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Sample records for clade genes relating

  1. In vitro and in vivo expression of virulence genes in Vibrio isolates belonging to the Harveyi clade in relation to their virulence towards gnotobiotic brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana).

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    Ruwandeepika, H A Darshanee; Defoirdt, Tom; Bhowmick, Patit Paban; Karunasagar, Indrani; Karunasagar, Iddya; Bossier, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Vibrios belonging to the Harveyi clade are pathogenic marine bacteria affecting both vertebrates and invertebrates, thereby causing a severe threat to the aquaculture industry. In this study, the expression of haemolysin, metalloprotease, serine protease, the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR and the virulence regulator ToxR in different Harveyi clade isolates was measured with reverse transcriptase real-time PCR with specific primers. There was relatively low variation in the in vitro expression levels of the quorum sensing master regulator luxR (sevenfold), whereas for the other genes, the difference in expression between the isolates showing lowest and highest expression levels was over 25-fold. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between expression levels of toxR and luxR and between the expression levels of these regulators and the protease genes. The expression levels of luxR, toxR and haemolysin were negatively correlated with the survival of brine shrimp larvae challenged with the isolates. Finally, a non-virulent, a moderately virulent and a strongly virulent isolate were selected to study in vivo expression of the virulence genes during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae. The in vivo gene expression study showed a clear difference in virulence gene expression between both virulent isolates and the non-virulent isolate.

  2. Massive mitochondrial gene transfer in a parasitic flowering plant clade.

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    Zhenxiang Xi

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that plant genomes have undergone potentially rampant horizontal gene transfer (HGT, especially in the mitochondrial genome. Parasitic plants have provided the strongest evidence of HGT, which appears to be facilitated by the intimate physical association between the parasites and their hosts. A recent phylogenomic study demonstrated that in the holoparasite Rafflesia cantleyi (Rafflesiaceae, whose close relatives possess the world's largest flowers, about 2.1% of nuclear gene transcripts were likely acquired from its obligate host. Here, we used next-generation sequencing to obtain the 38 protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes common to the mitochondrial genomes of angiosperms from R. cantleyi and five additional species, including two of its closest relatives and two host species. Strikingly, our phylogenetic analyses conservatively indicate that 24%-41% of these gene sequences show evidence of HGT in Rafflesiaceae, depending on the species. Most of these transgenic sequences possess intact reading frames and are actively transcribed, indicating that they are potentially functional. Additionally, some of these transgenes maintain synteny with their donor and recipient lineages, suggesting that native genes have likely been displaced via homologous recombination. Our study is the first to comprehensively assess the magnitude of HGT in plants involving a genome (i.e., mitochondria and a species interaction (i.e., parasitism where it has been hypothesized to be potentially rampant. Our results establish for the first time that, although the magnitude of HGT involving nuclear genes is appreciable in these parasitic plants, HGT involving mitochondrial genes is substantially higher. This may represent a more general pattern for other parasitic plant clades and perhaps more broadly for angiosperms.

  3. Massive mitochondrial gene transfer in a parasitic flowering plant clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhenxiang; Wang, Yuguo; Bradley, Robert K; Sugumaran, M; Marx, Christopher J; Rest, Joshua S; Davis, Charles C

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that plant genomes have undergone potentially rampant horizontal gene transfer (HGT), especially in the mitochondrial genome. Parasitic plants have provided the strongest evidence of HGT, which appears to be facilitated by the intimate physical association between the parasites and their hosts. A recent phylogenomic study demonstrated that in the holoparasite Rafflesia cantleyi (Rafflesiaceae), whose close relatives possess the world's largest flowers, about 2.1% of nuclear gene transcripts were likely acquired from its obligate host. Here, we used next-generation sequencing to obtain the 38 protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes common to the mitochondrial genomes of angiosperms from R. cantleyi and five additional species, including two of its closest relatives and two host species. Strikingly, our phylogenetic analyses conservatively indicate that 24%-41% of these gene sequences show evidence of HGT in Rafflesiaceae, depending on the species. Most of these transgenic sequences possess intact reading frames and are actively transcribed, indicating that they are potentially functional. Additionally, some of these transgenes maintain synteny with their donor and recipient lineages, suggesting that native genes have likely been displaced via homologous recombination. Our study is the first to comprehensively assess the magnitude of HGT in plants involving a genome (i.e., mitochondria) and a species interaction (i.e., parasitism) where it has been hypothesized to be potentially rampant. Our results establish for the first time that, although the magnitude of HGT involving nuclear genes is appreciable in these parasitic plants, HGT involving mitochondrial genes is substantially higher. This may represent a more general pattern for other parasitic plant clades and perhaps more broadly for angiosperms.

  4. Rodent phylogeny revised: analysis of six nuclear genes from all major rodent clades

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    Pupko Tal

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rodentia is the most diverse order of placental mammals, with extant rodent species representing about half of all placental diversity. In spite of many morphological and molecular studies, the family-level relationships among rodents and the location of the rodent root are still debated. Although various datasets have already been analyzed to solve rodent phylogeny at the family level, these are difficult to combine because they involve different taxa and genes. Results We present here the largest protein-coding dataset used to study rodent relationships. It comprises six nuclear genes, 41 rodent species, and eight outgroups. Our phylogenetic reconstructions strongly support the division of Rodentia into three clades: (1 a "squirrel-related clade", (2 a "mouse-related clade", and (3 Ctenohystrica. Almost all evolutionary relationships within these clades are also highly supported. The primary remaining uncertainty is the position of the root. The application of various models and techniques aimed to remove non-phylogenetic signal was unable to solve the basal rodent trifurcation. Conclusion Sequencing and analyzing a large sequence dataset enabled us to resolve most of the evolutionary relationships among Rodentia. Our findings suggest that the uncertainty regarding the position of the rodent root reflects the rapid rodent radiation that occurred in the Paleocene rather than the presence of conflicting phylogenetic and non-phylogenetic signals in the dataset.

  5. The diversity and expansion of the trans-sialidase gene family is a common feature in Trypanosoma cruzi clade members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiurillo, Miguel Angel; Cortez, Danielle R; Lima, Fábio M; Cortez, Caroline; Ramírez, José Luis; Martins, Andre G; Serrano, Myrna G; Teixeira, Marta M G; da Silveira, José Franco

    2016-01-01

    Trans-sialidase (TS) is a polymorphic protein superfamily described in members of the protozoan genus Trypanosoma. Of the eight TS groups recently described, TS group I proteins (some of which have catalytic activity) are present in the distantly related Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi phylogenetic clades, whereas other TS groups have only been described in some species belonging to the T. cruzi clade. In the present study we analyzed the repertoire, distribution and phylogenetic relationships of TS genes among species of the T. cruzi clade based on sequence similarity, multiple sequence alignment and tree-reconstruction approaches using TS sequences obtained with the aid of PCR-based strategies or retrieved from genome databases. We included the following representative isolates of the T. cruzi clade from South America: T. cruzi, T. cruzi Tcbat, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma dionisii, Trypanosoma rangeli and Trypanosoma conorhini. The cloned sequences encoded conserved TS protein motifs Asp-box and VTVxNVxLYNR but lacked the FRIP motif (conserved in TS group I). The T. conorhini sequences were the most divergent. The hybridization patterns of TS probes with chromosomal bands confirmed the abundance of these sequences in species in the T. cruzi clade. Divergence and relationship analysis placed most of the TS sequences in the groups defined in T. cruzi. Further examination of members of TS group II, which includes T. cruzi surface glycoproteins implicated in host cell attachment and invasion, showed that sequences of T. cruzi Tcbat grouped with those of T. cruzi genotype TcI. Our analysis indicates that different members of the T. cruzi clade, with different vertebrate hosts, vectors and pathogenicity, share the extensive expansion and sequence diversification of the TS gene family. Altogether, our results are congruent with the evolutionary history of the T. cruzi clade and represent a contribution to the understanding of the molecular

  6. Genes of the most conserved WOX clade in plants affect root and flower development in Arabidopsis

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    Moreau Hervé

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Wuschel related homeobox (WOX family proteins are key regulators implicated in the determination of cell fate in plants by preventing cell differentiation. A recent WOX phylogeny, based on WOX homeodomains, showed that all of the Physcomitrella patens and Selaginella moellendorffii WOX proteins clustered into a single orthologous group. We hypothesized that members of this group might preferentially share a significant part of their function in phylogenetically distant organisms. Hence, we first validated the limits of the WOX13 orthologous group (WOX13 OG using the occurrence of other clade specific signatures and conserved intron insertion sites. Secondly, a functional analysis using expression data and mutants was undertaken. Results The WOX13 OG contained the most conserved plant WOX proteins including the only WOX detected in the highly proliferating basal unicellular and photosynthetic organism Ostreococcus tauri. A large expansion of the WOX family was observed after the separation of mosses from other land plants and before monocots and dicots have arisen. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AtWOX13 was dynamically expressed during primary and lateral root initiation and development, in gynoecium and during embryo development. AtWOX13 appeared to affect the floral transition. An intriguing clade, represented by the functional AtWOX14 gene inside the WOX13 OG, was only found in the Brassicaceae. Compared to AtWOX13, the gene expression profile of AtWOX14 was restricted to the early stages of lateral root formation and specific to developing anthers. A mutational insertion upstream of the AtWOX14 homeodomain sequence led to abnormal root development, a delay in the floral transition and premature anther differentiation. Conclusion Our data provide evidence in favor of the WOX13 OG as the clade containing the most conserved WOX genes and established a functional link to organ initiation and development in Arabidopsis, most

  7. An expanded clade of rodent Trim5 genes.

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    Tareen, Semih U; Sawyer, Sara L; Malik, Harmit S; Emerman, Michael

    2009-03-15

    Trim5alpha from primates (including humans), cows, and rabbits has been shown to be an active antiviral host gene that acts against a range of retroviruses. Although this suggests that Trim5alpha may be a common antiviral restriction factor among mammals, the status of Trim5 genes in rodents has been unclear. Using genomic and phylogenetic analyses, we describe an expanded paralogous cluster of at least eight Trim5-like genes in mice (including the previously described Trim12 and Trim30 genes), and three Trim5-like genes in rats. Our characterization of the rodent Trim5 locus, and comparison to the Trim5 locus in humans, cows, and rabbits, indicates that Trim5 has undergone independent evolutionary expansions within species. Evolutionary analysis shows that rodent Trim5 genes have evolved under positive selection, suggesting evolutionary conflicts consistent with important antiviral function. Sampling six rodent Trim5 genes failed to reveal antiviral activities against a set of eight retroviral challenges, although we predict that such activities exist.

  8. Global Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131 Clade with blaCTX-M-27 Gene.

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    Matsumura, Yasufumi; Pitout, Johann D D; Gomi, Ryota; Matsuda, Tomonari; Noguchi, Taro; Yamamoto, Masaki; Peirano, Gisele; DeVinney, Rebekah; Bradford, Patricia A; Motyl, Mary R; Tanaka, Michio; Nagao, Miki; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2016-11-01

    The Escherichia coli sequence type (ST) 131 C2/H30Rx clade with the blaCTX-M-15 gene had been most responsible for the global dissemination of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli. ST131 C1/H30R with blaCTX-M-27 emerged among ESBL-producing E. coli in Japan during the late 2000s. To investigate the possible expansion of a single clade, we performed whole-genome sequencing for 43 Japan and 10 global ST131 isolates with blaCTX-M-27 (n = 16), blaCTX-M-14 (n = 16), blaCTX-M-15 (n = 13), and others (n = 8). We also included 8 ST131 genomes available in public databases. Core genome-based analysis of 61 isolates showed that ST131 with blaCTX-M-27 from 5 countries formed a distinct cluster within the C1/H30R clade, named C1-M27 clade. Accessory genome analysis identified a unique prophage-like region, supporting C1-M27 as a distinct clade. Our findings indicate that the increase of ESBL-producing E. coli in Japan is due mainly to emergence of the C1-M27 clade.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis and molecular signatures defining a monophyletic clade of heterocystous cyanobacteria and identifying its closest relatives.

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    Howard-Azzeh, Mohammad; Shamseer, Larissa; Schellhorn, Herb E; Gupta, Radhey S

    2014-11-01

    Detailed phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses are reported on 140 genome sequenced cyanobacteria with the main focus on the heterocyst-differentiating cyanobacteria. In a phylogenetic tree for cyanobacteria based upon concatenated sequences for 32 conserved proteins, the available cyanobacteria formed 8-9 strongly supported clades at the highest level, which may correspond to the higher taxonomic clades of this phylum. One of these clades contained all heterocystous cyanobacteria; within this clade, the members exhibiting either true (Nostocales) or false (Stigonematales) branching of filaments were intermixed indicating that the division of the heterocysts-forming cyanobacteria into these two groups is not supported by phylogenetic considerations. However, in both the protein tree as well as in the 16S rRNA gene tree, the akinete-forming heterocystous cyanobacteria formed a distinct clade. Within this clade, the members which differentiate into hormogonia or those which lack this ability were also separated into distinct groups. A novel molecular signature identified in this work that is uniquely shared by the akinete-forming heterocystous cyanobacteria provides further evidence that the members of this group are specifically related and they shared a common ancestor exclusive of the other cyanobacteria. Detailed comparative analyses on protein sequences from the genomes of heterocystous cyanobacteria reported here have also identified eight conserved signature indels (CSIs) in proteins involved in a broad range of functions, and three conserved signature proteins, that are either uniquely or mainly found in all heterocysts-forming cyanobacteria, but generally not found in other cyanobacteria. These molecular markers provide novel means for the identification of heterocystous cyanobacteria, and they provide evidence of their monophyletic origin. Additionally, this work has also identified seven CSIs in other proteins which in addition to the heterocystous

  10. A clade-specific Arabidopsis gene connects primary metabolism and senescence

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    Dallas C. Jones

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nearly immobile, plants have evolved new components to be able to respond to changing environments. One example is Qua Quine Starch (QQS, AT3G30720, an Arabidopsis thaliana-specific orphan gene that integrates primary metabolism with adaptation to environment changes. SAQR (Senescence-Associated and QQS-Related, AT1G64360, is unique to a clade within the family Brassicaceae; as such, the gene may have arisen about 20 million years ago. SAQR is up-regulated in QQS RNAi mutants and in the apx1 mutant under light-induced oxidative stress. SAQR plays a role in carbon allocation: overexpression lines of SAQR have significantly decreased starch content; conversely, in a SAQR T-DNA knockout line, starch accumulation is increased. Meta-analysis of public microarray data indicates that SAQR expression is correlated with expression of a subset of genes involved in senescence, defense, and stress responses. SAQR promoter::GUS expression analysis reveals that SAQR expression increases after leaf expansion and photosynthetic capacity have peaked, just prior to visible natural senescence. SAQR is expressed predominantly within leaf and cotyledon vasculature, increasing in intensity as natural senescence continues, and then decreasing prior to death. In contrast, under experimentally-induced senescence, SAQR expression increases in vasculature of cotyledons but not in true leaves. In SAQR knockout line, the transcript level of the dirigent-like disease resistance gene (AT1G22900 is increased, while that of the Early Light Induced Protein 1 gene (ELIP1, AT3G22840 is decreased. Taken together, these data indicate that SAQR may function in the QQS network, playing a role in integration of primary metabolism with adaptation to internal and environmental changes, specifically those that affect the process of senescence.

  11. Frequent expansions of the bitter taste receptor gene repertoire during evolution of mammals in the Euarchontoglires clade.

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    Hayakawa, Takashi; Suzuki-Hashido, Nami; Matsui, Atsushi; Go, Yasuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Genome studies of mammals in the superorder Euarchontoglires (a clade that comprises the orders Primates, Dermoptera, Scandentia, Rodentia, and Lagomorpha) are important for understanding the biological features of humans, particularly studies of medical model animals such as macaques and mice. Furthermore, the dynamic ecoevolutionary signatures of Euarchontoglires genomes may be discovered because many species in this clade are characterized by their successful adaptive radiation to various ecological niches. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary trajectory of bitter taste receptor genes (TAS2Rs) in 28 Euarchontoglires species based on homology searches of 39 whole-genome assemblies. The Euarchontoglires species possessed variable numbers of intact TAS2Rs, which ranged from 16 to 40, and their last common ancestor had at least 26 intact TAS2Rs. The gene tree showed that there have been at least seven lineage-specific events involving massive gene duplications. Gene duplications were particularly evident in the ancestral branches of anthropoids (the anthropoid cluster), which may have promoted the adaptive evolution of anthropoid characteristics, such as a trade-off between olfaction and other senses and the development of herbivorous characteristics. Subsequent whole-gene deletions of anthropoid cluster TAS2Rs in hominoid species suggest ongoing ectopic homologous recombination in the anthropoid cluster. These findings provide insights into the roles of adaptive sensory evolution in various ecological niches and important clues related to the molecular mechanisms that underlie taste diversity in Euarchontoglires mammalian species, including humans.

  12. Morphological diversity and evolution of the spermatozoon in the mouse-related clade of rodents.

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    Breed, William G; Leigh, Chris M; Aplin, Ken P; Shahin, Adel A B; Avenant, Nico L

    2014-05-01

    Most species in the three highly speciose families of the mouse-related clade of rodents, the Muridae, Cricetidae, and Nesomyidae (superfamily Muroidea), have a highly complex sperm head in which there is an apical hook but there are few data available for the other related families of these rodents. In the current study, using light and electron microscopies, we investigated the structure of the spermatozoon in representative species of four other families within the mouse-related clade, the Dipodidae, Spalacidae, Pedetidae, and Heteromyidae, that diverged at or near the base of the muroid lineage. Our results indicate that a diverse array of sperm head shapes and tail lengths occurs but none of the species in the families Spalacidae, Dipodidae, or Pedetidae has a sperm head with an apical hook. By contrast, a rostrally extending apical hook is present in spermatozoa of members of the Family Heteromyidae which also invariably have comparatively long sperm tails. These findings suggest that the hook-shaped sperm head in the murid, cricetid, and nesomyid rodents evolved after divergence of this lineage from its common ancestor with the other families of the mouse-related clade, and that separate, and independent, convergent evolution of a similar sperm head form, and long sperm tail, occurred in the Heteromyidae.

  13. Bony labyrinth morphometry indicates locomotor adaptations in the squirrel-related clade (Rodentia, Mammalia)

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The semicircular canals (SCs) of the inner ear detect angular acceleration and are located in the bony labyrinth of the petrosal bone. Based on high-resolution computed tomography, we created a size-independent database of the bony labyrinth of 50 mammalian species especially rodents of the squirrel-related clade comprising taxa with fossorial, arboreal and gliding adaptations. Our sampling also includes gliding marsupials, actively flying bats, the arboreal tree shrew and subterranean specie...

  14. Effect of test duration and feeding on relative sensitivity of genetically distinct clades of Hyalella azteca.

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    Soucek, David J; Dickinson, Amy; Major, Kaley M; McEwen, Abigail R

    2013-11-01

    The amphipod Hyalella azteca is widely used in ecotoxicology laboratories for the assessment of chemical risks to aquatic environments, and it is a cryptic species complex with a number of genetically distinct strains found in wild populations. While it would be valuable to note differences in contaminant sensitivity among different strains collected from various field sites, those findings would be influenced by acclimation of the populations to local conditions. In addition, potential differences in metabolism or lipid storage among different strains may confound assessment of sensitivity in unfed acute toxicity tests. In the present study, our aim was to assess whether there are genetic differences in contaminant sensitivity among three cryptic provisional species of H. azteca. Therefore, we used organisms cultured under the same conditions, assessed their ability to survive for extended periods without food, and conducted fed and unfed acute toxicity tests with two anions (nitrate and chloride) whose toxicities are not expected to be altered by the addition of food. We found that the three genetically distinct clades of H. azteca had substantially different responses to starvation, and the presence/absence of food during acute toxicity tests had a strong role in determining the relative sensitivity of the three clades. In fed tests, where starvation was no longer a potential stressor, significant differences in sensitivity were still observed among the three clades. In light of these differences in sensitivity, we suggest that ecotoxicology laboratories consider using a provisional species in toxicity tests that is a regionally appropriate surrogate.

  15. Congruence between nuclear and mitochondrial genes in Demospongiae: a new hypothesis for relationships within the G4 clade (Porifera: Demospongiae).

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    Morrow, C C; Picton, B E; Erpenbeck, D; Boury-Esnault, N; Maggs, C A; Allcock, A L

    2012-01-01

    The current morphological classification of the Demospongiae G4 clade was tested using large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA) sequences from 119 taxa. Fifty-three mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (CO1) barcoding sequences were also analysed to test whether the 28S phylogeny could be recovered using an independent gene. This is the largest and most comprehensive study of the Demospongiae G4 clade. The 28S and CO1 genetrees result in congruent clades but conflict with the current morphological classification. The results confirm the polyphyly of Halichondrida, Hadromerida, Dictyonellidae, Axinellidae and Poecilosclerida and show that several of the characters used in morphological classifications are homoplasious. Robust clades are clearly shown and a new hypothesis for relationships of taxa allocated to G4 is proposed.

  16. The Hox gene complement of acoel flatworms, a basal bilaterian clade.

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    Cook, Charles E; Jiménez, Eva; Akam, Michael; Saló, Emili

    2004-01-01

    Several molecular data sets suggest that acoelomorph flatworms are not members of the phylum Platyhelminthes but form a separate branch of the Metazoa that diverged from all other bilaterian animals before the separation of protostomes and deuterostomes. Here we examine the Hox gene complement of the acoel flatworms. In two distantly related acoel taxa, we identify only three distinct classes of Hox gene: an anterior gene, a posterior gene, and a central class gene most similar to genes of Hox classes 4 and 5 in other Bilateria. Phylogenetic analysis of these genes, together with the acoel caudal homologue, supports the basal position of the acoels. The similar gene sets found in two distantly related acoels suggest that this reduced gene complement may be ancestral in the acoels and that the acoels may have diverged from other bilaterians before elaboration of the 8- to 10-gene Hox cluster that characterizes most bilaterians.

  17. Bony labyrinth morphometry indicates locomotor adaptations in the squirrel-related clade (Rodentia, Mammalia).

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    Pfaff, Cathrin; Martin, Thomas; Ruf, Irina

    2015-06-22

    The semicircular canals (SCs) of the inner ear detect angular acceleration and are located in the bony labyrinth of the petrosal bone. Based on high-resolution computed tomography, we created a size-independent database of the bony labyrinth of 50 mammalian species especially rodents of the squirrel-related clade comprising taxa with fossorial, arboreal and gliding adaptations. Our sampling also includes gliding marsupials, actively flying bats, the arboreal tree shrew and subterranean species. The morphometric anatomy of the SCs was correlated to the locomotion mode. Even if the phylogenetic signal cannot entirely be excluded, the main significance for functional morphological studies has been found in the diameter of the SCs, whereas the radius of curvature is of minor interest. Additionally, we found clear differences in the bias angle of the canals between subterranean and gliding taxa, but also between sciurids and glirids. The sensitivity of the inner ear correlates with the locomotion mode, with a higher sensitivity of the SCs in fossorial species than in flying taxa. We conclude that the inner ear of flying and gliding mammals is less sensitive due to the large information flow into this sense organ during locomotion.

  18. Phylogenomics reveals surprising sets of essential and dispensable clades of MIKC(c)-group MADS-box genes in flowering plants.

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    Gramzow, Lydia; Theißen, Günter

    2015-06-01

    MIKC(C)-group MADS-box genes are involved in the control of many developmental processes in flowering plants. All of these genes are members of one of 17 clades that had already been established in the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of extant angiosperms. These clades trace back to 11 seed plant-specific superclades that were present in the MRCA of extant seed plants. Due to their important role in plant development and evolution, the origin of the clades of MIKC(C)-group genes has been studied in great detail. In contrast, whether any of these ancestral clades has ever been lost completely in any species has not been investigated so far. Here, we determined the presence of these clades by BLAST, PSI-BLAST, and Hidden Markov Model searches and by phylogenetic methods in the whole genomes of 27 flowering plants. Our data suggest that there are only three superclades of which all members have been lost in at least one of the investigated flowering plant species, and only few additional losses of angiosperm-specific MIKC(C)-group gene clades could be identified. Remarkably, for one seed plant superclade (TM8-like genes) and one angiosperm clade (FLC-like genes), multiple losses were identified, suggesting that the function of these genes is dispensable or that gene loss might have even been adaptive. The clades of MIKC(C)-group genes that have never been wiped out in any of the investigated species comprises, in addition to the expected floral organ identity genes, also TM3-like (SOC1-like), StMADS11-like (SVP-like), AGL17-like and GGM13-like (Bsister) genes, suggesting that these genes are more important for angiosperm development and evolution than has previously been appreciated.

  19. Immunogenic comparison of chimeric adenovirus 5/35 vector carrying optimized human immunodeficiency virus clade C genes and various promoters.

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    Shoji, Masaki; Yoshizaki, Shinji; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Okuda, Kenji; Shimada, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Adenovirus vector-based vaccine is a promising approach to protect HIV infection. However, a recent phase IIb clinical trial using the vector did not show its protective efficacy against HIV infection. To improve the vaccine, we explored the transgene protein expression and its immunogenicity using optimized codon usage, promoters and adaptors. We compared protein expression and immunogenicity of adenovirus vector vaccines carrying native or codon usage-optimized HIV-1 clade C gag and env genes expression cassettes driven by different promoters (CMV, CMVi, and CA promoters) and adapters (IRES and F2A). The adenovirus vector vaccine containing optimized gag gene produced higher Gag protein expression and induced higher immune responses than the vector containing native gag gene in mice. Furthermore, CA promoter generated higher transgene expression and elicited higher immune responses than other two popularly used promoters (CMV and CMVi). The second gene expression using F2A adaptor resulted in higher protein expression and immunity than that of using IRES and direct fusion protein. Taken together, the adenovirus vector containing the expression cassette with CA promoter, optimized HIV-1 clade C gene and an F2A adaptor produced the best protein expression and elicited the highest transgene-specific immune responses. This finding would be promising for vaccine design and gene therapy.

  20. Highly diverse nirK genes comprise two major clades that harbour ammonium-producing denitrifiers

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Copper dependent nitrite reductase, NirK, catalyses the key step in denitrification, i.e. nitrite reduction to nitric oxide. Distinct structural NirK classes and phylogenetic clades of NirK-type denitrifiers have previously been observed based on a limited set of NirK sequences, however, their environmental distribution or ecological strategies are currently unknown. In addition, environmental nirK-type denitrifiers are currently underestimated in PCR-dependent surveys due to prime...

  1. Gray mold populations in german strawberry fields are resistant to multiple fungicides and dominated by a novel clade closely related to Botrytis cinerea.

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    Leroch, Michaela; Plesken, Cecilia; Weber, Roland W S; Kauff, Frank; Scalliet, Gabriel; Hahn, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea is a major threat to fruit and vegetable production. Strawberry fields usually receive several fungicide treatments against Botrytis per season. Gray mold isolates from several German strawberry-growing regions were analyzed to determine their sensitivity against botryticides. Fungicide resistance was commonly observed, with many isolates possessing resistance to multiple (up to six) fungicides. A stronger variant of the previously described multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype MDR1, called MDR1h, was found to be widely distributed, conferring increased partial resistance to two important botryticides, cyprodinil and fludioxonil. A 3-bp deletion mutation in a transcription factor-encoding gene, mrr1, was found to be correlated with MDR1h. All MDR1h isolates and the majority of isolates with resistance to multiple fungicides were found to be genetically distinct. Multiple-gene sequencing confirmed that they belong to a novel clade, called Botrytis group S, which is closely related to B. cinerea and the host-specific species B. fabae. Isolates of Botrytis group S genotypes were found to be widespread in all German strawberry-growing regions but almost absent from vineyards. Our data indicate a clear subdivision of gray mold populations, which are differentially distributed according to their host preference and adaptation to chemical treatments.

  2. Phylogenomic analyses of nuclear genes reveal the evolutionary relationships within the BEP clade and the evidence of positive selection in Poaceae.

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    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Peng-Fei; Liu, Qi; Li, De-Zhu; Guo, Zhen-Hua

    2013-01-01

    BEP clade of the grass family (Poaceae) is composed of three subfamilies, i.e. Bambusoideae, Ehrhartoideae, and Pooideae. Controversies on the phylogenetic relationships among three subfamilies still persist in spite of great efforts. However, previous evidence was mainly provided from plastid genes with only a few nuclear genes utilized. Given different evolutionary histories recorded by plastid and nuclear genes, it is indispensable to uncover their relationships based on nuclear genes. Here, eleven species with whole-sequenced genome and six species with transcriptomic data were included in this study. A total of 121 one-to-one orthologous groups (OGs) were identified and phylogenetic trees were reconstructed by different tree-building methods. Genes which might have undergone positive selection and played important roles in adaptive evolution were also investigated from 314 and 173 one-to-one OGs in two bamboo species and 14 grass species, respectively. Our results support the ((B, P) E) topology with high supporting values. Besides, our findings also indicate that 24 and nine orthologs with statistically significant evidence of positive selection are mainly involved in abiotic and biotic stress response, reproduction and development, plant metabolism and enzyme etc. from two bamboo species and 14 grass species, respectively. In summary, this study demonstrates the power of phylogenomic approach to shed lights on the evolutionary relationships within the BEP clade, and offers valuable insights into adaptive evolution of the grass family.

  3. Phylogenomic analyses of nuclear genes reveal the evolutionary relationships within the BEP clade and the evidence of positive selection in Poaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhao

    Full Text Available BEP clade of the grass family (Poaceae is composed of three subfamilies, i.e. Bambusoideae, Ehrhartoideae, and Pooideae. Controversies on the phylogenetic relationships among three subfamilies still persist in spite of great efforts. However, previous evidence was mainly provided from plastid genes with only a few nuclear genes utilized. Given different evolutionary histories recorded by plastid and nuclear genes, it is indispensable to uncover their relationships based on nuclear genes. Here, eleven species with whole-sequenced genome and six species with transcriptomic data were included in this study. A total of 121 one-to-one orthologous groups (OGs were identified and phylogenetic trees were reconstructed by different tree-building methods. Genes which might have undergone positive selection and played important roles in adaptive evolution were also investigated from 314 and 173 one-to-one OGs in two bamboo species and 14 grass species, respectively. Our results support the ((B, P E topology with high supporting values. Besides, our findings also indicate that 24 and nine orthologs with statistically significant evidence of positive selection are mainly involved in abiotic and biotic stress response, reproduction and development, plant metabolism and enzyme etc. from two bamboo species and 14 grass species, respectively. In summary, this study demonstrates the power of phylogenomic approach to shed lights on the evolutionary relationships within the BEP clade, and offers valuable insights into adaptive evolution of the grass family.

  4. Property differences among the four major Candida albicans strain clades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, Donna M; Castillo, Luis; Nather, Kerstin; Munro, Carol A; Brown, Alistair J P; Gow, Neil A R; Odds, Frank C

    2009-03-01

    A selection of 43 Candida albicans isolates, chosen to represent the four major strain clades of the species and also intraclade diversity, was screened for their virulence in the murine intravenous challenge model of C. albicans infection, for a range of properties measurable in vitro that might relate to virulence, and for the numbers of midrepeat sequences in genes of the ALS and HYR families. Heterozygosity at the mating type locus and low whole-cell acid phosphatase activity and growth rate at 40 degrees C were found to be significantly positively associated with the most virulent isolates. Acid phosphatase activity and growth in 2 M NaCl were statistically significant variables between clades by univariate analysis. Isolates in different clades also differed significantly in midrepeat sequence alleles of ALS2, ALS4, ALS6, ALS7, ALS9, HYR1, and HYR2. There was no association between the midrepeat alleles of any ALS or HYR gene and the virulence of isolates to mice. Genome-wide transcript profiles of 20 isolates (5 per clade) grown under two conditions showed considerable variation between individual isolates, but only a small number of genes showed statistically significant differential gene expression between clades. Analysis of the expression profiles by overall strain virulence revealed 18 open reading frames differing significantly between isolates of high, intermediate, and low virulence. Four of these genes encoded functions related to phosphate uptake and metabolism. This finding and the significant association between whole-cell acid phosphatase activity and virulence led us to disrupt PHO100, which encodes a predicted periplasmic acid phosphatase. The pho100Delta mutant was mildly but significantly attenuated in terms of survival curves in the mouse model. The study has extended the range of properties known to differ between C. albicans clades and suggests a possible but minor role of phosphate metabolism in the virulence of the species.

  5. Architecture of Burkholderia cepacia complex σ70 gene family: evidence of alternative primary and clade-specific factors, and genomic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menard Aymeric

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc groups bacterial species with beneficial properties that can improve crop yields or remediate polluted sites but can also lead to dramatic human clinical outcomes among cystic fibrosis (CF or immuno-compromised individuals. Genome-wide regulatory processes of gene expression could explain parts of this bacterial duality. Transcriptional σ70 factors are components of these processes. They allow the reversible binding of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase to form the holoenzyme that will lead to mRNA synthesis from a DNA promoter region. Bcc genome-wide analyses were performed to investigate the major evolutionary trends taking place in the σ70 family of these bacteria. Results Twenty σ70 paralogous genes were detected in the Burkholderia cenocepacia strain J2315 (Bcen-J2315 genome, of which 14 were of the ECF (extracytoplasmic function group. Non-ECF paralogs were related to primary (rpoD, alternative primary, stationary phase (rpoS, flagellin biosynthesis (fliA, and heat shock (rpoH factors. The number of σ70 genetic determinants among this genome was of 2,86 per Mb. This number is lower than the one of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a species found in similar habitats including CF lungs. These two bacterial groups showed strikingly different σ70 family architectures, with only three ECF paralogs in common (fecI-like, pvdS and algU. Bcen-J2315 σ70 paralogs showed clade-specific distributions. Some paralogs appeared limited to the ET12 epidemic clone (ecfA2, particular Bcc species (sigI, the Burkholderia genus (ecfJ, ecfF, and sigJ, certain proteobacterial groups (ecfA1, ecfC, ecfD, ecfE, ecfG, ecfL, ecfM and rpoS, or were broadly distributed in the eubacteria (ecfI, ecfK, ecfH, ecfB, and rpoD-, rpoH-, fliA-like genes. Genomic instability of this gene family was driven by chromosomal inversion (ecfA2, recent duplication events (ecfA and RpoD, localized (ecfG and large scale deletions (sig

  6. Determining Semantically Related Significant Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    GO relation embodies some aspects of existence dependency. If GO term xis existence-dependent on GO term y, the presence of y implies the presence of x. Therefore, the genes annotated with the function of the GO term y are usually functionally and semantically related to the genes annotated with the function of the GO term x. A large number of gene set enrichment analysis methods have been developed in recent years for analyzing gene sets enrichment. However, most of these methods overlook the structural dependencies between GO terms in GO graph by not considering the concept of existence dependency. We propose in this paper a biological search engine called RSGSearch that identifies enriched sets of genes annotated with different functions using the concept of existence dependency. We observe that GO term xcannot be existence-dependent on GO term y, if x- and y- have the same specificity (biological characteristics). After encoding into a numeric format the contributions of GO terms annotating target genes to the semantics of their lowest common ancestors (LCAs), RSGSearch uses microarray experiment to identify the most significant LCA that annotates the result genes. We evaluated RSGSearch experimentally and compared it with five gene set enrichment systems. Results showed marked improvement.

  7. Vibrio salilacus sp. nov., a new member of the Anguillarum clade with six alleles of the 16S rRNA gene from a saline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Ying; Liu, Hong-Can; Wang, Fang; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2015-08-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, catalase- and oxidase-positive, facultatively aerobic bacterium, strain DSG-S6T, was isolated from Dasugan Lake (salinity 3.1%, w/w), China. Its taxonomic position was determined by using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain DSG-S6T were non-spore-forming, slightly bent rods, and motile by means of a single polar flagellum. Growth occurred in the presence of 0-7.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 2.0%), at 4-35 °C (optimum, 30 °C) and at pH 6.0-10.5 (optimum, pH 8.0-8.5). C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω7c and C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c were the major fatty acids. Six alleles of the 16S rRNA gene sharing 98.9-99.9  % similarity were detected in strain DSG-S6T, which showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Vibrio aestuarianus ATCC 35048T (97.7 %), then to Vibrio pacinii LMG 19999T (97.6%) and Vibrio metschnikovii CIP 69.14T (96.8%). Multilocus sequence analysis of four housekeeping genes and 16S rRNA genes clearly clustered it as a member of the Anguillarum clade. Mean DNA-DNA relatedness between strain DSG-S6T and V. aestuarianus NBRC 15629T, V. pacinii CGMCC 1.12557T and V. metschnikovii JCM 21189T was 20.6 ± 2.3, 38.1 ± 3.5 and 24.2 ± 2.8%, respectively. The DNA G+C content was 46.8 mol% (Tm). Based on the data, it is concluded that strain DSG-S6T represents a novel species of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio salilacus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DSG-S6T ( = CGMCC 1.12427T = JCM 19265T).

  8. Multilocus sequence analysis of the central clade of the genus Vibrio by using the 16S rRNA, recA, pyrH, rpoD, gyrB, rctB and toxR genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Javier; Macián, M Carmen; Arahal, David R; Garay, Esperanza; Pujalte, María J

    2010-01-01

    The central clade of the genus Vibrio, also called the Vibrio core group, comprises six species that are tightly related (DNA-DNA reassociation values are very close to 70 % for most species pairs). Identification of novel strains to the species level within this group is troublesome and results are quite often dependent on the methodology employed. Therefore, this group represents an excellent framework to test the robustness of multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) not only for inferring phylogeny but also as an identification tool without the need for DNA-DNA hybridization assays. The genes selected, 16S rRNA, recA, pyrH, rpoD, gyrB, rctB and toxR, were amplified by direct PCR from 44 Vibrio core-group strains. Subsequent analysis allowed us to recognize toxR and rpoD as the most resolving individual genes and showed that concatenated sequences of rpoD, rctB and toxR were more useful than concatenated sequences of all seven genes. To validate our conclusions, MLSA similarities have been correlated with DNA-DNA relatedness values obtained in this study and values taken from the literature. Although the seven concatenated genes gave the best correlation, the concatenated sequences of rpoD, rctB and toxR have the practical advantage of showing a considerable gap between the maximal interspecies similarity and the minimal intraspecies similarity recorded, meaning that they can be used quite conveniently for species identification of vibrios.

  9. Vorticella Linnaeus, 1767 (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophora, Peritrichia) is a grade not a clade: redefinition of Vorticella and the families Vorticellidae and Astylozoidae using molecular characters derived from the gene coding for small subunit ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Clamp, John; Xu, Dapeng; Kusuoka, Yasushi; Miao, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses of the peritrich genus Vorticella have suggested that it might be paraphyletic, with one Vorticella species - Vorticella microstoma grouping with the swimming peritrichs Astylozoon and Opisthonecta in a distant clade. These results were based on very limited taxon sampling and thus could not be accepted as conclusive evidence for revising the generic classification. We tested paraphyly of the genus Vorticella by making a new analysis with a broad range of samples from three continents that yielded 52 new sequences of the gene coding for small subunit rRNA. Our results, together with the available sequences in Genbank, form a comprehensive set of data for the genus Vorticella. Analyses of these data showed that Vorticella microstoma morphotypes, Astylozoon, and Opisthonecta form a well-supported, monophyletic clade, that is distinct from and basal to the family Vorticellidae containing other species of Vorticella. Paraphyly of the genus Vorticella and family Vorticellidae was strongly confirmed by these results. Furthermore, the two clades of Vorticella identified by the SSU rRNA gene are so genetically diverse whereas the genetic distances within the one containing Vorticella microstoma morphotypes, Astylozoon, and Opisthonecta were so slight, which marked it as a separate family that must be defined by molecular characters in the absence of unifying morphological and morphogenetic characters. An emended characterization and status of the genus Vorticella, the families Vorticellidae and Astylozoidae are presented and discussed.

  10. Genomic differentiation among two strains of the PS1 clade isolated from geographically separated marine habitats

    KAUST Repository

    Jimenez Infante, Francy M.

    2014-05-22

    Using dilution-to-extinction cultivation, we isolated a strain affiliated with the PS1 clade from surface waters of the Red Sea. Strain RS24 represents the second isolate of this group of marine Alphaproteobacteria after IMCC14465 that was isolated from the East (Japan) Sea. The PS1 clade is a sister group to the OCS116 clade, together forming a putatively novel order closely related to Rhizobiales. While most genomic features and most of the genetic content are conserved between RS24 and IMCC14465, their average nucleotide identity (ANI) is < 81%, suggesting two distinct species of the PS1 clade. Next to encoding two different variants of proteorhodopsin genes, they also harbor several unique genomic islands that contain genes related to degradation of aromatic compounds in IMCC14465 and in polymer degradation in RS24, possibly reflecting the physicochemical differences in the environment they were isolated from. No clear differences in abundance of the genomic content of either strain could be found in fragment recruitment analyses using different metagenomic datasets, in which both genomes were detectable albeit as minor part of the communities. The comparative genomic analysis of both isolates of the PS1 clade and the fragment recruitment analysis provide first insights into the ecology of this group. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  11. Evidence of Sympatry of Clade A and Clade B Head Lice in a Pre-Columbian Chilean Mummy from Camarones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutellis, Amina; Drali, Rezak; Rivera, Mario A.; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y.; Raoult, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Three different lineages of head lice are known to parasitize humans. Clade A, which is currently worldwide in distribution, was previously demonstrated to be present in the Americas before the time of Columbus. The two other types of head lice are geographically restricted to America and Australia for clade B and to Africa and Asia for clade C. In this study, we tested two operculated nits from a 4,000-year-old Chilean mummy of Camarones for the presence of the partial Cytb mitochondrial gene (270 bp). Our finding shows that clade B head lice were present in America before the arrival of the European colonists. PMID:24204678

  12. Cellular identity of an 18S rRNA gene sequence clade within the class Kinetoplastea: the novel genus Actuariola gen. nov. (Neobodonida) with description of the type species Actuariola framvarensis sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeck, Thorsten; Schwarz, M V Julian; Boenigk, Jens; Schweikert, Michael; von der Heyden, Sophie; Behnke, Anke

    2005-11-01

    Environmental molecular surveys of microbial diversity have uncovered a vast number of novel taxonomic units in the eukaryotic tree of life that are exclusively known by their small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene signatures. In this study, we reveal the cellular and taxonomic identity of a novel eukaryote SSU rRNA gene sequence clade within the Kinetoplastea. Kinetoplastea are ubiquitously distributed flagellated protists of high ecological and medical importance. We isolated an organism from the oxic-anoxic interface of the anoxic Framvaren Fjord (Norway), which branches within an unidentified kinetoplastean sequence clade. Ultrastructural studies revealed a typical cellular organization that characterized the flagellated isolate as a member of the order Neobodonida Vickerman 2004, which contains five genera. The isolate differed in several distinctive characters from Dimastigella, Cruzella, Rhynchobodo and Rhynchomonas. The arrangement of the microtubular rod that supports the apical cytostome and the cytopharynx differed from the diagnosis of the fifth described genus (Neobodo Vickerman 2004) within the order Neobodonida. On the basis of both molecular and microscopical data, a novel genus within the order Neobodonida, Actuariola gen. nov., is proposed. Here, we characterize its type species, Actuariola framvarensis sp. nov., and provide an in situ tool to access the organism in nature and study its ecology.

  13. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes.

  14. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes. PMID:27622766

  15. Gene trees, species trees, and morphology converge on a similar phylogeny of living gars (Actinopterygii: Holostei: Lepisosteidae), an ancient clade of ray-finned fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jeremy J; David, Solomon R; Near, Thomas J

    2012-06-01

    Extant gars represent the remaining members of a formerly diverse assemblage of ancient ray-finned fishes and have been the subject of multiple phylogenetic analyses using morphological data. Here, we present the first hypothesis of phylogenetic relationships among living gar species based on molecular data, through the examination of gene tree heterogeneity and coalescent species tree analyses of a portion of one mitochondrial (COI) and seven nuclear (ENC1, myh6, plagl2, S7 ribosomal protein intron 1, sreb2, tbr1, and zic1) genes. Individual gene trees displayed varying degrees of resolution with regards to species-level relationships, and the gene trees inferred from COI and the S7 intron were the only two that were completely resolved. Coalescent species tree analyses of nuclear genes resulted in a well-resolved and strongly supported phylogenetic tree of living gar species, for which Bayesian posterior node support was further improved by the inclusion of the mitochondrial gene. Species-level relationships among gars inferred from our molecular data set were highly congruent with previously published morphological phylogenies, with the exception of the placement of two species, Lepisosteus osseus and L. platostomus. Re-examination of the character coding used by previous authors provided partial resolution of this topological discordance, resulting in broad concordance in the phylogenies inferred from individual genes, the coalescent species tree analysis, and morphology. The completely resolved phylogeny inferred from the molecular data set with strong Bayesian posterior support at all nodes provided insights into the potential for introgressive hybridization and patterns of allopatric speciation in the evolutionary history of living gars, as well as a solid foundation for future examinations of functional diversification and evolutionary stasis in a "living fossil" lineage.

  16. Cloning arbuscule-related genes from mycorrhizas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burleigh, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Until recently little was known about the identity of the genes expressed in the arbuscules of mycorrhizas, due in part to problems associated with cloning genes from the tissues of an obligate symbiont. However, the combination of advanced molecular techniques, innovative use of the materials...... available and fortuitous cloning has resulted in the recent identification of a number of arbuscule-related genes. This article provides a brief summary of the genes involved in arbuscule development, function and regulation, and the techniques used to study them. Molecular techniques include differential...

  17. The phylogenetic position of "Acomyinae" (Rodentia, Mammalia) as sister group of a Murinae plus Gerbillinae clade : Evidence from the nuclear ribonuclease gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, JYF; Catzeflis, FM; Beintema, JJ

    1999-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of Acomys and Uranomys within Muridae were investigated using nuclear pancreatic ribonuclease A gene sequences. The various kinds of substitutions in the data matrix (15 taxa x 375 nucleotides) were examined for saturation, in order to apply a weighted parsimony approa

  18. Species-specific primers for Fusarium redolens and a PCR-RFLP technique to distinguish among three clades of Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogale, Mesfin; Wingfield, Brenda D; Wingfield, Michael J; Steenkamp, Emma T

    2007-06-01

    The currently available morphological and molecular diagnostic techniques for Fusarium redolens and the three phylogenetic clades of Fusarium oxysporum are problematic. Aligned translation elongation factor 1 alpha (TEF-1 alpha) gene sequences from these species and their close relatives were used to design F. redolens-specific primers, and to identify restriction sites that discriminate among the three clades of F. oxysporum. The F. redolens-specific primers distinguished this species from all others included in the study. There were three TEF-1 alpha-RFLP patterns among formae speciales of F. oxysporum. These PCR-RFLP patterns corresponded with the three clades. These techniques provide simple and inexpensive diagnostic methods for the identification of F. redolens and members of the three clades of F. oxysporum.

  19. Cloning and sequencing genes related to preeclampsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Juan-zi; LIU Yan-fang; YAO Yuan-qing; YAN Wei; ZHU Feng; ZHAO Zhong-liang

    2001-01-01

    To clone genes specifically expressed in the placenta of patients with preeclampsia, and to explain the mechanism in the etiopathology ofpreeclampsia. Methods: The placentae ofpreeclamptic and normotensive subjects with pregnancy were used as models, and the cDNA Library was constructed and 20 differentially expressed fragments were cloned after a new version of PCR-based subtractive hybridization. The false positive clones were identified by reverse dot blot analysis. With one of the obtained gene taken as the probe, the placentas of 10 normal pregnant women and 10 preeclamptic patients were studied by using dot hybridization methods. Results: Six false positive clones were identified by reverse dot blot, and the rest 14 clones were identified as preeclampsia-related genes. These clones were sequenced, and analyzed with BLAST analysis system. Eleven of 14 clones were genes already known, among which one belongs to necdin family; the rest 3 were identified as novel genes. These 3 genes were acknowledged by GenBank, with the accession numbers AF232216, AF232217, AF233648. The results of dot hybridization using necdin gene as probe were as follows: (1) There was this mRNA in the placental tissues of normal pregnancy as well as in that ofpreeclampsia.(2) The intensity of transcription of this mRNA in the placental tissues of preeclampsia increased significantly compared with that of the normal pregnancy (P<0.05). Conclusions: This study for the first time reported this group of genes, especially necdin-expressing gene, which are related to the etiopathology of preeclampsia. In addition, the overtranscription ofnecdin gene has been found in preeclampsia. It is helpful in further studies of the etiology ofpreeclampsia.

  20. Stable non-synonymous substitutions on NS gene (NS1 and NS2 proteins) of Qinghai lake H5N1 influenza virus (Clade 2.2) after successive passages in Muscovy ducks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG XiaoHui; HUANG Yu; XIAO HaiXia; LIU Di; GAO George F.

    2009-01-01

    Although worldwide concern has been raised since the large-scale outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza in wild birds at Qinghai Lake, China in 2005, the factors responsible for the ability to kill watertowl remain unclear. The why and how questions of the H5N1 virus species-jump into its reservoir host need to be answered. In this report we test the pathogenicity and adaptation of Qinghai Lake (Clade 2.2) isolate to Muscovy ducks for further understanding of this virus. The isolate was highly pathogenic in ducks and retained its high pathogenicity even after 20 generations of passage in ducks. During the process of serial passages, only the NS gene developed non-synonymous substitutions, which caused two mutations in NSl protein (Va123Ala and Leu207Pro) and one in NS2 (Phe55Leu). These mutations persisted immutably through all subsequent passages and the pathogenicity remained high, implying that highly pathogenic H5N1 virus remains stable in aquatic birds through oral transmission. Although the exact functions of these mutations are not known, our results provide an important foundation for further understanding the characteristics of the Qinghai Lake isolates.

  1. Stable non-synonymous substitutions on NS gene (NS1 and NS2 proteins) of Qinghai lake H5N1 influenza virus (Clade 2.2) after successive passages in Muscovy ducks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; George; F.

    2009-01-01

    Although worldwide concern has been raised since the large-scale outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza in wild birds at Qinghai Lake,China in 2005,the factors responsible for the ability to kill waterfowl remain unclear. The why and how questions of the H5N1 virus species-jump into its reservoir host need to be answered. In this report we test the pathogenicity and adaptation of Qinghai Lake (Clade 2.2) isolate to Muscovy ducks for further understanding of this virus. The isolate was highly pathogenic in ducks and retained its high pathogenicity even after 20 generations of passage in ducks. During the process of serial passages,only the NS gene developed non-synonymous substitutions,which caused two mutations in NS1 protein (Val23Ala and Leu207Pro) and one in NS2 (Phe55Leu). These mutations persisted immutably through all subsequent passages and the pathogenicity remained high,implying that highly pathogenic H5N1 virus remains stable in aquatic birds through oral transmission. Although the exact functions of these mutations are not known,our results provide an important foundation for further understanding the characteristics of the Qinghai Lake isolates.

  2. A network view on Schizophrenia related genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreedevi Chandrasekaran

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is a part of a project investigating the molecular determinants of neurological diseases. To account for the systemic nature of these diseases we proceeded from a well established list of 38 schizophrenia-related genes (Allen et al., 2008; Ross et al., 2006 and investigated their closest network environment. The created networks were compared to recently proposed list of 173 schizophrenia related genes (Sun et al., 2009. 115 genes were predicted as potentially related to schizophrenia and subjected to GSEA. The enriched groups of proteins included neuromodulators, neurotransmitters and lipid transport. Over 100 signaling pathways were found significantly involved, signal transduction emerging as the most highly significant biological process. Next, we analyzed two microarray expression datasets derived from olfactory mucosa biopsies of schizophrenic patients and postmortem brain tissue samples from SMRIDB. The systems biology analysis resulted in a number of other genes predicted to be potentially related to schizophrenia, as well as in additional information of interest for elucidating molecular mechanisms of schizophrenia.

  3. Radiosensitivity and cancer-related genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    The influence of several cancer-related genes, myc, fos, jun, ras, raf mos, cot, src, erbB, bcl-2, RB and p53, on radiosensitivity has been shown by tranfection studies. This review focuses on the functions of growth arrest, DNA repair and apoptosis regulated by these cancer-related genes. Resistance to apoptosis has emerged as a major category of radiation sensitivity. In the near future, it might be clear which of the cancer-related genes acts in an important role in apoptosis pathway after irradiation. In addition, there is no direct evidence in the activation of DNA repair during the cell cycle arrest. Therefore, identification of factors directly acting on radiation sensitivity will offer new strategies in cancer predictical assay using biopsied tumor specimens in radiotherapy. Further studies are must to be carried out for detection of common mutations in cancer-related genes for predictical assay and the potential for induction of apoptosis by radiotherapy and genetherapy. (author). 107 refs.

  4. Sugarcane genes related to mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Ghislaine V.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria function as metabolic powerhouses by generating energy through oxidative phosphorylation and have become the focus of renewed interest due to progress in understanding the subtleties of their biogenesis and the discovery of the important roles which these organelles play in senescence, cell death and the assembly of iron-sulfur (Fe/S centers. Using proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana we searched the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database for the presence of expressed sequence tags (ESTs with similarity to nuclear genes related to mitochondrial functions. Starting with 869 protein sequences, we searched for sugarcane EST counterparts to these proteins using the basic local alignment search tool TBLASTN similarity searching program run against 260,781 sugarcane ESTs contained in 81,223 clusters. We were able to recover 367 clusters likely to represent sugarcane orthologues of the corresponding genes from S. cerevisiae, H. sapiens and A. thaliana with E-value <= 10-10. Gene products belonging to all functional categories related to mitochondrial functions were found and this allowed us to produce an overview of the nuclear genes required for sugarcane mitochondrial biogenesis and function as well as providing a starting point for detailed analysis of sugarcane gene structure and physiology.

  5. Sequence Analysis of Insecticide Action and Detoxification-Related Genes in the Insect Pest Natural Enemy Pardosa pseudoannulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangkun; Zhang, Yixi; Bao, Haibo; Liu, Zewen

    2015-01-01

    The pond wolf spider Pardosa pseudoannulata, an important natural predatory enemy of rice planthoppers, is found widely distributed in paddy fields. However, data on the genes involved in insecticide action, detoxification, and response are very limited for P. pseudoannulata, which inhibits the development and appropriate use of selective insecticides to control insect pests on rice. We used transcriptome construction from adult spider cephalothoraxes to analyze and manually identify genes enconding metabolic enzymes and target receptors related to insecticide action and detoxification, including 90 cytochrome P450s, 14 glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), 17 acetylcholinesterases (AChEs), 17 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and 17 gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, as well as 12 glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl) unigenes. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed the different subclassifications of P450s and GSTs, some important sequence diversities in nAChRs and GABA receptors, polymorphism in AChEs, and high similarities in GluCls. For P450s in P. pseudoannulata, the number of unigenes belonging to the CYP2 clade was much higher than that in CYP3 and CYP4 clades. The results differed from insects in which most P450 genes were in CYP3 and CYP4 clades. For GSTs, most unigenes belonged to the delta and sigma classes, and no epsilon GST class gene was found, which differed from the findings for insects and acarina. Our results will be useful for studies on insecticide action, selectivity, and detoxification in the spider and other related animals, and the sequence differences in target genes between the spider and insects will provide important information for the design of selective insecticides.

  6. Sequence Analysis of Insecticide Action and Detoxification-Related Genes in the Insect Pest Natural Enemy Pardosa pseudoannulata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangkun Meng

    Full Text Available The pond wolf spider Pardosa pseudoannulata, an important natural predatory enemy of rice planthoppers, is found widely distributed in paddy fields. However, data on the genes involved in insecticide action, detoxification, and response are very limited for P. pseudoannulata, which inhibits the development and appropriate use of selective insecticides to control insect pests on rice. We used transcriptome construction from adult spider cephalothoraxes to analyze and manually identify genes enconding metabolic enzymes and target receptors related to insecticide action and detoxification, including 90 cytochrome P450s, 14 glutathione S-transferases (GSTs, 17 acetylcholinesterases (AChEs, 17 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, and 17 gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptors, as well as 12 glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl unigenes. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed the different subclassifications of P450s and GSTs, some important sequence diversities in nAChRs and GABA receptors, polymorphism in AChEs, and high similarities in GluCls. For P450s in P. pseudoannulata, the number of unigenes belonging to the CYP2 clade was much higher than that in CYP3 and CYP4 clades. The results differed from insects in which most P450 genes were in CYP3 and CYP4 clades. For GSTs, most unigenes belonged to the delta and sigma classes, and no epsilon GST class gene was found, which differed from the findings for insects and acarina. Our results will be useful for studies on insecticide action, selectivity, and detoxification in the spider and other related animals, and the sequence differences in target genes between the spider and insects will provide important information for the design of selective insecticides.

  7. Molecular characteristic and pathogenicity of Indonesian H5N1 clade 2.3.2 viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmayanti NLPI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of disease in late 2012 in Indonesia caused high duck mortality. The agent of the disease was identified as H5N1 clade 2.3.2. The disease caused economic loss to the Indonesian duck farmer. The clade 2.3.2 of H5N1 virus has not previously been identified, so this study was conducted to characterize 4 of H5N1 clade 2.3.2 viruses by DNA sequencing in eight genes segment virus namely HA, NA, NS, M, PB1, PB2, PA and NP. The pathogenicity test of clade 2.3.2 viruses in ducks was compared to clade 2.1.3 viruses which predominat circulating in Indonesia. Results of phylogenetic tree analysis showed that the four of clade 2.3.2 viruses isolated in 2012 was the new introduced virus from abroad. Further analysis showed eight genes were in one group with the clade 2.3.2 viruses, especially those from VietNam and did not belong to Indonesia viruses group. The pathogenicity test in ducks showed that virus H5N1 clade 2.3.2 and clade 2.1.3 have similar clinical symptoms and pathogenicity and cause death in 75% of ducks on days 3-6 after infection.

  8. Clades reach highest morphological disparity early in their evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Martin; Gerber, Sylvain; Albion Wills, Matthew

    2013-08-01

    There are few putative macroevolutionary trends or rules that withstand scrutiny. Here, we test and verify the purported tendency for animal clades to reach their maximum morphological variety relatively early in their evolutionary histories (early high disparity). We present a meta-analysis of 98 metazoan clades radiating throughout the Phanerozoic. The disparity profiles of groups through time are summarized in terms of their center of gravity (CG), with values above and below 0.50 indicating top- and bottom-heaviness, respectively. Clades that terminate at one of the "big five" mass extinction events tend to have truncated trajectories, with a significantly top-heavy CG distribution overall. The remaining 63 clades show the opposite tendency, with a significantly bottom-heavy mean CG (relatively early high disparity). Resampling tests are used to identify groups with a CG significantly above or below 0.50; clades not terminating at a mass extinction are three times more likely to be significantly bottom-heavy than top-heavy. Overall, there is no clear temporal trend in disparity profile shapes from the Cambrian to the Recent, and early high disparity is the predominant pattern throughout the Phanerozoic. Our results do not allow us to distinguish between ecological and developmental explanations for this phenomenon. To the extent that ecology has a role, however, the paucity of bottom-heavy clades radiating in the immediate wake of mass extinctions suggests that early high disparity more probably results from the evolution of key apomorphies at the base of clades rather than from physical drivers or catastrophic ecospace clearing.

  9. Loss of genes related to Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) and implications for reductive genome evolution in symbionts of deep-sea vesicomyid clams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Shigeru; Kaneko, Takashi; Ozawa, Genki; Matsumoto, Mamiko Nishino; Koshiishi, Takeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Kato, Chiaki; Takai, Ken; Yoshida, Takao; Fujikura, Katsunori; Barry, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular thioautotrophic symbionts of deep-sea vesicomyid clams lack some DNA repair genes and are thought to be undergoing reductive genome evolution (RGE). In this study, we addressed two questions, 1) how these symbionts lost their DNA repair genes and 2) how such losses affect RGE. For the first question, we examined genes associated with nucleotide excision repair (NER; uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, uvrD, uvrD paralog [uvrDp] and mfd) in 12 symbionts of vesicomyid clams belonging to two clades (5 clade I and 7 clade II symbionts). While uvrA, uvrDp and mfd were conserved in all symbionts, uvrB and uvrC were degraded in all clade I symbionts but were apparently intact in clade II symbionts. UvrD was disrupted in two clade II symbionts. Among the intact genes in Ca. Vesicomyosocius okutanii (clade I), expressions of uvrD and mfd were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), but those of uvrA and uvrDp were not. In contrast, all intact genes were expressed in the symbiont of Calyptogena pacifica (clade II). To assess how gene losses affect RGE (question 2), genetic distances of the examined genes in symbionts from Bathymodiolus septemdierum were shown to be larger in clade I than clade II symbionts. In addition, these genes had lower guanine+cytosine (GC) content and higher repeat sequence densities in clade I than measured in clade II. Our results suggest that NER genes are currently being lost from the extant lineages of vesicomyid clam symbionts. The loss of NER genes and mutY in these symbionts is likely to promote increases in genetic distance and repeat sequence density as well as reduced GC content in genomic genes, and may have facilitated reductive evolution of the genome. PMID:28199404

  10. Arabidopsis Clade I TGA Factors Regulate Apoplastic Defences against the Bacterial Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae through Endoplasmic Reticulum-Based Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Lipu Wang; Pierre R Fobert

    2013-01-01

    During the plant immune response, large-scale transcriptional reprogramming is modulated by numerous transcription (co) factors. The Arabidopsis basic leucine zipper transcription factors TGA1 and TGA4, which comprise the clade I TGA factors, have been shown to positively contribute to disease resistance against virulent strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae . Despite physically interacting with the key immune regulator, NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1 (NPR1), f...

  11. Separate introns gained within short and long soluble peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein genes during radiation of Symbiodinium (Dinophyceae) clade A and B lineages - PLoS One

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we document introns in two Symbiodinium clades that were most likely gained following divergence of this genus from other peridinin-containing dinoflagellate lineages. Soluble peridinin-chlorophyll a-proteins (sPCP) occur in short and long forms in different species, and all...

  12. Genetic tools for the investigation of Roseobacter clade bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tielen Petra

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Roseobacter clade represents one of the most abundant, metabolically versatile and ecologically important bacterial groups found in marine habitats. A detailed molecular investigation of the regulatory and metabolic networks of these organisms is currently limited for many strains by missing suitable genetic tools. Results Conjugation and electroporation methods for the efficient and stable genetic transformation of selected Roseobacter clade bacteria including Dinoroseobacter shibae, Oceanibulbus indolifex, Phaeobacter gallaeciensis, Phaeobacter inhibens, Roseobacter denitrificans and Roseobacter litoralis were tested. For this purpose an antibiotic resistance screening was performed and suitable genetic markers were selected. Based on these transformation protocols stably maintained plasmids were identified. A plasmid encoded oxygen-independent fluorescent system was established using the flavin mononucleotide-based fluorescent protein FbFP. Finally, a chromosomal gene knockout strategy was successfully employed for the inactivation of the anaerobic metabolism regulatory gene dnr from D. shibae DFL12T. Conclusion A genetic toolbox for members of the Roseobacter clade was established. This provides a solid methodical basis for the detailed elucidation of gene regulatory and metabolic networks underlying the ecological success of this group of marine bacteria.

  13. Identification of pathogenicity-related genes in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew; Vágány, Viktória; Jackson, Alison C; Harrison, Richard J; Rainoni, Alessandro; Clarkson, John P

    2016-09-01

    Pathogenic isolates of Fusarium oxysporum, distinguished as formae speciales (f. spp.) on the basis of their host specificity, cause crown rots, root rots and vascular wilts on many important crops worldwide. Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae (FOC) is particularly problematic to onion growers worldwide and is increasing in prevalence in the UK. We characterized 31 F. oxysporum isolates collected from UK onions using pathogenicity tests, sequencing of housekeeping genes and identification of effectors. In onion seedling and bulb tests, 21 isolates were pathogenic and 10 were non-pathogenic. The molecular characterization of these isolates, and 21 additional isolates comprising other f. spp. and different Fusarium species, was carried out by sequencing three housekeeping genes. A concatenated tree separated the F. oxysporum isolates into six clades, but did not distinguish between pathogenic and non-pathogenic isolates. Ten putative effectors were identified within FOC, including seven Secreted In Xylem (SIX) genes first reported in F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Two highly homologous proteins with signal peptides and RxLR motifs (CRX1/CRX2) and a gene with no previously characterized domains (C5) were also identified. The presence/absence of nine of these genes was strongly related to pathogenicity against onion and all were shown to be expressed in planta. Different SIX gene complements were identified in other f. spp., but none were identified in three other Fusarium species from onion. Although the FOC SIX genes had a high level of homology with other f. spp., there were clear differences in sequences which were unique to FOC, whereas CRX1 and C5 genes appear to be largely FOC specific.

  14. Identification of pathogenicity‐related genes in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vágány, Viktória; Jackson, Alison C.; Harrison, Richard J.; Rainoni, Alessandro; Clarkson, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pathogenic isolates of Fusarium oxysporum, distinguished as formae speciales (f. spp.) on the basis of their host specificity, cause crown rots, root rots and vascular wilts on many important crops worldwide. Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae (FOC) is particularly problematic to onion growers worldwide and is increasing in prevalence in the UK. We characterized 31 F. oxysporum isolates collected from UK onions using pathogenicity tests, sequencing of housekeeping genes and identification of effectors. In onion seedling and bulb tests, 21 isolates were pathogenic and 10 were non‐pathogenic. The molecular characterization of these isolates, and 21 additional isolates comprising other f. spp. and different Fusarium species, was carried out by sequencing three housekeeping genes. A concatenated tree separated the F. oxysporum isolates into six clades, but did not distinguish between pathogenic and non‐pathogenic isolates. Ten putative effectors were identified within FOC, including seven Secreted In Xylem (SIX) genes first reported in F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Two highly homologous proteins with signal peptides and RxLR motifs (CRX1/CRX2) and a gene with no previously characterized domains (C5) were also identified. The presence/absence of nine of these genes was strongly related to pathogenicity against onion and all were shown to be expressed in planta. Different SIX gene complements were identified in other f. spp., but none were identified in three other Fusarium species from onion. Although the FOC SIX genes had a high level of homology with other f. spp., there were clear differences in sequences which were unique to FOC, whereas CRX1 and C5 genes appear to be largely FOC specific. PMID:26609905

  15. The evolutionary dynamics of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 in south-central Vietnam reveals multiple clades evolving from Chinese and Cambodian viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tinh Huu; Than, Van Thai; Thanh, Hien Dang; Nguyen, Van Quang; Nguyen, Kim Hue; Nguyen, Duc Tan; Park, Jong-Hwa; Chung, In Sik; Jeong, Dae Gwin; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Oh, Tae Kwang; Kim, Wonyong

    2015-10-01

    In Vietnam, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), such as that caused by H5N1 viruses, is the most highly contagious infectious disease that has been affecting domestic poultry in recent years. Vietnam might be an evolutionary hotspot and a potential source of globally pandemic strains. However, few studies have reported viruses circulating in the south-central region of Vietnam. In the present study, 47 H5N1-positive samples were collected from both vaccinated and unvaccinated poultry farms in the South Central Coast region of Vietnam during 2013-2014, and their genetic diversity was analyzed. A common sequence motif for HPAI virus was identified at HA-cleavage sites in all samples: either RERRRKR/G (clades 2.3.2.1c and 2.3.2.1a) or REGRRKKR/G (clade 1.1.2). Phylogenetic analysis of HA genes identified three clades of HPAI H5N1: 1.1.2 (n=1), 2.3.2.1a (n=1), and 2.3.2.1c (n=45). The phylogenetic analysis indicated that these Vietnamese clades may have evolved from Chinese and Cambodian virus clades isolated in 2012-2013 but are less closely related to the clades detected from the Tyva Republic, Bulgaria, Mongolia, Japan, and Korea in 2009-2011. Detection of the coexistence of virus clades 2.3.2.1 and the very virulent 1.1.2 in the south-central regions suggests their local importance and highlights concerns regarding their spread, both northwards and southwards, as well as the potential for reassortment. The obtained data highlight the importance of regular identification of viral evolution and the development and use of region-specific vaccines.

