HIV-1 restriction factors that have been studied in great detail. Recently, six novel restriction factors were discovered that exhibit significant antiviral activity: endoplasmic reticulum α1,2-mannosidase I (ERManI), translocator protein (TSPO), guanylate-binding protein 5 (GBP5), serine incorporator (SERINC3/5) and zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP). The focus of this review is to discuss the antiviral mechanism of action of these six restriction factors and provide insights into the probable counter-evasion strategies employed by the HIV-1 virus. The recent discovery of new restriction factors substantiates the complex host-pathogen interactions occurring during HIV-1 pathogenesis and makes it imperative that further investigations are conducted to elucidate the molecular basis of HIV-1 replication.

  16. Má oclusão de Classe I de Angle, com ausência congênita e impacção de dentes permanentes Angle Class I malocclusion with congenitally absence and impaction of permanent teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Silveira Ferreira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo relata o tratamento ortodôntico de um paciente com 14 anos e 6 meses de idade, portador de má oclusão de Classe I de Angle, que apresentava ectopia e impacção do dente 45 e ausência congênita do dente 35. O caso foi tratado com extração do dente 45 e fechamento dos espaços inferiores. Documentações inicial, final e pós-tratamento serão apresentadas e discutidas. Esse caso foi apresentado à Diretoria do Board Brasileiro de Ortodontia e Ortopedia Facial (BBO, representando a categoria 7, livre escolha, como parte dos requisitos para a obtenção do título de Diplomado pelo BBO.This article reports the orthodontic treatment of a 14 year and 6 months old patient that had a Angle Class I malocclusion with an ectopic position and impaction of the tooth 45 and congenitally absence of tooth 35. This case was treated with the extraction of the tooth 45 and space closure in the lower arch. Initial, final and post-treatment orthodontic records will be presented and discussed. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO, representing the category 7, free choice, as part of the requirements for achieving the title of BBO diplomate.

  17. 75 FR 11620 - Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 6918] Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to Cambodia Pursuant to section 7086(c)(2) of the Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs... Cambodia, and I hereby waive such restriction. This determination shall be reported to the Congress, and...

  18. Salmonella enterica isolates from pasture-raised poultry exhibit antimicrobial resistance and class I integrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, S N; Hanning, I; Han, J; Nayak, R; Clement, A R; Wooming, A; Hererra, P; Jones, F T; Foley, S L; Ricke, S C

    2010-12-01

    While considerable foodborne pathogen research has been conducted on conventionally produced broilers and turkeys, few studies have focused on free-range (organic) or pastured poultry. The current surveillance study was designed to isolate, identify and genetically characterize Salmonella from pastured poultry farm environment and from retail samples. In this study, 59 isolates were collected from two pastured poultry farms (n = 164; pens, feed, water and insect traps) and retail carcasses (n = 36) from a local natural foods store and a local processing plant. All isolates were serotyped and analysed phenotypically (antimicrobial resistance profiles) and genotypically (DNA fingerprints, plasmid profiles and integron analysis). Salmonella enterica was detected using standard microbiological methods. Salmonella Kentucky was the most prevalent serotype detected from the sampled sources (53%), followed by Salmonella Enteritidis (24%), Bareilly (10%), Mbandaka (7%), Montevideo (5%) or Newport (2%). All isolates were resistant to sulfisoxazole and novobiocin, and the majority (40/59) possessed class I integrons shown by PCR detection. Each Salmonella serotype elicited a distinct pulsed-field gel electrophoresis fingerprint profile, and unique differences were observed among the serotypes.  The findings of this study show that Salmonella serotypes isolated from pasture-raised poultry exhibit antimicrobial resistance and class I integrons.  This study demonstrates that despite the cessation of antibiotic usage in poultry production, antibiotic resistant Salmonella may still be recovered from the environment and poultry products. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Class of regular bouncing cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilić, Milovan

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, I construct a class of everywhere regular geometric sigma models that possess bouncing solutions. Precisely, I show that every bouncing metric can be made a solution of such a model. My previous attempt to do so by employing one scalar field has failed due to the appearance of harmful singularities near the bounce. In this work, I use four scalar fields to construct a class of geometric sigma models which are free of singularities. The models within the class are parametrized by their background geometries. I prove that, whatever background is chosen, the dynamics of its small perturbations is classically stable on the whole time axis. Contrary to what one expects from the structure of the initial Lagrangian, the physics of background fluctuations is found to carry two tensor, two vector, and two scalar degrees of freedom. The graviton mass, which naturally appears in these models, is shown to be several orders of magnitude smaller than its experimental bound. I provide three simple examples to demonstrate how this is done in practice. In particular, I show that graviton mass can be made arbitrarily small.