  16. Melon chlorotic leaf curl virus: characterization and differential reassortment with closest relatives reveal adaptive virulence in the squash leaf curl virus clade and host shifting by the host-restricted bean calico mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, A M; Mills-Lujan, K; Martin, K; Brown, J K

    2008-02-01

    The genome components of the Melon chlorotic leaf curl virus (MCLCuV) were cloned from symptomatic cantaloupe leaves collected in Guatemala during 2002. The MCLCuV DNA-A and DNA-B components shared their closest nucleotide identities among begomoviruses, at approximately 90 and 81%, respectively, with a papaya isolate of MCLCuV from Costa Rica. The closest relatives at the species level were other members of the Squash leaf curl virus (SLCV) clade, which is endemic in the southwestern United States and Mexico. Biolistic inoculation of cantaloupe seedlings with the MCLCuV DNA-A and -B components resulted in the development of characteristic disease symptoms, providing definitive evidence of causality. MCLCuV experimentally infected species within the Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae, and Solanaceae. The potential for interspecific reassortment was examined for MCLCuV and its closest relatives, including the bean-restricted Bean calico mosaic virus (BCaMV), and three other cucurbit-infecting species, Cucurbit leaf crumple virus (CuLCrV), SLCV, and SMLCV. The cucurbit viruses have distinct but overlapping host ranges. All possible reassortants were established using heterologous combinations of the DNA-A or DNA-B components. Surprisingly, only certain reassortants arising from MCLCuV and BCaMV, or MCLCuV and CuLCrV, were viable in bean, even though it is a host of all of the "wild-type" (parent) viruses. The bean-restricted BCaMV was differentially assisted in systemically infecting the cucurbit test species by the components of the four cucurbit-adapted begomoviruses. In certain heterologous combinations, the BCaMV DNA-A or -B component was able to infect one or more cucurbit species. Generally, the reassortants were less virulent in the test hosts than the respective wild-type (parent) viruses, strongly implicating adaptive modulation of virulence. This is the first illustration of reassortment resulting in the host range expansion of a host-restricted begomovirus.

  17. Distinct Processes Drive Diversification in Different Clades of Gesneriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roalson, Eric H; Roberts, Wade R

    2016-07-01

    Using a time-calibrated phylogenetic hypothesis including 768 Gesneriaceae species (out of [Formula: see text]3300 species) and more than 29,000 aligned bases from 26 gene regions, we test Gesneriaceae for diversification rate shifts and the possible proximal drivers of these shifts: geographic distributions, growth forms, and pollination syndromes. Bayesian Analysis of Macroevolutionary Mixtures analyses found five significant rate shifts in Beslerieae, core Nematanthus, core Columneinae, core Streptocarpus, and Pacific Cyrtandra These rate shifts correspond with shifts in diversification rates, as inferred by Binary State Speciation and Extinction Model and Geographic State Speciation and Extinction model, associated with hummingbird pollination, epiphytism, unifoliate growth, and geographic area. Our results suggest that diversification processes are extremely variable across Gesneriaceae clades with different combinations of characters influencing diversification rates in different clades. Diversification patterns between New and Old World lineages show dramatic differences, suggesting that the processes of diversification in Gesneriaceae are very different in these two geographic regions.

  18. Calcitonin gene related peptide and its functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimian M

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP was first reported in 1982. This peptide contains 37 amino acids which could be found in Alpha and Beta forms. CGRP shows diversity both in its receptors and biological effects and up to now four different types of receptors have been reported. It can act like a neurotransmitter, local hormone and neuromodulator. They have a variety of effects on different organs such as a potent effect on vasodilation and smooth muscle relaxation. Ability of CGRP for induction of protein extravasation from blood vessels was uncertain. In this study intra-articular infusion of 10^-6 M CGRP to the rat knee joint induced significant protein extravasation into the rat knee joint space. The amount of protein was detected by modified Iawata method which could detect amount of protein between 5-500 mg/L. Higher and lower concentrations failed to induce protein extravasation. Failure in higher concentration was likely due to significant fall in blood pressure. In the presence of an arterial hypotension induced by an ? adenoreceptor antagonist, 10^-6 M of CGRP failed to produce protein extravasation. This effect of CGRP was a specific active effect and not a passive effect due to its potent vasodilation effect, as similar vasodilatory response induced by a ?-adrenoreceptor agonist failed to induce protein extravasation. There is more than 50% of sensory neurons which contain CGRP and they are spread in all over the body and joints, therefore CGRP induced protein extravasation can potentiate inflammation in different organs.

  19. A phylogenetic revision of the Glaucopsyche section (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae), with special focus on the Phengaris-Maculinea clade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugelvig, L. V.; Vila, R.; Pierce, N. E.

    2011-01-01

    . The evolutionary history of this butterfly section is particularly important to understand the evolution of life history diversity connected to food-plant and host-ant associations in the larval stage. In the present study, we use a combination of four nuclear and two mitochondrial genes to reconstruct...... the phylogeny of the Glaucopsyche section, and in particular, to study the relationships among and within the Phengaris-Maculinea species. We find a clear pattern between the clades recovered in the Glaucopsyche section phylogeny and their food-plant associations, with only the Phengaris-Maculinea clade...... utilising more than one plant family. Maculinea is, for the first time, recovered with strong support as a monophyletic group nested within Phengaris, with the closest relative being the rare genus Caerulea. The genus Glaucopsyche is polyphyletic, including the genera Sinia and Iolana. Interestingly, we...

  20. 43 genes support the lungfish-coelacanth grouping related to the closest living relative of tetrapods with the Bayesian method under the coalescence model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gras Robin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the discovery of the "living fossil" in 1938, the coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae has generally been considered to be the closest living relative of the land vertebrates, and this is still the prevailing opinion in most general biology textbooks. However, the origin of tetrapods has not been resolved for decades. Three principal hypotheses (lungfish-tetrapod, coelacanth-tetrapod, or lungfish-coelacanth sister group have been proposed. Findings We used the Bayesian method under the coalescence model with the latest published program (Bayesian Estimation of Species Trees, or BEST to perform a phylogenetic analysis for seven relevant taxa and 43 nuclear protein-coding genes with the jackknife method for taxon sub-sampling. The lungfish-coelacanth sister group was consistently reconstructed with the Bayesian method under the coalescence model in 17 out of 21 taxon sets with a Bayesian posterior probability as high as 99%. Lungfish-tetrapod was only inferred from BCLS and BACLS. Neither coelacanth-tetrapod nor lungfish-coelacanth-tetrapod was recovered out of all 21 taxon sets. Conclusions Our results provide strong evidence in favor of accepting the hypothesis that lungfishes and coelacanths form a monophyletic sister-group that is the closest living relative of tetrapods. This clade was supported by high Bayesian posterior probabilities of the branch (a lungfish-coelacanth clade and high taxon jackknife supports.

  1. Iron homeostasis related genes in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gross Jeferson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for plants. However, excess iron is toxic, leading to oxidative stress and decreased productivity. Therefore, plants must use finely tuned mechanisms to keep iron homeostasis in each of their organs, tissues, cells and organelles. A few of the genes involved in iron homeostasis in plants have been identified recently, and we used some of their protein sequences as queries to look for corresponding genes in the rice (Oryza sativa genome. We have assigned possible functions to thirty-nine new rice genes. Together with four previously reported sequences, we analyzed a total of forty-three genes belonging to five known protein families: eighteen YS (Yellow Stripe, two FRO (Fe3+-chelate reductase oxidase, thirteen ZIP (Zinc regulated transporter / Iron regulated transporter Protein, eight NRAMP (Natural Resistance - Associated Macrophage Protein, and two Ferritin proteins. The possible cellular localization and number of potential transmembrane domains were evaluated, and phylogenetic analysis performed for each gene family. Annotation of genomic sequences was performed. The presence and number of homologues in each gene family in rice and Arabidopsis is discussed in light of the established iron acquisition strategies used by each one of these two plants.

  2. Updating the Vibrio Clades Defined by Multilocus Sequence Phylogeny: Proposal of Eight New Clades, and the Description of Vibrio tritonius sp. nov.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoo eSawabe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To date 142 species have been described in the Vibrionaceae family of bacteria, classified into seven genera; Aliivibrio, Echinomonas, Enterovibrio, Grimontia, Photobacterium, Salinivibrio and Vibrio. As vibrios are widespread in marine environments and show versatile metabolisms and ecologies, these bacteria are recognized as one of the most diverse and important marine heterotrophic bacterial groups for elucidating the correlation between genome evolution and ecological adaptation. However, on the basis of 16S rRNA gene phylogeny, we could not find any robust monophyletic lineages in any of the known genera. We needed further attempts to reconstruct their evolutionary history based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA and/or genome wide taxonomy of all the recognized species groups. In our previous report in 2007, we conducted the first broad multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA to infer the evolutionary history of vibrios using nine housekeeping genes (the 16S rRNA gene, gapA, gyrB, ftsZ, mreB, pyrH, recA, rpoA, and topA, and we proposed 14 distinct clades in 58 species of Vibrionaceae. Due to the difficulty of designing universal primers that can amplify the genes for MLSA in every Vibrionaceae species, some clades had yet to be defined. In this study, we present a better picture of an updated molecular phylogeny for 86 described vibrio species and 10 genome sequenced Vibrionaceae strains, using 8 housekeeping gene sequences. This new study places special emphasis on 1 eight newly identified clades (Damselae, Mediterranei, Pectenicida, Phosphoreum, Profundum, Porteresiae, Rosenbergii, and Rumoiensis; 2 clades amended since the 2007 proposal with recently described new species; 3 orphan clades of genomospecies F6 and F10; 4 phylogenetic positions defined in 3 genome-sequenced strains (N418, EX25, and EJY3; and 5 description of V. tritonius sp. nov., which is a member of the Porteresiae clade.

  3. Beijing clades of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are associated with differential survival in HIV-negative Russian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabanova, Yanina; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Ignatyeva, Olga; Kontsevaya, Irina; Mironova, Svetlana; Kovalyov, Alexander; Kritsky, Andrey; Rodionova, Yulia; Fedorin, Ivan; Casali, Nicola; Hooper, Richard; Horstmann, Rolf D; Nejentsev, Sergey; Hoffner, Sven; Nuernberg, Peter; Drobniewski, Francis

    2015-12-01

    We conducted a prospective study to establish factors associated with survival in tuberculosis patients in Russia including social, clinical and pathogen-related genetic parameters. Specifically we wished to determine whether different strains/clades of the Beijing lineage exerted a differential effect of survival. HIV-negative culture-confirmed cases were recruited during 2008-2010 across Samara Oblast and censored in December 2011. Molecular characterization was performed by a combination of spoligotyping, multilocus VNTR typing and whole genome sequencing (WGS). We analyzed 2602 strains and detected a high prevalence of Beijing family (n=1933; 74%) represented largely by two highly homogenous dominant clades A (n=794) and B (n=402) and non-A/non-B (n=737). Multivariable analysis of 1366 patients with full clinical and genotyping data showed that multi- and extensive drug resistance (HR=1.86; 95%CI: 1.52, 2.28 and HR=2.19; 95%CI: 1.55, 3.11) had the largest impact on survival. In addition older age, extensive lung damage, shortness of breath, treatment in the past and alcohol abuse reduced survival time. After adjustment for clinical and demographic predictors there was evidence that clades A and B combined were associated with poorer survival than other Beijing strains (HR=0.48; 95%CI 0.34, 0.67). All other pathogen-related factors (polymorphisms in genes plcA, plcB, plcC, lipR, dosT and pks15/1) had no effect on survival. In conclusion, drug resistance exerted the greatest effect on survival of TB patients. Nevertheless we provide evidence for the independent biological effect on survival of different Beijing family strains even within the same defined geographical population. Better understanding of the role of different strain factors in active disease and their influence on outcome is essential.

  4. A Ser29Leu substitution in the cytosine deaminase Fca1p is responsible for clade-specific flucytosine resistance in Candida dubliniensis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McManus, Brenda A

    2009-11-01

    The population structure of the opportunistic yeast pathogen Candida dubliniensis is composed of three main multilocus sequence typing clades (clades C1 to C3), and clade C3 predominantly consists of isolates from the Middle East that exhibit high-level resistance (MIC(50) > or = 128 microg\\/ml) to the fungicidal agent flucytosine (5FC). The close relative of C. dubliniensis, C. albicans, also exhibits clade-specific resistance to 5FC, and resistance is most commonly mediated by an Arg101Cys substitution in the FUR1 gene encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase. Broth microdilution assays with fluorouracil (5FU), the toxic deaminated form of 5FC, showed that both 5FC-resistant and 5FC-susceptible C. dubliniensis isolates exhibited similar 5FU MICs, suggesting that the C. dubliniensis cytosine deaminase (Fca1p) encoded by C. dubliniensis FCA1 (CdFCA1) may play a role in mediating C. dubliniensis clade-specific 5FC resistance. Amino acid sequence analysis of the CdFCA1 open reading frame (ORF) identified a homozygous Ser29Leu substitution in all 12 5FC-resistant isolates investigated which was not present in any of the 9 5FC-susceptible isolates examined. The tetracycline-inducible expression of the CdFCA1 ORF from a 5FC-susceptible C. dubliniensis isolate in two separate 5FC-resistant clade C3 isolates restored susceptibility to 5FC, demonstrating that the Ser29Leu substitution was responsible for the clade-specific 5FC resistance and that the 5FC resistance encoded by FCA1 genes with the Ser29Leu transition is recessive. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed no significant difference in CdFCA1 expression between 5FC-susceptible and 5FC-resistant isolates in either the presence or the absence of subinhibitory concentrations of 5FC, suggesting that the Ser29Leu substitution in the CdFCA1 ORF is the sole cause of 5FC resistance in clade C3 C. dubliniensis isolates.

  5. Mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korber, Bette T.; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Letvin, Norman; Hahn; Beatrice H.

    2011-05-31

    The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  6. Reproduction-related genes in the pearl oyster genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toshie; Masaoka, Tetsuji; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yoji; Satoh, Nori; Awaji, Masahiko

    2013-10-01

    Molluscan reproduction has been a target of biological research because of the various reproductive strategies that have evolved in this phylum. It has also been studied for the development of fisheries technologies, particularly aquaculture. Although fundamental processes of reproduction in other phyla, such as vertebrates and arthropods, have been well studied, information on the molecular mechanisms of molluscan reproduction remains limited. The recently released draft genome of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata provides a novel and powerful platform for obtaining structural information on the genes and proteins involved in bivalve reproduction. In the present study, we analyzed the pearl oyster draft genome to screen reproduction-related genes. Analysis was mainly conducted for genes reported from other molluscs for encoding orthologs of reproduction-related proteins in other phyla. The gene search in the P. fucata gene models (version 1.1) and genome assembly (version 1.0) were performed using Genome Browser and BLAST software. The obtained gene models were then BLASTP searched against a public database to confirm the best-hit sequences. As a result, more than 40 gene models were identified with high accuracy to encode reproduction-related genes reported for P. fucata and other molluscs. These include vasa, nanos, doublesex- and mab-3-related transcription factor, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors, vitellogenin, estrogen receptor, and others. The set of reproduction-related genes of P. fucata identified in the present study constitute a new tool for research on bivalve reproduction at the molecular level.

  7. Genes, inflammation, and age-related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trompet, Stella

    2010-01-01

    The general objective of this thesis was to investigate associations between genetic variants involved in inflammation and epigenetics and age-related diseases in an elderly cohort to get more insights in the patho-physiological mechanisms involved in age-related diseases, like cardiovascular diseas

  8. Nitrate competition in a coral symbiosis varies with temperature among Symbiodinium clades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David M; Andras, Jason P; Jordán-Garza, Adán Guillermo; Fogel, Marilyn L

    2013-06-01

    Many reef-building corals form symbioses with dinoflagellates from the diverse genus Symbiodinium. There is increasing evidence of functional significance to Symbiodinium diversity, which affects the coral holobiont's response to changing environmental conditions. For example, corals hosting Symbiodinium from the clade D taxon exhibit greater resistance to heat-induced coral bleaching than conspecifics hosting the more common clade C. Yet, the relatively low prevalence of clade D suggests that this trait is not advantageous in non-stressful environments. Thus, clade D may only be able to out-compete other Symbiodinium types within the host habitat when conditions are chronically stressful. Previous studies have observed enhanced photosynthesis and fitness by clade C holobionts at non-stressful temperatures, relative to clade D. Yet, carbon-centered metrics cannot account for enhanced growth rates and patterns of symbiont succession to other genetic types when nitrogen often limits reef productivity. To investigate the metabolic costs of hosting thermally tolerant symbionts, we examined the assimilation and translocation of inorganic (15)N and (13)C in the coral Acropora tenuis experimentally infected with either clade C (sub-type C1) or D Symbiodinium at 28 and 30 °C. We show that at 28 °C, C1 holobionts acquired 22% more (15)N than clade D. However, at 30 °C, C1 symbionts acquired equivalent nitrogen and 16% less carbon than D. We hypothesize that C1 competitively excludes clade D in hospite via enhanced nitrogen acquisition and thus dominates coral populations despite warming oceans.

  9. Genes, inflammation, and age-related diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Trompet, Stella

    2010-01-01

    The general objective of this thesis was to investigate associations between genetic variants involved in inflammation and epigenetics and age-related diseases in an elderly cohort to get more insights in the patho-physiological mechanisms involved in age-related diseases, like cardiovascular disease, cognitive decline and cancer. For all analyses we used data of the participants of the PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). We have shown that subjects carrying gen...

  10. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  11. Development of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for Different Clades of “Candidatus Accumulibacter”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, An Ni; Mao, Yanping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-05-01

    We designed novel quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primers for the polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) gene, targeting eight individual “Candidatus Accumulibacter” (referred to as Accumulibacter) clades. An evaluation of primer sets was conducted regarding the coverage, specificity, and PCR efficiency. (i) All primer sets were designed to cover all available sequences of the target clade. (ii) The phylogenetic analysis of the sequences retrieved from the qPCR products by each primer set demonstrated a high level of specificity. (iii) All calibration curves presented high PCR efficiencies in the range of 85–112% (R2 = 0.962–0.998). In addition, the possible interference of non-target amplicons was individually examined using the qPCR assay for 13 Accumulibacter clades, which were either undetected or showed negligible detection. With the primers designed by other research groups, a highly selective and sensitive qPCR-based method was developed to quantify all Accumulibacter clades, with the exception of Clade IE, in one assay, which enables more comprehensive insights into the community dynamics. The applicability to environmental samples was demonstrated by profiling the Accumulibacter clades in activated sludge samples of nine full-scale wastewater treatment plants.

  12. [Research progress in relative crystallin genes of congenital cataract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D D; Yang, H J; Yi, J L

    2016-02-01

    Congenital cataract is the common cause of visual disability in children. Nearly one third of congenital cataract cases may have a related genetic mutation. With the development of molecular genetics, especially gentechnik, more and more genes, such as crystallin genes, membrane protein genes, eytoskeletal protein genes and regulatory protein genes have been confirmed to participate in the process of congenital cataract. Furthermore, crystallin genes account for most of these genes and the crystallin has the highest amount of the whole protein in lens.It has been found that nearly one hundred mutations in crystallin genes are associated with the onset of congenital cataract. Researchers are exploring how these mutations further affect the function of cellular biology and eventually lead to cataract. Although more and more research results gradually reveal the pathogenesis of congenital cataract from the level of gene and protein, the specific pathogenesis is still unclear. The recent progression about inherited congenital cataract related with crysallin genes is summarized in this review.

  13. Influenza A H5N1 clade 2.3.4 virus with a different antiviral susceptibility profile replaced clade 1 virus in humans in northern Vietnam.

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    Mai T Q Le

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prior to 2007, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses isolated from poultry and humans in Vietnam were consistently reported to be clade 1 viruses, susceptible to oseltamivir but resistant to amantadine. Here we describe the re-emergence of human HPAI H5N1 virus infections in Vietnam in 2007 and the characteristics of the isolated viruses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Respiratory specimens from patients suspected to be infected with avian influenza in 2007 were screened by influenza and H5 subtype specific polymerase chain reaction. Isolated H5N1 strains were further characterized by genome sequencing and drug susceptibility testing. Eleven poultry outbreak isolates from 2007 were included in the sequence analysis. Eight patients, all of them from northern Vietnam, were diagnosed with H5N1 in 2007 and five of them died. Phylogenetic analysis of H5N1 viruses isolated from humans and poultry in 2007 showed that clade 2.3.4 H5N1 viruses replaced clade 1 viruses in northern Vietnam. Four human H5N1 strains had eight-fold reduced in-vitro susceptibility to oseltamivir as compared to clade 1 viruses. In two poultry isolates the I117V mutation was found in the neuraminidase gene, which is associated with reduced susceptibility to oseltamivir. No mutations in the M2 gene conferring amantadine resistance were found. CONCLUSION: In 2007, H5N1 clade 2.3.4 viruses replaced clade 1 viruses in northern Vietnam and were susceptible to amantadine but showed reduced susceptibility to oseltamivir. Combination antiviral therapy with oseltamivir and amantadine for human cases in Vietnam is recommended.

  14. Patterns of expression of cell wall related genes in sugarcane

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    Lima D.U.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Our search for genes related to cell wall metabolism in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database (http://sucest.lbi.dcc.unicamp.br resulted in 3,283 reads (1% of the total reads which were grouped into 459 clusters (potential genes with an average of 7.1 reads per cluster. To more clearly display our correlation coefficients, we constructed surface maps which we used to investigate the relationship between cell wall genes and the sugarcane tissues libraries from which they came. The only significant correlations that we found between cell wall genes and/or their expression within particular libraries were neutral or synergetic. Genes related to cellulose biosynthesis were from the CesA family, and were found to be the most abundant cell wall related genes in the SUCEST database. We found that the highest number of CesA reads came from the root and stem libraries. The genes with the greatest number of reads were those involved in cell wall hydrolases (e.g. beta-1,3-glucanases, xyloglucan endo-beta-transglycosylase, beta-glucosidase and endo-beta-mannanase. Correlation analyses by surface mapping revealed that the expression of genes related to biosynthesis seems to be associated with the hydrolysis of hemicelluloses, pectin hydrolases being mainly associated with xyloglucan hydrolases. The patterns of cell wall related gene expression in sugarcane based on the number of reads per cluster reflected quite well the expected physiological characteristics of the tissues. This is the first work to provide a general view on plant cell wall metabolism through the expression of related genes in almost all the tissues of a plant at the same time. For example, developing flowers behaved similarly to both meristematic tissues and leaf-root transition zone tissues. Besides providing a basis for future research on the mechanisms of plant development which involve the cell wall, our findings will provide valuable tools for plant engineering in the

  15. Open source approaches to establishing Roseobacter clade bacteria as synthetic biology chassis for biogeoengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Yanika; Grigonyte, Aurelija Marija; Boeing, Philipp; Wolfenden, Bethan; Smith, Patrick; Beaufoy, William; Rose, Simon; Ratisai, Tonderai; Zaikin, Alexey; Nesbeth, Darren N

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The nascent field of bio-geoengineering stands to benefit from synthetic biologists' efforts to standardise, and in so doing democratise, biomolecular research methods. Roseobacter clade bacteria comprise 15-20% of oceanic bacterio-plankton communities, making them a prime candidate for establishment of synthetic biology chassis for bio-geoengineering activities such as bioremediation of oceanic waste plastic. Developments such as the increasing affordability of DNA synthesis and laboratory automation continue to foster the establishment of a global 'do-it-yourself' research community alongside the more traditional arenas of academe and industry. As a collaborative group of citizen, student and professional scientists we sought to test the following hypotheses: (i) that an incubator capable of cultivating bacterial cells can be constructed entirely from non-laboratory items, (ii) that marine bacteria from the Roseobacter clade can be established as a genetically tractable synthetic biology chassis using plasmids conforming to the BioBrick(TM) standard and finally, (iii) that identifying and subcloning genes from a Roseobacter clade species can readily by achieved by citizen scientists using open source cloning and bioinformatic tools. Method. We cultivated three Roseobacter species, Roseobacter denitrificans, Oceanobulbus indolifexand Dinoroseobacter shibae. For each species we measured chloramphenicol sensitivity, viability over 11 weeks of glycerol-based cryopreservation and tested the effectiveness of a series of electroporation and heat shock protocols for transformation using a variety of plasmid types. We also attempted construction of an incubator-shaker device using only publicly available components. Finally, a subgroup comprising citizen scientists designed and attempted a procedure for isolating the cold resistance anf1 gene from Oceanobulbus indolifexcells and subcloning it into a BioBrick(TM) formatted plasmid. Results. All species were stable

  16. Open source approaches to establishing Roseobacter clade bacteria as synthetic biology chassis for biogeoengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanika Borg

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The nascent field of bio-geoengineering stands to benefit from synthetic biologists’ efforts to standardise, and in so doing democratise, biomolecular research methods. Roseobacter clade bacteria comprise 15–20% of oceanic bacterio-plankton communities, making them a prime candidate for establishment of synthetic biology chassis for bio-geoengineering activities such as bioremediation of oceanic waste plastic. Developments such as the increasing affordability of DNA synthesis and laboratory automation continue to foster the establishment of a global ‘do-it-yourself’ research community alongside the more traditional arenas of academe and industry. As a collaborative group of citizen, student and professional scientists we sought to test the following hypotheses: (i that an incubator capable of cultivating bacterial cells can be constructed entirely from non-laboratory items, (ii that marine bacteria from the Roseobacter clade can be established as a genetically tractable synthetic biology chassis using plasmids conforming to the BioBrickTM standard and finally, (iii that identifying and subcloning genes from a Roseobacter clade species can readily by achieved by citizen scientists using open source cloning and bioinformatic tools. Method. We cultivated three Roseobacter species, Roseobacter denitrificans, Oceanobulbus indolifexand Dinoroseobacter shibae. For each species we measured chloramphenicol sensitivity, viability over 11 weeks of glycerol-based cryopreservation and tested the effectiveness of a series of electroporation and heat shock protocols for transformation using a variety of plasmid types. We also attempted construction of an incubator-shaker device using only publicly available components. Finally, a subgroup comprising citizen scientists designed and attempted a procedure for isolating the cold resistance anf1 gene from Oceanobulbus indolifexcells and subcloning it into a BioBrickTM formatted plasmid. Results. All

  17. High-throughput proteogenomics of Ruegeria pomeroyi: seeding a better genomic annotation for the whole marine Roseobacter clade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie-Oleza Joseph A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structural and functional annotation of genomes is now heavily based on data obtained using automated pipeline systems. The key for an accurate structural annotation consists of blending similarities between closely related genomes with biochemical evidence of the genome interpretation. In this work we applied high-throughput proteogenomics to Ruegeria pomeroyi, a member of the Roseobacter clade, an abundant group of marine bacteria, as a seed for the annotation of the whole clade. Results A large dataset of peptides from R. pomeroyi was obtained after searching over 1.1 million MS/MS spectra against a six-frame translated genome database. We identified 2006 polypeptides, of which thirty-four were encoded by open reading frames (ORFs that had not previously been annotated. From the pool of 'one-hit-wonders', i.e. those ORFs specified by only one peptide detected by tandem mass spectrometry, we could confirm the probable existence of five additional new genes after proving that the corresponding RNAs were transcribed. We also identified the most-N-terminal peptide of 486 polypeptides, of which sixty-four had originally been wrongly annotated. Conclusions By extending these re-annotations to the other thirty-six Roseobacter isolates sequenced to date (twenty different genera, we propose the correction of the assigned start codons of 1082 homologous genes in the clade. In addition, we also report the presence of novel genes within operons encoding determinants of the important tricarboxylic acid cycle, a feature that seems to be characteristic of some Roseobacter genomes. The detection of their corresponding products in large amounts raises the question of their function. Their discoveries point to a possible theory for protein evolution that will rely on high expression of orphans in bacteria: their putative poor efficiency could be counterbalanced by a higher level of expression. Our proteogenomic analysis will increase

  18. Prediction and Analysis of Retinoblastoma Related Genes through Gene Ontology and KEGG

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    Zhen Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important and challenging problems in biomedicine is how to predict the cancer related genes. Retinoblastoma (RB is the most common primary intraocular malignancy usually occurring in childhood. Early detection of RB could reduce the morbidity and promote the probability of disease-free survival. Therefore, it is of great importance to identify RB genes. In this study, we developed a computational method to predict RB related genes based on Dagging, with the maximum relevance minimum redundancy (mRMR method followed by incremental feature selection (IFS. 119 RB genes were compiled from two previous RB related studies, while 5,500 non-RB genes were randomly selected from Ensemble genes. Ten datasets were constructed based on all these RB and non-RB genes. Each gene was encoded with a 13,126-dimensional vector including 12,887 Gene Ontology enrichment scores and 239 KEGG enrichment scores. Finally, an optimal feature set including 1061 GO terms and 8 KEGG pathways was obtained. Analysis showed that these features were closely related to RB. It is anticipated that the method can be applied to predict the other cancer related genes as well.

  19. Herbivory increases diversification across insect clades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, John J; Lapoint, Richard T; Whiteman, Noah K

    2015-09-24

    Insects contain more than half of all living species, but the causes of their remarkable diversity remain poorly understood. Many authors have suggested that herbivory has accelerated diversification in many insect clades. However, others have questioned the role of herbivory in insect diversification. Here, we test the relationships between herbivory and insect diversification across multiple scales. We find a strong, positive relationship between herbivory and diversification among insect orders. However, herbivory explains less variation in diversification within some orders (Diptera, Hemiptera) or shows no significant relationship with diversification in others (Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Orthoptera). Thus, we support the overall importance of herbivory for insect diversification, but also show that its impacts can vary across scales and clades. In summary, our results illuminate the causes of species richness patterns in a group containing most living species, and show the importance of ecological impacts on diversification in explaining the diversity of life.

  20. Real-time RT-PCR assay to differentiate clades of H5N1 avian influenza viruses circulating in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Z; Jones, J; Creanga, A; Ferdinand, K; Inui, K; Gerloff, N; Davis, C T; Nguyen, T; Donis, R O

    2013-11-01

    Continued circulation and geographical expansion of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus have led to the emergence of numerous clades in Vietnam. Although viral RNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis are the gold standard for H5N1 HA clade designation, limited sequencing capacity in many laboratories precludes rapid H5N1 clade identification and detection of novel viruses. Therefore, a Taqman real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid differentiation of the four major H5N1 clades detected in Vietnam was developed. Using HA sequence alignments of clades 1.1, 2.3.2.1, 2.3.4, and 7 viruses, primers and FAM-labeled probes were designed to target conserved regions characteristic of each clade. The assay was optimized and evaluated using circulating clades of H5N1 collected in Vietnam from 2007 to 2012 and shown to be both sensitive and specific for the differentiation of the four H5N1 clades. The assay provides a useful tool for screening of large specimen collections for HA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis and for the rapid identification of molecular clade signatures to support outbreak investigations and surveillance activities. Finally, this assay may be useful to monitor for the emergence of novel or variant clades of H5N1 in Vietnam in the future or in other countries where these particular clades may circulate.

  1. A potentially novel overlapping gene in the genomes of Israeli acute paralysis virus and its relatives

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    Price Nicholas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV is a honeybee-infecting virus that was found to be associated with colony collapse disorder. The IAPV genome contains two genes encoding a structural and a nonstructural polyprotein. We applied a recently developed method for the estimation of selection in overlapping genes to detect purifying selection and, hence, functionality. We provide evolutionary evidence for the existence of a functional overlapping gene, which is translated in the +1 reading frame of the structural polyprotein gene. Conserved orthologs of this putative gene, which we provisionally call pog (predicted overlapping gene, were also found in the genomes of a monophyletic clade of dicistroviruses that includes IAPV, acute bee paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus, and Solenopsis invicta (red imported fire ant virus 1.

  2. A plastid gene phylogeny of the non-photosynthetic parasitic Orobanche (Orobanchaceae) and related genera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.-M.; Manen, J.-F.; Colwell, A.E.; Schneeweiss, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the non-photosynthetic Orobanche sensu lato (Orobanchaceae), which includes some of the economically most important parasitic weeds, remain insufficiently understood and controversial. This concerns both the phylogenetic relationships within the genus, in particular its monophyly or lack thereof, and the relationships to other holoparasitic genera such as Cistanche or Conopholis. Here we present the first comprehensive phylogenetic study of this group based on a region from the plastid genome (rps2 gene). Although substitution rates appear to be elevated compared to the photosynthetic members of Orobanchaceae, relationships among the major lineages Cistanche, Conopholis plus Epifagus, Boschniakia rossica (Cham. & Schltdl.) B. Fedtsch., B. himalaica Hook. f. & Thomson, B. hookeri Walp. plus B. strobilacea A. Gray, and Orobanche s. l. remain unresolved. Resolution within Orobanche, however, is much better. In agreement with morphological, cytological and other molecular phylogenetic evidence, five lineages, corresponding to the four traditionally recognised sections (Gymnocaulis, Myzorrhiza, Orobanche, Trionychon) and O. latisquama Reut. ex Boiss. (of sect. Orobanche), can be distinguished. A combined analysis of plastid rps2 and nuclear ITS sequences of the holoparasitic genera results in more resolved and better supported trees, although the relationships among Orobanche s. l., Cistanche, and the clade including the remaining genera is unresolved. Therefore, rps2 is a marker from the plastid genome that is well-suited to be used in combination with other already established nuclear markers for resolving generic relationships of Orobanche and related genera. ?? 2008 The Botanical Society of Japan and Springer.

  3. Rare disease relations through common genes and protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Novo, Sara; Pazos, Florencio; Chagoyen, Monica

    2016-06-01

    ODCs (Orphan Disease Connections), available at http://csbg.cnb.csic.es/odcs, is a novel resource to explore potential molecular relations between rare diseases. These molecular relations have been established through the integration of disease susceptibility genes and human protein-protein interactions. The database currently contains 54,941 relations between 3032 diseases.

  4. Vitamin D and Related Genes, Race, and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Vitamin D and Related Genes, Race, and Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0568 Aggressiveness 5c. PROGRAM...examine whether altered vitamin D status (as measured by serum metabolites and by functional polymorphisms within genes related to vitamin D...potential to provide insights into a chronically underserved population carrying an unequal burden of disease. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Vitamin D, prostate

  5. Phase analysis of circadian-related genes in two tissues

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    Li Leping

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent circadian clock studies using gene expression microarray in two different tissues of mouse have revealed not all circadian-related genes are synchronized in phase or peak expression times across tissues in vivo. Instead, some circadian-related genes may be delayed by 4–8 hrs in peak expression in one tissue relative to the other. These interesting biological observations prompt a statistical question regarding how to distinguish the synchronized genes from genes that are systematically lagged in phase/peak expression time across two tissues. Results We propose a set of techniques from circular statistics to analyze phase angles of circadian-related genes in two tissues. We first estimate the phases of a cycling gene separately in each tissue, which are then used to estimate the paired angular difference of the phase angles of the gene in the two tissues. These differences are modeled as a mixture of two von Mises distributions which enables us to cluster genes into two groups; one group having synchronized transcripts with the same phase in the two tissues, the other containing transcripts with a discrepancy in phase between the two tissues. For each cluster of genes we assess the association of phases across the tissue types using circular-circular regression. We also develop a bootstrap methodology based on a circular-circular regression model to evaluate the improvement in fit provided by allowing two components versus a one-component von-Mises model. Conclusion We applied our proposed methodologies to the circadian-related genes common to heart and liver tissues in Storch et al. 2, and found that an estimated 80% of circadian-related transcripts common to heart and liver tissues were synchronized in phase, and the other 20% of transcripts were lagged about 8 hours in liver relative to heart. The bootstrap p-value for being one cluster is 0.063, which suggests the possibility of two clusters. Our methodologies can

  6. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html.

  7. The Genome of Nosema sp. Isolate YNPr: A Comparative Analysis of Genome Evolution within the Nosema/Vairimorpha Clade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhenggang; Li, Tian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Debrunner-Vossbrinck, Bettina A.; Zhou, Zeyang; Vossbrinck, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    The microsporidian parasite designated here as Nosema sp. Isolate YNPr was isolated from the cabbage butterfly Pieris rapae collected in Honghe Prefecture, Yunnan Province, China. The genome was sequenced by Illumina sequencing and compared to those of two related members of the Nosema/Vairimorpha clade, Nosema ceranae and Nosema apis. Based upon assembly statistics, the Nosema sp. YNPr genome is 3.36 x 106bp with a G+C content of 23.18% and 2,075 protein coding sequences. An “ACCCTT” motif is present approximately 50-bp upstream of the start codon, as reported from other members of the clade and from Encephalitozoon cuniculi, a sister taxon. Comparative small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) analysis as well as genome-wide phylogenetic analysis confirms a closer relationship between N. ceranae and Nosema sp. YNPr than between the two honeybee parasites N. ceranae and N. apis. The more closely related N. ceranae and Nosema sp. YNPr show similarities in a number of structural characteristics such as gene synteny, gene length, gene number, transposon composition and gene reduction. Based on transposable element content of the assemblies, the transposon content of Nosema sp. YNPr is 4.8%, that of N. ceranae is 3.7%, and that of N. apis is 2.5%, with large differences in the types of transposons present among these 3 species. Gene function annotation indicates that the number of genes participating in most metabolic activities is similar in all three species. However, the number of genes in the transcription, general function, and cysteine protease categories is greater in N. apis than in the other two species. Our studies further characterize the evolution of the Nosema/Vairimorpha clade of microsporidia. These organisms maintain variable but very reduced genomes. We are interested in understanding the effects of genetic drift versus natural selection on genome size in the microsporidia and in developing a testable hypothesis for further studies on the genomic

  8. Barcoding success as a function of phylogenetic relatedness in Viburnum, a clade of woody angiosperms

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    Clement Wendy L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chloroplast genes matK and rbcL have been proposed as a “core” DNA barcode for identifying plant species. Published estimates of successful species identification using these loci (70-80% may be inflated because they may have involved comparisons among distantly related species within target genera. To assess the ability of the proposed two-locus barcode to discriminate closely related species, we carried out a hierarchically structured set of comparisons within Viburnum, a clade of woody angiosperms containing ca. 170 species (some 70 of which are currently used in horticulture. For 112 Viburnum species, we evaluated rbcL + matK, as well as the chloroplast regions rpl32-trnL, trnH-psbA, trnK, and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (nrITS. Results At most, rbcL + matK could discriminate 53% of all Viburnum species, with only 18% of the comparisons having genetic distances >1%. When comparisons were progressively restricted to species within major Viburnum subclades, there was a significant decrease in both the discriminatory power and the genetic distances. trnH-psbA and nrITS show much higher levels of variation and potential discriminatory power, and their use in plant barcoding should be reconsidered. As barcoding has often been used to discriminate species within local areas, we also compared Viburnum species within two regions, Japan and Mexico and Central America. Greater success in discriminating among the Japanese species reflects the deeper evolutionary history of Viburnum in that area, as compared to the recent radiation of a single clade into the mountains of Latin America. Conclusions We found very low levels of discrimination among closely related species of Viburnum, and low levels of variation in the proposed barcoding loci may limit success within other clades of long-lived woody plants. Inclusion of the supplementary barcodes trnH-psbA and nrITS increased discrimination rates but

  9. Streamlining and core genome conservation among highly divergent members of the SAR11 clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Jana; Thrash, J Cameron; Huggett, Megan J; Landry, Zachary C; Carini, Paul; Giovannoni, Stephen J; Rappé, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    SAR11 is an ancient and diverse clade of heterotrophic bacteria that are abundant throughout the world's oceans, where they play a major role in the ocean carbon cycle. Correlations between the phylogenetic branching order and spatiotemporal patterns in cell distributions from planktonic ocean environments indicate that SAR11 has evolved into perhaps a dozen or more specialized ecotypes that span evolutionary distances equivalent to a bacterial order. We isolated and sequenced genomes from diverse SAR11 cultures that represent three major lineages and encompass the full breadth of the clade. The new data expand observations about genome evolution and gene content that previously had been restricted to the SAR11 Ia subclade, providing a much broader perspective on the clade's origins, evolution, and ecology. We found small genomes throughout the clade and a very high proportion of core genome genes (48 to 56%), indicating that small genome size is probably an ancestral characteristic. In their level of core genome conservation, the members of SAR11 are outliers, the most conserved free-living bacteria known. Shared features of the clade include low GC content, high gene synteny, a large hypervariable region bounded by rRNA genes, and low numbers of paralogs. Variation among the genomes included genes for phosphorus metabolism, glycolysis, and C1 metabolism, suggesting that adaptive specialization in nutrient resource utilization is important to niche partitioning and ecotype divergence within the clade. These data provide support for the conclusion that streamlining selection for efficient cell replication in the planktonic habitat has occurred throughout the evolution and diversification of this clade. IMPORTANCE The SAR11 clade is the most abundant group of marine microorganisms worldwide, making them key players in the global carbon cycle. Growing knowledge about their biochemistry and metabolism is leading to a more mechanistic understanding of organic carbon

  10. Relating Perturbation Magnitude to Temporal Gene Expression in Biological Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callister, Stephen J.; Parnell, John J.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Hashsham, Syed

    2009-03-19

    A method to quantitatively relate stress to response at the level of gene expression is described using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. Stress was defined as the magnitude of perturbation and strain was defined as the magnitude of cumulative response in terms of gene expression. Expression patterns of sixty genes previously reported to be significantly impacted by osmotic shock or belonging to the high-osmotic glycerol, glycerolipid metabolism, and glycolysis pathways were determined following perturbations of increasing sodium chloride concentrations (0, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, 1.5, and 1.4 M). Expression of these genes was quantified temporally using reverse transcriptase real time polymerase chain reaction. The magnitude of cumulative response was obtained by calculating the total moment of area of the temporal response envelope for all the 60 genes, either together or for the set of genes related to each pathway. A non-linear relationship between stress and response was observed for the range of stress studied. This study examines a quantitative approach to quantify the strain at the level of gene expression to relate stress to strain in biological systems. The approach should be generally applicable to quantitatively evaluate the response of organisms to environmental change.

  11. Relating perturbation magnitude to temporal gene expression in biological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfrender Michael E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most transcriptional activity is a result of environmental variability. This cause (environment and effect (gene expression relationship is essential to survival in any changing environment. The specific relationship between environmental perturbation and gene expression – and stability of the response – has yet to be measured in detail. We describe a method to quantitatively relate perturbation magnitude to response at the level of gene expression. We test our method using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism and osmotic stress as an environmental stress. Results Patterns of gene expression were measured in response to increasing sodium chloride concentrations (0, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, and 1.2 M for sixty genes impacted by osmotic shock. Expression of these genes was quantified over five time points using reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction. Magnitudes of cumulative response for specific pathways, and the set of all genes, were obtained by combining the temporal response envelopes for genes exhibiting significant changes in expression with time. A linear relationship between perturbation magnitude and response was observed for the range of concentrations studied. Conclusion This study develops a quantitative approach to describe the stability of gene response and pathways to environmental perturbation and illustrates the utility of this approach. The approach should be applicable to quantitatively evaluate the response of organisms via the magnitude of response and stability of the transcriptome to environmental change.

  12. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Pollen Development Related Gene RsMF2 from Raphanus sativus L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tao; CAO Jia-shu

    2005-01-01

    In the paper, the full length cDNA of RsMF2 gene, homologous with the BcMF2 gene encoding pollen-specific polygalacturonase of Chinese cabbage-pak-choi (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino) was cloned from Raphanus sativus L. cv. Yuanbai by PCR, with a pair of primer designed according to the coding sequence of BcMF2. The largest opening reading frame of RsMF2 gene is 1 266 bp in length and encodes a protein of 421 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 43.9 kDa. Sequence analysis revealed that it has three potential N-glycosylation sites and one polygalacturonase active position (RVTCGPGHGLSVGS). And the first 32 amino acids of the predicted RsMF2 protein form a N-terminal hydrophobic domain which displays the properties of a signal peptide. The predicted secondary structure composition for the protein has 6.9% helix, 42.0% sheet and 51.1% loop. Four domains which are highly conserved in the whole plant and fungal PGs is present in RsMF2. Phylogenetic analysis showed that RsMF2 falls into the category of clade-C, which includes PGs related to pollen. These results indicate that RsMF2 may act as polygalacturonase related to pollen development.

  13. Polysaccharide biosynthesis-related genes explain phenotype-genotype correlation of Microcystis colonies in Meiliang Bay of Lake Taihu, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shutu; Sun, Qianqian; Zhou, Xiaohua; Tan, Xiao; Xiao, Man; Zhu, Wei; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The 16S rDNA, 16S-23S rDNA-ITS, cpcBA-IGS, mcy gene and several polysaccharide biosynthesis-related genes (epsL and TagH) were analyzed along with the identification of the morphology of Microcystis colonies collected in Lake Taihu in 2014. M. wesenbergii colonies could be distinguished directly from other colonies using espL. TagH divided all of the samples into two clusters but failed to distinguish different phenotypes. Our results indicated that neither morphology nor molecular tools including 16S rDNA, 16S-23S ITS and cpcBA-IGS could distinguish toxic and non-toxic species among the identified Microcystis species. No obvious relationship was detected between the phenotypes of Microcystis and their genotypes using 16S, 16S-23S and cpcBA-IGS, but polysaccharide biosynthesis-related genes may distinguish the Microcystis phenotypes. Furthermore, the sequences of the polysaccharide biosynthesis-related genes (espL and TagH) extracted from Microcystis scums collected throughout 2015 was analyzed. Samples dominated by M. ichthyoblabe (60–100%) and M. wesenbergii (60–100%) were divided into different clade by both espL and TagH, respectively. Therefore, it was confirmed that M. wesenbergii and M. ichthyoblabe could be distinguished by the polysaccharide biosynthesis-related genes (espL and TagH). This study is of great significance in filling the gap between classification of molecular biology and the morphological taxonomy of Microcystis. PMID:27752091

  14. State-related alterations of gene expression in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Vinberg, Maj; Berk, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Munkholm K, Vinberg M, Berk M, Kessing LV. State-related alterations of gene expression in bipolar disorder: a systematic review. Bipolar Disord 2012: 14: 684-696. © 2012 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Objective:  Alterations in gene expression in bipolar disorder...... vulnerability pathways. This review therefore evaluated the evidence for whether gene expression in bipolar disorder is state or trait related. Methods:  A systematic review, using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guideline for reporting systematic reviews, based...... on comprehensive database searches for studies on gene expression in patients with bipolar disorder in specific mood states, was conducted. We searched Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and The Cochrane Library, supplemented by manually searching reference lists from retrieved publications. Results:  A total of 17...

  15. Transcriptional Wiring of Cell Wall-Related Genes in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Mutwil; Colin Ruprecht; Federico M. Giorgi; Martin Bringmann; Bj(o)rn Usadel; Staffan Persson

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional coordination, or co-expression, of genes may signify functional relatedness of the correspond-ing proteins. For example, several genes involved in secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis are co-expressed with genes engaged in the synthesis of xylan, which is a major component of the secondary cell wall. To extend these types of anal-yses, we investigated the co-expression relationships of all Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes (CAZy)-related genes for Arabidopsis thaliana. Thus, the intention was to transcriptionally link different cell wall-related processes to each other, and also to other biological functions. To facilitate easy manual inspection, we have displayed these interactions as networks and matrices, and created a web-based interface (http://aranet.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/corecarb) containing downloadable files for all the transcriptional associations.

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of Melon chlorotic leaf curl virus from Guatemala: Another emergent species in the Squash leaf curl virus clade

    KAUST Repository

    Brown, J.K.

    2011-06-01

    The genome of a new bipartite begomovirus Melon chlorotic leaf curl virus from Guatemala (MCLCuV-GT) was cloned and the genome sequence was determined. The virus causes distinct symptoms on melons that were not previously observed in melon crops in Guatemala or elsewhere. Phylogenetic analysis of MCLCuV-GT and begomoviruses infecting cucurbits and other host plant species indicated that its closest relative was MCLCuV from Costa Rica (MCLCuV-CR). The DNA-A components of two isolates shared 88.8% nucleotide identity, making them strains of the same species. Further, both MCLCuV-GT and MCLCuV-CR grouped with other Western Hemisphere cucurbit-infecting species in the SLCV-clade making them the most southerly cucurbit-infecting members of the clade to date. Although the common region of the cognate components of MCLCuV-GT and MCLCuV-CR, shared similar to 96.3% nucleotide identity. While DNA-A and DNA-B components of MCLCuV-GT were less than 86% nucleotide identity with the respective DNAA and DNA-B common regions of MCLCuV-CR. The late viral genes of the two strains shared the least nt identity (<88%) while their early genes shared the highest nt identity (>90%). The collective evidence suggests that these two strains of MCLCuV are evolutionarily divergent owing in part to recombination, but also due to the accumulation of a substantial number of mutations. In addition they are differentially host-adapted, as has been documented for other cucurbit-infecting, bean-adapted, species in the SLCV clade. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A graphic method for identification of novel glioma related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Shu, Yang; Yang, Lei; He, Yi-Chun; Li, Li-Peng; Huang, GuaHua; Li, Hai-Peng; Jiang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Glioma, as the most common and lethal intracranial tumor, is a serious disease that causes many deaths every year. Good comprehension of the mechanism underlying this disease is very helpful to design effective treatments. However, up to now, the knowledge of this disease is still limited. It is an important step to understand the mechanism underlying this disease by uncovering its related genes. In this study, a graphic method was proposed to identify novel glioma related genes based on known glioma related genes. A weighted graph was constructed according to the protein-protein interaction information retrieved from STRING and the well-known shortest path algorithm was employed to discover novel genes. The following analysis suggests that some of them are related to the biological process of glioma, proving that our method was effective in identifying novel glioma related genes. We hope that the proposed method would be applied to study other diseases and provide useful information to medical workers, thereby designing effective treatments of different diseases.

  18. A complex network analysis of hypertension-related genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Xu, Chuan-Yun; Hu, Jing-Bo; Cao, Ke-Fei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a network of hypertension-related genes is constructed by analyzing the correlations of gene expression data among the Dahl salt-sensitive rat and two consomic rat strains. The numerical calculations show that this sparse and assortative network has small-world and scale-free properties. Further, 16 key hub genes (Col4a1, Lcn2, Cdk4, etc.) are determined by introducing an integrated centrality and have been confirmed by biological/medical research to play important roles in hypertension.

  19. Genotyping of Brucella species using clade specific SNPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Jeffrey T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucellosis is a worldwide disease of mammals caused by Alphaproteobacteria in the genus Brucella. The genus is genetically monomorphic, requiring extensive genotyping to differentiate isolates. We utilized two different genotyping strategies to characterize isolates. First, we developed a microarray-based assay based on 1000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that were identified from whole genome comparisons of two B. abortus isolates , one B. melitensis, and one B. suis. We then genotyped a diverse collection of 85 Brucella strains at these SNP loci and generated a phylogenetic tree of relationships. Second, we developed a selective primer-extension assay system using capillary electrophoresis that targeted 17 high value SNPs across 8 major branches of the phylogeny and determined their genotypes in a large collection ( n = 340 of diverse isolates. Results Our 1000 SNP microarray readily distinguished B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis, differentiating B. melitensis and B. suis into two clades each. Brucella abortus was divided into four major clades. Our capillary-based SNP genotyping confirmed all major branches from the microarray assay and assigned all samples to defined lineages. Isolates from these lineages and closely related isolates, among the most commonly encountered lineages worldwide, can now be quickly and easily identified and genetically characterized. Conclusions We have identified clade-specific SNPs in Brucella that can be used for rapid assignment into major groups below the species level in the three main Brucella species. Our assays represent SNP genotyping approaches that can reliably determine the evolutionary relationships of bacterial isolates without the need for whole genome sequencing of all isolates.

  20. Six genetically distinct clades of Palola (Eunicidae, Annelida) from Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Anja

    2015-09-18

    A total of 36 lots of Palola spp. (Eunicidae, Annelida) were collected during the Lizard Island Polychaete Workshop on Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia. Of these, 21 specimens were sequenced for a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene. These sequences were analysed in conjunction with existing sequences of Palola spp. from other geographic regions. The samples from Lizard Island form six distinct clades, although none of them can clearly be assigned to any of the nominal species. Four of the six Lizard Island clades fall into species group A and the remaining two into species group B (which also includes the type species, Palola viridis). All sequenced specimens were characterized morphologically as far as possible and a dichotomous key was assembled. Based on this key, the remaining samples were identified as belonging to one of the clades.

  1. Phylogeny of the sea hares in the aplysia clade based on mitochondrial DNA sequence data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Monica; Collins, Timothy; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2004-02-20

    Sea hare species within the Aplysia clade are distributed worldwide. Their phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships are, however, still poorly known. New molecular evidence is presented from a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 gene (cox1) that improves our understanding of the phylogeny of the group. Based on these data a preliminary discussion of the present distribution of sea hares in a biogeographic context is put forward. Our findings are consistent with only some aspects of the current taxonomy and nomenclatural changes are proposed. The first, is the use of a rank free classification for the different Aplysia clades and subclades as opposed to previously used genus and subgenus affiliations. The second, is the suggestion that Aplysia brasiliana (Rang, 1828) is a junior synonym of Aplysia fasciata (Poiret, 1789). The third, is the elimination of Neaplysia since its only member is confirmed to be part of the large Varria clade.

  2. Genome trees constructed using five different approaches suggest new major bacterial clades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatusov Roman L

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of multiple complete genome sequences from diverse taxa prompts the development of new phylogenetic approaches, which attempt to incorporate information derived from comparative analysis of complete gene sets or large subsets thereof. Such attempts are particularly relevant because of the major role of horizontal gene transfer and lineage-specific gene loss, at least in the evolution of prokaryotes. Results Five largely independent approaches were employed to construct trees for completely sequenced bacterial and archaeal genomes: i presence-absence of genomes in clusters of orthologous genes; ii conservation of local gene order (gene pairs among prokaryotic genomes; iii parameters of identity distribution for probable orthologs; iv analysis of concatenated alignments of ribosomal proteins; v comparison of trees constructed for multiple protein families. All constructed trees support the separation of the two primary prokaryotic domains, bacteria and archaea, as well as some terminal bifurcations within the bacterial and archaeal domains. Beyond these obvious groupings, the trees made with different methods appeared to differ substantially in terms of the relative contributions of phylogenetic relationships and similarities in gene repertoires caused by similar life styles and horizontal gene transfer to the tree topology. The trees based on presence-absence of genomes in orthologous clusters and the trees based on conserved gene pairs appear to be strongly affected by gene loss and horizontal gene transfer. The trees based on identity distributions for orthologs and particularly the tree made of concatenated ribosomal protein sequences seemed to carry a stronger phylogenetic signal. The latter tree supported three potential high-level bacterial clades,: i Chlamydia-Spirochetes, ii Thermotogales-Aquificales (bacterial hyperthermophiles, and ii Actinomycetes-Deinococcales-Cyanobacteria. The latter group also

  3. The expansion of Phytophthora clade 8b: three new species associated with winter grown vegetable crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertier, L; Brouwer, H; de Cock, A W A M; Cooke, D E L; Olsson, C H B; Höfte, M

    2013-12-01

    Despite its association with important agricultural crops, Phytophthora clade 8b is a poorly studied group of species. The clade currently consists of three officially described species (Phytophthora porri, P. brassicae and P. primulae) that are host-specific pathogens of leek, cabbages and Primula spp., respectively. However, over the past few decades, several other clade 8b-like Phytophthoras have been found on a variety of different host plants that were all grown at low temperatures in winter seasons. In this study, a collection of 30 of these isolates was subjected to a phylogenetic study using two loci (the rDNA ITS region and the mitochondrial cox1 gene). This analysis revealed a clear clustering of isolates according to their host plants. To verify whether these isolates belong to separate species, a detailed morphological study was conducted. On the basis of genetic and morphological differences and host specificity, we now present the official description of three new species in clade 8b: Phytophthora cichorii sp. nov., P. dauci sp. nov. and P. lactucae sp. nov. Two other groups of isolates (Phytophthora taxon castitis and Phytophthora taxon parsley) might also represent new species but the data available at this time are insufficient for an official description. This brings Phytophthora clade 8b to a group of six species that are all host-specific, slow-growing and specifically infect herbaceous crops at low temperatures.

  4. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  5. Comparative and functional analysis of cardiovascular-related genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-09-01

    The ability to detect putative cis-regulatory elements in cardiovascular-related genes has been accelerated by the availability of genomic sequence data from numerous vertebrate species and the recent development of comparative genomic tools. This improvement is anticipated to lead to a better understanding of the complex regulatory architecture of cardiovascular (CV) genes and how genetic variants in these non-coding regions can potentially play a role in cardiovascular disease. This manuscript reviews a recently established database dedicated to the comparative sequence analysis of 250 human CV genes of known importance, 37 of which currently contain sequence comparison data for organisms beyond those of human, mouse and rat. These data have provided a glimpse into the variety of possible insights from deep vertebrate sequence comparisons and the identification of putative gene regulatory elements.

  6. Characterization of Starch Degradation Related Genes in Postharvest Kiwifruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiong; Kuang, Sheng; Zhang, Ai-Di; Zhang, Wang-Shu; Chen, Miao-Jin; Yin, Xue-Ren; Chen, Kun-Song

    2016-01-01

    Starch is one of the most important storage carbohydrates in plants. Kiwifruit typically accumulate large amounts of starch during development. The fruit retain starch until commercial maturity, and its postharvest degradation is essential for consumer acceptance. The activity of genes related to starch degradation has, however, rarely been investigated. Based on the kiwifruit genome sequence and previously reported starch degradation-related genes, 17 novel genes were isolated and the relationship between their expression and starch degradation was examined using two sets of materials: ethylene-treated (100 µL/L, 20 °C; ETH) vs. control (20 °C; CK) and controlled atmosphere stored (CA, 5% CO2 + 2% O2, 0 °C) vs. normal atmosphere in cold storage (NA, 0 °C). Physiological analysis indicated that ETH accelerated starch degradation and increased soluble solids content (SSC) and soluble sugars (glucose, fructose and sucrose), while CA inhibited starch reduction compared with NA. Using these materials, expression patterns of 24 genes that may contribute to starch degradation (seven previously reported and 17 newly isolated) were analyzed. Among the 24 genes, AdAMY1, AdAGL3 and AdBAM3.1/3L/9 were significantly induced by ETH and positively correlated with starch degradation. Furthermore, these five genes were also inhibited by CA, conforming the likely involvement of these genes in starch degradation. Thus, the present study has identified the genes with potential for involvement in starch degradation in postharvest kiwifruit, which will be useful for understanding the regulation of kiwifruit starch content and metabolism. PMID:27983700

  7. Characterization of Starch Degradation Related Genes in Postharvest Kiwifruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Hu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Starch is one of the most important storage carbohydrates in plants. Kiwifruit typically accumulate large amounts of starch during development. The fruit retain starch until commercial maturity, and its postharvest degradation is essential for consumer acceptance. The activity of genes related to starch degradation has, however, rarely been investigated. Based on the kiwifruit genome sequence and previously reported starch degradation-related genes, 17 novel genes were isolated and the relationship between their expression and starch degradation was examined using two sets of materials: ethylene-treated (100 µL/L, 20 °C; ETH vs. control (20 °C; CK and controlled atmosphere stored (CA, 5% CO2 + 2% O2, 0 °C vs. normal atmosphere in cold storage (NA, 0 °C. Physiological analysis indicated that ETH accelerated starch degradation and increased soluble solids content (SSC and soluble sugars (glucose, fructose and sucrose, while CA inhibited starch reduction compared with NA. Using these materials, expression patterns of 24 genes that may contribute to starch degradation (seven previously reported and 17 newly isolated were analyzed. Among the 24 genes, AdAMY1, AdAGL3 and AdBAM3.1/3L/9 were significantly induced by ETH and positively correlated with starch degradation. Furthermore, these five genes were also inhibited by CA, conforming the likely involvement of these genes in starch degradation. Thus, the present study has identified the genes with potential for involvement in starch degradation in postharvest kiwifruit, which will be useful for understanding the regulation of kiwifruit starch content and metabolism.

  8. Phylogenetics of Cucumis (Cucurbitaceae: Cucumber (C. sativus belongs in an Asian/Australian clade far from melon (C. melo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaefer Hanno

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melon, Cucumis melo, and cucumber, C. sativus, are among the most widely cultivated crops worldwide. Cucumis, as traditionally conceived, is geographically centered in Africa, with C. sativus and C. hystrix thought to be the only Cucumis species in Asia. This taxonomy forms the basis for all ongoing Cucumis breeding and genomics efforts. We tested relationships among Cucumis and related genera based on DNA sequences from chloroplast gene, intron, and spacer regions (rbcL, matK, rpl20-rps12, trnL, and trnL-F, adding nuclear internal transcribed spacer sequences to resolve relationships within Cucumis. Results Analyses of combined chloroplast sequences (4,375 aligned nucleotides for 123 of the 130 genera of Cucurbitaceae indicate that the genera Cucumella, Dicaelospermum, Mukia, Myrmecosicyos, and Oreosyce are embedded within Cucumis. Phylogenetic trees from nuclear sequences for these taxa are congruent, and the combined data yield a well-supported phylogeny. The nesting of the five genera in Cucumis greatly changes the natural geographic range of the genus, extending it throughout the Malesian region and into Australia. The closest relative of Cucumis is Muellerargia, with one species in Australia and Indonesia, the other in Madagascar. Cucumber and its sister species, C. hystrix, are nested among Australian, Malaysian, and Western Indian species placed in Mukia or Dicaelospermum and in one case not yet formally described. Cucumis melo is sister to this Australian/Asian clade, rather than being close to African species as previously thought. Molecular clocks indicate that the deepest divergences in Cucumis, including the split between C. melo and its Australian/Asian sister clade, go back to the mid-Eocene. Conclusion Based on congruent nuclear and chloroplast phylogenies we conclude that Cucumis comprises an old Australian/Asian component that was heretofore unsuspected. Cucumis sativus evolved within this Australian

  9. Comparative and functional triatomine genomics reveals reductions and expansions in insecticide resistance-related gene families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Lucila; Lavore, Andrés; Sierra, Ivana; Palacio, Victorio; Martinez-Barnetche, Jesús; Latorre-Estivalis, José Manuel; Mougabure-Cueto, Gaston; Francini, Flavio; Lorenzo, Marcelo G.; Rodríguez, Mario Henry; Ons, Sheila; Rivera-Pomar, Rolando V.

    2017-01-01

    Background Triatomine insects are vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan parasite that is the causative agent of Chagas’ disease. This is a neglected disease affecting approximately 8 million people in Latin America. The existence of diverse pyrethroid resistant populations of at least two species demonstrates the potential of triatomines to develop high levels of insecticide resistance. Therefore, the incorporation of strategies for resistance management is a main concern for vector control programs. Three enzymatic superfamilies are thought to mediate xenobiotic detoxification and resistance: Glutathione Transferases (GSTs), Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) and Carboxyl/Cholinesterases (CCEs). Improving our knowledge of key triatomine detoxification enzymes will strengthen our understanding of insecticide resistance processes in vectors of Chagas’ disease. Methods and findings The discovery and description of detoxification gene superfamilies in normalized transcriptomes of three triatomine species: Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma infestans and Triatoma pallidipennis is presented. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of these superfamilies among the triatomine transcriptomes and the genome of Rhodnius prolixus, also a triatomine vector of Chagas’ disease, and other well-studied insect genomes was performed. The expression pattern of detoxification genes in R. prolixus transcriptomes from key organs was analyzed. The comparisons reveal gene expansions in Sigma class GSTs, CYP3 in CYP superfamily and clade E in CCE superfamily. Moreover, several CYP families identified in these triatomines have not yet been described in other insects. Conversely, several groups of insecticide resistance related enzymes within each enzyme superfamily are reduced or lacking in triatomines. Furthermore, our qRT-PCR results showed an increase in the expression of a CYP4 gene in a T. infestans population resistant to pyrethroids. These results could point to an involvement of metabolic

  10. Detecting Horizontal Gene Transfer between Closely Related Taxa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Adato

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT, the transfer of genetic material between organisms, is crucial for genetic innovation and the evolution of genome architecture. Existing HGT detection algorithms rely on a strong phylogenetic signal distinguishing the transferred sequence from ancestral (vertically derived genes in its recipient genome. Detecting HGT between closely related species or strains is challenging, as the phylogenetic signal is usually weak and the nucleotide composition is normally nearly identical. Nevertheless, there is a great importance in detecting HGT between congeneric species or strains, especially in clinical microbiology, where understanding the emergence of new virulent and drug-resistant strains is crucial, and often time-sensitive. We developed a novel, self-contained technique named Near HGT, based on the synteny index, to measure the divergence of a gene from its native genomic environment and used it to identify candidate HGT events between closely related strains. The method confirms candidate transferred genes based on the constant relative mutability (CRM. Using CRM, the algorithm assigns a confidence score based on "unusual" sequence divergence. A gene exhibiting exceptional deviations according to both synteny and mutability criteria, is considered a validated HGT product. We first employed the technique to a set of three E. coli strains and detected several highly probable horizontally acquired genes. We then compared the method to existing HGT detection tools using a larger strain data set. When combined with additional approaches our new algorithm provides richer picture and brings us closer to the goal of detecting all newly acquired genes in a particular strain.

  11. The Innate Immune-Related Genes in Catfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Catfish is one of the most important aquaculture species in America (as well as in Asia and Africa. In recent years, the production of catfish has suffered massive financial losses due to pathogen spread and breakouts. Innate immunity plays a crucial role in increasing resistance to pathogenic organisms and has generated increasing interest in the past few years. This review summarizes the current understanding of innate immune-related genes in catfish, including pattern recognition receptors, antimicrobial peptides, complements, lectins, cytokines, transferrin and gene expression profiling using microarrays and next generation sequencing technologies. This review will benefit the understanding of innate immune system in catfish and further efforts in studying the innate immune-related genes in fish.

  12. The chloroplast genome of a symbiodinium sp. clade C3 isolate

    KAUST Repository

    Barbrook, Adrian C.

    2014-01-01

    Dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium form important symbioses within corals and other benthic marine animals. Dinoflagellates possess an extremely reduced plastid genome relative to those examined in plants and other algae. In dinoflagellates the plastid genes are located on small plasmids, commonly referred to as \\'minicircles\\'. However, the chloroplast genomes of dinoflagellates have only been extensively characterised from a handful of species. There is also evidence of considerable variation in the chloroplast genome organisation across those species that have been examined. We therefore characterised the chloroplast genome from an environmental coral isolate, in this case containing a symbiont belonging to the Symbiodinium sp. clade C3. The gene content of the genome is well conserved with respect to previously characterised genomes. However, unlike previously characterised dinoflagellate chloroplast genomes we did not identify any \\'empty\\' minicircles. The sequences of this chloroplast genome show a high rate of evolution relative to other algal species. Particularly notable was a surprisingly high level of sequence divergence within the core polypeptides of photosystem I, the reasons for which are currently unknown. This chloroplast genome also possesses distinctive codon usage and GC content. These features suggest that chloroplast genomes in Symbiodinium are highly plastic. © 2013 Adrian C. Barbrook.

  13. Different stress-related gene expression in depression and suicide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, J; Qi, X-R; Gao, S-F; Lu, J; van Wamelen, D J; Kamphuis, W; Bao, A-M; Swaab, D F

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Suicide occurs in some, but not all depressed patients. So far, it remains unknown whether the studied stress-related candidate genes change in depression, suicide or both. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in, among other things, impulse control and inhibitory behavior and plays an

  14. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP in Cerebrovascular Disease

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    Lars Edvinsson

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral blood vessels are innervated by sensory nerves that store several neurotransmitters among which calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP is the most abundant. In primary headaches, there is a clear association between the head pain and the release of CGRP. In cluster headache there is an additional release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP.

  15. Calcitonin gene-related peptide and migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob M; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key molecule in migraine pathophysiology. Most studies have focused on CGRP in relation to migraine without aura (MO). About one-third of migraine patients have attacks with aura (MA), and this is a systematic review of the current literature...... of CGRP in MA is less studied than in MO. Further studies of the importance of CGRP for auras and migraine are needed....

  16. The Insect SNMP Gene Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    B 1 ( b o v ) Clade 3 - SNMPs Clade 2 Clade 1 CD36 Insect (Holometabola) CD36 Gene family Holometabola Phylogeny (11 Orders) Tribolium castaneum...melanogaster genes (see Nichols and Vogt, 2008). Bootstrap support (1000 replicates) is indicated for the major clades. B. Phylogeny of holometabolous...A. aegypti eggs were graciously provided by Mark Brown (University of Georgia, Department of Entomology) and raised on a larval diet (pond fish food

  17. Gene-network analysis identifies susceptibility genes related to glycobiology in autism.

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    Bert van der Zwaag

    Full Text Available The recent identification of copy-number variation in the human genome has opened up new avenues for the discovery of positional candidate genes underlying complex genetic disorders, especially in the field of psychiatric disease. One major challenge that remains is pinpointing the susceptibility genes in the multitude of disease-associated loci. This challenge may be tackled by reconstruction of functional gene-networks from the genes residing in these loci. We applied this approach to autism spectrum disorder (ASD, and identified the copy-number changes in the DNA of 105 ASD patients and 267 healthy individuals with Illumina Humanhap300 Beadchips. Subsequently, we used a human reconstructed gene-network, Prioritizer, to rank candidate genes in the segmental gains and losses in our autism cohort. This analysis highlighted several candidate genes already known to be mutated in cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders, including RAI1, BRD1, and LARGE. In addition, the LARGE gene was part of a sub-network of seven genes functioning in glycobiology, present in seven copy-number changes specifically identified in autism patients with limited co-morbidity. Three of these seven copy-number changes were de novo in the patients. In autism patients with a complex phenotype and healthy controls no such sub-network was identified. An independent systematic analysis of 13 published autism susceptibility loci supports the involvement of genes related to glycobiology as we also identified the same or similar genes from those loci. Our findings suggest that the occurrence of genomic gains and losses of genes associated with glycobiology are important contributors to the development of ASD.

  18. GNBP domain of Anopheles darlingi: are polymorphic inversions and gene variation related to adaptive evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridi, L C; Rafael, M S

    2016-02-01

    Anopheles darlingi is the main malaria vector in humans in South America. In the Amazon basin, it lives along the banks of rivers and lakes, which responds to the annual hydrological cycle (dry season and rainy season). In these breeding sites, the larvae of this mosquito feed on decomposing organic and microorganisms, which can be pathogenic and trigger the activation of innate immune system pathways, such as proteins Gram-negative binding protein (GNBP). Such environmental changes affect the occurrence of polymorphic inversions especially at the heterozygote frequency, which confer adaptative advantage compared to homozygous inversions. We mapped the GNBP probe to the An. darlingi 2Rd inversion by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), which was a good indicator of the GNBP immune response related to the chromosomal polymorphic inversions and adaptative evolution. To better understand the evolutionary relations and time of divergence of the GNBP of An. darlingi, we compared it with nine other mosquito GNBPs. The results of the phylogenetic analysis of the GNBP sequence between the species of mosquitoes demonstrated three clades. Clade I and II included the GNBPB5 sequence, and clade III the sequence of GNBPB1. Most of these sequences of GNBP analyzed were homologous with that of subfamily B, including that of An. gambiae (87 %), therefore suggesting that GNBP of An. darling belongs to subfamily B. This work helps us understand the role of inversion polymorphism in evolution of An. darlingi.

  19. Contrasting patterns of phylogenetic assemblage structure along the elevational gradient for major hummingbird clades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parra, Juan L.; Rahbek, Carsten; McGuire, Jimmy A.

    2011-01-01

    a variety of published and non-published sources. For the entire family and each of the major hummingbird clades (hermits, emeralds, mangoes, coquettes and brilliants) we quantified the phylogenetic structure of each assemblage using the net relatedness index (NRI). This index calculates the standardized...... mean of all possible pairwise phylogenetic distances between co-occurring species. We related NRI for each clade to elevation, precipitation and vegetation-related variables using generalized additive models. Results Our findings support the prediction of an increase in the co-occurrence of close...

  20. Expression of isgylation related genes in regenerating rat liver

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    Kuklin A. V.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Our recent studies have revealed the early up-regulated expression of interferon alpha (IFNα in the liver, induced by partial hepatectomy. The role of this cytokine of innate immune response in liver regeneration is still controversial. Aim. To analyze expression of canonical interferon-stimulated genes Ube1l, Ube2l6, Trim25, Usp18 and Isg15 during the liver transition from quiescence to proliferation induced by partial hepatectomy, and acute phase response induced by laparotomy. These genes are responsible for posttranslational modification of proteins by ISGylation. The expression of genes encoding TATA binding protein (TBP and 18S rRNA served as indirect general markers of transcriptional and translational activities. Methods. The abundance of investigated RNAs was assessed in total liver RNA by real time RT–qPCR. Results. Partial hepatecomy induced steady upregulation of the Tbp and 18S rRNA genes expression during 12 hours post-surgery and downregulation or no change in expression of ISGylation-related genes during the first 3 hours followed by slight upregulation at 12 hours. The level of Isg15 transcripts was permanently below that of the control during the prereplicative period. Laparotomy induced a continuous downregulation of Tbp and 18S rRNA expression and early (1–3h upregulation of ISGylation–related transcripts followed by a sharp drop at 6 hours and slight increase/decrease at 12 hours. The changes in the abundance of Ifnα and ISGylation-related mRNAs were oppositely directed at each stage of the response to partial hepatectomy and laparotomy. Conclusion. We suggest that the expression of ISGylation-related genes does not depend on the expression of Ifnα gene after both surgeries. The indirect indices of transcription and translation as well as the expression of ISGylation-relaled genes are principally different in response to partial hepatectomy and laparotomy and argue for the high specificity of innate immune response.

  1. Validation of commonly used reference genes for sleep-related gene expression studies

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    Castro Rosa MRPS

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep is a restorative process and is essential for maintenance of mental and physical health. In an attempt to understand the complexity of sleep, multidisciplinary strategies, including genetic approaches, have been applied to sleep research. Although quantitative real time PCR has been used in previous sleep-related gene expression studies, proper validation of reference genes is currently lacking. Thus, we examined the effect of total or paradoxical sleep deprivation (TSD or PSD on the expression stability of the following frequently used reference genes in brain and blood: beta-actin (b-actin, beta-2-microglobulin (B2M, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT. Results Neither TSD nor PSD affected the expression stability of all tested genes in both tissues indicating that b-actin, B2M, GAPDH and HPRT are appropriate reference genes for the sleep-related gene expression studies. In order to further verify these results, the relative expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase1 (GPD1 was evaluated in brain and blood, respectively. The normalization with each of four reference genes produced similar pattern of expression in control and sleep deprived rats, but subtle differences in the magnitude of expression fold change were observed which might affect the statistical significance. Conclusion This study demonstrated that sleep deprivation does not alter the expression stability of commonly used reference genes in brain and blood. Nonetheless, the use of multiple reference genes in quantitative RT-PCR is required for the accurate results.

  2. Avian influenza (H5N1 virus of clade 2.3.2 in domestic poultry in India.

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    Shanmuga Nagarajan

    Full Text Available South Asia has experienced regular outbreaks of H5N1 avian influenza virus since its first detection in India and Pakistan in February, 2006. Till 2009, the outbreaks in this region were due to clade 2.2 H5N1 virus. In 2010, Nepal reported the first outbreak of clade 2.3.2 virus in South Asia. In February 2011, two outbreaks of H5N1 virus were reported in the State of Tripura in India. The antigenic and genetic analyses of seven H5N1 viruses isolated during these outbreaks were carried out. Antigenic analysis confirmed 64 to 256-fold reduction in cross reactivity compared with clade 2.2 viruses. The intravenous pathogenicity index of the isolates ranged from 2.80-2.95 indicating high pathogenicity to chickens. Sequencing of all the eight gene-segments of seven H5N1 viruses isolated in these outbreaks was carried out. The predicted amino acid sequence analysis revealed high pathogenicity to chickens and susceptibility to the antivirals, amantadine and oseltamivir. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that these viruses belong to clade 2.3.2.1 and were distinct to the clade 2.3.2.1 viruses isolated in Nepal. Identification of new clade 2.3.2 H5N1 viruses in South Asia is reminiscent of the introduction of clade 2.2 viruses in this region in 2006/7. It is now important to monitor whether the clade 2.3.2.1 is replacing clade 2.2 in this region or co-circulating with it. Continued co-circulation of various subclades of the H5N1 virus which are more adapted to land based poultry in a highly populated region such as South Asia increases the risk of evolution of pandemic H5N1 strains.

  3. Human papillomavirus clade A9 specific cellular immunity during the natural course of disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hende, Muriel van den

    2012-01-01

    The immune system plays an important role in the balance between viral clearance and viral persistence in HPV related (pre)malignant lesions. In this thesis, we analyzed HPV clade A9-specific T-cell responses in relation to virological and clinical outcome to gain further insight into HPV-specific

  4. Comprehensive analysis of gene expression patterns of hedgehog-related genes

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    Baillie David

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Caenorhabditis elegans genome encodes ten proteins that share sequence similarity with the Hedgehog signaling molecule through their C-terminal autoprocessing Hint/Hog domain. These proteins contain novel N-terminal domains, and C. elegans encodes dozens of additional proteins containing only these N-terminal domains. These gene families are called warthog, groundhog, ground-like and quahog, collectively called hedgehog (hh-related genes. Previously, the expression pattern of seventeen genes was examined, which showed that they are primarily expressed in the ectoderm. Results With the completion of the C. elegans genome sequence in November 2002, we reexamined and identified 61 hh-related ORFs. Further, we identified 49 hh-related ORFs in C. briggsae. ORF analysis revealed that 30% of the genes still had errors in their predictions and we improved these predictions here. We performed a comprehensive expression analysis using GFP fusions of the putative intergenic regulatory sequence with one or two transgenic lines for most genes. The hh-related genes are expressed in one or a few of the following tissues: hypodermis, seam cells, excretory duct and pore cells, vulval epithelial cells, rectal epithelial cells, pharyngeal muscle or marginal cells, arcade cells, support cells of sensory organs, and neuronal cells. Using time-lapse recordings, we discovered that some hh-related genes are expressed in a cyclical fashion in phase with molting during larval development. We also generated several translational GFP fusions, but they did not show any subcellular localization. In addition, we also studied the expression patterns of two genes with similarity to Drosophila frizzled, T23D8.1 and F27E11.3A, and the ortholog of the Drosophila gene dally-like, gpn-1, which is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. The two frizzled homologs are expressed in a few neurons in the head, and gpn-1 is expressed in the pharynx. Finally, we compare the

  5. Dickeya species relatedness and clade structure determined by comparison of recA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Neil; Stead, David; Bew, Janice; Heeney, John; Tsror Lahkim, Leah; Elphinstone, John

    2009-10-01

    Using sequences from the recA locus, we have produced a phylogeny of 188 Dickeya strains from culture collections and identified species relatedness and subspecies clade structure within the genus. Of the six recognized species, Dickeya paradisiaca, D. chrysanthemi and D. zeae were discriminated with long branch lengths. The clade containing the D. paradisiaca type strain included just one additional strain, isolated from banana in Colombia. Strains isolated from Chrysanthemum and Parthenium species made up most of the clade containing the D. chrysanthemi type strain, and the host range of this species was extended to include potato. The D. zeae clade had the largest number of sequevars and branched into two major sister clades that contained all of the Zea mays isolates, and were identified as phylotypes PI and PII. The host range was increased from six to 13 species, including potato. The recA sequence of an Australian sugar-cane strain was sufficiently distinct to rank as a new species-level branch. In contrast to these species, Dickeya dadantii, D. dianthicola and D. dieffenbachiae were distinguished with shorter branch lengths, indicating relatively closer relatedness. The recA sequence for the type strain of D. dadantii clustered separately from other strains of the species. However, sequence comparison of three additional loci revealed that the D. dadantii type strain grouped together with the six other D. dadantii strains that were sequenced. Analysis of all four loci indicated that the D. dadantii strains were most closely related to D. dieffenbachiae. Three further branches (DUC-1, -2 and -3) were associated with these three species, which all diverged from a common origin and can be considered as a species complex. The large clade containing the D. dianthicola type strain comprised 58 strains and had little sequence diversity. One sequevar accounted for the majority of these strains, which were isolated nearly exclusively from eight hosts from Europe

  6. Spinning gland transcriptomics from two main clades of spiders (order: Araneae--insights on their molecular, anatomical and behavioral evolution.

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    Francisco Prosdocimi

    Full Text Available Characterized by distinctive evolutionary adaptations, spiders provide a comprehensive system for evolutionary and developmental studies of anatomical organs, including silk and venom production. Here we performed cDNA sequencing using massively parallel sequencers (454 GS-FLX Titanium to generate ∼80,000 reads from the spinning gland of Actinopus spp. (infraorder: Mygalomorphae and Gasteracantha cancriformis (infraorder: Araneomorphae, Orbiculariae clade. Actinopus spp. retains primitive characteristics on web usage and presents a single undifferentiated spinning gland while the orbiculariae spiders have seven differentiated spinning glands and complex patterns of web usage. MIRA, Celera Assembler and CAP3 software were used to cluster NGS reads for each spider. CAP3 unigenes passed through a pipeline for automatic annotation, classification by biological function, and comparative transcriptomics. Genes related to spider silks were manually curated and analyzed. Although a single spidroin gene family was found in Actinopus spp., a vast repertoire of specialized spider silk proteins was encountered in orbiculariae. Astacin-like metalloproteases (meprin subfamily were shown to be some of the most sampled unigenes and duplicated gene families in G. cancriformis since its evolutionary split from mygalomorphs. Our results confirm that the evolution of the molecular repertoire of silk proteins was accompanied by the (i anatomical differentiation of spinning glands and (ii behavioral complexification in the web usage. Finally, a phylogenetic tree was constructed to cluster most of the known spidroins in gene clades. This is the first large-scale, multi-organism transcriptome for spider spinning glands and a first step into a broad understanding of spider web systems biology and evolution.

  7. The Regulation of Exosporium-Related Genes in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qi; Kao, Guiwei; Qu, Ning; Zhang, Jie; Li, Jie; Song, Fuping

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are spore-forming members of the Bacillus cereus group. Spores of B. cereus group species are encircled by exosporium, which is composed of an external hair-like nap and a paracrystalline basal layer. Despite the extensive studies on the structure of the exosporium-related proteins, little is known about the transcription and regulation of exosporium gene expression in the B. cereus group. Herein, we studied the regulation of several exosporium-related genes in Bt. A SigK consensus sequence is present upstream of genes encoding hair-like nap proteins (bclA and bclB), basal layer proteins (bxpA, bxpB, cotB, and exsY ), and inosine hydrolase (iunH). Mutation of sigK decreased the transcriptional activities of all these genes, indicating that the transcription of these genes is controlled by SigK. Furthermore, mutation of gerE decreased the transcriptional activities of bclB, bxpB, cotB, and iunH but increased the expression of bxpA, and GerE binds to the promoters of bclB, bxpB, cotB, bxpA, and iunH. These results suggest that GerE directly regulates the transcription of these genes, increasing the expression of bclB, bxpB, cotB, and iunH and decreasing that of bxpA. These findings provide insight into the exosporium assembly process at the transcriptional level. PMID:26805020

  8. Inflammation-related genes up-regulated in schizophrenia brains

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    Kreuger Johan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple studies have shown that brain gene expression is disturbed in subjects suffering from schizophrenia. However, disentangling disease effects from alterations caused by medication is a challenging task. The main goal of this study is to find transcriptional alterations in schizophrenia that are independent of neuroleptic treatment. Methods We compared the transcriptional profiles in brain autopsy samples from 55 control individuals with that from 55 schizophrenic subjects, subdivided according to the type of antipsychotic medication received. Results Using global and high-resolution mRNA quantification techniques, we show that genes involved in immune response (GO:0006955 are up regulated in all groups of patients, including those not treated at the time of death. In particular, IFITM2, IFITM3, SERPINA3, and GBP1 showed increased mRNA levels in schizophrenia (p-values from qPCR ≤ 0.01. These four genes were co-expressed in both schizophrenic subjects and controls. In-vitro experiments suggest that these genes are expressed in both oligodendrocyte and endothelial cells, where transcription is inducible by the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-α and IFN-γ. Conclusion Although the modified genes are not classical indicators of chronic or acute inflammation, our results indicate alterations of inflammation-related pathways in schizophrenia. In addition, the observation in oligodendrocyte cells suggests that alterations in inflammatory-related genes may have consequences for myelination. Our findings encourage future research to explore whether anti-inflammatory agents can be used in combination with traditional antipsychotics for a more efficient treatment of schizophrenia.

  9. Phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins related to the last steps of assembly and export of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sara B.; Mota, Rita; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-10-01

    Many cyanobacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with particular characteristics (e.g. anionic nature and presence of sulfate) that make them suitable for industrial processes such as bioremediation of heavy metals or thickening, suspending or emulsifying agents. Nevertheless, their biosynthetic pathway(s) are still largely unknown, limiting their utilization. In this work, a phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins putatively involved in the assembly and export of EPS in cyanobacteria was performed. Our results demonstrated that most strains harbor genes encoding proteins related to the three main pathways: Wzy-, ABC transporter-, and Synthase-dependent, but often not the complete set defining one pathway. Multiple gene copies are mainly correlated to larger genomes, and the strains with reduced genomes (e.g. the clade of marine unicellular Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), seem to have lost most of the EPS-related genes. Overall, the distribution of the different genes/proteins within the cyanobacteria phylum raises the hypothesis that cyanobacterial EPS production may not strictly follow one of the pathways previously characterized. Moreover, for the proteins involved in EPS polymerization, amino acid patterns were defined and validated constituting a novel and robust tool to identify proteins with similar functions and giving a first insight to which polymer biosynthesis they are related to.

  10. Clusters of ancestrally related genes that show paralogy in whole or in part are a major feature of the genomes of humans and other species.

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    Michael B Walker

    Full Text Available Arrangements of genes along chromosomes are a product of evolutionary processes, and we can expect that preferable arrangements will prevail over the span of evolutionary time, often being reflected in the non-random clustering of structurally and/or functionally related genes. Such non-random arrangements can arise by two distinct evolutionary processes: duplications of DNA sequences that give rise to clusters of genes sharing both sequence similarity and common sequence features and the migration together of genes related by function, but not by common descent. To provide a background for distinguishing between the two, which is important for future efforts to unravel the evolutionary processes involved, we here provide a description of the extent to which ancestrally related genes are found in proximity.Towards this purpose, we combined information from five genomic datasets, InterPro, SCOP, PANTHER, Ensembl protein families, and Ensembl gene paralogs. The results are provided in publicly available datasets (http://cgd.jax.org/datasets/clustering/paraclustering.shtml describing the extent to which ancestrally related genes are in proximity beyond what is expected by chance (i.e. form paraclusters in the human and nine other vertebrate genomes, as well as the D. melanogaster, C. elegans, A. thaliana, and S. cerevisiae genomes. With the exception of Saccharomyces, paraclusters are a common feature of the genomes we examined. In the human genome they are estimated to include at least 22% of all protein coding genes. Paraclusters are far more prevalent among some gene families than others, are highly species or clade specific and can evolve rapidly, sometimes in response to environmental cues. Altogether, they account for a large portion of the functional clustering previously reported in several genomes.

  11. Th17-Related Genes and Celiac Disease Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Luz María; García-Magariños, Manuel; Dema, Bárbara; Espino, Laura; Maluenda, Carlos; Polanco, Isabel; Figueredo, M. Ángeles; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Núñez, Concepción

    2012-01-01

    Th17 cells are known to be involved in several autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In celiac disease (CD), recent studies suggest an implication of those cells in disease pathogenesis. We aimed at studying the role of genes relevant for the Th17 immune response in CD susceptibility. A total of 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), mainly selected to cover most of the variability present in 16 Th17-related genes (IL23R, RORC, IL6R, IL17A, IL17F, CCR6, IL6, JAK2, TNFSF15, IL23A, IL22, STAT3, TBX21, SOCS3, IL12RB1 and IL17RA), were genotyped in 735 CD patients and 549 ethnically matched healthy controls. Case-control comparisons for each SNP and for the haplotypes resulting from the SNPs studied in each gene were performed using chi-square tests. Gene-gene interactions were also evaluated following different methodological approaches. No significant results emerged after performing the appropriate statistical corrections. Our results seem to discard a relevant role of Th17 cells on CD risk. PMID:22359581

  12. Th17-related genes and celiac disease susceptibility.

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    Luz María Medrano

    Full Text Available Th17 cells are known to be involved in several autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In celiac disease (CD, recent studies suggest an implication of those cells in disease pathogenesis. We aimed at studying the role of genes relevant for the Th17 immune response in CD susceptibility. A total of 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, mainly selected to cover most of the variability present in 16 Th17-related genes (IL23R, RORC, IL6R, IL17A, IL17F, CCR6, IL6, JAK2, TNFSF15, IL23A, IL22, STAT3, TBX21, SOCS3, IL12RB1 and IL17RA, were genotyped in 735 CD patients and 549 ethnically matched healthy controls. Case-control comparisons for each SNP and for the haplotypes resulting from the SNPs studied in each gene were performed using chi-square tests. Gene-gene interactions were also evaluated following different methodological approaches. No significant results emerged after performing the appropriate statistical corrections. Our results seem to discard a relevant role of Th17 cells on CD risk.

  13. Experimental evolution reveals habitat-specific fitness dynamics among Wolbachia clades in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versace, Elisabetta; Nolte, Viola; Pandey, Ram Vinay; Tobler, Ray; Schlötterer, Christian

    2014-02-01

    The diversity and infection dynamics of the endosymbiont Wolbachia can be influenced by many factors, such as transmission rate, cytoplasmic incompatibility, environment, selection and genetic drift. The interplay of these factors in natural populations can result in heterogeneous infection patterns with substantial differences between populations and strains. The causes of these heterogeneities are not yet understood, partly due to the complexity of natural environments. We present experimental evolution as a new approach to study Wolbachia infection dynamics in replicate populations exposed to a controlled environment. A natural Drosophila melanogaster population infected with strains of Wolbachia belonging to different clades evolved in two laboratory environments (hot and cold) for 1.5 years. In both treatments, the rate of Wolbachia infection increased until fixation. In the hot environment, the relative frequency of different Wolbachia clades remained stable over 37 generations. In the cold environment, however, we observed marked changes in the composition of the Wolbachia population: within 15 generations, one Wolbachia clade increased more than 50% in frequency, whereas the other two clades decreased in frequency, resulting in the loss of one clade. The frequency change was highly reproducible not only among replicates, but also when flies that evolved for 42 generations in the hot environment were transferred to the cold environment. These results document how environmental factors can affect the composition of Wolbachia in D. melanogaster. The high reproducibility of the pattern suggests that experimental evolution studies can efficiently determine the functional basis of habitat-specific fitness among Wolbachia strains.

  14. First molecular evidence for the existence of a Tardigrada + Arthropoda clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giribet, G; Carranza, S; Baguñà, J; Riutort, M; Ribera, C

    1996-01-01

    The complete 18S rDNA gene sequence of Macrobiotus group hufelandi (Tardigrada) was obtained and aligned with 18S rDNA and rRNA gene sequences of 24 metazoans (mainly protostomes). Discrete character (maximum-parsimony) and distance (neighbor-joining) methods were used to infer their phylogeny. The evolution of bootstrap proportions with sequence length (pattern of resolved nodes, PRN) was studied to test the resolution of the nodes in neighbor-joining trees. The results show that arthropods are monophyletic. Tardigrades represent the sister group of arthropods (in parsimony analyses) or they are related with crustaceans (distance analysis and PRN). Arthropoda are divided into two main evolutionary lines, the Hexapoda + Crustacea line (weakly supported), and the Myriapoda + Chelicerata line. The Hexapoda + Crustacea line includes Pentastomida, but the internal resolution is far from clear. The Insecta (Ectognatha) are monophyletic, but no evidence for the monophyly of Hexapoda is found. The Chelicerata are a monophyletic group and the Myriapoda cluster close to Arachnida. Overall, the results obtained represent the first molecular evidence for a Tardigrada + Arthropoda clade. In addition, the congruence between molecular phylogenies of the Arthropoda from other authors and this obtained here indicates the need to review those obtained solely on morphological characters.

  15. Phylogenetic positions of two marine ciliates, Metanophrys similis and Pseudocohnilembus hargisi (Protozoa, Ciliophora, Scuticociliatia), inferred from complete small subunit rRNA gene sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The small subunit rRNA (SSrRNA) gene was sequenced for two marine scuticociliates Metanophrys similis and Pseudocohnilembus hargisi. The results show that this gene comprises 1763 and 1753 nucleotides in the two marine ciliates respectively.Metanophrys similis is phylogenetically closely related to the clade containing Mesanophrys carcini and Anophyroides haemophila, which branches basally to other species within the order Philasterida. Pseudocohnilembus hargisi groups with its congener, P. marinus, with strong bootstrap support. Paranophrys magna groups with the clade including Cohnilembus and Uronema, representing a sister clade to that containing the two Pseudocohnilembus species.

  16. Deep divergences and extensive phylogeographic structure in a clade of lowland tropical salamanders

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    Rovito Sean M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complex geological history of Mesoamerica provides the opportunity to study the impact of multiple biogeographic barriers on population differentiation. We examine phylogeographic patterns in a clade of lowland salamanders (Bolitoglossa subgenus Nanotriton using two mitochondrial genes and one nuclear gene. We use several phylogeographic analyses to infer the history of this clade and test hypotheses regarding the geographic origin of species and location of genetic breaks within species. We compare our results to those for other taxa to determine if historical events impacted different species in a similar manner. Results Deep genetic divergence between species indicates that they are relatively old, and two of the three widespread species show strong phylogeographic structure. Comparison of mtDNA and nuclear gene trees shows no evidence of hybridization or introgression between species. Isolated populations of Bolitoglossa rufescens from Los Tuxtlas region constitute a separate lineage based on molecular data and morphology, and divergence between Los Tuxtlas and other areas appears to predate the arrival of B. rufescens in other areas west of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. The Isthmus appears responsible for Pliocene vicariance within B. rufescens, as has been shown for other taxa. The Motagua-Polochic fault system does not appear to have caused population vicariance, unlike in other systems. Conclusions Species of Nanotriton have responded to some major geological events in the same manner as other taxa, particularly in the case of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. The deep divergence of the Los Tuxtlas populations of B. rufescens from other populations highlights the contribution of this volcanic system to patterns of regional endemism, and morphological differences observed in the Los Tuxtlas populations suggests that they may represent an undescribed species of Bolitoglossa. The absence of phylogeographic structure in B

  17. Relation between ADIPOQ Gene Polymorphisms and Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-Peng Li; Mei Zhang; Jie Gao; Guo-Yan Zhou; Shuang-Qing Li; Zhen-Mei An

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The manuscript investigates the relation between adiponectin gene (ADIPOQ) polymorphisms and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a Chinese population. Methods: We designed a case-control study involving 340 normal glucose tolerant (NGT) subjects and 340 type 2 diabetes patients. Three SNPs (rs182052, rs1501299, and rs7627128) were genotyped by TaqMan methods. Results: We found that rs7627128, rs1501299 and rs182052 were significantly associated with T2DM. Haplotypes analysis indicat...

  18. Molecular phylogenetics and character evolution of the "sacaca" clade: novel relationships of Croton section Cleodora (Euphorbiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruzo, Maria Beatriz R; van Ee, Benjamin W; Cordeiro, Inês; Berry, Paul E; Riina, Ricarda

    2011-08-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of Croton section Cleodora (Klotzsch) Baill. were evaluated using the nuclear ribosomal ITS and the chloroplast trnL-F and trnH-psbA regions. Our results show a strongly supported clade containing most previously recognized section Cleodora species, plus some other species morphologically similar to them. Two morphological synapomorphies that support section Cleodora as a clade include pistillate flowers in which the sepals overlap to some degree, and styles that are connate at the base to varying degrees. The evolution of vegetative and floral characters that have previously been relied on for taxonomic decisions within this group are evaluated in light of the phylogenetic hypotheses. Within section Cleodora there are two well-supported clades, which are proposed here as subsections (subsection Sphaerogyni and subsection Spruceani). The resulting phylogenetic hypothesis identifies the closest relatives of the medicinally important and essential oil-rich Croton cajucara Benth. as candidates for future screening in phytochemical and pharmacological studies.

  19. Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Quorum Sensing in the Roseobacter Clade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindong Zan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Roseobacter clade are ecologically important and numerically abundant in coastal environments and can associate with marine invertebrates and nutrient-rich marine snow or organic particles, on which quorum sensing (QS may play an important role. In this review, we summarize current research progress on roseobacterial acyl-homoserine lactone-based QS, particularly focusing on three relatively well-studied representatives, Phaeobacter inhibens DSM17395, the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11 and the dinoflagellate symbiont Dinoroseobacter shibae. Bioinformatic survey of luxI homologues revealed that over 80% of available roseobacterial genomes encode at least one luxI homologue, reflecting the significance of QS controlled regulatory pathways in adapting to the relevant marine environments. We also discuss several areas that warrant further investigation, including studies on the ecological role of these diverse QS pathways in natural environments.

  20. Terminal Bacteroid Differentiation Is Associated With Variable Morphological Changes in Legume Species Belonging to the Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Jesús; Szűcs, Attila; Boboescu, Iulian Z; Gherman, Vasile D; Kondorosi, Éva; Kereszt, Attila

    2016-03-01

    Medicago and closely related legume species from the inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) impose terminal differentiation onto their bacterial endosymbionts, manifested in genome endoreduplication, cell enlargement, and loss of cell-division capacity. Nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) secreted host peptides are plant effectors of this process. As bacteroids in other IRLC legumes, such as Cicer arietinum and Glycyrrhiza lepidota, were reported not to display features of terminal differentiation, we investigated the fate of bacteroids in species from these genera as well as in four other species representing distinct genera of the phylogenetic tree for this clade. Bacteroids in all tested legumes proved to be larger in size and DNA content than cultured cells; however, the degree of cell elongation was rather variable in the different species. In addition, the reproductive ability of the bacteroids isolated from these legumes was remarkably reduced. In all IRLC species with available sequence data, the existence of NCR genes was found. These results indicate that IRLC legumes provoke terminal differentiation of their endosymbionts with different morphotypes, probably with the help of NCR peptides.

  1. Vibrio ishigakensis sp. nov., in Halioticoli clade isolated from seawater in Okinawa coral reef area, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Al-Saari, Nurhidayu; Rohul Amin, A K M; Sato, Kazumichi; Mino, Sayaka; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Ohkuma, Moriya; Hargreaves, Paulo Iiboshi; Meirelles, Pedro Milet; Thompson, Fabiano L; Thompson, Cristiane; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Sawabe, Toko; Sawabe, Tomoo

    2016-07-01

    Five novel strains showing non-motile, alginolytic, halophilic and fermentative features were isolated from seawater samples off Okinawa in coral reef areas. These strains were characterized by an advanced polyphasic taxonomy including genome based taxonomy using multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and in silico DNA-DNA similarity (in silico DDH). Phylogenetic analyses on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolates could be assigned to the genus Vibrio, however they were not allocated into any distinct cluster with known Vibrionaceae species. MLSA based on eight protein-coding genes (gapA, gyrB, ftsZ, mreB, pyrH, recA, rpoA, and topA) showed the vibrios formed an outskirt branch of Halioticoli clade. The experimental DNA-DNA hybridization data revealed that the five strains were in the range of being defined as conspecific but separate from nine Halioticoli clade species. The G+C contents of the Vibrio ishigakensis strains were 47.3-49.1mol%. Both Amino Acid Identity and Average Nucleotide Identity of the strain C1(T) against Vibrio ezurae HDS1-1(T), Vibrio gallicus HT2-1(T), Vibrio halioticoli IAM 14596(T), Vibrio neonatus HDD3-1(T) and Vibrio superstes G3-29(T) showed less than 95% similarity. The genome-based taxonomic approach by means of in silico DDH values also supports the V. ishigakensis strains being distinct from the other known Halioticoli clade species. Sixteen traits (growth temperature range, DNase and lipase production, indole production, and assimilation of 10 carbon compounds) distinguished these strains from Halioticoli clade species. The names V. ishigakensis sp. nov. is proposed for the species of Halioticoli clade, with C1(T) as the type strain (JCM 19231(T)=LMG 28703(T)).

  2. A detailed investigation of the Pterocarpus clade (Leguminosae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgård, Bente B.; Forest, Félix; Booth, Thomas J.;

    2013-01-01

    The pantropical genus Pterocarpus (Leguminosae: Dalbergieae) with papilionoid flowers, and allied genera in the Pterocarpus clade were sampled for the five molecular markers ITS2, trnL-F, ndhF-rpL32, matK, and rbcL, as part of our ongoing systematic studies in the clade. For wider analyses...

  3. Molecular cloning of allelopathy related genes and their relation to HHO in Eupatorium adenophorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huiming; Pei, Xixiang; Wan, Fanghao; Cheng, Hongmei

    2011-10-01

    In this study, conserved sequence regions of HMGR, DXR, and CHS (encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase and chalcone synthase, respectively) were amplified by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR from Eupatorium adenophorum. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the expression of CHS was related to the level of HHO, an allelochemical isolated from E. adenophorum. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that there was no significant difference in expression of genes among three different tissues, except for CHS. Southern blotting indicated that at least three CHS genes are present in the E. adenophorum genome. A full-length cDNA from CHS genes (named EaCHS1, GenBank ID: FJ913888) was cloned. The 1,455 bp cDNA contained an open reading frame (1,206 bp) encoding a protein of 401 amino acids. Preliminary bioinformatics analysis of EaCHS1 revealed that EaCHS1 was a member of CHS family, the subcellular localization predicted that EaCHS1 was a cytoplasmic protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of conserved sequences of these genes and of a full-length EaCHS1 gene in E. adenophorum. The results indicated that CHS gene is related to allelopathy of E. adenophorum.

  4. Exploring genetic variation in the tomato (Solanum section Lycopersicon) clade by whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflitos, Saulo; Schijlen, Elio; de Jong, Hans; de Ridder, Dick; Smit, Sandra; Finkers, Richard; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Gengyun; Li, Ning; Mao, Likai; Bakker, Freek; Dirks, Rob; Breit, Timo; Gravendeel, Barbara; Huits, Henk; Struss, Darush; Swanson-Wagner, Ruth; van Leeuwen, Hans; van Ham, Roeland C H J; Fito, Laia; Guignier, Laëtitia; Sevilla, Myrna; Ellul, Philippe; Ganko, Eric; Kapur, Arvind; Reclus, Emannuel; de Geus, Bernard; van de Geest, Henri; Te Lintel Hekkert, Bas; van Haarst, Jan; Smits, Lars; Koops, Andries; Sanchez-Perez, Gabino; van Heusden, Adriaan W; Visser, Richard; Quan, Zhiwu; Min, Jiumeng; Liao, Li; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Guangbiao; Yue, Zhen; Yang, Xinhua; Xu, Na; Schranz, Eric; Smets, Erik; Vos, Rutger; Rauwerda, Johan; Ursem, Remco; Schuit, Cees; Kerns, Mike; van den Berg, Jan; Vriezen, Wim; Janssen, Antoine; Datema, Erwin; Jahrman, Torben; Moquet, Frederic; Bonnet, Julien; Peters, Sander

    2014-10-01

    We explored genetic variation by sequencing a selection of 84 tomato accessions and related wild species representative of the Lycopersicon, Arcanum, Eriopersicon and Neolycopersicon groups, which has yielded a huge amount of precious data on sequence diversity in the tomato clade. Three new reference genomes were reconstructed to support our comparative genome analyses. Comparative sequence alignment revealed group-, species- and accession-specific polymorphisms, explaining characteristic fruit traits and growth habits in the various cultivars. Using gene models from the annotated Heinz 1706 reference genome, we observed differences in the ratio between non-synonymous and synonymous SNPs (dN/dS) in fruit diversification and plant growth genes compared to a random set of genes, indicating positive selection and differences in selection pressure between crop accessions and wild species. In wild species, the number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) exceeds 10 million, i.e. 20-fold higher than found in most of the crop accessions, indicating dramatic genetic erosion of crop and heirloom tomatoes. In addition, the highest levels of heterozygosity were found for allogamous self-incompatible wild species, while facultative and autogamous self-compatible species display a lower heterozygosity level. Using whole-genome SNP information for maximum-likelihood analysis, we achieved complete tree resolution, whereas maximum-likelihood trees based on SNPs from ten fruit and growth genes show incomplete resolution for the crop accessions, partly due to the effect of heterozygous SNPs. Finally, results suggest that phylogenetic relationships are correlated with habitat, indicating the occurrence of geographical races within these groups, which is of practical importance for Solanum genome evolution studies.

  5. The glycoprotein TRP36 of Ehrlichia sp. UFMG-EV and related cattle pathogen Ehrlichia sp. UFMT-BV evolved from a highly variable clade of E. canis under adaptive diversifying selection

    OpenAIRE

    Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Valdés, James J.; Fuente, José de la

    2014-01-01

    Background A new species of Ehrlichia, phylogenetically distant from E. ruminantium, was found in 2010 infecting cattle in Canada. In 2012 and 2013, we reported the in vitro propagation, molecular and ultrastructural characterization of Ehrlichia sp. UFMG-EV (E. mineirensis), a new species of Ehrlichia isolated from the haemolymph of Brazilian Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus ticks. A new organism, named Ehrlichia sp. UFMT-BV, closely related to Ehrlichia sp. UFMG-EV, was recently describe...

  6. A novel sister clade to the enterobacteria microviruses (family Microviridae) identified in methane seep sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Samuel Joseph; Thurber, Andrew R; Correa, Adrienne M S; Orphan, Victoria J; Vega Thurber, Rebecca

    2015-10-01

    Methane seep microbial communities perform a key ecosystem service by consuming the greenhouse gas methane prior to its release into the hydrosphere, minimizing the impact of marine methane sources on our climate. Although previous studies have examined the ecology and biochemistry of these communities, none has examined viral assemblages associated with these habitats. We employed virus particle purification, genome amplification, pyrosequencing and gene/genome reconstruction and annotation on two metagenomic libraries, one prepared for ssDNA and the other for all DNA, to identify the viral community in a methane seep. Similarity analysis of these libraries (raw and assembled) revealed a community dominated by phages, with a significant proportion of similarities to the Microviridae family of ssDNA phages. We define these viruses as the Eel River Basin Microviridae (ERBM). Assembly and comparison of 21 ERBM closed circular genomes identified five as members of a novel sister clade to the Microvirus genus of Enterobacteria phages. Comparisons among other metagenomes and these Microviridae major-capsid sequences indicated that this clade of phages is currently unique to the Eel River Basin sediments. Given this ERBM clade's relationship to the Microviridae genus Microvirus, we define this sister clade as the candidate genus Pequeñovirus.

  7. A divergent clade of circular single-stranded DNA viruses from pig feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using metagenomics and molecular cloning methods, we characterized five novel small circular viral genomes from pig feces distantly related to chimpanzee and porcine stool-associated circular viruses, (ChiSCV and PoSCV1). Phylogenetic analysis placed these viruses into a new, highly divergent, clade...

  8. Exploring genetic variation in the tomato (Solanum section Lycopersicon) clade by whole-genome sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aflitos, S.; Schijlen, E.; de Jong, H.; de Ridder, D.; Smit, S.; Finkers, R.; Wang, J.; Zhang, G.; Li, N.; Mao, L.; Bakker, F.; Dirks, R.; Breit, T.; Gravendeel, B.; Huits, H.; Struss, D.; Swanson-Wagner, R.; van Leeuwen, H.; van Ham, R.C.H.J.; Fito, L.; Guignier, L.; Sevilla, M.; Ellul, P.; Ganko, E.; Kapur, A.; Reclus, E.; de Geus, B.; van de Geest, H.; te Lintel Hekkert, B.; van Haarst, J.; Smits, L.; Koops, A.; Sanchez-Perez, G.; van Heusden, A.W.; Visser, R.; Quan, Z.; Min, J.; Liao, L.; Wang, X.; Wang, G.; Yue, Z.; Yang, X.; Xu, N.; Schranz, E.; Smets, E.; Vos, R.; Rauwerda, J.; Ursem, R.; Schuit, C.; Kerns, M.; van den Berg, J.; Vriezen, W.; Janssen, A.; Datema, E.; Jahrman, T.; Moquet, F.; Bonnet, J.; Peters, S.

    2014-01-01

    We explored genetic variation by sequencing a selection of 84 tomato accessions and related wild species representative of the Lycopersicon, Arcanum, Eriopersicon and Neolycopersicon groups, which has yielded a huge amount of precious data on sequence diversity in the tomato clade. Three new referen

  9. Phytophthora borealis and Phytophthora riparia, new species in Phytophthora ITS Clade 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Everett M; Reeser, Paul W; Sutton, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Phytophthora borealis and Phytophthora riparia, identified in recent Phytophthora surveys of forest streams in Oregon, California and Alaska, are described as new species in Phytophthora ITS Clade 6. They are similar in growth form and morphology to P. gonapodyides and are predominantly sterile. They present unique DNA sequences, however, and differ in temperature/growth relations and geographic distribution.

  10. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korber, Bette T; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  11. Impact of obesity-related genes in Spanish population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective was to investigate the association between BMI and single nucleotide polymorphisms previously identified of obesity-related genes in two Spanish populations. Forty SNPs in 23 obesity-related genes were evaluated in a rural population characterized by a high prevalence of obesity (869 subjects, mean age 46 yr, 62% women, 36% obese) and in an urban population (1425 subjects, mean age 54 yr, 50% women, 19% obese). Genotyping was assessed by using SNPlex and PLINK for the association analysis. Results Polymorphisms of the FTO were significantly associated with BMI, in the rural population (beta 0.87, p-value <0.001). None of the other SNPs showed significant association after Bonferroni correction in the two populations or in the pooled analysis. A weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) was constructed using the risk alleles of the Tag-SNPs with a positive Beta parameter in both populations. From the first to the fifth quintile of the score, the BMI increased 0.45 kg/m2 in Hortega and 2.0 kg/m2 in Pizarra. Overall, the obesity predictive value was low (less than 1%). Conclusion The risk associated with polymorphisms is low and the overall effect on BMI or obesity prediction is minimal. A weighted genetic risk score based on genes mainly acting through central nervous system mechanisms was associated with BMI but it yields minimal clinical prediction for the obesity risk in the general population. PMID:24267414

  12. Gene expression profiles of autophagy-related genes in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igci, Mehri; Baysan, Mehmet; Yigiter, Remzi; Ulasli, Mustafa; Geyik, Sirma; Bayraktar, Recep; Bozgeyik, İbrahim; Bozgeyik, Esra; Bayram, Ali; Cakmak, Ecir Ali

    2016-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an imflammatory disease of central nervous system caused by genetic and environmental factors that remain largely unknown. Autophagy is the process of degradation and recycling of damaged cytoplasmic organelles, macromolecular aggregates, and long-lived proteins. Malfunction of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases, and autophagy genes may modulate the T cell survival. We aimed to examine the expression levels of autophagy-related genes. The blood samples of 95 unrelated patients (aged 17-65years, 37 male, 58 female) diagnosed as MS and 95 healthy controls were used to extract the RNA samples. After conversion to single stranded cDNA using polyT priming: the targeted genes were pre-amplified, and 96×78 (samples×primers) qRT-PCR reactions were performed for each primer pair on each sample on a 96.96 array of Fluidigm BioMark™. Compared to age- and sex-matched controls, gene expression levels of ATG16L2, ATG9A, BCL2, FAS, GAA, HGS, PIK3R1, RAB24, RGS19, ULK1, FOXO1, HTT were significantly altered (false discovery rategenes may affect protein levels, which in turn would influence the activity of autophagy, or most probably, those genes might be acting independent of autophagy and contributing to MS pathogenesis as risk factors. The indeterminate genetic causes leading to alterations in gene expressions require further analysis.

  13. Recognition of two major clades and early diverged groups within the subfamily Cyperoideae (Cyperaceae) including Korean sedges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jongduk; Choi, Hong-Keun

    2013-05-01

    We aim to present phylogenetic major groups within the subfamily Cyperoideae (Cyperaceae) on the basis of three molecular data sets; nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer and 5.8S ribosomal RNA region, the ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit gene, and trnL intron and trnL-F intergenic spacer. Three molecular data and two combined data sets were used to obtain robust and detailed phylogenetic trees by using maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference, respectively. We analyzed 81 genera and 426 species of Cyperaceae, including Korean species. We suggest one early diverged group (EDGs), and two major clades (FAEC and SDC) within the subfamily Cyperoideae. And the clade EDGs comprises six tribes (Schoeneae, Bisboeckelereae, Sclerieae, Cryptangieae, Trilepideae, and Rhynchosporeae) at the basal nodes of Cyperoideae. The FAEC clade (posterior probability [PP]/bootstrap value [BS] = 1.00/85) comprises four tribes (Fuireneae, Abildgaardieae, Eleocharideae, Cypereae), and the SDC clade (PP/BS = 1.00/86) comprises three tribes (Scirpeae, Dulichieae, Cariceae). These three clades used for phylogenetic groups in our study will be useful for establishing the major lineage of the sedge family. The phylogeny of Korean sedges was also investigated within the whole phylogeny of Cyperaceae. The 20 genera of Korean sedges were placed in 10 tribes forming 14 clades.

  14. Primary function analysis of human mental retardation related gene CRBN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Wang; Xiaohua, Ni; Peilin, Chen; Xin, Chen; Yaqiong, Sun; Qihan, Wu

    2008-06-01

    The mutation of human cereblon gene (CRBN) is revealed to be related with mild mental retardation. Since the molecular characteristics of CRBN have not been well presented, we investigated the general properties of CRBN. We analyzed its gene structure and protein homologues. The CRBN protein might belong to a family of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent Lon protease. We also found that CRBN was widely expressed in different tissues, and the expression level in testis is significantly higher than other tissues. This may suggested it could play some important roles in several other tissues besides brain. Transient transfection experiment in AD 293 cell lines suggested that both CRBN and CRBN mutant (nucleotide position 1,274(C > T)) are located in the whole cells. This may suggest new functions of CRBN in cell nucleolus besides its mitochondria protease activity in cytoplasm.

  15. Systematically characterizing and prioritizing chemosensitivity related gene based on Gene Ontology and protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of genes that predict in vitro cellular chemosensitivity of cancer cells is of great importance. Chemosensitivity related genes (CRGs have been widely utilized to guide clinical and cancer chemotherapy decisions. In addition, CRGs potentially share functional characteristics and network features in protein interaction networks (PPIN. Methods In this study, we proposed a method to identify CRGs based on Gene Ontology (GO and PPIN. Firstly, we documented 150 pairs of drug-CCRG (curated chemosensitivity related gene from 492 published papers. Secondly, we characterized CCRGs from the perspective of GO and PPIN. Thirdly, we prioritized CRGs based on CCRGs’ GO and network characteristics. Lastly, we evaluated the performance of the proposed method. Results We found that CCRG enriched GO terms were most often related to chemosensitivity and exhibited higher similarity scores compared to randomly selected genes. Moreover, CCRGs played key roles in maintaining the connectivity and controlling the information flow of PPINs. We then prioritized CRGs using CCRG enriched GO terms and CCRG network characteristics in order to obtain a database of predicted drug-CRGs that included 53 CRGs, 32 of which have been reported to affect susceptibility to drugs. Our proposed method identifies a greater number of drug-CCRGs, and drug-CCRGs are much more significantly enriched in predicted drug-CRGs, compared to a method based on the correlation of gene expression and drug activity. The mean area under ROC curve (AUC for our method is 65.2%, whereas that for the traditional method is 55.2%. Conclusions Our method not only identifies CRGs with expression patterns strongly correlated with drug activity, but also identifies CRGs in which expression is weakly correlated with drug activity. This study provides the framework for the identification of signatures that predict in vitro cellular chemosensitivity and offers a valuable

  16. Glycan-related gene expression signatures in breast cancer subtypes; relation to survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapenko, Ivan O; Lüders, Torben; Russnes, Hege G; Helland, Åslaug; Sørlie, Therese; Kristensen, Vessela N; Nord, Silje; Lingjærde, Ole C; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Haakensen, Vilde D

    2015-04-01

    Alterations in glycan structures are early signs of malignancy and have recently been proposed to be in part a driving force behind malignant transformation. Here, we explore whether differences in expression of genes related to the process of glycosylation exist between breast carcinoma subtypes - and look for their association to clinical parameters. Five expression datasets of 454 invasive breast carcinomas, 31 ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS), and 79 non-malignant breast tissue samples were analysed. Results were validated in 1960 breast carcinomas. 419 genes encoding glycosylation-related proteins were selected. The DCIS samples appeared expression-wise similar to carcinomas, showing altered gene expression related to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and N-glycans when compared to non-malignant samples. In-situ lesions with different aggressiveness potentials demonstrated changes in glycosaminoglycan sulfation and adhesion proteins. Subtype-specific expression patterns revealed down-regulation of genes encoding glycan-binding proteins in the luminal A and B subtypes. Clustering basal-like samples using a consensus list of genes differentially expressed across discovery datasets produced two clusters with significantly differing prognosis in the validation dataset. Finally, our analyses suggest that glycolipids may play an important role in carcinogenesis of breast tumors - as demonstrated by association of B3GNT5 and UGCG genes to patient survival. In conclusion, most glycan-specific changes occur early in the carcinogenic process. We have identified glycan-related alterations specific to breast cancer subtypes including a prognostic signature for two basal-like subgroups. Future research in this area may potentially lead to markers for better prognostication and treatment stratification of breast cancer patients.

  17. Denitrification of nitrate and nitrite by 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' clade IC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sondos A; Welles, Laurens; Abbas, Ben; Lopez-Vazquez, Carlos M; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Brdjanovic, Damir

    2016-11-15

    Phosphate accumulating organisms (PAO) are assumed to use nitrate as external electron acceptor, allowing an efficient integration of simultaneous nitrogen and phosphate removal with minimal organic carbon (COD) requirements. However, contradicting findings appear in literature regarding the denitrification capacities of PAO due to the lack of clade specific highly enriched PAO cultures. Whereas some studies suggest that only PAO clade I may be capable of using nitrate as external electron acceptor for anoxic P-uptake, other studies indicate that PAO clade II may be responsible for anoxic P-removal. In the present study, a highly enriched PAO clade IC culture (>99% according to FISH) was cultivated in an SBR operated under Anaerobic/Oxic conditions and subsequently exposed to Anaerobic/Anoxic/Oxic conditions using nitrate as electron acceptor. Before and after acclimatization to the presence of nitrate, the aerobic and anoxic (nitrate and nitrite) activities of the PAO I culture were assessed through the execution of batch tests using either acetate or propionate as electron donor. In the presence of nitrate, significant P-uptake by PAO I was not observed before or after acclimatization. Using nitrite as electron acceptor, limited nitrite removal rates were observed before acclimatization with lower rates in the acetate fed reactor without P-uptake and slightly higher in the propionate fed reactor with a marginal anoxic P-uptake. Only after acclimatization to nitrate, simultaneous P and nitrite removal was observed. This study suggests that PAO clade IC is not capable of using nitrate as external electron acceptor for anoxic P-removal. The elucidation of the metabolic capacities for individual PAO clades helps in better understanding and optimization of the relation between microbial ecology and process performance in enhanced biological phosphate removal processes.

  18. Phylogeny and taxonomy of the North American clade of the Ceratocystis fimbriata complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jason A; Harrington, Thomas C; Engelbrecht, C J B

    2005-01-01

    Ceratocystis fimbriata is a widely distributed, plant pathogenic fungus that causes wilts and cankers on many woody hosts. Earlier phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences revealed three geographic clades within the C. fimbriata complex that are centered respectively in North America, Latin America and Asia. This study looked for cryptic species within the North American clade. The internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of the rDNA were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis indicated that most isolates from the North American clade group into four host-associated lineages, referred to as the aspen, hickory, oak and cherry lineages, which were isolated primarily from wounds or diseased trees of Populus, Carya, Quercus and Prunus, respectively. A single isolate collected from P. serotina in Wisconsin had a unique ITS sequence. Allozyme electromorphs also were highly polymorphic within the North American clade, and the inferred phylogenies from these data were congruent with the ITS-rDNA analyses. In pairing experiments isolates from the aspen, hickory, oak and cherry lineages were interfertile only with other isolates from their respective lineages. Inoculation experiments with isolates of the four host-associated groupings showed strong host specialization by isolates from the aspen and hickory lineages on Populus tremuloides and Carya illinoensis, respectively, but isolates from the oak and cherry lineages did not consistently reveal host specialization. Morphological features distinguish isolates in the North American clade from those of the Latin American clade (including C. fimbriata sensu stricto). Based on the phylogenetic evidence, interfertility, host specialization and morphology, the oak and cherry lineages are recognized as the earlier described C. variospora, the poplar lineage as C. populicola sp. nov., and the hickory lineage as C. caryae sp. nov. A new species associated with the bark beetle Scolytus quadrispinosus on Carya is closely related to C

  19. Association and gene-gene interactions study of reelin signaling pathway related genes with autism in the Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yidong; Xun, Guanglei; Guo, Hui; He, Yiqun; Ou, Jianjun; Dong, Huixi; Xia, Kun; Zhao, Jingping

    2016-04-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder with unclear etiology. Reelin had been proposed to participate in the etiology of autism due to its important role in brain development. The goal of this study was to explore the association and gene-gene interactions of reelin signaling pathway related genes (RELN, VLDLR, LRP8, DAB1, FYN, and CDK5) with autism in Han Chinese population. Genotyping data of the six genes were obtained from a recent genome-wide association study performed in 430 autistic children who fulfilled the DSM-IV-TR criteria for autistic disorder, and 1,074 healthy controls. Single marker case-control association analysis and haplotype case-control association analysis were conducted after the data was screened. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) was applied to further test gene-gene interactions. Neither the single marker nor the haplotype association tests found any significant difference between the autistic group and the control group after permutation test of 1,000 rounds. The 4-locus MDR model (comprising rs6143734, rs1858782, rs634500, and rs1924267 which belong to RELN and DAB1) was determined to be the model with the highest cross-validation consistency (CVC) and testing balanced accuracy. The results indicate that an interaction between RELN and DAB1 may increase the risk of autism in the Han Chinese population. Furthermore, it can also be inferred that the involvement of RELN in the etiology of autism would occur through interaction with DAB1.

  20. Specificity of binding of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein to different conformational states of the clade E serpins plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and proteinase nexin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jan K; Dolmer, Klavs; Gettins, Peter G W

    2009-07-03

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) is the principal clearance receptor for serpins and serpin-proteinase complexes. The ligand binding regions of LRP consist of clusters of cysteine-rich approximately 40-residue complement-like repeats (CR), with cluster II being the principal ligand-binding region. To better understand the specificity of binding at different sites within the cluster and the ability of LRP to discriminate in vivo between uncomplexed and proteinase-complexed serpins, we have systematically examined the affinities of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and proteinase nexin-1 (PN-1) in their native, cleaved, and proteinase-complexed states to (CR)(2) and (CR)(3) fragments of LRP cluster II. A consistent blue shift of the CR domain tryptophan fluorescence suggested a common mode of serpin binding, involving lysines on the serpin engaging the acidic region around the calcium binding site of the CR domain. High affinity binding of non-proteinase-complexed PAI-1 and PN-1 occurred to all fragments containing three CR domains (3-59 nm) and most that contain only two CR domains, although binding energies to different (CR)(3) fragments differed by up to 18% for PAI-1 and 9% for PN-1. No detectable difference in affinity was seen between native and cleaved serpin. However, the presence of proteinase in complex with the serpin enhanced affinity modestly and presumably nonspecifically. This may be sufficient to give preferential binding of such complexes in vivo at the relevant physiological concentrations.

  1. Remarkable phylogenetic resolution of the most complex clade of Cyprinidae (Teleostei: Cypriniformes): a proof of concept of homology assessment and partitioning sequence data integrated with mixed model Bayesian analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wenjing; Mayden, Richard L; He, Shunping

    2013-03-01

    Despite many efforts to resolve evolutionary relationships among major clades of Cyprinidae, some nodes have been especially problematic and remain unresolved. In this study, we employ four nuclear gene fragments (3.3kb) to infer interrelationships of the Cyprinidae. A reconstruction of the phylogenetic relationships within the family using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian analyses is presented. Among the taxa within the monophyletic Cyprinidae, Rasborinae is the basal-most lineage; Cyprinine is sister to Leuciscine. The monophyly for the subfamilies Gobioninae, Leuciscinae and Acheilognathinae were resolved with high nodal support. Although our results do not completely resolve relationships within Cyprinidae, this study presents novel and significant findings having major implications for a highly diverse and enigmatic clade of East-Asian cyprinids. Within this monophyletic group five closely-related subgroups are identified. Tinca tinca, one of the most phylogenetically enigmatic genera in the family, is strongly supported as having evolutionary affinities with this East-Asian clade; an established yet remarkable association because of the natural variation in phenotypes and generalized ecological niches occupied by these taxa. Our results clearly argue that the choice of partitioning strategies has significant impacts on the phylogenetic reconstructions, especially when multiple genes are being considered. The most highly partitioned model (partitioned by codon positions within genes) extracts the strongest phylogenetic signals and performs better than any other partitioning schemes supported by the strongest 2Δln Bayes factor. Future studies should include higher levels of taxon sampling and partitioned, model-based analyses.

  2. Estrogen-related receptor alpha modulates the expression of adipogenesis-related genes during adipocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijichi, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Yagi, Ken; Okazaki, Yasushi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2007-07-06

    Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates cellular energy metabolism by modulating gene expression involved in fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue. However, the physiological role of ERRalpha in adipogenesis and white adipose tissue development has not been well studied. Here, we show that ERRalpha and ERRalpha-related transcriptional coactivators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and PGC-1beta, can be up-regulated in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes at mRNA levels under the adipogenic differentiation condition including the inducer of cAMP, glucocorticoid, and insulin. Gene knockdown by ERRalpha-specific siRNA results in mRNA down-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 4, PPARgamma, and PGC-1alpha in 3T3-L1 cells in the adipogenesis medium. ERRalpha and PGC-1beta mRNA expression can be also up-regulated in another preadipocyte lineage DFAT-D1 cells and a pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2 under the differentiation condition. Furthermore, stable expression of ERRalpha in 3T3-L1 cells up-regulates adipogenic marker genes and promotes triglyceride accumulation during 3T3-L1 differentiation. These results suggest that ERRalpha may play a critical role in adipocyte differentiation by modulating the expression of various adipogenesis-related genes.

  3. Species living in hars environments have low clade rank and are localized on former Laurasian continents: a case study of Willemia (Collembola)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinzing, A.; Haese, D' C.A.; Pavoine, S.; Ponge, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Certain species have few living relatives (i.e. they occupy low clade ranks) and hence they possess high conservation value and scientific interest as unique representatives of ancient lineages. However, we do not know whether particular environments favour the maintenance of low clade ranks or

  4. Isolation of tumor suppressor genes from MEN-1 related neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavari, R.; Kinder, B.; Bale, A.E. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) is a cancer predisposition syndrome marked by the development of tumors in specific endocrine tissues such as the pituitary, parathyroid and pancreatic islets. Genetic linkage studies have mapped the MEN 1 gene to 11q13, and allelic loss in related tumors suggests that the gene is a tumor suppressor. Because inactivation of tumor suppressors may be accompanied by underexpression, subtractive hybridization was used to isolate potential candidate genes underexpressed in MEN 1 tumors. cDNA was synthesized from tumor and normal parathyroid tissue by RT-PCR. Biotinylated tumor cDNA was used as a driver and normal cDNA as a tester in subtractive hybridization. Following annealing of the driver and tester amplicons, the biotinylated strands were removed with streptavidin. The subtracted material was then used as a probe to isolate clones from a normal pancreatic islet library. Screening 2 x 10{sup 5} plaques yielded 14 positive clones. Of 6 clones analyzed, 3 were confirmed to be underexpressed in parathyroid tumors. Sequence analysis identified 2 clones as human ribosomal protein S10 (RPS10, chromosome 6) and 1 as the islet amyloid polypeptide (1AP, chromosome 12). The precise function of human RPS10 is not known but the related RPS6 functions as a tumor suppressor in Drosophila. 1AP has been implicated in modulation of G protein activity. The remaining positive clones will be mapped to determine if any fall on chromosome 11q13, and additional subtractions with parathyroid and pancreatic islet neoplasms are underway.

  5. Calcitonin gene-related peptide in cervicogenic headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frese, Amalie; Schilgen, M; Edvinsson, L

    2005-01-01

    Trigeminovascular activation is involved in the pathophysiology of migraine and cluster headache. The marker evaluated best for trigeminovascular activation is calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the cranial circulation. It is unknown whether trigeminovascular activation plays any role...... in cervicogenic headache (CEH). The objective of this study was to investigate CGRP plasma levels in CEH patients in relation to headache state. To compare plasma CGRP levels between the peripheral and the cranial circulation. Blood from both external jugular veins and from the antecubital vein was drawn from 11...... patients with CEH. Plasma CGRP levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. No difference was found between CGRP levels assessed on days with and without headache. There was no difference between CGRP levels from the symptomatic and the asymptomatic external jugular vein and the antecubital vein...

  6. Origins and Evolution of WUSCHEL-Related Homeobox Protein Family in Plant Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaibin Lian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX is a large group of transcription factors specifically found in plants. WOX members contain the conserved homeodomain essential for plant development by regulating cell division and differentiation. However, the evolutionary relationship of WOX members in plant kingdom remains to be elucidated. In this study, we searched 350 WOX members from 50 species in plant kingdom. Linkage analysis of WOX protein sequences demonstrated that amino acid residues 141–145 and 153–160 located in the homeodomain are possibly associated with the function of WOXs during the evolution. These 350 members were grouped into 3 clades: the first clade represents the conservative WOXs from the lower plant algae to higher plants; the second clade has the members from vascular plant species; the third clade has the members only from spermatophyte species. Furthermore, among the members of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, we observed ubiquitous expression of genes in the first clade and the diversified expression pattern of WOX genes in distinct organs in the second clade and the third clade. This work provides insight into the origin and evolutionary process of WOXs, facilitating their functional investigations in the future.

  7. Transport of magnesium by a bacterial Nramp-related gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ho Shin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5-2.0 mM. Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes.

  8. On the relation between gene flow theory and genetic gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolliams John A

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In conventional gene flow theory the rate of genetic gain is calculated as the summed products of genetic selection differential and asymptotic proportion of genes deriving from sex-age groups. Recent studies have shown that asymptotic proportions of genes predicted from conventional gene flow theory may deviate considerably from true proportions. However, the rate of genetic gain predicted from conventional gene flow theory was accurate. The current note shows that the connection between asymptotic proportions of genes and rate of genetic gain that is embodied in conventional gene flow theory is invalid, even though genetic gain may be predicted correctly from it.