  20. Structure of a Class I Tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate Aldolase - Investigation into an Apparent Loss of Stereospecificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LowKam, C.; Liotard, B; Sygusch, J

    2010-01-01

    Tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase from Streptococcus pyogenes is a class I aldolase that exhibits a remarkable lack of chiral discrimination with respect to the configuration of hydroxyl groups at both C3 and C4 positions. The enzyme catalyzes the reversible cleavage of four diastereoisomers (fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), psicose 1,6-bisphosphate, sorbose 1,6-bisphosphate, and tagatose 1,6-bisphosphate) to dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate with high catalytic efficiency. To investigate its enzymatic mechanism, high resolution crystal structures were determined of both native enzyme and native enzyme in complex with dihydroxyacetone-P. The electron density map revealed a ({alpha}/{beta}){sub 8} fold in each dimeric subunit. Flash-cooled crystals of native enzyme soaked with dihydroxyacetone phosphate trapped a covalent intermediate with carbanionic character at Lys{sup 205}, different from the enamine mesomer bound in stereospecific class I FBP aldolase. Structural analysis indicates extensive active site conservation with respect to class I FBP aldolases, including conserved conformational responses to DHAP binding and conserved stereospecific proton transfer at the DHAP C3 carbon mediated by a proximal water molecule. Exchange reactions with tritiated water and tritium-labeled DHAP at C3 hydrogen were carried out in both solution and crystalline state to assess stereochemical control at C3. The kinetic studies show labeling at both pro-R and pro-S C3 positions of DHAP yet detritiation only at the C3 pro-S-labeled position. Detritiation of the C3 pro-R label was not detected and is consistent with preferential cis-trans isomerism about the C2-C3 bond in the carbanion as the mechanism responsible for C3 epimerization in tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase.

  1. Sources of nitrogen deposition in Federal Class I areas in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-M. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is desired to control excessive reactive nitrogen (Nr deposition due to its detrimental impact on ecosystems. Using a three-dimensional atmospheric chemical transport model, GEOS-Chem, Nr deposition in the contiguous US and eight selected Class I areas (Voyageurs (VY, Smoky Mountain (SM, Shenandoah (SD, Big Bend (BB, Rocky Mountain (RM, Grand Teton (GT, Joshua Tree (JT, and Sequoia (SQ is investigated. First, modeled Nr deposition is compared with National Trends Network (NTN and Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET deposition values. The seasonality of measured species is generally well represented by the model (R2 > 0.6, except in JT. While modeled Nr is generally within the range of seasonal observations, large overestimates are present in sites such as SM and SD in the spring and summer (up to 0.6 kg N ha month−1, likely owing to model high-biases in surface HNO3. The contribution of non-measured species (mostly dry deposition of NH3 to total modeled Nr deposition ranges from 1 to 55 %. The spatial distribution of the origin of Nr deposited in each Class I area and the contributions of individual emission sectors are estimated using the GEOS-Chem adjoint model. We find the largest role of long-range transport for VY, where 50 % (90 % of annual Nr deposition originates within 670 (1670 km of the park. In contrast, the Nr emission footprint is most localized for SQ, where 50 % (90 % of the deposition originates from within 130 (370 km. Emissions from California contribute to the Nr deposition in remote areas in the western US (RM, GT. Mobile NOx and livestock NH3 are found to be the major sources of Nr deposition in all sites except BB, where contributions of NOx from lightning and soils to natural levels of Nr deposition are significant (∼ 40 %. The efficiency in terms of Nr deposition per kg emissions of NH3-N, NOx-N, and SO2-S are also estimated. Unique seasonal features are found in JT (opposing

  2. Determination of optimal LWR containment design, excluding accidents more severe than Class 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cave, L.; Min, T.K.

    1980-04-01

    Information is presented concerning the restrictive effect of existing NRC requirements; definition of possible targets for containment; possible containment systems for LWR; optimization of containment design for class 3 through class 8 accidents (PWR); estimated costs of some possible containment arrangements for PWR relative to the standard dry containment system; estimated costs of BWR containment

  3. 38 CFR 36.4362 - Rights and restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... parking areas or facilities. (ii) Any contract or lease, including franchises and licenses, to which a declarant is a party. (iii) The requirements of paragraphs (a)(2)(i) and (ii) of this section do not apply... restrictions are acceptable: (i) A requirement that leases have a minimum initial term of up to 1 year; or (ii...

  4. Different features of the MHC class I heterodimer have evolved at different rates. Chicken B-F and beta 2-microglobulin sequences reveal invariant surface residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Andersen, R; Avila, D

    1992-01-01

    molecules and the MHC-encoded nonclassical molecules more than CD1 or the class I-like FcR. In contrast, the chicken alpha 3 domain is equally homologous to all alpha 3 domains, to beta 2m and to class II beta 2 domains. For each pair of extracellular domains (alpha 1 vs alpha 2, alpha 3 vs beta 2m...... of small exons in the cytoplasmic region. The cDNA sequences were compared to turkey beta 2m, the apparent allele B-F12 alpha and other vertebrate homologs, using the 2.6 A structure of the human HLA-A2 molecule as a model. Both chicken alpha 1 and alpha 2 domains resemble mammalian classical class I...... the ends of the peptide, two residues that bind CD8, and three residues that are phosphorylated. The positions of the allelic residues are conserved. There are other patches of invariant residues on alpha 1, alpha 2, and beta 2m; these might bind TCR or other molecules involved in class I function...

  5. Teacher's Perceptions of Class Control in the Upper Primary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Alasdair

    1984-01-01

    Reports that 73% of 66 elementary school (primary) teachers interviewed in the Aberdeen, Scotland, area operated using moderate policies of class control, rather than the permissive policies commonly found in small rural schools or the more traditional restrictive policies. (SB)

  6. Class, Mothering and the Values of Food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamann, Iben Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    The data analysed in this empirical paper stems from ethnographic fieldwork among new school parents at three Danish primary schools. I draw on empirically grounded theories on the cultural and subjective dimensions of class, inspired by the “English School” of poststructuralist informed, feminist...... scholars, to explore how class matters. Using the values ascribed to food at social arrangements as a lens, I explore different ways of doing class and mothering: through the exchange value of the food, through its use value and through its healthiness. I conclude by arguing that food studies hold a huge...

  7. The role of germline promoters and I exons in cytokine-induced gene-specific class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnick, Wesley A; Shi, Jian; Holden, Victoria; Fontaine, Clinton; Collins, John T

    2011-01-01

    Germline transcription precedes class switch recombination (CSR). The promoter regions and I exons of these germline transcripts include binding sites for activation- and cytokine-induced transcription factors, and the promoter regions/I exons are essential for CSR. Therefore, it is a strong hypothesis that the promoter/I exons regions are responsible for much of cytokine-regulated, gene-specific CSR. We tested this hypothesis by swapping the germline promoter and I exons for the murine γ1 and γ2a H chain genes in a transgene of the entire H chain C-region locus. We found that the promoter/I exon for γ1 germline transcripts can direct robust IL-4-induced recombination to the γ2a gene. In contrast, the promoter/I exon for the γ2a germline transcripts works poorly in the context of the γ1 H chain gene, resulting in expression of γ1 H chains that is level. Nevertheless, the small amount of recombination to the chimeric γ1 gene is induced by IFN-γ. These results suggest that cytokine regulation of CSR, but not the magnitude of CSR, is regulated by the promoter/I exons.

  8. 25 CFR 502.4 - Class III gaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Class III gaming. 502.4 Section 502.4 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.4 Class III gaming. Class III gaming means all forms of gaming that are not class I gaming or class...

  9. Bounded Delay Timing Analysis of a Class of CSP Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgaard, Henrik; Burns, Steven M.

    1997-01-01

    We describe an algebraic technique for performing timing analysis of a class of asynchronous circuits described as CSP programs (including Martin's probe operator) with the restrictions that there is no OR-causality and that guard selection is either completely free or mutually exclusive...

  10. Culture and social class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuri

    2017-12-01

    A large body of research in Western cultures has demonstrated the psychological and health effects of social class. This review outlines a cultural psychological approach to social stratification by comparing psychological and health manifestations of social class across Western and East Asian cultures. These comparisons suggest that cultural meaning systems shape how people make meaning and respond to material/structural conditions associated with social class, thereby leading to culturally divergent manifestations of social class. Specifically, unlike their counterparts in Western cultures, individuals of high social class in East Asian cultures tend to show high conformity and other-orientated psychological attributes. In addition, cultures differ in how social class impacts health (i.e. on which bases, through which pathways, and to what extent). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Implications of secondary structure prediction and amino acid sequence comparison of class I and class II phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthases on catalysis, regulation, and quaternary structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krath, B N; Hove-Jensen, B

    2001-01-01

    Spinach 5-phospho-D-ribosyl alpha-1-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase isozyme 4 was synthesized in Escherichia coli and purified to near homogeneity. The activity of the enzyme is independent of P(i); it is inhibited by ADP in a competitive manner, indicating a lack of an allosteric site; and it accepts...... is consistent with a homotrimer. Secondary structure prediction shows that spinach PRPP synthase isozyme 4 has a general folding similar to that of Bacillus subtilis class I PRPP synthase, for which the three-dimensional structure has been solved, as the position and extent of helices and beta-sheets of the two...... in the spinach enzyme. In contrast, residues of the active site of B. subtilis PRPP synthase show extensive conservation in spinach PRPP synthase isozyme 4....