  9. Culturing and environmental DNA sequencing uncover hidden kinetoplastid biodiversity and a major marine clade within ancestrally freshwater Neobodo designis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Heyden, Sophie; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    Bodonid flagellates (class Kinetoplastea) are abundant, free-living protozoa in freshwater, soil and marine habitats, with undersampled global biodiversity. To investigate overall bodonid diversity, kinetoplastid-specific PCR primers were used to amplify and sequence 18S rRNA genes from DNA extracted from 16 diverse environmental samples; of 39 different kinetoplastid sequences, 35 belong to the subclass Metakinetoplastina, where most group with the genus Neobodo or the species Bodo saltans, whilst four group with the subclass Prokinetoplastina (Ichthyobodo). To study divergence between freshwater and marine members of the genus Neobodo, 26 new Neobodo designis strains were cultured and their 18S rRNA genes were sequenced. It is shown that the morphospecies N. designis is a remarkably ancient species complex with a major marine clade nested among older freshwater clades, suggesting that these lineages were constrained physiologically from moving between these environments for most of their long history. Other major bodonid clades show less-deep separation between marine and freshwater strains, but have extensive genetic diversity within all lineages and an apparently biogeographically distinct distribution of B. saltans subclades. Clade-specific 18S rRNA gene primers were used for two N. designis subclades to test their global distribution and genetic diversity. The non-overlap between environmental DNA sequences and those from cultures suggests that there are hundreds, possibly thousands, of different rRNA gene sequences of free-living bodonids globally.

  10. Two novel species representing a new clade and cluster of Phytophthora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Copes, Warren E; Hong, Chuanxue

    2014-01-01

    Phytophthora stricta sp. nov. and Phytophthora macilentosa sp. nov. are described based on morphological, physiological and molecular characters in this study. Phytophthora stricta represents a previously unknown clade in the rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-based phylogeny. Phytophthora macilentosa, along with nine other species, consistently forms a high temperature-tolerant cluster within ITS clade 9. These observations are supported by the sequence analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene. Both species are heterothallic and all examined isolates are A1 mating type. Phytophthora stricta produces nonpapillate and slightly caducous sporangia. This species is named after its characteristic constrictions on sporangiophores. Phytophthora macilentosa produces nonpapillate and noncaducous sporangia, which are mostly elongated obpyriform with a high length to breadth ratio. Both species were recovered from irrigation water of an ornamental plant nursery in Mississippi, USA and P. stricta was also recovered from stream water in Virginia, USA.

  11. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L H; Jacobsen, V B; Haderslev, P A

    2008-01-01

    mug/min) or placebo for 20 min was studied in 12 patients with migraine without aura outside attacks. Xenon-133 inhalation SPECT-determined regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and transcranial Doppler (TCD)-determined blood velocity (V (mean)) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), as well as the heart......Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves are closely associated with cranial blood vessels. CGRP is the most potent vasodilator known in isolated cerebral blood vessels. CGRP can induce migraine attacks, and two selective CGRP receptor antagonists are effective in the treatment...... of migraine attacks. It is therefore important to investigate its mechanism of action in patients with migraine. We here investigate the effects of intravenous human alpha-CGRP (halphaCGRP) on intracranial hemodynamics. In a double-blind, cross-over study, the effect of intravenous infusion of halphaCGRP (2...

  12. Glia-related genes and their contribution to schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenyao; Aleksic, Branko; Ozaki, Norio

    2015-08-01

    Schizophrenia, a debilitating disease with 1% prevalence in the general population, is characterized by major neuropsychiatric symptoms, including delusions, hallucinations, and deficits in emotional and social behavior. Previous studies have directed their investigations on the mechanism of schizophrenia towards neuronal dysfunction and have defined schizophrenia as a 'neuron-centric' disorder. However, along with the development of genetics and systematic biology approaches in recent years, the crucial role of glial cells in the brain has also been shown to contribute to the etiopathology of schizophrenia. Here, we summarize comprehensive data that support the involvement of glial cells (including oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglial cells) in schizophrenia and list several acknowledged glia-related genes or molecules associated with schizophrenia. Instead of purely an abnormality of neurons in schizophrenia, an additional 'glial perspective' provides us a novel and promising insight into the causal mechanisms and treatment for this disease.

  13. A comparative analysis of the evolution, expression, and cis-regulatory element of polygalacturonase genes in grasses and dicots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Yu, Youjian; Cui, Jinlong; Lyu, Meiling; Xu, Liai; Cao, Jiashu

    2016-11-01

    Cell walls are a distinguishing characteristic of plants essential to their survival. The pectin content of primary cell walls in grasses and dicots is distinctly different. Polygalacturonases (PGs) can degrade pectins and participate in multiple developmental processes of plants. This study comprehensively compared the evolution, expression, and cis-regulatory element of PGs in grasses and dicots. A total of 577 PGs identified from five grasses and five dicots fell into seven clades. Evolutionary analysis demonstrated the distinct differences between grasses and dicots in patterns of gene duplication and loss, and evolutionary rates. Grasses generally contained much fewer clade C and F members than dicots. We found that this disparity was the result of less duplication and more gene losses in grasses. More duplications occurred in clades D and E, and expression analysis showed that most of clade E members were expressed ubiquitously at a high overall level and clade D members were closely related to male reproduction in both grasses and dicots, suggesting their biological functions were highly conserved across species. In addition to the general role in reproductive development, PGs of clades C and F specifically played roles in root development in dicots, shedding light on organ differentiation between the two groups of plants. A regulatory element analysis of clade C and F members implied that possible functions of PGs in specific biological responses contributed to their expansion and preservation. This work can improve the knowledge of PGs in plants generally and in grasses specifically and is beneficial to functional studies.

  14. The estimation of tree posterior probabilities using conditional clade probability distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larget, Bret

    2013-07-01

    In this article I introduce the idea of conditional independence of separated subtrees as a principle by which to estimate the posterior probability of trees using conditional clade probability distributions rather than simple sample relative frequencies. I describe an algorithm for these calculations and software which implements these ideas. I show that these alternative calculations are very similar to simple sample relative frequencies for high probability trees but are substantially more accurate for relatively low probability trees. The method allows the posterior probability of unsampled trees to be calculated when these trees contain only clades that are in other sampled trees. Furthermore, the method can be used to estimate the total probability of the set of sampled trees which provides a measure of the thoroughness of a posterior sample.

  15. cDNA cloning and expression of an apoptosis-related gene, human TFAR15 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉刚; 刘洪涛; 张颖妹; 马大龙

    1999-01-01

    By means of cDNA-RDA method. some cDNA fragments were found to have high levels of expression during deprivation of GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor) in a human myeloid cell line, TF-1 cells. One of these tragments was identified as a novel gene. To get the full length of cDNA, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and expressed sequence tags (EST) overlapping fragments assembling strategies were used. The novel gene was named TRAF15 (TF-1 cell apoptosis related gene-15), which consists of 1218 nueleotides and encodes 212 amino acids. The putative protein protein product of TFAR15 is partially homologous to C. elegans protein C14A4. 11. TFAR15 mRNA is expressed in fetal liver, kidney, spleen and lung. and also in some human myeloid cell lines. Both of the TFAR15 mRNA and protein were highly expressed in TF-(?) cells after GM-CSF withdrawal. In vitro analysis showed that the recombinant TFAR15 protein co(?)ld inhibit the natural cell death of 293 cells, an embryonic kidney cell

  16. Evolution of xyloglucan-related genes in green plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincentz Michel GA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell shape and morphology of plant tissues are intimately related to structural modifications in the primary cell wall that are associated with key processes in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. The primary cell wall is composed mainly of cellulose immersed in a matrix of hemicellulose, pectin, lignin and some structural proteins. Xyloglucan is a hemicellulose polysaccharide present in the cell walls of all land plants (Embryophyta and is the main hemicellulose in non-graminaceous angiosperms. Results In this work, we used a comparative genomic approach to obtain new insights into the evolution of the xyloglucan-related enzymatic machinery in green plants. Detailed phylogenetic analyses were done for enzymes involved in xyloglucan synthesis (xyloglucan transglycosylase/hydrolase, α-xylosidase, β-galactosidase, β-glucosidase and α-fucosidase and mobilization/degradation (β-(1→4-glucan synthase, α-fucosyltransferases, β-galactosyltransferases and α-xylosyl transferase based on 12 fully sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tags from 29 species of green plants. Evidence from Chlorophyta and Streptophyta green algae indicated that part of the Embryophyta xyloglucan-related machinery evolved in an aquatic environment, before land colonization. Streptophyte algae have at least three enzymes of the xyloglucan machinery: xyloglucan transglycosylase/hydrolase, β-(1→4-glucan synthase from the celullose synthase-like C family and α-xylosidase that is also present in chlorophytes. Interestingly, gymnosperm sequences orthologs to xyloglucan transglycosylase/hydrolases with exclusively hydrolytic activity were also detected, suggesting that such activity must have emerged within the last common ancestor of spermatophytes. There was a positive correlation between the numbers of founder genes within each gene family and the complexity of the plant cell wall. Conclusions Our data support the idea that a

  17. Evolution of pollination niches in a generalist plant clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, José María; Perfectti, Francisco; Abdelaziz, Mohamed; Lorite, Juan; Muñoz-Pajares, Antonio Jesús; Valverde, Javier

    2015-01-01

    It is widely assumed that floral diversification occurs by adaptive shifts between pollination niches. In contrast to specialized flowers, identifying pollination niches of generalist flowers is a challenge. Consequently, how generalist pollination niches evolve is largely unknown. We apply tools from network theory and comparative methods to investigate the evolution of pollination niches among generalist species belonging to the genus Erysimum. These species have similar flowers. We found that the studied species may be grouped in several multidimensional niches separated not by a shift of pollinators, but instead by quantitative variation in the relative abundance of pollinator functional groups. These pollination niches did not vary in generalization degree; we did not find any evolutionary trend toward specialization within the studied clade. Furthermore, the evolution of pollination niche fitted to a Brownian motion model without phylogenetic signal, and was characterized by frequent events of niche convergences and divergences. We presume that the evolution of Erysimum pollination niches has occurred mostly by recurrent shifts between slightly different generalized pollinator assemblages varying spatially as a mosaic and without any change in specialization degree. Most changes in pollination niches do not prompt floral divergence, a reason why adaptation to pollinators is uncommon in generalist plants.

  18. Clade-level Spatial Modelling of HPAI H5N1 Dynamics in the Mekong Region Reveals New Patterns and Associations with Agro-Ecological Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artois, Jean; Newman, Scott H; Dhingra, Madhur S; Chaiban, Celia; Linard, Catherine; Cattoli, Giovanni; Monne, Isabella; Fusaro, Alice; Xenarios, Ioannis; Engler, Robin; Liechti, Robin; Kuznetsov, Dmitri; Pham, Thanh Long; Nguyen, Tung; Pham, Van Dong; Castellan, David; Von Dobschuetz, Sophie; Claes, Filip; Dauphin, Gwenaëlle; Inui, Ken; Gilbert, Marius

    2016-07-25

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus has been circulating in Asia since 2003 and diversified into several genetic lineages, or clades. Although the spatial distribution of its outbreaks was extensively studied, differences in clades were never previously taken into account. We developed models to quantify associations over time and space between different HPAI H5N1 viruses from clade 1, 2.3.4 and 2.3.2 and agro-ecological factors. We found that the distribution of clades in the Mekong region from 2004 to 2013 was strongly regionalised, defining specific epidemiological zones, or epizones. Clade 1 became entrenched in the Mekong Delta and was not supplanted by newer clades, in association with a relatively higher presence of domestic ducks. In contrast, two new clades were introduced (2.3.4 and 2.3.2) in northern Viet Nam and were associated with higher chicken density and more intensive chicken production systems. We suggest that differences in poultry production systems in these different epizones may explain these associations, along with differences in introduction pressure from neighbouring countries. The different distribution patterns found at the clade level would not be otherwise apparent through analysis treating all outbreaks equally, which requires improved linking of disease outbreak records and genetic sequence data.

  19. Vectors based on modified vaccinia Ankara expressing influenza H5N1 hemagglutinin induce substantial cross-clade protective immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett Hessel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses are continuing to evolve with a potential threat for an influenza pandemic. So far, the H5N1 influenza viruses have not widely circulated in humans and therefore constitute a high risk for the non immune population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cross-protective potential of the hemagglutinins of five H5N1 strains of divergent clades using a live attenuated modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA vector vaccine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The replication-deficient MVA virus was used to express influenza hemagglutinin (HA proteins. Specifically, recombinant MVA viruses expressing the HA genes of the clade 1 virus A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (VN/1203, the clade 2.1.3 virus A/Indonesia/5/2005 (IN5/05, the clade 2.2 viruses A/turkey/Turkey/1/2005 (TT01/05 and A/chicken/Egypt/3/2006 (CE/06, and the clade 2.3.4 virus A/Anhui/1/2005 (AH1/05 were constructed. These experimental live vaccines were assessed in a lethal mouse model. Mice vaccinated with the VN/1203 hemagglutinin-expressing MVA induced excellent protection against all the above mentioned clades. Also mice vaccinated with the IN5/05 HA expressing MVA induced substantial protection against homologous and heterologous AH1/05 challenge. After vaccination with the CE/06 HA expressing MVA, mice were fully protected against clade 2.2 challenge and partially protected against challenge of other clades. Mice vaccinated with AH1/05 HA expressing MVA vectors were only partially protected against homologous and heterologous challenge. The live vaccines induced substantial amounts of neutralizing antibodies, mainly directed against the homologous challenge virus, and high levels of HA-specific IFN-γ secreting CD4 and CD8 T-cells against epitopes conserved among the H5 clades and subclades. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The highest level of cross-protection was induced by the HA derived from the VN/1203 strain, suggesting that pandemic H5 vaccines

  20. Review of Literature: Genes Related to Postaxial Polydactyly

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Prashant Kumar; El-Harouni, Ashraf A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postaxial polydactyly (PAP) is one of the commonest congenital malformations and usually is associated to several syndromes. There is no primary investigational strategy for PAP cases with single gene disorder in literature. PAP cases with single gene disorder can be classified according to common pathways and molecular basis. Molecular classification may help in diagnostic approach. Materials and Methods: All single gene disorders associated with PAP reported on PubMed and OMI...

  1. Differential expression of genes related to gain and intake in the liver of beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: To better understand which genes play a role in cattle feed intake and gain, we evaluated differential expression of genes related to gain and intake in the liver of crossbred beef steers. Based on past transcriptomics studies on cattle liver, we hypothesized that genes related to metabo...

  2. Relation between common polymorphisms in genes related to inflammatory response and colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George Theodoropoulos; Maria Gazouli; Ioannis Papaconstantinou; Evangelos Felekouras; Nikolaos Nikiteas; Petros Karakitsos; Dimitris Panoussopoulos; Andreas Ch Lazaris; Efstratios Patsouris; John Bramis

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the association between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in inflammatory response-related genes such as interleukin (IL)-6,IL-8, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in a group of Greek patients.METHODS: The study group consisted of 222 CRC patients and 200 healthy controls. Genotyping was performed using allele-specific PCR of PRC-RFLP and the results were confirmed by sequencing. We studied the association of SNPs in the IL-6 (-174G > C), IL-8 (-251T > A), TNFα (-308G > A), ICAM-1 (R241G and K469E),and PPARγ (Pro12Ala) genes and the risk of CRC.RESULTS: The IL-6 -174G, R241 and K469 alleles of ICAM-1 were associated with increased risk of CRC (OR =1.77, 95% CI: 1.34-2.34; OR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.23-2.72;and OR = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.03-1.77 respectively). The IL-8 and TNFα polymorphisms had no effect. Whereas the PPARγ Pro12 genotype was associated with increased risk of disease (OR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.25-2.49).CONCLUSION: The association between common SNPs in immunologic response-related genes and CRC is reported in the present study. Apart from shedding light on the mechanisms of malignancy initiation and progression, SNPs may improve appropriate screening for sub-populations at risk.

  3. Apoptosis-related genes change their expression with age and hearing loss in the mouse cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Sherif F; D'Souza, Mary; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D

    2008-11-01

    To understand possible causative roles of apoptosis gene regulation in age-related hearing loss (presbycusis), apoptotic gene expression patterns in the CBA mouse cochlea of four different age and hearing loss groups were compared, using GeneChip and real-time (qPCR) microarrays. GeneChip transcriptional expression patterns of 318 apoptosis-related genes were analyzed. Thirty eight probes (35 genes) showed significant differences in expression. The significant gene families include Caspases, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma2 family, P53, Calpains, Mitogen activated protein kinase family, Jun oncogene, Nuclear factor of kappa light chain gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor-related and tumor necrosis factor-related genes. The GeneChip results of 31 genes were validated using the new TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA). Eight genes showed highly correlated results with the GeneChip data. These genes are: activating transcription factor3, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma2, Bcl2-like1, caspase4 apoptosis-related cysteine protease 4, Calpain2, dual specificity phosphatase9, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member12a, and Tumor necrosis factor superfamily member13b, suggesting they may play critical roles in inner ear aging.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of three genes of Penguinpox virus corresponding to Vaccinia virus G8R (VLTF-1, A3L (P4b and H3L reveals that it is most closely related to Turkeypox virus, Ostrichpox virus and Pigeonpox virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Anna-Lise

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Phylogenetic analysis of three genes of Penguinpox virus, a novel Avipoxvirus isolated from African penguins, reveals its relationship to other poxviruses. The genes corresponding to Vaccinia virus G8R (VLTF-1, A3L (P4b and H3L were sequenced and phylogenetic trees (Neighbour-Joining and UPGMA constructed from MUSCLE nucleotide and amino acid alignments of the equivalent sequences from several different poxviruses. Based on this analysis, PEPV was confirmed to belong to the genus Avipoxvirus, specifically, clade A, subclade A2 and to be most closely related to Turkeypox virus (TKPV, Ostrichpox virus (OSPVand Pigeonpox virus (PGPV.

  5. Selection of reference genes for gene expression studies related to intramuscular fat deposition in Capra hircus skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wuzheng; Lin, Yaqiu; Liao, Honghai; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The identification of suitable reference genes is critical for obtaining reliable results from gene expression studies using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) because the expression of reference genes may vary considerably under different experimental conditions. In most cases, however, commonly used reference genes are employed in data normalization without proper validation, which may lead to incorrect data interpretation. Here, we aim to select a set of optimal reference genes for the accurate normalization of gene expression associated with intramuscular fat (IMF) deposition during development. In the present study, eight reference genes (PPIB, HMBS, RPLP0, B2M, YWHAZ, 18S, GAPDH and ACTB) were evaluated by three different algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper) in two types of muscle tissues (longissimus dorsi muscle and biceps femoris muscle) across different developmental stages. All three algorithms gave similar results. PPIB and HMBS were identified as the most stable reference genes, while the commonly used reference genes 18S and GAPDH were the most variably expressed, with expression varying dramatically across different developmental stages. Furthermore, to reveal the crucial role of appropriate reference genes in obtaining a reliable result, analysis of PPARG expression was performed by normalization to the most and the least stable reference genes. The relative expression levels of PPARG normalized to the most stable reference genes greatly differed from those normalized to the least stable one. Therefore, evaluation of reference genes must be performed for a given experimental condition before the reference genes are used. PPIB and HMBS are the optimal reference genes for analysis of gene expression associated with IMF deposition in skeletal muscle during development.

  6. A genome-wide survey of maize lipid-related genes: candidate genes mining,digital gene expression profiling and colocation with QTL for maize kernel oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Lipids play an important role in plants due to their abundance and their extensive participation in many metabolic processes.Genes involved in lipid metabolism have been extensively studied in Arabidopsis and other plant species.In this study,a total of 1003 maize lipid-related genes were cloned and annotated,including 42 genes with experimental validation,732 genes with full-length cDNA and protein sequences in public databases and 229 newly cloned genes.Ninety-seven maize lipid-related genes with tissue-preferential expression were discovered by in silico gene expression profiling based on 1984483 maize Expressed Sequence Tags collected from 182 cDNA libraries.Meanwhile,70 QTL clusters for maize kernel oil were identified,covering 34.5% of the maize genome.Fifty-nine (84%) QTL clusters co-located with at least one lipid-related gene,and the total number of these genes amounted to 147.Interestingly,thirteen genes with kernel-preferential expression profiles fell within QTL clusters for maize kernel oil content.All the maize lipid-related genes identified here may provide good targets for maize kernel oil QTL cloning and thus help us to better understand the molecular mechanism of maize kernel oil accumulation.

  7. Isolation and characterization of Agouti: a diabetes/obesity related gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woychik, Richard P.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to the cloning and expression of the Agouti gene and analogous genes in transformed, transfected and transgenic mice. The present invention provides an animal model for the study of diabetes, obesity and tumors for the testing of potential therapeutic agents. The present invention provides oligonucleotide probes for the detection of the Agouti gene and mutations in the gene. The present invention also relates to the isolation and recombinant production of the Agouti gene product, production of antibodies to the Agouti gene product and their use as diagnostic and therapeutic agents.

  8. Isolation and characterization of Agouti: a diabetes/obesity related gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woychik, Richard P. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-06-27

    The present invention relates to the cloning and expression of the Agouti gene and analogous genes in transformed, transfected and transgenic mice. The present invention provides an animal model for the study of diabetes, obesity and tumors for the testing of potential therapeutic agents. The present invention provides oligonucleotide probes for the detection of the Agouti gene and mutations in the gene. The present invention also relates to the isolation and recombinant production of the Agouti gene product, production of antibodies to the Agouti gene product and their use as diagnostic and therapeutic agents.

  9. Gene delivery in peritoneal dialysis related peritoneal fibrosis research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xie-jia; SUN Lin; XIAO Li; LIU Fu-you

    2012-01-01

    Objective To summarize the development of gene delivery vectors in peritoneal fibrosis research and discuss the feasibility and superiority of lentiviral vectors.Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant English articles published from 1995 to 2011.Study selection Articles regarding the gene therapy in peritoneal fibrosis research using non-viral vectors,adenoviral vectors,ratroviral vectors,and lentiviral vectors were selected.Data were mainly extracted from 60 articles,which are listed in the reference section of this review.Results Non-viral vector-mediated gene delivery (including naked DNA for ex vivo,oligonucleotides,ultrasoundcontrast agent mediated naked gene delivery,etc.) and viral vector-mediated gene delivery (including adenovirus,helper-dependant adenovirus,and retrovirus vectors) have been successfully applied both in the mechanistic investigation and the potential prevention and treatment of peritoneal fibrosis.Conclusions Peritoneal fibrosis is a major complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD).Recently,the wide use of the gene delivery technique made it possible to access and further research peritoneal fibrosis.The use of lentiviral vector is expected to be widely used in PD research in the future due to its advantages in gene delivery.

  10. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Tension-Type Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ashina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last 10 years there has been increasing interest in the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in primary headaches. Tension-type headache is one of the most common and important types of primary headaches, and ongoing nociception from myofascial tissues may play an important role in the pathophysiology of this disorder. CGRP sensory fibers are preferentially located in the walls of arteries, and nerve fibers containing CGRP accompany small blood vessels in human cranial muscles. It is well established that nociception may lead to release of CGRP from sensory nerve endings and from central terminals of sensory afferents into the spinal cord. It has also been shown that density of CGRP fibers around arteries is increased in persistently inflamed muscle. These findings indicate that ongoing activity in sensory neurons in the cranial muscles may be reflected in changes of plasma levels of neuropeptides in patients with chronic tension-type headache. To explore the possible role of CGRP in tension-type headache, plasma levels of CGRP were measured in patients with chronic tension-type headache. This study showed that plasma levels of CGRP are normal in patients and unrelated to headache state. However, the findings of normal plasma levels of CGRP do not exclude the possibility that abnormalities of this neuropeptide at the neuronal or peripheral (pericranial muscles levels play a role in the pathophysiology of tension-type headache. Investigation of CGRP in other compartments with new sensitive methods of analysis is necessary to clarify its role in tension-type headache.

  11. Effects related to gene-gene interactions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor on essential hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞浩

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of the gene-gene interaction among the single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα/δ/γ on essential hypertension(EH).Methods

  12. κMicroarray analysis of relative gene expression stability for selection of internal reference genes in the rhesus macaque brain

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    Urbanski Henryk F

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normalization of gene expression data refers to the comparison of expression values using reference standards that are consistent across all conditions of an experiment. In PCR studies, genes designated as "housekeeping genes" have been used as internal reference genes under the assumption that their expression is stable and independent of experimental conditions. However, verification of this assumption is rarely performed. Here we assess the use of gene microarray analysis to facilitate selection of internal reference sequences with higher expression stability across experimental conditions than can be expected using traditional selection methods. We recently demonstrated that relative gene expression from qRT-PCR data normalized using GAPDH, ALG9 and RPL13A expression values mirrored relative expression using quantile normalization in Robust Multichip Analysis (RMA on the Affymetrix® GeneChip® rhesus Macaque Genome Array. Having shown that qRT-PCR and Affymetrix® GeneChip® data from the same hormone replacement therapy (HRT study yielded concordant results, we used quantile-normalized gene microarray data to identify the most stably expressed among probe sets for prospective internal reference genes across three brain regions from the HRT study and an additional study of normally menstruating rhesus macaques (cycle study. Gene selection was limited to 575 previously published human "housekeeping" genes. Twelve animals were used per study, and three brain regions were analyzed from each animal. Gene expression stabilities were determined using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper software packages. Results Sequences co-annotated for ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27A, and ubiquitin were among the most stably expressed under all conditions and selection criteria used for both studies. Higher annotation quality on the human GeneChip® facilitated more targeted analysis than could be accomplished using the rhesus GeneChip®. In

  13. Transmissibility of the monkeypox virus clades via respiratory transmission: investigation using the prairie dog-monkeypox virus challenge system.

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    Christina L Hutson

    Full Text Available Monkeypox virus (MPXV is endemic within Africa where it sporadically is reported to cause outbreaks of human disease. In 2003, an outbreak of human MPXV occurred in the US after the importation of infected African rodents. Since the eradication of smallpox (caused by an orthopoxvirus (OPXV related to MPXV and cessation of routine smallpox vaccination (with the live OPXV vaccinia, there is an increasing population of people susceptible to OPXV diseases. Previous studies have shown that the prairie dog MPXV model is a functional animal model for the study of systemic human OPXV illness. Studies with this model have demonstrated that infected animals are able to transmit the virus to naive animals through multiple routes of exposure causing subsequent infection, but were not able to prove that infected animals could transmit the virus exclusively via the respiratory route. Herein we used the model system to evaluate the hypothesis that the Congo Basin clade of MPXV is more easily transmitted, via respiratory route, than the West African clade. Using a small number of test animals, we show that transmission of viruses from each of the MPXV clade was minimal via respiratory transmission. However, transmissibility of the Congo Basin clade was slightly greater than West African MXPV clade (16.7% and 0% respectively. Based on these findings, respiratory transmission appears to be less efficient than those of previous studies assessing contact as a mechanism of transmission within the prairie dog MPXV animal model.

  14. The expanding large-spored Metschnikowia clade: Metschnikowia matae sp. nov., a yeast species with two varieties from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Santos, Ana Raquel; Perri, Ami M; Andrietta, Maria da Graça Stupiello; Rosa, Carlos A; Lachance, Marc-André

    2015-09-01

    Fifty-two yeast isolates from flowers and associated nitidulid beetles of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest (Mata Atlântica) region were found to represent a new species in the large-spored Metschnikowia clade. The species is heterothallic, haploid, and allogamous, and produces asci with two aciculate ascospores that can reach 80 μm in length, as is typical in the clade. Analysis of sequences of the ribosomal RNA gene cluster indicates that the new species is closely related to Metschnikowia lochheadii, which ranges across Central America to northern Brazil, occurs as an adventive species in Hawaii, but is rarely found in central Brazil. The species is not readily distinguishable from relatives based on morphology or growth responses, but is well delineated from M. lochheadii on reproductive isolation. Based on an intron splice site PCR screen, we selected 26 isolates for further study. The sequence of the region that includes the complete internal transcribed spacer/5.8S rRNA gene segment as well as the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rRNA gene contained three polymorphic segments and 14 haplotypes were identified. Of these, a single divergent isolate from the southernmost of four sampled localities exhibited diminished mating success when crossed with others. We describe two varieties, Metschnikowia matae var. matae sp. nov. var. nov. (type UFMG-CM-Y395(T), CBS 13986(T), NRRL Y-63736(T); allotype UFMG-CM-Y391(A), CBS 13987(A), NRRL Y-63735(A)) and Metschnikowia matae var. maris sp. nov. var. nov. (type UFMG-CM-Y397(T), CBS 13985(T), NRRL Y-63737(T)). We also report on the discovery of the h (+) mating type of Candida ipomoeae and transfer of the species to Metschnikowia ipomoeae comb. nov. (allotype UWOPS 12-660.1(A), CBS 13988(A), NRRL Y-63738(A)).

  15. Characterization of SR3 reveals abundance of non-LTR retrotransposons of the RTE clade in the genome of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni

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    Brindley Paul J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is becoming apparent that perhaps as much as half of the genome of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni is constituted of mobile genetic element-related sequences. Non-long terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons, related to the LINE elements of mammals, comprise much of this repetitive component of the schistosome genome. Of more than 12 recognized clades of non-LTR retrotransposons, only members of the CR1, RTE, and R2 clades have been reported from the schistosome genome. Results Inspection of the nucleotide sequence of bacterial artificial chromosome number 49_J_14 from chromosome 1 of the genome of Schistosoma mansoni (GenBank AC093105 revealed the likely presence of several RTE-like retrotransposons. Among these, a new non-LTR retrotransposon designated SR3 was identified and is characterized here. Analysis of gene structure and phylogenetic analysis of both the reverse transcriptase and endonuclease domains of the mobile element indicated that SR3 represented a new family of RTE-like non-LTR retrotransposons. Remarkably, two full-length copies of SR3-like elements were present in BAC 49-J-14, and one of 3,211 bp in length appeared to be intact, indicating SR3 to be an active non-LTR retrotransposon. Both were flanked by target site duplications of 10–12 bp. Southern hybridization and bioinformatics analyses indicated the presence of numerous copies (probably >1,000 of SR3 interspersed throughout the genome of S. mansoni. Bioinformatics analyses also revealed SR3 to be transcribed in both larval and adult developmental stages of S. mansoni and to be also present in the genomes of the other major schistosome parasites of humans, Schistosoma haematobium and S. japonicum. Conclusion Numerous copies of SR3, a novel non-LTR retrotransposon of the RTE clade are present in the genome of S. mansoni. Non-LTR retrotransposons of the RTE clade including SR3 appear to have been remarkably successful in colonizing, and

  16. The urease gene cluster of Vibrio parahaemolyticus does not influence the expression of the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) gene or the TDH-related hemolysin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Okuda, Jun; Iida, Tetsuya; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate why the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) of Vibrio parahaemolyticus are produced at low levels from urease-positive strains, the effect of the functional urease gene cluster of V. parahaemolyticus on the expression of the tdh and trh genes was examined. Transcriptional lacZ fusions with the tdh1, tdh2, trh1 and trh2 genes representing variants of the tdh and trh genes were integrated into the chromosome of an Escherichia coli strain and a urease-negative V. parahaemolyticus strain. The plasmid-borne urease gene cluster introduced and expressed in these constructs did not affect expression of any of the fusion genes. The amount of TDH produced from a Kanagawa phenomenon-positive V. parahaemolyticus did not change by introduction of the urease gene cluster either. It was concluded therefore that the urease gene cluster is not involved in the regulation of tdh and trh expression.

  17. The zooflagellates Stephanopogon and Percolomonas are a clade (class Percolatea: Phylum Percolozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Nikolaev, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The enigmatic marine protozoan Stephanopogon was first classified with ciliate protozoa because its pellicle also has rows of cilia. As ciliates have nuclear dimorphism with separate germline and somatic nuclei, Stephanopogon with several identical nuclei was regarded as a model for a hypothetical homokaryotic ancestor of ciliates. When electron microscopy revealed radical differences from ciliates this idea was abandoned, but its evolutionary position remains controversial, affinities with three other phyla being suggested. We sequenced 18S rDNA from Stephanopogon aff. minuta and actin genes from it and Stephanopogon apogon to clarify their evolutionary position. Phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA nest S. aff. minuta and Stephanopogon minuta securely within the protozoan phylum Percolozoa with zooflagellates of the genus Percolomonas, their closest relatives, comprising the clade Percolatea. This supports a previous grouping of Stephanopogon (order Pseudociliatida) with Percolomonas (order Percolomonadida) as a purely zooflagellate class Percolatea within Percolozoa, in contrast to the fundamentally amoeboid Heterolobosea, which are probably ancestral to Percolatea. Stephanopogon actins evolve exceptionally fast: actin trees place them as a long branch within bikont eukaryotes without revealing their sisters. We establish Percolomonadidae fam. n. for Percolomonas, excluding Pharyngomonas kirbyi g., sp. n. and Pharyngomonas (=Tetramastix=Percolomonas) salina comb. n., which unlike Percolomonas have two anterior and two posterior cilia and a pocket-like pharynx, like "Macropharyngomonas", now grouped with Pharyngomonas as a new purely zooflagellate class Pharyngomonadea, within a new subphylum Pharyngomonada; this contrasts them with the revised ancestrally amoeboflagellate subphylum Tetramitia. We discuss evolution of the percolozoan cytoskeleton and different body forms.

  18. Collecting reliable clades using the Greedy Strict Consensus Merger

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    Markus Fleischauer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Supertree methods combine a set of phylogenetic trees into a single supertree. Similar to supermatrix methods, these methods provide a way to reconstruct larger parts of the Tree of Life, potentially evading the computational complexity of phylogenetic inference methods such as maximum likelihood. The supertree problem can be formalized in different ways, to cope with contradictory information in the input. Many supertree methods have been developed. Some of them solve NP-hard optimization problems like the well-known Matrix Representation with Parsimony, while others have polynomial worst-case running time but work in a greedy fashion (FlipCut. Both can profit from a set of clades that are already known to be part of the supertree. The Superfine approach shows how the Greedy Strict Consensus Merger (GSCM can be used as preprocessing to find these clades. We introduce different scoring functions for the GSCM, a randomization, as well as a combination thereof to improve the GSCM to find more clades. This helps, in turn, to improve the resolution of the GSCM supertree. We find this modifications to increase the number of true positive clades by 18% compared to the currently used Overlap scoring.

  19. Protein evolution in two co-occurring types of Symbiodinium: an exploration into the genetic basis of thermal tolerance in Symbiodinium clade D

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    Ladner Jason T

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The symbiosis between reef-building corals and photosynthetic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium is an integral part of the coral reef ecosystem, as corals are dependent on Symbiodinium for the majority of their energy needs. However, this partnership is increasingly at risk due to changing climatic conditions. It is thought that functional diversity within Symbiodinium may allow some corals to rapidly adapt to different environments by changing the type of Symbiodinium with which they partner; however, very little is known about the molecular basis of the functional differences among symbiont groups. One group of Symbiodinium that is hypothesized to be important for the future of reefs is clade D, which, in general, seems to provide the coral holobiont (i.e., coral host and associated symbiont community with elevated thermal tolerance. Using high-throughput sequencing data from field-collected corals we assembled, de novo, draft transcriptomes for Symbiodinium clades C and D. We then explore the functional basis of thermal tolerance in clade D by comparing rates of coding sequence evolution among the four clades of Symbiodinium most commonly found in reef-building corals (A-D. Results We are able to highlight a number of genes and functional categories as candidates for involvement in the increased thermal tolerance of clade D. These include a fatty acid desaturase, molecular chaperones and proteins involved in photosynthesis and the thylakoid membrane. We also demonstrate that clades C and D co-occur within most of the sampled colonies of Acropora hyacinthus, suggesting widespread potential for this coral species to acclimatize to changing thermal conditions via ‘shuffling’ the proportions of these two clades from within their current symbiont communities. Conclusions Transcriptome-wide analysis confirms that the four main Symbiodinium clades found within corals exhibit extensive evolutionary divergence (18.5-27.3% avg

  20. Cross-neutralizing activity of human anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies derived from non-B clade HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrabi, Raiees; Williams, Constance; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Li, Liuzhe; Choudhary, Alok K; Wig, Naveet; Biswas, Ashutosh; Luthra, Kalpana; Nadas, Arthur; Seaman, Michael S; Nyambi, Phillipe; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Gorny, Miroslaw K

    2013-05-10

    One approach to the development of an HIV vaccine is to design a protein template which can present gp120 epitopes inducing cross-neutralizing antibodies. To select a V3 sequence for immunogen design, we compared the neutralizing activities of 18 anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) derived from Cameroonian and Indian individuals infected with clade AG and C, respectively. It was found that V3 mAbs from the Cameroonian patients were significantly more cross-neutralizing than those from India. Interestingly, superior neutralizing activity of Cameroonian mAbs was also observed among the nine VH5-51/VL lambda genes encoding V3 mAbs which mediate a similar mode of recognition. This correlated with higher relative binding affinity to a variety of gp120s and increased mutation rates in V3 mAbs from Cameroon. These results suggest that clade C V3 is probably weakly immunogenic and that the V3 sequence of CRF02_AG viruses can serve as a plausible template for vaccine immunogen design.

  1. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN RECEPTOR-RELATED PROTEIN GENE, BUTYRYLCHOLINESTERASE GENE AND ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE IN CHINESE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕胜; 张昱; 吴江; 王德生; 赵庆杰

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To research the relations between low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein gene (LRP)polymorphism, butyrylcholinesterase gene (BchE) polymorphism and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in Chinese. Methods. The gene polymorphisms of LRP and BchE were genotyped in 38 AD eases and 40 controls withpolymerase chain reaction-restrictian fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods. AD groups were classi-fled according to the LRP C/C genotype and compared with matched controls. Resu/ts. AD group had higher frequencies ofC/C homozygote (81.6% vs 60. 0%, P <0. 05) and of C allele (89.5% vs 76. 3%, P < 0. 05), with no significant difference between any of these LRP genotypes classi-fied AD groups and their respective control groups. Conclusions. A positive correlation was found between LRP gene polymorphism and AD, but not betweenBchE gene polymorphism and AD in Chinese AD cases.

  2. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN RECEPTOR-RELATED PROTEIN GENE, BUTYRYLCHOLINESTERASE GENE AND ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE IN CHINESE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To research the relations between low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein gene (LRP) polymorphism, butyrylcholinesterase gene (BchE) polymorphism and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in Chinese. Methods. The gene polymorphisms of LRP and BchE were genotyped in 38 AD cases and 40 controls with polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods. AD groups were classified according to the LRP C/C genotype and compared with matched controls. Results. AD group had higher frequencies of C/C homozygote (81.6% vs 60.0% , P<0.05) and of C allele (89.5% vs 76.3% , P< 0.05),with no significant difference between any of these LRP genotypes classified AD groups and their respective control groups.? Conclusions. A positive correlation was found between LRP gene polymorphism and AD, but not between BchE gene polymorphism and AD in Chinese AD cases.

  3. Expansion of the Candida tanzawaensis yeast clade: 16 novel Candida species from basidiocarp-feeding beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Sung-Oui; McHugh, Joseph V; Blackwell, Meredith

    2004-11-01

    A major clade of new yeast taxa from the digestive tract of basidiocarp-feeding beetles is recognized based on rRNA gene sequence analyses. Almost 30 % of 650 gut isolates formed a statistically well-supported clade that included Candida tanzawaensis. The yeasts in the clade were isolated from 11 families of beetles, of which Tenebrionidae and Erotylidae were most commonly sampled. Repeated isolation of certain yeasts from the same beetle species at different times and places indicated strong host associations. Sexual reproduction was never observed in the yeasts. Based on comparisons of small- and large-subunit rRNA gene sequences and morphological and physiological traits, the yeasts were placed in Candida ambrosiae and in 16 other undescribed taxa. In this report, the novel species in the genus Candida are described and their relationships with other taxa in the Saccharomycetes are discussed. The novel species and their type strains are as follows: Candida guaymorum (NRRL Y-27568(T)=CBS 9823(T)), Candida bokatorum (NRRL Y-27571(T)=CBS 9824(T)), Candida kunorum (NRRL Y-27580(T)=CBS 9825(T)), Candida terraborum (NRRL Y-27573(T)=CBS 9826(T)), Candida emberorum (NRRL Y-27606(T)=CBS 9827(T)), Candida wounanorum (NRRL Y-27574(T)=CBS 9828(T)), Candida yuchorum (NRRL Y-27569(T)=CBS 9829(T)), Candida chickasaworum (NRRL Y-27566(T)=CBS 9830(T)), Candida choctaworum (NRRL Y-27584(T)=CBS 9831(T)), Candida bolitotheri (NRRL Y-27587(T)=CBS 9832(T)), Candida atakaporum (NRRL Y-27570(T)=CBS 9833(T)), Candida panamericana (NRRL Y-27567(T)=CBS 9834(T)), Candida bribrorum (NRRL Y-27572(T)=CBS 9835(T)), Candida maxii (NRRL Y-27588(T)=CBS 9836(T)), Candida anneliseae (NRRL Y-27563(T)=CBS 9837(T)) and Candida taliae (NRRL Y-27589(T)=CBS 9838(T)).

  4. Mitochondrial genome sequences reveal evolutionary relationships of the Phytophthora 1c clade species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassiter, Erica S; Russ, Carsten; Nusbaum, Chad; Zeng, Qiandong; Saville, Amanda C; Olarte, Rodrigo A; Carbone, Ignazio; Hu, Chia-Hui; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Samaniego, Jose A; Thorne, Jeffrey L; Ristaino, Jean B

    2015-11-01

    Phytophthora infestans is one of the most destructive plant pathogens of potato and tomato globally. The pathogen is closely related to four other Phytophthora species in the 1c clade including P. phaseoli, P. ipomoeae, P. mirabilis and P. andina that are important pathogens of other wild and domesticated hosts. P. andina is an interspecific hybrid between P. infestans and an unknown Phytophthora species. We have sequenced mitochondrial genomes of the sister species of P. infestans and examined the evolutionary relationships within the clade. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the P. phaseoli mitochondrial lineage is basal within the clade. P. mirabilis and P. ipomoeae are sister lineages and share a common ancestor with the Ic mitochondrial lineage of P. andina. These lineages in turn are sister to the P. infestans and P. andina Ia mitochondrial lineages. The P. andina Ic lineage diverged much earlier than the P. andina Ia mitochondrial lineage and P. infestans. The presence of two mitochondrial lineages in P. andina supports the hybrid nature of this species. The ancestral state of the P. andina Ic lineage in the tree and its occurrence only in the Andean regions of Ecuador, Colombia and Peru suggests that the origin of this species hybrid in nature may occur there.

  5. Phylogeny of Elatinaceae and the Tropical Gondwanan Origin of the Centroplacaceae(Malpighiaceae, Elatinaceae) Clade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhenxiang; Peterson, Kylee; Rushworth, Catherine; Beaulieu, Jeremy; Davis, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    The flowering plant family Elatinaceae is a widespread aquatic lineage inhabiting temperate and tropical latitudes, including ∼35(-50) species. Its phylogeny remains largely unknown, compromising our understanding of its systematics. Moreover, this group is particularly in need of attention because the biogeography of most aquatic plant clades has yet to be investigated, resulting in uncertainty about whether aquatic plants show histories that deviate from terrestrial plants. We inferred the phylogeny of Elatinaceae from four DNA regions spanning 59 accessions across the family. An expanded sampling was used for molecular divergence time estimation and ancestral area reconstruction to infer the biogeography of Elatinaceae and their closest terrestrial relatives, Malpighiaceae and Centroplacaceae. The two genera of Elatinaceae, Bergia and Elatine, are monophyletic, but several traditionally recognized groups within the family are non-monophyletic. Our results suggest two ancient biogeographic events in the Centroplacaceae(Malpighiaceae, Elatinaceae) clade involving western Gondwana, while Elatinaceae shows a more complicated biogeographic history with a high degree of continental endemicity. Our results indicate the need for further taxonomic investigation of Elatinaceae. Further, our study is one of few to implicate ancient Gondwanan biogeography in extant angiosperms, especially significant given the Centroplacaceae(Malpighiaceae, Elatinaceae) clade's largely tropical distribution. Finally, Elatinaceae demonstrates long-term continental in situ diversification, which argues against recent dispersal as a universal explanation commonly invoked for aquatic plant distributions. PMID:27684711

  6. Activities of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and related peptides at the CGRP receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maton, P.N.; Pradhan, T.; Zhou, Z.C.; Gardner, J.D.; Jensen, R.T. (National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    In guinea pig pancreatic acini rat calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) increased amylase release 2-fold, salmon calcitonin had an efficacy of only 44% of that of CGRP and (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37) and human calcitonin had no actions. (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37), but not human calcitonin, antagonized the actions of CGRP in pancreatic acini with an IC50 of 3 microM. (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37) produced a parallel rightward shift in the dose-response curve for CGRP-stimulated amylase secretion. The inhibition was specific for CGRP and was reversible. Studies with 125I-CGRP demonstrated that CGRP, salmon calcitonin and (Tyr0)CGRP, but not human calcitonin, interacted with CGRP receptors on pancreatic acini. These results indicate that various CGRP-related peptides demonstrate different relationships between their abilities to occupy the CGRP receptor and to affect biologic activity, with CGRP itself being a full agonist, salmon calcitonin a partial agonist, (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37) a competitive antagonist, and human calcitonin having no actions.

  7. Suppression subtractive hybridization identified differentially expressed genes in lung adenocarcinoma: ERGIC3 as a novel lung cancer-related gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Mingsong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To understand the carcinogenesis caused by accumulated genetic and epigenetic alterations and seek novel biomarkers for various cancers, studying differentially expressed genes between cancerous and normal tissues is crucial. In the study, two cDNA libraries of lung cancer were constructed and screened for identification of differentially expressed genes. Methods Two cDNA libraries of differentially expressed genes were constructed using lung adenocarcinoma tissue and adjacent nonmalignant lung tissue by suppression subtractive hybridization. The data of the cDNA libraries were then analyzed and compared using bioinformatics analysis. Levels of mRNA and protein were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-RT-PCR and western blot respectively, as well as expression and localization of proteins were determined by immunostaining. Gene functions were investigated using proliferation and migration assays after gene silencing and gene over-expression. Results Two libraries of differentially expressed genes were obtained. The forward-subtracted library (FSL and the reverse-subtracted library (RSL contained 177 and 59 genes, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that these genes were involved in a wide range of cellular functions. The vast majority of these genes were newly identified to be abnormally expressed in lung cancer. In the first stage of the screening for 16 genes, we compared lung cancer tissues with their adjacent non-malignant tissues at the mRNA level, and found six genes (ERGIC3, DDR1, HSP90B1, SDC1, RPSA, and LPCAT1 from the FSL were significantly up-regulated while two genes (GPX3 and TIMP3 from the RSL were significantly down-regulated (P  Conclusions The two libraries of differentially expressed genes may provide the basis for new insights or clues for finding novel lung cancer-related genes; several genes were newly found in lung cancer with ERGIC3 seeming a novel lung cancer-related

  8. Understanding the Role of Housekeeping and Stress-Related Genes in Transcription-Regulatory Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Allison; Kavraki, Lydia; Balázsi, Gábor

    2008-03-01

    Despite the increasing number of completely sequenced genomes, much remains to be learned about how living cells process environmental information and respond to changes in their surroundings. Accumulating evidence indicates that eukaryotic and prokaryotic genes can be classified in two distinct categories that we will call class I and class II. Class I genes are housekeeping genes, often characterized by stable, noise resistant expression levels. In contrast, class II genes are stress-related genes and often have noisy, unstable expression levels. In this work we analyze the large scale transcription-regulatory networks (TRN) of E. coli and S. cerevisiae and preliminary data on H. sapien. We find that stable, housekeeping genes (class I) are preferentially utilized as transcriptional inputs while stress related, unstable genes (class II) are utilized as transcriptional integrators. This might be the result of convergent evolution that placed the appropriate genes in the appropriate locations within transcriptional networks according to some fundamental principles that govern cellular information processing.

  9. Heat Stress Related Gene Expression in Gossypium hirsutum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DEMIREL; Ufuk; GR; M; Atilla; KARAKU; Mehmet; MEMON; Abdul; Rezaque

    2008-01-01

    Abiotic stress is a major limiting factor to crop productivity,and heat stress is one of the important elements for reduced crop production.Plants respond to heat stress at molecular and cellular levels as well as physiological level.Heat stress alters expression patterns of numerous genes in plants.

  10. A Systematic Investigation into Aging Related Genes in Brain and Their Relationship with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guofeng; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Mei, Hongkang

    2016-01-01

    Aging, as a complex biological process, is accompanied by the accumulation of functional loses at different levels, which makes age to be the biggest risk factor to many neurological diseases. Even following decades of investigation, the process of aging is still far from being fully understood, especially at a systematic level. In this study, we identified aging related genes in brain by collecting the ones with sustained and consistent gene expression or DNA methylation changes in the aging process. Functional analysis with Gene Ontology to these genes suggested transcriptional regulators to be the most affected genes in the aging process. Transcription regulation analysis found some transcription factors, especially Specificity Protein 1 (SP1), to play important roles in regulating aging related gene expression. Module-based functional analysis indicated these genes to be associated with many well-known aging related pathways, supporting the validity of our approach to select aging related genes. Finally, we investigated the roles of aging related genes on Alzheimer's Disease (AD). We found that aging and AD related genes both involved some common pathways, which provided a possible explanation why aging made the brain more vulnerable to Alzheimer's Disease.

  11. Discovery and analysis of inflammatory disease-related genes using cDNA microarrays

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    cDNA microarray technology is used to profile complex diseases and discover novel disease-related genes. In inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, expression patterns of diverse cell types contribute to the pathology. We have monitored gene expression in this disease state with a microarray of selected human genes of probable significance in inflammation as well as with genes expressed in peripheral human blood cells. Messenger RNA from cultured macrophages, chondrocyte cell lines...

  12. Age-related changes in relative expression stability of commonly used housekeeping genes in selected porcine tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Looft Christian

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression analysis using real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR is increasingly important in biological research due to the high-throughput and accuracy of qRT-PCR. For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, normalization of gene expression data against housekeeping genes or internal control genes is required. The stability of reference genes has a tremendous effect on the results of relative quantification of gene expression by qRT-PCR. The expression stability of reference genes could vary according to tissues, age of individuals and experimental conditions. In the pig however, very little information is available on the expression stability of reference genes. The aim of this research was therefore to develop a new set of reference genes which can be used for normalization of mRNA expression data of genes expressed in varieties of porcine tissues at different ages. Results The mRNA expression stability of nine commonly used reference genes (B2M, BLM, GAPDH, HPRT1, PPIA, RPL4, SDHA, TBP and YWHAZ was determined in varieties of tissues collected from newborn, young and adult pigs. geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper software were used to rank the genes according to their stability. geNorm software revealed that RPL4, PPIA and YWHAZ showed high stability in newborn and adult pigs, while B2M, YWHAZ and SDHA showed high stability in young pigs. In all cases, GAPDH showed the least stability in geNorm. NormFinder revealed that TBP was the most stable gene in newborn and young pigs, while PPIA was most stable in adult pigs. Moreover, geNorm software suggested that the geometric mean of three most stable gene would be the suitable combination for accurate normalization of gene expression study. Conclusions Although, there was discrepancy in the ranking order of reference genes obtained by different analysing software methods, the geometric mean of the RPL4, PPIA and YWHAZ seems to be the most appropriate combination of

  13. Symbiosis-related pea genes modulate fungal and plant gene expression during the arbuscule stage of mycorrhiza with Glomus intraradices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Elena; Seddas-Dozolme, Pascale M A; Arnould, Christine; Tollot, Marie; van Tuinen, Diederik; Borisov, Alexey; Gianinazzi, Silvio; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne

    2010-08-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhiza association results from a successful interaction between genomes of the plant and fungal symbiotic partners. In this study, we analyzed the effect of inactivation of late-stage symbiosis-related pea genes on symbiosis-associated fungal and plant molecular responses in order to gain insight into their role in the functional mycorrhizal association. The expression of a subset of ten fungal and eight plant genes, previously reported to be activated during mycorrhiza development, was compared in Glomus intraradices-inoculated wild-type and isogenic genotypes of pea mutated for the PsSym36, PsSym33, and PsSym40 genes where arbuscule formation is inhibited or fungal turnover modulated, respectively. Microdissection was used to corroborate arbuscule-related fungal gene expression. Molecular responses varied between pea genotypes and with fungal development. Most of the fungal genes were downregulated when arbuscule formation was defective, and several were upregulated with more rapid fungal development. Some of the plant genes were also affected by inactivation of the PsSym36, PsSym33, and PsSym40 loci, but in a more time-dependent way during root colonization by G. intraradices. Results indicate a role of the late-stage symbiosis-related pea genes not only in mycorrhiza development but also in the symbiotic functioning of arbuscule-containing cells.

  14. Selection of Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies related to lung injury in a preterm lamb model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Fantini, Prue M; Rajapaksa, Anushi E; Oakley, Regina; Tingay, David G

    2016-05-23

    Preterm newborns often require invasive support, however even brief periods of supported ventilation applied inappropriately to the lung can cause injury. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qPCR) has been extensively employed in studies of ventilation-induced lung injury with the reference gene 18S ribosomal RNA (18S RNA) most commonly employed as the internal control reference gene. Whilst the results of these studies depend on the stability of the reference gene employed, the use of 18S RNA has not been validated. In this study the expression profile of five candidate reference genes (18S RNA, ACTB, GAPDH, TOP1 and RPS29) in two geographical locations, was evaluated by dedicated algorithms, including geNorm, Normfinder, Bestkeeper and ΔCt method and the overall stability of these candidate genes determined (RefFinder). Secondary studies examined the influence of reference gene choice on the relative expression of two well-validated lung injury markers; EGR1 and IL1B. In the setting of the preterm lamb model of lung injury, RPS29 reference gene expression was influenced by tissue location; however we determined that individual ventilation strategies influence reference gene stability. Whilst 18S RNA is the most commonly employed reference gene in preterm lamb lung studies, our results suggest that GAPDH is a more suitable candidate.

  15. Study on Wusan Granule Anti-tumor Related Target Gene Screened by Cdna Microarray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Zi-li; SHI Jin-ping; CHEN Hai-hong

    2006-01-01

    To screen Wusan Granule anti-tumor related target gene using cDNA microarray technique, both mRNA from Lewis lung carcinoma tissues treated by Wusan Granule and untreated control are reversibly transcribed to prepare cDNA probes which are labeled by Cy5 and Cy3. Then, the probes are hybridized to the mice cDNA microarray type MGEC-20S. After hybridization, the cDNA microarray is scanned by ScanArray 3 000 scanner and the data is analyzed by ImaGene 3 software to screen the differentially expressed genes. There are 45 differentially expressed genes including 18 known genes and 27 unknown genes between the two groups, and among them, 20 elevated genes and 25 reduced genes are identified. Additionally, the genes related to invasion and metastasis of malignant carcinomas are down-regulated and the genes related to apoptosis are up-regulated. The cDNA microarray technique is a high-throughput approach to screen the Wusan Granule anti-tumor related target genes, which allow us to explore the molecular biological mechanism on a genomic scale.

  16. Rank sum method for related gene selection and its application to tumor diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Lin; MA Jinwen; PEI Jian

    2004-01-01

    Tumor diagnosis by analyzing gene expression profiles becomes an interesting topic in bioinformatics and the main problem is to identify the genes related to a tumor.This paper proposes a rank sum method to identify the related genes based on the rank sum test theory in statistics.The tumor diagnosis system is constructed by the support vector machine (SVM) trained on the set of the related gene expression profiles. The experiments demonstrate that the constructed tumor diagnosis system with the rank sum method and SVM can reach an accuracy level of 96.2% on the colon data and 100 % on the leukemia data.

  17. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of elite genes in wheat and its related species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jirui Wang; Pengfei Qi; Yuming Wei; Dengcai Liu; George Fedak; Youliang Zheng

    2010-12-01

    The tribe Triticeae includes major cereal crops (bread wheat, durum wheat, triticale, barley and rye), as well as abundant forage and lawn grasses. Wheat and its wild related species possess numerous favourable genes for yield improvement, grain quality enhancement, biotic and abiotic stress resistance, and constitute a giant gene pool for wheat improvement. In recent years, significant progress on molecular characterization and functional analysis of elite genes in wheat and its related species have been achieved. In this paper, we review the cloned functional genes correlated with grain quality, biotic and abiotic stress resistance, photosystem and nutrition utilization in wheat and its related species.

  18. Transcriptome-Wide Differential Gene Expression in Bicyclus anynana Butterflies: Female Vision-Related Genes Are More Plastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias-Muñoz, Aide; Smith, Gilbert; Monteiro, Antónia; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2016-01-01

    Vision is energetically costly to maintain. Consequently, over time many cave-adapted species downregulate the expression of vision genes or even lose their eyes and associated eye genes entirely. Alternatively, organisms that live in fluctuating environments, with different requirements for vision at different times, may evolve phenotypic plasticity for expression of vision genes. Here, we use a global transcriptomic and candidate gene approach to compare gene expression in the heads of a polyphenic butterfly. Bicyclus anynana have two seasonal forms that display sexual dimorphism and plasticity in eye morphology, and female-specific plasticity in opsin gene expression. Nonchoosy dry season females downregulate opsin expression, consistent with the high physiological cost of vision. To identify other genes associated with sexually dimorphic and seasonally plastic differences in vision, we analyzed RNA-sequencing data from whole head tissues. We identified two eye development genes (klarsicht and warts homologs) and an eye pigment biosynthesis gene (henna) differentially expressed between seasonal forms. By comparing sex-specific expression across seasonal forms, we found that klarsicht, warts, henna, and another eye development gene (domeless) were plastic in a female-specific manner. In a male-only analysis, white (w) was differentially expressed between seasonal forms. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed that warts and white are expressed in eyes only, whereas klarsicht, henna and domeless are expressed in both eyes and brain. We find that differential expression of eye development and eye pigment genes is associated with divergent eye phenotypes in B. anynana seasonal forms, and that there is a larger effect of season on female vision-related genes.

  19. Differential Expression of Genes of the Calvin-Benson Cycle and its Related Genes During Leaf Development in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Chihiro; Suzuki, Yuji; Makino, Amane

    2016-01-01

    To understand how the machinery for photosynthetic carbon assimilation is formed and maintained during leaf development, changes in the mRNA levels of the Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase and two key enzymes for sucrose synthesis were determined in rice (Oryza sativa L.). According to the patterns of changes in the mRNA levels, these genes were categorized into three groups. Group 1 included most of the genes involved in the carboxylation and reduction phases of the Calvin-Benson cycle, as well as three genes in the regeneration phase. The mRNA levels increased and reached maxima during leaf expansion and then rapidly declined, although there were some variations in the residual mRNA levels in senescent leaves. Group 2 included a number of genes involved in the regeneration phase, one gene in the reduction phase of the Calvin-Benson cycle and one gene in sucrose synthesis. The mRNA levels increased and almost reached maxima before full expansion and then gradually declined. Group 3 included Rubisco activase, one gene involved in the regeneration phase and one gene in sucrose synthesis. The overall pattern was similar to that in group 2 genes except that the mRNA levels reached maxima after the stage of full expansion. Thus, genes of the Calvin-Benson cycle and its related genes were differentially expressed during leaf development in rice, suggesting that such differential gene expression is necessary for formation and maintenance of the machinery of photosynthetic carbon assimilation.

  20. Identifying and Analyzing Novel Epilepsy-Related Genes Using Random Walk with Restart Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Shang, Dong-Mei; Cao, Jing-Hui; Feng, Kaiyan; Wang, ShaoPeng

    2017-01-01

    As a pathological condition, epilepsy is caused by abnormal neuronal discharge in brain which will temporarily disrupt the cerebral functions. Epilepsy is a chronic disease which occurs in all ages and would seriously affect patients' personal lives. Thus, it is highly required to develop effective medicines or instruments to treat the disease. Identifying epilepsy-related genes is essential in order to understand and treat the disease because the corresponding proteins encoded by the epilepsy-related genes are candidates of the potential drug targets. In this study, a pioneering computational workflow was proposed to predict novel epilepsy-related genes using the random walk with restart (RWR) algorithm. As reported in the literature RWR algorithm often produces a number of false positive genes, and in this study a permutation test and functional association tests were implemented to filter the genes identified by RWR algorithm, which greatly reduce the number of suspected genes and result in only thirty-three novel epilepsy genes. Finally, these novel genes were analyzed based upon some recently published literatures. Our findings implicate that all novel genes were closely related to epilepsy. It is believed that the proposed workflow can also be applied to identify genes related to other diseases and deepen our understanding of the mechanisms of these diseases.

  1. Strong linkages between DOM optical properties and main clades of aquatic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amaral, Valentina; Graeber, Daniel; Calliari, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable research on the linkages between dissolved organic matter (DOM) and bacteria, it is not yet clear how the abundance of the main aquatic clades relates to DOM composition in natural aquatic systems. We evaluated this relation using PARAFAC modeling of excitation...... factors for modeling their abundance in situ. The combination and significance of the factors was specific for each bacterial group, strongly indicating that they behave as coherent and distinctive units. Cytophaga-Flavobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were the groups which correlated with more DOM...

  2. AT1 Receptor Gene Polymorphisms in relation to Postprandial Lipemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Klop

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent data suggest that the renin-angiotensin system may be involved in triglyceride (TG metabolism. We explored the effect of the common A1166C and C573T polymorphisms of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R gene on postprandial lipemia. Methods. Eighty-two subjects measured daytime capillary TG, and postprandial lipemia was estimated as incremental area under the TG curve. The C573T and A1166C polymorphisms of the AT1R gene were determined. Results. Postprandial lipemia was significantly higher in homozygous carriers of the 1166-C allele (9.39±8.36 mM*h/L compared to homozygous carriers of the 1166-A allele (2.02±6.20 mM*h/L (P<0.05. Postprandial lipemia was similar for the different C573T polymorphisms. Conclusion. The 1166-C allele of the AT1R gene seems to be associated with increased postprandial lipemia. These data confirm the earlier described relationships between the renin-angiotensin axis and triglyceride metabolism.

  3. The clustering of functionally related genes contributes to CNV-mediated disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrews, T.; Honti, F.; Pfundt, R.P.; Leeuw, N. de; Hehir, J.Y.; Vulto-van Silfhout, A.T.; Vries, B. de; Webber, C.

    2015-01-01

    Clusters of functionally related genes can be disrupted by a single copy number variant (CNV). We demonstrate that the simultaneous disruption of multiple functionally related genes is a frequent and significant characteristic of de novo CNVs in patients with developmental disorders (P = 1 x 10(-3))

  4. A genome-wide screen indicates correlation between differentiation and expression of metabolism related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Priti; Kumar, Brijesh; Shende, Akhilesh; Singh, Anupama; Meena, Anil; Ghosal, Ritika; Ranganathan, Madhav; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation.

  5. A genome-wide screen indicates correlation between differentiation and expression of metabolism related genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti Roy

    Full Text Available Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation.

  6. [The effect of topology of quorum sensing-related genes in Pectobacterium atrosepticumon their expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoleva, N E; Shlykova, L V; Gorshkov, V Iu; Daminova, A G; Gogolev, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    In prokaryotic genomes, the neighboring genes are often located on the complementary DNA strands and adjoin each other by their 5'- or 3'-ends or even overlap by their open reading frames. It was suggested that such gene topology hasfunctional purpose providing the regulation of their expression. For those genes that overlap by their coding 3'-termini this assumption has not been confirmed experimentally. In a broad group of bacteria that belong to proteobacteria such a convergent gene arrangement is typical for functionally connected quorum sensing-related genes "P" and "R" that encode synthases of N-acyl homoserine lactones and their sensors, respectively. In the present study on the example of overlapping quorum sensing-related genes of plant pathogenic bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043--expI and expR it was shown that the topology of these genes determines the regula- tion of their expression.

  7. Quantifying variation in speciation and extinction rates with clade data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Emmanuel; Tedesco, Pablo A; Hugueny, Bernard

    2013-12-01

    High-level phylogenies are very common in evolutionary analyses, although they are often treated as incomplete data. Here, we provide statistical tools to analyze what we name "clade data," which are the ages of clades together with their numbers of species. We develop a general approach for the statistical modeling of variation in speciation and extinction rates, including temporal variation, unknown variation, and linear and nonlinear modeling. We show how this approach can be generalized to a wide range of situations, including testing the effects of life-history traits and environmental variables on diversification rates. We report the results of an extensive simulation study to assess the performance of some statistical tests presented here as well as of the estimators of speciation and extinction rates. These latter results suggest the possibility to estimate correctly extinction rate in the absence of fossils. An example with data on fish is presented.

  8. Gene regulations in HBV-related liver cirrhosis closely correlate with disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seram; Kim, Soyoun

    2007-09-30

    Liver cirrhosis (LC) is defined as comprising diffuse fibrosis and regenerating nodules of the liver. The biochemical and anatomical dysfunction in LC results from both reduced liver cell number and portal vascular derangement. Although several studies have investigated dysregulated genes in cirrhotic nodules, little is known about the genes implicated in the pathophysiologic change of LC or about their relationship with the degree of decompensation. Here, we applied cDNA microarray analysis using 38 HBsAg-positive LC specimens to identify the genes dysregulated in HBV-associated LC and to evaluate their relation to disease severity. Among 1063 known cancer- and apoptosis-related genes, we identified 104 genes that were significantly up- (44) or down- (60) regulated in LC. Interestingly, this subset of 104 genes was characteristically correlated with the degree of decompensation, called the Pugh-Child classification (20 Pugh-Child A, 10 Pugh-Child B, and 8 Pugh-Child C). Patient samples from Pugh-Child C exhibited a distinct pattern of gene expression relative to those of Pugh-Child A and B. Especially in Pugh-Child C, genes encoding hepatic proteins and metabolizing enzymes were significantly down-regulated, while genes encoding various molecules related to cell replication were up-regulated. Our results suggest that subsets of genes in liver cells correspond to the pathophysiologic change of LC according to disease severity and possibly to hepatocarcinogenesis.

  9. Prevalence of Tobacco mosaic virus in Iran and Evolutionary Analyses of the Coat Protein Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alishiri, Athar; Rakhshandehroo, Farshad; Zamanizadeh, Hamid-Reza; Palukaitis, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The incidence and distribution of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and related tobamoviruses was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on 1,926 symptomatic horticultural crops and 107 asymptomatic weed samples collected from 78 highly infected fields in the major horticultural crop-producing areas in 17 provinces throughout Iran. The results were confirmed by host range studies and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The overall incidence of infection by these viruses in symptomatic plants was 11.3%. The coat protein (CP) gene sequences of a number of isolates were determined and disclosed to be a high identity (up to 100%) among the Iranian isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of all known TMV CP genes showed three clades on the basis of nucleotide sequences with all Iranian isolates distinctly clustered in clade II. Analysis using the complete CP amino acid sequence showed one clade with two subgroups, IA and IB, with Iranian isolates in both subgroups. The nucleotide diversity within each sub-group was very low, but higher between the two clades. No correlation was found between genetic distance and geographical origin or host species of isolation. Statistical analyses suggested a negative selection and demonstrated the occurrence of gene flow from the isolates in other clades to the Iranian population.