  12. Class I KNOX genes are associated with organogenesis during bulbil formation in Agave tequilana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham-Juárez, María Jazmín; Martínez-Hernández, Aída; Leyva-González, Marco Antonio; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Simpson, June

    2010-09-01

    Bulbil formation in Agave tequilana was analysed with the objective of understanding this phenomenon at the molecular and cellular levels. Bulbils formed 14-45 d after induction and were associated with rearrangements in tissue structure and accelerated cell multiplication. Changes at the cellular level during bulbil development were documented by histological analysis. In addition, several cDNA libraries produced from different stages of bulbil development were generated and partially sequenced. Sequence analysis led to the identification of candidate genes potentially involved in the initiation and development of bulbils in Agave, including two putative class I KNOX genes. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR and in situ hybridization revealed that expression of the putative Agave KNOXI genes occurs at bulbil initiation and specifically in tissue where meristems will develop. Functional analysis of Agave KNOXI genes in Arabidopsis thaliana showed the characteristic lobed phenotype of KNOXI ectopic expression in leaves, although a slightly different phenotype was observed for each of the two Agave genes. An Arabidopsis KNOXI (knat1) mutant line (CS30) was successfully complemented with one of the Agave KNOX genes and partially complemented by the other. Analysis of the expression of the endogenous Arabidopsis genes KNAT1, KNAT6, and AS1 in the transformed lines ectopically expressing or complemented by the Agave KNOX genes again showed different regulatory patterns for each Agave gene. These results show that Agave KNOX genes are functionally similar to class I KNOX genes and suggest that spatial and temporal control of their expression is essential during bulbil formation in A. tequilana.

  13. Static Members of Classes in C#

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian LUPASC

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The C# language is object-oriented, which is why the declared member data must be part of a class. Thus, there is no possibility to declare certain variables that can be accessed from anywhere within the application, as it happens, for example, with global variables at the C language level. Making this work in C# is possible through static members of the class. Declaring a class implies defining some of its member data that later receive values when creating each object. A static member of the class can be interpreted as belonging only to the class, not to the objects subsequently created, which means that for the non-static data, there are as many children as there were objects created, while for the static ones there is only one copy, regardless of the number of created objects. In this regard, this paper presents the main aspects that characterize these abstract concepts of object oriented programming in general and C# language in particular, detailing how to develop an application that includes both static and non-static members. At the same time, particularities in the mirror for the two types of data, restrictions on use and potential limitations are presented.

  14. Species-Dependent Functionality of the Human Cytolytic Fusion Proteins Granzyme B-H22(scFv and H22(scFv-Angiogenin in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo Thepen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human cytolytic fusion proteins (hCFPs are comprised of a specific cell-surface-binding moiety and an effector molecule of human origin. In contrast to common immunotoxins, including bacterial or plant toxins, they are considered not to be immunogenic. Two examples for human pro-apoptotic effector proteins are the serine protease Granzyme B and the RNase Angiogenin. Pre-clinical testing of functionality in in vitro and in vivo studies is essential for therapeutics. Establishing relevant animal models that have predictive value for therapeutic success is a great challenge in biomedical research. In this study, we investigated the species-dependent cytotoxic activity of two hCFPs prior to their application in a murine inflammation model. We found that in vitro and ex vivo either hCFP was able to kill human cells only, leaving murine cells unaffected. In contrast, no species-dependency was found for the bacterial Pseudomonas exotoxin A based immunotoxin H22(scFv-ETA’. This species-dependent functioning has to be carefully considered when performing pre-clinical studies in animal models.

  15. Engineering chimeric human and mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I tetramers for the production of T-cell receptor (TCR) mimic antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Carol; Yates, Jenna; Salimi, Maryam; Greig, Jenny; Wiblin, Sarah; Hassanali, Tasneem; Banham, Alison H.

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting cell surface or secreted antigens are among the most effective classes of novel immunotherapies. However, the majority of human proteins and established cancer biomarkers are intracellular. Peptides derived from these intracellular proteins are presented on the cell surface by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and can be targeted by a novel class of T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm) antibodies that recognise similar epitopes to T-cell receptors. Humoural immune responses to MHC-I tetramers rarely generate TCRm antibodies and many antibodies recognise the α3 domain of MHC-I and β2 microglobulin (β2m) that are not directly involved in presenting the target peptide. Here we describe the production of functional chimeric human-murine HLA-A2-H2Dd tetramers and modifications that increase their bacterial expression and refolding efficiency. These chimeric tetramers were successfully used to generate TCRm antibodies against two epitopes derived from wild type tumour suppressor p53 (RMPEAAPPV and GLAPPQHLIRV) that have been used in vaccination studies. Immunisation with chimeric tetramers yielded no antibodies recognising the human α3 domain and β2m and generated TCRm antibodies capable of specifically recognising the target peptide/MHC-I complex in fully human tetramers and on the cell surface of peptide pulsed T2 cells. Chimeric tetramers represent novel immunogens for TCRm antibody production and may also improve the yield of tetramers for groups using these reagents to monitor CD8 T-cell immune responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mouse models of immunotherapy. PMID:28448627

  16. A RecB-family nuclease motif in the Type I restriction endonuclease EcoR124I

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šišáková, Eva; Stanley, L. K.; Weiserová, Marie; Szczelkun, M. D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 12 (2008), s. 1-11 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/07/0325 Grant - others:XE(XE) BioNano-Switch 043288 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : restriction endonuclease * mutagenesis * dsdna Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.878, year: 2008

  17. distribution, abundance and properties of restriction enzymes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA of granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) I and II with a view to ... properties for manipulation of the genes for production of modified starch. .... procurement, storage and handling of the ..... been made on restriction enzymes of potato,.

  18. Identification of neurotensin-related peptides in human thymic epithelial cell membranes and relationship with major histocompatibility complex class I molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneste, Y; Thome, A N; Vandersmissen, E; Charlet, C; Franchimont, D; Martens, H; Lhiaubet, A M; Schimpff, R M; Rostène, W; Geenen, V

    1997-06-01

    This study shows the expression at the cell surface of human thymic epithelial cells (TEC) of a neurotensin (NT)-like immunoreactivity. NT radio-immunoassay (RIA) revealed that cultured human TEC contain +/-5 ng immunoreactive (ir) NT/10(6) cells, of which 5% is associated with plasma cell membranes. HPLC analysis of NT-ir present in human TEC showed a major peak of NT-ir corresponding to NT1-13. NT-ir was not detected in the supernatant of human TEC cultures. Using an affinity column prepared with a anti-MHC class I monoclonal antibody, NT-ir-related peptides were retained on the column and eluted together with MHC class I-related proteins. According to the elution time on HPLC of these peptides, they correspond to intact NT1-13, as well as to smaller fragments of NT1-13.

  19. Physiological type I collagen organization induces the formation of a novel class of linear invadosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juin, Amélie; Billottet, Clotilde; Moreau, Violaine; Destaing, Olivier; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Rosenbaum, Jean; Génot, Elisabeth; Saltel, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Invadosomes are F-actin structures capable of degrading the matrix through the activation of matrix metalloproteases. As fibrillar type I collagen promotes pro-matrix metalloproteinase 2 activation by membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase, we aimed at investigating the functional relationships between collagen I organization and invadosome induction. We found that fibrillar collagen I induced linear F-actin structures, distributed along the fibrils, on endothelial cells, macrophages, fibroblasts, and tumor cells. These structures share features with conventional invadosomes, as they express cortactin and N-WASP and accumulate the scaffold protein Tks5, which proved essential for their formation. On the basis of their ability to degrade extracellular matrix elements and their original architecture, we named these structures “linear invadosomes.” Interestingly, podosomes or invadopodia were replaced by linear invadosomes upon contact of the cells with fibrillar collagen I. However, linear invadosomes clearly differ from classical invadosomes, as they do not contain paxillin, vinculin, and β1/β3 integrins. Using knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts and RGD peptide, we demonstrate that linear invadosome formation and activity are independent of β1 and β3 integrins. Finally, linear invadosomes also formed in a three-dimensional collagen matrix. This study demonstrates that fibrillar collagen I is the physiological inducer of a novel class of invadosomes. PMID:22114353