  10. Prevalence of Tobacco mosaic virus in Iran and Evolutionary Analyses of the Coat Protein Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athar Alishiri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and distribution of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV and related tobamoviruses was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on 1,926 symptomatic horticultural crops and 107 asymptomatic weed samples collected from 78 highly infected fields in the major horticultural crop-producing areas in 17 provinces throughout Iran. The results were confirmed by host range studies and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The overall incidence of infection by these viruses in symptomatic plants was 11.3%. The coat protein (CP gene sequences of a number of isolates were determined and disclosed to be a high identity (up to 100% among the Iranian isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of all known TMV CP genes showed three clades on the basis of nucleotide sequences with all Iranian isolates distinctly clustered in clade II. Analysis using the complete CP amino acid sequence showed one clade with two subgroups, IA and IB, with Iranian isolates in both subgroups. The nucleotide diversity within each sub-group was very low, but higher between the two clades. No correlation was found between genetic distance and geographical origin or host species of isolation. Statistical analyses suggested a negative selection and demonstrated the occurrence of gene flow from the isolates in other clades to the Iranian population.

  11. Gene expression changes for antioxidants pathways in the mouse cochlea: relations to age-related hearing deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif F Tadros

    Full Text Available Age-related hearing loss - presbycusis - is the number one neurodegenerative disorder and top communication deficit of our aged population. Like many aging disorders of the nervous system, damage from free radicals linked to production of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively may play key roles in disease progression. The efficacy of the antioxidant systems, e.g., glutathione and thioredoxin, is an important factor in pathophysiology of the aging nervous system. In this investigation, relations between the expression of antioxidant-related genes in the auditory portion of the inner ear - cochlea, and age-related hearing loss was explored for CBA/CaJ mice. Forty mice were classified into four groups according to age and degree of hearing loss. Cochlear mRNA samples were collected and cDNA generated. Using Affymetrix® GeneChip, the expressions of 56 antioxidant-related gene probes were analyzed to estimate the differences in gene expression between the four subject groups. The expression of Glutathione peroxidase 6, Gpx6; Thioredoxin reductase 1, Txnrd1; Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1, Idh1; and Heat shock protein 1, Hspb1; were significantly different, or showed large fold-change differences between subject groups. The Gpx6, Txnrd1 and Hspb1 gene expression changes were validated using qPCR. The Gpx6 gene was upregulated while the Txnrd1 gene was downregulated with age/hearing loss. The Hspb1 gene was found to be downregulated in middle-aged animals as well as those with mild presbycusis, whereas it was upregulated in those with severe presbycusis. These results facilitate development of future interventions to predict, prevent or slow down the progression of presbycusis.

  12. Gene expression changes for antioxidants pathways in the mouse cochlea: relations to age-related hearing deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Sherif F; D'Souza, Mary; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss - presbycusis - is the number one neurodegenerative disorder and top communication deficit of our aged population. Like many aging disorders of the nervous system, damage from free radicals linked to production of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) may play key roles in disease progression. The efficacy of the antioxidant systems, e.g., glutathione and thioredoxin, is an important factor in pathophysiology of the aging nervous system. In this investigation, relations between the expression of antioxidant-related genes in the auditory portion of the inner ear - cochlea, and age-related hearing loss was explored for CBA/CaJ mice. Forty mice were classified into four groups according to age and degree of hearing loss. Cochlear mRNA samples were collected and cDNA generated. Using Affymetrix® GeneChip, the expressions of 56 antioxidant-related gene probes were analyzed to estimate the differences in gene expression between the four subject groups. The expression of Glutathione peroxidase 6, Gpx6; Thioredoxin reductase 1, Txnrd1; Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1, Idh1; and Heat shock protein 1, Hspb1; were significantly different, or showed large fold-change differences between subject groups. The Gpx6, Txnrd1 and Hspb1 gene expression changes were validated using qPCR. The Gpx6 gene was upregulated while the Txnrd1 gene was downregulated with age/hearing loss. The Hspb1 gene was found to be downregulated in middle-aged animals as well as those with mild presbycusis, whereas it was upregulated in those with severe presbycusis. These results facilitate development of future interventions to predict, prevent or slow down the progression of presbycusis.

  13. [Screening genes related to 'black' character in wu-ding chicken by delta differential display].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ge-Min; Liu, Xiao-Chun; Lou, Yi-Zhou; Shi, Qi-Shun

    2005-01-01

    The 'black' character is a cardinal character of black chicken that is very important to the medical value and economical value of black chicken. The study compared gene expression between black chicken and non-black chicken by delta differential display method, and obtained twenty-nine expressed sequence tags(ESTs) by extraction, amplification, purification, northern blotting, cloning and sequencing of gel-embedded DNA. Of twenty-nine ESTs, eight ESTs have high similarity rate with known gene in chicken-beta-trepomyosin gene, cardiac myosin alkali light chain gene, insertionally activated c-Ha-ras oncogene, fra-2 oncogene, 16S rRNA gene and mitochondrion genome sequence, respectively, with similarity rate 97%,100%, 98%, 98%, 98%, 99%, 99% and 97%. Five ESTs have high similarity rate with human TTN gene, human phosphoglucomutase 5 gene, human or mouse signal recongnition particle 54 kD gene, human or mouse ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitor gene, respectively, with similarity rate 82%, 82%, 87%, 99% and 99%. Their homologous genes in chicken are still not cloned. Thirteen ESTs are novel gene fragments. Of thirteen ESTs, nine ESTs have high similarity with ESTs in database. Four ESTs have not high similarity with any EST in database. The results of gene expression analysis show that one known gene (insertionally activated c-Ha-ras oncogene) fragment and one novel gene fragment are expressed in all non-black chicken and are not expressed in all black chicken, and that one known gene (signal recongnition particle 54 kD gene) fragment is expressed in all black chicken and is not expressed in all non-black chicken. According to these results, we conclude that the expression of insertionally activated c-Ha-ras oncogene, signal recongnition particle 54 kD gene and one novel gene are related to the 'black' character in chicken.

  14. Novel strategies to mine alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes by combining existing knowledge framework

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG RuiJie; LI Xia; JIANG YongShuai; LIU GuiYou; LI ChuanXing; ZHANG Fan; XIAO Yun; GONG BinSheng

    2009-01-01

    High-throughout single nucleotide polymorphism detection technology and the existing knowledge provide strong support for mining the disease-related haplotypes and genes. In this study, first, we apply four kinds of haplotype identification methods (Confidence Intervals, Four Gamete Testa, Solid Spine of LD and fusing method of haplotype block) into high-throughout SNP genotype data to identify blocks, then use cluster analysis to verify the effectiveness of the four methods, and select the alcoholism-related SNP haplotypes through risk analysis. Second, we establish a mapping from haplotypes to alcoholism-related genes. Third, we inquire NCBI SNP and gene databases to locate the blocks and identify the candidate genes. In the end, we make gene function annotation by KEGG, Biocarta, and GO database. We find 159 haplotype blocks, which relate to the alcoholism most possibly on chromosome 1-22, including 227 haplotypes, of which 102 SNP haplotypes may increase the risk of alcoholism. We get 121 alcoholism-related genes and verify their reliability by the functional annotation of biology. In a word, we not only can handle the SNP data easily, but also can locate the disease-related genes precisely by combining our novel strategies of mining alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes with existing knowledge framework.

  15. Novel strategies to mine alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes by combining existing knowledge framework

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    High-throughout single nucleotide polymorphism detection technology and the existing knowledge provide strong support for mining the disease-related haplotypes and genes. In this study, first, we apply four kinds of haplotype identification methods (Confidence Intervals, Four Gamete Tests, Solid Spine of LD and fusing method of haplotype block) into high-throughout SNP genotype data to identify blocks, then use cluster analysis to verify the effectiveness of the four methods, and select the alco- holism-related SNP haplotypes through risk analysis. Second, we establish a mapping from haplotypes to alcoholism-related genes. Third, we inquire NCBI SNP and gene databases to locate the blocks and identify the candidate genes. In the end, we make gene function annotation by KEGG, Biocarta, and GO database. We find 159 haplotype blocks, which relate to the alcoholism most possibly on chromosome 1~22, including 227 haplotypes, of which 102 SNP haplotypes may increase the risk of alcoholism. We get 121 alcoholism-related genes and verify their reliability by the functional annotation of biology. In a word, we not only can handle the SNP data easily, but also can locate the disease-related genes pre- cisely by combining our novel strategies of mining alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes with ex- isting knowledge framework.

  16. Novel strategies to mine alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes by combining existing knowledge framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, RuiJie; Li, Xia; Jiang, YongShuai; Liu, GuiYou; Li, ChuanXing; Zhang, Fan; Xiao, Yun; Gong, BinSheng

    2009-02-01

    High-throughout single nucleotide polymorphism detection technology and the existing knowledge provide strong support for mining the disease-related haplotypes and genes. In this study, first, we apply four kinds of haplotype identification methods (Confidence Intervals, Four Gamete Tests, Solid Spine of LD and fusing method of haplotype block) into high-throughout SNP genotype data to identify blocks, then use cluster analysis to verify the effectiveness of the four methods, and select the alcoholism-related SNP haplotypes through risk analysis. Second, we establish a mapping from haplotypes to alcoholism-related genes. Third, we inquire NCBI SNP and gene databases to locate the blocks and identify the candidate genes. In the end, we make gene function annotation by KEGG, Biocarta, and GO database. We find 159 haplotype blocks, which relate to the alcoholism most possibly on chromosome 1 approximately 22, including 227 haplotypes, of which 102 SNP haplotypes may increase the risk of alcoholism. We get 121 alcoholism-related genes and verify their reliability by the functional annotation of biology. In a word, we not only can handle the SNP data easily, but also can locate the disease-related genes precisely by combining our novel strategies of mining alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes with existing knowledge framework.

  17. Virulence differences among Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis clades in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia R Molins

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis (type A and holarctica (type B are of clinical importance in causing tularemia. Molecular typing methods have further separated type A strains into three genetically distinct clades, A1a, A1b and A2. Epidemiological analyses of human infections in the United States suggest that A1b infections are associated with a significantly higher mortality rate as compared to infections caused by A1a, A2 and type B. To determine if genetic differences as defined by molecular typing directly correlate with differences in virulence, A1a, A1b, A2 and type B strains were compared in C57BL/6 mice. Here we demonstrate significant differences between survival curves for infections caused by A1b versus A1a, A2 and type B, with A1b infected mice dying earlier than mice infected with A1a, A2 or type B; these results were conserved among multiple strains. Differences were also detected among type A clades as well as between type A clades and type B with respect to bacterial burdens, and gross anatomy in infected mice. Our results indicate that clades defined within F. tularensis subsp. tularensis by molecular typing methods correlate with virulence differences, with A1b strains more virulent than A1a, A2 and type B strains. These findings indicate type A strains are not equivalent with respect to virulence and have important implications for public health as well as basic research programs.

  18. Age-related regulation of genes: slow homeostatic changes and age-dimension technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurachi, Kotoku; Zhang, Kezhong; Huo, Jeffrey; Ameri, Afshin; Kuwahara, Mitsuhiro; Fontaine, Jean-Marc; Yamamoto, Kei; Kurachi, Sumiko

    2002-11-01

    Through systematic studies of pro- and anti-blood coagulation factors, we have determined molecular mechanisms involving two genetic elements, age-related stability element (ASE), GAGGAAG and age-related increase element (AIE), a unique stretch of dinucleotide repeats (AIE). ASE and AIE are essential for age-related patterns of stable and increased gene expression patterns, respectively. Such age-related gene regulatory mechanisms are also critical for explaining homeostasis in various physiological reactions as well as slow homeostatic changes in them. The age-related increase expression of the human factor IX (hFIX) gene requires the presence of both ASE and AIE, which apparently function additively. The anti-coagulant factor protein C (hPC) gene uses an ASE (CAGGAG) to produce age-related stable expression. Both ASE sequences (G/CAGAAG) share consensus sequence of the transcriptional factor PEA-3 element. No other similar sequences, including another PEA-3 consensus sequence, GAGGATG, function in conferring age-related gene regulation. The age-regulatory mechanisms involving ASE and AIE apparently function universally with different genes and across different animal species. These findings have led us to develop a new field of research and applications, which we named “age-dimension technology (ADT)”. ADT has exciting potential for modifying age-related expression of genes as well as associated physiological processes, and developing novel, more effective prophylaxis or treatments for age-related diseases.

  19. Identifying Novel Candidate Genes Related to Apoptosis from a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoman Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD that occurs in multicellular organisms. This process of normal cell death is required to maintain the balance of homeostasis. In addition, some diseases, such as obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, can be cured through apoptosis, which produces few side effects. An effective comprehension of the mechanisms underlying apoptosis will be helpful to prevent and treat some diseases. The identification of genes related to apoptosis is essential to uncover its underlying mechanisms. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify novel candidate genes related to apoptosis. First, protein-protein interaction information was used to construct a weighted graph. Second, a shortest path algorithm was applied to the graph to search for new candidate genes. Finally, the obtained genes were filtered by a permutation test. As a result, 26 genes were obtained, and we discuss their likelihood of being novel apoptosis-related genes by collecting evidence from published literature.

  20. Heat Stress Related Gene Expression in Gossypium hirsutum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DEMIREL Ufuk; G(U)R M Atilla; KARAKU Mehmet; MEMON Abdul Rezaque

    2008-01-01

    @@ Abiotic stress is a major limiting factor to crop productivity,and heat stress is one of the important elements for reduced crop production.Plants respond to heat stress at molecular and cellular levels as well as physiological level.Heat stress alters expression patterns of numerous genes in plants.At the molecular level,most of the information for heat stress response was obtained from model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana,Medicago trancatula,and ,Oryza sativa,but little molecular research has focused on heat stress respones in cotton.

  1. Moving towards a complete molecular framework of the Nematoda: a focus on the Enoplida and early-branching clades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambshead P John D

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subclass Enoplia (Phylum Nematoda is purported to be the earliest branching clade amongst all nematode taxa, yet the deep phylogeny of this important lineage remains elusive. Free-living marine species within the order Enoplida play prominent roles in marine ecosystems, but previous molecular phylogenies have provided only the briefest evolutionary insights; this study aimed to firmly resolve internal relationships within the hyper-diverse but poorly understood Enoplida. In addition, we revisited the molecular framework of the Nematoda using a rigorous phylogenetic approach in order to investigate patterns of early splits amongst the oldest lineages (Dorylaimia and Enoplia. Results Morphological identifications, nuclear gene sequences (18S and 28S rRNA, and mitochondrial gene sequences (cox1 were obtained from marine Enoplid specimens representing 37 genera. The 18S gene was used to resolve deep splits within the Enoplia and evaluate the branching order of major clades in the nematode tree; multiple phylogenetic methods and rigorous empirical tests were carried out to assess tree topologies under different parameters and combinations of taxa. Significantly increased taxon sampling within the Enoplida resulted in a well-supported, robust phylogenetic topology of this group, although the placement of certain clades was not fully resolved. Our analysis could not unequivocally confirm the earliest splits in the nematode tree, and outgroup choice significantly affected the observed branching order of the Dorylaimia and Enoplia. Both 28S and cox1 were too variable to infer deep phylogeny, but provided additional insight at lower taxonomic levels. Conclusions Analysis of internal relationships reveals that the Enoplia is split into two main clades, with groups consisting of terrestrial (Triplonchida and primarily marine fauna (Enoplida. Five independent lineages were recovered within the Enoplida, containing a mixture of marine

  2. Old World fruitbat phylogeny: evidence for convergent evolution and an endemic African clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollar, L J; Springer, M S

    1997-05-27

    Knud Andersen (1912, Catalogue of the Chiroptera in the Collections of the British Museum: I. Megachiroptera, British Museum of Natural History, London) divided Old World fruitbats (family Pteropodidae) into the rousettine, cynopterine, epomophorine, eonycterine, and notopterine sections. The latter two sections comprise the subfamily Macroglossinae; members of this subfamily exhibit specializations for nectarivory (e.g., elongated, protrusible, brushy tongues) and cluster together in cladistic analyses based on anatomical characters. Other evidence, including single-copy DNA hybridization, suggests that macroglossines are either paraphyletic or polyphyletic; this implies that adaptations for pollen and nectar feeding evolved independently in different macroglossine lineages or were lost in nonmacroglossines after evolving in a more basal common ancestor. Hybridization data also contradict Andersen's phylogeny in providing support for an endemic African clade that includes representatives of three of Andersen's sections. Here, we present complete mitochondrial 12S rRNA and valine tRNA gene sequences for 20 pteropodids, including representatives of all of Andersen's sections, and examine the aforementioned controversies. Maximum likelihood, minimum evolution, and maximum parsimony analyses all contradict macroglossine monophyly and provide support for an African clade that associates Megaloglossus and Lissonycteris and those two with Epomophorus. In conjunction with the DNA hybridization results, there are now independent lines of molecular evidence suggesting: (i) convergent evolution of specializations for nectarivory, at least in Megaloglossus versus other macroglossines, and (ii) a previously unrecognized clade of endemic Africa taxa. Estimates of divergence time based on 12S rRNA and DNA hybridization data are also in good agreement and suggest that extant fruitbats trace back to a common ancestor 25 million to 36 million years ago.

  3. The historical biogeography of groupers: Clade diversification patterns and processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ka Yan; Craig, Matthew Thomas; Choat, John Howard; van Herwerden, Lynne

    2016-07-01

    Groupers (family Epinephelidae) are a clade of species-rich, biologically diverse reef fishes. Given their ecological variability and widespread distribution across ocean basins, it is important to scrutinize their evolutionary history that underlies present day distributions. This study investigated the patterns and processes by which grouper biodiversity has been generated and what factors have influenced their present day distributions. We reconstructed a robust, time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of Epinephelidae with comprehensive (∼87%) species sampling, whereby diversification rates were estimated and ancestral ranges were reconstructed. Our results indicate that groupers originated in what is now the East Atlantic during the mid-Eocene and diverged successively to form six strongly supported main clades. These clades differ in age (late Oligocene to mid-Miocene), geographic origin (West Atlantic to West Indo-Pacific) and temporal-spatial diversification pattern, ranging from constant rates of diversification to episodes of rapid radiation. Overall, divergence within certain biogeographic regions was most prevalent in groupers, while vicariant divergences were more common in Tropical Atlantic and East Pacific groupers. Our findings reveal that both biological and geographical factors have driven grouper diversification. They also underscore the importance of scrutinizing group-specific patterns to better understand reef fish evolution.

  4. LIS1 Lissencephaly gene CNS expression: Relation to neuronal migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiner, O. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)]|[Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Gal-Gerber, O.; Sapir, T. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Lis1 is the murine gene corresponding to human LIS1 gene involved in Miller-Dieker lissencephaly located on chromosome 17p13.3 as demonstrated by cDNA cloning, sequence analysis and genetic mapping. Lis1 expression was studied in developing mouse brain using in situ hybridization. At embryonic day 15, Lis1 expression was most prominently localized in the neuronal layer of the retina, the developing hippocampus, doral root ganglia, cranial ganglia and the thalamus. At postnatal day 5 a unique pattern of expression was detected in the developing cerebellum. Lis1 was expressed at high levels in the Purkinje cell layer when the granule cells were migrating through the Purkinje cell layer inwards. The expression of Lis1 in Purkinje cells in the adult is markedly reduced. Similarly, Lis1 was expressed in the ontogenetically older layers of the neocortex (layers 5 and 6) where younger neurons have to migrate through to settle in the superficial layers. Thus, at both sites a link between expression and neuronal migration was demonstrated. These studies on the expression pattern of Lis1 could be useful in understanding abnormalities in Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome (MDS) patients.

  5. Detection and genomic characterization of motility in Lactobacillus curvatus: confirmation of motility in a species outside the Lactobacillus salivarius clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, Fabien J; Lynch, Shónagh M; Harris, Hugh M B; McCann, Angela; Lynch, Denise B; Neville, B Anne; Irisawa, Tomohiro; Okada, Sanae; Endo, Akihito; O'Toole, Paul W

    2015-02-01

    Lactobacillus is the largest genus within the lactic acid bacteria (LAB), with almost 180 species currently identified. Motility has been reported for at least 13 Lactobacillus species, all belonging to the Lactobacillus salivarius clade. Motility in lactobacilli is poorly characterized. It probably confers competitive advantages, such as superior nutrient acquisition and niche colonization, but it could also play an important role in innate immune system activation through flagellin–Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) interaction. We now report strong evidence of motility in a species outside the L. salivarius clade, Lactobacillus curvatus (strain NRIC0822). The motility of L. curvatus NRIC 0822 was revealed by phase-contrast microscopy and soft-agar motility assays. Strain NRIC 0822 was motile at temperatures between 15 °C and 37 °C, with a range of different carbohydrates, and under varying atmospheric conditions. We sequenced the L. curvatus NRIC 0822 genome, which revealed that the motility genes are organized in a single operon and that the products are very similar (>98.5% amino acid similarity over >11,000 amino acids) to those encoded by the motility operon of Lactobacillus acidipiscis KCTC 13900 (shown for the first time to be motile also). Moreover, the presence of a large number of mobile genetic elements within and flanking the motility operon of L. curvatus suggests recent horizontal transfer between members of two distinct Lactobacillus clades: L. acidipiscis in the L. salivarius clade and L. curvatus inthe L. sakei clade. This study provides novel phenotypic, genetic, and phylogenetic insights into flagellum-mediated motility in lactobacilli.

  6. Origin and diversification of major clades in parmelioid lichens (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota) during the Paleogene inferred by Bayesian analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amo de Paz, Guillermo; Cubas, Paloma; Divakar, Pradeep K; Lumbsch, H Thorsten; Crespo, Ana

    2011-01-01

    There is a long-standing debate on the extent of vicariance and long-distance dispersal events to explain the current distribution of organisms, especially in those with small diaspores potentially prone to long-distance dispersal. Age estimates of clades play a crucial role in evaluating the impact of these processes. The aim of this study is to understand the evolutionary history of the largest clade of macrolichens, the parmelioid lichens (Parmeliaceae, Lecanoromycetes, Ascomycota) by dating the origin of the group and its major lineages. They have a worldwide distribution with centers of distribution in the Neo- and Paleotropics, and semi-arid subtropical regions of the Southern Hemisphere. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using DNA sequences of nuLSU and mtSSU rDNA, and the protein-coding RPB1 gene. The three DNA regions had different evolutionary rates: RPB1 gave a rate two to four times higher than nuLSU and mtSSU. Divergence times of the major clades were estimated with partitioned BEAST analyses allowing different rates for each DNA region and using a relaxed clock model. Three calibrations points were used to date the tree: an inferred age at the stem of Lecanoromycetes, and two dated fossils: Parmelia in the parmelioid group, and Alectoria. Palaeoclimatic conditions and the palaeogeological area cladogram were compared to the dated phylogeny of parmelioid. The parmelioid group diversified around the K/T boundary, and the major clades diverged during the Eocene and Oligocene. The radiation of the genera occurred through globally changing climatic condition of the early Oligocene, Miocene and early Pliocene. The estimated divergence times are consistent with long-distance dispersal events being the major factor to explain the biogeographical distribution patterns of Southern Hemisphere parmelioids, especially for Africa-Australia disjunctions, because the sequential break-up of Gondwana started much earlier than the origin of these clades. However, our

  7. The origin and diversification of the merozoite surface protein 3 (msp3) multi-gene family in Plasmodium vivax and related parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Benjamin L; Acosta, Mónica M; Pacheco, M Andreína; Carlton, Jane M; Barnwell, John W; Escalante, Ananias A

    2014-09-01

    The genus Plasmodium is a diversified group of parasites with more than 200 known species that includes those causing malaria in humans. These parasites use numerous proteins in a complex process that allows them to invade the red blood cells of their vertebrate hosts. Many of those proteins are part of multi-gene families; one of which is the merozoite surface protein-3 (msp3) family. The msp3 multi-gene family is considered important in the two main human parasites, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum, as its paralogs are simultaneously expressed in the blood stage (merozoite) and are immunogenic. There are large differences among Plasmodium species in the number of paralogs in this family. Such differences have been previously explained, in part, as adaptations that allow the different Plasmodium species to invade their hosts. To investigate this, we characterized the array containing msp3 genes among several Plasmodium species, including P. falciparum and P. vivax. We first found no evidence indicating that the msp3 family of P. falciparum was homologous to that of P. vivax. Subsequently, by focusing on the diverse clade of nonhuman primate parasites to which P. vivax is closely related, where homology was evident, we found no evidence indicating that the interspecies variation in the number of paralogs was an adaptation related to changes in host range or host switches. Overall, we hypothesize that the evolution of the msp3 family in P. vivax is consistent with a model of multi-allelic diversifying selection where the paralogs may have functionally redundant roles in terms of increasing antigenic diversity. Thus, we suggest that the expressed MSP3 proteins could serve as "decoys", via antigenic diversity, during the critical process of invading the host red blood cells.

  8. Overexpression of Fatty-Acid-β-Oxidation-Related Genes Extends the Lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Hae Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the aging process is necessary to ensure that the healthcare needs of an aging population are met. With the trend toward increased human life expectancies, identification of candidate genes affecting the regulation of lifespan and its relationship to environmental factors is essential. Through misexpression screening of EP mutant lines, we previously isolated several genes extending lifespan when ubiquitously overexpressed, including the two genes encoding the fatty-acid-binding protein and dodecenoyl-CoA delta-isomerase involved in fatty-acid β-oxidation, which is the main energy resource pathway in eukaryotic cells. In this study, we analyzed flies overexpressing the two main components of fatty-acid β-oxidation, and found that overexpression of fatty-acid-β-oxidation-related genes extended the Drosophila lifespan. Furthermore, we found that the ability of dietary restriction to extend lifespan was reduced by the overexpression of fatty-acid-β-oxidation-related genes. Moreover, the overexpression of fatty-acid-β-oxidation-related genes enhanced stress tolerance to oxidative and starvation stresses and activated the dFOXO signal, indicating translocation to the nucleus and transcriptional activation of the dFOXO target genes. Overall, the results of this study suggest that overexpression of fatty-acid-β-oxidation-related genes extends lifespan in a dietary-restriction-related manner, and that the mechanism of this process may be related to FOXO activation.

  9. Amygdalin inhibits genes related to cell cycle in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hae-Jeong Park; Sung-Vin Yim; Joo-Ho Chung; Seon-Pyo Hong; Seo-Hyun Yoon; Long-Shan Han; Long-Tai Zheng; Kyung-Hee Jung; Yoon-Kyung Uhm; Je-Hyun Lee; Ji-Seon Jeong; Woo-Sang Joo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The genes were divided into seven categories according to biological function; apoptosis-reiated, immune response-related, signal transduction-related, cell cyclerelated, cell growth-related, stress response-related and transcription-related genes.METHODS: We compared the gene expression profiles of SNU-C4 cells between amygdalin-treated (5 mg/mL,24 h) and non-treated groups using cDNA microarray analysis. We selected genes downregulated in cDNA microarray and investigated mRNA levels of the genes by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Microarray showed that amygdalin downregulated especially genes belonging to cell cycle category: exonuclease 1 (EXO1), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family F, member 2 (ABCF2), MRE11 meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (MRE114), topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1), and FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin-associated protein 1 (FRAP1). RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA levels of these genes were also decreased by amygdalin treatment in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that amygdalin have an anticancer effect via downregulation of cell cycle-related genes in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells,and might be used for therapeutic anticancer drug.

  10. The influence of sexual activity on the vaginal microbiota and Gardnerella vaginalis clade diversity in young women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Suzanne M.; Fairley, Christopher K.; Hocking, Jane S.; Law, Matthew G.; Plummer, Erica L.; Fethers, Katherine A.; Chow, Eric P. F.; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Bradshaw, Catriona S.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine the influence of sexual activity on the composition and consistency of the vaginal microbiota over time, and distribution of Gardnerella vaginalis clades in young women. Methods Fifty-two participants from a university cohort were selected. Vaginal swabs were self-collected every 3-months for up to 12 months with 184 specimens analysed. The vaginal microbiota was characterised using Roche 454 V3/4 region 16S rRNA sequencing, and G.vaginalis clade typing by qPCR. Results A Lactobacillus crispatus dominated vaginal microbiota was associated with Caucasian ethnicity (adjusted relative risk ratio[ARRR] = 7.28, 95%CI:1.37,38.57,p = 0.020). An L.iners (ARRR = 17.51, 95%CI:2.18,140.33,p = 0.007) or G.vaginalis (ARRR = 14.03, 95%CI:1.22,160.69, p = 0.034) dominated microbiota was associated with engaging in penile-vaginal sex. Microbiota dominated by L.crispatus, L.iners or other lactobacilli exhibited greater longitudinal consistency of the bacterial communities present compared to ones dominated by heterogeneous non-lactobacilli (pmicrobiota of these young, relatively sexually inexperienced women. Women had consistent vaginal microbiota over time if lactobacilli were the dominant spp. present. Penile-vaginal sex did not alter the consistency of microbial communities but increased G.vaginalis clade diversity in young women with and without BV, suggesting sexual transmission of commensal and potentially pathogenic clades. PMID:28234976

  11. Hypermethylation and aberrant expression of secreted fizzled-related protein genes in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-Min Bu; Cheng-Hai Zhao; Ning Zhang; Feng Gao; Shuai Lin; Xian-Wei Dai

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To determine the methylation status and aberrant expression of some secreted frizzled-related protein (SFRP) genes in pancreatic cancer and explore their role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. METHODS:Methylation status and expression of SFRP genes were detected by methylation-specific PCR (MSPCR) and reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) respectively. RESULTS:The frequencies of methylation for SFRP genes 1,2,4,5 were 70%, 48.3%,60% and 76.7% in pancreatic cancer samples, and 21.7%, 20%,10% and 36.7% in matched cancer adjacent normal tissue samples,respectively (χ2=28.23,P<0.0001 for SFRP gene 1; χ2=10.71,P=0.001 for SFRP gene 2;χ2=32.97,P<0.0001 for SFRP gene 4;χ2=19.55,P<0.0001 for SFRP gene 5). Expression loss of SFRP genes 1,2,4 and 5 was found in 65%,40%,55% and 71.7% of 60 pancreatic cancer samples, and 25%,15%,18.3% and 31.7% of matched cancer adjacent normal tissue samples,respectively (χ2=19.39,P<0.0001 for SFRP gene 1;χ2=9.40,P=0.002 for SFRP gene 2;χ2=17.37,P<0.0001 for SFRP gene 4;χ2=19.22,P<0.0001 for SFRP gene 5).SFRP gene 1 was methylated but not expressed in PC-3 and PANC-1,SFRP gene 2 was methylated but not expressed in PANC-1 and CFPAC-1,SFRP gene 4 was methylated but not expressed in PC-3,and SFRP gene 5 was methylated but not expressed in CFPAC-1. CONCLUSION:Hypermethylation and aberrant expression of SFRP genes are common in pancreatic cancer,which may be involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  12. Structure and expression of the S locus-related genes of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R; Walker, J C

    1993-03-01

    The extracellular of the putative receptor-like protein kinase, ZmPK1, is related to the self-incompatibility locus (S-locus) genes of Brassica. We have isolated and characterized a genomic DNA clone of ZmPK1 and three additional genes from maize that are highly related to ZmPK1. These three S-locus related genes do not appear to have the protein kinase catalytic domain that is found in ZmPK1. One or more of these genes are expressed specifically in the silks. This initial description of S-locus related genes in monocotyledonous plants suggests that the S-locus domain may be involved in several different cellular functions in a wide variety of plants.

  13. Genome-wide age-related changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in human PBMCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steegenga, Wilma T; Boekschoten, Mark V; Lute, Carolien; Hooiveld, Guido J; de Groot, Philip J; Morris, Tiffany J; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Butcher, Lee M; Beck, Stephan; Müller, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a progressive process that results in the accumulation of intra- and extracellular alterations that in turn contribute to a reduction in health. Age-related changes in DNA methylation have been reported before and may be responsible for aging-induced changes in gene expression, although a causal relationship has yet to be shown. Using genome-wide assays, we analyzed age-induced changes in DNA methylation and their effect on gene expression with and without transient induction with the synthetic transcription modulating agent WY14,643. To demonstrate feasibility of the approach, we isolated peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs) from five young and five old healthy male volunteers and cultured them with or without WY14,643. Infinium 450K BeadChip and Affymetrix Human Gene 1.1 ST expression array analysis revealed significant differential methylation of at least 5 % (ΔYO > 5 %) at 10,625 CpG sites between young and old subjects, but only a subset of the associated genes were also differentially expressed. Age-related differential methylation of previously reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging including ELOVL2, FHL2, PENK, and KLF14 was confirmed in our study, but these genes did not display an age-related change in gene expression in PBMCs. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that differentially methylated genes that lack an age-related expression change predominantly represent genes involved in carcinogenesis and developmental processes, and expression of most of these genes were silenced in PBMCs. No changes in DNA methylation were found in genes displaying transiently induced changes in gene expression. In conclusion, aging-induced differential methylation often targets developmental genes and occurs mostly without change in gene expression.

  14. Evolutionary analysis of the jacalin-related lectin family genes in 11 fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jun; Lv, Yueqing

    2016-09-01

    Jacalin-related lectins are a type of carbohydrate-binding proteins, which are distributed across a wide variety of organisms and involved in some important biological processes. The evolution of this gene family in fishes is unknown. Here, 47 putative jacalin genes in 11 fish species were identified and divided into 4 groups through phylogenetic analysis. Conserved gene organization and motif distribution existed in each group, suggesting their functional conservation. Some fishes have eleven jacalin genes, while others have only one or zero gene in their genomes, suggesting dynamic changes in the number of jacalin genes during the evolution of fishes. Intragenic recombination played a key role in the evolution of jacalin genes. Synteny analyses of jacalin genes in some fishes implied conserved and dynamic evolution characteristics of this gene family and related genome segments. Moreover, a few functional divergence sites were identified within each group pairs. Divergent expression profiles of the zebra fish jacalin genes were further investigated in different stresses. The results provided a foundation for exploring the characterization of the jacalin genes in fishes and will offer insights for additional functional studies.

  15. Cardiovascular disease-related genes and regulation by diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Heuvel, John P

    2009-11-01

    Diets rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) such as alpha-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid are associated with decreased incidence and severity of cardiovascular disease (CVD). At least some of the beneficial effects of these dietary fatty acids are mediated by metabolites such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, thromboxanes, and resolvins. The effects of n-3 PUFAs often differ from those of other fatty acids with very similar structures, such as linoleic acid and arachidonic acid (n-6 PUFAs) and their corresponding metabolites. This article reviews the evidence that specific receptors exist for fatty acids or their metabolites that are able to regulate gene expression and coordinately affect metabolic or signaling pathways associated with CVD. Four nuclear receptor subfamilies that respond to dietary and endogenous ligands and have implications for CVD are emphasized in this article: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, retinoid X receptors, liver X receptors, and the farnesoid X receptor.

  16. Bovine gene polymorphisms related to fat deposition and meat tenderness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina R.S. Fortes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptin, thyroglobulin and diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase play important roles in fat metabolism. Fat deposition has an influence on meat quality and consumers' choice. The aim of this study was to determine allele and genotype frequencies of polymorphisms of the bovine genes, which encode leptin (LEP, thyroglobulin (TG and diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase (DGAT1. A further objective was to establish the effects of these polymorphisms on meat characteristics. We genotyped 147 animals belonging to the Nelore (Bos indicus, Canchim (5/8 Bos taurus + 3/8 Bos indicus, Rubia Gallega X Nelore (1/2 Bos taurus + 1/2 Bos indicus, Brangus Three-way cross (9/16 Bos taurus + 7/16 Bos indicus and Braunvieh Three-way cross (3/4 Bos taurus + 1/4 Bos indicus breeds. Backfat thickness, total lipids, marbling score, ribeye area and shear force were fitted, using the General Linear Model (GLM procedure of the SAS software. The least square means of genotypes and genetic groups were compared using Tukey's test. Allele frequencies vary among the genetic groups, depending on Bos indicus versus Bos taurus influence. The LEP polymorphism segregates in pure Bos indicus Nelore animals, which is a new finding. The T allele of TG is fixed in Nelore, and DGAT1 segregates in all groups, but the frequency of allele A is lower in Nelore animals. The results showed no association between the genotypes and traits studied, but a genetic group effect on these traits was found. So, the genetic background remains relevant for fat deposition and meat tenderness, but the gene markers developed for Bos taurus may be insufficient for Bos indicus.

  17. Estimation of growth rate of Skeletonema costatum based on relative expression amount of PCNA gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Shanying; YU Zhigang

    2008-01-01

    Partial sequence of Skeletonema costatum proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene was obtained by reverse transcriptase PCR(RT-PCR) and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (3'-RACE) techniques.Based on the obtained PCNA and cytochrome b gene(Cyt b gene) sequences,a real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR (FQ-PCR) method was developed to detect the expres-sion S.costatum PCNA gene,and this method was applied to study the relationship between the growth rate of S.costatum and the average expression amount of PCNA gene in a single cell.The expression amount of PCNA gene had large variation in cells col-lected at different culture phases,and the trend was well consistent with the growth rate,which suggested that the expression amount of PCNA gene correlated well with the cell division,and the PCNA could be a promising indicator for the S.costatum cell proliferation.Furthermore,using the PCNA gene as the objective gene and the Cyt b gene as the house-keeping gene,a new method for estimating the in situ growth rate of S.costatum was established by analysis of the relative expression quantity (REQ) of the PCNA gene.

  18. Myelination-related genes are associated with decreased white matter integrity in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarria-Siles, Ivan; White, Tonya; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Goudriaan, Andrea; Lips, Esther; Ehrlich, Stefan; Turner, Jessica A; Calhoun, Vince D; Gollub, Randy L; Magnotta, Vincent A; Ho, Beng-Choon; Smit, August B; Verheijen, Mark H G; Posthuma, Danielle

    2016-03-01

    Disruptions in white matter (WM) tract structures have been implicated consistently in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Global WM integrity--as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA)--is highly heritable and may provide a good endophenotype for genetic studies of schizophrenia. WM abnormalities in schizophrenia are not localized to one specific brain region but instead reflect global low-level decreases in FA coupled with focal abnormalities. In this study, we sought to investigate whether functional gene sets associated with schizophrenia are also associated with WM integrity. We analyzed FA and genetic data from the Mind Research Network Clinical Imaging Consortium to study the effect of multiple oligodendrocyte gene sets on schizophrenia and WM integrity using a functional gene set analysis in 77 subjects with schizophrenia and 104 healthy controls. We found that a gene set involved in myelination was significantly associated with schizophrenia and FA. This gene set includes 17 genes that are expressed in oligodendrocytes and one neuronal gene (NRG1) that is known to regulate myelination. None of the genes within the gene set were associated with schizophrenia or FA individually, suggesting that no single gene was driving the association of the gene set. Our findings support the hypothesis that multiple genetic variants in myelination-related genes contribute to the observed correlation between schizophrenia and decreased WM integrity as measured by FA.

  19. Identification of immunity related genes to study the Physalis peruviana--Fusarium oxysporum pathosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix E; González, Carolina; Rodríguez, Edwin A; López, Camilo E; Landsman, David; Barrero, Luz Stella; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    The Cape gooseberry (Physalisperuviana L) is an Andean exotic fruit with high nutritional value and appealing medicinal properties. However, its cultivation faces important phytosanitary problems mainly due to pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, Cercosporaphysalidis and Alternaria spp. Here we used the Cape gooseberry foliar transcriptome to search for proteins that encode conserved domains related to plant immunity including: NBS (Nucleotide Binding Site), CC (Coiled-Coil), TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor). We identified 74 immunity related gene candidates in P. peruviana which have the typical resistance gene (R-gene) architecture, 17 Receptor like kinase (RLKs) candidates related to PAMP-Triggered Immunity (PTI), eight (TIR-NBS-LRR, or TNL) and nine (CC-NBS-LRR, or CNL) candidates related to Effector-Triggered Immunity (ETI) genes among others. These candidate genes were categorized by molecular function (98%), biological process (85%) and cellular component (79%) using gene ontology. Some of the most interesting predicted roles were those associated with binding and transferase activity. We designed 94 primers pairs from the 74 immunity-related genes (IRGs) to amplify the corresponding genomic regions on six genotypes that included resistant and susceptible materials. From these, we selected 17 single band amplicons and sequenced them in 14 F. oxysporum resistant and susceptible genotypes. Sequence polymorphisms were analyzed through preliminary candidate gene association, which allowed the detection of one SNP at the PpIRG-63 marker revealing a nonsynonymous mutation in the predicted LRR domain suggesting functional roles for resistance.

  20. Identification of immunity related genes to study the Physalis peruviana--Fusarium oxysporum pathosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix E Enciso-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available The Cape gooseberry (Physalisperuviana L is an Andean exotic fruit with high nutritional value and appealing medicinal properties. However, its cultivation faces important phytosanitary problems mainly due to pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, Cercosporaphysalidis and Alternaria spp. Here we used the Cape gooseberry foliar transcriptome to search for proteins that encode conserved domains related to plant immunity including: NBS (Nucleotide Binding Site, CC (Coiled-Coil, TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor. We identified 74 immunity related gene candidates in P. peruviana which have the typical resistance gene (R-gene architecture, 17 Receptor like kinase (RLKs candidates related to PAMP-Triggered Immunity (PTI, eight (TIR-NBS-LRR, or TNL and nine (CC-NBS-LRR, or CNL candidates related to Effector-Triggered Immunity (ETI genes among others. These candidate genes were categorized by molecular function (98%, biological process (85% and cellular component (79% using gene ontology. Some of the most interesting predicted roles were those associated with binding and transferase activity. We designed 94 primers pairs from the 74 immunity-related genes (IRGs to amplify the corresponding genomic regions on six genotypes that included resistant and susceptible materials. From these, we selected 17 single band amplicons and sequenced them in 14 F. oxysporum resistant and susceptible genotypes. Sequence polymorphisms were analyzed through preliminary candidate gene association, which allowed the detection of one SNP at the PpIRG-63 marker revealing a nonsynonymous mutation in the predicted LRR domain suggesting functional roles for resistance.

  1. Schizophrenia and vitamin D related genes could have been subject to latitude-driven adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monticelli Antonella

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many natural phenomena are directly or indirectly related to latitude. Living at different latitudes, indeed, has its consequences with being exposed to different climates, diets, light/dark cycles, etc. In humans, one of the best known examples of genetic traits following a latitudinal gradient is skin pigmentation. Nevertheless, also several diseases show latitudinal clinals such as hypertension, cancer, dismetabolic conditions, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and many more. Results We investigated, for the first time on a wide genomic scale, the latitude-driven adaptation phenomena. In particular, we selected a set of genes showing signs of latitude-dependent population differentiation. The biological characterization of these genes showed enrichment for neural-related processes. In light of this, we investigated whether genes associated to neuropsychiatric diseases were enriched by Latitude-Related Genes (LRGs. We found a strong enrichment of LRGs in the set of genes associated to schizophrenia. In an attempt to try to explain this possible link between latitude and schizophrenia, we investigated their associations with vitamin D. We found in a set of vitamin D related genes a significant enrichment of both LRGs and of genes involved in schizophrenia. Conclusions Our results suggest a latitude-driven adaptation for both schizophrenia and vitamin D related genes. In addition we confirm, at a molecular level, the link between schizophrenia and vitamin D. Finally, we discuss a model in which schizophrenia is, at least partly, a maladaptive by-product of latitude dependent adaptive changes in vitamin D metabolism.

  2. Comparison of Envelope-Related Genes in Unicellular and Filamentous Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the evolution of cyanobacterial envelopes and the relation between gene content and environmental adaptation, cell envelope structures and components of unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria were analyzed in comparative genomics. Hundreds of envelope biogenesis genes were divided into 5 major groups and annotated according to their conserved domains and phylogenetic profiles. Compared to unicellular species, the gene numbers of filamentous cyanobacteria expanded due to genome enlargement effect, but only few gene families amplified disproportionately, such as those encoding waaG and glycosyl transferase 2. Comparison of envelope genes among various species suggested that the significant variance of certain cyanobacterial envelope biogenesis genes should be the response to their environmental adaptation, which might be also related to the emergence of filamentous shapes with some new functions.

  3. Oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) is related to psychological resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saphire-Bernstein, Shimon; Way, Baldwin M; Kim, Heejung S; Sherman, David K; Taylor, Shelley E

    2011-09-13

    Psychological resources--optimism, mastery, and self-esteem--buffer the deleterious effects of stress and are predictors of neurophysiological and psychological health-related outcomes. These resources have been shown to be highly heritable, yet the genetic basis for this heritability remains unknown. Here, we report a link between the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) SNP rs53576 and psychological resources, such that carriers of the "A" allele have lower levels of optimism, mastery, and self-esteem, relative to G/G homozygotes. OXTR was also associated with depressive symptomatology. Mediation analysis indicates that the effects of OXTR on depressive symptoms may be largely mediated by the influence of OXTR on psychological resources.

  4. Identification of immune response-related genes in the Chinese oak silkworm, Antheraea pernyi by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Zhu, Bao-Jian; Wang, Lei; Wei, Guo-Qing; Dai, Li-Shang; Lin, Kun-Zhang; Sun, Yu; Qiu, Jian-Feng; Fu, Wei-Wei; Liu, Chao-Liang

    2013-11-01

    Insects possess an innate immune system that responds to invading microorganisms. In this study, a subtractive cDNA library was constructed to screen for immune response-related genes in the fat bodies of Antheraea pernyi (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) pupa challenged with Escherichia coli. Four hundred putative EST clones were identified by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH), including 50 immune response-related genes, three cytoskeleton genes, eight cell cycle and apoptosis genes, five respiration and energy metabolism genes, five transport genes, 40 metabolism genes, ten stress response genes, four transcription and translation regulation genes and 77 unknown genes. To verify the reliability of the SSH data, the transcription of a set of randomly selected immune response-related genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). These identified immune response-related genes provide insight into understanding the innate immunity in A. pernyi.

  5. Gene expression in skeletal muscle biopsies from people with type 2 diabetes and relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palsgaard, Jane; Brøns, Charlotte; Friedrichsen, Martin

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene expression alterations have previously been associated with type 2 diabetes, however whether these changes are primary causes or secondary effects of type 2 diabetes is not known. As healthy first degree relatives of people with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing...... type 2 diabetes, they provide a good model in the search for primary causes of the disease. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle biopsies from Caucasian males with type 2 diabetes, healthy first degree relatives, and healthy controls. Gene expression...... downregulated in people with type 2 diabetes. On the individual gene level, 11 genes showed altered expression levels in first degree relatives compared to controls, among others KIF1B and GDF8 (myostatin). LDHB was found to have a decreased expression in both groups compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS...

  6. Analysis of vascular endothelial dysfunction genes and related pathways in obesity through systematic bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jing; Sun, Ling; Xu, Qiuqin; Hou, Miao; Ding, Yueyue; Huang, Jie; Chen, Ye; Cao, Lei; Zhang, Jianmin; Qian, Weiguo; Lv, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has become an increasingly serious health problem and popular research topic. It is associated with many diseases, especially cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related endothelial dysfunction. This study analyzed genes related to endothelial dysfunction and obesity and then summarized their most significant signaling pathways. Genes related to vascular endothelial dysfunction and obesity were extracted from a PubMed database, and analyzed by STRING, DAVID, and Gene-Go Meta-Core software. 142 genes associated with obesity were found to play a role in endothelial dysfunction in PubMed. A significant pathway (Angiotensin system maturation in protein folding and maturation) associated with obesity and endothelial dysfunction was explored. The genes and the pathway explored may play an important role in obesity. Further studies about preventing vascular endothelial dysfunction obesity should be conducted through targeting these loci and pathways.

  7. Differentially Gene Expression Profile Related to Inflammation in Endometrial Cells Induce by Lipopolysaccharide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-hua QIN; Ruo-guang WANG; Sheng LI; Chun-mei LI

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate differentially expressed genes related to inflammation in endometrial cells induced by Lipopolysaccharide(LPS).Methods Normal endometrium in the proliferative phase of specimen from 3 cases for the experiment was collected. The LPS group were treated with 50 μg/ml LPS. Total RNA was extracted using Trizol reagent from cells. RNA quality was assessed by determining the OD260/280 ratio by agarose gel electrophoresis, the chip was scanned by laser scanner. The acquired was analyzed. Results A total of differentially expressed genes were found, these genes were relative to many aspects. Among them, the expression of genes involved in inflammation were up-regulated by LPS, such as overexpression of lL-lβ, 8, etc.Conclusion The results indicates that inflammation-related genes may be one of the mechanisms of abnormal uterine bleeding by LPS-induced.

  8. Can treefrog phylogeographical clades and species’ phylogenetic topologies be recovered by bioacoustical analyses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forti, Lucas Rodriguez; Lingnau, Rodrigo; Encarnação, Lais Carvalho; Bertoluci, Jaime; Toledo, Luís Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Phenotypic traits, such as the frog advertisement call, are generally correlated with interspecific genetic variation, and, as a consequence of strong sexual selection, these behaviors may carry a phylogenetic signal. However, variation in acoustic traits is not always correlated with genetic differences between populations (intraspecific variation); phenotypic plasticity and environmental variables may explain part of such variation. For example, local processes can affect acoustic properties in different lineages due to differences in physical structure, climatic conditions, and biotic interactions, particularly when populations are isolated. However, acoustic traits can be used to test phylogenetic hypotheses. We analyzed the advertisement calls of Dendropsophus elegans males from 18 sites and compared them with those of four closely related congeneric species, in order to test for differences between inter and intraspecific variation. We analyzed 451 calls of 45 males of these five species. Because males from distant sites were grouped together without population congruence, differences found in advertisement calls among individuals were not correlated with phylogeographical clades. Phylogenetic and cluster analyses of the D. elegans clades and those of closely related species grouped all five species into the same topology, as reported by previous molecular and morphological phylogenies. However, the topology of the D. elegans phylogeographical clades did not match the topology previously reported. Acoustic communication in D. elegans seems to be conserved among populations, and the phylogeographical history of the species does not explain the variation among lineages in call properties, despite some congruent phylogenetic signals evident at the species level. Based on molecular clocks retrieved from the literature, it seems that more than 6.5 million years of divergence (late Miocene) are necessary to allow significant changes to occur in the acoustic

  9. Comparative Study of Apoptosis-related Gene Loci in Human, Mouse and Rat Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Bin YIN; Yong ZHANG; Peng YU; Jing-Chu LUO; Ying JIANG; Song-Gang LI

    2005-01-01

    Many genes are involved in mammalian cell apoptosis pathway. These apoptosis genes often contain characteristic functional domains, and can be classified into at least 15 functional groups, according to previous reports. Using an integrated bioinformatics platform for motif or domain search from three public mammalian proteomes (International Protein Index database for human, mouse, and rat), we systematically cataloged all of the proteins involved in mammalian apoptosis pathway. By localizing those proteins onto the genomes, we obtained a gene locus centric apoptosis gene catalog for human, mouse and rat.Further phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the apoptosis related gene loci are conserved among these three mammals. Interestingly, about one-third of apoptosis gene loci form gene clusters on mammal chromosomes, and exist in the three species, which indicated that mammalian apoptosis gene orders are also conserved. In addition, some tandem duplicated gene loci were revealed by comparing gene loci clusters in the three species. All data produced in this work were stored in a relational database and may be viewed at http://pcas.cbi.pku.edu.cn/database/apd.php.

  10. Six new Phytophthora species from ITS Clade 7a including two sexually functional heterothallic hybrid species detected in natural ecosystems in Taiwan.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, T.; Jung, M.H.; Scanu, B.; Seress, D.; Kovács, G.M.; Maia, C.; Pérez-Sierra, A.; Chang, T.-T.; Chandelier, A.; Heungens, K.; Poucke, van K.; Abad-Campos, P.; Léon, M.; Cacciola, S.O.; Bakonyi, J.

    2017-01-01

    During a survey of Phytophthora diversity in natural ecosystems in Taiwan six new species were detected. Multigene phylogeny based on the nuclear ITS, ß-tubulin and HSP90 and the mitochondrial cox1 and NADH1 gene sequences demonstrated that they belong to ITS Clade 7a with P. europaea, P. uniformis,

  11. Memory B cell antibodies to HIV-1 gp140 cloned from individuals infected with clade A and B viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Mouquet

    Full Text Available Understanding the antibody response to HIV-1 in humans that show broad neutralizing serologic activity is a crucial step in trying to reproduce such responses by vaccination. Investigating antibodies with cross clade reactivity is particularly important as these antibodies may target conserved epitopes on the HIV envelope gp160 protein. To this end we have used a clade B YU-2 gp140 trimeric antigen and single-cell antibody cloning methods to obtain 189 new anti-gp140 antibodies representing 51 independent B cell clones from the IgG memory B cells of 3 patients infected with HIV-1 clade A or B viruses and exhibiting broad neutralizing serologic activity. Our results support previous findings showing a diverse antibody response to HIV gp140 envelope protein, characterized by differentially expanded B-cell clones producing highly hypermutated antibodies with heterogenous gp140-specificity and neutralizing activity. In addition to their high-affinity binding to the HIV spike, the vast majority of the new anti-gp140 antibodies are also polyreactive. Although none of the new antibodies are as broad or potent as VRC01 or PG9, two clonally-related antibodies isolated from a clade A HIV-1 infected donor, directed against the gp120 variable loop 3, rank in the top 5% of the neutralizers identified in our large collection of 185 unique gp140-specific antibodies in terms of breadth and potency.

  12. Genomic Evidence Reveals the Extreme Diversity and Wide Distribution of the Arsenic-Related Genes in Burkholderiales

    OpenAIRE

    Xiangyang Li; Linshuang Zhang; Gejiao Wang

    2014-01-01

    So far, numerous genes have been found to associate with various strategies to resist and transform the toxic metalloid arsenic (here, we denote these genes as "arsenic-related genes"). However, our knowledge of the distribution, redundancies and organization of these genes in bacteria is still limited. In this study, we analyzed the 188 Burkholderiales genomes and found that 95% genomes harbored arsenic-related genes, with an average of 6.6 genes per genome. The results indicated: a) compare...

  13. Measured Gene-by-Environment Interaction in Relation to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, Joel; Nikolas, Molly; Burt, S. Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To summarize and evaluate the state of knowledge regarding the role of measured gene-by-environment interactions in relation to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Method: A selective review of methodologic issues was followed by a systematic search for relevant articles on measured gene-by-environment interactions; the search…

  14. Spermatogenesis-related ring finger gene ZNF230 promoter: identification and functional analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Wenming; Zhang, Sizhong; Qiu, Weimin

    2009-01-01

    The ZNF230 gene is a recently cloned gene which is transcribed only in fertile male testes and may be related to human spermatogenesis. To characterize the multiple stage-specific transcription elements necessary for ZNF230 expression, we cloned ZNF230 promoter and constructed chimeric luciferase...

  15. Centrin protein and genes in Trichomonas vaginalis and close relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugerolle, G; Bricheux, G; Coffe, G

    2000-01-01

    Anti-centrin monoclonal antibodies 20H5 and 11B2 produced against Clamydomononas centrin decorated the group of basal bodies as well as very closely attached structures in all trichomonads studied and in the devescovinids Foaina and Devescovina. Moreover, these antibodies decorated the undulating membrane in Trichomonas vaginalis, Trichomitus batrachorum, and Tritrichomonas foetus, and the cresta in Foaina. Centrin was not demonstrated in the dividing spindle and paradesmosis. Immunogold labeling, both in pre- and post-embedding, confirmed that centrin is associated with the basal body cylinder and is a component of the nine anchoring arms between the terminal plate of flagellar bases and the plasma-membrane. Centrin is also associated with the hook-shaped fibers attached to basal bodies (F1, F3), the X-fiber, and along sigmoid fibers (F2) at the pelta-axostyle junction, which is the microtubule organizing center for pelta-axostyle microtubules. There was no labeling on the striated costa and parabasal fibers nor on microtubular pelta-axostyle, but the fibrous structure inside the undulating membrane was labeled in T. vaginalis. Two proteins of 22-20 kDa corresponding to the centrin molecular mass were recognized by immunoblotting using these antibodies in the three trichomonad species examined. By screening a T. vaginalis cDNA library with 20H5 antibody, two genes encoding identical protein sequences were found. The sequence comprises the 4 typical EF-hand Ca++-binding domains present in every known centrin. Trichomonad centrin is closer to the green algal cluster (70% identity) than to the yeast Cdc31 cluster (55% identity) or the Alveolata cluster (46% identity).

  16. Oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) is related to psychological resources

    OpenAIRE

    Saphire-Bernstein, Shimon; Way, Baldwin M.; Kim, Heejung S.; Sherman, David K.; Taylor, Shelley E.

    2011-01-01

    Psychological resources—optimism, mastery, and self-esteem—buffer the deleterious effects of stress and are predictors of neurophysiological and psychological health-related outcomes. These resources have been shown to be highly heritable, yet the genetic basis for this heritability remains unknown. Here, we report a link between the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) SNP rs53576 and psychological resources, such that carriers of the “A” allele have lower levels of optimism, mastery, and self-esteem, r...

  17. An association screen of myelin-related genes implicates the chromosome 22q11 PIK4CA gene in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, B. J.; Hoogendoorn, M. L. C.; Bakker, S. C.; van't Slot, R.; Bardoel, A. F.; Ophoff, R. A.; Wijmenga, C.; Kahn, R. S.; Sinke, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence, including expression analyses, brain imaging and genetic studies suggest that the integrity of myelin is disturbed in schizophrenia patients. In this study, we first reconstructed a pathway of 138 myelin-related genes, all involved in myelin structure, composition, develop

  18. The RT-PCR Analysis of Lignocellulytic Biodegradation-related Gene Expression of Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Mingfeng(江明锋); Zhang Yizheng

    2004-01-01

    Expression of lignocellulytic biodegradation-related genes of Phanerochaete chrysosporium grown in 10 kinds of defined media for 5 days and on fir wood chip for 2 to 8 weeks is analyzed by using the RT-PCR method. The result shows that an individual gene of lip gene family responds differently to different nutrient factors. The expression of lipD gene can be promoted by molecular O2 but suppressed by Mn2+. The influence of nitorgen is not the controlling factor for lipD gene expression. No clear relationship is found between nutrient factors and the expression of lipA gene which may be regulated by several nutrient factors through a complex system. Mnp3 gene is not strongly regulated by Mn2+ and other nutrient factors. It can be expressed in different media. CBHI gene family can not be expressed in the presence of glucose as the sole carbon source. Glx expression is regulated by Mn2+ and molecular O2, and depressed when Mn2+ concerntration goes up to 300 mg/L. The transcription patterns of lip gene family grown on fir wood chip are shown to be markedly different from those patterns in defined media. The expression of single lip gene changes with colonized time. No difference is observed between the expression pattern of mnp, cbh, glx gene in defined media and fir wood chips.

  19. Gene Expression Profile Related to the Progression of Preneoplastic Nodules toward Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Isael Pérez-Carréon

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the time course gene expression profile of preneoplastic nodules and hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC to define the genes implicated in cancer progression in a resistant hepatocyte model. Tissues that included early nodules (1 month, ENT-1, persistent nodules (5 months, ENT-5, dissected HCC (12 months, and normal livers (NIL from adult rats were analyzed by cDNA arrays including 1185 rat genes. Differential genes were derived in each type of sample (n = 3 by statistical analysis. The relationship between samples was described in a Venn diagram for 290 genes. From these, 72 genes were shared between tissues with nodules and HCC. In addition, 35 genes with statistical significance only in HCC and with extreme ratios were identified. Differential expression of 11 genes was confirmed by comparative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, whereas that of 2 genes was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Members involved in cytochrome P450 and second-phase metabolism were downregulated, whereas genes involved in glutathione metabolism were upregulated, implicating a possible role of glutathione and oxidative regulation. We provide a gene expression profile related to the progression of nodules into HCC, which contributes to the understanding of liver cancer development and offers the prospect for chemoprevention strategies or early treatment of HCC.

  20. Metamorphosis and neoteny: alternative pathways in an extinct amphibian clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Rainer R; Fröbisch, Nadia B

    2006-07-01

    The Branchiosauridae was a clade of small amphibians from the Permo-Carboniferous with an overall salamander-like appearance. The clade is distinguished by an extraordinary fossil record that comprises hundreds of well-preserved specimens, representing a wide range of ontogenetic stages. Branchiosaurids had external gills and weakly ossified skeletons, and due to this larval appearance their status as neotenic (perennibranchiate) forms has long been accepted. Despite their extensive fossil record large specimens with an adult morphology appeared to be lacking altogether, but recently two adult specimens were identified in a rich sample of Apateon gracilis collected in the 19th century from a locality near Dresden, Saxony. These specimens are unique among branchiosaurids in showing a high level of ossification, including bones that have never been reported in a branchiosaur. These highlight the successive formation of features believed to indicate terrestrial locomotion, as well as feeding on larger prey items. Moreover, these transformations occurred in a small time window (whereas the degree of size increase is used as a proxy of time) and the degree of concentration of developmental events in branchiosaurids is unique among tetrapods outside the lissamphibians. These specimens are compared with large adults of the neotenic branchiosaurid Apateon caducus from the Saar-Nahe Basin, which despite their larger body size lack the features found in the adult A. gracilis specimens. These specimens give new insight into patterns of metamorphosis (morphological transformation) in branchiosaurids that are believed to be correlated to a change of habitat, and clearly show that different life-history pathways comparable to those of modern salamanders were already established in this Paleozoic clade.

  1. Expression and significance of tumor-related genes in HCC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Li Lü; Dian-Zhong Luo; Jian-Ming Wen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the e xpression and clinical significance of DEK, cyclin D1, insulin-like growth factor Ⅱ (IGF-Ⅱ),glypican 3 (GPC3), ribosomal phosphoprotein 0 (rpP0) mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its paraneoplastic tissues.METHODS: The expression of mRNAs of DEK, cyclin D1,IGF-Ⅱ, GPC3 and rpP0 mRNA was detected in HCC and its paraneoplastic tissues by multiplex RT-PCR.RESULTS: By the simplex RT-PCR, the overexpression of mRNAs of DEK, cyclin D1, IGF-Ⅱ, GPC3, rpP0 mRNA in HCC and its paraneoplastic tissues was 78.1%, 87.5%,87.5%, 75.0%, 81.3% and 15.6%, 40.6%, 37.5%, 21.9%,31.3% respectively (P<0.05). By the multiplex RT-PCR,at least one of the mRNAs was detected in all HCC samples and in 75.0% of paraneoplastic samples (P>0.05). However,all these five mRNAs were found in 68.8% of HCC samples,but only in 9.4% of paraneoplastic tissues (P<0.05). The positive expression of mRNAs of DEK, cyclin D1, IGF-Ⅱ,GPC3, rpP0 in well- and poorly-differentiated HCC was 89.0%, 66.7%, 66.7%, 66.7%, 77.8% and 73.9%, 95.7%,95.7%, 95.7%, 82.6%, respectively (P>0.05). The expression of these genes in HCCs with α-feto protein (AFP) negative and positive was 90.0%, 80.0%, 90.0%, 90.0%, 90.0% and 72.7%, 86.3%, 77.3%, 90.9%, 68.2% respectively (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: The expression of DEK,, cyclin D1, IGF-Ⅱ,GPC3, rpP0 mRNA in HCC is much higher in HCC than in its paraneoplastic tissues. Multiplex RT-PCR assay is an effective, sensitive, accurate, and cost-effective diagnostic method of HCC.

  2. SVM-T-RFE: a novel gene selection algorithm for identifying metastasis-related genes in colorectal cancer using gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobo; Peng, Sihua; Chen, Jian; Lü, Bingjian; Zhang, Honghe; Lai, Maode

    2012-03-09

    Although metastasis is the principal cause of death cause for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, the molecular mechanisms underlying CRC metastasis are still not fully understood. In an attempt to identify metastasis-related genes in CRC, we obtained gene expression profiles of 55 early stage primary CRCs, 56 late stage primary CRCs, and 34 metastatic CRCs from the expression project in Oncology (http://www.intgen.org/expo/). We developed a novel gene selection algorithm (SVM-T-RFE), which extends support vector machine recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) algorithm by incorporating T-statistic. We achieved highest classification accuracy (100%) with smaller gene subsets (10 and 6, respectively), when classifying between early and late stage primary CRCs, as well as between metastatic CRCs and late stage primary CRCs. We also compared the performance of SVM-T-RFE and SVM-RFE gene selection algorithms on another large-scale CRC dataset and the five public microarray datasets. SVM-T-RFE bestowed SVM-RFE algorithm in identifying more differentially expressed genes, and achieving highest prediction accuracy using equal or smaller number of selected genes. A fraction of selected genes have been reported to be associated with CRC development or metastasis.

  3. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  4. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2016-11-29

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  5. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2014-08-05

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  6. An anti-HIV-1 V3 loop antibody fully protects cross-clade and elicits T-cell immunity in macaques mucosally challenged with an R5 clade C SHIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D Watkins

    Full Text Available Neutralizing antibodies have been shown to protect macaques against SHIV challenge. However, genetically diverse HIV-1 clades have evolved, and a key question left unanswered is whether neutralizing antibodies can confer cross-clade protection in vivo. The novel human monoclonal antibody HGN194 was isolated from an individual infected with an HIV-1 clade AG recombinant circulating recombinant form (CRF. HGN194 targets an epitope in the third hypervariable loop (V3 of HIV-1 gp120 and neutralizes a range of relatively neutralization-sensitive and resistant viruses. We evaluated the potential of HGN194 to protect infant rhesus monkeys against a SHIV encoding a primary CCR5-tropic HIV-1 clade C envelope. After high-dose mucosal challenge, all untreated controls became highly viremic while all HGN194-treated animals (50 mg/kg were completely protected. When HGN194 was given at 1 mg/kg, one out of two monkeys remained aviremic, whereas the other had delayed, lower peak viremia. Interestingly, all protected monkeys given high-dose HGN194 developed Gag-specific proliferative responses of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. To test whether generation of the latter involved cryptic infection, we ablated CD8+ cells after HGN194 clearance. No viremia was detected in any protected monkeys, thus ruling out virus reservoirs. Thus, induction of CD8 T-cell immunity may have resulted from transient "Hit and Run" infection or cross priming via Ag-Ab-mediated cross-presentation. Together, our data identified the HGN194 epitope as protective and provide proof-of-concept that this anti-V3 loop mAb can prevent infection with sterilizing immunity after challenge with virus of a different clade, implying that V3 is a potential vaccine target.

  7. Two new species in Agaricus tropical clade I

    OpenAIRE

    Karunarathna, Samantha C.; Guinberteau, Jacques; Chen, Jie; Vellinga, Else C.; Zhao, Rui-lin; Chukeatirote, Ekachai; Yan, Jiye; Hyde, Kevin D.; Callac, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    As part of our efforts of study the saprobic mushrooms in Asia we have collected numerous taxa of the genus Agaricus in northern Thailand. It is likely that more than 40 new species occur in this region and many are potentially edible or medicinal. A recent phylogenetic study revealed that most species of this region belong to exclusively tropical clades of which the largest one, TR I, was suspected to represent section Brunneopicti. In this paper we introduce two new species as Agaricus chia...

  8. Gene expression variation resolves species and individual strains among coral-associated dinoflagellates within the genus Symbiodinium

    KAUST Repository

    Parkinson, John Everett

    2016-02-11

    Reef-building corals depend on symbiotic mutualisms with photosynthetic dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium. This large microalgal group comprises many highly divergent lineages (“Clades A-I”) and hundreds of undescribed species. Given their ecological importance, efforts have turned to genomic approaches to characterize the functional ecology of Symbiodinium. To date, investigators have only compared gene expression between representatives from separate clades—the equivalent of contrasting genera or families in other dinoflagellate groups—making it impossible to distinguish between clade-level and species-level functional differences. Here, we examined the transcriptomes of four species within one Symbiodinium clade (Clade B) at ~20,000 orthologous genes, as well as multiple isoclonal cell lines within species (i.e. cultured strains). These species span two major adaptive radiations within Clade B, each encompassing both host-specialized and ecologically cryptic taxa. Species-specific expression differences were consistently enriched for photosynthesis-related genes, likely reflecting selection pressures driving niche diversification. Transcriptional variation among strains involved fatty acid metabolism and biosynthesis pathways. Such differences among individuals are potentially a major source of physiological variation, contributing to the functional diversity of coral holobionts composed of unique host-symbiont genotype pairings. Our findings expand the genomic resources available for this important symbiont group and emphasize the power of comparative transcriptomics as a method for studying speciation processes and inter-individual variation in non-model organisms.

  9. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1 levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation.

  10. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Sun, Ning; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe; Lu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation.

  11. Addiction and Reward-related Genes Show Altered Expression in the Postpartum Nucleus Accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiu eZhao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Motherhood involves a switch in natural rewards, whereby offspring become highly rewarding. Nucleus accumbens (NAC is a key CNS region for natural rewards and addictions, but to date no study has evaluated on a large scale the events in NAC that underlie the maternal change in natural rewards. In this study we utilized microarray and bioinformatics approaches to evaluate postpartum NAC gene expression changes in mice. Modular Single-set Enrichment Test (MSET indicated that postpartum (relative to virgin NAC gene expression profile was significantly enriched for genes related to addiction and reward in 5 of 5 independently curated databases (e.g., Malacards, Phenopedia. Over 100 addiction/reward related genes were identified and these included: Per1, Per2, Arc, Homer2, Creb1, Grm3, Fosb, Gabrb3, Adra2a, Ntrk2, Cry1, Penk, Cartpt, Adcy1, Npy1r, Htr1a, Drd1a, Gria1, and Pdyn. ToppCluster analysis found maternal NAC expression profile to be significantly enriched for genes related to the drug action of nicotine, ketamine, and dronabinol. Pathway analysis indicated postpartum NAC as enriched for RNA processing, CNS development/differentiation, and transcriptional regulation. Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analysis identified possible networks for transcription factors, including Nr1d1, Per2, Fosb, Egr1, and Nr4a1. The postpartum state involves increased risk for mental health disorders and MSET analysis indicated postpartum NAC to be enriched for genes related to depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Mental health related genes included: Fabp7, Grm3, Penk, and Nr1d1. We confirmed via quantitative PCR Nr1d1, Per2, Grm3, Penk, Drd1a, and Pdyn. This study indicates for the first time that postpartum NAC involves large scale gene expression alterations linked to addiction and reward. Because the postpartum state also involves decreased response to drugs, the findings could provide insights into how to mitigate addictions.

  12. Neuroimaging abnormalities in clade C HIV are independent of Tat genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Robert H; Phillips, Sarah; Hoare, Jacqueline; Laidlaw, David H; Cabeen, Ryan; Olbricht, Gayla R; Su, Yuqing; Stein, Dan J; Engelbrecht, Susan; Seedat, Soraya; Salminen, Lauren E; Baker, Laurie M; Heaps, Jodi; Joska, John

    2017-04-01

    Controversy remains regarding the neurotoxicity of clade C human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-C). When examined in preclinical studies, a cysteine to serine substitution in the C31 dicysteine motif of the HIV-C Tat protein (C31S) results in less severe brain injury compared to other viral clades. By contrast, patient cohort studies identify significant neuropsychological impairment among HIV-C individuals independent of Tat variability. The present study clarified this discrepancy by examining neuroimaging markers of brain integrity among HIV-C individuals with and without the Tat substitution. Thirty-seven HIV-C individuals with the Tat C31S substitution, 109 HIV-C individuals without the Tat substitution (C31C), and 34 HIV- controls underwent 3T structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Volumes were determined for the caudate, putamen, thalamus, corpus callosum, total gray matter, and total white matter. DTI metrics included fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD). Tracts of interest included the anterior thalamic radiation (ATR), cingulum bundle (CING), uncinate fasciculus (UNC), and corpus callosum (CC). HIV+ individuals exhibited smaller volumes in subcortical gray matter, total gray matter and total white matter compared to HIV- controls. HIV+ individuals also exhibited DTI abnormalities across multiple tracts compared to HIV- controls. By contrast, neither volumetric nor diffusion indices differed significantly between the Tat C31S and C31C groups. Tat C31S status is not a sufficient biomarker of HIV-related brain integrity in patient populations. Clinical attention directed at brain health is warranted for all HIV+ individuals, independent of Tat C31S or clade C status.

  13. Exression and Cloning of Apoptosis-related Gene and Its Association with Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Qidong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUDongdong; ZHANGXiran; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To explore the molecular basis of hepatocarcinogenesis by cloning and expressing a novel liver cancer apoptosis -related gene.Methods:With homologous screening and RT-PCR,we had cloned an apoptosis-related gene APG from liver cancer cells,compared its expression in hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) tissue and paracarcinoma tissue,and analyzed its sequence from these tissues.The association of APG gene expression with HCC was investigated.Results:A new gene APG was cloned with a full-legth cDNA of 563 bp.Sequencing analysis showed heterogeneity of APG gene from hepatocarcinoma tissue and from paracarcinoma tissue.Among 50 cases of liver cancer,APG gene expressions were down-regulated in 42 cases(84%) ,while up-regulated in 8 cases(16%,P0.05).Conclusion APG is an appoptosis-relate gene and down-regualted in HCC.Its expression is associated with many clinical and pathologic features of HCC,suggesting that APG gene is probably involved in the tumorigenesis of HCC.

  14. A Bayesian Hierarchical Model for Relating Multiple SNPs within Multiple Genes to Disease Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewei Duan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of methods have been proposed for studying the association of multiple genes thought to be involved in a common pathway for a particular disease. Here, we present an extension of a Bayesian hierarchical modeling strategy that allows for multiple SNPs within each gene, with external prior information at either the SNP or gene level. The model involves variable selection at the SNP level through latent indicator variables and Bayesian shrinkage at the gene level towards a prior mean vector and covariance matrix that depend on external information. The entire model is fitted using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. Simulation studies show that the approach is capable of recovering many of the truly causal SNPs and genes, depending upon their frequency and size of their effects. The method is applied to data on 504 SNPs in 38 candidate genes involved in DNA damage response in the WECARE study of second breast cancers in relation to radiotherapy exposure.

  15. Angiosperm phylogeny inferred from sequences of four mitochondrial genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Long QIU; Zhi-Duan CHEN; Libo LI; Bin WANG; Jia-Yu XUE; Tory A. HENDRY; Rui-Qi LI; Joseph W. BROWN; Yang LIU; Geordan T. HUDSON

    2010-01-01

    An angiosperm phylogeny was reconstructed in a maximum likelihood analysis of sequences of four mitochondrial genes, atpl, matR, had5, and rps3, from 380 species that represent 376 genera and 296 families of seed plants. It is largely congruent with the phylogeny of angiosperms reconstructed from chloroplast genes atpB, matK, and rbcL, and nuclear 18S rDNA. The basalmost lineage consists of Amborella and Nymphaeales (including Hydatellaceae). Austrobaileyales follow this clade and are sister to the mesangiosperms, which include Chloranthaceae, Ceratophyllum, magnoliids, monocots, and eudicots. With the exception of Chloranthaceae being sister to Ceratophyllum, relationships among these five lineages are not well supported. In eudicots, Ranunculales, Sabiales, Proteales, Trochodendrales, Buxales, Gunnerales, Saxifragales, Vitales, Berberidopsidales, and Dilleniales form a basal grade of lines that diverged before the diversification of rosids and asterids. Within rosids, the COM (Celastrales-Oxalidales-Malpighiales) clade is sister to malvids (or rosid Ⅱ), instead of to the nitrogen-fixing clade as found in all previous large-scale molecular analyses of angiosperms. Santalales and Caryophyllales are members of an expanded asterid clade. This study shows that the mitochondrial genes are informative markers for resolving relationships among genera, families, or higher rank taxa across angiosperms. The low substitution rates and low homoplasy levels of the mitochondrial genes relative to the chloroplast genes, as found in this study, make them particularly useful for reconstructing ancient phylogenetic relationships. A mitochondrial gene-based angiosperm phylogeny provides an independent and essential reference for comparison with hypotheses of angiosperm phylogeny based on chloroplast genes, nuclear genes, and non-molecular data to reconstruct the underlying organismal phylogeny.

  16. Bioinformatics analysis of breast cancer bone metastasis related gene-CXCR4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng-Wei Zhang; Xian-Fu Sun; Ya-Ning He; Jun-Tao Li; Xu-Hui Guo; Hui Liu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To analyze breast cancer bone metastasis related gene-CXCR4. Methods: This research screened breast cancer bone metastasis related genes by high-flux gene chip. Results:It was found that the expressions of 396 genes were different including 165 up-regulations and 231 down-regulations. The expression of chemokine receptor CXCR4 was obviously up-regulated in the tissue with breast cancer bone metastasis. Compared with the tissue without bone metastasis, there was significant difference, which indicated that CXCR4 played a vital role in breast cancer bone metastasis. Conclusions: The bioinformatics analysis of CXCR4 can provide a certain basis for the occurrence and diagnosis of breast cancer bone metastasis, target gene therapy and evaluation of prognosis.

  17. Integrase inhibitor (INI) genotypic resistance in treatment-naive and raltegravir-experienced patients infected with diverse HIV-1 clades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Tomas; Dunn, David T.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; De Mendoza, Carmen; Garcia, Frederico; Smit, Erasmus; Fearnhill, Esther; Marcelin, Anne-Genevieve; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Kaiser, Rolf; Geretti, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to characterize the prevalence and patterns of genotypic integrase inhibitor (INI) resistance in relation to HIV-1 clade. Methods The cohort comprised 533 INI-naive subjects and 255 raltegravir recipients with viraemia who underwent integrase sequencing in routine care across Europe, including 134/533 (25.1%) and 46/255 (18.0%), respectively, with non-B clades (A, C, D, F, G, CRF01, CRF02, other CRFs, complex). Results No major INI resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) occurred in INI-naive subjects. Among raltegravir recipients with viraemia (median 3523 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL), 113/255 (44.3%) had one or more major INI RAMs, most commonly N155H (45/255, 17.6%), Q148H/R/K + G140S/A (35/255, 13.7%) and Y143R/C/H (12/255, 4.7%). In addition, four (1.6%) raltegravir recipients showed novel mutations at recognized resistance sites (E92A, S147I, N155D, N155Q) and novel mutations at other integrase positions that were statistically associated with raltegravir exposure (K159Q/R, I161L/M/T/V, E170A/G). Comparing subtype B with non-B clades, Q148H/R/K occurred in 42/209 (20.1%) versus 2/46 (4.3%) subjects (P = 0.009) and G140S/A occurred in 36/209 (17.2%) versus 1/46 (2.2%) subjects (P = 0.005). Intermediate- to high-level cross-resistance to twice-daily dolutegravir was predicted in 40/255 (15.7%) subjects, more commonly in subtype B versus non-B clades (39/209, 18.7% versus 1/46, 2.2%; P = 0.003). A glycine (G) to serine (S) substitution at integrase position 140 required one nucleotide change in subtype B and two nucleotide changes in all non-B clades. Conclusions No major INI resistance mutations occurred in INI-naive subjects. Reduced occurrence of Q148H/R/K + G140S/A was seen in non-B clades versus subtype B, and was explained by the higher genetic barrier to the G140S mutation observed in all non-B clades analysed. PMID:26311843

  18. Autism and increased paternal age related changes in global levels of gene expression regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Alter

    Full Text Available A causal role of mutations in multiple general transcription factors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism suggested that alterations in global levels of gene expression regulation might also relate to disease risk in sporadic cases of autism. This premise can be tested by evaluating for changes in the overall distribution of gene expression levels. For instance, in mice, variability in hippocampal-dependent behaviors was associated with variability in the pattern of the overall distribution of gene expression levels, as assessed by variance in the distribution of gene expression levels in the hippocampus. We hypothesized that a similar change in variance might be found in children with autism. Gene expression microarrays covering greater than 47,000 unique RNA transcripts were done on RNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL of children with autism (n = 82 and controls (n = 64. Variance in the distribution of gene expression levels from each microarray was compared between groups of children. Also tested was whether a risk factor for autism, increased paternal age, was associated with variance. A decrease in the variance in the distribution of gene expression levels in PBL was associated with the diagnosis of autism and a risk factor for autism, increased paternal age. Traditional approaches to microarray analysis of gene expression suggested a possible mechanism for decreased variance in gene expression. Gene expression pathways involved in transcriptional regulation were down-regulated in the blood of children with autism and children of older fathers. Thus, results from global and gene specific approaches to studying microarray data were complimentary and supported the hypothesis that alterations at the global level of gene expression regulation are related to autism and increased paternal age. Global regulation of transcription, thus, represents a possible point of convergence for multiple etiologies of autism and other

  19. Molecular epidemiology of dengue virus serotypes 2 and 3 in Paraguay during 2001-2006: the association of viral clade introductions with shifting serotype dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Jose D J Diaz; Tang, Wei-Feng; Ishii, Ryoichi; Ono, Tetsuro; Eshita, Yuki; Aono, Hiroshi; Makino, Yoshihiro

    2008-11-01

    To determine the genetic variability of dengue viruses (DENVs) in Paraguay, the complete envelope gene was sequenced for 4 DENV-2 and 22 DENV-3 strains isolated from 2001 to 2006. The sequence data were used in Bayesian phylogenetic analyses, which revealed that Paraguayan DENV-2 strains fell into two distinct clades within the American/Asian genotype, thus suggesting that the introduction of a new DENV-2 clade was likely associated with the shift of dominant serotype from DENV-3 to DENV-2 in 2005 and might have caused an outbreak of DENV-2. This study also indicated that DENV-3 strains fell into genotype III, of which, several 2006 isolates varied from the remaining isolates in their tree locations. The introduction of this new clade was likely associated with the shift of dominant serotype from DENV-2 to DENV-3 in 2006 and might have caused an epidemic of DENV-3. More data are needed to test this hypothesis.

  20. Mapping and annotating obesity-related genes in pig and human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Pier Luigi; Fontanesi, Luca; Piovesan, Damiano; Fariselli, Piero; Casadio, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Background. Obesity is a major health problem in both developed and emerging countries. Obesity is a complex disease whose etiology involves genetic factors in strong interplay with environmental determinants and lifestyle. The discovery of genetic factors and biological pathways underlying human obesity is hampered by the difficulty in controlling the genetic background of human cohorts. Animal models are then necessary to further dissect the genetics of obesity. Pig has emerged as one of the most attractive models, because of the similarity with humans in the mechanisms regulating the fat deposition. Results. We collected the genes related to obesity in humans and to fat deposition traits in pig. We localized them on both human and pig genomes, building a map useful to interpret comparative studies on obesity. We characterized the collected genes structurally and functionally with BAR+ and mapped them on KEGG pathways and on STRING protein interaction network. Conclusions. The collected set consists of 361 obesity related genes in human and pig genomes. All genes were mapped on the human genome, and 54 could not be localized on the pig genome (release 2012). Only for 3 human genes there is no counterpart in pig, confirming that this animal is a good model for human obesity studies. Obesity related genes are mostly involved in regulation and signaling processes/pathways and relevant connection emerges between obesity-related genes and diseases such as cancer and infectious diseases.

  1. Decoupled form and function in disparate herbivorous dinosaur clades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschlager, Stephan; Brassey, Charlotte A.; Button, David J.; Barrett, Paul M.

    2016-05-01

    Convergent evolution, the acquisition of morphologically similar traits in unrelated taxa due to similar functional demands or environmental factors, is a common phenomenon in the animal kingdom. Consequently, the occurrence of similar form is used routinely to address fundamental questions in morphofunctional research and to infer function in fossils. However, such qualitative assessments can be misleading and it is essential to test form/function relationships quantitatively. The parallel occurrence of a suite of morphologically convergent craniodental characteristics in three herbivorous, phylogenetically disparate dinosaur clades (Sauropodomorpha, Ornithischia, Theropoda) provides an ideal test case. A combination of computational biomechanical models (Finite Element Analysis, Multibody Dynamics Analysis) demonstrate that despite a high degree of morphological similarity between representative taxa (Plateosaurus engelhardti, Stegosaurus stenops, Erlikosaurus andrewsi) from these clades, their biomechanical behaviours are notably different and difficult to predict on the basis of form alone. These functional differences likely reflect dietary specialisations, demonstrating the value of quantitative biomechanical approaches when evaluating form/function relationships in extinct taxa.

  2. Direct evidence for the Homo-Pan clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Rainer; Kirsch, Stefan; Rappold, Gudrun A; Schempp, Werner

    2002-01-01

    For a long time, the evolutionary relationship between human and African apes, the 'trichotomy problem', has been debated with strong differences in opinion and interpretation. Statistical analyses of different molecular DNA data sets have been carried out and have primarily supported a Homo-Pan clade. An alternative way to address this question is by the comparison of evolutionarily relevant chromosomal breakpoints. Here, we made use of a P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC)/bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig spanning approximately 2.8 Mb on the long arm of the human Y chromosome, to comparatively map individual PAC clones to chromosomes from great apes, gibbons, and two species of Old World monkeys by fluorescence in-situ hybridization. During our search for evolutionary breakpoints on the Y chromosome, it transpired that a transposition of an approximately 100-kb DNA fragment from chromosome 1 onto the Y chromosome must have occurred in a common ancestor of human, chimpanzee and bonobo. Only the Y chromosomes of these three species contain the chromosome-1-derived fragment; it could not be detected on the Y chromosomes of gorillas or the other primates examined. Thus, this shared derived (synapomorphic) trait provides clear evidence for a Homo-Pan clade independent of DNA sequence analysis.

  3. Advanced Microbial Taxonomy Combined with Genome-Based-Approaches Reveals that Vibrio astriarenae sp. nov., an Agarolytic Marine Bacterium, Forms a New Clade in Vibrionaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhidayu Al-Saari

    Full Text Available Advances in genomic microbial taxonomy have opened the way to create a more universal and transparent concept of species but is still in a transitional stage towards becoming a defining robust criteria for describing new microbial species with minimum features obtained using both genome and classical polyphasic taxonomies. Here we performed advanced microbial taxonomies combined with both genome-based and classical approaches for new agarolytic vibrio isolates to describe not only a novel Vibrio species but also a member of a new Vibrio clade. Two novel vibrio strains (Vibrio astriarenae sp. nov. C7T and C20 showing agarolytic, halophilic and fermentative metabolic activity were isolated from a seawater sample collected in a coral reef in Okinawa. Intraspecific similarities of the isolates were identical in both sequences on the 16S rRNA and pyrH genes, but the closest relatives on the molecular phylogenetic trees on the basis of 16S rRNA and pyrH gene sequences were V. hangzhouensis JCM 15146T (97.8% similarity and V. agarivorans CECT 5085T (97.3% similarity, respectively. Further multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA on the basis of 8 protein coding genes (ftsZ, gapA, gyrB, mreB, pyrH, recA, rpoA, and topA obtained by the genome sequences clearly showed the V. astriarenae strain C7T and C20 formed a distinct new clade protruded next to V. agarivorans CECT 5085T. The singleton V. agarivorans has never been included in previous MLSA of Vibrionaceae due to the lack of some gene sequences. Now the gene sequences are completed and analysis of 100 taxa in total provided a clear picture describing the association of V. agarivorans into pre-existing concatenated network tree and concluded its relationship to our vibrio strains. Experimental DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH data showed that the strains C7T and C20 were conspecific but were separated from all of the other Vibrio species related on the basis of both 16S rRNA and pyrH gene phylogenies (e.g., V

  4. Screening for candidate genes related to breast cancer with cDNA microarray analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Juan Xiang; Zhi-Gang Yu; Ming-Ming Guo; Qin-Ye Fu; Zhong-Bing Ma; De-Zong Gao; Qiang Zhang; Yu-Yang Li; Liang Li; Lu Liu; Chun-Miao Ye

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to reveal the exact changes during the occurrence of breast cancer to explore significant new and promising genes or factors related to this disease. Methods: We compared the gene expression profiles of breast cancer tissues with its uninvolved normal breast tissues as controls using the cDNA microarray analysis in seven breast cancer patients. Further, one representative gene, named IFI30, was quanti-tatively analyzed by real-time PCR to confirm the result of the cDNA microarray analysis. Results: A total of 427 genes were identified with significantly differential expression, 221 genes were up-regulated and 206 genes were down-regulated. And the result of cDNA microarray analysis was validated by detection of IFI30 mRNA level changes by real-time PCR. Genes for cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell division, mitosis, apoptosis, and immune response were enriched in the up-regulated genes, while genes for cell adhesion, proteolysis, and transport were significantly enriched in the down-regulated genes in breast cancer tissues compared with normal breast tissues by a gene ontology analysis. Conclusion: Our present study revealed a range of differentially expressed genes between breast cancer tissues and normal breast tissues, and provide candidate genes for further study focusing on the pathogenesis and new biomarkers for breast cancer. Copyright © 2015, Chinese Medical Association Production. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of KeAi Communications Co., Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  5. Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 Clade 2.3.2.1c virus in migratory birds, 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yuhai; Chen, Jianjun; Zhang, Zhenjie; Li, Mingxin; Cai, Tianlong; Sharshov, Kirill; Susloparov, Ivan; Shestopalov, Alexander; Wong, Gary; He, Yubang; Xing, Zhi; Sun, Jianqing; Liu, Di; Liu, Yingxia; Liu, Lei; Liu, Wenjun; Lei, Fumin; Shi, Weifeng; Gao, George F

    2016-08-01

    A novel Clade 2.3.2.1c H5N1 reassortant virus caused several outbreaks in wild birds in some regions of China from late 2014 to 2015. Based on the genetic and phylogenetic analyses, the viruses possess a stable gene constellation with a Clade 2.3.2.1c HA, a H9N2-derived PB2 gene and the other six genes of Asian H5N1-origin. The Clade 2.3.2.1c H5N1 reassortants displayed a high genetic relationship to a human H5N1 strain (A/Alberta/01/2014). Further analysis showed that similar viruses have been circulating in wild birds in China, Russia, Dubai (Western Asia), Bulgaria and Romania (Europe), as well as domestic poultry in some regions of Africa. The affected areas include the Central Asian, East Asian-Australasian, West Asian-East African, and Black Sea/Mediterranean flyways. These results show that the novel Clade 2.3.2.1c reassortant viruses are circulating worldwide and may have gained a selective advantage in migratory birds, thus posing a serious threat to wild birds and potentially humans.

  6. Expression of a sugar clade gustatory receptor, BmGr6, in the oral sensory organs, midgut, and central nervous system of larvae of the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Dingze; Shu, Min; Endo, Haruka; Yoshizawa, Yasutaka; Nagata, Shinji; Kikuta, Shingo; Sato, Ryoichi

    2016-03-01

    Insects taste nonvolatile chemicals through gustatory receptors (Grs) and make choices for feeding, mating, and oviposition. To date, genome projects have identified 69 Gr genes in the silkworm, Bombyx mori; however, the expression sites of these Grs remain to be explored. In this study, we used reverse transcription (RT)-PCR to investigate expression of the B. mori Gr-6 (BmGr6) gene, a member of the putative sugar clade gene family in various tissues. BmGr6 is expressed in the midgut, central nervous system (CNS), and oral sensory organs. Moreover, immunohistochemistry using an anti-BmGr6 antiserum demonstrated that BmGr6 is expressed in cells by oral sensory organs, midgut and nervous system. Furthermore, double-immunohistochemistry indicated that BmGr6 is expressed in midgut enteroendocrine cells, also in CNS neurosecretory cells. In particular, a portion of BmGr6-expressing cells, in both midgut and CNS, secretes FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs). These results suggest that BmGr6 functions not only as a taste receptor, but also as a chemical sensor such as for the regulation of gut movement, physiological conditions, and feeding behavior of larvae.

  7. Transcriptomic network analysis of micronuclei-related genes: a case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, D. M.; Pedersen, Marie; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.;

    2011-01-01

    checkpoint and aneuploidy. The MN-related gene network was tested against a transcriptomics case study associated with MN measurements. In this case study, transcriptomic data from children and adults differentially exposed to ambient air pollution in the Czech Republic were analysed and visualised......Mechanistically relevant information on responses of humans to xenobiotic exposure in relation to chemically induced biological effects, such as micronuclei (MN) formation can be obtained through large-scale transcriptomics studies. Network analysis may enhance the analysis and visualisation...... of such data. Therefore, this study aimed to develop a 'MN formation' network based on a priori knowledge, by using the pathway tool MetaCore. The gene network contained 27 genes and three gene complexes that are related to processes involved in MN formation, e.g. spindle assembly checkpoint, cell cycle...

  8. Recognition- and defense-related gene expression at 3 resynthesis stages in lichen symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athukorala, Sarangi N P; Piercey-Normore, Michele D

    2015-01-01

    Recognition and defense responses are early events in plant-pathogen interactions and between lichen symbionts. The effect of elicitors on responses between lichen symbionts is not well understood. The objective of this study was to compare the difference in recognition- and defense-related gene expression as a result of culture extracts (containing secreted water-soluble elicitors) from compatible and incompatible interactions at each of 3 resynthesis stages in the symbionts of Cladonia rangiferina. This study investigated gene expression by quantitative PCR in cultures of C. rangiferina and its algal partner, Asterochloris glomerata/irregularis, after incubation with liquid extracts from cultures of compatible and incompatible interactions at 3 early resynthesis stages. Recognition-related genes were significantly upregulated only after physical contact, demonstrating symbiont recognition in later resynthesis stages than expected. One of 3 defense-related genes, chit, showed significant downregulation in early resynthesis stages and upregulation in the third resynthesis stage, demonstrating a need for the absence of chitinase early in thallus formation and a need for its presence in later stages as an algal defense reaction. This study revealed that recognition- and defense-related genes are triggered by components in culture extracts at 3 stages of resynthesis, and some defense-related genes may be induced throughout thallus growth. The parasitic nature of the interaction shows parallels between lichen symbionts and plant pathogenic systems.

  9. miRTex: A Text Mining System for miRNA-Gene Relation Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Ross, Karen E; Arighi, Cecilia N; Peng, Yifan; Wu, Cathy H; Vijay-Shanker, K

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate a wide range of cellular and developmental processes through gene expression suppression or mRNA degradation. Experimentally validated miRNA gene targets are often reported in the literature. In this paper, we describe miRTex, a text mining system that extracts miRNA-target relations, as well as miRNA-gene and gene-miRNA regulation relations. The system achieves good precision and recall when evaluated on a literature corpus of 150 abstracts with F-scores close to 0.90 on the three different types of relations. We conducted full-scale text mining using miRTex to process all the Medline abstracts and all the full-length articles in the PubMed Central Open Access Subset. The results for all the Medline abstracts are stored in a database for interactive query and file download via the website at http://proteininformationresource.org/mirtex. Using miRTex, we identified genes potentially regulated by miRNAs in Triple Negative Breast Cancer, as well as miRNA-gene relations that, in conjunction with kinase-substrate relations, regulate the response to abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. These two use cases demonstrate the usefulness of miRTex text mining in the analysis of miRNA-regulated biological processes.

  10. Glutamate-related gene expression changes with age in the mouse auditory midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Sherif F; D'Souza, Mary; Zettel, Martha L; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Waxmonsky, Nicole C; Frisina, Robert D

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in both the peripheral and central auditory systems. Changes of glutamate and glutamate-related genes with age may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of age-related hearing loss-presbycusis. In this study, changes in glutamate-related mRNA gene expression in the CBA mouse inferior colliculus with age and hearing loss were examined and correlations were sought between these changes and functional hearing measures, such as the auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). Gene expression of 68 glutamate-related genes was investigated using both genechip microarray and real-time PCR (qPCR) molecular techniques for four different age/hearing loss CBA mouse subject groups. Two genes showed consistent differences between groups for both the genechip and qPCR. Pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase enzyme (Pycs) showed down-regulation with age and a high-affinity glutamate transporter (Slc1a3) showed up-regulation with age and hearing loss. Since Pycs plays a role in converting glutamate to proline, its deficiency in old age may lead to both glutamate increases and proline deficiencies in the auditory midbrain, playing a role in the subsequent inducement of glutamate toxicity and loss of proline neuroprotective effects. The up-regulation of Slc1a3 gene expression may reflect a cellular compensatory mechanism to protect against age-related glutamate or calcium excitoxicity.

  11. A novel erythroid differen tiation related gene EDRF2 inhibited α-globin gene expression in K562 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In previous studies, we found that EDRF2 was an erythroid differentiation related factor, whose expression was markedly upregulated during erythroid differentiation. It suggested that this factor played a role in erythropoiesis.By using rapid amplification of cDNA ends technology, we cloned EDRF2 gene 5 '- and 3 '-cDNA ends successfully.Transfection and Northern blot analysis demonstrated that EDRF2 inhibited mRNA expression of α-globin gene, while did not regulate γ-globin gene expression. Gel shift assay confirmed that DNA-binding activity of erythroid specific transcription factors GATA-1, NF-E2 and AP1 was not af fected by either forced overexpression or artificial down regulation of EDRF2 gene in K562 cells. However, we de tected that the negative regulator of expression of GATA-1 transcription factor was increased in EDRF2 overexpressed K562 cells. These results strongly suggested that EDRF2 was involved in α-globin gene expression and erythroid differen tiation and served as a negative regulator of PU.1 transcrip tion factor.

  12. Identification of hepatocellular carcinoma-related genes with a machine learning and network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Tuantuan; Dong, Xiao; Li, Rudong; Li, Yixue; Wang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the main type of liver cancer. We applied a machine learning approach with maximum-relevance-minimum-redundancy (mRMR) algorithm followed by incremental feature selection (IFS) to a set of microarray data generated from 43 tumor and 52 nontumor samples. With the machine learning approach, we identified 117 gene probes that could optimally separate tumor and nontumor samples. These genes not only include known HCC-relevant genes such as MT1X, BMI1, and CAP2, but also include cancer genes that were not found previously to be closely related to HCC, such as TACSTD2. Then, we constructed a molecular interaction network based on the protein-protein interaction (PPI) data from the STRING database and identified 187 genes on the shortest paths among the genes identified with the machine learning approach. Network analysis reveals new potential roles of ubiquitin C in the pathogenesis of HCC. Based on gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis, we showed that the identified subnetwork is significantly enriched in biological processes related to cell death. These results bring new insights of understanding the process of HCC.

  13. Identification of genes related to Paulownia witches' broom by AFLP and MSAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xibing; Fan, Guoqiang; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Dong, Yanpeng

    2014-08-21

    DNA methylation is believed to play important roles in regulating gene expression in plant growth and development. Paulownia witches' broom (PaWB) infection has been reported to be related to gene expression changes in paulownia plantlets. To determine whether DNA methylation is associated with gene expression changes in response to phytoplasma, we investigated variations in genomic DNA sequence and methylation in PaWB plantlets treated with methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) techniques, respectively. The results indicated that PaWB seedings recovered a normal morphology after treatment with more than 15 mg·L(-1) MMS. PaWB infection did not cause changes of the paulownia DNA sequence at the AFLP level; However, DNA methylation levels and patterns were altered. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that three of the methylated genes were up-regulated and three were down-regulated in the MMS-treated PaWB plantlets that had regained healthy morphology. These six genes might be involved in transcriptional regulation, plant defense, signal transduction and energy. The possible roles of these genes in PaWB are discussed. The results showed that changes of DNA methylation altered gene expression levels, and that MSAP might help identify genes related to PaWB.

  14. Identification of Genes Related to Paulownia Witches’ Broom by AFLP and MSAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibing Cao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is believed to play important roles in regulating gene expression in plant growth and development. Paulownia witches’ broom (PaWB infection has been reported to be related to gene expression changes in paulownia plantlets. To determine whether DNA methylation is associated with gene expression changes in response to phytoplasma, we investigated variations in genomic DNA sequence and methylation in PaWB plantlets treated with methyl methane sulfonate (MMS using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP techniques, respectively. The results indicated that PaWB seedings recovered a normal morphology after treatment with more than 15 mg·L−1 MMS. PaWB infection did not cause changes of the paulownia DNA sequence at the AFLP level; However, DNA methylation levels and patterns were altered. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR showed that three of the methylated genes were up-regulated and three were down-regulated in the MMS-treated PaWB plantlets that had regained healthy morphology. These six genes might be involved in transcriptional regulation, plant defense, signal transduction and energy. The possible roles of these genes in PaWB are discussed. The results showed that changes of DNA methylation altered gene expression levels, and that MSAP might help identify genes related to PaWB.

  15. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Krause, Michael W. [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kostrouch, Zdenek [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Kostrouchova, Marta, E-mail: marta.kostrouchova@lf1.cuni.cz [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. {yields} The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. {yields} Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. {yields} Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. {yields} New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  16. Steroidogenesis-related gene expression in the rat ovary exposed to melatonin supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Negro Lima

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze steroidogenesis-related gene expression in the rat ovary exposed to melatonin supplementation. METHODS: Thirty-two virgin adult female rats were randomized to two groups as follows: the control group GI received vehicle and the experimental group GII received melatonin supplementation (10 µg/night per animal for 60 consecutive days. After the treatment, animals were anesthetized and the collected ovaries were immediately placed in liquid nitrogen for complementary deoxyribonucleic acid microarray analyses. A GeneChip¯ Kit Rat Genome 230 2.0 Affymetrix Array was used for gene analysis and the experiment was repeated three times for each group. The results were normalized with the GeneChip¯ Operating Software program and confirmed through analysis with the secondary deoxyribonucleic acid-Chip Analyzer (dChip software. The data were confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Genes related to ovarian function were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: We found the upregulation of the type 9 adenylate cyclase and inhibin beta B genes and the downregulation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element modulator and cytochrome P450 family 17a1 genes in the ovarian tissue of GII compared to those of the control group. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that melatonin supplementation decreases gene expression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, which changes ovarian steroidogenesis.

  17. Microevolution of Virulence-Related Genes in Helicobacter pylori Familial Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Furuta

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that can infect human stomach causing gastritis, ulcers and cancer, is known to have a high degree of genome/epigenome diversity as the result of mutation and recombination. The bacteria often infect in childhood and persist for the life of the host. One of the reasons of the rapid evolution of H. pylori is that it changes its genome drastically for adaptation to a new host. To investigate microevolution and adaptation of the H. pylori genome, we undertook whole genome sequencing of the same or very similar sequence type in multi-locus sequence typing (MLST with seven genes in members of the same family consisting of parents and children in Japan. Detection of nucleotide substitutions revealed likely transmission pathways involving children. Nonsynonymous (amino acid changing mutations were found in virulence-related genes (cag genes, vacA, hcpDX, tnfα, ggt, htrA and the collagenase gene, outer membrane protein (OMP genes and other cell surface-related protein genes, signal transduction genes and restriction-modification genes. We reconstructed various pathways by which H. pylori can adapt to a new human host, and our results raised the possibility that the mutational changes in virulence-related genes have a role in adaptation to a child host. Changes in restriction-modification genes might remodel the methylome and transcriptome to help adaptation. This study has provided insights into H. pylori transmission and virulence and has implications for basic research as well as clinical practice.

  18. miRNA-mediated functional changes through co-regulating function related genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs play important roles in various biological processes involving fairly complex mechanism. Analysis of genome-wide miRNA microarray demonstrate that a single miRNA can regulate hundreds of genes, but the regulative extent on most individual genes is surprisingly mild so that it is difficult to understand how a miRNA provokes detectable functional changes with such mild regulation. RESULTS: To explore the internal mechanism of miRNA-mediated regulation, we re-analyzed the data collected from genome-wide miRNA microarray with bioinformatics assay, and found that the transfection of miR-181b and miR-34a in Hela and HCT-116 tumor cells regulated large numbers of genes, among which, the genes related to cell growth and cell death demonstrated high Enrichment scores, suggesting that these miRNAs may be important in cell growth and cell death. MiR-181b induced changes in protein expression of most genes that were seemingly related to enhancing cell growth and decreasing cell death, while miR-34a mediated contrary changes of gene expression. Cell growth assays further confirmed this finding. In further study on miR-20b-mediated osteogenesis in hMSCs, miR-20b was found to enhance osteogenesis by activating BMPs/Runx2 signaling pathway in several stages by co-repressing of PPARγ, Bambi and Crim1. CONCLUSIONS: With its multi-target characteristics, miR-181b, miR-34a and miR-20b provoked detectable functional changes by co-regulating functionally-related gene groups or several genes in the same signaling pathway, and thus mild regulation from individual miRNA targeting genes could have contributed to an additive effect. This might also be one of the modes of miRNA-mediated gene regulation.

  19. RELATIVE EXPRESSION OF GENES CHIA1, SGF14C AND CHS8* IN SOYBEAN SEED COATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS ANDRÉ BAHRY

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative expression of three candidate genes, CHIA1, SGF14c and CHS8 * possibly involved in seed quality, in contrasting seed coats from four soybean genotypes. Two genotypes with yellow seed coats, BMX Potência RR and CD 202, and two genotypes with black seed coats, TP and IAC were studied to determine the relative gene expression through the qPCR technique, in sev- en stages of seed coat development for all four genotypes, at 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50 and 55 days after anthesis. The CHIA1 and SGF14c genes showed higher expression in cultivar CD 202; the former in the final stages of seed coat development, at 55 days after anthesis, the latter gene at earlier stages, specifically at 25 days after anthesis. The CHS8* gene showed higher expression in CD 202 seed coats at 50 days after anthesis. All three genes expressed at higher levels on genotypes of yellow seed coats, and are considered relevant to new areas of research based on the expression of genes related to seed quality.

  20. An integrative evolution theory of histo-blood group ABO and related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Fumiichiro; Cid, Emili; Yamamoto, Miyako; Saitou, Naruya; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Blancher, Antoine

    2014-10-13

    The ABO system is one of the most important blood group systems in transfusion/transplantation medicine. However, the evolutionary significance of the ABO gene and its polymorphism remained unknown. We took an integrative approach to gain insights into the significance of the evolutionary process of ABO genes, including those related not only phylogenetically but also functionally. We experimentally created a code table correlating amino acid sequence motifs of the ABO gene-encoded glycosyltransferases with GalNAc (A)/galactose (B) specificity, and assigned A/B specificity to individual ABO genes from various species thus going beyond the simple sequence comparison. Together with genome information and phylogenetic analyses, this assignment revealed early appearance of A and B gene sequences in evolution and potentially non-allelic presence of both gene sequences in some animal species. We argue: Evolution may have suppressed the establishment of two independent, functional A and B genes in most vertebrates and promoted A/B conversion through amino acid substitutions and/or recombination; A/B allelism should have existed in common ancestors of primates; and bacterial ABO genes evolved through horizontal and vertical gene transmission into 2 separate groups encoding glycosyltransferases with distinct sugar specificities.

  1. X-linked intellectual disability related genes disrupted by balanced X-autosome translocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Meloni, Vera Ayres; Di Battista, Adriana; de Mello, Claudia Berlim; Bragagnolo, Silvia; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas; Carvalheira, Gianna Maria; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Detailed molecular characterization of chromosomal rearrangements involving X-chromosome has been a key strategy in identifying X-linked intellectual disability-causing genes. We fine-mapped the breakpoints in four women with balanced X-autosome translocations and variable phenotypes, in order to investigate the corresponding genetic contribution to intellectual disability. We addressed the impact of the gene interruptions in transcription and discussed the consequences of their functional impairment in neurodevelopment. Three patients presented with cognitive impairment, reinforcing the association between the disrupted genes (TSPAN7-MRX58, KIAA2022-MRX98, and IL1RAPL1-MRX21/34) and intellectual disability. While gene expression analysis showed absence of TSPAN7 and KIAA2022 expression in the patients, the unexpected expression of IL1RAPL1 suggested a fusion transcript ZNF611-IL1RAPL1 under the control of the ZNF611 promoter, gene disrupted at the autosomal breakpoint. The X-chromosomal breakpoint definition in the fourth patient, a woman with normal intellectual abilities, revealed disruption of the ZDHHC15 gene (MRX91). The expression assays did not detect ZDHHC15 gene expression in the patient, thus questioning its involvement in intellectual disability. Revealing the disruption of an X-linked intellectual disability-related gene in patients with balanced X-autosome translocation is a useful tool for a better characterization of critical genes in neurodevelopment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Molecular evolution of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jennifer R; McAssey, Edward V; Nambeesan, Savithri; Garcia-Navarro, Elena; Burke, John M

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary analyses aimed at detecting the molecular signature of selection during crop domestication and/or improvement can be used to identify genes or genomic regions of likely agronomic importance. Here, we describe the DNA sequence-based characterization of a pool of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower. These genes, which were identified based on homology to genes of known effect in other study systems, were initially sequenced from a panel of improved lines. All genes that exhibited a paucity of sequence diversity, consistent with the possible effects of selection during the evolution of cultivated sunflower, were then sequenced from a panel of wild sunflower accessions an outgroup. These data enabled formal tests for the effects of selection in shaping sequence diversity at these loci. When selection was detected, we further sequenced these genes from a panel of primitive landraces, thereby allowing us to investigate the likely timing of selection (i.e., domestication vs. improvement). We ultimately identified seven genes that exhibited the signature of positive selection during either domestication or improvement. Genetic mapping of a subset of these genes revealed co-localization between candidates for genes involved in the determination of flowering time, seed germination, plant growth/development, and branching and QTL that were previously identified for these traits in cultivated × wild sunflower mapping populations.

  3. Non-essential genes in the vaccinia virus HindIII K fragment: a gene related to serine protease inhibitors and a gene related to the 37K vaccinia virus major envelope antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursnell, M E; Foulds, I J; Campbell, J I; Binns, M M

    1988-12-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a cloned copy of the HindIII K fragment of the WR strain of vaccinia virus has been determined. Eight open reading frames (ORFs) have been identified, on the basis of size and codon usage. The predicted amino acid sequences of the putative genes have been compared to the Protein Identification Resource and to published vaccinia virus sequences. One gene, predicted to encode a 42.2K protein, is highly related to the family of serine protease inhibitors. It shows approximately 25% identity to human antithrombin III and 19% identity to the cowpox virus 38K protein gene which is also related to serine protease inhibitors. The product of another gene shows a similar high level of identity to the 37K vaccinia virus major envelope antigen. The existence of viable deletion mutants and recombinants containing foreign DNA inserted into both these genes indicates that they are non-essential.

  4. ArxA, a new clade of arsenite oxidase within the DMSO reductase family of molybdenum oxidoreductases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargar, Kamrun; Conrad, Alison; Bernick, David L.; Lowe, Todd M.; Stolc, Viktor; Hoeft, Shelley; Oremland, Ronald S.; Stolz, John; Saltikov, Chad W.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenotrophy, growth coupled to autotrophic arsenite oxidation or arsenate respiratory reduction, occurs only in the prokaryotic domain of life. The enzymes responsible for arsenotrophy belong to distinct clades within the DMSO reductase family of molybdenum-containing oxidoreductases: specifically arsenate respiratory reductase, ArrA, and arsenite oxidase, AioA (formerly referred to as AroA and AoxB). A new arsenite oxidase clade, ArxA, represented by the haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii strain MLHE-1 was also identified in the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Ectothiorhodospira sp. strain PHS-1. A draft genome sequence of PHS-1 was completed and an arx operon similar to MLHE-1 was identified. Gene expression studies showed that arxA was strongly induced with arsenite. Microbial ecology investigation led to the identification of additional arxA-like sequences in Mono Lake and Hot Creek sediments, both arsenic-rich environments in California. Phylogenetic analyses placed these sequences as distinct members of the ArxA clade of arsenite oxidases. ArxA-like sequences were also identified in metagenome sequences of several alkaline microbial mat environments of Yellowstone National Park hot springs. These results suggest that ArxA-type arsenite oxidases appear to be widely distributed in the environment presenting an opportunity for further investigations of the contribution of Arx-dependent arsenotrophy to the arsenic biogeochemical cycle.

  5. Evaluate the effect of the soluble fraction of crude oil on changes of symbiotic Zooxanthellae clades with two species of reef-building corals in vitro and molecular methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Faghidi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oil pollution is one of the factors affecting symbiotic Zooxanthellae with coral stone. It seems that one of the causes of coral bleaching is soluble fraction of crude oil and its effect on their symbiotic algae physiology, which can lead to the loss of Zooxanthellae clades or change in the type of their clades. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the soluble fraction of crude oil on changes of symbiotic Zooxanthellae clades with two species of reef-building corals in vitro and molecular methods. Method: In this study, two species corals of Faviapallidae and Psammocoracontigua were sampled on the Larak Island. Corals were stored for two weeks in three treatments, 50% and 30% and 10% of the soluble fraction of crude oil. After leaving slime Zooxanthellae of coral tissues by air pump and extraction of their DNA, using PCR and target gene was evaluated (ITS2 Internal Transcribed spacer in the presence of different clouds using specific primers. Results: in samples of 50% of the soluble fraction of crude oil, after 9 days, bleaching was observed, and after two weeks, all samples were bleached. Also in the molecular study showed that, pallidaeFavia coral specie in three treatment by soluble fraction of crude oil have clade D and sub-clade D1a and not changed, and Psammocoracontigua coral have clade D and sub-clade D1a and C1 D1a and not changed.

  6. Ontology design patterns to disambiguate relations between genes and gene products in GENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoehndorf Robert

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motivation Annotated reference corpora play an important role in biomedical information extraction. A semantic annotation of the natural language texts in these reference corpora using formal ontologies is challenging due to the inherent ambiguity of natural language. The provision of formal definitions and axioms for semantic annotations offers the means for ensuring consistency as well as enables the development of verifiable annotation guidelines. Consistent semantic annotations facilitate the automatic discovery of new information through deductive inferences. Results We provide a formal characterization of the relations used in the recent GENIA corpus annotations. For this purpose, we both select existing axiom systems based on the desired properties of the relations within the domain and develop new axioms for several relations. To apply this ontology of relations to the semantic annotation of text corpora, we implement two ontology design patterns. In addition, we provide a software application to convert annotated GENIA abstracts into OWL ontologies by combining both the ontology of relations and the design patterns. As a result, the GENIA abstracts become available as OWL ontologies and are amenable for automated verification, deductive inferences and other knowledge-based applications. Availability Documentation, implementation and examples are available from http://www-tsujii.is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp/GENIA/.

  7. Preliminary phylogenetic analysis of the Andean clade and the placement of new Colombian blueberries (Ericaceae, Vaccinieae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Pedraza-Penalosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The blueberry tribe Vaccinieae (Ericaceae is particularly diverse in South America and underwent extensive radiation in Colombia where many endemics occur. Recent fieldwork in Colombia has resulted in valuable additions to the phylogeny and as well in the discovery of morphologically noteworthy new species that need to be phylogenetically placed before being named. This is particularly important, as the monophyly of many of the studied genera have not been confirmed. In order to advance our understanding of the relationships within neotropical Vaccinieae and advice the taxonomy of the new blueberry relatives, here we present the most comprehensive phylogenetic analysis for the Andean clade. Anthopterus, Demosthenesia, and Pellegrinia are among the putative Andean genera recovered as monophyletic, while other eight Andean genera were not. The analyses also showed that genera that have been traditionally widely defined are non-monophyletic and could be further split into more discrete groups. Four newly discovered Colombian Vaccinieae are placed in the monophyletic Satyria s.s. and the Psammisia I clade. Although these new species are endemic to the Colombian Western Cordillera and Chocó biogeographic region and three are not known outside of Las Orquídeas National Park, they do not form sister pairs.

  8. Accelerated alcoholic fermentation caused by defective gene expression related to glucose derepression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Naoya; Mizuno, Megumi; Zhou, Yan; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Sake yeast strains maintain high fermentation rates, even after the stationary growth phase begins. To determine the molecular mechanisms underlying this advantageous brewing property, we compared the gene expression profiles of sake and laboratory yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the stationary growth phase. DNA microarray analysis revealed that the sake yeast strain examined had defects in expression of the genes related to glucose derepression mediated by transcription factors Adr1p and Cat8p. Furthermore, deletion of the ADR1 and CAT8 genes slightly but statistically significantly improved the fermentation rate of a laboratory yeast strain. We also identified two loss-of-function mutations in the ADR1 gene of existing sake yeast strains. Taken together, these results indicate that the gene expression program associated with glucose derepression for yeast acts as an impediment to effective alcoholic fermentation under glucose-rich fermentative conditions.

  9. Environment effect on fruit ripening related gene to develop a new post harvest technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivany, Fenny; Esyanti, Rizkita Rahmi; Robertlee, Jekson; Paramaputra, Indra Chandra; Permatadewi, Rinda Kania; Tambun, Dina Hermawaty; Handayani, Resnanti Utami; Pratiwi, Aksarani'Sa; Zaskia, Herafi

    2014-03-01

    Ripening process of fruits is a very complex process, which involves ethylene production, causing alteration on molecular and physiology level. Environmental stress caused by biotic and abiotic stress conditions (such as pathogen, mechanical stress, physical and physiology stress) can stimulate ethylene production. High levels of ethylene in turn can also inhibit growth, cause premature ripening and induce the onset of senescence, which then potentially reduce plant productivity. The ACC Synthase (ACS) and ACC Oxidase (ACO) genes are genes that have role in the ethylene production. By regulating those genes, especially ethylene biosynthesis genes, we might improve the quality of fruit at post harvest condition. Therefore, in this research we studied fruit ripening related genes expression on banana such as MaACS family at different environment condition. The result of study can give contributions in developing of new plants with desired traits or new post harvest technologies.

  10. A novel gene: sawD related to the differentiation of streptomyces ansochromogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, L; Wei, C; Yuqing, T; Huarong, T; Chater, K F; Buttner, M J

    1999-01-01

    A 1.3 kb DNA fragment was cloned from a total DNA library of Streptomyces ansochromogenes using Southern hybridization. Nucleotide sequencing analysis indicated that the 1320 bp DNA fragment contained a complete open reading frame (ORF). In search of databases, the deduced product of ORF containing 213 amino acids is homologous to the serine protease of Caulobacter cresceatus, and a conserved serine-catalytic active site (GPSAG) exists. The gene was designated as sawD. The function of this gene was studied with the strategy of gene disruption, and the result showed that the sawD may be related to sporulation and especially to the spore septation in Streptomyces ansochromogenes. The preliminary result indicated that sawD mutant could produce abundant pigment in contrast with the wild type, it seems that sawD gene may be involved in pigment biosynthesis, and this gene is also dispensable for biosynthesis of nikkomycin in Streptomyces ansochromogenes.

  11. DNMT3B modulates the expression of cancer-related genes and downregulates the expression of the gene VAV3 via methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Arrieta, Irlanda; Hernández-Sotelo, Daniel; Castro-Coronel, Yaneth; Leyva-Vázquez, Marco Antonio; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice

    2017-01-01

    Altered promoter DNA methylation is one of the most important epigenetic abnormalities in human cancer. DNMT3B, de novo methyltransferase, is clearly related to abnormal methylation of tumour suppressor genes, DNA repair genes and its overexpression contributes to oncogenic processes and tumorigenesis in vivo. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of the overexpression of DNMT3B in HaCaT cells on global gene expression and on the methylation of selected genes to the identification of genes that can be target of DNMT3B. We found that the overexpression of DNMT3B in HaCaT cells, modulate the expression of genes related to cancer, downregulated the expression of 151 genes with CpG islands and downregulated the expression of the VAV3 gene via methylation of its promoter. These results highlight the importance of DNMT3B in gene expression and human cancer.

  12. DNMT3B modulates the expression of cancer-related genes and downregulates the expression of the gene VAV3 via methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Arrieta, Irlanda; Hernández-Sotelo, Daniel; Castro-Coronel, Yaneth; Leyva-Vázquez, Marco Antonio; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice

    2017-01-01

    Altered promoter DNA methylation is one of the most important epigenetic abnormalities in human cancer. DNMT3B, de novo methyltransferase, is clearly related to abnormal methylation of tumour suppressor genes, DNA repair genes and its overexpression contributes to oncogenic processes and tumorigenesis in vivo. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of the overexpression of DNMT3B in HaCaT cells on global gene expression and on the methylation of selected genes to the identification of genes that can be target of DNMT3B. We found that the overexpression of DNMT3B in HaCaT cells, modulate the expression of genes related to cancer, downregulated the expression of 151 genes with CpG islands and downregulated the expression of the VAV3 gene via methylation of its promoter. These results highlight the importance of DNMT3B in gene expression and human cancer. PMID:28123849

  13. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for

  14. The transcription factor ultraspiracle influences honey bee social behavior and behavior-related gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth A Ament

    Full Text Available Behavior is among the most dynamic animal phenotypes, modulated by a variety of internal and external stimuli. Behavioral differences are associated with large-scale changes in gene expression, but little is known about how these changes are regulated. Here we show how a transcription factor (TF, ultraspiracle (usp; the insect homolog of the Retinoid X Receptor, working in complex transcriptional networks, can regulate behavioral plasticity and associated changes in gene expression. We first show that RNAi knockdown of USP in honey bee abdominal fat bodies delayed the transition from working in the hive (primarily "nursing" brood to foraging outside. We then demonstrate through transcriptomics experiments that USP induced many maturation-related transcriptional changes in the fat bodies by mediating transcriptional responses to juvenile hormone. These maturation-related transcriptional responses to USP occurred without changes in USP's genomic binding sites, as revealed by ChIP-chip. Instead, behaviorally related gene expression is likely determined by combinatorial interactions between USP and other TFs whose cis-regulatory motifs were enriched at USP's binding sites. Many modules of JH- and maturation-related genes were co-regulated in both the fat body and brain, predicting that usp and cofactors influence shared transcriptional networks in both of these maturation-related tissues. Our findings demonstrate how "single gene effects" on behavioral plasticity can involve complex transcriptional networks, in both brain and peripheral tissues.

  15. The ancestor of the Paulinella chromatophore obtained a carboxysomal operon by horizontal gene transfer from a Nitrococcus-like γ-proteobacterium

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    Glöckner Gernot

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paulinella chromatophora is a freshwater filose amoeba with photosynthetic endosymbionts (chromatophores of cyanobacterial origin that are closely related to free-living Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus species (PS-clade. Members of the PS-clade of cyanobacteria contain a proteobacterial form 1A RubisCO (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase that was acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT of a carboxysomal operon. In rDNA-phylogenies, the Paulinella chromatophore diverged basal to the PS-clade, raising the question whether the HGT occurred before or after the split of the chromatophore ancestor. Results Phylogenetic analyses of the almost complete rDNA operon with an improved taxon sampling containing most known cyanobacterial lineages recovered the Paulinella chromatophore as sister to the complete PS-clade. The sequence of the complete carboxysomal operon of Paulinella was determined. Analysis of RubisCO large subunit (rbcL sequences revealed that Paulinella shares the proteobacterial form 1A RubisCO with the PS-clade. The γ-proteobacterium Nitrococcus mobilis was identified as sister of the Paulinella chromatophore and the PS-clade in the RubisCO phylogeny. Gene content and order in the carboxysomal operon correlates well with the RubisCO phylogeny demonstrating that the complete carboxysomal operon was acquired by the common ancestor of the Paulinella chromatophore and the PS-clade through HGT. The carboxysomal operon shows a significantly elevated AT content in Paulinella, which in the rbcL gene is confined to third codon positions. Combined phylogenies using rbcL and the rDNA-operon resulted in a nearly fully resolved tree of the PS-clade. Conclusion The HGT of the carboxysomal operon predated the divergence of the chromatophore ancestor from the PS-clade. Following HGT and divergence of the chromatophore ancestor, diversification of the PS-clade into at least three subclades occurred. The

  16. Characterization of the gene encoding a fibrinogen-related protein expressed in Crassostrea gigas hemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skazina, M A; Gorbushin, A M

    2016-07-01

    Four exons of the CgFrep1 gene (3333 bp long) encode a putative fibrinogen-related protein (324 aa) bearing a single C-terminal FBG domain. Transcripts of the gene obtained from hemocytes of different Pacific oysters show prominent individual variation based on SNP and indels of tandem repeats resulted in polymorphism of N-terminus of the putative CgFrep1 polypeptide. The polypeptide chain bears N-terminal coiled-coil region potentially acting as inter-subunit interface in the protein oligomerization. It is suggested that CgFrep1 gene encodes the oligomeric lectin composed of at least two subunits.

  17. Associations between DNA methylation and schizophrenia-related intermediate phenotypes - a gene set enrichment analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Johanna; Walton, Esther; Wright, Carrie; Beyer, Andreas; Scholz, Markus; Turner, Jessica; Liu, Jingyu; Smolka, Michael N; Roessner, Veit; Sponheim, Scott R; Gollub, Randy L; Calhoun, Vince D; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2015-06-03

    Multiple genetic approaches have identified microRNAs as key effectors in psychiatric disorders as they post-transcriptionally regulate expression of thousands of target genes. However, their role in specific psychiatric diseases remains poorly understood. In addition, epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, which affect the expression of both microRNAs and coding genes, are critical for our understanding of molecular mechanisms in schizophrenia. Using clinical, imaging, genetic, and epigenetic data of 103 patients with schizophrenia and 111 healthy controls of the Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium (MCIC) study of schizophrenia, we conducted gene set enrichment analysis to identify markers for schizophrenia-associated intermediate phenotypes. Genes were ranked based on the correlation between DNA methylation patterns and each phenotype, and then searched for enrichment in 221 predicted microRNA target gene sets. We found the predicted hsa-miR-219a-5p target gene set to be significantly enriched for genes (EPHA4, PKNOX1, ESR1, among others) whose methylation status is correlated with hippocampal volume independent of disease status. Our results were strengthened by significant associations between hsa-miR-219a-5p target gene methylation patterns and hippocampus-related neuropsychological variables. IPA pathway analysis of the respective predicted hsa-miR-219a-5p target genes revealed associated network functions in behavior and developmental disorders. Altered methylation patterns of predicted hsa-miR-219a-5p target genes are associated with a structural aberration of the brain that has been proposed as a possible biomarker for schizophrenia. The (dys)regulation of microRNA target genes by epigenetic mechanisms may confer additional risk for developing psychiatric symptoms. Further study is needed to understand possible interactions between microRNAs and epigenetic changes and their impact on risk for brain-based disorders such as schizophrenia.

  18. Dynamics of clade diversification on the morphological hypercube

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilets, S

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between taxonomic and morphological changes is important in identifying the reasons for accelerated morphological diversification early in the history of animal phyla. Here, a simple general model describing the joint dynamics of taxonomic diversity and morphological disparity is presented and applied to the data on the diversification of blastozoans. I show that the observed patterns of deceleration in clade diversification can be explicable in terms of the geometric structure of the morphospace and the effects of extinction and speciation on morphological disparity without invoking major declines in the size of morphological transitions or taxonomic turnover rates. The model allows testing of hypotheses about patterns of diversification and estimation of rates of morphological evolution. In the case of blastozoans, I find no evidence that major changes in evolutionary rates and mechanisms are responsible for the deceleration of morphological diversification seen during the per...

  19. Roseobacter-clade bacteria as probiotics in marine larvaeculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grotkjær, Torben

    Disease caused by fish pathogenic bacteria can cause large scale crashes in marine fish larval rearing units. One of the biggest challenges for aquaculture is the management of these bacterial outbreaks. Vaccines can be admitted to fish but only the juvenile and the adult fish because they need...... to have a mature immune system. This means that the larvae of the fish, until they are 2-3 weeks old are more prone to bacterial infections. A short term solution is antibiotics but this leaves way for the selection for antibiotic resistance among the pathogenic bacteria, which again can be transferred...... to human pathogens. Alternatives are therefore needed and one could be the use of probiotic bacteria. Marine bacteria from the Roseobacter clade (Phaeobacter inhibens) have shown great potential as probiotic bacteria, and we have hypothesized that they could be used to antagonize pathogenic fish...

  20. Phylogeny-based comparative analysis of venom proteome variation in a clade of rattlesnakes (Sistrurus sp..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Lisle Gibbs

    Full Text Available A long-standing question in evolutionary studies of snake venoms is the extent to which phylogenetic divergence and diet can account for between-species differences in venom composition. Here we apply phylogeny-based comparative methods to address this question. We use data on venom variation generated using proteomic techniques for all members of a small clade of rattlesnakes (Sistrurus sp. and two outgroups for which phylogenetic and diet information is available. We first complete the characterization of venom variation for all members of this clade with a "venomic" analysis of pooled venoms from two members of this genus, S. milarius streckeri and S. m. milarius. These venoms exhibit the same general classes of proteins as those found in other Sistrurus species but differ in their relative abundances of specific protein families. We then test whether there is significant phylogenetic signal in the relative abundances of major venom proteins across species and if diet (measured as percent mammals and lizards among all prey consumed covaries with venom composition after phylogenetic divergence is accounted for. We found no evidence for significant phylogenetic signal in venom variation: K values for seven snake venom proteins and two composite venom variables [PC 1 and 2] were all nonsignificant and lower (mean = 0.11+0.06 sd than mean K values (>0.35 previously reported for a wide range of morphological, life history, physiological and behavioral traits from other species. Finally, analyses based on Phylogenetic Generalized Least Squares (PGLS methods reveal that variation in abundance of some venom proteins, most strongly CRISP is significantly related to snake diet. Our results demonstrate that venom variation in these snakes is evolutionarily a highly labile trait even among very closely-related taxa and that natural selection acting through diet variation may play a role in molding the relative abundance of specific venom proteins.

  1. Identification of differentially expressed genes related to aphid resistance in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Danna; Liu, Min; Hu, Qijing; He, Min; Qi, Xiaohua; Xu, Qiang; Zhou, Fucai; Chen, Xuehao

    2015-05-11

    Cucumber, a very important vegetable crop worldwide, is easily damaged by pests. Aphids (Aphis gossypii Glover) are among the most serious pests in cucumber production and often cause severe loss of yield and make fruit quality get worse. Identifying genes that render cucumbers resistant to aphid-induced damage and breeding aphid-resistant cucumber varieties have become the most promising control strategies. In this study, a Illumina Genome Analyzer platform was applied to monitor changes in gene expression in the whole genome of the cucumber cultivar 'EP6392' which is resistant to aphids. Nine DGE libraries were constructed from infected and uninfected leaves. In total, 49 differentially expressed genes related to cucumber aphid resistance were screened during the treatment period. These genes are mainly associated with signal transduction, plant-pathogen interactions, flavonoid biosynthesis, amino acid metabolism and sugar metabolism pathways. Eight of the 49 genes may be associated with aphid resistance. Finally, expression of 9 randomly selected genes was evaluated by qRT-PCR to verify the results for the tag-mapped genes. With the exception of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase homolog 6, the expression of the chosen genes was in agreement with the results of the tag-sequencing analysis patterns.

  2. Polyphyletic origin of MERS coronaviruses and isolation of a novel clade A strain from dromedary camels in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susanna K P; Wernery, Renate; Wong, Emily Y M; Joseph, Sunitha; Tsang, Alan K L; Patteril, Nissy Annie Georgy; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Muhammed, Rubeena; Kinne, Jöerg; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Wernery, Ulrich; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-01-01

    Little is known regarding the molecular epidemiology of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) circulating in dromedaries outside Saudi Arabia. To address this knowledge gap, we sequenced 10 complete genomes of MERS-CoVs isolated from 2 live and 8 dead dromedaries from different regions in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Phylogenetic analysis revealed one novel clade A strain, the first detected in the UAE, and nine clade B strains. Strain D998/15 had a distinct phylogenetic position within clade A, being more closely related to the dromedary isolate NRCE-HKU205 from Egypt than to the human isolates EMC/2012 and Jordan-N3/2012. A comparison of predicted protein sequences also demonstrated the existence of two clade A lineages with unique amino acid substitutions, A1 (EMC/2012 and Jordan-N3/2012) and A2 (D998/15 and NRCE-HKU205), circulating in humans and camels, respectively. The nine clade B isolates belong to three distinct lineages: B1, B3 and B5. Two B3 strains, D1271/15 and D1189.1/15, showed evidence of recombination between lineages B4 and B5 in ORF1ab. Molecular clock analysis dated the time of the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) of clade A to March 2011 and that of clade B to November 2011. Our data support a polyphyletic origin of MERS-CoV in dromedaries and the co-circulation of diverse MERS-CoVs including recombinant strains in the UAE. PMID:27999424

  3. Investigation of the Genetics and Biochemistry of Roseobacticide Production in the Roseobacter Clade Bacterium Phaeobacter inhibens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rurun Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Roseobacter clade bacteria are abundant in surface waters and are among the most metabolically diverse and ecologically significant species. This group includes opportunistic symbionts that associate with micro- and macroalgae. We have proposed that one representative member, Phaeobacter inhibens, engages in a dynamic symbiosis with the microalga Emiliania huxleyi. In one phase, mutualistically beneficial molecules are exchanged, including the Roseobacter-produced antibiotic tropodithietic acid (TDA, which is thought to protect the symbiotic interaction. In an alternative parasitic phase, triggered by algal senescence, the bacteria produce potent algaecides, the roseobacticides, which kill the algal host. Here, we employed genetic and biochemical screens to identify the roseobacticide biosynthetic gene cluster. By using a transposon mutagenesis approach, we found that genes required for TDA synthesis—the tda operon and paa catabolon—are also necessary for roseobacticide production. Thus, in contrast to the one-cluster–one-compound paradigm, the tda gene cluster can generate two sets of molecules with distinct structures and bioactivities. We further show that roseobacticide production is quorum sensing regulated via an N-acyl homoserine lactone signal (3-OH–C10-HSL. To ensure tight regulation of algaecide production, and thus of a lifestyle switch from mutualism to parasitism, roseobacticide biosynthesis necessitates the presence of both an algal senescence molecule and a quorum sensing signal.