  20. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the chicken MHC class I molecule YF1*7.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hee, Chee Seng; Gao, Song; Miller, Marcia M.; Goto, Ronald M.; Ziegler, Andreas; Daumke, Oliver; Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The chicken classical MHC class I antigen YF1*7.1 was crystallized together with β 2 -microglobulin but without a peptide ligand. Crystals diffracted synchrotron radiation to 1.32 Å and belonged to the monoclinic space group P2 1 . YF1*7.1 is an allele of a polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like locus within the chicken Y gene complex. With the aim of understanding the possible role of the YF1*7.1 molecule in antigen presentation, the complex of YF1*7.1 heavy chain and β 2 -microglobulin was reconstituted and purified without a peptide. Crystals diffracted synchrotron radiation to 1.32 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P2 1 . The phase problem was solved by molecular replacement. A detailed examination of the structure may provide insight into the type of ligand that could be bound by the YF1*7.1 molecule

  1. Optimal Policy under Restricted Government Spending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Welfare ranking of policy instruments is addressed in a two-sector Ramsey model with monopoly pricing in one sector as the only distortion. When government spending is restricted, i.e. when a government is unable or unwilling to finance the required costs for implementing the optimum policy...... effectiveness canexceed the welfare loss from introducing new distortions. Moreover, it is found that the investment subsidy is gradually phased out of the welfare maximizing policy, which may be a policy combining the two subsidies, when the level of government spending is increased.Keywords: welfare ranking......, indirect and direct policy instruments, restricted government spending JEL: E61, O21, O41...

  2. Genomic Characterization of Methanomicrobiales Reveals Three Classes of Methanogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain; Ulrich, Luke E.; Lupa, Boguslaw; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Hooper, Sean D.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Saunders, Elizabeth; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Lucas, Susan; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Whitman, William B.; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-05-01

    Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  3. The Missing Link in Epstein-Barr Virus Immune Evasion: the BDLF3 Gene Induces Ubiquitination and Downregulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I (MHC-I) and MHC-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Laura L; Williams, Luke R; White, Claire; Forrest, Calum; Zuo, Jianmin; Rowe, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to spread and persist in human populations relies on a balance between host immune responses and EBV immune evasion. CD8(+) cells specific for EBV late lytic cycle antigens show poor recognition of target cells compared to immediate early and early antigen-specific CD8(+) cells. This phenomenon is due in part to the early EBV protein BILF1, whose immunosuppressive activity increases with lytic cycle progression. However, published data suggest the existence of a hitherto unidentified immune evasion protein further enhancing protection against late EBV antigen-specific CD8(+) cells. We have now identified the late lytic BDLF3 gene as the missing link accounting for efficient evasion during the late lytic cycle. Interestingly, BDLF3 also contributes to evasion of CD4(+) cell responses to EBV. We report that BDLF3 downregulates expression of surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules in the absence of any effect upon other surface molecules screened, including CD54 (ICAM-1) and CD71 (transferrin receptor). BDLF3 both enhanced internalization of surface MHC molecules and reduced the rate of their appearance at the cell surface. The reduced expression of surface MHC molecules correlated with functional protection against CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell recognition. The molecular mechanism was identified as BDLF3-induced ubiquitination of MHC molecules and their subsequent downregulation in a proteasome-dependent manner. Immune evasion is a necessary feature of viruses that establish lifelong persistent infections in the face of strong immune responses. EBV is an important human pathogen whose immune evasion mechanisms are only partly understood. Of the EBV immune evasion mechanisms identified to date, none could explain why CD8(+) T cell responses to late lytic cycle genes are so infrequent and, when present, recognize lytically infected target cells so poorly relative to CD8(+) T cells specific for

  4. Improved prediction of MHC class I and class II epitopes using a novel Gibbs sampling approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Worning, Peder

    2004-01-01

    Prediction of which peptides will bind a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) constitutes an important step in identifying potential T-cell epitopes suitable as vaccine candidates. MHC class II binding peptides have a broad length distribution complicating such predictions. Thus......, identifying the correct alignment is a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. In this context, we wish to describe a novel Gibbs motif sampler method ideally suited for recognizing such weak sequence motifs. The method is based on the Gibbs sampling method, and it incorporates...