  4. Expression of Th1/Th2/Th3/Th17-related genes in recurrent aphthous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewkowicz, Natalia; Kur, Barbara; Kurnatowska, Anna; Tchorzewski, Henryk; Lewkowicz, Przemyslaw

    2011-10-01

    The pathogenesis of recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU) is unknown, although an abnormal immune reaction appears to be involved. RAU may result from oral epithelium damage caused by T cell-mediated immune response. To improve understanding of the role of T cells in RAU, the present study analyzed. the expression of T cell-related genes in oral ulcers from patients with RAU, as well as in healthy non-keratinized oral mucosa from aphthae-free volunteers. Biopsies from RAU patients and healthy individuals were analyzed using Human Th1-Th2-Th3 RT(2) Profiler PCR Array and qRT-PCR that allowed to quantify the transcript levels of 86 genes related to T cell activation. We found that cells present in aphthous ulcers express a characteristic Th1-like gene profile. The majority of genes up-regulated in aphthous lesions such as IFN-γ, TNF, IL-15, IRF1, STAT-1 and STAT-4 were Th1-associated. Th2-realated genes were not overexpressed in RAU tissues, with the exception for CCR3. Th3- and Th17-related gene expression patterns were not demonstrated in RAU. These findings clearly reveal that aphthous ulcer formation is predominantly dependent on the activation of the Th1-type immune response.

  5. Citrus plastid-related gene profiling based on expressed sequence tag analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tercilio Calsa Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastid-related sequences, derived from putative nuclear or plastome genes, were searched in a large collection of expressed sequence tags (ESTs and genomic sequences from the Citrus Biotechnology initiative in Brazil. The identified putative Citrus chloroplast gene sequences were compared to those from Arabidopsis, Eucalyptus and Pinus. Differential expression profiling for plastid-directed nuclear-encoded proteins and photosynthesis-related gene expression variation between Citrus sinensis and Citrus reticulata, when inoculated or not with Xylella fastidiosa, were also analyzed. Presumed Citrus plastome regions were more similar to Eucalyptus. Some putative genes appeared to be preferentially expressed in vegetative tissues (leaves and bark or in reproductive organs (flowers and fruits. Genes preferentially expressed in fruit and flower may be associated with hypothetical physiological functions. Expression pattern clustering analysis suggested that photosynthesis- and carbon fixation-related genes appeared to be up- or down-regulated in a resistant or susceptible Citrus species after Xylella inoculation in comparison to non-infected controls, generating novel information which may be helpful to develop novel genetic manipulation strategies to control Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC.

  6. Role of an esterase in flavor volatile variation within the tomato clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Charles; Mageroy, Melissa H; Lam, Nghi B; Floystad, Abbye; Tieman, Denise M; Klee, Harry J

    2012-11-13

    Tomato flavor is dependent upon a complex mixture of volatiles including multiple acetate esters. Red-fruited species of the tomato clade accumulate a relatively low content of acetate esters in comparison with the green-fruited species. We show that the difference in volatile ester content between the red- and green-fruited species is associated with insertion of a retrotransposon adjacent to the most enzymatically active member of a family of esterases. This insertion causes higher expression of the esterase, resulting in the reduced levels of multiple esters that are negatively correlated with human preferences for tomato. The insertion was evolutionarily fixed in the red-fruited species, suggesting that high expression of the esterase and consequent low ester content may provide an adaptive advantage in the ancestor of the red-fruited species. These results illustrate at a molecular level how closely related species exhibit major differences in volatile production by altering a volatile-associated catabolic activity.

  7. Distinct patterns of symbiosis-related gene expression in actinorhizal nodules from different plant families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawlowski, K.; Swensen, S.; Guan, C.; Hadri, A.E.; Berry, A.M.; Bisseling, T.

    2003-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses suggest that, among the members of the Eurosid I clade, nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses developed multiple times independently, four times with rhizobia and four times with the genus Frankia. In order to understand the degree of similarity between symbiotic systems of dif

  8. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships and Docking Studies of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Kyani, Anahita

    2012-01-01

    Defining the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine pathogenesis could lead to the application of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists as novel migraine therapeutics. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of biological activities of a large range...... of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists was performed using a panel of physicochemical descriptors. The computational studies evaluated different variable selection techniques and demonstrated shuffling stepwise multiple linear regression to be superior over genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression....... The linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model revealed better statistical parameters of cross-validation in comparison with the non-linear support vector regression technique. Implementing only five peptide descriptors into this linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model...

  9. Genetic Association Analysis of 30 Genes Related to Obesity in a European American Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Lin, Wan-Yu; Allison, David B.; Chung, Wendy K.; Leibel, Rudolph L.; Yi, Nengjun; Liu, Nianjun

    2013-01-01

    Objective Obesity, which is frequently associated with diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases, is primarily the result of a net excess of caloric intake over energy expenditure. Human obesity is highly heritable, but the specific genes mediating susceptibility in non-syndromic obesity remain unclear. We tested candidate genes in pathways related to food intake and energy expenditure for association with body mass index (BMI). Methods We re-analyzed 355 common genetic variants of 30 candidate genes in 7 molecular pathways related to obesity in 1,982 unrelated European Americans from the New York Health Project. Data were analyzed by using a Bayesian hierarchical generalized linear model. The BMIs were log-transformed and then adjusted for covariates including age, age2, gender, and diabetes status. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were modeled as additive effects. Results With the stipulated adjustments, nine SNPs in eight genes were significantly associated with BMI: GHRL (rs35683), AGRP (rs5030980), CPE (rs1946816 and rs4481204), GLP1R (rs2268641), HTR2A (rs912127), NPY5R (Y5R1c52), SOCS3 (rs4969170), and STAT3 (rs4796793). We also found a gender-by-SNP interaction (rs1745837 in HTR2A), which indicated that variants in the gene HTR2A had a stronger association with BMI in males. In addition, NPY1R was detected as having a significant gene effect even though none of the SNPs in this gene was significant. Conclusion Variations in genes AGRP, CPE, GHRL, GLP1R, HTR2A, NPY1R, NPY5R, SOCS3, and STAT3 showed modest associations with BMI in European Americans. The pathways in which these genes participate regulate energy intake and thus these associations are mechanistically plausible in this context. PMID:23900445

  10. Increased circulating calcitonin in cirrhosis. Relation to severity of disease and calcitonin gene-related peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Schifter, S; Møller, S

    2000-01-01

    circulating plasma concentrations of CT in patients with cirrhosis in relation to the severity of disease and the plasma level of CGRP. Moreover, the kinetics of CT was evaluated for different organ systems by determination of arteriovenous extraction. Thirty-nine patients with cirrhosis (Child-Turcotte...... control (12.1 v 6.9 pmol/L, P Turcotte score was found (P

  11. Differences in Inflammatory Response Induced by Two Representatives of Clades of the Pandemic ST258 Klebsiella pneumoniae Clonal Lineage Producing KPC-Type Carbapenemases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castronovo, Giuseppe; Clemente, Ann Maria; Antonelli, Alberto; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Tanturli, Michele; Perissi, Eloisa; Paccosi, Sara; Parenti, Astrid; Cozzolino, Federico; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Torcia, Maria Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    ST258-K. pneumoniae (ST258-KP) strains, the most widespread multidrug-resistant hospital-acquired pathogens, belong to at least two clades differing in a 215 Kb genomic region that includes the cluster of capsule genes. To investigate the effects of the different capsular phenotype on host-pathogen interactions, we studied representatives of ST258-KP clades, KKBO-1 and KK207-1, for their ability to activate monocytes and myeloid dendritic cells from human immune competent hosts. The two ST258-KP strains strongly induced the production of inflammatory cytokines. Significant differences between the strains were found in their ability to induce the production of IL-1β: KK207-1/clade I was much less effective than KKBO-1/clade II in inducing IL-1β production by monocytes and dendritic cells. The activation of NLRP3 inflammasome pathway by live cells and/or purified capsular polysaccharides was studied in monocytes and dendritic cells. We found that glibenclamide, a NLRP3 inhibitor, inhibits more than 90% of the production of mature IL-1β induced by KKBO1 and KK207-1. KK207-1 was always less efficient compared to KKBO-1 in: a) inducing NLRP3 and pro-IL-1β gene and protein expression; b) in inducing caspase-1 activation and pro-IL-1β cleavage. Capsular composition may play a role in the differential inflammatory response induced by the ST258-KP strains since capsular polysaccharides purified from bacterial cells affect NLRP3 and pro-IL-1β gene expression through p38MAPK- and NF-κB-mediated pathways. In each of these functions, capsular polysaccharides from KK207-1 were significantly less efficient compared to those purified from KKBO-1. On the whole, our data suggest that the change in capsular phenotype may help bacterial cells of clade I to partially escape innate immune recognition and IL-1β-mediated inflammation.

  12. Gene expression profile related to inflammation in rat model of traumatic deep vein thrombosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chun-qiang; HUANG He; ZHAO Zhi; TANG Xi-zhang; WANG Bing; HE Fei; ZHAO Xue-ling; LI Shi-he

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To study the relationship between inflammation and traumatic deep vein thrombosis (TDVT).Methods : A rat model of deep venous thrombosis was established by directly clamping femoral vein. Based on the different biological situations of femoral vein thrombosis and observation phases, 150 SD rats were divided into 7 groups. Inflammatory cells in vein wall of each group were counted. The fold change and cluster analysis were applied to study the change of gene expression during the development of venous thrombosis. Especially, the genes related to inflammation, fibrinolysis, coagulation of endothelium were analyzed in detail.Results: The inflammation cells in femoral vein wall were mostly neutrophilic granulocytes in Groups B, C and D, while they were lymphocytes in Groups E, F and G. Compared with Groups A, B, E and G, the inflammation cell counts in Groups C, D and F were much higher (P <0.05). The results of fold-change analysis showed that 2 504 genes ( Log 2 ratio ≥ 1 or≤-1 ) presented different expressions in the process of TDVT. Most of these genes' functions were not clarified so far and the genes with known functions were involved in inflammation, DNA-dependent transcription regulation, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, etc. Among them, 23 genes related to inflammation had different expressions during TDVT. The cluster analysis showed that the expression changes of several genes, such as IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, Cinc2, corresponded with the development of femoral vein thrombosis.Conclusion: There is a close relationship between the genes related to inflammation and deep vein thrombosis induced by direct vascular trauma.

  13. Regulation of iron transport related genes by boron in the marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Ariel; Trimble, Lyndsay; Hobusch, Ashtian R; Schroeder, Kristine J; Amin, Shady A; Hartnett, Andrej D; Barker, Ryan A; Crumbliss, Alvin L; Carrano, Carl J

    2013-08-01

    While there has been extensive interest in the use of boron isotope ratios as a surrogate of pH in paleoclimate studies in the context of climate change-related questions, the high (0.4 mM) concentration and the depth-independent (conservative or non-nutrient-like) concentration profile of this element have led to boron being neglected as a potentially biologically relevant element in the modern ocean. Here we report that boron affects the expression of a number of protein and genes in the "algal-associated" Gram-negative marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893. Most intriguingly, a number of these proteins and genes are related to iron uptake. In a recent separate publication we have shown that boron regulates one such iron transport related protein, i.e. the periplasmic iron binding protein FbpA via a direct interaction of the metalloid with this protein. Here we show that a number of other iron uptake related genes are also affected by boron but in the opposite way i.e. they are up-regulated. We propose that the differential effect of boron on FbpA expression relative to other iron transport related genes is a result of an interaction between boron and the global iron regulatory protein Fur.

  14. Potential DMSP-degrading Roseobacter clade dominates endosymbiotic microflora of Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum (Dinophyceae) in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Deo Florence L; Azanza, Rhodora V; Lluisma, Arturo O

    2015-09-01

    Many aspects of the biology and ecology of the toxic dinoflagellate Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum are still poorly understood. In this brief note, we present identification of its associated intracellular bacteria or endosymbionts via PCR cloning and 16s rRNA gene sequencing and their localization by confocal microscopy, a first for Pyrodinium. The most frequently observed species in the endosymbiotic microflora were from Roseobacter clade (Alphaproteobacteria, 68%) and Gilvibacter sediminis (Flavobacteriaceae, 20%). Roseobacter lineage, the most abundant taxa in this study, is known to be involved in dimethylsulfoniopropionate metabolism which is highly produced in dinoflagellates-a possible strong factor shaping the structure of the associated bacterial community.

  15. Cultivation of a chemoautotroph from the SUP05 clade of marine bacteria that produces nitrite and consumes ammonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vega; Chang, Bonnie X; Morris, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are expanding regions of intense nitrogen cycling. Up to half of the nitrogen available for marine organisms is removed from the ocean in these regions. Metagenomic studies have identified an abundant group of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SUP05) with the genetic potential for nitrogen cycling and loss in OMZs. However, SUP05 have defied cultivation and their physiology remains untested. We cultured, sequenced and tested the physiology of an isolate from the SUP05 clade. We describe a facultatively anaerobic sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph that produces nitrite and consumes ammonium under anaerobic conditions. Genetic evidence that closely related strains are abundant at nitrite maxima in OMZs suggests that sulfur-oxidizing chemoautotrophs from the SUP05 clade are a potential source of nitrite, fueling competing nitrogen removal processes in the ocean. PMID:27434424

  16. Altered expression of immune-related genes in children with Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Lancia Zampieri

    Full Text Available Individuals with Down syndrome (DS have a high incidence of immunological alterations with increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections and high frequency of different types of hematologic malignancies and autoimmune disorders. In the current study, we profiled the expression pattern of 92 immune-related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of two different groups, children with DS and control children, to identify differentially expressed genes that might be of pathogenetic importance for the development and phenotype of the immunological alterations observed in individuals with DS. PBMCs samples were obtained from six DS individuals with karyotypically confirmed full trisomy 21 and six healthy control individuals (ages 2-6 years. Gene expression was profiled in duplicate according to the manufacturer's instructions provided by commercially available TaqMan Human Immune Array representing 92 immune function genes and four reference genes on a 96-plex gene card. A set of 17 differentially expressed genes, not located on chromosome 21 (HSA21, involved in immune and inflammatory pathways was identified including 13 genes (BCL2, CCL3, CCR7, CD19, CD28, CD40, CD40LG, CD80, EDN1, IKBKB, IL6, NOS2 and SKI significantly down-regulated and four genes (BCL2L1, CCR2, CCR5 and IL10 significantly up-regulated in children with DS. These findings highlight a list of candidate genes for further investigation into the molecular mechanism underlying DS pathology and reinforce the secondary effects of the presence of a third copy of HSA21.

  17. Expression patterns of the retinal development-related genes in the fetal and adult retina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui-ming; WANG Feng; QIU Wei; LIU Yan; HUANG Qian

    2007-01-01

    Background Retina is important in converting light into neural signals, but little is known about the regulatory genes essential for the retinal morphological formation, development and functional differentiation. This study aimed to investigate the mRNA expression patterns and cellular or subcellular distribution of 33 differentially expressed genes in the retina belonging to the early and middle-late embryogenesis stages as well as the early adult stage during human development.Methods In situ hybridization and real-time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (FQ-RT-PCR) were used to assay 33 differentially expressed genes which were screened out using microarray analysis and were not present in the retinal cDNA or the Expressed Sequence Tags (EST) database of the National Eye Institute (NEI) Genebank.Results Nine of the 33 genes belonged to EST or the unknown cDNA fragments, and the remaining belonged to the novel genes in the retina. During the human retinal development 17 genes were down-regulated, 6 were up-regulated and the remaining 10 were relatively unchanged. Most of the genes expressed in all layers of the retina at the gestation stage, and in the fully developed retina some genes examined did show higher expression level in certain specific cells and structures such as retinal ganglion cells or the outer segment of photoreceptor cells.Conclusion The gene expression profile during retinal development possesses temporal and spatial distribution features, which can provide experimental evidence for further research of the functions of those genes.

  18. Computational workflow for analysis of gain and loss of genes in distantly related genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ptitsyn Andrey

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early evolution of animals led to profound changes in body plan organization, symmetry and the rise of tissue complexity including formation of muscular and nervous systems. This process was associated with massive restructuring of animal genomes as well as deletion, acquisition and rapid differentiation of genes from a common metazoan ancestor. Here, we present a simple but efficient workflow for elucidation of gene gain and gene loss within major branches of the animal kingdom. Methods We have designed a pipeline of sequence comparison, clustering and functional annotation using 12 major phyla as illustrative examples. Specifically, for the input we used sets of ab initio predicted gene models from the genomes of six bilaterians, three basal metazoans (Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera, two unicellular eukaryotes (Monosiga and Capsospora and the green plant Arabidopsis as an out-group. Due to the large amounts of data the software required a high-performance Linux cluster. The final results can be imported into standard spreadsheet analysis software and queried for the numbers and specific sets of genes absent in specific genomes, uniquely present or shared among different taxons. Results and conclusions The developed software is open source and available free of charge on Open Source principles. It allows the user to address a number of specific questions regarding gene gain and gene loss in particular genomes, and user-defined groups of genomes can be formulated in a type of logical expression. For example, our analysis of 12 sequenced genomes indicated that these genomes possess at least 90,000 unique genes and gene families, suggesting enormous diversity of the genome repertoire in the animal kingdom. Approximately 9% of these gene families are shared universally (homologous among all genomes, 53% are unique to specific taxa, and the rest are shared between two or more distantly related genomes.

  19. A relative variation-based method to unraveling gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Wang

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory network (GRN reconstruction is essential in understanding the functioning and pathology of a biological system. Extensive models and algorithms have been developed to unravel a GRN. The DREAM project aims to clarify both advantages and disadvantages of these methods from an application viewpoint. An interesting yet surprising observation is that compared with complicated methods like those based on nonlinear differential equations, etc., methods based on a simple statistics, such as the so-called Z-score, usually perform better. A fundamental problem with the Z-score, however, is that direct and indirect regulations can not be easily distinguished. To overcome this drawback, a relative expression level variation (RELV based GRN inference algorithm is suggested in this paper, which consists of three major steps. Firstly, on the basis of wild type and single gene knockout/knockdown experimental data, the magnitude of RELV of a gene is estimated. Secondly, probability for the existence of a direct regulation from a perturbed gene to a measured gene is estimated, which is further utilized to estimate whether a gene can be regulated by other genes. Finally, the normalized RELVs are modified to make genes with an estimated zero in-degree have smaller RELVs in magnitude than the other genes, which is used afterwards in queuing possibilities of the existence of direct regulations among genes and therefore leads to an estimate on the GRN topology. This method can in principle avoid the so-called cascade errors under certain situations. Computational results with the Size 100 sub-challenges of DREAM3 and DREAM4 show that, compared with the Z-score based method, prediction performances can be substantially improved, especially the AUPR specification. Moreover, it can even outperform the best team of both DREAM3 and DREAM4. Furthermore, the high precision of the obtained most reliable predictions shows that the suggested algorithm may be

  20. A database of annotated promoters of genes associated with common respiratory and related diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Chowdhary, Rajesh

    2012-07-01

    Many genes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of common respiratory and related diseases (RRDs), yet the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Differential gene expression patterns in diseased and healthy individuals suggest that RRDs affect or are affected by modified transcription regulation programs. It is thus crucial to characterize implicated genes in terms of transcriptional regulation. For this purpose, we conducted a promoter analysis of genes associated with 11 common RRDs including allergic rhinitis, asthma, bronchiectasis, bronchiolitis, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, emphysema, eczema, psoriasis, and urticaria, many of which are thought to be genetically related. The objective of the present study was to obtain deeper insight into the transcriptional regulation of these disease-associated genes by annotating their promoter regions with transcription factors (TFs) and TF binding sites (TFBSs). We discovered many TFs that are significantly enriched in the target disease groups including associations that have been documented in the literature. We also identified a number of putative TFs/TFBSs that appear to be novel. The results of our analysis are provided in an online database that is freely accessible to researchers at http://www.respiratorygenomics.com. Promoter-associated TFBS information and related genomic features, such as histone modification sites, microsatellites, CpG islands, and SNPs, are graphically summarized in the database. Users can compare and contrast underlying mechanisms of specific RRDs relative to candidate genes, TFs, gene ontology terms, micro-RNAs, and biological pathways for the conduct of metaanalyses. This database represents a novel, useful resource for RRD researchers. Copyright © 2012 by the American Thoracic Society.

  1. Gene-Environment Interactions of Circadian-Related Genes for Cardiometabolic Traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dashti, Hassan S; Follis, Jack L; Smith, Caren E;

    2015-01-01

    , MTNR1B-rs10830963, NR1D1-rs2314339) and cardiometabolic traits (fasting glucose [FG], HOMA-insulin resistance, BMI, waist circumference, and HDL-cholesterol) to facilitate personalized recommendations. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted inverse-variance weighted, fixed-effect meta......-analyses of results of adjusted associations and interactions between dietary intake/sleep duration and selected variants on cardiometabolic traits from 15 cohort studies including up to 28,190 participants of European descent from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium....... RESULTS: We observed significant associations between relative macronutrient intakes and glycemic traits and short sleep duration (traits. No interactions were evident after accounting for multiple comparisons. However, we observed...

  2. Alternate pathways of body shape evolution translate into common patterns of locomotor evolution in two clades of lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Philip J; Irschick, Duncan J

    2010-06-01

    Body shape has a fundamental impact on organismal function, but it is unknown how functional morphology and locomotor performance and kinematics relate across a diverse array of body shapes. We showed that although patterns of body shape evolution differed considerably between lizards of the Phrynosomatinae and Lerista, patterns of locomotor evolution coincided between clades. Specifically, we found that the phrynosomatines evolved a stocky phenotype through body widening and limb shortening, whereas Lerista evolved elongation through body lengthening and limb shortening. In both clades, relative limb length played a key role in locomotor evolution and kinematic strategies, with long-limbed species moving faster and taking longer strides. In Lerista, the body axis also influenced locomotor evolution. Similar patterns of locomotor evolution were likely due to constraints on how the body can move. However, these common patterns of locomotor evolution between the two clades resulted in different kinematic strategies and levels of performance among species because of their morphological differences. Furthermore, we found no evidence that distinct body shapes are adaptations to different substrates, as locomotor kinematics did not change on loose or solid substrates. Our findings illustrate the importance of studying kinematics to understand the mechanisms of locomotor evolution and phenotype-function relationships.

  3. Molecular characterisation of newly identified HIV-1 infections in Curitiba, Brazil: preponderance of clade C among males with recent infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Leandro de Paula Ferreira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available As in many areas of Brazil, the AIDS epidemic in Curitiba is relatively stable, but surveillance is important to support public policy. The molecular characteristics of HIV may be instrumental for monitoring epidemic trends. We evaluated plasma HIV-1 RNA (n = 37 from 38 cases presenting with positive serology, who were among 820 consenting volunteers visiting the downtown counselling and serology testing centre. Seroprevalence was 4.6% (CI 95% 3.2-6.3 and the estimated HIV incidence, as defined by the BED assay, was 2.86 persons/years (CI 95% 1.04-4.68. An additional set of contemporaneous, anonymous samples from a local laboratory was also analysed (n = 20. Regions of the HIV-1 polymerase (n = 57 and envelope (n = 34 were evaluated for subtyping, determination of mosaic structure, primary drug resistance mutations (pDRM, envelope V3 loop motifs and amino acid signatures related to viral tropism. HIV-1 clade B was observed in 53% of cases; HIV-1C in 30% and BC mosaics in 14%, with one F genome and one CF mosaic. Clade C infection was associated with recent infections among males (p < 0.03. Stanford surveillance pDRM was observed in 8.8% of sequences, with 7% showing high level resistance to at least one antiretroviral drug. Tropism for CXCR4 co-receptor was predicted in 18% of envelope sequences, which were exclusively among clade B genomes and cases with serological reactivity to chronic infection.

  4. A novel phylogenetic clade of picocyanobacteria from the Mazurian lakes (Poland) reflects the early ontogeny of glacial lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasser, Iwona; Królicka, Adriana; Karnkowska-Ishikawa, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The community of picocyanobacteria inhabiting the Great Mazurian Lakes system (comprising lakes ranging from mesotrophic to hypertrophic) is dominated by phycoerythrin-rich cells, which outnumber phycocyanin-rich cells, even in hypertrophic lakes. The genetic diversity and phylogeny of 43 strains of picocyanobacteria isolated from four Mazurian lakes were studied by analyzing the nucleotide sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and cpcBA-IGS operon. Phylogenetic analyses assigned some of the strains to several previously described clusters (Groups A, B, C, E and I) and revealed the existence of a novel clade, Group M (Mazurian), which exhibited a low level of similarity to the other clusters. Both phycocyanin and phycoerythrin picocyanobacteria were assigned to this clade based on an analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. The cpcBA sequence analysis assigned only phycocyanin strains to Group M, whereas the phycoerythrin strains from the M ribogroup were assigned to Groups B and E. We hypothesize that Group M originally contained only phycocyanin picocyanobacteria. The phycoerythrin found in strains belonging to ribogroup M seems to have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer as an adaptation to the changing environment early in the ontogeny of these glacial lakes.

  5. Gene structure of the human DDX3 and chromosome mapping of its related sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y S; Lee, S G; Park, S H; Song, K

    2001-10-31

    The human DDX3 gene (GenBank accession No. U50553) is the human homologue of the mouse Ddx3 gene and is a member of the gene family that contains DEAD motifs. Previously, we mapped the gene to the Xp11.3-11.23. In this report, we describe the structural organization of the human DDX3 gene. It consisted of 17 exons that span approximately 16 kb. An Alu element was present in the intron 13. Its organization was the same as that of the human DBY gene, a closely related sequence present on the Y chromosome. We also identified two processed pseudogenes (DDX3) with a sequence that is highly homologous to those of DDX3 cDNAs, but contain a translation termination codon within its open-reading frame. Pseudogenes are mapped on human chromosomes 4 and X, respectively. In this paper, we discuss the relationships between DDX3 and its related sequences that have been isolated.

  6. 'Obesity' is healthy for cetaceans? Evidence from pervasive positive selection in genes related to triacylglycerol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengfei; Chen, Zhuo; Xu, Shixia; Ren, Wenhua; Zhou, Kaiya; Yang, Guang

    2015-09-18

    Cetaceans are a group of secondarily adapted marine mammals with an enigmatic history of transition from terrestrial to fully aquatic habitat and subsequent adaptive radiation in waters around the world. Numerous physiological and morphological cetacean characteristics have been acquired in response to this drastic habitat transition; for example, the thickened blubber is one of the most striking changes that increases their buoyancy, supports locomotion, and provides thermal insulation. However, the genetic basis underlying the blubber thickening in cetaceans remains poorly explored. Here, 88 candidate genes associated with triacylglycerol metabolism were investigated in representative cetaceans and other mammals to test whether the thickened blubber matched adaptive evolution of triacylglycerol metabolism-related genes. Positive selection was detected in 41 of the 88 candidate genes, and functional characterization of these genes indicated that these are involved mainly in triacylglycerol synthesis and lipolysis processes. In addition, some essential regulatory genes underwent significant positive selection in cetacean-specific lineages, whereas no selection signal was detected in the counterpart terrestrial mammals. The extensive occurrence of positive selection in triacylglycerol metabolism-related genes is suggestive of their essential role in secondary adaptation to an aquatic life, and further implying that 'obesity' might be an indicator of good health for cetaceans.

  7. RNA-Seq Reveals OTA-Related Gene Transcriptional Changes in Aspergillus carbonarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerin, Donato; De Miccolis Angelini, Rita M.; Pollastro, Stefania; Faretra, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin harmful for animals and humans. Aspergillus carbonarius is the main responsible for OTA contamination of grapes and derived products. Gene transcriptional profiling of 4 A. carbonarius strains was carried out by RNA-Seq analysis to study transcriptome changes associated with OTA production. By comparing OTA inducing (OTAI) vs. non-inducing (OTAN) cultural conditions, a total of 3,705 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (fold change > |2| and FDR ≤ 0.05) were identified. Several genes involved in primary metabolic processes, with particular regard to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolisms, secondary metabolic processes, transport, response to stress and sporulation were up-regulated by OTAI conditions at all the analysed sampling times (4, 6 and 8 DAI) or starting from 6 DAI. Highly up-regulated DEGs encoding enzymes involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, oxidoreductases, transporters and transcription factors were examined for their potential involvement in OTA biosynthesis and related metabolic pathways. Differential expression of genes encoding polyketide synthases (pks), non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (nrps) and chloroperoxidase (cpo) was validated by RT-qPCR. Among clusters of co-regulated genes involved in SM biosynthesis, one putative OTA-gene cluster, including both pks and nrps genes, was detected in the A. carbonarius genome. PMID:26765536

  8. Exercise training alters DNA methylation patterns in genes related to muscle growth and differentiation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzleiter, Timo; Jähnert, Markus; Schulze, Gunnar; Selbig, Joachim; Hallahan, Nicole; Schwenk, Robert Wolfgang; Schürmann, Annette

    2015-05-15

    The adaptive response of skeletal muscle to exercise training is tightly controlled and therefore requires transcriptional regulation. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism known to modulate gene expression, but its contribution to exercise-induced adaptations in skeletal muscle is not well studied. Here, we describe a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in muscle of trained mice (n = 3). Compared with sedentary controls, 2,762 genes exhibited differentially methylated CpGs (P 5%, coverage >10) in their putative promoter regions. Alignment with gene expression data (n = 6) revealed 200 genes with a negative correlation between methylation and expression changes in response to exercise training. The majority of these genes were related to muscle growth and differentiation, and a minor fraction involved in metabolic regulation. Among the candidates were genes that regulate the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (Plexin A2) as well as genes that participate in muscle hypertrophy (Igfbp4) and motor neuron innervation (Dok7). Interestingly, a transcription factor binding site enrichment study discovered significantly enriched occurrence of CpG methylation in the binding sites of the myogenic regulatory factors MyoD and myogenin. These findings suggest that DNA methylation is involved in the regulation of muscle adaptation to regular exercise training.

  9. Targeted sequencing of cancer-related genes in colorectal cancer using next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae-Won Han

    Full Text Available Recent advance in sequencing technology has enabled comprehensive profiling of genetic alterations in cancer. We have established a targeted sequencing platform using next-generation sequencing (NGS technology for clinical use, which can provide mutation and copy number variation data. NGS was performed with paired-end library enriched with exons of 183 cancer-related genes. Normal and tumor tissue pairs of 60 colorectal adenocarcinomas were used to test feasibility. Somatic mutation and copy number alteration were analyzed. A total of 526 somatic non-synonymous sequence variations were found in 113 genes. Among these, 278 single nucleotide variations were 232 different somatic point mutations. 216 SNV were 79 known single nucleotide polymorphisms in the dbSNP. 32 indels were 28 different indel mutations. Median number of mutated gene per tumor was 4 (range 0-23. Copy number gain (>X2 fold was found in 65 genes in 40 patients, whereas copy number loss (genes in 39 patients. The most frequently altered genes (mutation and/or copy number alteration were APC in 35 patients (58%, TP53 in 34 (57%, and KRAS in 24 (40%. Altered gene list revealed ErbB signaling pathway as the most commonly involved pathway (25 patients, 42%. Targeted sequencing platform using NGS technology is feasible for clinical use and provides comprehensive genetic alteration data.

  10. RNA-Seq Reveals OTA-Related Gene Transcriptional Changes in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerin, Donato; De Miccolis Angelini, Rita M; Pollastro, Stefania; Faretra, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin harmful for animals and humans. Aspergillus carbonarius is the main responsible for OTA contamination of grapes and derived products. Gene transcriptional profiling of 4 A. carbonarius strains was carried out by RNA-Seq analysis to study transcriptome changes associated with OTA production. By comparing OTA inducing (OTAI) vs. non-inducing (OTAN) cultural conditions, a total of 3,705 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (fold change > |2| and FDR ≤ 0.05) were identified. Several genes involved in primary metabolic processes, with particular regard to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolisms, secondary metabolic processes, transport, response to stress and sporulation were up-regulated by OTAI conditions at all the analysed sampling times (4, 6 and 8 DAI) or starting from 6 DAI. Highly up-regulated DEGs encoding enzymes involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, oxidoreductases, transporters and transcription factors were examined for their potential involvement in OTA biosynthesis and related metabolic pathways. Differential expression of genes encoding polyketide synthases (pks), non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (nrps) and chloroperoxidase (cpo) was validated by RT-qPCR. Among clusters of co-regulated genes involved in SM biosynthesis, one putative OTA-gene cluster, including both pks and nrps genes, was detected in the A. carbonarius genome.

  11. RNA-Seq Reveals OTA-Related Gene Transcriptional Changes in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato Gerin

    Full Text Available Ochratoxin A (OTA is a mycotoxin harmful for animals and humans. Aspergillus carbonarius is the main responsible for OTA contamination of grapes and derived products. Gene transcriptional profiling of 4 A. carbonarius strains was carried out by RNA-Seq analysis to study transcriptome changes associated with OTA production. By comparing OTA inducing (OTAI vs. non-inducing (OTAN cultural conditions, a total of 3,705 differentially expressed genes (DEGs (fold change > |2| and FDR ≤ 0.05 were identified. Several genes involved in primary metabolic processes, with particular regard to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolisms, secondary metabolic processes, transport, response to stress and sporulation were up-regulated by OTAI conditions at all the analysed sampling times (4, 6 and 8 DAI or starting from 6 DAI. Highly up-regulated DEGs encoding enzymes involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, oxidoreductases, transporters and transcription factors were examined for their potential involvement in OTA biosynthesis and related metabolic pathways. Differential expression of genes encoding polyketide synthases (pks, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (nrps and chloroperoxidase (cpo was validated by RT-qPCR. Among clusters of co-regulated genes involved in SM biosynthesis, one putative OTA-gene cluster, including both pks and nrps genes, was detected in the A. carbonarius genome.

  12. Triterpenoid saponin content and the expression level of some related genes in calli of Centella asiatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas, Susana; Moyano, Elisabeth; Osuna, Lidia; Cusido, Rosa M; Bonfill, Mercedes; Palazón, Javier

    2008-10-01

    Centella asiatica has been extensively studied but there has been no report to date that relates gene expression and centelloside production in non-differentiated tissues. We have determined the content of the four principal triterpenoid bioactive compounds of C. asiatica (asiaticoside, madecassoside, asiatic acid and madecassic acid) in calli grown in different media and checked the expression level of some of the genes in the centelloside biosynthetic pathway. The results when compared with data from in vitro plant cultures showed a significantly lower expression of the gene encoding beta-amyrin synthase in calli, which is consistent with the observed lower production of centellosides (less than 900 microg/g DW), while in the plants the production was around 1.5-2 mg/g DW. Moreover, we find an efficient housekeeping gene for this plant. The biosynthesis of phytosterols is also discussed.

  13. RELATED GENES IN LUNG CANCER TISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH RESIDENTIAL HIGH RADON EXPOSURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏英; 杨梅英; 张守志; 叶常青

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the related genes in lung cancer tissues associated with residential high radon exposure. Methods: Differentially expressed gene fragments in lung cancer and normal lung tissues were discovered by differential display and reverse Northern blot hybridization method. The fragments positive in lung cancer and negative in normal lung tissue were determined. Results: Seven differential displayed fragments were sequenced. One of them named NA7 is 95% homologous with AI208667 in EAT of Genbank. Another fragment named NG2 is up to 98% homologous with five fragments. The remained one CA1 may be a new gene fragment. Conclusion: 3 gene fragments were discovered from lung cancer and normal lung tissues of high radon exposure resident.

  14. Green tea polyphenols reduce body weight in rats by modulating obesity-related genes.

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    Chuanwen Lu

    Full Text Available Beneficial effects of green tea polyphenols (GTP against obesity have been reported, however, the mechanism of this protection is not clear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify GTP-targeted genes in obesity using the high-fat-diet-induced obese rat model. A total of three groups (n = 12/group of Sprague Dawley (SD female rats were tested, including the control group (rats fed with low-fat diet, the HF group (rats fed with high-fat diet, and the HF+GTP group (rats fed with high-fat diet and GTP in drinking water. The HF group increased body weight as compared to the control group. Supplementation of GTP in the drinking water in the HF+GTP group reduced body weight as compared to the HF group. RNA from liver samples was extracted for gene expression analysis. A total of eighty-four genes related to obesity were analyzed using PCR array. Compared to the rats in the control group, the rats in the HF group had the expression levels of 12 genes with significant changes, including 3 orexigenic genes (Agrp, Ghrl, and Nr3c1; 7 anorectic genes (Apoa4, Cntf, Ghr, IL-1β, Ins1, Lepr, and Sort; and 2 genes that relate to energy expenditure (Adcyap1r1 and Adrb1. Intriguingly, the HF+GTP group restored the expression levels of these genes in the high-fat-induced obese rats. The protein expression levels of IL-1β and IL-6 in the serum samples from the control, HF, and HF+GTP groups confirmed the results of gene expression. Furthermore, the protein expression levels of superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1 and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT also showed GTP-regulated protective changes in this obese rat model. Collectively, this study revealed the beneficial effects of GTP on body weight via regulating obesity-related genes, anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant capacity, and estrogen-related actions in high-fat-induced obese rats.

  15. Green Tea Polyphenols Reduce Body Weight in Rats by Modulating Obesity-Related Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chuanwen; Zhu, Wenbin; Shen, Chwan-Li; Gao, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    Beneficial effects of green tea polyphenols (GTP) against obesity have been reported, however, the mechanism of this protection is not clear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify GTP-targeted genes in obesity using the high-fat-diet-induced obese rat model. A total of three groups (n = 12/group) of Sprague Dawley (SD) female rats were tested, including the control group (rats fed with low-fat diet), the HF group (rats fed with high-fat diet), and the HF+GTP group (rats fed with high-fat diet and GTP in drinking water). The HF group increased body weight as compared to the control group. Supplementation of GTP in the drinking water in the HF+GTP group reduced body weight as compared to the HF group. RNA from liver samples was extracted for gene expression analysis. A total of eighty-four genes related to obesity were analyzed using PCR array. Compared to the rats in the control group, the rats in the HF group had the expression levels of 12 genes with significant changes, including 3 orexigenic genes (Agrp, Ghrl, and Nr3c1); 7 anorectic genes (Apoa4, Cntf, Ghr, IL-1β, Ins1, Lepr, and Sort); and 2 genes that relate to energy expenditure (Adcyap1r1 and Adrb1). Intriguingly, the HF+GTP group restored the expression levels of these genes in the high-fat-induced obese rats. The protein expression levels of IL-1β and IL-6 in the serum samples from the control, HF, and HF+GTP groups confirmed the results of gene expression. Furthermore, the protein expression levels of superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) also showed GTP-regulated protective changes in this obese rat model. Collectively, this study revealed the beneficial effects of GTP on body weight via regulating obesity-related genes, anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant capacity, and estrogen-related actions in high-fat-induced obese rats. PMID:22715380

  16. Differential Expression of Motility-Related Protein-1 Gene in Gastric Cancer and Its Premalignant Lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YaoXu; JieZheng; WentianLiu; JunXing; YanyunLi; XinGeng; WeimingZhang

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify genes related to gastric cancer and to analyze their expression profiles in different gastric tissues. METHODS The differentially expressed cDNA bands were assayed by fluorescent differential display from gastric cancer specimens, matched with normal gastric mucosa and premalignant lesions. The motility-related protein-1 (MRP-1/CD9) gene expression was studied by Northern blots and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in different kinds of gastric tissue. RESULTS A differentially expressed cDNA fragment showed lower expression in all gastric cancers compared to the normal gastric mucosa and premalignant lesions; and it was found to be homologous to the MRP-1/CD9 gene. Northern blot analysis confirmed the differential expression. RT-PCR analysis showed that the MRP-1/CD9 gene was expressed at a much lower rate in gastric cancers (0.31 +0.18) compared to the matched normal gastric tissue (0.49+0.24) and premalignant lesions (0.47+0.18)(P<0.05). Furthermore, its expression in intestinal-type of gastric cancer (0.38+0.16) was higher than that expressed in a diffuse-type of gastric cancer (0.22±0.17)(P<0.05). CCONCLUSION The MRP-1/CD9 gene expression was down-regulated in gastric cancer and its expression may be related to the carcinogenic process and histological type of gastric cancer.

  17. Analysis of ripening-related gene expression in papaya using an Arabidopsis-based microarray

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    Fabi João Paulo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papaya (Carica papaya L. is a commercially important crop that produces climacteric fruits with a soft and sweet pulp that contain a wide range of health promoting phytochemicals. Despite its importance, little is known about transcriptional modifications during papaya fruit ripening and their control. In this study we report the analysis of ripe papaya transcriptome by using a cross-species (XSpecies microarray technique based on the phylogenetic proximity between papaya and Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Papaya transcriptome analyses resulted in the identification of 414 ripening-related genes with some having their expression validated by qPCR. The transcription profile was compared with that from ripening tomato and grape. There were many similarities between papaya and tomato especially with respect to the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in primary metabolism, regulation of transcription, biotic and abiotic stress and cell wall metabolism. XSpecies microarray data indicated that transcription factors (TFs of the MADS-box, NAC and AP2/ERF gene families were involved in the control of papaya ripening and revealed that cell wall-related gene expression in papaya had similarities to the expression profiles seen in Arabidopsis during hypocotyl development. Conclusion The cross-species array experiment identified a ripening-related set of genes in papaya allowing the comparison of transcription control between papaya and other fruit bearing taxa during the ripening process.

  18. Meaning of relative gene expression in multilayered cultures of epidermal keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaisse, Jérémy; Hermant, Maryse; Hayez, Aurélie; Poumay, Yves; Lambert de Rouvroit, Catherine

    2014-10-01

    Reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) has become an in vitro model of choice for studying cell and tissue functions. Analysis of gene expression over the course of reconstruction must take into account the heterogeneous differentiation states of keratinocytes reconstituting the typical epidermal layers. In monolayer cultures, relative mRNA expression levels of differentiation markers are usually expressed as a ratio versus a classical reference gene (also named house-keeping gene) tested to be expressed equally in certain experimental conditions. Applied to complex tissues in which the cell number increases over time together with differentiation, calculation of relative gene expression does not take enough into account a crucial phenomenon: epidermal morphogenesis results in progressive restriction of differentiation markers, such as involucrin, to a specific layer, or in the delayed onset of mRNA expression of filaggrin or TMEM45A for instance following stratification. Our study illustrates that comparing the relative expression level of mRNAs to that of a basal layer-specific gene (e.g. ITGA6) better illustrates the contribution of specific differentiation markers to the process of epidermal morphogenesis.

  19. Codon 201Gly Polymorphic Type of the DCC Gene is Related to Disseminated Neuroblastoma

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    Xiao-Tang Kong

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC gene is a potential tumor- suppressor gene on chromosome 18821.3. The relatively high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH and loss of expression of this gene in neuroblastoma, especially in the advanced stages, imply the possibility of involvement of the DCC gene in progression of neuroblastoma. However, only few typical mutations have been identified in this gene, indicating that other possible mechanisms for the inactivation of this gene may exist. A polymorphic change (Arg to Gly at DCC codon 201 is related to advanced colorectal carcinoma and increases in the tumors with absent DCC protein expression. In order to understand whether this change is associated with the development or progression of neuroblastoma, we investigated codon 201 polymorphism of the DCC gene in 102 primary neuroblastomas by polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism. We found no missense or nonsense mutations, but a polymorphic change from CGA (Arg to GGA (Gly at codon 201 resulting in three types of polymorphism: codon 201Gly type, codon 201Arg/Gly type, and codon 201Arg type. The codon 201Gly type occurred more frequently in disseminated (stages IV and IVs neuroblastomas (72% than in localized (stages I, II, and III tumors (48% (P=.035, and normal controls (38% (P=.024. In addition, the codon 201Gly type was significantly more common in tumors found clinically (65% than in those found by mass screening (35% (P=.002. The results suggested that the codon 201Gly type of the DCC gene might be associated with a higher risk of disseminating neuroblastoma.

  20. The Influence of Co-Suppressing Tomato 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylic Acid Oxidase Ⅰ on the Expression of Fruit Ripening-Related and Pathogenesis-Related Protein Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zong-li; CHEN Xu-qing; CHEN Guo-ping; L(U) Li-juan; Grierson Donald

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the influence of co-suppressing tomato ACC oxidase I on the expression of fruit ripening-related and pathogenesis-related protein genes, and on the biosynthesis of endogenous ethylene and storage ability of fruits. Specific fragments of several fruit ripening-related and pathogenesis-related protein genes from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) were cloned, such as the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase 1 gene (LeACO1), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase 3 gene (LeAC03), EIN3-binding F-box 1 gene (LeEBF1), pathogenesisrelated protein 1 gene (LePR1), pathogenesis-related protein 5 gene (LePR5), and pathogenesis-related protein osmotin precursor gene (LeNP24) by PCR or RT-PCR. Then these specific DNA fragments were used as probes to hybridize with the total RNAs extracted from the wild type tomato Ailsa Craig (AC++) and the LeACO1 co-suppression tomatoes (V1187 and T4B), respectively. At the same time, ethylene production measurement and storage experiment of tomato fruits were carried out. The hybridization results indicated that the expression of fruit ripening-related genes such as LeACO3 and LeEBF1, and pathogenesis-related protein genes such as LePR1, LePR5, and LeNP24, were reduced sharply, and the ethylene production in the fruits, wounded leaves decreased and the storage time of ripening fruits was prolonged, when the expression of LeACO1 gene in the transgenic tomato was suppressed. In the co-suppression tomatoes, the expression of fruit ripening-related and pathogenesis-related protein genes were restrained at different degrees, the biosynthesis of endogenous ethylene decreased and the storage ability of tomato fruits increased.

  1. Characterization of the rainbow trout spleen transcriptome and identification of immune-related genes

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    Ali eAli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Resistance against diseases affects profitability of rainbow trout. Limited information is available about functions and mechanisms of teleost immune pathways. Immunogenomics provides powerful tools to determine disease resistance genes/gene pathways and develop genetic markers for genomic selection.RNA-Seq sequencing of the rainbow trout spleen yielded 93,532,200 reads (100bp. High quality reads were assembled into 43,047 contigs. 26,333 (61.17% of the contigs had hits to the NR protein database and 7,024 (16.32% had hits to the KEGG database. Gene ontology showed significant percentages of transcripts assigned to binding (51%, signaling (7%, response to stimuli (9% and receptor activity (4% suggesting existence of many immune-related genes. KEGG annotation revealed 2,825 sequences belonging to organismal systems with the highest number of sequences, 842 (29.81%, assigned to immune system. A number of sequences were identified for the first time in rainbow trout belonging to Toll-like receptor signaling (25, B cell receptor signaling pathway (28, T cell receptor signaling pathway (33, chemokine signaling pathway (44, Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis (23, leukocyte transendothelial migration (34 and NK cell mediated cytotoxicity (21. In addition, 51 transcripts were identified as spleen-specific genes. The list includes 277 full-length cDNAs.The presence of a large number of immune-related genes and pathways similar to other vertebrates suggests that innate and adaptive immunity in fish are conserved. This study provides deep-sequence data of rainbow trout spleen transcriptome and identifies many new immune-related genes and full-length cDNAs. This data will help identify allelic variations suitable for genomic selection and genetic manipulation in aquaculture.

  2. Sex-related differences in gene expression in human skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Welle

    Full Text Available There is sexual dimorphism of skeletal muscle, the most obvious feature being the larger muscle mass of men. The molecular basis for this difference has not been clearly defined. To identify genes that might contribute to the relatively greater muscularity of men, we compared skeletal muscle gene expression profiles of 15 normal men and 15 normal women by using comprehensive oligonucleotide microarrays. Although there were sex-related differences in expression of several hundred genes, very few of the differentially expressed genes have functions that are obvious candidates for explaining the larger muscle mass of men. The men tended to have higher expression of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins, ribosomal proteins, and a few translation initiation factors. The women had >2-fold greater expression than the men (P<0.0001 of two genes that encode proteins in growth factor pathways known to be important in regulating muscle mass: growth factor receptor-bound 10 (GRB10 and activin A receptor IIB (ACVR2B. GRB10 encodes a protein that inhibits insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 signaling. ACVR2B encodes a myostatin receptor. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed higher expression of GRB10 and ACVR2B genes in these women. In an independent microarray study of 10 men and 9 women with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, women had higher expression of GRB10 (2.7-fold, P<0.001 and ACVR2B (1.7-fold, P<0.03. If these sex-related differences in mRNA expression lead to reduced IGF-1 activity and increased myostatin activity, they could contribute to the sex difference in muscle size.

  3. Gene expression related to oxidative stress in the heart of mice after intestinal ischemia

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    Somaio Neto, Frederico; Ikejiri, Adauto Tsutomu; Bertoletto, Paulo Roberto; Chaves, José Carlos Bertoletto [Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados - UFGD, Dourados, MS (Brazil); Teruya, Roberto [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul - UFMS, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Fagundes, Djalma José, E-mail: fsomaio@cardiol.br; Taha, Murched Omar [Universidade Federal de São Paulo - UNIFESP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-15

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion is a frequent clinical event associated to injury in distant organs, especially the heart. To investigate the gene expression of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in the heart of inbred mice subjected to intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (IR). Twelve mice (C57BL / 6) were assigned to: IR Group (GIR) with 60 minutes of superior mesenteric artery occlusion followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion; Control Group (CG) which underwent anesthesia and laparotomy without IR procedure and was observed for 120 minutes. Intestine and heart samples were processed using the RT-qPCR / Reverse transcriptase-quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction method for the gene expression of 84 genes related to oxidative stress and oxidative defense (Student's 't' test, p < 0.05). The intestinal tissue (GIR) was noted to have an up-regulation of 65 genes (74.71%) in comparison to normal tissue (CG), and 37 genes (44.04%) were hyper-expressed (greater than three times the threshold allowed by the algorithm). Regarding the remote effects of intestinal I/R in cardiac tissue an up-regulation of 28 genes (33.33%) was seen, but only eight genes (9.52%) were hyper-expressed three times above threshold. Four (7.14%) of these eight genes were expressed in both intestinal and cardiac tissues. Cardiomyocytes with smaller and pyknotic nuclei, rich in heterochromatin with rare nucleoli, indicating cardiac distress, were observed in the GIR. Intestinal I/R caused a statistically significant over expression of 8 genes associated with oxidative stress in remote myocardial tissue.

  4. Gene Expression Proifling Related to Hyphal Growth in a Temperature- Sensitive Mutant ofMagnaporthe oryzae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xue-song; XU Fei; WANG Hong-kai; and LIN Fu-cheng

    2013-01-01

    The rice blast, caused by fungusMagnaporthe oryzae, is a major constraint to the world food security. Hyphal growth is the foundation of fungal development and proliferation of fungi. To investigate genes involved in hyphal growth of this fungus, digital gene expression tag proifling was used to compare a previously generated temperature-sensitive mutant which defect at hyphae growth and reduction on pathogenicity, with its related wildtype strain. 416 genes were detected as differential expression, 178 of which were speciifcally expressed in Guy-11 but down-regulated expression in the mutant. Functional classiifcation analysis revealed the phenotype mutation may be mainly caused by a defection in translational and vacuole-related processes. The results and the protocol used will improve our knowledge on morphogenesis and promote the further study onM. oryzae pathogenesis.

  5. Disruption of ubiquitin-related genes in laboratory yeast strains enhances ethanol production during sake brewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Watanabe, Tomoko; Araki, Yoshio; Kitagaki, Hiroshi; Akao, Takeshi; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2009-06-01

    Sake yeast can produce high levels of ethanol in concentrated rice mash. While both sake and laboratory yeast strains belong to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the laboratory strains produce much less ethanol. This disparity in fermentation activity may be due to the strains' different responses to environmental stresses, including ethanol accumulation. To obtain more insight into the stress response of yeast cells under sake brewing conditions, we carried out small-scale sake brewing tests using laboratory yeast strains disrupted in specific stress-related genes. Surprisingly, yeast strains with disrupted ubiquitin-related genes produced more ethanol than the parental strain during sake brewing. The elevated fermentation ability conferred by disruption of the ubiquitin-coding gene UBI4 was confined to laboratory strains, and the ubi4 disruptant of a sake yeast strain did not demonstrate a comparable increase in ethanol production. These findings suggest different roles for ubiquitin in sake and laboratory yeast strains.

  6. Application of nanomaterials in the bioanalytical detection of disease-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoqian; Li, Jiao; He, Hanping; Huang, Min; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2015-12-15

    In the diagnosis of genetic diseases and disorders, nanomaterials-based gene detection systems have significant advantages over conventional diagnostic systems in terms of simplicity, sensitivity, specificity, and portability. In this review, we describe the application of nanomaterials for disease-related genes detection in different methods excluding PCR-related method, such as colorimetry, fluorescence-based methods, electrochemistry, microarray methods, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) methods, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The most commonly used nanomaterials are gold, silver, carbon and semiconducting nanoparticles. Various nanomaterials-based gene detection methods are introduced, their respective advantages are discussed, and selected examples are provided to illustrate the properties of these nanomaterials and their emerging applications for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences.

  7. Common polymorphisms in dopamine-related genes combine to produce a 'schizophrenia-like' prefrontal hypoactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercammen, A; Weickert, C S; Skilleter, A J; Lenroot, R; Schofield, P R; Weickert, T W

    2014-02-04

    Individual changes in dopamine-related genes influence prefrontal activity during cognitive-affective processes; however, the extent to which common genetic variations combine to influence prefrontal activity is unknown. We assessed catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val108/158Met (rs4680) and dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) G-T (rs2283265) single nucleotide polymorphisms and functional magnetic resonance imaging during an emotional response inhibition test in 43 healthy adults and 27 people with schizophrenia to determine the extent to which COMT Val108/158Met and DRD2 G-T polymorphisms combine to influence prefrontal response to cognitive-affective challenges. We found an increased number of cognitive-deficit risk alleles in these two dopamine-regulating genes predict reduced prefrontal activation during response inhibition in healthy adults, mimicking schizophrenia-like prefrontal hypoactivity. Our study provides evidence that functionally related genes can combine to produce a disease-like endophenotype.

  8. Reconstruction of Family-Level Phylogenetic Relationships within Demospongiae (Porifera) Using Nuclear Encoded Housekeeping Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Malcolm S.; Hill, April L.; Lopez, Jose; Peterson, Kevin J.; Pomponi, Shirley; Diaz, Maria C.; Thacker, Robert W.; Adamska, Maja; Boury-Esnault, Nicole; Cárdenas, Paco; Chaves-Fonnegra, Andia; Danka, Elizabeth; De Laine, Bre-Onna; Formica, Dawn; Hajdu, Eduardo; Lobo-Hajdu, Gisele; Klontz, Sarah; Morrow, Christine C.; Patel, Jignasa; Picton, Bernard; Pisani, Davide; Pohlmann, Deborah; Redmond, Niamh E.; Reed, John; Richey, Stacy; Riesgo, Ana; Rubin, Ewelina; Russell, Zach; Rützler, Klaus; Sperling, Erik A.; di Stefano, Michael; Tarver, James E.; Collins, Allen G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Demosponges are challenging for phylogenetic systematics because of their plastic and relatively simple morphologies and many deep divergences between major clades. To improve understanding of the phylogenetic relationships within Demospongiae, we sequenced and analyzed seven nuclear housekeeping genes involved in a variety of cellular functions from a diverse group of sponges. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated data from each of the four sponge classes (i.e., Calcarea, Demospongiae, Hexactinellida, and Homoscleromorpha), but focused on family-level relationships within demosponges. With data for 21 newly sampled families, our Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian-based approaches recovered previously phylogenetically defined taxa: Keratosap, Myxospongiaep, Spongillidap, Haploscleromorphap (the marine haplosclerids) and Democlaviap. We found conflicting results concerning the relationships of Keratosap and Myxospongiaep to the remaining demosponges, but our results strongly supported a clade of Haploscleromorphap+Spongillidap+Democlaviap. In contrast to hypotheses based on mitochondrial genome and ribosomal data, nuclear housekeeping gene data suggested that freshwater sponges (Spongillidap) are sister to Haploscleromorphap rather than part of Democlaviap. Within Keratosap, we found equivocal results as to the monophyly of Dictyoceratida. Within Myxospongiaep, Chondrosida and Verongida were monophyletic. A well-supported clade within Democlaviap, Tetractinellidap, composed of all sampled members of Astrophorina and Spirophorina (including the only lithistid in our analysis), was consistently revealed as the sister group to all other members of Democlaviap. Within Tetractinellidap, we did not recover monophyletic Astrophorina or Spirophorina. Our results also reaffirmed the monophyly of order Poecilosclerida (excluding Desmacellidae and Raspailiidae), and polyphyly of Hadromerida and Halichondrida. Conclusions/Significance These results, using an

  9. Characterization of immune-related genes in the yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco in response to LPS challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Xin, Zhao-Zhe; Chai, Xin-Yue; Jiang, Sen-Hao; Li, Chao-Feng; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Ge, Bao-Ming; Zhang, Dai-Zhen; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Tang, Bo-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Fish are considered an excellent model for studies in comparative immunology as they are a representative population of lower vertebrates linked to invertebrate evolution. To gain a better understanding of the immune response in fish, we constructed a subtractive cDNA library from the head kidney of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). A total of 300 putative EST clones were identified which contained 95 genes, including 27 immune-related genes, 7 cytoskeleton-related genes, 3 genes involved in the cell cycle and apoptosis, 9 respiration and energy metabolism-related genes, 7 genes related to transport, 24 metabolism-related genes, 10 genes involved in stress responses, seven genes involved in regulation of transcription and translation and 59 unknown genes. Using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR, a subset of randomly selected genes involved in the immune response to lipopolysaccharide challenge were investigated to verify the reliability of the SSH data which identified 16 up-regulated genes. The genes identified in this study provide novel insight into the immune response in fish.

  10. In situ morphometric survey elucidates the evolutionary systematics of the Eurasian Himantoglossum clade (Orchidaceae: Orchidinae

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    Richard M. Bateman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims The charismatic Himantoglossum s.l. clade of Eurasian orchids contains an unusually large proportion of taxa that are of controversial circumscriptions and considerable conservation concern. Whereas our previously published study addressed the molecular phylogenetics and phylogeography of every named taxon within the clade, here we use detailed morphometric data obtained from the same populations to compare genotypes with associated phenotypes, in order to better explore taxonomic circumscription and character evolution within the clade. Methods Between one and 12 plants found in 25 populations that encompassed the entire distribution of the Himantoglossum s.l. clade were measured in situ for 51 morphological characters. Results for 45 of those characters were subjected to detailed multivariate and univariate analyses. Key Results Multivariate analyses readily separate subgenus Barlia and subgenus Comperia from subgenus Himantoglossum, and also the early-divergent H. formosum from the less divergent remainder of subgenus Himantoglossum. The sequence of divergence of these four lineages is confidently resolved. Our experimental approach to morphometric character analysis demonstrates clearly that phenotypic evolution within Himantoglossum is unusually multi-dimensional. Conclusions Degrees of divergence between taxa shown by morphological analyses approximate those previously shown using molecular analyses. Himantoglossum s.l. is readily divisible into three subgenera. The three sections of subgenus Himantoglossum—hircinum, caprinum and formosum—are arrayed from west to east with only limited geographical overlap. At this taxonomic level, their juxtaposition combines with conflict between contrasting datasets to complicate attempts to distinguish between clinal variation and the discontinuities that by definition separate bona fide species. All taxa achieve allogamy via food deceit and have only weak pollinator specificity

  11. The Patterns of Coevolution in Clade B HIV Envelope's N-Glycosylation Sites.

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    Swetha Garimalla

    Full Text Available The co-evolution of the potential N-glycosylation sites of HIV Clade B gp120 was mapped onto the coevolution network of the protein structure using mean field direct coupling analysis (mfDCA. This was possible for 327 positions with suitable entropy and gap content. Indications of pressure to preserve the evolving glycan shield are seen as well as strong dependencies between the majority of the potential N-glycosylation sites and the rest of the structure. These findings indicate that although mainly an adaptation against antibody neutralization, the evolving glycan shield is structurally related to the core polypeptide, which, thus, is also under pressure to reflect the changes in the N-glycosylation. The map we propose fills the gap in previous attempts to tease out sequon evolution by providing a more general molecular context. Thus, it will help design strategies guiding HIV gp120 evolution in a rational way.

  12. The Patterns of Coevolution in Clade B HIV Envelope's N-Glycosylation Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimalla, Swetha; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas; Pashov, Anastas D.

    2015-01-01

    The co-evolution of the potential N-glycosylation sites of HIV Clade B gp120 was mapped onto the coevolution network of the protein structure using mean field direct coupling analysis (mfDCA). This was possible for 327 positions with suitable entropy and gap content. Indications of pressure to preserve the evolving glycan shield are seen as well as strong dependencies between the majority of the potential N-glycosylation sites and the rest of the structure. These findings indicate that although mainly an adaptation against antibody neutralization, the evolving glycan shield is structurally related to the core polypeptide, which, thus, is also under pressure to reflect the changes in the N-glycosylation. The map we propose fills the gap in previous attempts to tease out sequon evolution by providing a more general molecular context. Thus, it will help design strategies guiding HIV gp120 evolution in a rational way. PMID:26110648

  13. Fungal genes related to calcium homeostasis and signalling are upregulated in symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhiza interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Arnould, Christine; Wipf, Daniel; Zhao, Bin; van Tuinen, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuations in intracellular calcium levels generate signalling events and regulate different cellular processes. Whilst the implication of Ca(2+) in plant responses during arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) interactions is well documented, nothing is known about the regulation or role of this secondary messenger in the fungal symbiont. The spatio-temporal expression pattern of putatively Ca(2+)-related genes of Glomus intraradices BEG141 encoding five proteins involved in membrane transport and one nuclear protein kinase, was investigated during the AM symbiosis. Expression profiles related to successful colonization of host roots were observed in interactions of G. intraradices with roots of wild-type Medicago truncatula (line J5) compared to the mycorrhiza-defective mutant dmi3/Mtsym13. Symbiotic fungal activity was monitored using stearoyl-CoA desaturase and phosphate transporter genes. Laser microdissection based-mapping of fungal gene expression in mycorrhizal root tissues indicated that the Ca(2+)-related genes were differentially upregulated in arbuscules and/or in intercellular hyphae. The spatio-temporal variations in gene expression suggest that the encoded proteins may have different functions in fungal development or function during symbiosis development. Full-length cDNA obtained for two genes with interesting expression profiles confirmed a close similarity with an endoplasmic reticulum P-type ATPase and a Vcx1-like vacuolar Ca(2+) ion transporter functionally characterized in other fungi and involved in the regulation of cell calcium pools. Possible mechanisms are discussed in which Ca(2+)-related proteins G. intraradices BEG141 may play a role in mobilization and perception of the intracellular messenger by the AM fungus during symbiotic interactions with host roots.

  14. Investigating a crow die-off in January-February 2011 during the introduction of a new clade of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 into Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Salah Uddin; Berman, Lashondra; Haider, Najmul; Gerloff, Nancy; Rahman, Md Z; Shu, Bo; Rahman, Mustafizur; Dey, Tapan Kumar; Davis, Todd C; Das, Bidhan Chandra; Balish, Amanda; Islam, Ausraful; Teifke, Jens P; Zeidner, Nord; Lindstrom, Steven; Klimov, Alexander; Donis, Ruben O; Luby, Stephen P; Shivaprasad, H L; Mikolon, Andrea B

    2014-03-01

    We investigated unusual crow mortality in Bangladesh during January-February 2011 at two sites. Crows of two species, Corvus splendens and C. macrorhynchos, were found sick and dead during the outbreaks. In selected crow roosts, morbidity was ~1 % and mortality was ~4 % during the investigation. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 clade 2.3.2.1 was isolated from dead crows. All isolates were closely related to A/duck/India/02CA10/2011 (H5N1) with 99.8 % and A/crow/Bangladesh/11rs1984-15/2011 (H5N1) virus with 99 % nucleotide sequence identity in their HA genes. The phylogenetic cluster of Bangladesh viruses suggested a common ancestor with viruses found in poultry from India, Myanmar and Nepal. Histopathological changes and immunohistochemistry staining in brain, pancreas, liver, heart, kidney, bursa of Fabricius, rectum, and cloaca were consistent with influenza virus infection. Through our limited investigation in domesticated birds near the crow roosts, we did not identify any samples that tested positive for influenza virus A/H5N1. However, environmental samples collected from live-bird markets near an outbreak site during the month of the outbreaks tested very weakly positive for influenza virus A/H5N1 in clade 2.3.2.1-specific rRT-PCR. Continuation of surveillance in wild and domestic birds may identify evolution of new avian influenza virus and associated public-health risks.

  15. Triazole induced concentration-related gene signatures in rat whole embryo culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, J.F.; Tonk, E.C.M.; Verhoef, A.; Piersma, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Commonly used as antifungal agents in agriculture and medicine, triazoles have been shown to cause teratogenicity in a diverse set of animal models. Here, we evaluated the dose-dependent impacts of flusilazole, cyproconazole and triadimefon, on global gene expression in relation to effects on embryo

  16. Statistical applications in nutrigenomics : analyzing multiple genes and proteins in relation to complex diseases in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidema, A.G.