  5. Introduction of a point mutation into an HLA class I single-chain trimer induces enhancement of CTL priming and antitumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Matsui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously discovered one particular HLA-A*02:01 mutant that enhanced peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL recognition in vitro compared to wild-type HLA-A*02:01. This mutant contains a single amino acid substitution from histidine to leucine at position 74 (H74L that is located in the peptide-binding groove. To investigate the effect of the H74L mutation on the in vivo CTL priming, we took advantage of the technology of the HLA class I single-chain trimer (SCT in which three components involving a peptide, β2 microglobulin and the HLA class I heavy chain are joined together via flexible linkers. We generated recombinant adenovirus expressing SCT comprised influenza A matrix protein (FMP-derived peptide, β2 microglobulin and the H74L heavy chain. HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice were immunized with the adenovirus, and the induction of peptide-specific CTLs and antitumor immunity was investigated. It was clearly shown that the H74L mutation enabled the HLA-A*02:01 SCT molecule to dramatically enhance both in vivo priming of FMP-specific CTLs and protection against a lethal challenge of tumor cells expressing FMP. These data present the first evidence that a simple point mutation in the HLA class I heavy chain of SCT is beneficial for improving CTL-based immunotherapy and prophylaxis to control tumors.

  6. Antihypertensive medication classes used among medicare beneficiaries initiating treatment in 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Shia T; Shimbo, Daichi; Huang, Lei; Diaz, Keith M; Kilgore, Meredith L; Oparil, Suzanne; Muntner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    After the 2003 publication of the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) guidelines, there was a 5-10% increase in patients initiating antihypertensive medication with a thiazide-type diuretic, but most patients still did not initiate treatment with this class. There are few contemporary published data on antihypertensive medication classes filled by patients initiating treatment. We used the 5% random Medicare sample to study the initiation of antihypertensive medication between 2007 and 2010. Initiation was defined by the first antihypertensive medication fill preceded by 365 days with no antihypertensive medication fills. We restricted our analysis to beneficiaries ≥ 65 years who had two or more outpatient visits with a hypertension diagnosis and full Medicare fee-for-service coverage for the 365 days prior to initiation of antihypertensive medication. Between 2007 and 2010, 32,142 beneficiaries in the 5% Medicare sample initiated antihypertensive medication. Initiation with a thiazide-type diuretic decreased from 19.2% in 2007 to 17.9% in 2010. No other changes in medication classes initiated occurred over this period. Among those initiating antihypertensive medication in 2010, 31.3% filled angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is), 26.9% filled beta blockers, 17.2% filled calcium channel blockers, and 14.4% filled angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Initiation with >1 antihypertensive medication class decreased from 25.6% in 2007 to 24.1% in 2010. Patients initiated >1 antihypertensive medication class most commonly with a thiazide-type diuretic and either an ACE-I or ARB. These results suggest that JNC 7 had a limited long-term impact on the choice of antihypertensive medication class and provide baseline data prior to the publication of the 2014 Evidence-Based Guideline for the Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults from the Panel Members Appointed to

  7. An introduction and overview of DRAFT CSA Standard N288.7 Groundwater Protection at Class I Nuclear Facilities and Uranium Mines and Mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWilde, J., E-mail: john_dewilde@golder.com [Golder Associates Ltd., Whitby, ON (Canada); Klukas, M.; Audet, M., E-mail: marc.audet@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    The DRAFT CSA Standard N288.7 entitled Groundwater Protection at Class I Nuclear Facilities and Uranium Mines and Mills is currently under development and is anticipated to publish in June of 2015. This draft standard identifies a process for the protection and monitoring of groundwater at nuclear facilities but may also be used at any facility (i.e. nuclear facilities that are not Class I or non-nuclear facilities). The paper discusses the background to the draft standard, the formalized methodology described in the draft standard and provides some input on implementation. The paper is intended for people that have responsibilities related to groundwater protection at facilities that may need to comply with the draft standard or any site/facility that has some form of groundwater monitoring program. (author)

  8. Knowledge and Attitudes towards Antibiotic Use and Resistance - A Latent Class Analysis of a Swedish Population-Based Sample.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Vallin

    Full Text Available In 2006, a study investigating knowledge and attitudes regarding antibiotic use and resistance in Sweden, indicated high level of knowledge but also areas in need of improvement.(i To provide an update on the knowledge and attitudes to antibiotic use and resistance of the Swedish population, and (ii to identify which groups within the population are in particular need of improved knowledge or attitudes.A questionnaire was sent by post in 2013 to 2,500 randomly-selected individuals aged 18-74, living in Sweden. Latent class analyses were conducted to group respondents based on their responses. The association between socio-demographic characteristics and the probability of belonging to each latent class was assessed.The response rate was 57%. Ninety-four per cent of the responders knew that bacteria could become resistant to antibiotics and the majority answered correctly to the questions regarding antibiotic resistance development. The respondents expressed confidence in doctors who decided not to prescribe antibiotics. Three latent classes related to 'knowledge regarding antibiotic use and resistance', two regarding 'attitudes towards antibiotic accessibility and infection prevention' and three regarding 'attitudes towards antibiotic use and effects' were revealed. Men, younger and more educated people were more knowledgeable but males had a less restrictive attitude. Respondents with high levels of knowledge on antibiotics were more likely to have appropriate restrictive attitudes to antibiotics.Knowledge on antibiotic use and resistance is maintained high and has improved in Sweden compared to 2006. People with lower education and elderly are especially in need of improved knowledge about antibiotic use and resistance.

  9. On the distinction of the mechanisms of DNA cleavage by restriction enzymes—The I-, II-, and III-type molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikin, S. A.

    2008-09-01

    A comparative physical description is given for the functioning of various restriction enzymes and for their processes of DNA cleavage. The previously proposed model system of kinetic equations is applied to the I-and III-type enzymes, which use ATP molecules as an energy source, while the II-type enzymes work thanks to catalytic reactions with participation of an electric field. All the enzymes achieved bending and twisting DNA, providing for either the linear motion of the II-type enzyme along the DNA chain or the DNA translocation by the I-and III-type enzymes due to moving chiral kinks. A comparative estimation of the considered linear and angular velocities is performed. The role of stalling forces for enzyme-DNA complexes, which induce the observed cutting of the DNA either inside the enzyme (II) or in some “weak” places outside enzymes I and III, which results in the supercoiling of the DNA, is shown. The role of ionic screening for the described processes is discussed.

  10. Protective influences on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by MHC class I and class II alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustafa, M; Vingsbo, C; Olsson, T

    1994-01-01

    are resistant. Interestingly, rats with the MHC u haplotype develop an immune response to the MBP 63-88, but do not get EAE. In this study we have used intra-MHC recombinant rat strains to compare the influences of the MHC u with the a haplotype. We discovered the following: 1) The class II region of the MHC...... a haplotype permits EAE and a Th1 type of immune response as measured by IFN-gamma production after in vitro challenge of in vivo-primed T cells with MBP 63-88. 2) The class II region of the u haplotype is associated with a disease-protective immune response characterized by production of not only IFN......Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is influenced by polymorphism of the MHC. We have previously found that Lewis rats with certain MHC haplotypes are susceptible to disease induced with the myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide 63-88, whereas Lewis rats with other MHC haplotypes...

  11. Social Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aktor, Mikael

    2018-01-01

    . Although this social structure was ideal in nature and not equally confirmed in other genres of ancient and medieval literature, it has nevertheless had an immense impact on Indian society. The chapter presents an overview of the system with its three privileged classes, the Brahmins, the Kṣatriyas......The notions of class (varṇa) and caste (jāti) run through the dharmaśāstra literature (i.e. Hindu Law Books) on all levels. They regulate marriage, economic transactions, work, punishment, penance, entitlement to rituals, identity markers like the sacred thread, and social interaction in general...

  12. In silico peptide-binding predictions of passerine MHC class I reveal similarities across distantly related species, suggesting convergence on the level of protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follin, Elna; Karlsson, Maria; Lundegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Morten; Wallin, Stefan; Paulsson, Kajsa; Westerdahl, Helena

    2013-04-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are the most polymorphic genes found in the vertebrate genome, and they encode proteins that play an essential role in the adaptive immune response. Many songbirds (passerines) have been shown to have a large number of transcribed MHC class I genes compared to most mammals. To elucidate the reason for this large number of genes, we compared 14 MHC class I alleles (α1-α3 domains), from great reed warbler, house sparrow and tree sparrow, via phylogenetic analysis, homology modelling and in silico peptide-binding predictions to investigate their functional and genetic relationships. We found more pronounced clustering of the MHC class I allomorphs (allele specific proteins) in regards to their function (peptide-binding specificities) compared to their genetic relationships (amino acid sequences), indicating that the high number of alleles is of functional significance. The MHC class I allomorphs from house sparrow and tree sparrow, species that diverged 10 million years ago (MYA), had overlapping peptide-binding specificities, and these similarities across species were also confirmed in phylogenetic analyses based on amino acid sequences. Notably, there were also overlapping peptide-binding specificities in the allomorphs from house sparrow and great reed warbler, although these species diverged 30 MYA. This overlap was not found in a tree based on amino acid sequences. Our interpretation is that convergent evolution on the level of the protein function, possibly driven by selection from shared pathogens, has resulted in allomorphs with similar peptide-binding repertoires, although trans-species evolution in combination with gene conversion cannot be ruled out.