    2008-01-01

    Background The recent advances in technology provide the possibility to obtain large genomic datasets that contain information on large numbers of variables, while the sample sizes are moderate to small. This has lead to statistical challenges in the analysis of multiple genes and proteins in relat

  17. Effect of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist telcagepant in human cranial arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Edvinsson (Lars); K.Y. Chan (Kayi); S. Eftekhari; E. Nilsson (Elisabeth); R. de Vries (René); H. Säveland (Hans); C.M.F. Dirven (Clemens); A.H.J. Danser (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuronal messenger in intracranial sensory nerves and is considered to play a significant role in migraine pathophysiology. Materials and methods: We investigated the effect of the CGRP receptor antagonist, telcagepant, on CGRP-in

  18. Clopidogrel metabolism related gene polymorphisms in Chinese patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯广迅

    2013-01-01

    Objective To detect the single nucleotide polymorphisms of clopidogrel metabolism related genes(CYP2C19,ABCB1 and PON1) in Chinese patients with acute coronary syndrome(ACS) by genotype analysis. Methods Genetic analysis was performed in patients admitted to

  19. Induction of wheat defense related genes in response to Puccinia striiformis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most important diseases of wheat worldwide. To isolate defense-related genes against the pathogen, a suppression subtractive hybridization library was constructed for an incompatible interaction. From the library, 652 se...

  20. Extensive expression of craniofacial related homeobox genes in canine mammary sarcomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensman, H.; Goransson, H.; Leuchowius, K.J.; Stromberg, S.; Ponten, F.; Isaksson, A.; Rutteman, G.R.; Heldin, N.; Pejler, G.; Hellmen, E.

    2009-01-01

    Extensive expression of craniofacial related homeobox genes in canine mammary sarcomas Journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment Publisher Springer Netherlands ISSN 0167-6806 (Print) 1573-7217 (Online) Issue Volume 118, Number 2 / November, 2009 Category Preclinical Study DOI 10.1007/s10549-008-0

  1. Novel expression patterns of carotenoid pathway-related gene in citrus leaves and maturing fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are abundant in citrus fruits and vary among cultivars and species. In the present study, HPLC and real-time PCR were used to investigate the expression patterns of 23 carotenoid biosynthesis gene family members and their possible relation with carotenoid accumulation in flavedo, juice s...

  2. Calcitonin gene-related peptide does not cause migraine attacks in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob M; Thomsen, Lise L; Olesen, Jes

    2011-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key molecule in migraine pathogenesis. Intravenous CGRP triggers migraine-like attacks in patients with migraine with aura and without aura. In contrast, patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) with known mutations did not report more migraine-...

  3. The Australasian frog family Ceratobatrachidae in China, Myanmar and Thailand: discovery of a new Himalayan forest frog clade

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAN, Fang; JIANG, Ke; WANG, Kai; JIN, Jie-Qiong; SUWANNAPOOM, Chatmongkon; LI, Cheng; Jens, V. VINDUM; Rafe, M. BROWN; CHE, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to study the systematic affinities and specieslevel phylogenetic relationships of the enigmatic anurans variably assigned to the genera Ingerana or Limnonectes (family Dicroglossidae), we collected new molecular sequence data for five species including four Himalayan taxa, Limnonectes xizangensis, Lim. medogensis, Lim. alpine, Ingerana borealis and one southeast Asian species, I. tasanae, and analyzed these together with data from previous studies involving other ostensibly related taxa. Our surprising results demonstrate unequivocally that Lim. xizangensis, Lim. medogensis and Lim. alpine form a strongly supported clade, the sister-group of the family Australasian forest frog family Ceratobatrachidae. This discovery requires an expansion of the definition of Ceratobatrachidae and represents the first record of this family in China. These three species are distinguished from the species of Ingerana and Limnonectes by the: (1) absence of interdigital webbing of the foot, (2) absence of terminal discs on fingers and toes, (3) absence of circumarginal grooves on the fingers and toes, and (4) absence of tarsal folds. Given their phylogenetic and morphological distinctiveness, we assign them to the oldest available generic name for this clade, Liurana Dubois 1987, and transfer Liurana from Dicroglossidae to the family Ceratobatrachidae. In contrast, Ingerana tasanae was found to be clustered with strong support with the recently described genus Alcalus (Ceratobatrachidae), a small clade of otherwise Sundaic species; this constitutes a new record of the family Ceratobatrachidae for Myanmar and Thailand. Finally, Ingerana borealis clustered with the "true" Ingerana (family Dicroglossidae), for which the type species is I. tenasserimensis. PMID:26828029

  4. Host-species transferrin receptor 1 orthologs are cellular receptors for nonpathogenic new world clade B arenaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Abraham

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a New World (NW clade B arenavirus to enter cells using human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1 strictly correlates with its ability to cause hemorrhagic fever. Amapari (AMAV and Tacaribe (TCRV, two nonpathogenic NW clade B arenaviruses that do not use human TfR1, are closely related to the NW arenaviruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers. Here we show that pseudotyped viruses bearing the surface glycoprotein (GP of AMAV or TCRV can infect cells using the TfR1 orthologs of several mammalian species, including those of their respective natural hosts, the small rodent Neacomys spinosus and the fruit bat Artibeus jamaicensis. Mutation of one residue in human TfR1 makes it a functional receptor for TCRV, and mutation of four residues makes it a functional receptor for AMAV. Our data support an in vivo role for TfR1 in the replication of most, if not all, NW clade B arenaviruses, and suggest that with modest changes in their GPs the nonpathogenic arenaviruses could use human TfR1 and emerge as human pathogens.

  5. Design and implementation of degenerate microsatellite primers for the mammalian clade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Buschiazzo

    Full Text Available Microsatellites are popular genetic markers in molecular ecology, genetic mapping and forensics. Unfortunately, despite recent advances, the isolation of de novo polymorphic microsatellite loci often requires expensive and intensive groundwork. Primers developed for a focal species are commonly tested in a related, non-focal species of interest for the amplification of orthologous polymorphic loci; when successful, this approach significantly reduces cost and time of microsatellite development. However, transferability of polymorphic microsatellite loci decreases rapidly with increasing evolutionary distance, and this approach has shown its limits. Whole genome sequences represent an under-exploited resource to develop cross-species primers for microsatellites. Here we describe a three-step method that combines a novel in silico pipeline that we use to (1 identify conserved microsatellite loci from a multiple genome alignments, (2 design degenerate primer pairs, with (3 a simple PCR protocol used to implement these primers across species. Using this approach we developed a set of primers for the mammalian clade. We found 126,306 human microsatellites conserved in mammalian aligned sequences, and isolated 5,596 loci using criteria based on wide conservation. From a random subset of ~1000 dinucleotide repeats, we designed degenerate primer pairs for 19 loci, of which five produced polymorphic fragments in up to 18 mammalian species, including the distinctly related marsupials and monotremes, groups that diverged from other mammals 120-160 million years ago. Using our method, many more cross-clade microsatellite loci can be harvested from the currently available genomic data, and this ability is set to improve exponentially as further genomes are sequenced.

  6. Bayesian inference towards the resolution of molecular evolution:application to the "Trichoderma harzianum sensu lato" clade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Druzhinina I S; Kubicek C P

    2004-01-01

    @@ The Hypocrea lixii/Trichoderma harzianum species aggregate contains a group of taxa (H. lixii/T.harzianum , T. aggressivum , T. tomentosum , T. cerinum , T. velutinum , H. tawa ) of which some (e. g. T. harzianum) are important for biocontrol of plant pathogenic fungi in agriculture, whereas others are aggressive pathogens of Agaricus spp. and Pleurotus spp. in mushroom farms (T. aggressivum), or opportunistic pathogens of immunocompromised mammals including humans (T. harzianum). We characterized the evolutionary properties of three genomic regions in Hypocrea/Trichoderma: the internal transcribed spacer regions ITS1 and 2 of rDNA, the large intron of translation elongation factor 1-alpha (tef1a), and a portion of the large exon of the endochitinase 42 gene (ech42 ), selected the best model which describes the evolution of every fragment, tested the molecular clock hypothesis and made an estimation of the usability of the combined three fragments data matrix for the phylogenetic analysis of the genus as a whole as well as on the level of the holomorphic H. liaxii/T. harzianum species clade and separate clonal lineages. To this end, we applied Bayesian phylogenetic inferences to 124 sequences of ITS1 and 2 and of the large tef1a intron, and to 64 ech42 gene sequences to resolve the evolution of H. lixii/T. harzianum with respect to the position of other taxa with closely related phenotypes. The resulting phylogram clearly identified T.aggressivum, T. velutinum, H. tawa, T. cerinum and T. tomentosum as phylogenetic species, and in addition identified three new unknown phylogenetic species as members of this clacle. The clear distinction between T. tomentosum and T. cerinum was not recognized in all trees, but was supported by multivariate analysis of phenotype micro arrays. In contrast, H. lixii/T. harzianum did not form a single phylogenetic species in this study, as its monophyly was not supported in any analysis. Strains morphologically identified as H. lixii

  7. The tumor suppressor Rb and its related Rbl2 genes are regulated by Utx histone demethylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashima, Minoru; Ishimura, Akihiko; Yoshida, Masakazu [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan); Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Takeshi, E-mail: suzuki-t@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Utx increases expression of Rb and Rbl2 genes through its demethylase activity. {yields} Utx changes histone H3 methylation on the Rb and Rbl2 promoters. {yields} Utx induces decreased cell proliferation of mammalian primary cells. -- Abstract: Utx is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that encodes histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase. In this study, we found that ectopic expression of Utx enhanced the expression of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene Rb and its related gene Rbl2. This activation was dependent on the demethylase activity of Utx, and was suggested to contribute to the decreased cell proliferation induced by Utx. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that over-expressed Utx was associated with the promoter regions of Rb and Rbl2 resulting in the removal of repressive H3K27 tri-methylation and the increase in active H3K4 tri-methylation. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Utx revealed the recruitment of endogenous Utx protein on the promoters of Rb and Rbl2 genes. These results indicate that Rb and Rbl2 are downstream target genes of Utx and may play important roles in Utx-mediated cell growth control.

  8. Differential display of vincristine-resistance-related genes in gastric cancer SGC7901 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Wang; Bo-Rong Pan; Jian-Ping Jin; Dai-Ming Fan; Mei Lan; Yong-Quan Shi; Ju Lu; Yue-Xia Zhong; Han-Ping Wu; Hui-Hong Zai; Jie Ding; Kai-Cun Wu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To isolate and clone the vincristine-resistine-relatedgenes in gastric cancer SGC7901 cell line and to clarify themultidrug-resistant molecular mechanism of gastric cancercells.METHODS: The modified differential-display polymerasechain reaction (DD-PCR) was used to examine thedifferences in the mRNA composition of Vincristine-resistantgastric cancer SGC 7901 cells (SGC7901/VCR), induced byvincristine sulfate versus SGC7901cells. The differentiallyexpressed cDNA fragments were confirmed byreverseNorthern analysis, sequencing, BLAST analysis andNorthern bolt analysis.RESULTS: DD-PCR identified that 54 cDNA fragments werepreferentially expressed in SGC 7901/VCR cells. When thesecDNA fragments were analyzed by reverseNorthern blot, 20were reproducibly expressed at a high level in SGC7901/VCR. Sequencing and BLAST analysis revealed that sevenof the genes were known genes: ADP-ribosylation factor 4,cytochrorne oxidase subunit Ⅱ, Ss-A/Ro ribonucleoprteinautoantigen 60kd subunit, ribosomal protein S13, galaectin-8 gene, oligophrenin 1 mRNA, and ribosomal protein L23mRNA; and thirteen of the genes were unknown genes. Thelength and abundance of the four unknown genes mRNAwere further confirmed by Northern blot analysis.CONCLUSION: The twenty differential known and unknowngenes may be related to the vincristine-resistant mechanismin human gastric cancer SGC7901 cell line.

  9. Clinal variation at phenology-related genes in spruce: parallel evolution in FTL2 and Gigantea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Tsuda, Yoshiaki; Stocks, Michael; Källman, Thomas; Xu, Nannan; Kärkkäinen, Katri; Huotari, Tea; Semerikov, Vladimir L; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Lascoux, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Parallel clines in different species, or in different geographical regions of the same species, are an important source of information on the genetic basis of local adaptation. We recently detected latitudinal clines in SNPs frequencies and gene expression of candidate genes for growth cessation in Scandinavian populations of Norway spruce (Picea abies). Here we test whether the same clines are also present in Siberian spruce (P. obovata), a close relative of Norway spruce with a different Quaternary history. We sequenced nine candidate genes and 27 control loci and genotyped 14 SSR loci in six populations of P. obovata located along the Yenisei river from latitude 56°N to latitude 67°N. In contrast to Scandinavian Norway spruce that both departs from the standard neutral model (SNM) and shows a clear population structure, Siberian spruce populations along the Yenisei do not depart from the SNM and are genetically unstructured. Nonetheless, as in Norway spruce, growth cessation is significantly clinal. Polymorphisms in photoperiodic (FTL2) and circadian clock (Gigantea, GI, PRR3) genes also show significant clinal variation and/or evidence of local selection. In GI, one of the variants is the same as in Norway spruce. Finally, a strong cline in gene expression is observed for FTL2, but not for GI. These results, together with recent physiological studies, confirm the key role played by FTL2 and circadian clock genes in the control of growth cessation in spruce species and suggest the presence of parallel adaptation in these two species.

  10. A pathway-based network analysis of hypertension-related genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Hu, Jing-Bo; Xu, Chuan-Yun; Zhang, De-Hai; Yan, Qian; Xu, Ming; Cao, Ke-Fei; Zhang, Xu-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Complex network approach has become an effective way to describe interrelationships among large amounts of biological data, which is especially useful in finding core functions and global behavior of biological systems. Hypertension is a complex disease caused by many reasons including genetic, physiological, psychological and even social factors. In this paper, based on the information of biological pathways, we construct a network model of hypertension-related genes of the salt-sensitive rat to explore the interrelationship between genes. Statistical and topological characteristics show that the network has the small-world but not scale-free property, and exhibits a modular structure, revealing compact and complex connections among these genes. By the threshold of integrated centrality larger than 0.71, seven key hub genes are found: Jun, Rps6kb1, Cycs, Creb312, Cdk4, Actg1 and RT1-Da. These genes should play an important role in hypertension, suggesting that the treatment of hypertension should focus on the combination of drugs on multiple genes.

  11. General and Specific Genetic Polymorphism of Cytokines-Related Gene in AITD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhou, Mei; Bei, He; Huilong, Li; Xin, Wang; Rui, Hu; Lu, Li

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) shows the highest incidence among organ-specific autoimmune diseases and is the most common thyroid disease in humans, including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). The susceptibility to autoimmune diseases is affected by increased autoantibody levels, susceptibility gene polymorphisms, environmental factors, and psychological factors, but the pathogenesis remains unclear. Various cytokines and related genes encoding them play important roles in the development and progression of AITD. CD152, an expression product of the CTLA-4 gene, downregulates T cell activation. The A/A genotype polymorphism in the CT60 locus may reduce the production of thyroid autoantibodies. The C1858T polymorphism of the PTNP22 gene reduces the expression of its encoded LYP, which increases the risk of GD and HT. GD is an organ-specific autoimmune disease involving increased secretion of thyroid hormone, whereas HT may be associated with the destruction of thyroid gland tissue and hypothyroidism. These two diseases exhibit similar pathogenesis but opposite trends in the clinical manifestations. In this review, we focus on the structure and function of these cytokines and related genes in AITD, as well as the association of polymorphisms with susceptibility to GD and HT, and attempt to describe their differences in pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. PMID:28133421

  12. DNA repair gene polymorphisms in relation to chromosome aberration frequencies in retired radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilding, Craig S. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: craig.wilding@westlakes.ac.uk; Relton, Caroline L. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom); Paediatric and Lifecourse Epidemiology Research Group, School of Clinical Medical Sciences (Child Health), Newcastle University, Sir James Spence Institute, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE1 4LP (United Kingdom); Rees, Gwen S. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom); Tarone, Robert E. [International Epidemiology Institute, 1455 Research Boulevard, Suite 550, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Whitehouse, Caroline A. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom); Tawn, E. Janet [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-15

    Polymorphic variation in DNA repair genes was examined in a group of retired workers from the British Nuclear Fuels plc facility at Sellafield in relation to previously determined translocation frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Variation at seven polymorphisms in four genes involved in the base excision repair (XRCC1 R194W, R399Q and a [AC]{sub n} microsatellite in the 3' UTR) and double strand break repair (XRCC3 T241M and a [AC]{sub n} microsatellite in intron 3 of XRCC3, XRCC4 I134T, and a GACTAn microsatellite located 120kb 5' of XRCC5) pathways was determined for 291 retired radiation workers who had received cumulative occupational external radiation doses of between 0 and 1873mSv. When the interaction between radiation dose and each DNA repair gene polymorphism was examined in relation to translocation frequency there was no evidence for any of the polymorphisms studied influencing the response to occupational exposure. A positive interaction observed between genotype (individuals with at least one allele >=20 repeat units) at a microsatellite locus in the XRCC3 gene and smoking status should be interpreted cautiously because interactions were investigated for seven polymorphisms and two exposures. Nonetheless, further research is warranted to examine whether this DNA repair gene variant might be associated with a sub-optimal repair response to smoking-induced DNA damage and hence an increased frequency of translocations.

  13. Splicing-related genes are alternatively spliced upon changes in ambient temperatures in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Johan; Lammers, Michiel; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; Bonnema, Guusje; Rodenburg, Nicole; Proveniers, Marcel C. G.; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2017-01-01

    Plants adjust their development and architecture to small variations in ambient temperature. In a time in which temperatures are rising world-wide, the mechanism by which plants are able to sense temperature fluctuations and adapt to it, is becoming of special interest. By performing RNA-sequencing on two Arabidopsis accession and one Brassica species exposed to temperature alterations, we showed that alternative splicing is an important mechanism in ambient temperature sensing and adaptation. We found that amongst the differentially alternatively spliced genes, splicing related genes are enriched, suggesting that the splicing machinery itself is targeted for alternative splicing when temperature changes. Moreover, we showed that many different components of the splicing machinery are targeted for ambient temperature regulated alternative splicing. Mutant analysis of a splicing related gene that was differentially spliced in two of the genotypes showed an altered flowering time response to different temperatures. We propose a two-step mechanism where temperature directly influences alternative splicing of the splicing machinery genes, followed by a second step where the altered splicing machinery affects splicing of downstream genes involved in the adaptation to altered temperatures. PMID:28257507

  14. Nucleotide diversity patterns of local adaptation at drought-related candidate genes in wild tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hui; Camus-Kulandaivelu, Létizia; Stephan, Wolfgang; Tellier, Aurélien; Zhang, Zhenwen

    2010-10-01

    We surveyed nucleotide diversity at two candidate genes LeNCED1 and pLC30-15, involved in an ABA (abscisic acid) signalling pathway, in two closely related tomato species Solanum peruvianum and Solanum chilense. Our six population samples (three for each species) cover a range of mesic to very dry habitats. The ABA pathway plays an important role in the plants' response to drought stress. LeNCED1 is an upstream gene involved in ABA biosynthesis, and pLC30-15 is a dehydrin gene positioned downstream in the pathway. The two genes show very different patterns of nucleotide variation. LeNCED1 exhibits very low nucleotide diversity relative to the eight neutral reference loci that were previously surveyed in these populations. This suggests that strong purifying selection has been acting on this gene. In contrast, pLC30-15 exhibits higher levels of nucleotide diversity and, in particular in S. chilense, higher genetic differentiation between populations than the reference loci, which is indicative of local adaptation. In the more drought-tolerant species S. chilense, one population (from Quicacha) shows a significant haplotype structure, which appears to be the result of positive (diversifying) selection.

  15. General and Specific Genetic Polymorphism of Cytokines-Related Gene in AITD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaoheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD shows the highest incidence among organ-specific autoimmune diseases and is the most common thyroid disease in humans, including Graves’ disease (GD and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT. The susceptibility to autoimmune diseases is affected by increased autoantibody levels, susceptibility gene polymorphisms, environmental factors, and psychological factors, but the pathogenesis remains unclear. Various cytokines and related genes encoding them play important roles in the development and progression of AITD. CD152, an expression product of the CTLA-4 gene, downregulates T cell activation. The A/A genotype polymorphism in the CT60 locus may reduce the production of thyroid autoantibodies. The C1858T polymorphism of the PTNP22 gene reduces the expression of its encoded LYP, which increases the risk of GD and HT. GD is an organ-specific autoimmune disease involving increased secretion of thyroid hormone, whereas HT may be associated with the destruction of thyroid gland tissue and hypothyroidism. These two diseases exhibit similar pathogenesis but opposite trends in the clinical manifestations. In this review, we focus on the structure and function of these cytokines and related genes in AITD, as well as the association of polymorphisms with susceptibility to GD and HT, and attempt to describe their differences in pathogenesis and clinical manifestations.

  16. Fast neurotransmission related genes are expressed in non nervous endoderm in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matan Oren

    Full Text Available Cnidarian nervous systems utilize chemical transmission to transfer signals through synapses and neurons. To date, ample evidence has been accumulated for the participation of neuropeptides, primarily RFamides, in neurotransmission. Yet, it is still not clear if this is the case for the classical fast neurotransmitters such as GABA, Glutamate, Acetylcholine and Monoamines. A large repertoire of cnidarian Fast Neurotransmitter related Genes (FNGs has been recently identified in the genome of the sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis. In order to test whether FNGs are localized in cnidarian neurons, we characterized the expression patterns of eight Nematostella genes that are closely or distantly related to human central and peripheral nervous systems genes, in adult Nematostella and compared them to the RFamide localization. Our results show common expression patterns for all tested genes, in a single endodermal cell layer. These expressions did not correspond with the RFamide expressing nerve cell network. Following these results we suggest that the tested Nematostella genes may not be directly involved in vertebrate-like fast neurotransmission.

  17. Efficient Inactivation of Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation Related Genes in Lotus japonicus Using CRISPR-Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Longxiang; Wang, Longlong; Tan, Qian; Fan, Qiuling; Zhu, Hui; Hong, Zonglie; Zhang, Zhongming; Duanmu, Deqiang

    2016-01-01

    The targeted genome editing technique, CRISPR/Cas9 system, has been widely used to modify genes of interest in a predictable and precise manner. In this study, we describe the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated efficient editing of representative SNF (symbiotic nitrogen fixation) related genes in the model legume Lotus japonicus via Agrobacterium-mediated stable or hairy root transformation. We first predicted nine endogenous U6 genes in Lotus and then demonstrated the efficacy of the LjU6-1 gene promoter in driving expression of single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) by using a split yellow fluorescence protein (YFP) reporter system to restore the fluorescence in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Next, we chose a customized sgRNA targeting SYMRK (symbiosis receptor-like kinase) loci and achieved ~35% mutagenic efficiency in 20 T0 transgenic plants, two of them containing biallelic homozygous mutations with a 2-bp deletion near the PAM region. We further designed two sgRNAs targeting three homologous leghemoglobin loci (LjLb1, LjLb2, LjLb3) for testing the possibility of generating multi-gene knockouts. 20 out of 70 hairy root transgenic plants exhibited white nodules, with at least two LjLbs disrupted in each plant. Compared with the constitutively active CaMV 35S promoter, the nodule-specific LjLb2 promoter was also effective in gene editing in nodules by hairy root transformation. Triple mutant knockout of LjLbs was also obtained by stable transformation using two sgRNAs. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system should greatly facilitate functional analyses of SNF related genes in Lotus japonicus. PMID:27630657

  18. Efficient inactivation of symbiotic nitrogen fixation related genes in Lotus japonicus using CRISPR-Cas9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longxiang Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The targeted genome editing technique, CRISPR/Cas9 system, has been widely used to modify genes of interest in a predictable and precise manner. In this study, we describe the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated efficient editing of representative SNF (symbiotic nitrogen fixation related genes in the model legume Lotus japonicus via Agrobacterium-mediated stable or hairy root transformation. We first predicted nine endogenous U6 genes in Lotus and then demonstrated the efficacy of the LjU6-1 gene promoter in driving expression of single guide RNAs (sgRNAs by using a split yellow fluorescence protein (YFP reporter system to restore the fluorescence in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Next, we chose a customized sgRNA targeting SYMRK (symbiosis receptor kinase loci and achieved ~35% mutagenic efficiency in 20 T0 transgenic plants, two of them containing biallelic homozygous mutations with a 2-bp deletion near the PAM region. We further designed two sgRNAs targeting three homologous leghemoglobin loci (LjLb1, LjLb2, LjLb3 for testing the possibility of generating multi-gene knockouts. 20 out of 70 hairy root transgenic plants exhibited white nodules, with at least two LjLbs disrupted in each plant. Compared with the constitutively active CaMV 35S promoter, the nodule-specific LjLb2 promoter was also effective in gene editing in nodules by hairy root transformation. Triple mutant knockout of LjLbs was also obtained by stable transformation using two sgRNAs. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system should greatly facilitate functional analyses of SNF related genes in Lotus japonicus.

  19. Systematic cloning and analysis of autophagy-related genes from the silkworm Bombyx mori

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    Cao Yang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Through the whole life of eukaryotes, autophagy plays an important role in various biological events including development, differentiation and determination of lifespan. A full set of genes and their encoded proteins of this evolutionarily conserved pathway have been identified in many eukaryotic organisms from yeast to mammals. However, this pathway in the insect model organism, the silkworm Bombyx mori, remains poorly investigated. Results Based on the autophagy pathway in several model organisms and a series of bioinformatic analyses, we have found more than 20 autophagy-related genes from the current database of the silkworm Bombyx mori. These genes could be further classified into the signal transduction pathway and two ubiquitin-like pathways. Using the mRNA extracted from the silkgland, we cloned the full length cDNA fragments of some key genes via reverse transcription PCR and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE. In addition, we found that the transcription levels of two indicator genes BmATG8 and BmATG12 in the silkgland tend to be increased from 1st to 8th day of the fifth instar larvae. Conclusion Bioinformatics in combination with RT-PCR enable us to remodel a preliminary pathway of autophagy in the silkworm. Amplification and cloning of most autophagy-related genes from the silkgland indicated autophagy is indeed an activated process. Furthermore, the time-course transcriptional profiles of BmATG8 and BmATG12 revealed that both genes are up-regulated along the maturation of the silkgland during the fifth instar. These findings suggest that the autophagy should play an important role in Bombyx mori silkgland.

  20. [Progress in genes related to seed-coat color in soybean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jian; Guo, Yong; Yu, Li-Jie; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2012-06-01

    Seed-coat color has changed from black to yellow during natural and artificial selection of cultivated soybean from wild soybean, and it is also an important morphological marker. Therefore, discovering genes related to the soybean seed-coat color will play a very important role in breeding and evolutionary study. Different seed-coat colors caused by deposition of various anthocyanin pigments. Although pigmentation has been well dissected at molecular level in several plant species, the genes controlling natural variation of seed-coat color in soybean remain to be unknown. Genes related to seed-coat color in soybean were discussed in this paper, including 5 genetic loci (I, T, W1, R and O). Locus I is located in a region that riches in chalcone synthase (CHS) genes on chromosome 8. Gene CHS is a multi-gene family with highly conserved sequences in soybean. Locus T located on chromosome 6 has been cloned and verified, which encodes a flavon-oid-3'-hydroxylase. Mutant of F3'H can not interact with the heme-binding domain due to lack of conservative domain GGEK caused by a nucleotide deletion in the coding region of F3'H. Locus R is located between A668-1 and K387-1 on chromosome 9 (linkage group K). This locus may encode a R2R3 MYB transcription factor or a UDP flavonoid 3-O glyco-syltransferase. Locus O is located between Satt207 and Satt493 on chromosome 8 (linkage group A2) and its molecular characteristics has not been characterized. Locus W1 may be a homology of F3'5'H gene.

  1. Genes related to antioxidant metabolism are involved in Methylobacterium mesophilicum-soybean interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Welington Luiz; Santos, Daiene Souza; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Salgueiro-Londoño, Jennifer Katherine; Camargo-Neves, Aline Aparecida; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega

    2015-10-01

    The genus Methylobacterium is composed of pink-pigmented methylotrophic bacterial species that are widespread in natural environments, such as soils, stream water and plants. When in association with plants, this genus colonizes the host plant epiphytically and/or endophytically. This association is known to promote plant growth, induce plant systemic resistance and inhibit plant infection by phytopathogens. In the present study, we focused on evaluating the colonization of soybean seedling-roots by Methylobacterium mesophilicum strain SR1.6/6. We focused on the identification of the key genes involved in the initial step of soybean colonization by methylotrophic bacteria, which includes the plant exudate recognition and adaptation by planktonic bacteria. Visualization by scanning electron microscopy revealed that M. mesophilicum SR1.6/6 colonizes soybean roots surface effectively at 48 h after inoculation, suggesting a mechanism for root recognition and adaptation before this period. The colonization proceeds by the development of a mature biofilm on roots at 96 h after inoculation. Transcriptomic analysis of the planktonic bacteria (with plant) revealed the expression of several genes involved in membrane transport, thus confirming an initial metabolic activation of bacterial responses when in the presence of plant root exudates. Moreover, antioxidant genes were mostly expressed during the interaction with the plant exudates. Further evaluation of stress- and methylotrophic-related genes expression by qPCR showed that glutathione peroxidase and glutathione synthetase genes were up-regulated during the Methylobacterium-soybean interaction. These findings support that glutathione (GSH) is potentially a key molecule involved in cellular detoxification during plant root colonization. In addition to methylotrophic metabolism, antioxidant genes, mainly glutathione-related genes, play a key role during soybean exudate recognition and adaptation, the first step in

  2. Genome size increases in recently diverged hornwort clades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainard, Jillian D; Villarreal, Juan Carlos

    2013-08-01

    As our knowledge of plant genome size estimates continues to grow, one group has continually been neglected: the hornworts. Hornworts (Anthocerotophyta) have been traditionally grouped with liverworts and mosses because they share a haploid dominant life cycle; however, recent molecular studies place hornworts as the sister lineage to extant tracheophytes. Given the scarcity of information regarding the DNA content of hornworts, our objective was to estimate the 1C-value for a range of hornwort species within a phylogenetic context. Using flow cytometry, we estimated genome size for 36 samples representing 24 species. This accounts for roughly 10% of known hornwort species. Haploid genome sizes (1C-value) ranged from 160 Mbp or 0.16 pg (Leiosporoceros dussii) to 719 Mbp or 0.73 pg (Nothoceros endiviifolius). The average 1C-value was 261 ± 104 Mbp (0.27 ± 0.11 pg). Ancestral reconstruction of genome size on a hornwort phylogeny suggests a small ancestral genome size and revealed increases in genome size in the most recently divergent clades. Much more work is needed to understand DNA content variation in this phylogenetically important group, but this work has significantly increased our knowledge of genome size variation in hornworts.

  3. A framework phylogeny of the American oak clade based on sequenced RAD data.

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    Andrew L Hipp

    Full Text Available Previous phylogenetic studies in oaks (Quercus, Fagaceae have failed to resolve the backbone topology of the genus with strong support. Here, we utilize next-generation sequencing of restriction-site associated DNA (RAD-Seq to resolve a framework phylogeny of a predominantly American clade of oaks whose crown age is estimated at 23-33 million years old. Using a recently developed analytical pipeline for RAD-Seq phylogenetics, we created a concatenated matrix of 1.40 E06 aligned nucleotides, constituting 27,727 sequence clusters. RAD-Seq data were readily combined across runs, with no difference in phylogenetic placement between technical replicates, which overlapped by only 43-64% in locus coverage. 17% (4,715 of the loci we analyzed could be mapped with high confidence to one or more expressed sequence tags in NCBI Genbank. A concatenated matrix of the loci that BLAST to at least one EST sequence provides approximately half as many variable or parsimony-informative characters as equal-sized datasets from the non-EST loci. The EST-associated matrix is more complete (fewer missing loci and has slightly lower homoplasy than non-EST subsampled matrices of the same size, but there is no difference in phylogenetic support or relative attribution of base substitutions to internal versus terminal branches of the phylogeny. We introduce a partitioned RAD visualization method (implemented in the R package RADami; http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/RADami to investigate the possibility that suboptimal topologies supported by large numbers of loci--due, for example, to reticulate evolution or lineage sorting--are masked by the globally optimal tree. We find no evidence for strongly-supported alternative topologies in our study, suggesting that the phylogeny we recover is a robust estimate of large-scale phylogenetic patterns in the American oak clade. Our study is one of the first to demonstrate the utility of RAD-Seq data for inferring phylogeny in a

  4. A framework phylogeny of the American oak clade based on sequenced RAD data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Andrew L; Eaton, Deren A R; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine; Fitzek, Elisabeth; Nipper, Rick; Manos, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    Previous phylogenetic studies in oaks (Quercus, Fagaceae) have failed to resolve the backbone topology of the genus with strong support. Here, we utilize next-generation sequencing of restriction-site associated DNA (RAD-Seq) to resolve a framework phylogeny of a predominantly American clade of oaks whose crown age is estimated at 23-33 million years old. Using a recently developed analytical pipeline for RAD-Seq phylogenetics, we created a concatenated matrix of 1.40 E06 aligned nucleotides, constituting 27,727 sequence clusters. RAD-Seq data were readily combined across runs, with no difference in phylogenetic placement between technical replicates, which overlapped by only 43-64% in locus coverage. 17% (4,715) of the loci we analyzed could be mapped with high confidence to one or more expressed sequence tags in NCBI Genbank. A concatenated matrix of the loci that BLAST to at least one EST sequence provides approximately half as many variable or parsimony-informative characters as equal-sized datasets from the non-EST loci. The EST-associated matrix is more complete (fewer missing loci) and has slightly lower homoplasy than non-EST subsampled matrices of the same size, but there is no difference in phylogenetic support or relative attribution of base substitutions to internal versus terminal branches of the phylogeny. We introduce a partitioned RAD visualization method (implemented in the R package RADami; http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/RADami) to investigate the possibility that suboptimal topologies supported by large numbers of loci--due, for example, to reticulate evolution or lineage sorting--are masked by the globally optimal tree. We find no evidence for strongly-supported alternative topologies in our study, suggesting that the phylogeny we recover is a robust estimate of large-scale phylogenetic patterns in the American oak clade. Our study is one of the first to demonstrate the utility of RAD-Seq data for inferring phylogeny in a 23-33 million

  5. The expansion of Phytophthora clade 8b: three new species associated with winter grown vegetable crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertier, L.; Brouwer, H.; Cock, de A.W.A.M.; Cooke, D.E.L.; Olsson, C.H.B.; Höfte, M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite its association with important agricultural crops, Phytophthora clade 8b is a poorly studied group of species. The clade currently consists of three officially described species (Phytophthora porri, P. brassicae and P. primulae) that are host-specific pathogens of leek, cabbages and Primula

  6. Diversity of Archaea in Icelandic hot springs based on 16S rRNA and chaperonin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirete, Salvador; de Figueras, Carolina G; González-Pastor, Jose E

    2011-07-01

    The diversity of archaeal communities growing in four hot springs (65-90 °C, pH 6.5) was assessed with 16S rRNA gene primers specific for the domain Archaea. Overall, mainly uncultured members of the Desulfurococcales, the Thermoproteales and the Korarchaeota, were identified. Based on this diversity, a set of chaperonin heat-shock protein (Hsp60) gene sequences from different archaeal species were aligned to design two degenerate primer sets for the amplification of the chaperonin gene: Ths and Kor (which can also detect the korarchaeotal chaperonin gene from one of the samples). A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the chaperonin sequences retrieved and other sequences from cultured representatives. The Alpha and Beta paralogs of the chaperonin gene were observed within the main clades and orthologs among them. Cultivated representatives from these clades were assigned to either paralog in the chaperonin tree. Uncultured representatives observed in the 16S rRNA gene analysis were found to be related to the Desulfurococcales. The topologies of the 16S rRNA gene and chaperonin phylogenetic trees were compared, and similar phylogenetic relationships were observed. Our results suggest that the chaperonin Hsp60 gene may be used as a phylogenetic marker for the clades found in this extreme environment.

  7. QKI-7 regulates expression of interferon-related genes in human astrocyte glioma cells.

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    Lin Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human QKI gene, called quaking homolog, KH domain RNA binding (mouse, is a candidate gene for schizophrenia encoding an RNA-binding protein. This gene was shown to be essential for myelination in oligodendrocytes. QKI is also highly expressed in astrocytes, but its function in these cells is not known. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied the effect of small interference RNA (siRNA-mediated QKI depletion on global gene expression in human astrocyte glioma cells. Microarray measurements were confirmed with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. The presence of QKI binding sites (QRE was assessed by a bioinformatic approach. Viability and cell morphology were also studied. The most significant alteration after QKI silencing was the decreased expression of genes involved in interferon (IFN induction (P = 6.3E-10, including IFIT1, IFIT2, MX1, MX2, G1P2, G1P3, GBP1 and IFIH1. All eight genes were down-regulated after silencing of the splice variant QKI-7, but were not affected by QKI-5 silencing. Interestingly, four of them were up-regulated after treatment with the antipsychotic agent haloperidol that also resulted in increased QKI-7 mRNA levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The coordinated expression of QKI-7 splice variant and IFN-related genes supports the idea that this particular splice variant has specific functions in astrocytes. Furthermore, a role of QKI-7 as a regulator of an inflammatory gene pathway in astrocytes is suggested. This hypothesis is well in line with growing experimental evidence on the role of inflammatory components in schizophrenia.

  8. Identification and engineering of regulation-related genes toward improved kasugamycin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenchen; Kang, Qianjin; Bai, Linquan; Cheng, Lin; Deng, Zixin

    2016-02-01

    Kasugamycin, produced by Streptomyces kasugaensis and Streptomyces microaureus, is an important amino-glycoside family antibiotic and widely used for veterinary and agricultural applications. In the left flanking region of the previously reported kasugamycin gene cluster, four additional genes (two-component system kasW and kasX, MerR-family kasV, and isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase kasS) were identified both in the low-yielding S. kasugaensis BCRC12349 and high-yielding S. microaureus XM301. Deletion of regulatory gene kasT abolished kasugamycin production, and its overexpression in BCRC12349 resulted in an increased titer by 186 %. Deletion of kasW, kasX, kasV, and kasS improved kasugamycin production by 12, 19, 194, and 22 %, respectively. qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the transcription of kas genes was significantly increased in all the four mutants. Similar gene inactivation was performed in the high-yielding strain S. microaureus XM301. As expected, the deletion of kasW/X resulted in a 58 % increase of the yield from 6 to 9.5 g/L. However, the deletion of kasV and over-expression of kasT had no obvious effect, and the disruption of kasS surprisingly decreased kasugamycin production. In addition, trans-complementation of the kasS mutant with a TTA codon-mutated kasS increased the kasugamycin yield by 20 %. A much higher transcription of kas genes was detected in the high-yielding XM301 than in the low-yielding BCRC12349, which may partially account for the discrepancy of gene inactivation effects between them. Our work not only generated engineered strains with improved kasugamycin yield, but also pointed out that different strategies on manipulating regulatory-related genes should be considered for low-yielding or high-yielding strains.

  9. Identifying genes related to choriogenesis in insect panoistic ovaries by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellés Xavier

    2009-04-01

    most of the genes, functions related to choriogenesis are postulated. The relatively high percentage of novel genes obtained and the practical absence of chorion genes typical of meroistic ovaries suggest that mechanisms regulating chorion formation in panoistic ovaries are significantly different from those of meroistic ones.

  10. Cloning and analysis of the antagonistic related genes of Enterobacter cloacae B8

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xuping; ZHU Junli; YAO Xunping; HE Shicheng; HUANG Haining; CHEN Weiliang; LI Debao

    2004-01-01

    To understand the antagonistic mechanism of the broad spectrum antagonistic Enterobacter cloacae B8,Tn5 transposon-mediated mutagenesis is performed using suicide plasmid pZJ25. Two mutant strains that lost antagonistic character are isolated. Tagging with kanr gene on Tn5,an antagonistic related DNA fragment, the F fragment, right of the Tn5 insertion site is cloned in a plasmid named pTLF,from one of the mutant strains B8F. The 735 bp F fragment is then sequenced after subcloning. Genomic DNA of the original B8 strain is isolated, digested with Pst I and ligated to Pst I cassette. DNA fragments left and right of the F fragment are amplified from the Pst I cassette library using cassette primer and specific primers designed according to known sequence. 1106 bp sequence left of the F fragment and 664bp sequence right of the F fragment are finally obtained. Bioinformatics analysis shows that the contig assembled from the sequences of the cloned antagonistic related DNA fragments of B8 encodes three ORFs and is homogeneous to admM,admN and admO genes of Pantoea agglomerans andrimid biosynthetic gene cluster (AY192157). The ORF, named anrF gene which encodes a polyketide synthase, knocked out by Tn5 insertion, is a homology of admM and the insertion site of Tn5 is at 214 bp upstream of the stop codon. It is concluded that the anrF gene is a gene related to the antagonistic activity of E. cloacae B8, and speculated that the antagonistic substance produced by B8 is an andrimid.

  11. Comparative sequence analysis of nitrogen fixation-related genes in six legumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hyun eKim

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Legumes play an important role as food and forage crops in international agriculture especially in developing countries. Legumes have a unique biological process called nitrogen fixation (NF by which they convert atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. Although legume genomes have undergone polyploidization, duplication and divergence, NF-related genes, because of their essential functional role for legumes, might have remained conserved. To understand the relationship of divergence and evolutionary processes in legumes, this study analyzes orthologs and paralogs for selected 20 NF-related genes by using comparative genomic approaches in six legumes i.e. Medicago truncatula (Mt, Cicer arietinum, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan (Cc, Phaseolus vulgaris (Pv and Glycine max (Gm. Subsequently, sequence distances, numbers of synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (Ks and nonsynonymous substitutions per nonsynonymous site (Ka between orthologs and paralogs were calculated and compared across legumes. These analyses suggest the closest relationship between Gm and Cc and the farthest distance between Mt and Pv in 6 legumes. Ks proportional plots clearly showed ancient genome duplication in all legumes, whole genome duplication event in Gm and also speciation pattern in different legumes. This study also reported some interesting observations e.g. no peak at Ks 0.4 in Gm-Gm, location of two independent genes next to each other in Mt and low Ks values for outparalogs for three genes as compared to other 12 genes. In summary, this study underlines the importance of NF-related genes and provides important insights in genome organization and evolutionary aspects of six legume species analyzed.

  12. Intrahepatic expression of genes related to metabotropic receptors in chronic hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej Cie(s)la,; Maciej Ku(s)mider,; Agata Faron-Górecka; Marta Dziedzicka-Wasylewska; Monika Bociaga-Jasik; Danuta Owczarek; Irena Cie(c)ko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To screen for genes related to metabotropic receptors that might be involved in the development of chronic hepatitis.METHODS:Assessment of 20 genes associated with metabotropic receptors was performed in liver specimens obtained by punch biopsy from 12 patients with autoimmune and chronic hepatitis type B and C.For this purpose,a microarray with low integrity grade and with oligonucleotide DNA probes complementary to target transcripts was used.Evaluation of gene expression was performed in relation to transcript level,correlation between samples and grouping of clinical parameters used in chronic hepatitis assessment.Clinical markers of chronic hepatitis included alanine and aspartate aminotransferase,γ-glutamyltranspeptidase,alkaline phosphatase and cholinesterase activity,levels of iron ions,total cholesterol,triglycerides,albumin,glucose,hemoglobin,platelets,histological analysis of inflammatory and necrotic status,fibrosis according to METAVIR score,steatosis,as well as anthropometric body mass index,waist/hip index,percentage of adipose tissue and liver size in ultrasound examination.Gender,age,concomitant diseases and drugs were also taken into account.Validation of oligonucleotide microarray gene expression results was done with the use of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR).RESULTS:The highest (0.002 < P < 0.046) expression among genes encoding main components of metabotropic receptor pathways,such as the a subunit of G-coupled protein,phosphoinositol-dependent protein kinase or arrestin was comparable to that of angiotensinogen synthesized in the liver.Carcinogenesis suppressor genes,such as chemokine ligand 4,transcription factor early growth response protein 1 and lysophosphatidic acid receptor,were characterized by the lowest expression (0.002 < P < 0.046),while the factor potentially triggering hepatic cancer,transcription factor JUN-B,had a 20-fold higher expression.The correlation between expression of genes of

  13. Phylogenetic Signal of Threatening Processes among Hylids: The Need for Clade-Level Conservation Planning

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    Sarah J. Corey

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid, global declines among amphibians are partly alarming because many occur for apparently unknown or enigmatic reasons. Moreover, the relationship between phylogeny and enigmatic declines in higher clades of the amphibian phylogeny appears at first to be an intractable problem. I present a working solution by assessing threatening processes potentially underlying enigmatic declines in the family, Hylidae. Applying comparative methods that account for various evolutionary scenarios, I find extreme concentrations of threatening processes, including pollution and habitat loss, in the clade Hylini, potentially influenced by traits under selection. The analysis highlights hotspots of declines under phylogenetic influence in the genera Isthmohyla, Plectrohyla and Ptychohyla, and geographically in Mexico and Guatemala. The conservation implications of concentrated phylogenetic influence across multiple threatening processes are twofold: Data Deficient species of threatened clades should be prioritized in future surveys and, perhaps, a greater vulnerability should be assigned to such clades for further consideration of clade-level conservation priorities.

  14. Progress to extinction: increased specialisation causes the demise of animal clades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raia, P.; Carotenuto, F.; Mondanaro, A.; Castiglione, S.; Passaro, F.; Saggese, F.; Melchionna, M.; Serio, C.; Alessio, L.; Silvestro, D.; Fortelius, M.

    2016-08-01

    Animal clades tend to follow a predictable path of waxing and waning during their existence, regardless of their total species richness or geographic coverage. Clades begin small and undifferentiated, then expand to a peak in diversity and range, only to shift into a rarely broken decline towards extinction. While this trajectory is now well documented and broadly recognised, the reasons underlying it remain obscure. In particular, it is unknown why clade extinction is universal and occurs with such surprising regularity. Current explanations for paleontological extinctions call on the growing costs of biological interactions, geological accidents, evolutionary traps, and mass extinctions. While these are effective causes of extinction, they mainly apply to species, not clades. Although mass extinctions is the undeniable cause for the demise of a sizeable number of major taxa, we show here that clades escaping them go extinct because of the widespread tendency of evolution to produce increasingly specialised, sympatric, and geographically restricted species over time.

  15. Polymorphisms in fatty acid metabolism-related genes are associated with colorectal cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeft, B.; Linseisen, J.; Beckmann, L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant tumor and the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The crucial role of fatty acids for a number of important biological processes suggests a more in-depth analysis of inter-individual differences in fatty acid metabolizing genes...... as contributing factor to colon carcinogenesis. We examined the association between genetic variability in 43 fatty acid metabolism-related genes and colorectal risk in 1225 CRC cases and 2032 controls participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Three hundred...

  16. Association of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-related gene variants with the severity of autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi X. Fujisawa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to environmental chemicals, such as dioxin, is known to have adverse effects on the homeostasis of gonadal steroids, thereby potentially altering the sexual differentiation of the brain to express autistic traits. Dioxin-like chemicals act on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR, polymorphisms and mutations of AhR-related gene may exert pathological influences on sexual differentiation of the brain, causing autistic traits. To ascertain the relationship between AhR-related gene polymorphisms and autism susceptibility, we identified genotypes of them in patients and controls and determined whether there are different gene and genotype distributions between both groups. In addition, to clarify the relationships between the polymorphisms and the severity of autism, we compared the two genotypes of AhR-related genes (rs2066853, rs2228099 with the severity of autistic symptoms. Although no statistically significant difference was found between autism spectrum disorder (ASD patients and control individuals for the genotypic distribution of any of the polymorphisms studied herein, a significant difference in the total score of severity was observed in rs2228099 polymorphism, suggesting that the polymorphism modifies the severity of ASD symptoms but not ASD susceptibility. Moreover, we found that a significant difference in the social communication score of severity was observed. These results suggest that the rs2228099 polymorphism is possibly associated with the severity of social communication impairment among the diverse ASD symptoms.

  17. Associations between KCNJ6 (GIRK2) gene polymorphisms and pain-related phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruehl, Stephen; Denton, Jerod S; Lonergan, Daniel; Koran, Mary Ellen; Chont, Melissa; Sobey, Christopher; Fernando, Shanik; Bush, William S; Mishra, Puneet; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A

    2013-12-01

    G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels are effectors determining degree of analgesia experienced upon opioid receptor activation by endogenous and exogenous opioids. The impact of GIRK-related genetic variation on human pain responses has received little research attention. We used a tag single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) approach to comprehensively examine pain-related effects of KCNJ3 (GIRK1) and KCNJ6 (GIRK2) gene variation. Forty-one KCNJ3 and 69 KCNJ6 tag SNPs were selected, capturing the known variability in each gene. The primary sample included 311 white patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty in whom postsurgical oral opioid analgesic medication order data were available. Primary sample findings were then replicated in an independent white sample of 63 healthy pain-free individuals and 75 individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP) who provided data regarding laboratory acute pain responsiveness (ischemic task) and chronic pain intensity and unpleasantness (CLBP only). Univariate quantitative trait analyses in the primary sample revealed that 8 KCNJ6 SNPs were significantly associated with the medication order phenotype (P KCNJ6 gene (gene set-based analysis) just failed to reach significance (P = .054). No significant KCNJ3 effects were observed. A continuous GIRK Related Risk Score (GRRS) was derived in the primary sample to summarize each individual's number of KCNJ6 "pain risk" alleles. This GRRS was applied to the replication sample, which revealed significant associations (P KCNJ6 genetic variation on pain outcomes is warranted.

  18. Identification of immunity-related genes in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, H; Badapanda, C; Vilcinskas, A

    2011-12-01

    Burying beetles reproduce on small vertebrate cadavers which they bury in the soil after localization through volatiles emitted from the carcass. They then chemically preserve the carcass and prepare it as a diet for the adults and their offspring. It is predicted that exposure to high loads of soil and/or carrion-associated microbes necessitates an effective immune system. In the present paper, we report experimental screening for immunity-related genes in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides using the suppression subtractive hybridization approach. A total of 1179 putative gene objects were identified in the Nicrophorus cDNA library, which was enriched for transcripts differentially expressed upon challenge with heat-inactivated bacteria. In addition to genes known to be involved in immunity-related recognition and signalling, we found transcripts encoding for antimicrobial peptides and for an array of enzymes that can be linked to immunity or to stress-induced pathways. We also determined proteins that may contribute to detoxification of toxins produced by microbial competitors. In addition, factors involved in mRNA stability determination and central components of the RNA interference machinery were identified, implying transcriptional reprogramming and potential stress-induced retrotransposon elimination. The identified candidate immune effector and stress-related genes may provide important information about the unusual ecology and evolution of the burying beetles.

  19. An evaluation of mitochondrial tRNA gene evolution and its relation to the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, R J

    1982-04-01

    Extensive sequence data on mitochondrial (mt) tRNAs give for the first time an opportunity to evaluate tRNA gene evolution in this organelle. Deductions from these gene structures relate to the evolution of tRNA genes in other cellular systems and to the origin of the genetic code. Mt tRNAs, in contrast to the prokaryotic nature of chloroplastic tRNA structure, can not at the present time be definitely related to either prokaryotic or eukaryotic tRNAs, probably because of a higher mutation rate in mitochondria. Fungal mt tRNAs having the same anticodon and function are generally similar enough to be considered homologous. Comparisons af all mt tRNA sequences contained in the same mitochondrion indicate that some tRNAs originated by duplication of a prototypic gene which, after divergence, led to tRNAs having different amino acid specificities. The deviant mt genetic code, although admittedly permitting a simpler decoding mechanism, is not useful in determining whether the origin of mitochondria had preceded or was derived from prokaryotes or eukaryotes, since the genetic code is variable even among mitochondria. Variants of the mt genetic code lead to speculation on the nature of the primordial code and its relation to the present "universal" code.

  20. The Transmission and Antibiotic Resistance Variation in a Multiple Drug Resistance Clade of Vibrio cholerae Circulating in Multiple Countries in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Bo; Du, Pengcheng; Zhou, Zhemin; Diao, Baowei; Cui, Zhigang; Zhou, Haijian; Kan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae has caused massive outbreaks and even trans-continental epidemics. In 2008 and 2010, at least 3 remarkable cholera outbreaks occurred in Hainan, Anhui and Jiangsu provinces of China. To address the possible transmissions and the relationships to the 7th pandemic strains of those 3 outbreaks, we sequenced the whole genomes of the outbreak isolates and compared with the global isolates from the 7th pandemic. The three outbreaks in this study were caused by a cluster of V. cholerae in clade 3.B which is parallel to the clade 3.C that was transmitted from Nepal to Haiti and caused an outbreak in 2010. Pan-genome analysis provided additional evolution information on the mobile element and acquired multiple antibiotic resistance genes. We suggested that clade 3.B should be monitored because the multiple antibiotic resistant characteristics of this clade and the 'amplifier' function of China in the global transmission of current Cholera pandemic. We also show that dedicated whole genome sequencing analysis provided more information than the previous techniques and should be applied in the disease surveillance networks.

  1. The Transmission and Antibiotic Resistance Variation in a Multiple Drug Resistance Clade of Vibrio cholerae Circulating in Multiple Countries in Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Pang

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae has caused massive outbreaks and even trans-continental epidemics. In 2008 and 2010, at least 3 remarkable cholera outbreaks occurred in Hainan, Anhui and Jiangsu provinces of China. To address the possible transmissions and the relationships to the 7th pandemic strains of those 3 outbreaks, we sequenced the whole genomes of the outbreak isolates and compared with the global isolates from the 7th pandemic. The three outbreaks in this study were caused by a cluster of V. cholerae in clade 3.B which is parallel to the clade 3.C that was transmitted from Nepal to Haiti and caused an outbreak in 2010. Pan-genome analysis provided additional evolution information on the mobile element and acquired multiple antibiotic resistance genes. We suggested that clade 3.B should be monitored because the multiple antibiotic resistant characteristics of this clade and the 'amplifier' function of China in the global transmission of current Cholera pandemic. We also show that dedicated whole genome sequencing analysis provided more information than the previous techniques and should be applied in the disease surveillance networks.

  2. The Complement Control-Related Genes CSMD1 and CSMD2 Associate to Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håvik, Bjarte; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Rietschel, Marcella;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with schizophrenia often suffer from cognitive dysfunction, including impaired learning and memory. We recently demonstrated that long-term potentiation in rat hippocampus, a mechanistic model of learning and memory, is linked to gene expression changes in immunity...... demonstrate a significant role of complement control-related genes in the etiology of schizophrenia and support disease mechanisms that involve the activity of immunity-related pathways in the brain.......-related processes involved in complement activity and antigen presentation. We therefore aimed to examine whether key regulators of these processes are genetic susceptibility factors in schizophrenia. METHODS: Analysis of genetic association was based on data mining of genotypes from a German genome...

  3. A genetic polymorphism evolving in parallel in two cell compartments and in two clades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watt Ward B

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, PEPCK, occurs in its guanosine-nucleotide-using form in animals and a few prokaryotes. We study its natural genetic variation in Colias (Lepidoptera, Pieridae. PEPCK offers a route, alternative to pyruvate kinase, for carbon skeletons to move between cytosolic glycolysis and mitochondrial Krebs cycle reactions. Results PEPCK is expressed in both cytosol and mitochondrion, but differently in diverse animal clades. In vertebrates and independently in Drosophila, compartment-specific paralogous genes occur. In a contrasting expression strategy, compartment-specific PEPCKs of Colias and of the silkmoth, Bombyx, differ only in their first, 5′, exons; these are alternatively spliced onto a common series of following exons. In two Colias species from distinct clades, PEPCK sequence is highly variable at nonsynonymous and synonymous sites, mainly in its common exons. Three major amino acid polymorphisms, Gly 335 ↔ Ser, Asp 503 ↔ Glu, and Ile 629 ↔ Val occur in both species, and in the first two cases are similar in frequency between species. Homology-based structural modelling shows that the variants can alter hydrogen bonding, salt bridging, or van der Waals interactions of amino acid side chains, locally or at one another′s sites which are distant in PEPCK′s structure, and thus may affect its enzyme function. We ask, using coalescent simulations, if these polymorphisms′ cross-species similarities are compatible with neutral evolution by genetic drift, but find the probability of this null hypothesis is 0.001 ≤ P ≤ 0.006 under differing scenarios. Conclusion Our results make the null hypothesis of neutrality of these PEPCK polymorphisms quite unlikely, but support an alternative hypothesis that they are maintained by natural selection in parallel in the two species. This alternative can now be justifiably tested further via studies of PEPCK genotypes′ effects

  4. Gene expression profiling provides insights into pathways of oxaliplatin-related sinusoidal obstruction syndrome in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Tauzin, Sébastien; Brezault, Catherine; Delucinge-Vivier, Céline; Descombes, Patrick; Dousset, Bertand; Majno, Pietro E; Mentha, Gilles; Terris, Benoit

    2011-04-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS; formerly veno-occlusive disease) is a well-established complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, pyrrolizidine alkaloid intoxication, and widely used chemotherapeutic agents such as oxaliplatin. It is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Pathogenesis of SOS in humans is poorly understood. To explore its molecular mechanisms, we used Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays to investigate the gene expression profile of 11 human livers with oxaliplatin-related SOS and compared it to 12 matched controls. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed that profiles from SOS and controls formed distinct clusters. To identify functional networks and gene ontologies, data were analyzed by the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tool. A total of 913 genes were differentially expressed in SOS: 613 being upregulated and 300 downregulated. Reverse transcriptase-PCR results showed excellent concordance with microarray data. Pathway analysis showed major gene upregulation in six pathways in SOS compared with controls: acute phase response (notably interleukin 6), coagulation system (Serpine1, THBD, and VWF), hepatic fibrosis/hepatic stellate cell activation (COL3a1, COL3a2, PDGF-A, TIMP1, and MMP2), and oxidative stress. Angiogenic factors (VEGF-C) and hypoxic factors (HIF1A) were upregulated. The most significant increase was seen in CCL20 mRNA. In conclusion, oxaliplatin-related SOS can be readily distinguished according to morphologic characteristics but also by a molecular signature. Global gene analysis provides new insights into mechanisms underlying chemotherapy-related hepatotoxicity in humans and potential targets relating to its diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. Activation of VEGF and coagulation (vWF) pathways could partially explain at a molecular level the clinical observations that bevacizumab and aspirin have a preventive effect in SOS.

  5. Gene profiling, biomarkers and pathways characterizing HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buonaguro Luigi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of HCV-induced hepatocarcinogenesis are not yet fully elucidated. Besides indirect effects as tissue inflammation and regeneration, a more direct oncogenic activity of HCV can be postulated leading to an altered expression of cellular genes by early HCV viral proteins. In the present study, a comparison of gene expression patterns has been performed by microarray analysis on liver biopsies from HCV-positive HCC patients and HCV-negative controls. Methods Gene expression profiling of liver tissues has been performed using a high-density microarray containing 36'000 oligos, representing 90% of the human genes. Samples were obtained from 14 patients affected by HCV-related HCC and 7 HCV-negative non-liver-cancer patients, enrolled at INT in Naples. Transcriptional profiles identified in liver biopsies from HCC nodules and paired non-adjacent non-HCC liver tissue of the same HCV-positive patients were compared to those from HCV-negative controls by the Cluster program. The pathway analysis was performed using the BRB-Array- Tools based on the "Ingenuity System Database". Significance threshold of t-test was set at 0.001. Results Significant differences were found between the expression patterns of several genes falling into different metabolic and inflammation/immunity pathways in HCV-related HCC tissues as well as the non-HCC counterpart compared to normal liver tissues. Only few genes were found differentially expressed between HCV-related HCC tissues and paired non-HCC counterpart. Conclusion In this study, informative data on the global gene expression pattern of HCV-related HCC and non-HCC counterpart, as well as on their difference with the one observed in normal liver tissues have been obtained. These results may lead to the identification of specific biomarkers relevant to develop tools for detection

  6. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes in simulated gastrointestinal system and transcriptional profiling of stress- and adhesion-related genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Lingli; Olesen, Inger; Andersen, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    survival of L. monocytogenes serotypes 4b and 1=2a strains were higher than that of serotype 1=2c, suggesting that pathogenicity might be related to the viability in the gastrointestinal tract.The transcription levels of prfA and the general stress-related genes clpC, clpE, and clpP were upregulated...... afterpassing through the simulated gastrointestinal tract, whereas that of the adhesion-related gene ami was downregulated. Taken together, this study revealed that L. monocytogenes strains enhanced the expression of stressrelated genes and decreased the transcription of adhesion-related gene in order...

  7. Highly Pathogenic Reassortant Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus Clade 2.3.2.1a in Poultry, Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinova-Petkova, Atanaska; Franks, John; Tenzin, Sangay; Dahal, Narapati; Dukpa, Kinzang; Dorjee, Jambay; Feeroz, Mohammed M.; Rehg, Jerold E.; Barman, Subrata; Krauss, Scott; McKenzie, Pamela; Webby, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1), clade 2.3.2.1a, with an H9-like polymerase basic protein 1 gene, isolated in Bhutan in 2012, replicated faster in vitro than its H5N1 parental genotype and was transmitted more efficiently in a chicken model. These properties likely help limit/eradicate outbreaks, combined with strict control measures. PMID:27584733

  8. Molecular interactions of the γ-clade homeodomain-leucine zipper class I transcription factors during the wheat response to water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John C; Sornaraj, Pradeep; Taylor, Mathew; Bazanova, Natalia; Baumann, Ute; Lovell, Ben; Langridge, Peter; Lopato, Sergiy; Hrmova, Maria

    2016-03-01

    The γ-clade of class I homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip I) transcription factors (TFs) constitute members which play a role in adapting plant growth to conditions of water deficit. Given the importance of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) as a global food crop and the impact of water deficit upon grain yield, we focused on functional aspects of wheat drought responsive HD-Zip I TFs. While the wheat γ-clade HD-Zip I TFs share significant sequence similarities with homologous genes from other plants, the clade-specific features in transcriptional response to abiotic stress were detected. We demonstrate that wheat TaHDZipI-3, TaHDZipI-4, and TaHDZipI-5 genes respond differentially to a variety of abiotic stresses, and that proteins encoded by these genes exhibit pronounced differences in oligomerisation, strength of DNA binding, and trans-activation of an artificial promoter. Three-dimensional molecular modelling of the protein-DNA interface was conducted to address the ambiguity at the central nucleotide in the pseudo-palindromic cis-element CAATNATTG that is recognised by all three HD-Zip I proteins. The co-expression of these genes in the same plant tissues together with the ability of HD-Zip I TFs of the γ-clade to hetero-dimerise suggests a role in the regulatory mechanisms of HD-Zip I dependent transcription. Our findings highlight the complexity of TF networks involved in plant responses to water deficit. A better understanding of the molecular complexity at the protein level during crop responses to drought will enable adoption of efficient strategies for production of cereal plants with enhanced drought tolerance.

  9. An integrative systems genetics approach reveals potential causal genes and pathways related to obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kogelman, Lisette; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Westra, Harm-Jan;

    2015-01-01

    expression analysis was performed using the Obesity Index as a continuous variable in a linear model. eQTL mapping was then performed to integrate 60 K porcine SNP chip data with the RNA sequencing data. Results were restricted based on genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms, detected...... polymorphisms to detect obesity-related genes and pathways. Building a co-expression network using eQTLs resulted in the detection of a module strongly associated with lipid pathways. Furthermore, we detected several obesity candidate genes, for example, ENPP1, CTSL, and ABHD12B. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge......BACKGROUND: Obesity is a multi-factorial health problem in which genetic factors play an important role. Limited results have been obtained in single-gene studies using either genomic or transcriptomic data. RNA sequencing technology has shown its potential in gaining accurate knowledge about...

  10. An anther-specific chalcone synthase-like gene D5 related to rice pollen development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    It was shown in a previous analysis that D5 gene from rice (Oryza sativa L.) was an anther-specific gene encoding a chalcone synthase-related protein. In this study, D5 gene was found specifically expressed in tapetum cells as well as in the peripheral cells of the vascular bundle of rice anthers by RNA in situ hybridization. In order to study its function, D5 was transformed into rice in both sense and antisense directions driven by a rice Actin 1 promoter. It has been observed that the pollen grains from the antisense D5 transgenic rice plants are abnormal, indicating that D5 plays a critical role in rice pollen development.

  11. Nocvel potential targets and related genes of transcription factor Caplp in Candida albicans 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YahWANG; Yong-bingCAO; Xin-mingJIA; De-junWANG; ZhengXU; HuiSHEN; KangYING; Wan-shengCHEN; Yuan-yingJIANG

    2005-01-01

    AIM Capl p, encoded by CAP1 in Candida albicans, is highly homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor Yapl p. It has been associated with tolerance to oxidative stress and resistance to a variety of toxicants previously. We used homemade microarray to reveal Capl p related genes in a broad spectrum as well as to lucubrate the functions of Capl p. METHODS Microarray analysis was used to identify differentially expressed genes between CAP1 deletion strain CJD21 and its parental strain CAI4. CAP1 over-expression strain was constructed to confirm the relationship between CAP1 and some differentially expressedgenes. Bioinformatics was applied to reveal promoters with Capl p binding site as well as the clusters of differentially expressed genes. RT-PCR and drug efflux analysis were used to lucubrate the functions of Caplp in Candida albicans.

  12. Detecting horizontally transferred and essential genes based on dinucleotide relative abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Robert H; Ko, Hanseok

    2008-10-01

    Various methods have been developed to detect horizontal gene transfer in bacteria, based on anomalous nucleotide composition, assuming that compositional features undergo amelioration in the host genome. Evolutionary theory predicts the inevitability of false positives when essential sequences are strongly conserved. Foreign genes could become more detectable on the basis of their higher order compositions if such features ameliorate more rapidly and uniformly than lower order features. This possibility is tested by comparing the heterogeneities of bacterial genomes with respect to strand-independent first- and second-order features, (i) G + C content and (ii) dinucleotide relative abundance, in 1 kb segments. Although statistical analysis confirms that (ii) is less inhomogeneous than (i) in all 12 species examined, extreme anomalies with respect to (ii) in the Escherichia coli K12 genome are typically co-located with essential genes.

  13. DIA1R is an X-linked gene related to Deleted In Autism-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhari Aziz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDS are frequently occurring disorders diagnosed by deficits in three core functional areas: social skills, communication, and behaviours and/or interests. Mental retardation frequently accompanies the most severe forms of ASDs, while overall ASDs are more commonly diagnosed in males. Most ASDs have a genetic origin and one gene recently implicated in the etiology of autism is the Deleted-In-Autism-1 (DIA1 gene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a bioinformatics-based approach, we have identified a human gene closely related to DIA1, we term DIA1R (DIA1-Related